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Sample records for herschel gasps open

  1. The Evolution of Gas in Protoplanetary Systems: The Herschel GASPS Open Time Key Programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, A.; Dent, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory will be the first extensive, systematic survey of gas in circumstellar disks over the critical transition from gas-rich protoplanetary through to gas-poor debris. The brightest spectral lines from disks lie in the far-infrared and arise from radii spanning roughly 10 to 100 AU, where giant planets are expected to form. Herschel is uniquely able to observe this wavelength regime with the sensitivity to allow a large scale survey. We will execute a 2-phase study using the PACS instrument. Phase I is a spectroscopic survey about 250 young stars for fine structure emission lines of [CII] (at 157 microns) and [OI] (at 63 microns). In Phase II, the brightest sources will be followed up with additional PACS spectroscopy ([OI] at 145 microns and some rotational lines of water). We expect that the gas mass sensitivity will be more than an order of magnitude lower than that achieved by ISO and Spitzer or expected for SOFIA. We will also measure the dust continuum to an equivalent mass sensitivity. We will observe several nearby clusters with ages from 1 to 30 Myr, encompassing a wide range of disk masses and stellar luminosities. The sample covers disk evolution from protoplanetary disks through to young debris disks, i.e. the main epoch of planet formation. With this extensive dataset, the GASPS project will: 1) trace gas and dust in the planet formation region across a large multivariate parameter space, 2) provide the first definitive measurement of the gas dissipation timescale in disks, 3) elucidate the evolutionary link between protoplanetary and debris disks, 4) investigate water abundances in the planetforming regions of disks, and 5) provide a huge database of disk observations and models with long-lasting legacy value for follow-up studies.

  2. DIGIT, GASPS, DEBRIS and DUNES: four HERSCHEL Open Time Key Programs to survey the dust cycle in circumstellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augereau, J.-C.; Absil, O.; Bouvier, J.; Duchêne, G.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Maret, S.; Martin-Zaïdi, C.; Ménard, F.; Morbidelli, A.; Olofsson, J.; Pantin, E.; Pinte, C.; Thébault, P.

    2008-11-01

    Four accepted HERSCHEL open time key programs, DIGIT, GASPS, DEBRIS and DUNES, will study the evolution of the dust grains in circumstellar disks around young and Main Sequence stars. There is a strong implication of the french community in these four projects which represent a total of 930 hours (>38 days) of her\\ observing time. The DIGIT and GASPS projects will focus on the first stages of planet formation, while the DEBRIS and DUNES projects will search for extra-solar Kuiper Belt analogs around nearby Main Sequence stars. In this paper, we give an overview of the scientific goals of the four projects and of the numerical tools that we will be providing to the teams to model and interpret the her\\ observations from these programs.

  3. GASPS--A Herschel Survey of Gas and Dust in Protoplanetary Disks: Summary and Initial Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, W.R.F.; Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; Williams, J. P.; Menard, F.; Andrews, S.; Ardila, D.; Aresu, G.; Augereau, J.-C.; Barrado y Navascues, D.; Brittain, S.; Carmona, A.; Ciardi, D.; Danchi, W.; Donaldson, J.; Duchene, G.; Eiroa, C.; Fedele, D.; Grady, C.; de Gregorio-Molsalvo, I.; Howard, C.; Huelamo, N.; Krivov, A.; Lebreton, J.; Roberge, A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a large-scale far-infrared line and continuum survey of protoplanetary disk through to young debris disk systems carried out using the ACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This Open Time Key program, known as GASPS (Gas Survey of Protoplanetary Systems), targeted approx. 250 young stars in narrow wavelength regions covering the [OI] fine structure line at 63 micron the brightest far-infrared line in such objects. A subset of the brightest targets were also surveyed in [OI]145 micron, [CII] at 157 µm, as well as several transitions of H2O and high-excitation CO lines at selected wavelengths between 78 and 180 micron. Additionally, GASPS included continuum photometry at 70, 100 and 160 micron, around the peak of the dust emission. The targets were SED Class II– III T Tauri stars and debris disks from seven nearby young associations, along with a comparable sample of isolated Herbig AeBe stars. The aim was to study the global gas and dust content in a wide sample of circumstellar disks, combining the results with models in a systematic way. In this overview paper we review the scientific aims, target selection and observing strategy of the program. We summarize some of the initial results, showing line identifications, listing the detections, and giving a first statistical study of line detectability. The [OI] line at 63 micron was the brightest line seen in almost all objects, by a factor of 10. Overall [OI] 63 micron detection rates were 49%, with 100% of HAeBe stars and 43% of T Tauri stars detected. A comparison with published disk dust masses (derived mainly from sub-mm continuum, assuming standard values of the mm mass opacity) shows a dust mass threshold for [OI] 63 µm detection of approx.10(exp -5) Solar M.. Normalizing to a distance of 140 pc, 84% of objects with dust masses =10 (exp -5) Solar M can be detected in this line in the present survey; 32% of those of mass 10(exp -6) – 10 (exp -5) Solar M, and only a very small number

  4. Correlations between the stellar and disc properties of Taurus PMS stars in the GASPS sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Martínez, Miguel; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Pascual, Natalia; Montesinos, Benjamín; Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Göran; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Eiroa, Carlos; Dent, Bill

    2013-07-01

    The Herschel Open Time Key Programme GASPS (P.I. B. Dent) has observed a large number of pre-main sequence TTauri stars in Taurus with PACS (photometry and spectroscopy). In addition, we have also carried out new ground-based optical and near-IR observations (photometry and spectroscopy) of most of the Taurus GASPS sample. In this poster, we present some preliminary results on correlations between the stellar and disc properties of this young stellar sample.

  5. The Herschel DUNES Open Time Key Programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.

    2009-01-01

    We will use the unique photometric capabilities provided by Herschel to perform a deep and systematic survey for faint, cold debris disks around nearby stars. Our sensitivity-limited Open Time Key Programme (OTKP) aims at finding and characterizing faint extrasolar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB) in an unbiased, statistically significant sample of nearby FGK main-sequence stars. Our target set spans a broad range of stellar ages (from 0.1 to 10 Gyr) and is volume-limited (distances < 20 pc). All stars with known extrasolar planets within this distance are included; additionally, some M- and A-type stars will be observed in collaboration with the Herschel DEBRIS OTKP, so that the entire sample covers a decade in stellar mass, from 0.2 to 2 solar masses. We will perform PACS and SPIRE photometric observations covering the wavelength range from 70 to 500 microns. The PACS observations at 100 microns have been designed to detect the stellar photospheres down to the confusion limit with a signal-to-noise ratio > 5. The observations in the other Herschel bands will allow us to characterize, model, and constrain the disks. As a result, it will be possible for us to reach fractional dust luminosities of a few times 10-7, close to the EKB level in the Solar System. This will provide an unprecedented lower limit to the fractional abundance of planetesimal systems and allow us to assess the presence of giant planets, which would play dynamical roles similar to those played by Jupiter and Neptune in the Solar System. The proposed observations will provide new and unique evidence for the presence of mature planetary systems in the solar neighbourhood and, in turn, will address the universality of planet/planetary system formation in disks around young stars.

  6. THE HERSCHEL INVENTORY OF THE AGENTS OF GALAXY EVOLUTION IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS, A HERSCHEL OPEN TIME KEY PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Meixner, M.; Roman-Duval, J.; Seale, J.; Gordon, K.; Beck, T.; Boyer, M. L.; Panuzzo, P.; Hony, S.; Sauvage, M.; Okumura, K.; Chanial, P.; Babler, B.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bolatto, A.; Bot, C.; Carlson, L. R.; Clayton, G. C.; and others

    2013-09-15

    We present an overview of the HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) in the Magellanic Clouds project, which is a Herschel Space Observatory open time key program. We mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instruments on board Herschel using the SPIRE/PACS parallel mode. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC. The far-infrared and submillimeter emission is an effective tracer of the interstellar medium (ISM) dust, the most deeply embedded young stellar objects (YSOs), and the dust ejected by the most massive stars. We describe in detail the data processing, particularly for the PACS data, which required some custom steps because of the large angular extent of a single observational unit and overall the large amount of data to be processed as an ensemble. We report total global fluxes for the LMC and SMC and demonstrate their agreement with measurements by prior missions. The HERITAGE maps of the LMC and SMC are dominated by the ISM dust emission and bear most resemblance to the tracers of ISM gas rather than the stellar content of the galaxies. We describe the point source extraction processing and the criteria used to establish a catalog for each waveband for the HERITAGE program. The 250 {mu}m band is the most sensitive and the source catalogs for this band have {approx}25,000 objects for the LMC and {approx}5500 objects for the SMC. These data enable studies of ISM dust properties, submillimeter excess dust emission, dust-to-gas ratio, Class 0 YSO candidates, dusty massive evolved stars, supernova remnants (including SN1987A), H II regions, and dust evolution in the LMC and SMC. All images and catalogs are delivered to the Herschel Science Center as part of the community support

  7. The HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Magellanic Clouds, a HERschel Open Time Key Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meixner, Margaret; Panuzzo, P.; Roman-Duval, J.; Engelbracht, C.; Babler, B.; Seale, J.; Hony, S.; Montiel, E.; Sauvage, M.; Gordon, K.; Misselt, K.; Okumura, K.; Chanial, P.; Beck, T.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bolatto, A.; Bot, C.; Boyer, M. L.; Carlson, L. R.; Clayton, G. C.; Chen, C.-H. R.; Cormier, D.; Fukui, Y.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview or the HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) in the Magellanic Clouds project, which is a Herschel Space Observatory open time key program. We mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instruments on board Herschel using the SPIRE/PACS parallel mode. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC. The far-infrared and submillimeter emission is an effective tracer of the interstellar medium (ISM) dust, the most deeply embedded young stellar objects (YSOs), and the dust ejected by the most massive stars. We describe in detail the data processing, particularly for the PACS data, which required some custom steps because of the large angular extent of a single observational unit and overall the large amount of data to be processed as an ensemble. We report total global fluxes for LMC and SMC and demonstrate their agreement with measurements by prior missions. The HERITAGE maps of the LMC and SMC are dominated by the ISM dust emission and bear most resemblance to the tracers of ISM gas rather than the stellar content of the galaxies. We describe the point source extraction processing and the critetia used to establish a catalog for each waveband for the HERITAGE program. The 250 micron band is the most sensitive and the source catalogs for this band have approx. 25,000 objects for the LMC and approx. 5500 objects for the SMC. These data enable studies of ISM dust properties, submillimeter excess dust emission, dust-to-gas ratio, Class 0 YSO candidates, dusty massive evolved stars, supemova remnants (including SN1987A), H II regions, and dust evolution in the LMC and SMC. All images and catalogs are delivered to the Herschel Science Center as part of the conummity support

  8. DUNES: DUst around NEarby Stars. A Herschel Open Time Key Programme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiroa, C.; Dunes Consortium

    2013-04-01

    Preliminary results of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme DUNES are presented. The data show the capability of Herschel/PACS to detect and resolve dust disks with a luminosity close to the EKB luminosity. Our results suggest that the incidence of debris disks around mature solar-type, main-sequence stars is ˜ 24%, which is a remarkable increase with respect to previous estimates. The rate of resolved disks is ˜ 50% of the total number of identified debris disks, which again represents a huge increase in the number of resolved disk in the far-IR. The Herschel/PACS images allow us to study with unprecedent spatial detail many of those disks. The interpretation of some data poses challenges to debris disk models since the observed SEDs. e.g. the steep sources and the cold disks, cannot be explained by means of “clasical” debris disk scenarios

  9. GASPS Photometry of the Tucana-Horologium Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Donaldson J.; Roberge, Aki

    2010-01-01

    The GASPS Open Time Key Programme on Herschel represents a new opportunity to sensitively probe protoplanetary and debris disks at far-IR wavelengths. We present preliminary PACS 70 and 160 micron photometry of eighteen stars in the 30 Myr-old Tucana-Horologium association. Of these eighteen, eight were detected in the 70 micron band. Four of these eight were also detected in the 160 micron band. We constructed SEDs for these systems using optical data from Hipparcos (B and V), near-IR data from 2MASS (J, H, and K), mid-IR data from IRAS and Spitzer MIPS (12 and 24 microns, respectively), and the new far-IR data from PACS. For the stars showing IR excess emission, we fit simple single-temperature blackbody curves to the IR excess in order to determine the rough dust abundances and temperatures. Dust observations at these wavelengths will also be important for comparison with upcoming Herschel PACS spectra that will search for gas in the disks. Our goal is to determine or limit the ever-allusive gas-to-dust ratio for these disk systems.

  10. Debris Discs and Connection to Exoplanets: Herschel Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, J. S.

    2012-03-01

    Debris discs are an exciting science area that has been opened up by Herschel through deep far-infrared observations. Key Projects cover disc evolution from the early stages when planets form (GASPS) and onwards to discs hosted by stars even older than the Solar System (GT, DUNES, DEBRIS). New categories are being discovered, including very cold cometary belts and unusual types of dust grain, and new connections are being made for systems of low-mass stars and planets. I will review these discoveries in the context of our ideas on how planetesimal belts from and evolve.

  11. Dust Around Nearby Stars: The Herschel DUNES Open Time Key Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchi, William C.; Eiroa, C.; Herschel DUNES Team

    2010-01-01

    We will use the unique photometric capabilities provided by Herschel to perform a deep and systematic survey for faint, cold debris disks around nearby stars. Our sensitivity-limited Open Time Key Programme (OTKP) aims at finding and characterizing faint extrasolar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB) in an unbiased, statistically significant sample of nearby FGK main-sequence stars. Our target set spans a broad range of stellar ages (from 0.1 to 10 Gyr) and is volume-limited (distances < 20 pc). All stars with known extrasolar planets within this distance are included; additionally, some M- and A-type stars will be observed in collaboration with the Herschel DEBRIS OTKP, so that the entire sample covers a decade in stellar mass, from 0.2 to 2 solar masses. We will perform PACS and SPIRE photometric observations covering the wavelength range from 70 to 500 microns. The PACS observations at 100 microns have been designed to detect the stellar photospheres down to the confusion limit with a signal-to-noise ratio > 5. The observations in the other Herschel bands will allow us to characterize, model, and constrain the disks. As a result, it will be possible for us to reach fractional dust luminosities of a few times 10-7, close to the EKB level in the Solar System. This will provide an unprecedented lower limit to the fractional abundance of planetesimal systems and allow us to assess the presence of giant planets, which would play dynamical roles similar to those played by Jupiter and Neptune in the Solar System. The proposed observations will provide new and unique evidence for the presence of mature planetary systems in the solar neighbourhood and, in turn, will address the universality of planet/planetary system formation in disks around young stars.

  12. The Herschel ATLAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eales, S.; Dunne, L.; Clements, D.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M.; Lagache, G.; Maddox, S.; Negrello, M.; Serjeant, S.; Thompson, M. A.; Van Kampen, E.; Amblard, A.; Andreani, P.; Baes, M.; Beelen, A.; Bendo, G. J.; Bertoldi, F.; Benford, D.; Bock, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel ATLAS is the largest open-time key project that will be carried out on the Herschel Space Observatory. It will survey 570 sq deg of the extragalactic sky, 4 times larger than all the other Herschel extragalactic surveys combined, in five far-infrared and submillimeter bands. We describe the survey, the complementary multiwavelength data sets that will be combined with the Herschel data, and the six major science programs we are undertaking. Using new models based on a previous submillimeter survey of galaxies, we present predictions of the properties of the ATLAS sources in other wave bands.

  13. GASP- GENERAL AVIATION SYNTHESIS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    The General Aviation Synthesis Program, GASP, was developed to perform tasks generally associated with the preliminary phase of aircraft design. GASP gives the analyst the capability of performing parametric studies in a rapid manner during preliminary design efforts. During the development of GASP, emphasis was placed on small fixed-wing aircraft employing propulsion systems varying from a single piston engine with a fixed pitch propeller through twin turboprop/turbofan systems as employed in business or transport type aircraft. The program is comprised of modules representing the various technical disciplines of design, integrated into a computational flow which ensures that the interacting effects of design variables are continuously accounted for in the aircraft sizing procedures. GASP provides a useful tool for comparing configurations, assessing aircraft performance and economics, and performing tradeoff and sensitivity studies. By utilizing GASP, the impact of various aircraft requirements and design factors may be studied in a systematic manner, with benefits being measured in terms of overall aircraft performance and economics. The GASP program consists of a control module and six "technology" submodules which perform the various independent studies required in the design of general aviation or small transport type aircraft. The six technology modules include geometry, aerodynamics, propulsion, weight and balance, mission analysis, and economics. The geometry module calculates the dimensions of the synthesized aircraft components based on such input parameters as number of passengers, aspect ratio, taper ratio, sweep angles, and thickness of wing and tail surfaces. The aerodynamics module calculates the various lift and drag coefficients of the synthesized aircraft based on inputs concerning configuration geometry, flight conditions, and type of high lift device. The propulsion module determines the engine size and performance for the synthesized aircraft

  14. Regulation of GDF-11 and myostatin activity by GASP-1 and GASP-2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) and growth and differentiation factor-11 (GDF-11) are highly related TGF-β family members that have distinct biological functions. MSTN is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle and acts to limit muscle growth. GDF-11 is expressed more widely and plays multiple roles, including regulating axial skeletal patterning during development. Several MSTN and GDF-11 binding proteins have been identified, including GDF-associated serum protein-1 (GASP-1) and GASP-2, which are capable of inhibiting the activities of these ligands. Here, we show that GASP-1 and GASP-2 act by blocking the initial signaling event (namely, the binding of the ligand to the type II receptor). Moreover, we show that mice lacking Gasp1 and Gasp2 have phenotypes consistent with overactivity of MSTN and GDF-11. Specifically, we show that Gasp2−/− mice have posteriorly directed transformations of the axial skeleton, which contrast with the anteriorly directed transformations seen in Gdf11−/− mice. We also show that both Gasp1−/− and Gasp2−/− mice have reductions in muscle weights, a shift in fiber type from fast glycolytic type IIb fibers to fast oxidative type IIa fibers, and impaired muscle regeneration ability, which are the reverse of what are seen in Mstn−/− mice. All of these findings suggest that both GASP-1 and GASP-2 are important modulators of GDF-11 and MSTN activity in vivo. PMID:24019467

  15. The Herschel Open Time Key Project; DUst Around NEarby Stars: Results from the Complete Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchi, William C.; Eiroa, C.; Consortium, DUNES

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel DUst Around Nearby Stars (DUNES) survey (Eiroa et al. 2010) was designed to address several fundamental questions regarding debris disks around nearby solar type stars, in order to put the Solar System into context. Our goals were to: (1) determine the fraction of stars with faint, Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB)-like disks, (2) explore collisional and dynamical evolution of EKB analogues, (3) observe dust properties and size distribution, and (4) determine the incidence of EKB-like disks vs. presence of planets. The final sample of stars directly observed by DUNES included 133 stars, including 27 F-type, 52 G-type and 54 K-type stars within 20 pc of the Sun. The integration time was set in order to make a 5-sigma detection of the expected photospheric emission at 100 and 160 microns, using the PACS instrument. In addition, 106 stars observed by DEBRIS survey (Mathews et al. 2010) satisfying the photospheric detection condition are shared targets, specifically 83 FGK stars - 51 F, 24 G and 8 K (the rest are A and M stars). We report the main conclusions from the survey including the frequency of detection of debris disks as a function of fractional luminosity of the dust, Ld/L*, and correlations of Ld/L* with metallicity, bolometric luminosity, effective temperature, and stellar age.

  16. GASP/WFIKKN Proteins: Evolutionary Aspects of Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, Olivier; Brun, Caroline; Cocquempot, Olivier; Petit, Daniel; Blanquet, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factor Associated Serum Protein (GASP) 1 and 2 are proteins known to be involved in the control of myostatin activity at least in vitro. Most deuterostome GASPs share a modular organization including WAP, follistatin/kazal, IGc2, two kunitz, and NTR domains. Based on an exon shuffling model, we performed independent phylogenetic analyses on these modules and assessed that papilin is probably a sister sequence to GASP with a divergence date estimated from the last common ancestor to bilateria. The final organization was acquired by the addition of the FS domain in early deuterostomes. Our study revealed that Gasp genes diverged during the first round of genome duplication in early vertebrates. By evaluating the substitution rate at different sites on the proteins, we showed a better conservation of the follistatin/kazal domain of GASP1 than GASP2 in mammals, suggesting a stronger interaction with myostatin. We also observed a progressive increase in the conservation of follistatin and kunitz domains from the ancestor of Ciona to early vertebrates. In situ hybridization performed on mouse embryos showed a weak Gasp1 expression in the formed somites at 10.5 dpc and in limb buds from embryonic E10.0 to E12.5. Similar results were obtained for zebrafish embryos. We propose a synthetic view showing possible interactions between GASP1 and myostatin and highlighting the role of the second kunitz domain in preventing myostatin proteolysis. PMID:22937083

  17. An analysis of the first two years of GASP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Nastrom, G. D.; Falconer, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    Distributions of mean ozone levels from the first two years of data from the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) show spatial and temporal variations in agreement with previous measurements. The standard deviations of these distributions reflect the large natural variability of ozone levels in the altitude range of the GASP measurements. Monthly mean levels of ozone below the tropopause show an annual cycle with a spring maximum which is believed to result from transport from the stratosphere. Correlations of ozone with independent meteorological parameters, and meteorological parameters obtained by the GASP systems show that this transport occurs primarily through cyclogenesis at mid-latitudes.

  18. Herschel Observations of Gas and Dust in the Unusual 49 Ceti Debris Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, A.; Kamp, I.; Montesinos, B.; Dent, W. R. F.; Meeus, G.; Donaldson, J. K.; Olofsson, J.; Moor, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Howard, C.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Ardila, D. R.; Sandell, G.; Woitke, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present far-IR/sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy of 49 Ceti, an unusual circumstellar disk around a nearby young A1V star. The system is famous for showing the dust properties of a debris disk, but the gas properties of a low-mass protoplanetary disk. The data were acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, largely as part of the “Gas in Protoplanetary Systems” (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme. Disk dust emission is detected in images at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron; 49 Cet is significantly extended in the 70 micron image, spatially resolving the outer dust disk for the first time. Spectra covering small wavelength ranges centered on eight atomic and molecular emission lines were obtained, including [O i] 63 micron and [C ii] 158 micron. The C ii line was detected at the 5 sigma level—the first detection of atomic emission from the disk. No other emission lines were seen, despite the fact that the Oi line is the brightest one observed in Herschel protoplanetary disk spectra. We present an estimate of the amount of circumstellar atomic gas implied by the C ii emission. The new far-IR/sub-mm data fills in a large gap in the previous spectral energy distribution (SED) of 49 Cet. A simple model of the new SED confirms the two-component structure of the disk: warm inner dust and cold outer dust that produces most of the observed excess. Finally, we discuss preliminary thermochemical modeling of the 49 Cet gas/dust disk and our attempts to match several observational results simultaneously. Although we are not yet successful in doing so, our investigations shed light on the evolutionary status of the 49 Cet gas, which might not be primordial gas but rather secondary gas coming from comets.

  19. Roles of GASP-1 and GDF-11 in Dental and Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Growth and differentiation factor-11 (GDF-11) is a TGF-β family member that plays important regulatory roles in development of multiple tissues which include axial skeletal patterning, palatal closure, and tooth formation. Proteins that have been identified as GDF-11 inhibitors include GDF-associated serum protein-1 (GASP-1) and GASP-2. Recently, we found that mice genetically engineered to lack both Gasp1 and Gdf11 have an increased frequency of cleft palate. The goal of this study was to investigate the roles of GDF-11 and its inhibitors, GASP-1 and GASP-2, during dental and craniofacial development and growth. Methods Mouse genetic studies were used in this study. Homozygous knockout mice for Gasp1 (Gasp1−/−) and Gasp2 (Gasp2−/−) were viable and fertile, but Gdf11 homozygous knockout (Gdf11−/−) mice died within 24 hours after birth. The effect of either Gasp1 or Gasp2 deletion in Gdf11−/− mice during embryogenesis was evaluated in Gasp1−/−;Gdf11−/− and Gasp2−/−;Gdf11−/− mouse embryos at 18.5 days post-coitum (E18.5). For the analysis of adult tissues, we used Gasp1−/−;Gdf11+/− and Gasp2−/−;Gdf11+/− mice to evaluate the potential haploinsufficiency of Gdf11 in Gasp1−/− and Gasp2−/− mice. Results Although Gasp2 expression decreased after E10.5, Gasp1 expression was readily detected in various ectodermal tissues at E17.5, including hair follicles, epithelium in nasal cavity, retina, and developing tooth buds. Interestingly, Gasp1−/−;Gdf11−/− mice had abnormal formation of lower incisors: tooth buds for lower incisors were under-developed or missing. Although Gdf11+/− mice were viable and had mild transformations of the axial skeleton, no specific defects in the craniofacial development have been observed in Gdf11+/− mice. However, loss of Gasp1 in Gdf11+/− mice occasionally resulted in small and abnormally shaped auricles. Conclusions These findings suggest that both GASP-1 and GDF-11 play

  20. Characterizations and comparisons of eupnoea and gasping in neonatal rats.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W; Fung, M L; Darnall, R A; St John, W M

    1996-01-01

    1. Our purpose was to characterize the ventilatory patterns of eupnoea and gasping in the neonatal rat. This study was precipitated by reports, using in vitro brainstem spinal cord preparations, that only a single pattern is present in neonatal rats. 2. In anaesthetized or decerebrate rat pups aged less than 13 days, eupnoea was characterized by a sudden onset of inspiratory activity and then a more gradual rise to peak levels. Following vagotomy, frequency fell and peak phrenic activity and tidal volume increased. The rate of rise of inspiratory activity also rose, but peak levels were still achieved during the latter half of inspiration. Vagal efferent activity exhibited bursts during both inspiration and the early expiration. This basic eupnoeic rhythm was not altered after sectioning of the carotid sinus nerves. 3. Upon exposure to hypoxia or anoxia, phrenic activity, tidal volume and frequency initially increased and then declined. In many animals, ventilatory activity then ceased, but later returned with a gasping pattern. 4. Gasping was characterized by a sudden onset of phrenic activity, which reached a peak intensity during the early portion of inspiration. The expiratory burst of vagal activity was eliminated. 5. Reductions of body temperature from 37 to 27 degrees C resulted in prolongations of inspiration and expiration and decreases of phrenic amplitude; phasic phrenic activity completely disappeared in some animals. Upon exposure to anoxia, gasping was observed, even in animals in which phrenic activity had disappeared in hyperoxia. 6. We conclude that, from the day of birth, rats can exhibit eupnoea and gasping patterns which are very similar to those of adult animals. 7. The rhythmic neural activities of the in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation, reported by others, differ markedly from eupnoea but are identical with gasping. We therefore conclude that this preparation is not suitable for investigation of the mechanisms that generate eupnoeic

  1. John Herschel's Graphical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    In 1833 John Herschel published an account of his graphical method for determining the orbits of double stars. He had hoped to be the first to determine such orbits, but Felix Savary in France and Johann Franz Encke in Germany beat him to the punch using analytical methods. Herschel was convinced, however, that his graphical method was much superior to analytical methods, because it used the judgment of the hand and eye to correct the inevitable errors of observation. Line graphs of the kind used by Herschel became common only in the 1830s, so Herschel was introducing a new method. He also found computation fatiguing and devised a "wheeled machine" to help him out. Encke was skeptical of Herschel's methods. He said that he lived for calculation and that the English would be better astronomers if they calculated more. It is difficult to believe that the entire Scientific Revolution of the 17th century took place without graphs and that only a few examples appeared in the 18th century. Herschel promoted the use of graphs, not only in astronomy, but also in the study of meteorology and terrestrial magnetism. Because he was the most prominent scientist in England, Herschel's advocacy greatly advanced graphical methods.

  2. Extreme debris discs around nearby stars with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.

    2011-10-01

    The excellent sensitivity and high resolution of PACS on the Herschel Space Observatory has opened up the possibility of detecting direct analogues to the Solar System's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt around nearby stars. We present an overview of the results from the Herschel/ DUNES Open Time Key Program, highlighting the extreme diversity of observed debris discs, covering both newly discovered and newly resolved systems that are amongst the largest, faintest and coldest discs yet known around Sun-like stars.

  3. A Debris Disk Case Study: 49 Ceti with Herschel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2011-01-01

    Gas-poor debris disks represent a fundamentally different class of circumstellar disk than gas-rich protoplanetary disks. Their gas probably originates from the same source as the dust, i.e. planetesimal destruction, but the low gas densities make it difficult to detect. So far, Herschel has detected far-IR gas emission from one debris disk, Beta Pictoris. Here I discuss a well-known debris disk system in the GASPS survey, 49 Ceti. It serves as a case study for modeling low-density gas in optically thin disks. The dust disk appears to be spatially resolved at 70 um. Most interestingly, there appears to be a hint of ClI 158 urn emission at the roughly 2 sigma level. Preliminary modeling suggests that reconciling the sub-mm CO emission from this system with the weak or non-existent far-IR atomic lines may require an unusual chemical composition in the gas of this disk.

  4. A Unique Gas-Rich Debris Disk: Herschel Imaging and Spectroscopy of 49 Ceti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2012-01-01

    Gas-poor debris disks represent a fundamentally different class of circumstellar disk than gas-rich protoplanetary disks. Their gas probably originates from the same source as the dust, i.e. planetesimal destruction, but the low gas densities make it difficult to detect. So far, Herschel has detected far-IR gas emission from only one or two debris disks, Beta Pictoris being one of them. Here we present Herschel GASPS observations of a well-known debris disk system, 49 Ceti. The dust disk is spatially resolved in thermal emission at 70 _m. Most interestingly, weak far-IR gas emission is detected. Preliminary modeling suggests that reconciling the sub-mm CO emission seen from this system with the far-IR gas detection and upper limits requires a low gas-to-dust ratio and possibly an unusual gas composition.

  5. Support of Herschel Key Programme Teams at the NASA Herschel Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupe, David L.; Appleton, P. N.; Ardila, D.; Bhattacharya, B.; Mei, Y.; Morris, P.; Rector, J.; NHSC Team

    2010-01-01

    The first science data from the Herschel Space Observatory were distributed to Key Programme teams in September 2009. This poster describes a number of resources that have been developed by the NASA Herschel Science Center (NHSC) to support the first users of the observatory. The NHSC webpages and Helpdesk serve as the starting point for information and queries from the US community. Details about the use of the Herschel Common Science Software can be looked up in the Helpdesk Knowledgebase. The capability of real-time remote support through desktop sharing has been implemented. The NHSC continues to host workshops on data analysis and observation planning. Key Programme teams have been provided Wiki sites upon request for their team's private use and for sharing information with other teams. A secure data storage area is in place for troubleshooting purposes and for use by visitors. The NHSC draws upon close working relationships with Instrument Control Centers and the Herschel Science Center in Madrid in order to have the necessary expertise on hand to assist Herschel observers, including both Key Programme teams and respondents to upcoming open time proposal calls.

  6. Reflex recruitment of medullary gasping mechanisms in eupnoea by pharyngeal stimulation in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, M L; St John, W M; Tomori, Z

    1994-01-01

    1. Mechanical stimulation of the naso- and oropharynx causes the replacement of the eupnoeic ventilatory pattern by a brief, but large, burst of activity of the phrenic nerve. Our purpose was to define whether these changes in phrenic activity represent a switch to gasping. 2. In decerebrate, vagotomized, paralysed and ventilated cats, mechanical stimulation of the pharynx was performed during eupnoea, apneusis and gasping. The latter two ventilatory patterns were produced by ventilating the experimental animal with 1.0% carbon monoxide in air or with 100% nitrogen. Eupnoea could be re-established by a recommencement of ventilation with oxygen. 3. The rate of rise of phrenic activity and its peak height were much greater following mechanical stimulation of the pharynx than the phrenic bursts of eupnoea or apneusis. The durations of phrenic burst and the period between these were much less following pharyngeal stimulation. In contrast, these variables of phrenic activity were the same during pharyngeal stimulation and in gasping. 4. Previous studies had established that activity within a region of the lateral tegmental field of medulla is critical for the manifestation of gasping. Hence, electrical stimulation of this region during gasping elicits premature gasps whereas its ablation irreversibly eliminates gasping. 5. We positioned a multibarrelled pipette in the critical medullary region for gasping. Its location was verified, once gasping was established in hypoxia or anoxia, by the elicitation of premature gasps following electrical stimulation. Neurons in this region were destroyed by microinjections of the neurotoxin kainic acid; in a few experiments the region was destroyed by electrolytic lesions. 6. Following destruction of the region of the lateral tegmental field, gasping could no longer be provoked in anoxia. In contrast, the eupnoeic pattern of phrenic activity continued. However, mechanical stimulation of the pharynx no longer caused any changes in the

  7. GASP: Gas stripping and the outskirts of galaxies as a function of environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggianti, Bianca; GASP Team

    2017-03-01

    We present GASP, an ongoing ESO Large Program with MUSE aiming to study gas removal processes from galaxies at low redshift. GASP targets 100 galaxies with tails, tentacles and one-sided debris. MUSE data allows a detailed investigation of the ionized stripped gas, as well as of the gas and stars within the galaxy out to large distances from the galaxy center. We show the first results for two of the GASP galaxies that are striking cluster jellyfish galaxies of stellar masses ~ 1011 M ⊙.

  8. nGASP - the nematode genome annotation assessment project

    SciTech Connect

    Coghlan, A; Fiedler, T J; McKay, S J; Flicek, P; Harris, T W; Blasiar, D; Allen, J; Stein, L D

    2008-12-19

    While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets for 10 Mb of the C. elegans genome. Predictions were compared to reference gene sets consisting of confirmed or manually curated gene models from WormBase. The most accurate gene-finders were 'combiner' algorithms, which made use of transcript- and protein-alignments and multi-genome alignments, as well as gene predictions from other gene-finders. Gene-finders that used alignments of ESTs, mRNAs and proteins came in second place. There was a tie for third place between gene-finders that used multi-genome alignments and ab initio gene-finders. The median gene level sensitivity of combiners was 78% and their specificity was 42%, which is nearly the same accuracy as reported for combiners in the human genome. C. elegans genes with exons of unusual hexamer content, as well as those with many exons, short exons, long introns, a weak translation start signal, weak splice sites, or poorly conserved orthologs were the most challenging for gene-finders. While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets for 10 Mb of the C. elegans genome

  9. nGASP – the nematode genome annotation assessment project

    PubMed Central

    Coghlan, Avril; Fiedler, Tristan J; McKay, Sheldon J; Flicek, Paul; Harris, Todd W; Blasiar, Darin; Stein, Lincoln D

    2008-01-01

    Background While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets across 10 Mb of the C. elegans genome. Predictions were compared to reference gene sets consisting of confirmed or manually curated gene models from WormBase. Results The most accurate gene-finders were 'combiner' algorithms, which made use of transcript- and protein-alignments and multi-genome alignments, as well as gene predictions from other gene-finders. Gene-finders that used alignments of ESTs, mRNAs and proteins came in second. There was a tie for third place between gene-finders that used multi-genome alignments and ab initio gene-finders. The median gene level sensitivity of combiners was 78% and their specificity was 42%, which is nearly the same accuracy reported for combiners in the human genome. C. elegans genes with exons of unusual hexamer content, as well as those with unusually many exons, short exons, long introns, a weak translation start signal, weak splice sites, or poorly conserved orthologs posed the greatest difficulty for gene-finders. Conclusion This experiment establishes a baseline of gene prediction accuracy in Caenorhabditis genomes, and has guided the choice of gene-finders for the annotation of newly sequenced genomes of Caenorhabditis and other nematode species. We have created new gene sets for C. briggsae, C. remanei, C. brenneri, C. japonica, and Brugia malayi using some of the best-performing gene-finders. PMID:19099578

  10. Gasp, a Grb2-associating protein, is critical for positive selection of thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Michael S.; Oda, Hiroyo; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Eshima, Koji; Kirikae, Teruo; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Shirai, Mutsunori; Abe, Takaya; Natsume, Tohru; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Suzuki, Harumi

    2009-01-01

    T cells develop in the thymus through positive and negative selection, which are responsible for shaping the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in selection remains an area of intense interest. Here, we identified and characterized a gene product Gasp (Grb2-associating protein, also called Themis) that is critically required for positive selection. Gasp is a cytosolic protein with no known functional motifs that is expressed only in T cells, especially immature CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) thymocytes. In the absence of Gasp, differentiation of both CD4 and CD8 single positive cells in the thymus was severely inhibited, whereas all other TCR-induced events such as β-selection, negative selection, peripheral activation, and homeostatic proliferation were unaffected. We found that Gasp constitutively associates with Grb2 via its N-terminal Src homology 3 domain, suggesting that Gasp acts as a thymocyte-specific adaptor for Grb2 or regulates Ras signaling in DP thymocytes. Collectively, we have described a gene called Gasp that is critical for positive selection. PMID:19805304

  11. Herschel Data Processing Development: 10 Years After

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, S.

    2013-10-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory, the fourth cornerstone mission in the ESA science program, was launched on the 14th of May 2009. As a cryogenic mission Herschel's operational lifetime is consumable-limited by its supply of liquid helium, estimated to be depleted by March 2013. Afterwards the mission will start a 4.75 year long post-operations phase. Originally it was considered sufficient to provide astronomers with raw data and software tools to carry out a basic data reduction, and no “data products” were to be generated and delivered. Following the realisation that the expectations of the astronomical community on the deliverables of an observatory mission evolved it was agreed to implement a single ‘cradle to grave’ data analysis system supporting the needs of all users for the whole project cycle. We will summarise the lessons learned during those ten years of Herschel data processing development, address the main challenges of this major software development project, and reflect on what went well, what needed to be adapted, and our open points.

  12. Herschel and the Molecular Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Helmich, F. P.

    2006-01-01

    Over the next decade, space-based missions will open up the universe to high spatial and spectral resolution studies at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. This will allow us to study, in much greater detail, the composition and the origin and evolution of molecules in space. Moreover, molecular transitions in these spectral ranges provide a sensitive probe of the dynamics and the physical and chemical conditions in a wide range of objects at scales ranging from budding planetary systems to galactic and extragalactic sizes. Hence, these missions provide us with the tools to study key astrophysical and astrochemical processes involved in the formation and evolution of planets, stars, and galaxies. These new missions can be expected to lead to the detection of many thousands of new spectral features. Identification, analysis and interpretation of these features in terms of the physical and chemical characteristics of the astronomical sources will require detailed astronomical modeling tools supported by laboratory measurements and theoretical studies of chemical reactions and collisional excitation rates on species of astrophysical relevance. These data will have to be made easily accessible to the scientific community through web-based data archives. In this paper, we will review the Herschel mission and its expected impact on our understanding of the molecular universe.

  13. The Herschel Inner Galaxy Gas Survey (HIGGS): Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher; Walker, C.; Kulesa, C.; Stark, A.; Smith, H.; Tolls, V.; White, G.; Israel, F.; Guesten, R.; Requenna-Torres, M.; Shaw, T.; Chen, S.; Schlawin, E.

    The Herschel Inner Galaxy Gas Survey (HIGGS) is a Herschel Open Time Key Programme to use the HIFI and PACS instruments to observe [CII], [NII], [OI], [OIII], and high-J CO emission lines in focused regions near the Galactic Center. By separating and evaluating the distinctly different roles of the central nuclear engine, the Galactic Bar, and dynamical stellar and interstellar feedback mechanisms, HIGGS will provide a high-resolution template for the physical processes in galactic nuclei throughout the local universe, in particular those engaged in starburst activity. We intend to present our early results along with a description of the data reduction and analysis tools that we have developed.

  14. Laboratory Astrophysics Needs of the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    The science teams of the Herschel Space Observatory have identified a number of areas where laboratory study is required for proper interpretation of Herschel observational data. The most critical is the collection and compilation of laboratory data on spectral line frequencies, transition probabilities and energy levels for the known astrophysical atomic and molecular species in 670 to 57 micron wavelength range of Herschel. The second most critical need is the compilation of collisional excitation cross sections for the species known to dominate the energy balance in the ISM and the temperature dependent chemical reaction rates. On the theoretical front, chemical and radiative transfer models need to be prepared in advance to assess calibration and identify instrument anomalies. In the next few years there will be a need to incorporate spectroscopists and theoretical chemists into teams of astronomers so that the spectroscopic surveys planned can he properly calibrated and rapidly interpreted once the data becomes available. The science teams have also noted that the enormous prospects for molecular discovery will be greatly handicapped by the nearly complete lack of spectroscopic data for anything not already well known in the ISM. As a minimum, molecular species predicted to exist by chemical models should be subjected to detailed laboratory study to ensure conclusive detections. This has the greatest impact on any astrobiology program that might be proposed for Herschel. Without a significant amount of laboratory work in the very near future Herschel will not be prepared for many planned observations, much less addressing the open questions in molecular astrophysics.

  15. Charles Darwin and John Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of John Herschel on the philosophical thoughts of Charles Darwin, both through the former's book, Natural Philosophy, and through their meeting in 1836 at the Cape of Good Hope, is discussed. With Herschel having himself speculated on evolution just a few months before he met Darwin, it is probable that he stimulated at least the beginnings of the latter's lifelong work on the subject.

  16. Caroline Lucretia Herschel -- Comet Huntress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.

    1999-04-01

    Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) was an active astronomer at a time when discovering comets, and calculating their orbits, was one of the main astronomical activities. She discovered eight comets and held the ladies' world record in this field until April 1987 when she was toppled from the podium by Carolyn S. Shoemaker. This paper places the Herschel cometary discoveries into the context of the contemporary cometary astronomy.

  17. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Humenik, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    Atmospheric ozone, water vapor, and related flight and meteorological data were obtained during 214 flights of a United Airlines B-747 and two Pan American World Airways B-747's from March through June 1976. In addition, trichlorofluoromethane data obtained from laboratory analysis of two whole air samples collected in flight are reported. These data are available on GASP tape VL0005 from the National Climatic Center, Asheville, North Carolina. In addition to the GASP data, tropopause pressure fields obtained from NMC archives for the dates of the GASP flights are included on the data tape. Flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, and data tape specifications are described in this report. Selected analyses including ozone and sample bottle data are also presented.

  18. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tapes VL0010 and VL0012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Tiefermann, M. W.; Nyland, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The GASP atmospheric trace constituent data currently available are considered. Included on tapes are in-situ measurements of atmospheric ozone, carbon monoxide, water vapor, and clouds, data from laboratory analysis of filters exposed in flight, and related flight and meteorological data. Measurements of ozone levels within the first class cabin of these aircraft are also reported. In addition to the GASP data, tropopause pressures obtained from time and space interpolation of NMC archived data for the dates of the flights are included. Reported herein are the flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, data tape specifications, and analyses of the cabin ozone measurements.

  19. HERSCHEL/PACS SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN TAURUS/AURIGA—OBSERVATIONS OF [O I] AND [C II], AND FAR-INFRARED CONTINUUM

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Göran; Vacca, William D.; Duchêne, Gaspard; Mathews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Ménard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Thi, Wing-Fai; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Grady, Carol; Roberge, Aki; Kamp, Inga; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-10

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe ∼120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 μm, [O I] 145 μm, [C II] 158 μm, OH, H{sub 2}O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 μm. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 μm line and the 63 μm continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 μm is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 μm emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 μm to [O I] 145 μm are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 μm and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  20. Herschel - PACS Survey Of Protoplanetary Disks In Taurus - Auriga Observations Of [O I] And [C Ii], And Far-Infrared Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Christian; Sandell, Goeran; Vacca, William D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Matthews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Barbado, David; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Grady, Carol; Kamp, Inga; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Roberge, Aki; Thi,, Wing-Fai; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe approx. 120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 micron, [O I] 145 micron, [C II] 158, micron OH, H2O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 micron. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 micron line and the 63 micron continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 micron is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 micron emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 micron to [O I] 145 micron are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 micron and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  1. Initial results from the Herschel Oxygen Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul; Encrenaz, Pierre; Liseau, R.; Bell, T. A.; Bergin, T.; Black, J.; Benz, A.; Caselli, P.; Caux, E.; Falgarone, E.; Gerin, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Hjalmarson, A.; Hollenbach, D.; Kaufman, M.; Larsson, B.; Le Bourlot, J.; Le Petit, F.; Li, D.; Lis, D.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Pagani, L.; Roueff, E.; Sandqvist, A.; Snell, R.; Vastel, C.; van Dishoek, E.; Viti, S.; van der Tak, F.

    Initial Results from the Herschel Oxygen Project (HOP) Oxygen is the third most abundant element in the cosmos, but can be found in many forms. In the gas phase, oxygen can be ionized, atomic, or in molecular form, and it is also incorporated into grains. The molecular form is expected to dominate in cold, well-shielded regions, and in such molecular clouds, oxygen can be found in key species including carbon monoxide and water. Gas phase chemistry models predict molecular oxygen (O2) to be almost as abundant as CO. A number of searches for rotational transitions of O2 have been carried out. These include ground-based searches for the isotopologue 16O18O and searches for 16O2 in galaxies with red shift sufficient to move the line away from terrestrial atmospheric absorption. Searches for Galactic 16O2 carried out with the SWAS and Odin spacecraft have yielded upper limits on the abundance of molecular oxygen typically 1 to 2 orders of magnitude below those predicted by gas-phase models. There has been a statistical detection of O2 in one source, again at a low abundance. A variety of new models have been proposed to explain this low abundance, which involve grain surface and photo effects. To address this important problem in astro-chemistry and molecular cloud structure, we have developed the Open Time Key Project HOP (Herschel Oxygen Project), which exploits the high angular resolution and sensitivity of the HIFI instrument on Herschel to observe 3 rotational transitions of O2 in a broad sample of molecular clouds. We report on the status of HOP and present early results available from Priority Science Phase and Science Definition Phase observations.

  2. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Nyland, T. W.; Tiefermann, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The GASP atmospheric trace constituent data cover atmospheric ozone, carbon monoxide, condensation nuclei, clouds, and related meteorological and flight information obtained during October 28-31, 1977. Reported herein are flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, and data tape specifications.

  3. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a Gasp homolog from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, and its putative role in cuticle formation.

    PubMed

    Nisole, A; Stewart, D; Bowman, S; Zhang, D; Krell, P J; Doucet, D; Cusson, M

    2010-10-01

    Proteins that are capable of binding chitin play essential roles in the synthesis and structural integrity of the insect cuticle and peritrophic matrix. In the course of developing expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries for the eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, we identified an abundant cDNA encoding a homolog of the Drosophila "gasp" gene (Gene Analogous to Small Peritrophins). For the present work, we undertook the characterization of this new homolog, CfGasp, in an effort to identify its role during larval development. As shown for DmGasp, the C. fumiferana homolog was found to contain three type-2 chitin-binding domains (CBDs), which were also found in Gasp orthologs retrieved from GenBank. In a phylogenetic analysis, these Gasp proteins formed a tight cluster, distinct from the midgut-specific peritrophins with which they share the cysteine-containing CBDs so far considered absent from cuticular proteins. However, unlike what has been shown for peritrophins, CfGasp transcript levels were low in larval midguts and most abundant in epidermis, while they were low in trachea and ovaries. Transcript levels increased during larval molts in a pattern similar to that observed for exocuticular proteins in other insects. In addition, the recombinant protein was shown to be capable of binding chitin. Altogether, these results suggest a structural role for CfGasp in exocuticle formation.

  5. William Herschel's 'Hole in the Sky' and the discovery of dark nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinicke, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    In 1785 William Herschel published a paper in the Philosophical Transactions containing the remarkable section "An opening or hole". It describes an unusual vacant place in Scorpius. This matter falls into oblivion until Caroline Herschel initiated a correspondence with her nephew John in 1833. It contains Herschel's spectacular words "Hier ist wahrhaftig ein Loch im Himmel" ("Here truly is a hole in the sky"). About a hundred years later, Johann Georg Hagen, Director of the Vatican Observatory, presented a spectacular candidate for the 'hole', discovered in 1857 by Angelo Secchi in Sagittarius and later catalogued by Edward E. Barnard as the dark nebula B 86. Hagen's claim initiated a debate, mainly in the Journal of the British Astronomical Association, about the identity of Herschel's 'object'. Though things could be partly cleared up, unjustified claims still remain. This is mainly due to the fact that original sources were not consulted. A comprehensive study of the curious 'hole' is presented here. It covers major parts of the epochal astronomical work of William, Caroline and John Herschel. This includes a general study of 'vacant places', found by William Herschel and others, and the speculations about their nature, eventually leading to the finding that dark nebulae are due to absorbing interstellar matter. Some of the 'vacant places' could be identified in catalogues of dark nebulae and this leads to a 'Herschel Catalogue of Dark Nebulae' - the first historic catalogue of its kind.

  6. Temperature histories of commercial flights at severe conditions from GASP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal environment of commercial aircraft from a data set gathered during the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is studied. The data set covers a four-year period of measurements. The report presents plots of airplane location and speed and atmospheric temperature as functions of elapsed time for 35 extreme-condition flights, selected by minimum values of several temperature parameters. One of these parameters, the severity factor, is an approximation of the in-flight wing-tank temperature. Representative low-severity-factor flight histories may be useful for actual temperature-profile inputs to design and research studies. Comparison of the GASP atmospheric temperatures to interpolated temperatures from National Meteorological Center and Global Weather Central analysis fields shows that the analysis temperatures are slightly biased toward warmer than actual temperatures, particularly over oceans and at extreme conditions.

  7. Herschel flight models sorption coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duband, L.; Clerc, L.; Ercolani, E.; Guillemet, L.; Vallcorba, R.

    2008-03-01

    The Herschel and Planck satellites will be jointly launched on an ARIANE 5 in 2008. The Herschel payload consists of three instruments built by international scientific consortia, heterodyne instrument for first (HIFI), photo-conductor array camera and spectrometer (PACS) and spectral and photometric imaging receiver (SPIRE). The spacecraft provides the environment for astronomical observations in the infrared and sub-millimeter wavelength range requiring cryogenic temperatures for the cold focal plane units. The spectral and photometric imaging receiver (SPIRE) will cover the 200-670 μm spectral range using bolometric detectors, as the photo-conductor array camera and spectrometer (PACS) will cover the 60-210 μm spectral range. Both instruments SPIRE and PACS feature detectors operating at 300 mK. This cooling will be effected by two helium sorption coolers developed at the Service des Basses Températures of the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA-SBT). These coolers based on an evaporative cooling cycle features no moving parts and can be recycled indefinitely pending the availability of a cold heat sink at temperature below 3 K. Several models were developed in the course of the Herschel program and this paper deals with the design, manufacturing and qualification of the flight model coolers.

  8. Introducing the GASP scale: a new measure of guilt and shame proneness.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Taya R; Wolf, Scott T; Panter, A T; Insko, Chester A

    2011-05-01

    Although scholars agree that moral emotions are critical for deterring unethical and antisocial behavior, there is disagreement about how 2 prototypical moral emotions--guilt and shame--should be defined, differentiated, and measured. We addressed these issues by developing a new assessment--the Guilt and Shame Proneness scale (GASP)--that measures individual differences in the propensity to experience guilt and shame across a range of personal transgressions. The GASP contains 2 guilt subscales that assess negative behavior-evaluations and repair action tendencies following private transgressions and 2 shame subscales that assess negative self-evaluations (NSEs) and withdrawal action tendencies following publically exposed transgressions. Both guilt subscales were highly correlated with one another and negatively correlated with unethical decision making. Although both shame subscales were associated with relatively poor psychological functioning (e.g., neuroticism, personal distress, low self-esteem), they were only weakly correlated with one another, and their relationships with unethical decision making diverged. Whereas shame-NSE constrained unethical decision making, shame-withdraw did not. Our findings suggest that differentiating the tendency to make NSEs following publically exposed transgressions from the tendency to hide or withdraw from public view is critically important for understanding and measuring dispositional shame proneness. The GASP's ability to distinguish these 2 classes of responses represents an important advantage of the scale over existing assessments. Although further validation research is required, the present studies are promising in that they suggest the GASP has the potential to be an important measurement tool for detecting individuals susceptible to corruption and unethical behavior.

  9. Are planets and debris correlated? Herschel imaging of 61 Vir.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, M.; Kennedy, G. M.; Moro-Martín, A.

    2012-03-01

    Debris disk studies with Spitzer found no evidence of a correlation between (giant) exoplanets and circumsteallar dust. Since these studies were carried out, a new parameter space of fainter and colder debris disks has been opened up by the Herschel Space Observatory -- improving our knowledge of the disk frequency, in particular around cooler stars -- and simultaneously higher precision doppler surveys have allowed the detection of lower-mass planets, the frequency of which can now be characterized.Ê Here, we revisit the planet-debris disk correlation using Herschel data from the DEBRIS and DUNES surveys. We assess whether the frequency and properties of disks around stars with high-mass and low-mass planets are any different from a control sample, and if these differences can be used to shed light on planet formation mechanisms and to ÒpredictÓ the presence of planets around stars with certain disk characteristics.

  10. Change in network connectivity during fictive-gasping generation in hypoxia: prevention by a metabolic intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Posadas, Andrés; Flores-Martínez, Ernesto; Lorea-Hernández, Jonathan-Julio; Rivera-Angulo, Ana-Julia; Pérez-Ortega, Jesús-Esteban; Bargas, José; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal circuit in charge of generating the respiratory rhythms, localized in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC), is configured to produce fictive-eupnea during normoxia and reconfigures to produce fictive-gasping during hypoxic conditions in vitro. The mechanisms involved in such reconfiguration have been extensively investigated by cell-focused studies, but the actual changes at the network level remain elusive. Since a failure to generate gasping has been linked to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), the study of gasping generation and pharmacological approaches to promote it may have clinical relevance. Here, we study the changes in network dynamics and circuit reconfiguration that occur during the transition to fictive-gasping generation in the brainstem slice preparation by recording the preBötC with multi-electrode arrays and assessing correlated firing among respiratory neurons or clusters of respiratory neurons (multiunits). We studied whether the respiratory network reconfiguration in hypoxia involves changes in either the number of active respiratory elements, the number of functional connections among elements, or the strength of these connections. Moreover, we tested the influence of isocitrate, a Krebs cycle intermediate that has recently been shown to promote breathing, on the configuration of the preBötC circuit during normoxia and on its reconfiguration during hypoxia. We found that, in contrast to previous suggestions based on cell-focused studies, the number and the overall activity of respiratory neurons change only slightly during hypoxia. However, hypoxia induces a reduction in the strength of functional connectivity within the circuit without reducing the number of connections. Isocitrate prevented this reduction during hypoxia while increasing the strength of network connectivity. In conclusion, we provide an overview of the configuration of the respiratory network under control conditions and how it is reconfigured during fictive-gasping

  11. Herschel/PACS observations of young sources in Taurus: the far-infrared counterpart of optical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podio, L.; Kamp, I.; Flower, D.; Howard, C.; Sandell, G.; Mora, A.; Aresu, G.; Brittain, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Pinte, C.; White, G. J.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Observations of the atomic and molecular line emission associated with jets and outflows emitted by young stellar objects provide sensitive diagnostics of the excitation conditions, and can be used to trace the various evolutionary stages they pass through as they evolve to become main sequence stars. Aims: To understand the relevance of atomic and molecular cooling in shocks, and how accretion and ejection efficiency evolves with the evolutionary state of the sources, we will study the far-infrared counterparts of bright optical jets associated with Class I and II sources in Taurus (T Tau, DG Tau A, DG Tau B, FS Tau A+B, and RW Aur). Methods: We have analysed Herschel/PACS observations of a number of atomic ([O i]63 μm, 145 μm, [C ii]158 μm) and molecular (high-J CO, H2O, OH) lines, collected within the open time key project GASPS (PI: W. R. F. Dent). To constrain the origin of the detected lines we have compared the obtained FIR emission maps with the emission from optical-jets and millimetre-outflows, and the measured line fluxes and ratios with predictions from shock and disk models. Results: All of the targets are associated with extended emission in the atomic lines; in particular, the strong [O i] 63 μm emission is correlated with the direction of the optical jet/mm-outflow. The line ratios suggest that the atomic lines can be excited in fast dissociative J-shocks occurring along the jet. The molecular emission, on the contrary, originates from a compact region, that is spatially and spectrally unresolved, and lines from highly excited levels are detected (e.g., the o-H2O 818-707 line, and the CO J = 36-35 line). Disk models are unable to explain the brightness of the observed lines (CO and H2O line fluxes up to 10-15-6 × 10-16 W m-2). Slow C- or J-shocks with high pre-shock densities reproduce the observed H2O and high-J CO lines; however, the disk and/or UV-heated outflow cavities may contribute to the observed emission. Conclusions

  12. John Herschel, photography and the camera lucida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, L. J.

    John Herschel's use of the camera lucida as a drawing aid and the part played by this instrument in Henry Fox Talbot's motivation to invent photography are described. Herschel's seminal contributions to the early progress of photography, his attempts at colour photography, his invention of the "blueprint" process and his assistance to other photographic pioneers are discussed.

  13. The Herschel Point Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Schulz, Bernhard; Altieri, Bruno; Calzoletti, Luca; Kiss, Csaba; Lim, Tanya; Lu, Nanyao; Paladini, Roberta; Papageorgiou, Andreas; Pearson, Chris; Rector, John; Shupe, David; Valtchanov, Ivan; Verebélyi, Erika; Xu, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was the fourth cornerstone mission in the European Space Agency (ESA) science programme with excellent broad band imaging capabilities in the submillimetre and far-infrared part of the spectrum. Although the spacecraft finished its observations in 2013, it left a large legacy dataset that is far from having been fully scrutinized and still has potential for new scientific discoveries. This is specifically true for the photometric observations of the PACS and SPIRE instruments that scanned >10% of the sky at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns. Some source catalogs have already been produced by individual observing programs, but there are many observations that would never be analyzed for their full source content. To maximize the science return of the SPIRE and PACS data sets, our international team of instrument experts is in the process of building the Herschel Point Source Catalog (HPSC) from all scan map observations. Our homogeneous source extraction enables a systematic and unbiased comparison of sensitivity across the different Herschel fields that single programs will generally not be able to provide. The extracted point sources will contain individual YSOs of our Galaxy, unresolved YSO clusters in resolved nearby galaxies and unresolved galaxies of the local and distant Universe that are related to star formation. Such a huge dataset will help scientists better understand the evolution from interstellar clouds to individual stars. Furthermore the analysis of stellar clusters and the star formation on galactic scales will add more details to the understanding of star formation laws through time.We present our findings on comparison of different source detection and photometric tools. First results of the extractions are shown along with the description of our pipelines and catalogue entries. We also provide an additional science product, the structure noise map, that is used for the quality assessment of the catalogue in

  14. Herschel Observations of Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Ryan T.; Tappert, Claus; Hoffman, Douglas I.; Campbell, Ryan K.

    2013-01-01

    We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 μm. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic "polars" in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n <= 3) is present in EF Eri and AM Her. Previously, such emission would have been presumed to be optically thick, and not provide significant orbitally modulated flux. This suggests that the accretion onto polars is more complicated than assumed in the simple models developed for these two sources. We develop a model for the near-/mid-IR light curves for WZ Sge with an L2 donor star that shows that the ellipsoidal variations from its secondary star are detected. We conclude that none of the targets surveyed have dusty circumbinary disks. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  15. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Ryan T.; Tappert, Claus; Hoffman, Douglas I.; Campbell, Ryan K. E-mail: rthamilt@nmsu.edu E-mail: dhoffman@ipac.caltech.edu

    2013-01-01

    We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic 'polars' in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n {<=} 3) is present in EF Eri and AM Her. Previously, such emission would have been presumed to be optically thick, and not provide significant orbitally modulated flux. This suggests that the accretion onto polars is more complicated than assumed in the simple models developed for these two sources. We develop a model for the near-/mid-IR light curves for WZ Sge with an L2 donor star that shows that the ellipsoidal variations from its secondary star are detected. We conclude that none of the targets surveyed have dusty circumbinary disks.

  16. Should unobstructed gasping be facilitated and confirmed before administering adrenaline, otherwise, give titrated vasopressin?

    PubMed

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2015-02-01

    A recent commentary, "Resuscitation That's (Un)Shockable: Time to Get the Adrenaline Flowing", published in the New England Journal of Medicine Journal Watch called attention to a relatively recent study showing that a large and increasing percentage of patients with in-hospital cardiac arrests exhibit initial nonshockable rhythms (asystole or pulseless electrical activity [PEA]; 82% in 2009 vs 69% in 2000) and a most recent study that concluded that neurologically intact survival to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrest was significantly more likely after earlier epinephrine administration. It was found that delayed administration of epinephrine was associated significantly with lower chance for survival to hospital discharge, in stepwise fashion (12%, 10%, 8%, and 7% survival, respectively, for patients receiving their first epinephrine dose≤3, 4-6, 7-9, and >9 minutes after arrest). Although early use of epinephrine to manage patients with nonshockable rhythms lacks strong evidence to support efficacy, focus on time to epinephrine administration-in addition to high-quality chest compressions-might be the best early intervention. However, evidence may strongly support the recommendation that adrenaline needs to be used very early because without effective-depth cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with complete recoil, epinephrine may only be effective when gasping is present, which is a time-limited phenomenon. However, because very few rescuers can perform effective-depth chest compressions with complete recoil, gasping is critically necessary for adequate ventilation and generation of adequate coronary and cerebral perfusion. However, under acidemic conditions and high catecholamine levels and/or absence of gasping, vasopressin should be administered instead.

  17. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Liu, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The data currently available from GASP, including flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, and data tape specifications are described. Measurements of atmospheric ozone, cabin ozine, carbon monoxide, water vapor, particles, clouds, condensation nuclei, filter samples and related meteorological and flight information obtained during 562 flights of aircraft N533PA, N4711U, N655PA, and VH-EBE from October 3, 1977 through January 5, 1978 are reported. Data representing tropopause pressures obtained from time and space interpolation of National Meteorological Center archived data for the dates of the flights are included.

  18. Herschel evidence for disk flattening or gas depletion in transitional disks

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J. T.; Pascucci, I.; Espaillat, C.; Woitke, P.; Andrews, S.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Meeus, G.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2014-06-01

    Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks characterized by reduced near- and mid-infrared emission, with respect to full disks. This characteristic spectral energy distribution indicates the presence of an optically thin inner cavity within the dust disk believed to mark the disappearance of the primordial massive disk. We present new Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of [O I] 63.18 μm for 21 transitional disks. Our survey complements the larger Herschel GASPS program ({sup G}as in Protoplanetary Systems{sup )} by quadrupling the number of transitional disks observed with PACS in this wavelength. [O I] 63.18 μm traces material in the outer regions of the disk, beyond the inner cavity of most transitional disks. We find that transitional disks have [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities ∼2 times fainter than their full disk counterparts. We self-consistently determine various stellar properties (e.g., bolometric luminosity, FUV excess, etc.) and disk properties (e.g., disk dust mass, etc.) that could influence the [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosity, and we find no correlations that can explain the lower [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities in transitional disks. Using a grid of thermo-chemical protoplanetary disk models, we conclude that either transitional disks are less flared than full disks or they possess lower gas-to-dust ratios due to a depletion of gas mass. This result suggests that transitional disks are more evolved than their full disk counterparts, possibly even at large radii.

  19. The Mystery of Herschel's ``Cold Debris Disks''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivov, A. V.; Löhne, T.; Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    An important result of the Herschel Open Times Key Program DUNES is a discovery of a new class of ``cold debris disks''. These are tenuous disks that show little or no infrared excess at 100μm, but a significant one at 160μm and possibly longer wavelengths. A comparison of the dust temperatures inferred from the SEDs to the disk radii estimated from resolved images suggests that the dust is colder than a black body at the dust location. This requires the grains to be large (compared to far-infrared wavelengths) and to have low absorption in the visible. While the latter can be achieved, for instance if the dust is rich in ices, the absence of small grains is puzzling, since collisional models of debris disks predict the grains of all sizes down to several times the radiation pressure blowout limit to be present. We will discuss several scenarios proposed to explain depletion of small grains: transport-dominated disks, disks with dynamically cold dust-producing planetesimals, and the disks of unstirred primordial millimeter-sized grains. While the first two scenarios encounter problems, the last one looks more promising. Our collisional simulations show that, at least for some collision outcome prescriptions, such disks can indeed survive for gigayears, largely preserving the primordial size distribution. The modeled thermal emission appears to be roughly consistent with the observed one.

  20. Herschel Observations of Interstellar Chloronium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Roueff, Evelyne; Snell, Ronald L.; Lis, Dariusz; Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; Black, John H.; De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gupta, Harshal; Indriolo, Nick; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; Larsson, Bengt; Melnick, Gary J.; Menten, Karl M.; Monje, Raquel; Nagy, Zsófia; Phillips, Thomas G.; Sandqvist, Aage; Sonnentrucker, Paule; van der Tak, Floris; Wolfire, Mark G.

    2012-03-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have observed para-chloronium (H2Cl+) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km s-1 cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H35 2Cl+ and para-H37 2Cl+ isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 111-000 transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for ~4%-12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed OPR of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of ~2 × 1013 cm-2 and ~1.2 × 1013 cm-2, respectively, for chloronium in these two sources. We obtained upper limits on the para-H35 2Cl+ line strengths toward H2 Peak 1 in the Orion Molecular cloud and toward the massive young star AFGL 2591. The chloronium abundances inferred in this study are typically at least a factor ~10 larger than the predictions of steady-state theoretical models for the chemistry of interstellar molecules containing chlorine. Several explanations for this discrepancy were investigated, but none has proven satisfactory, and thus the large observed abundances of chloronium remain puzzling. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Herschel's DEBRIS - An Update on the Search for Kuiper Belts Around the Nearest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butner, Harold M.; Matthews, B.; DEBRIS Survey Team

    2011-01-01

    DEBRIS (Disk Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) is an open time key project on Herschel that aims to conduct an unbiased statistical survey for debris disks around the nearest stars. The goal is to achieve flux-limited observations at 100 and 160 microns - and thereby reach unprecedented debris disk mass limits. The sample includes 446 primaries, 348 of which are observed by the DEBRIS team and 98 which are covered by another project (DUNES - DUst disks around NEarby Stars). The sample covers spectral types from A0 through M7, and is designed to allow the detection of dust masses similar to those of our own Kuiper belt. The superior resolution of Herschel combined with the fact that our sample are all nearby stars will provide resolved disks for many of the detected disks. We will discuss the status of ongoing Herschel observations for this unique unbiased survey of debris disk candidates.

  2. Debris disks as seen by Herschel/DUNES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhne, T.; Eiroa, C.; Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Absil, O.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Thébault, P.; Bayo, A.; del Burgo, C.; Danchi, W.; Krivov, A. V.; Lebreton, J.; Letawe, G.; Magain, P.; Maldonado, J.; Montesinos, B.; Pilbratt, G. L.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2012-06-01

    The far-infrared excesses produced by debris disks are common features of stellar systems. These disks are thought to contain solids ranging from micron-sized dust to planetesimals. Naturally, their formation and evolution are linked to those of potential planets. With this motivation, the Herschel open time key programme DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars) aims at further characterising known debris disks and discovering new ones in the regime explored by the Herschel space observatory. On the one hand, in their survey of 133 nearby FGK stars, DUNES discovered a class of extremely cold and faint debris disks, different from well-known disks such as the one around Vega in that their inferred typical grain sizes are rather large, indicating low dynamical excitation and low collision rates. On the other hand, for the more massive disk around the sun-like star HD 207129, well-resolved PACS images confirmed the ring-liked structure seen in HST images and provided valuable information for an in-depth study and benchmark for models. Employing both models for power-law fitting and collisional evolution we found the disk around HD 207129 to feature low collision rates and large grains, as well. Transport by means of Poynting-Robertson drag likely plays a role in replenishing the dust seen closer to the star, inside of the ring. The inner edge is therefore rather smooth and the contribution from the extended halo of barely bound grains is small. Both slowly self-stirring and planetary perturbations could potentially have formed and shaped this disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  3. On the insignificance of Herschel's sunspot correlation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine William Herschel's hypothesis that solar-cycle variation of the Sun's irradiance has a modulating effect on the Earth's climate and that this is, specifically, manifested as an anticorrelation between sunspot number and the market price of wheat. Since Herschel first proposed his hypothesis in 1801, it has been regarded with both interest and skepticism. Recently, reports have been published that either support Herschel's hypothesis or rely on its validity. As a test of Herschel's hypothesis, we seek to reject a null hypothesis of a statistically random correlation between historical sunspot numbers, wheat prices in London and the United States, and wheat farm yields in the United States. We employ binary-correlation, Pearson-correlation, and frequency-domain methods. We test our methods using a historical geomagnetic activity index, well known to be causally correlated with sunspot number. As expected, the measured correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity would be an unlikely realization of random data; the correlation is “statistically significant.” On the other hand, measured correlations between sunspot number and wheat price and wheat yield data would be very likely realizations of random data; these correlations are “insignificant.” Therefore, Herschel's hypothesis must be regarded with skepticism. We compare and contrast our results with those of other researchers. We discuss procedures for evaluating hypotheses that are formulated from historical data.

  4. Flight summaries and temperature climatology at airliner cruise altitudes from GASP (Global Atmospheric Sampling Program) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Jasperson, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature data obtained by the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) during the period March 1975 to July 1979 are compiled to form flight summaries of static air temperature and a geographic temperature climatology. The flight summaries include the height and location of the coldest observed temperature and the mean flight level, temperature and the standard deviation of temperature for each flight as well as for flight segments. These summaries are ordered by route and month. The temperature climatology was computed for all statistically independent temperture data for each flight. The grid used consists of 5 deg latitude, 30 deg longitude and 2000 feet vertical resolution from FL270 to FL430 for each month of the year. The number of statistically independent observations, their mean, standard deviation and the empirical 98, 50, 16, 2 and .3 probability percentiles are presented.

  5. Signatures of energy flux in particle production: a black hole birth cry and death gasp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Michael R. R.; Ong, Yen Chin

    2015-07-01

    It is recently argued that if the Hawking radiation process is unitary, then a black hole's mass cannot be monotonically decreasing. We examine the time dependent particle count and negative energy flux in the non-trivial conformal vacuum via the moving mirror approach. A new, exactly unitary solution is presented which emits a characteristic above-thermal positive energy burst, a thermal plateau, and negative energy flux. It is found that the characteristic positive energy flare and thermal plateau is observed in the particle outflow. However, the results of time dependent particle production show no overt indication of negative energy flux. Therefore, a black hole's birth cry is detectable by asymptotic observers via particle count, whereas its death gasp is not.

  6. GASP- General Aviation Synthesis Program. Volume 1: Main program. Part 1: Theoretical development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D.

    1978-01-01

    The General Aviation synthesis program performs tasks generally associated with aircraft preliminary design and allows an analyst the capability of performing parametric studies in a rapid manner. GASP emphasizes small fixed-wing aircraft employing propulsion systems varying froma single piston engine with fixed pitch propeller through twin turboprop/ turbofan powered business or transport type aircraft. The program, which may be operated from a computer terminal in either the batch or interactive graphic mode, is comprised of modules representing the various technical disciplines integrated into a computational flow which ensures that the interacting effects of design variables are continuously accounted for in the aircraft sizing procedure. The model is a useful tool for comparing configurations, assessing aircraft performance and economics, performing tradeoff and sensitivity studies, and assessing the impact of advanced technologies on aircraft performance and economics.

  7. GASP-PL/I Simulation of Integrated Avionic System Processor Architectures. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    A development study sponsored by NASA was completed in July 1977 which proposed a complete integration of all aircraft instrumentation into a single modular system. Instead of using the current single-function aircraft instruments, computers compiled and displayed inflight information for the pilot. A processor architecture called the Team Architecture was proposed. This is a hardware/software approach to high-reliability computer systems. A follow-up study of the proposed Team Architecture is reported. GASP-PL/1 simulation models are used to evaluate the operating characteristics of the Team Architecture. The problem, model development, simulation programs and results at length are presented. Also included are program input formats, outputs and listings.

  8. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, D. J.; Holdeman, J. D.; Humenik, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is obtaining measurements of atmospheric trace constituents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere using fully automated air sampling systems on board several commercial B-747 aircraft in routine airline service. Atmospheric ozone, and related flight and meteorological data were obtained during 245 flights of a Qantas Airways of Australia B-747 and two Pan American World Airways B-747s from July 1976 through September 1976. In addition, whole air samples, obtained during three flights, were analyzed for trichlorofluoromethane, and filter samples, obtained during four flights, were analyzed for sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, and chlorides. Flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, data tape specifications, and selected analyses are discussed.

  9. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Humenik, F. M.; Lezberg, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is obtaining measurements of atmospheric trace constituents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere using fully automated air sampling systems on board several commercial B-747 aircraft in routine airline service. Atmospheric ozone, water vapor, and related flight and meteorological data were obtained during 139 flights of a United Airlines B-747 and a Pan American World Airways B-747 from December 1975 through March 1976. In addition, sample bottles were exposed during three flights and analyzed for trichlorofluoromethane, and filter samples were exposed during five flights and analyzed for sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides. Flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, data tape specifications, and selected analyses are discussed.

  10. Mapping the Milky Way: William Herschel's Star Gages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timberlake, Todd

    2013-01-01

    William Herschel (Fig. 1) is rightfully known as one of the greatest astronomers of all time. Born in Hanover (in modern Germany) in 1738, Herschel immigrated to England in 1757 and began a successful career as a professional musician. Later in life Herschel developed a strong interest in astronomy. He began making his own reflecting telescopes in…

  11. Forecasting method of ice blocks fall by logistic model and melting degree-days calculation: a case study in northern Gaspésie, Québec, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Francis; Hétu, Bernard; Allard, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Ice blocks fall is a serious natural hazard that frequently happens in mountainous cold region. The ice blocks result from the melting and collapse of rockwall icings (ice walls or frozen waterfalls). Environment Canada weather data were analysed for 440 cases of ice blocks fall events reported in northern Gaspésie by the "Ministère des Transports du Québec" (M.T.Q.). The analysis shows that the ice blocks fall are mainly controlled by an increase of the air temperature above 0oC. The melting degree-days (DDmelt) can be used to follow the temperature variations and the heat transfer into the ice bodies. Furthermore, large daily temperature changes, especially drastic drops of temperatures and freeze-thaw cycles, can induce enough mechanical stress to favour the opening of cracks and possibly cause the collapse of unstable ice structures such as freestanding ice formations. By following the evolution of the DDmelt and the best logistic model, it is possible to forecast the collapse of some of the most problematic rockwall icings and target the most hazardous periods along the northern Gaspésie roads.

  12. Gaspé Belt subsurface geometry in the northern Québec Appalachians as revealed by an integrated geophysical and geological study: 2 — Seismic interpretation and potential field modelling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Geological information, seismic reflection profiles and potential field data are used to study the geometry of the Middle Paleozoic Gaspé Belt (eastern Canada) that has been interpreted in various ways in the past. On the western edge of the Gaspé Belt, in the Matapédia area, growth strata are imaged on seismic profiles and testify of normal (or transtensional) motion during the period spanning the Silurian (and possibly Late Ordovician) to earliest Devonian along several faults, including the Shickshock-Sud Fault. In this area, Acadian deformation during the Middle to Late Devonian is associated with relatively modest shortening (less than 20%) accommodated by broad open folds, steeply-dipping neo-formed faults and inversion of previously formed faults. Neo-formed faults cut the entire Middle Paleozoic succession and offset the Ordovician Taconian unconformity suggesting that no sedimentary interval acted as an efficient décollement level. Toward the SE, the Sainte-Florence Fault divides rock assemblages with different paleogeographic settings and structural styles. Increase in tectonic complexity and amount of shortening to the south of the fault is interpreted as resulting of a vise effect between two basement blocks.

  13. Mirror Figuring Techniques of Sir William Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, E. F.

    2004-05-01

    Between the years 1773 to 1818, Sir William Herschel constructed dozens of speculum telescope mirrors, with diameters ranging from 6 - 48 inches. Very little, if any, detailed information has ever been published on the specifics of his mirror figuring efforts. The reason for this certainly relates to his desire to closely guard mirror production trade secrets. Upon Herschel's death, all telescope-making documents were passed on to his only son, Sir John Herschel. These materials are now in the possession of the British RAS and primarily consist of: a) a four volume series entitled "Experiments on the Construction of Specula," b) a 129 page treaty called "On the Construction of Specula," and c) a 179 page manuscript entitled "Results of Experiments on the Construction of Mirrors." It is suggested that publication was further delayed and then eventually abandoned due to silver-coated glass mirrors coming into favor. A recent investigation by the author, of the unpublished manuscripts on the construction of specula, suggests that Herschel's mirror figuring techniques did not involve any guess work; in fact, his methods were highly refined -- never leaving to chance the evolution of a spherical surface into the required paraboloid. At the heart of Herschel's figuring techniques were a series of aperture diaphragms (similar to the Couder masks used by modern telescope makers) that were placed over the mirror, which allowed for the precise determination of its curvature at various predefined zones. With this information, Herschel was able to vary his figuring strokes with his polishing tool accordingly. In addition, all mirrors were subsequently "star tested," sometimes with aperture diaphragms in place, allowing for field examination of the mirror's "distinctness" or performance. Double stars and the planet Saturn were favorite targets used to analyze and then correct a mirror's figure.

  14. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonick, Michael

    2008-11-12

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus—the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  15. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonick, Michael

    2008-11-12

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus - the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  16. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    ScienceCinema

    Lemonick, Michael [Princeton University and Time Magazine, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

    2016-07-12

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus—the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  17. FIR colours and SEDs of nearby galaxies observed with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Buat, V.; Cortese, L.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bock, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Bradford, M.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Chanial, P.; Charlot, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D.; Corbelli, E.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Dariush, A.; Davies, J.; de Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S.; Elbaz, D.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Gear, W.; Giovanardi, C.; Glenn, J.; Gomez, H.; Griffin, M.; Grossi, M.; Hony, S.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L.; Isaak, K.; Jones, A.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Madden, S. C.; O'Halloran, B.; Okumura, K.; Oliver, S.; Page, M.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Parkin, T.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Rangwala, N.; Rigby, E.; Roussel, H.; Rykala, A.; Sabatini, S.; Sacchi, N.; Sauvage, M.; Schulz, B.; Schirm, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Stevens, J.; Sundar, S.; Symeonidis, M.; Trichas, M.; Vaccari, M.; Verstappen, J.; Vigroux, L.; Vlahakis, C.; Wilson, C.; Wozniak, H.; Wright, G.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zeilinger, W.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present infrared colours (in the 25-500 μm spectral range) and UV to radio continuum spectral energy distributions of a sample of 51 nearby galaxies observed with SPIRE on Herschel. The observed sample includes all morphological classes, from quiescent ellipticals to active starbursts. Active galaxies have warmer colour temperatures than normal spirals. In ellipticals hosting a radio galaxy, the far-infrared (FIR) emission is dominated by the synchrotron nuclear emission. The colour temperature of the cold dust is higher in quiescent E-S0a than in star-forming systems probably because of the different nature of their dust heating sources (evolved stellar populations, X-ray, fast electrons) and dust grain properties. In contrast to the colour temperature of the warm dust, the f350/f500 index sensitive to the cold dust decreases with star formation and increases with metallicity, suggesting an overabundance of cold dust or an emissivity parameter β < 2 in low metallicity, active systems. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by Principal Investigator consortia. It is open for proposals for observing time from the worldwide astronomical community.

  18. Tabulations of ambient ozone data obtained by GASP (Global Air Sampling Program) airliners, March 1975 to July 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Tabulations are given of GASP ambient ozone mean, standard deviation, median, 84th percentile, and 98th percentile values, by month, flight level, and geographical region. These data are tabulated to conform to the temporal and spatial resolution required by FAA Advisory Circular 120-38 (monthly by 2000 ft in altitude by 5 deg in latitude) for climatological data used to show compliance with cabin ozone regulations. In addition seasonal x 10 deg latitude tabulations are included which are directly comparable to and supersede the interim GASP ambient ozone tabulations given in appendix B of FAA-EE-80-43 (NASA TM-81528). Selected probability variations are highlighted to illustrate the spatial and temporal variability of ambient ozone and to compare results from the coarse and fine grid analyses.

  19. Herschel Observations of Dusty Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vican, Laura; Schneider, Adam; Bryden, Geoff; Melis, Carl; Zuckerman, B.; Rhee, Joseph; Song, Inseok

    2016-12-01

    We present results from two Herschel observing programs using the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer. During three separate campaigns, we obtained Herschel data for 24 stars at 70, 100, and 160 μm. We chose stars that were already known or suspected to have circumstellar dust based on excess infrared (IR) emission previously measured with the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) or Spitzer and used Herschel to examine long-wavelength properties of the dust. Fifteen stars were found to be uncontaminated by background sources and possess IR emission most likely due to a circumstellar debris disk. We analyzed the properties of these debris disks to better understand the physical mechanisms responsible for dust production and removal. Seven targets were spatially resolved in the Herschel images. Based on fits to their spectral energy distributions, nine disks appear to have two temperature components. Of these nine, in three cases, the warmer dust component is likely the result of a transient process rather than a steady-state collisional cascade. The dust belts at four stars are likely stirred by an unseen planet and merit further investigation.

  20. The first year of routine Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-06-01

    MEETING REPORT The successful completion of the first year of routine science operations of ESA's Herschel Space Observatory was marked by a Specialist Discussion Meeting of the RAS held in January 2011. A few of the early science highlights from the mission were presented. Derek Ward-Thompson and David Clements summarize.

  1. Main results on asteroids and comets returned from the Herschel mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas; Vilenius, Esa

    The Herschel Space Observatory was designed to observe the 'cool universe' in the far-IR wavelength range. During the operational phase between May 2009 and April 2013 the main focus was on the exploration of the formation of galaxies and stars, but also many solar system objects were studied in detail. Several space-mission targets like Bennu (OSIRIS-REx), 1999 JU _{3} (Hayabusa-2), Lutetia (Rosetta), Ceres and Vesta (DAWN) were observed at far-infrared wavelengths with the Herschel instruments. These thermal emission studies provide information which is complementary to the in-situ or flyby data and help to derive physical properties and to understand thermal processes. The results can be applied to many similar objects which are not included in interplanetary mission studies, but easily accessible by remote observations. Trans-Neptunian objects (TNO) and Centaurs have their thermal emission peak at Herschel's far-IR wavelength range and about 130 TNOs have been characterized as part of the Herschel Open Time Key programm "TNOs are Cool!". The newly derived physical and thermal properties show the large diversity in the outer solar system. TNO densities, albedos, or size distributions are important ingredients for testing formation and evolution scenarios. We will present the results of dedicated photometric and spectroscopic studies of prominent near-Earth, main-belt, and trans-Neptunian objects, as well as selected comets. Highlights of the Herschel mission are the finding of water on Ceres, the Earth-like D/H ratio of comet Hartley-2 and the detailed picture of the trans-Neptunian population with implications also for models describing the migration of the giant planets about 4 billion years ago.

  2. Genetic heterogeneity in regional populations of Quebec--parental lineages in the Gaspe Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Claudia; Vézina, Hélène; Yotova, Vania; Hamon, Robert; de Knijff, Peter; Sinnett, Daniel; Labuda, Damian

    2009-08-01

    Stable colonization of the Gaspe Peninsula by Europeans started in the middle of the 18th century at the time of the British conquest of New France. The earliest settlers were Acadians, escaping British deportation policies, followed by Loyalists from the US, who preferred to remain under British rule after the Declaration of Independence. In the 19th century, the developing fishing industry attracted French Canadians from the St. Lawrence Valley and newcomers from Europe including Channel Islanders from Jersey and Guernsey. We analyzed parental lineages of the self-declared descendants of these four groups of settlers by mtDNA D-loop sequencing and Y-chromosome genotyping and compared them with French, British, and Irish samples. Their representation in terms of haplotype frequency classes reveals different signatures of founder effects, such as a loss of rare haplotypes, modification of intermediate frequency haplotypes, reduction in genetic diversity (seen in Acadians), but also enrichment by admixture. Parental lineages correlate with group identity. Descendants of early settlers, Acadians and Loyalists, preserved their identity more than those of French Canadian and Channel Islander "latecomers." Although overall genetic diversity among Gaspesians is comparable with their European source populations, F(ST) analysis indicated their greater differentiation. Distinct settlement history, a limited number of founders and relative genetic isolation contributed to the regionalization of the Quebec gene pool that appears less homogenous than usually anticipated.

  3. The evolution of temperature extremes in the Gaspé Peninsula, Quebec, Canada (1974-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Guillaume; Acquaotta, Fiorella; Fratianni, Simona

    2016-07-01

    The majority of natural hazards that affect Canadian territory are the result of extreme climate and weather conditions. Among these weather hazards, some can be calculated from the application of thresholds for minimum and maximum temperatures at a daily or monthly timescale. These thermal indices allowed the prediction of extreme conditions that may have an impact on the human population by affecting, for example, health, agriculture, and water resources. In this article, we discuss the methods used (RHtestsV4, SPLIDHOM, ClimPACT) then describe the steps followed to calculate the indices, including how we dealt with the problem of missing data and the necessity to identify a common methodology to analyze the time series. We also present possible solutions for ensuring the quality of meteorological data. We then present an overview of the results, namely the main trends and variability of extreme temperature for seven stations located in the Gaspé Peninsula from 1974 to 2013. Our results indicate some break points in time series and positive trends for most indices related to the rise of the temperatures but indicate a negative trend for the indices related to low temperatures for most stations during the study period.

  4. John Herschel on the Discovery of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerstrom, Nicholas

    2006-12-01

    The letters of John Herschel that concern the discovery of the planet Neptune have not been greatly discussed by historians of science. I have transcribed these in the course of archiving the British Neptune-discovery documents. Herschel tends to be depicted as a background figure in narrations of the story of Neptune's discovery, whereas the present account focuses upon his evolving view of the topic: the rival merits of the two main protagonists, and the startling manner in which an obscure branch of mathematics (perturbation theory) was able to pinpoint the position of a new sphere in the sky. As the son of the man who found Uranus, his views have a special relevance. Also, I suggest that his eloquent prose style may still be enjoyed today.

  5. Herschel Observations of Debris Disks from WISE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, D. L.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Liu, W.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.

    2012-01-01

    The \\Vide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has just completed a sensitive all-sky survey in photometric bands at 3.4, 4.6,12 and 22 microns. We report on a study of main sequence Hipparcos and Tycho catalog stars within 120 pc with WISE 22 micron emission in excess of photospheric levels. This warm excess emission traces material in the circumstellar region likely to host terrestrial planets and is preferentially found in young systems with ages < 1 Gyr. Nearly a hundred of the WISE new warm debris disk candidates detected among FGK stars are being observed by Herschel/PACS to characterize circumstellar dust. Preliminary results indicate 70 micron detection rates in excess of 80% for these targets, suggesting that most of these systems have both warm and cool dust in analogy to our asteroid and Kuiper belts. In this contribution, we will discuss the WISE debris disk survey and latest results from Herschel observations of these sources.

  6. IRAC Snapshot Imaging of Red Herschel Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Wardlow, Julie; Ivison, Rob; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Riechers, Dominik; Clements, David; Oliver, Seb; Oteo, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Wide-field submillimeter surveys with Herschel have produced large samples of rare populations, which provide some of the most stringent constraints on galaxy formation theories. In this proposal we request IRAC observations of 'red' Herschel sources, which are the most extreme DSFGs at z>4. The proposed snapshot IRAC 3.6 and 4.5um data will probe the stellar emission from these systems - complementary data to the far-infrared dust emission that led to their identification. We will use these data to extend the SEDs into the near-IR regime and measure more reliable stellar masses than otherwise available. They will be combined with existing survey data and dedicated follow-up programs to map the evolution of DSFGs as a function of redshift, stellar mass and far-IR luminosity.

  7. News Note: Herschel-Darwin commemoration dinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coning, Chris

    2016-08-01

    On the evening of 15 June 1836 Charles Darwin had dinner with John Herschel in Cape Town. The year 2016 makes it 180 years since this event took place. Auke Slotegraaf and Chris de Coning decided that the event should be commemorated. A total of 15 people attended the dinner, which was held on 15 June at a restaurant in the house occupied by the astronomer Fearon Fallows in 1821. It was a very informal evening and there were three speakers.

  8. The peculiar UV extinction of Herschel 36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, J.; Helfer, H. L.; Wolf, J.; Donn, B.; Pipher, J. L.

    The differential extinction curve of Herschel 36 was determined from International Ultraviolet Explorer data. It is quite unusual, characterized by a distinct 2200 A peak with a very low far blue end at 5 to 7 mu to the -1 power. The star appears to be an extreme member of the group Savage drew attention to, previously consisting only of theta Ori, NU Ori, sigma Sco, and rho Oph. It appears that multiple scattering effects are needed to explain the observations.

  9. Herschel Oxygen Project Observations of Molecular Oxygen in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.; Liseau, R.; Bell, T. A.; Lis, D. C.; Chen, J. H.; Snell, R.; Li, D.; Kaufman, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Melnick, G.; HOP Team

    2011-05-01

    Oxygen is the third most abundant element in the cosmos. In the gas phase, oxygen can be ionized, atomic, or in molecular, and it is also incorporated into interstellar grains. Models of the gas-phase chemistry in dense clouds predict molecular oxygen (O2) to be almost as abundant as carbon monoxide (CO). A number of searches for molecular oxygen have been carried out, including ground-based searches for the isotopologue 16O18O and searches for O2 in redshifted galaxies. Searches for Galactic O2 carried out with the SWAS and Odin spacecraft have yielded upper limits on the abundance of molecular oxygen typically 1 to 2 orders of magnitude below those predicted by gas-phase models. There has been a detection of a single transition of O2 in one source, again indicating a low abundance. A variety of explanations have been proposed to explain this low abundance. Some of these are based on depletion of atomic oxygen onto dust grains, resulting in incorporation of this species into water that remains on the grain surface. Available gas-phase oxygen is largely incorporated into CO, leaving little for gas-phase O2. Other models involve circulation of material between UV-irradiated and well-shielded regions, and highly clumpy cloud structure. The Herschel Open Time Key Project HOP (Herschel Oxygen Project) addresses this important problem in astrochemistry, exploiting the high angular resolution and sensitivity of the Herschel HIFI instrument to observe 3 rotational transitions of O2 in a broad sample of molecular clouds. The sensitivity and angular resolution of HIFI are dramatically better than what has previously been available at these frequencies. We will discuss the HOP observations to date, focusing on the detection of O2 towards the H2 Peak 1 position near KL in Orion. This region is heavily impacted by the molecular outflow and resulting shocks which are manifest in the highly-structured emission from pure rotational and rotation-vibration transitions of molecular

  10. A Herschel-PACS view of 16 Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, Rene; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Vilenius, E.; Ortiz, J.; Mueller, T.; Fornasier, S.; Lellouch, E.; Mommert, M.; Pal, A.; Kiss, C.; Mueller, M.; Stansberry, J.; Delsanti, A.; Peixinho, N.

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize a set of Centaurs in terms of their size, albedo, and thermal properties. The Herschel open time key program "TNOs are Cool!'' observed 130 Centaurs and TNOs in 2009-2012. In this particular work we use Herschel/PACS three-band photometry to obtain monochromatic flux densities at 70, 100 and 160 μm. Additionally, we also incorporate Spitzer/MIPS flux densities at 24 and 70 μm when available. We use a consistent method for data reduction and aperture photometry to finally determine sizes and albedos of 16 Centaurs using radiometric techniques. We study the correlations between the size and albedo resulting from our models and other physical (i.e spectral slope) and orbital parameters using a more extended sample (obtained from literature). The final sample comprises 36 objects: 18 Centaurs observed with Herschel/PACS; 10 observed only with Spitzer and 8 SDOs. The first conclusion is that the albedo of the Centaurs is not determined by their orbit. Similarly we do not find any correlation between diameter and orbital parameters. We also find that most of the objects in our sample are dark (pv < 7%) and most of them are small (D < 120km). However, we do not find any correlation between albedo and diameter, in particular for the group of the small objects we can find albedo values homogeneously distributed from 4 - 15%. When it comes to correlation with the color of the objects, we find that the red objects are all small (mean diameter 65 km), while the gray ones are either small or large (mean diameter 120 km). Also, the gray objects seem to be darker, with a mean value of 5.6%, while for the red objects the albedo can vary from 5 to 15%, with a mean value of 8.5%. All of this shows that there are other physical properties (size and albedo distribution) that make differences between the gray and red objects, even if we do not yet have a physical explanation for the origin of this bimodality.

  11. The European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (Euro-GASP)--a sentinel approach in the European Union (EU)/European Economic Area (EEA).

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Gianfranco; Cole, Michelle; Unemo, Magnus; Hoffmann, Steen; Ison, Catherine; van de Laar, Marita

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is monitored in the European Union/European Economic Area through the European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (Euro-GASP) coordinated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Euro-GASP includes a sentinel surveillance programme which aims to detect in a timely manner changes in resistance patterns and inform treatment guidelines. The programme aims to test a representative number of isolates from each European Union/European Economic Area member state per year for a range of therapeutically relevant antimicrobials through a biannual hybrid centralised/decentralised system. Testing is supported by an External Quality Assurance programme and a laboratory training programme. Participation in the programme has increased to 21 countries in 2012. Euro-GASP has been able to detect the rapid spread of isolates with decreased susceptibility to cefixime across Europe in 2010 and 2011. Results from the programme have informed changes in European treatment guidelines for gonorrhoea and led to the development of the 'Response plan to control and manage the threat of multidrug resistant gonorrhoea in Europe'. Future challenges for Euro-GASP include supporting countries to participate in Euro-GASP through decentralised testing, improving timeliness and epidemiological data quality, and increasing participation from Eastern Europe.

  12. The Herschels: A very fashionable scientific family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterburn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    What is special about the Herschel family? It is a family that has attracted the attention of historians of science for many years and has done so for a number of reasons. Some simply marvel at the family's ability to have produced generations upon generation of great men and women of science. Others have highlighted the work of individuals within the family and how their work changed the way astronomy was done, what it was about, and then later did the same for science as a whole. The unusually high status enjoyed by Herschel women, Caroline Herschel in particular, has not escaped notice, though I will here question some of the conclusions drawn about her motivations. Most of all, however I will argue in this paper, they should be interesting to a modern audience for the way in which they managed time and again, generation on generation, to make science fashionable and popular. In this paper I will look at three generations of this family - from William and Caroline discovering comets and planets in the late eighteenth century, through John and his claim that society needs science to be properly civilised, to John and Margaret's children and their varied takes on the relationship between astronomy, science and the public. I will look at the role astronomy played in each of their lives, how they were taught and taught each other and how in each generation they managed to make their work the talk of the town.

  13. Pre-collapse phase studies before Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafalla, M.

    2012-03-01

    The role of molecular clouds as factories of stars has been recognized for decades, but understanding how a large cloud of tens of thousands or more solar masses fragments into stellar-sized pockets with an efficiency of only a few percent and an IMF spectrum is still a puzzling mystery. In this talk, I will review how our observational understanding of the stages prior to star formation has evolved with time, from the earliest molecular studies to the pre-Herschel era. Both the large scale of clouds and the small structure of dense cores will be covered, following the results from molecular-line observation and dust emission/extinction studies. Although Herschel observations are clearly revolutionizing our view of cloud and core formation, parallel work on the kinematics of the cloud gas is also shedding new light on the pre-collapse phases. I will end my presentation showing how large-scale kinematics studies, highly complementary to the Herschel continuum data, reveal a sequence of fragmentation that seems responsible for core formation.

  14. Constraining the properties of transitional discs in Chamaeleon I with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Á.; Bouy, H.; Merín, B.; Duchêne, G.; Rebollido, I.; Espaillat, C.; Pinte, C.

    2016-05-01

    Transitional discs are protoplanetary discs with opacity gaps/cavities in their dust distribution, a feature that may be linked to planet formation. We perform Bayesian modelling of the three transitional discs SZ Cha, CS Cha, and T25 including photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory to quantify the improvements added by these new data. We find disc dust masses between 2 × 10-5 and 4 × 10-4 M⊙ and gap radii in the range of 7-18 au, with uncertainties of ˜ one order of magnitude and ˜4 au, respectively. Our results show that adding Herschel data can significantly improve these estimates with respect to mid-infrared data alone, which have roughly twice as large uncertainties on both disc mass and gap radius. We also find weak evidence for different density profiles with respect to full discs. These results open exciting new possibilities to study the distribution of disc masses for large samples of discs.

  15. Correlation of gravity with the Maquereau Group, southern Gaspe Peninsula, Quebec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, Maurice K.

    1986-06-01

    Gravity observations at 150 locations in the Port-Daniel and Chandler area, southeastern Gaspé, Quebec, delineate an E-W to ENE-WSW trending elliptical positive Bouguer gravity anomaly with an amplitude of 19 mGal and a residual gravity anomaly of circa 22 mGal. This anomaly correlates closely with the Lower Cambrian and/or Hadrynian Maquereau Group, the steep gradients defining it coinciding with the contact between the group and the surrounding Ordovician and Siluro-Devonian sedimentary rocks. On the basis of its similar geological setting, this gravity anomaly may be compared with the positive Bouguer anomalies observed over the Fleur de, Lys zone to the east of the Baie Verte lineament in Newfoundland. Tridimensional modelling of the gravity data is inconsistent with a serpentinite dome as originally proposed and it suggests that the Maquereau Group represents an upthrusted slice of deep-seated volcanosedimentary sequences. These were originally located on the lower segment of the continental slope; they constituted a topographic high during the final process of the mountain building at the Taconic phase (Middle to Upper Ordovician time). The most probable way of emplacement of the Maquereau block is through a tear-fault running E-W to ESE-WNW in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence west of Cape Breton and resulting from Early Paleozoic continental collision between a Eurafrican continent and a North American continent which had a salient located beneath the site of the modern Gulf. The Maquereau may then have been reactivated with a left-lateral motion accompanied of a rotation about a sub-horizontal axis. The presumed Baie Verte-Brompton line ought to be displaced to the north and the Humber zone is narrowed.

  16. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP). Data report for tape VL0001. [data management and data retrieval of information from environmental surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Lezberg, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    Atmospheric trace constituents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are now being measured as part of the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP), using fully automated air sampling systems on board commercial 747 aircraft in routine airline service. Measurements of atmospheric ozone and related meteorological and flight information obtained during several GASP flights in March 1975 are now available from the National Climatic Center, Asheville, North Carolina. In addition to the data from the aircraft, tropopause pressure data obtained from the National Meteorological Center (NMC) archives for the dates of the flights are included. This report is the first of a series of reports which describes the data currently available from GASP, including flight routes and dates, instrumentation, the data processing procedure used, and data tape specifications.

  17. Proteomics analysis of a long-term survival strain of Escherichia coli K-12 exhibiting a growth advantage in stationary-phase (GASP) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Assunta; Lamboglia, Egidio; Bianchi, Laura; Landi, Claudia; Armini, Alessandro; Ciolfi, Silvia; Bini, Luca; Marri, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was the functional and proteomic analysis of a mutant, W3110 Bgl(+) /10, isolated from a batch culture of an Escherichia coli K-12 strain maintained at room temperature without addition of nutrients for 10 years. When the mutant was evaluated in competition experiments in co-culture with the wild-type, it exhibited the growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype. Proteomes of the GASP mutant and its parental strain were compared by using a 2DE coupled with MS approach. Several differentially expressed proteins were detected and many of them were successful identified by mass spectrometry. Identified expression-changing proteins were grouped into three functional categories: metabolism, protein synthesis, chaperone and stress responsive proteins. Among them, the prevalence was ascribable to the "metabolism" group (72%) for the GASP mutant, and to "chaperones and stress responsive proteins" group for the parental strain (48%).

  18. An investigation of the Eigenvalue Calibration Method (ECM) using GASP for non-imaging and imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyne, Gillian; Lara, David; Hallinan, Gregg; Redfern, Michael; Shearer, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Polarised light from astronomical targets can yield a wealth of information about their source radiation mechanisms, and about the geometry of the scattered light regions. Optical observations, of both the linear and circular polarisation components, have been impeded due to non-optimised instrumentation. The need for suitable observing conditions and the availability of luminous targets are also limiting factors. The science motivation of any instrument adds constraints to its operation such as high signal-to-noise (SNR) and detector readout speeds. These factors in particular lead to a wide range of sources that have yet to be observed. The Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP) has been specifically designed to make observations of these sources. GASP uses division of amplitude polarimeter (DOAP) (Compain and Drevillon Appl. Opt. 37, 5938-5944, 1998) to measure the four components of the Stokes vector (I, Q, U and V) simultaneously, which eliminates the constraints placed upon the need for moving parts during observation, and offers a real-time complete measurement of polarisation. Results from the GASP calibration are presented in this work for both a 1D detector system, and a pixel-by-pixel analysis on a 2D detector system. Following Compain et al. (Appl. Opt. 38, 3490-3502 1999) we use the Eigenvalue Calibration Method (ECM) to measure the polarimetric limitations of the instrument for each of the two systems. Consequently, the ECM is able to compensate for systematic errors introduced by the calibration optics, and it also accounts for all optical elements of the polarimeter in the output. Initial laboratory results of the ECM are presented, using APD detectors, where errors of 0.2 % and 0.1° were measured for the degree of linear polarisation (DOLP) and polarisation angle (PA) respectively. Channel-to-channel image registration is an important aspect of 2-D polarimetry. We present our calibration results of the measured Mueller matrix of each sample

  19. GASP: A Performance Analysis Tool Interface for Global AddressSpace Programming Models, Version 1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Leko, Adam; Bonachea, Dan; Su, Hung-Hsun; George, Alan D.; Sherburne, Hans; George, Alan D.

    2006-09-14

    Due to the wide range of compilers and the lack of astandardized performance tool interface, writers of performance toolsface many challenges when incorporating support for global address space(GAS) programming models such as Unified Parallel C (UPC), Titanium, andCo-Array Fortran (CAF). This document presents a Global Address SpacePerformance tool interface (GASP) that is flexible enough to be adaptedinto current global address space compiler and runtime infrastructureswith little effort, while allowing performance analysis tools to gathermuch information about the performance of global address spaceprograms.

  20. Panchromatic spectral energy distributions of Herschel sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

    2013-03-01

    Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S, and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near-infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected restframe ten colors space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multivariate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median SEDs of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the magphys code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-infrared luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z ~ 1 Ly-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eightother popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather than by the choice of

  1. Mapping the Milky Way: William Herschel's Star Gages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberlake, Todd

    2013-01-01

    William Herschel (Fig. 1) is rightfully known as one of the greatest astronomers of all time. Born in Hanover (in modern Germany) in 1738, Herschel immigrated to England in 1757 and began a successful career as a professional musician. Later in life Herschel developed a strong interest in astronomy. He began making his own reflecting telescopes in 1774, and soon his telescopes were recognized as the finest in the world. It was through one of his homemade telescopes, a Newtonian reflector with a focal length of seven feet and an aperture of 6.2 inches, that Herschel first spotted the planet Uranus in 1781. The discovery of a new planet catapulted Herschel to fame and secured him a position as personal astronomer to King George III.

  2. The peculiar extinction of Herschel 36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, B.; Hecht, J. H.; Helfer, H. L.; Wolf, J.; Pipher, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The extinction of Herschel 36 was measured and found to be peculiar in the same sense as that observed in Orion. Following the treatment of Mathis and Wallenhorst, this can be explained by the presence of large silicate and graphite grains than are normally found in the interstellar medium. Correcting the stellar flux for foreground extinction results in a residual extinction curve for the associated dust cloud, with an unusually small normalized extinction (less than 1.0) at 1500 A. This low UV extinction may be due to the effects of scattering by the dust cloud material.

  3. Growth advantage in stationary-phase (GASP) phenotype in long-term survival strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Helmus, Ruth A; Liermann, Laura J; Brantley, Susan L; Tien, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens exists in the subsurface and has been identified in sites contaminated with radioactive metals, consistent with its ability to reduce metals under anaerobic conditions. The natural state of organisms in the environment is one that lacks access to high concentrations of nutrients, namely electron donors and terminal electron acceptors (TEAs). Most studies have investigated G. sulfurreducens under high-nutrient conditions or have enriched for it in environmental systems via acetate amendments. We replicated the starvation state through long-term batch culture of G. sulfurreducens, where both electron donor and TEA were scarce. The growth curve revealed lag, log, stationary, death, and survival phases using acetate as electron donor and either fumarate or iron(III) citrate as TEA. In survival phase, G. sulfurreducens persisted at a constant cell count for as long as 23 months without replenishment of growth medium. Geobacter sulfurreducens demonstrated an ability to acquire a growth advantage in stationary-phase phenotype (GASP), with strains derived from subpopulations from death- or survival phase being able to out-compete mid-log-phase populations when co-cultured. The molecular basis for GASP was not because of any detectable mutation in the rpoS gene (GSU1525) nor because of a mutation in a putative homolog to Escherichia coli lrp, GSU3370.

  4. GASP cloud- and particle-encounter statistics and their application to LFC aircraft studies. Volume 2: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Nastron, G. D.; Davis, R. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Summary studies are presented for the entire cloud observation archive from the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP). Studies are also presented for GASP particle-concentration data gathered concurrently with the cloud observations. Cloud encounters are shown on about 15 percent of the data samples overall, but the probability of cloud encounter is shown to vary significantly with altitude, latitude, and distance from the tropopause. Several meteorological circulation features are apparent in the latitudinal distribution of cloud cover, and the cloud-encounter statistics are shown to be consistent with the classical mid-latitude cyclone model. Observations of clouds spaced more closely than 90 minutes are shown to be statistically dependent. The statistics for cloud and particle encounter are utilized to estimate the frequency of cloud encounter on long-range airline routes, and to assess the probability and extent of laminaar flow loss due to cloud or particle encounter by aircraft utilizing laminar flow control (LFC). It is shown that the probability of extended cloud encounter is too low, of itself, to make LFC impractical. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the narrative, analysis, and conclusions. Volume II contains five supporting appendixes.

  5. GASP cloud- and particle-encounter statistics and their application to LPC aircraft studies. Volume 1: Analysis and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Nastrom, G. D.; Davis, R. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Summary studies are presented for the entire cloud observation archieve from the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP). Studies are also presented for GASP particle concentration data gathered concurrently with the cloud observations. Cloud encounters are shown on about 15 percent of the data samples overall, but the probability of cloud encounter is shown to vary significantly with altitude, latitude, and distance from the tropopause. Several meteorological circulation features are apparent in the latitudinal distribution of cloud cover, and the cloud encounter statistics are shown to be consistent with the classical mid-latitude cyclone model. Observations of clouds spaced more closely than 90 minutes are shown to be statistically dependent. The statistics for cloud and particle encounter are utilized to estimate the frequency of cloud encounter on long range airline routes, and to assess the probability and extent of laminar flow loss due to cloud or particle encounter by aircraft utilizing laminar flow control (LFC). It is shown that the probability of extended cloud encounter is too low, of itself, to make LFC impractical.

  6. The far-infrared behaviour of Herbig Ae/Be discs: Herschel PACS photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, N.; Montesinos, B.; Meeus, G.; Marshall, J. P.; Mendigutía, I.; Sandell, G.

    2016-02-01

    Herbig Ae/Be objects are pre-main sequence stars surrounded by gas- and dust-rich circumstellar discs. These objects are in the throes of star and planet formation, and their characterisation informs us of the processes and outcomes of planet formation processes around intermediate mass stars. Here we analyse the spectral energy distributions of disc host stars observed by the Herschel open time key programme "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems". We present Herschel/PACS far-infrared imaging observations of 22 Herbig Ae/Bes and 5 debris discs, combined with ancillary photometry spanning ultraviolet to sub-millimetre wavelengths. From these measurements we determine the diagnostics of disc evolution, along with the total excess, in three regimes spanning near-, mid-, and far-infrared wavelengths. Using appropriate statistical tests, these diagnostics are examined for correlations. We find that the far-infrared flux, where the disc becomes optically thin, is correlated with the millimetre flux, which provides a measure of the total dust mass. The ratio of far-infrared to sub-millimetre flux is found to be greater for targets with discs that are brighter at millimetre wavelengths and that have steeper sub-millimetre slopes. Furthermore, discs with flared geometry have, on average, larger excesses than flat geometry discs. Finally, we estimate the extents of these discs (or provide upper limits) from the observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  7. HERSCHEL PACS OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF DEBRIS DISKS IN THE TUCANA-HOROLOGIUM ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, J. K.; Roberge, A.; Chen, C. H.; Augereau, J.-C.; Menard, F.; Eiroa, C.; Meeus, G.; Krivov, A. V.; Mathews, G. S.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Sandell, G.

    2012-07-10

    We present Herschel PACS photometry of 17 B- to M-type stars in the 30 Myr old Tucana-Horologium Association. This work is part of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme 'Gas in Protoplanetary Systems'. 6 of the 17 targets were found to have infrared excesses significantly greater than the expected stellar IR fluxes, including a previously unknown disk around HD30051. These six debris disks were fitted with single-temperature blackbody models to estimate the temperatures and abundances of the dust in the systems. For the five stars that show excess emission in the Herschel PACS photometry and also have Spitzer IRS spectra, we fit the data with models of optically thin debris disks with realistic grain properties in order to better estimate the disk parameters. The model is determined by a set of six parameters: surface density index, grain size distribution index, minimum and maximum grain sizes, and the inner and outer radii of the disk. The best-fitting parameters give us constraints on the geometry of the dust in these systems, as well as lower limits to the total dust masses. The HD105 disk was further constrained by fitting marginally resolved PACS 70 {mu}m imaging.

  8. Debris On Herschel: An Overview Of The Search For Kuiper Belts Around The Nearest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butner, Harold M.; Matthews, B.; DEBRIS Survey Team

    2010-01-01

    Building on the recent success of Spitzer in detecting debris disks around the nearest stars and the SCUBA instrument at the JCMT in imaging cold disks, DEBRIS (Disk Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) is an open time key project on Herschel which aims to conduct an unbiased statistical survey for debris disks around the nearest stars to unprecedented mass limits. The survey is driven by 100 and 160 micron observations and is flux-limited. The sample is drawn from a database of nearby stars of spectral types A0 through M7 and totals 446 primaries, 348 of which will be observed by the DEBRIS team and 98 of which are covered by another project, the DUNES (DUst disks around NEarby Stars) team. Each target will be observed to a 100 micron rms of 1.2 mJy, allowing the detection of disks with dust masses comparable that of our own Kuiper belt towar the nearest stars. The superior resolution of Herschel should provide resolved images of many of the closest disks, and even our most distant disks may be resolvable. We will discuss the current state of debris disk research and highlight the areas in which Herschel will make the biggest impacts: establishing the true incidence of debris disks; characterizing the debris disk population, resolving disks and modeling their structure for evidence of long period planets; and the placing of our own Solar System in context

  9. Herschel discovery of a new class of cold, faint debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Krivov, A. V.; Montesinos, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Arévalo, M.; Augereau, J.-Ch.; Bayo, A.; Danchi, W.; Del Burgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, M.; González-García, B. M.; Heras, A. M.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Maldonado, J.; Meeus, G.; Montes, D.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Thébault, P.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2011-12-01

    We present Herschel PACS 100 and 160 μm observations of the solar-type stars α Men, HD 88230 and HD 210277, which form part of the FGK stars sample of the Herschel open time key programme (OTKP) DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars). Our observations show small infrared excesses at 160 μm for all three stars. HD 210277 also shows a small excess at 100 μm, while the 100 μm fluxes of α Men and HD 88230 agree with the stellar photospheric predictions. We attribute these infrared excesses to a new class of cold, faint debris discs. Both α Men and HD 88230 are spatially resolved in the PACS 160 μm images, while HD 210277 is point-like at that wavelength. The projected linear sizes of the extended emission lie in the range from ~115 to ≤ 250 AU. The estimated black body temperatures from the 100 and 160 μm fluxes are ≲22 K, and the fractional luminosity of the cold dust is Ldust/L ⋆ ~ 10-6, close to the luminosity of the solar-system's Kuiper belt. These debris discs are the coldest and faintest discs discovered so far around mature stars, so they cannot be explained easily invoking "classical" debris disc models. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  10. The DEBRIS Project: Searching for Kuiper Belts around the Nearest Stars with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Brenda

    Building on the recent success of Spitzer in detecting debris disks around the nearest stars and the SCUBA instrument at the JCMT in imaging cold disks, DEBRIS (Disk Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) is an open time key project on Herschel which aims to conduct an unbiased statistical survey for debris disks around the nearest stars to unprecedented mass limits. The survey is driven by 100 and 160 micron observations and is flux-limited. The sample is drawn from a database of nearby stars (Phillips et al. in prep) of spectral types A0 through M7 and totals 446 primaries, 348 of which will be observed by the DEBRIS team and 98 of which are covered by another the DUNES (DUst disks around NEarby Stars) team. Each target will be observed to a 100 micron rms of 1.2 mJy, allowing the detection of disks with dust masses comparable that of our own Kuiper belt towar the nearest stars. The superior resolution of Herschel should provide resolved images of many of the closest disks, and even our most distant disks may be resolvable. I will discuss the current state of debris disk research and highlight the areas in which Herschel will make the biggest impacts: establishing the true incidence of debris disks; characterizing the debris disk population, resolving disks and modeling their structure for evidence of long period planets; and the placing of our own Solar System in context.

  11. Transient effects in Herschel/PACS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Jacobson, Jeffery D.; Appleton, Philip N.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The Ge:Ga detectors used in the PACS spectrograph onboard the Herschel space telescope react to changes of the incident flux with a certain delay. This generates transient effects on the resulting signal which can be important and last for up to an hour. Aims: The paper presents a study of the effects of transients on the detected signal and proposes methods to mitigate them especially in the case of the unchopped mode. Methods: Since transients can arise from a variety of causes, we classified them in three main categories: transients caused by sudden variations of the continuum due to the observational mode used; transients caused by cosmic ray impacts on the detectors; transients caused by a continuous smooth variation of the continuum during a wavelength scan. We propose a method to disentangle these effects and treat them separately. In particular, we show that a linear combination of three exponential functions is needed to fit the response variation of the detectors during a transient. An algorithm to detect, fit, and correct transient effects is presented. Results: The solution proposed to correct the signal for the effects of transients substantially improves the quality of the final reduction with respect to the standard methods used for archival reduction in the cases where transient effects are most pronounced. Conclusions: The programs developed to implement the corrections are offered through two new interactive data reduction pipelines in the latest releases of the Herschel Interactive Processing Environment.

  12. William Herschel and the 'garnet' stars: μ Cephei and more

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinicke, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    Although William Herschel's 'Garnet Star' (μ Cephei) is a prominent object, the story of the discovery of this famous red star is not well documented. Prior to and after Herschel, the identification of this star was the subject of confusion in various catalogues and atlases. The case is complex and involves other stars in southern Cepheus, including double stars, found by Herschel in the course of his star surveys. It is also fascinating to learn that μ Cephei is not the only star called 'garnet' by him. This study reveals that there are 21 in all, resulting in a 'Herschel Catalogue of Garnet Stars' - the first historical catalogue of red stars. Among them are prominent objects, which in the literature are credited to later observers. This misconception is corrected here, for Herschel was the true discoverer of all of them. The most interesting cases are Hind's 'Crimson Star', Secchi's 'La Superba', John Herschel's 'Ruby Star' and Schmidt's V Aquilae. Finally, we discussed whether Herschel speculated about the physical nature of his garnet stars, many of which are now known to be variable.

  13. Mapping dust in Orion protostars: from Herschel to APEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanke, Thomas; Stutz, Amelia; Megeath, Thomas; HOPS Team

    2013-07-01

    HOPS (Herschel Orion Protostar Survey) is a 70 and 160mum Herschel PACS survey towards a sample of Spitzer identified protostar candidates in the Orion A and B giant molecular clouds. In this poster we give an overview of our efforts to obtain longer wavelength dust continuum maps, using the Laboca and Saboca cameras (870 and 350mum, respectively) at the APEX telescope, which provide maps at spatial resolutions well matched to the Herschel PACS data. The Laboca maps cover the entire field surveyed also by Herschel, providing a dust continuum measurement for all protostars observed by Herschel. The Saboca maps are restricted to smaller maps, mainly targeting PACS-bright protostar candidates, new protostar candidates not seen previously by Spitzer and identified from the Herschel maps, and also all bright cores found in the Laboca maps which do not have a protostellar association (i.e., starless cores). The data are used to provide long-wavelength submm photometry constraining the protostellar envelope masses. The 350mum Saboca data spatially resolve the emission from the outer envelope and are used to constrain their radial density distribution. Furthermore, combined with the Herschel data, we derive column density and temperature maps of the dense gas surrounding the protostars.

  14. Could the survival and outcome benefit of adrenaline also be dependent upon the presence of gasping upon arrival of emergency rescuers?

    PubMed

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2014-09-01

    A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of adrenaline use during resuscitation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found no benefit of adrenaline in survival to discharge or neurological outcomes. It did, however, find an advantage of standard dose adrenaline (SDA) over placebo and high dose adrenaline over SDA in overall survival to admission and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), which was also consistent with previous reviews. As a result, the question that remains is "Why is there no difference in the rate of survival to discharge when there are increased rates of ROSC and survival to admission in patients who receive adrenaline?" It was suggested that the lack of efficacy and effectiveness of adrenaline may be confounded by the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during cardiac arrest, which has been demonstrated in animal models. CPR quality was not measured or reported in the included randomized controlled trials. However, the survival and outcome benefit of adrenaline may also depend upon the presence of witnessed gasping and/or gasping upon arrival of emergency rescuers, which is a critical factor not accounted for in the analyses of the cited animal studies that allowed gasping but showed the survival and neurological outcome benefits of adrenaline use. Moreover, without the aid of gasping, very few rescuers can provide high-quality CPR. Also, age and the absence of gasping observed by bystanders and/or upon arrival of emergency- rescuers may be important factors in the determination of whether vasopressin instead of adrenaline should be used first.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Draco nebula Herschel 250um map (Miville-Deschenes+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miville-Deschenes, M.-A.; Salome, Q.; Martin, P. G.; Joncas, G.; Blagrave, K.; Dassas, K.; Abergel, A.; Beelen, A.; Boulanger, F.; Lagache, G.; Lockman, F. J.; Marshall, D. J.

    2017-03-01

    Draco was observed with Herschel PACS (110 and 170um) and SPIRE (250, 350 and 500um) as part of the open-time program "First steps toward star formation: unveiling the atomic to molecular transition in the diffuse interstellar medium" (P.I. M-A Miville-Deschenes). A field of 3.85x3.85 was observed in parallel mode. Unfortunately, an error occurred during the acquisition of the PACS data making them unusable. Therefore, the results presented here are solely based on SPIRE data, especially the 250um map that has the highest angular resolution. (2 data files).

  16. Herschel DUNES Observations of Cold Debris Disks Around Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, Aki; Eiroa, C.; DUNES Team

    2011-01-01

    The DUNES (DUst discs around NEarby Stars) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory is a sensitivity-limited photometric survey for faint, cold debris disks around nearby FGK stars. It takes advantage of the PACS and SPIRE instruments to detect and characterize cold disks as faint as Ldust/Lstar 10-7 - 10-6, at dust temperatures around 30 - 40 K. Such systems are extrasolar analogues of Solar System's Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB). DUNES will observe a statistically significant, volume-limited (d < 20 pc) sample, constrained only by background confusion. Stars at larger distances (d < 25 pc) with previously known exoplanets and/or Spitzer-detected faint debris disks are also included. More than one third of the DUNES sample has been observed to date. Our goal of detecting very faint, cold dust disks has been achieved; many disks are also spatially resolved. The unresolved disks show a variety of spectral energy distributions, some suggesting the presence of cold EKB-like dust rings. A number of previously unknown debris disks have been detected, including the coldest disks yet found. Preliminary results relating disk properties to the host star parameters will be shown.

  17. CAROLINE HERSCHEL: AGENCY AND SELF-PRESENTATION.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Emily

    2015-03-20

    Caroline Herschel was rare among her female contemporaries in gaining public recognition for her work in science, yet her role in this process and her role in designing her training have never previously been studied. We know that access to education and participation in science was different for men and women in the eighteenth century. However, drawing on feminist, pedagogical and biographical approaches to history, I argue that although access depended on a variety of factors, a more consistent gender divide came in lessons on how to learn, and in what was regarded as appropriate behaviour. Caroline's skill--so often misunderstood--was to be aware of the differences and to use them to her own advantage.

  18. Caroline Herschel: agency and self-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Winterburn, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Caroline Herschel was rare among her female contemporaries in gaining public recognition for her work in science, yet her role in this process and her role in designing her training have never previously been studied. We know that access to education and participation in science was different for men and women in the eighteenth century. However, drawing on feminist, pedagogical and biographical approaches to history, I argue that although access depended on a variety of factors, a more consistent gender divide came in lessons on how to learn, and in what was regarded as appropriate behaviour. Caroline's skill—so often misunderstood—was to be aware of the differences and to use them to her own advantage. PMID:26489184

  19. Herschel Views on Stellar and Circumstellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelkens, Christoffel

    2010-05-01

    We review the first results of Herschel on stellar and circumstellar evolution. - For main-sequence stars, PACS and SPIRE measurements of the debris disks surrounding Vega and Beta Pictoris are presented, revealing the disks with unprecedented spatial resolution at the peaks of their spectral energy distribution. - Through imaging and spectroscopic studies, the mass loss mechanisms and histories during the final stages of stellar evolution are investigated. Imaging of the circumstellar environments of AGB stars enables a detailed discussion of the discontinuous nature of the mass loss processes which induce the final evolution. With their moderately high spectral resolution, PACS and SPIRE reveal spectacularly rich molecular diagnostics on the dynamics of and the chemistry in the environments of objects such as CW Leo and VY CMa.

  20. Herschel Measurements of Molecular Oxygen in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Liseau, René; Bell, Tom A.; Black, John H.; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael J.; Li, Di; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; Snell, Ronald; Benz, Arnold O.; Bergin, Edwin; Bruderer, Simon; Caselli, Paola; Caux, Emmanuel; Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Hjalmarson, Åke; Larsson, Bengt; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; De Luca, Massimo; Nagy, Zsofia; Roueff, Evelyne; Sandqvist, Aage; van der Tak, Floris; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Vastel, Charlotte; Viti, Serena; Yıldız, Umut

    2011-08-01

    We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5 × 1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam-filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19''), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is (0.3-7.3) × 10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~5'' diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~10 M sun and the dust temperature is >=150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T >= 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature >=180 K. The inferred O2 column density sime5 × 1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) ~= 4 × 1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10-15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Studying evolved stars with Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Santos, João Manuel

    2016-07-01

    A systematic inspection of the far-infrared (FIR) properties of evolved stars allows not only to constrain physical models, but also to understand the chemical evolution that takes place in the end of their lives. In this work we intend to study the circumstellar envelopes (CSE) on a sample of stars in the THROES catalogue from AGB/post-AGB stars to planetary nebulae using photometry and spectroscopy provided by the PACS instrument on-board Herschel telescope. In the first part we are interested in obtaining an estimate of the size of FIR emitting region and to sort our targets in two classes: point-like and extended. Secondly, we focus on the molecular component of the envelope traced by carbon monoxide (CO) rotational lines. We conduct a line survey on a sample of evolved stars by identifying and measuring flux of both 12CO and 13CO isotopologues in the PACS range, while looking at the overall properties of the sample. Lastly, we will be interested in obtaining physical parameters of the CSE, namely gas temperature, mass and mass-loss rate on a sample of carbon stars. For that, we make use of PACS large wavelength coverage, which enables the simultaneous study of a large number of CO transitions, to perform the rotational diagram analysis. We report the detection of CO emission in a high number of stars from the catalogue, which were mostly classified as point-like targets with a few exceptions of planetary nebulae. High J rotational number transitions were detected in a number of targets, revealing the presence of a significant amount of hot gas (T ˜ 400-900 K) and high mass-loss rates. We conclude that Herschel/PACS is in a privileged position to detect a new population of warmer gas, typically missed in sub-mm/mm observations.

  2. Sir William Herschel's notebooks - Abstracts of solar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1992-01-01

    An introduction to the background of Sir William Herschel's notebooks and the historical context within which his observations were made are provided. The observations have relevance in reconstructing solar behavior, as discussed in a separate analysis paper by Hoyt and Schatten (1992), and in understanding active features on the sun such as faculae. The text of Herschel's notebooks with modern terms used throughout forms the body of this paper. The complete text has not previously been published and is not easily accessible to scholars. Herschel used different words for solar features than are used today, and thus, for clarity, his terminology is changed on two occasions. A glossary explains the terminology changed. In the text of the notebooks, several contemporaries are mentioned; a brief description of Herschel's colleagues is provided.

  3. John Herschel, Charles Lyell, and the planet Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    John Herschel and Charles Lyell are not usually seen as scientists who had much in common. One was an astronomer, the other a geologist. They shared, however, an active interest in the age of the Earth and in the history of the physical processes that produced the planet before us. Herschel brought to this discussion a well-polished mastery of celestial mechanics and the chemistry and optics of crystals, and Lyell brought with him a familiarity with fossils, strata, and rock types. This talk focuses on Herschel and Lyell's discussions about the Earth through time and space, and about what qualified (to them) as acceptable geo-theory. Along the way, more attention is paid to Herschel's interests in terrestrial topics, since this is less well known.

  4. The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS): HST Frontier Field Coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Eiichi

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS; PI: Egami) is a large Far-IR/Submm imaging survey of massive galaxy clusters using the Herschel Space Observatory. Its main goal is to detect and study IR/Submm galaxies that are below the nominal confusion limit of Herschel by taking advantage of the strong gravitational lensing power of massive galaxy clusters. HLS has obtained deep PACS (100/160 um) and SPIRE (250/350/500 um) images for 54 cluster fields (HLS-deep) as well as shallower but nearly confusion-limited SPIRE-only images for 527 cluster fields (HLS-snapshot) with a total observing time of ~420 hours. Extensive multi-wavelength follow-up studies are currently on-going with a variety of observing facilities including ALMA.Here, I will focus on the analysis of the deep Herschel PACS/SPIRE images obtained for the 6 HST Frontier Fields (5 observed by HLS-deep; 1 observed by the Herschel GT programs). The Herschel/SPIRE maps are wide enough to cover the Frontier-Field parallel pointings, and we have detected a total of ~180 sources, some of which are strongly lensed. I will present the sample and discuss the properties of these Herschel-detected dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) identified in the Frontier Fields. Although the majority of these Herschel sources are at moderate redshift (z<3), a small number of extremely high-redshift (z>6) candidates can be identified as "Herschel dropouts" when combined with longer-wavelength data. We have also identified ~40 sources as likely cluster members, which will allow us to study the properties of DSFGs in the dense cluster environment.A great legacy of our HLS project will be the extensive multi-wavelength database that incorporates most of the currently available data/information for the fields of the Frontier-Field, CLASH, and other HLS clusters (e.g., HST/Spitzer/Herschel images, spectroscopic/photometric redshifts, lensing models, best-fit SED models etc.). Provided with a user-friendly GUI and a flexible search engine, this

  5. A Herschel study of NGC 650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoof, P. A. M.; Van de Steene, G. C.; Exter, K. M.; Barlow, M. J.; Ueta, T.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Gear, W. K.; Gomez, H. L.; Hargrave, P. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Leeks, S. J.; Lim, T. L.; Olofsson, G.; Polehampton, E. T.; Swinyard, B. M.; Van Winckel, H.; Waelkens, C.; Wesson, R.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the Herschel guaranteed time key project Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) we have imaged a sample of planetary nebulae. In this paper we present the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) images of the classical bipolar planetary nebula NGC 650. We used these images to derive a temperature map of the dust. We also constructed a photoionization and dust radiative transfer model using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. To constrain this model, we used the PACS and SPIRE fluxes and combined them with hitherto unpublished International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) spectra as well as various other data from the literature. A temperature map combined with a photoionization model were used to study various aspects of the central star, the nebula, and in particular the dust grains in the nebula. The central star parameters are determined to be Teff = 208 kK and L = 261 L⊙ assuming a distance of 1200 pc. The stellar temperature is much higher than previously published values. We confirm that the nebula is carbon-rich with a C/O ratio of 2.1. The nebular abundances are typical for a type IIa planetary nebula. With the photoionization model we determined that the grains in the ionized nebula are large (assuming single-sized grains, they would have a radius of 0.15 μm). Most likely these large grains were inherited from the asymptotic giant branch phase. The PACS 70/160 μm temperature map shows evidence of two radiation components heating the grains. The first component is direct emission from the central star, while the second component is diffuse emission from the ionized gas (mainly Lyα). We show that previous suggestions of a photo-dissociation region surrounding the ionized region are incorrect. The neutral material resides in dense clumps inside the ionized region. These may also harbor stochastically heated very small grains in addition to the large

  6. NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) data report for tape VL0015, VL0016, VL0017, VL0018, VL0019, and VL0020

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papthakos, L. C.; Briehl, D.

    1981-01-01

    This is the twelfth of a series of reports which describes the data currently available from GASP, including flight routes and dates, instrumentation, data processing procedures, and data tape specifications. In-situ measurements of atmospheric ozone, cabin ozone, carbon monoxide, water vapor, particles, clouds, condensation nuclei, filter samples and related meteorological and flight information obtained during 1732 flights of aircraft N533PA, N4711U, N655PA, and VH-EBE from January 5, 1978 through October 9, 1978 are reported. These data are now available from the National Climatic Center, Asheville, NC, 22801. In addition to the GASP data, tropopause pressures obtained from time ans space interpolation of National Meteorological Center archived data for the dates of the flights are included.

  7. Bars as seen by Herschel and Sloan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Guido; Dotti, Massimo; Boselli, Alessandro; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Gargiulo, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    We present an observational study of the effect of bars on the gas component and on the star formation properties of their host galaxies in a statistically significant sample of resolved objects, the Herschel Reference Sample. The analysis of optical and far-infrared images allows us to identify a clear spatial correlation between stellar bars and the cold-gas distribution mapped by the warm dust emission. We find that the infrared counterparts of optically identified bars are either bar-like structures or dead central regions in which star formation is strongly suppressed. Similar morphologies are found in the distribution of star formation directly traced by Hα maps. The sizes of such optical and infrared structures correlate remarkably well, hinting at a causal connection. In the light of previous observations and of theoretical investigations in the literature, we interpret our findings as further evidence of the scenario in which bars drive strong inflows toward their host nuclei: young bars are still in the process of perturbing the gas and star formation clearly delineates the shape of the bars; old bars on the contrary already removed any gas within their extents, carving a dead region of negligible star formation.

  8. Downregulation of 5-HT7 Serotonin Receptors by the Atypical Antipsychotics Clozapine and Olanzapine. Role of Motifs in the C-Terminal Domain and Interaction with GASP-1.

    PubMed

    Manfra, Ornella; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Skieterska, Kamila; Frimurer, Thomas; Schwartz, Thue W; Levy, Finn Olav; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel

    2015-07-15

    The human 5-HT7 serotonin receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), activates adenylyl cyclase constitutively and upon agonist activation. Biased ligands differentially activate 5-HT7 serotonin receptor desensitization, internalization and degradation in addition to G protein activation. We have previously found that the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine inhibited G protein activation and, surprisingly, induced both internalization and lysosomal degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. Here, we aimed to determine the mechanism of clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. In the C-terminus of the 5-HT7 receptor, we identified two YXXΦ motifs, LR residues, and a palmitoylated cysteine anchor as potential sites involved in receptor trafficking to lysosomes followed by receptor degradation. Mutating either of these sites inhibited clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5-HT7 receptors and also interfered with G protein activation. In addition, we tested whether receptor degradation was mediated by the GPCR-associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1). We show that GASP-1 binds the 5-HT7 receptor and regulates the clozapine-mediated degradation. Mutations of the identified motifs and residues, located in or close to Helix-VIII of the 5-HT7 receptor, modified antipsychotic-stimulated binding of proteins (such as GASP-1), possibly by altering the flexibility of Helix-VIII, and also interfered with G protein activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that binding of clozapine or olanzapine to the 5-HT7 receptor leads to antagonist-mediated lysosomal degradation by exposing key residues in the C-terminal tail that interact with GASP-1.

  9. A peculiar class of debris disks from Herschel/DUNES. A steep fall off in the far infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, S.; Wolf, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.; Augereau, J.-C.; Krivov, A. V.; Löhne, T.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Arévalo, M.; Bayo, A.; Bryden, G.; del Burgo, C.; Greaves, J.; Kennedy, G.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Maldonado, J.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.; White, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The existence of debris disks around old main sequence stars is usually explained by continuous replenishment of small dust grains through collisions from a reservoir of larger objects. Aims: We present photometric data of debris disks around HIP 103389 (HD 199260), HIP 107350 (HN Peg, HD 206860), and HIP 114948 (HD 219482), obtained in the context of our Herschel open time key program DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars). Methods: We used Herschel/PACS to detect the thermal emission of the three debris disks with a 3σ sensitivity of a few mJy at 100 μm and 160 μm. In addition, we obtained Herschel/PACS photometric data at 70 μm for HIP 103389. These observations are complemented by a large variety of optical to far-infrared photometric data. Two different approaches are applied to reduce the Herschel data to investigate the impact of data reduction on the photometry. We fit analytical models to the available spectral energy distribution (SED) data using the fitting method of simulated thermal annealing as well as a classical grid search method. Results: The SEDs of the three disks potentially exhibit an unusually steep decrease at wavelengths ≥70 μm. We investigate the significance of the peculiar shape of these SEDs and the impact on models of the disks provided it is real. Using grain compositions that have been applied successfully for modeling of many other debris disks, our modeling reveals that such a steep decrease of the SEDs in the long wavelength regime is inconsistent with a power-law exponent of the grain size distribution -3.5 expected from a standard equilibrium collisional cascade. In contrast, a steep grain size distribution or, alternatively an upper grain size in the range of few tens of micrometers are implied. This suggests that a very distinct range of grain sizes would dominate the thermal emission of such disks. However, we demonstrate that the understanding of the data of faint sources obtained with Herschel is still incomplete

  10. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. I. Luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bomans, D. J.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Dariush, A.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) and the first data obtained as part of the science demonstration phase (SDP). The data cover a central 4×4 sq deg region of the cluster. We use SPIRE and PACS photometry data to produce 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm luminosity functions (LFs) for optically bright galaxies that are selected at 500 μm and detected in all bands. We compare these LFs with those previously derived using IRAS, BLAST and Herschel-ATLAS data. The Virgo cluster LFs do not have the large numbers of faint galaxies or examples of very luminous galaxies seen previously in surveys covering less dense environments. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. Infrared study of transitional disks in Ophiuchus with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollido, Isabel; Merín, Bruno; Ribas, Álvaro; Bustamante, Ignacio; Bouy, Hervé; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Prusti, Timo; Pilbratt, Göran L.; André, Philippe; Ábrahám, Péter

    2015-09-01

    Context. Observations of nearby star-forming regions with the Herschel Space Observatory complement our view of the protoplanetary disks in Ophiuchus with information about the outer disks. Aims: The main goal of this project is to provide new far-infrared fluxes for the known disks in the core region of Ophiuchus and to identify potential transitional disks using data from Herschel. Methods: We obtained PACS and SPIRE photometry of previously spectroscopically confirmed young stellar objects (YSO) in the region and analysed their spectral energy distributions. Results: From an initial sample of 261 objects with spectral types in Ophiuchus, we detect 49 disks in at least one Herschel band. We provide new far-infrared fluxes for these objects. One of them is clearly a new transitional disk candidate. Conclusions: The data from Herschel Space Observatory provides fluxes that complement previous infrared data and that we use to identify a new transitional disk candidate. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Final reduced Herschel maps are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/581/A30Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgAll tables are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/581/A30

  12. Enhancing the Legacy of Spitzer and Herschel with the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen

    The next frontier for comprehensive galaxy surveys is the epoch at z~1.5-3.5, the peak of star formation and black hole activity. Despite the new windows that Spitzer and Herschel have opened up into the stellar and dust emission of distant galaxies and AGN during this key epoch, these studies have been limited by the lack of spectroscopic redshifts and the unknown physical conditions (e.g., metallicities, ionization) within the targeted galaxies. To realize the full potential of Spitzer and Herschel, we require a large spectroscopic survey that will: (a) efficiently assemble spectroscopic redshifts for large samples of galaxies at z=1.4-3.8; (b) yield the physical conditions, including the ionization and metallicities of these galaxies; and (c) easily obtain spectroscopic redshifts even for very dusty/confused galaxies. To this end, our team has been allocated a large program of 47 Keck nights with the multi-object near-IR spectrograph MOSFIRE to carry out the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field Survey (MOSDEF) in three of the Hubble CANDELS fields. MOSDEF will obtain rest-optical spectra of ~1500 galaxies at redshifts z=1.4-3.8, targeting many of the optical nebular emission lines and continuum features (e.g., [OII], [OIII], H-beta, H-alpha, [NII], [SII], 4000 Angstrom break, Ca H and K, and Mbg) that until now have been inaccessible for large samples of distant galaxies, but which are routinely used to measure the SFRs, dust attenuation, metal and gas content, and ionization and dynamical properties in nearby galaxies. MOSDEF spectroscopy provides a critical supporting role for the analysis of Spitzer and Herschel observations of distant galaxies. With this transformative dataset, we will perform the following analyses. First, we will use Spitzer and Herschel imaging, aided with spectroscopic redshifts from MOSDEF, to construct individual and mean dust SEDs for galaxies at redshifts 1.4

  13. An incidence of skeletal fluorosis associated with groundwaters of the maritime carboniferous basin, Gaspé region, Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Boyle, D R; Chagnon, M

    1995-03-01

    Consumption of unusually high concentrations of F(-) in groundwaters of the Maria area in the Gaspé peninsula of Quebec have resulted in symptoms of skeletal fluorosis in two members of the population. One of these individuals consumed approximately 50 mg of fluoride per day over a 6 year period before being hospitalized and later diagnosed with skeletal fluorosis. It is estimated that, until this case came to light, approximately 15-20% of the rural population (total approximately 1,600) in the area were consuming groundwaters with F(-) levels between 5 and 28 mg L(-1) for at least 6 years. The high concentrations of F(-) in well waters of the Maria area occur only in wells completed in Carboniferous sandstone-siltstone-conglomerate sediments that underlie a thick blanket of alluvial-colluvial-glacial overburden. These fluoriferous groundwaters exhibit high Na and HCO3 (-) contents and low Ca and Mg concentrations compared to those associated with the overburden sediments. The high F levels greatly increase the risk for fluorotic diseases such as skeletal fluorosis and skeletal radiculomyopathy. Wells completed in overburden, although having suboptimal F(-) levels are safer for the health of individuals in this region. Effective regulations for well drilling need to be formulated for regions underlain by Carboniferous formations in the Maritime provinces of Canada. In some regions, high F(-) levels (10-25 mg L(-1)) in groundwaters will seriously affect how, and to what extent, groundwater supplies can be developed for domestic use.

  14. Herschel Discovery of a New Class of Cold, Faint Debris Discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiroal, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Krivov, A. V.; Montesinos, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Arevalo, M.; Augereau, J.-Ch.; Bayo, A.; Danchi, W.; del Burgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B. M.; Heras, A. M.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Maldonado, J.; Meeus, G.; Montes, D.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present Herschel PACS 100 and 160 micron observations of the solar-type stars alpha Men, HD 88230 and HD 210277, which form part of the FGK stars sample of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme (OTKP) DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars). Our observations show small infrared excesses at 160 m for all three stars. HD 210277 also shows a small excess at 100 micron, while the 100 micron fluxes of alpha Men and HD 88230 agree with the stellar photospheric predictions. We attribute these infrared excesses to a new class of cold, faint debris discs. alpha Men and HD 88230 are spatially resolved in the PACS 160 m images, while HD 210277 is point-like at that wavelength. The projected linear sizes of the extended emission lie in the range from approx 115 to <= 250 AU. The estimated black body temperatures from the 100 and 160 micron fluxes are approx < 22 K, while the fractional luminosity of the cold dust is L(sub dust) / L(*) approx 10 (exp 6) close to the luminosity of the Solar-System's Kuiper belt. These debris discs are the coldest and faintest discs discovered so far around mature stars and cannot easily be explained by invoking "classical" debris disc models.

  15. Herschel Discovery of a New class of Cold, Faint Debris Discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Krivov, A. V.; Montesinos, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Arevalo, M.; Augereau, J. -Ch.; Bayo, A.; Danchi, W.; del Burgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B. M.; Heras, A. M.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Maldonado, J.; Meeus, G.; Montes, D.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present Herschel PACS 100 and 160 micron observations of the solar-type stars alpha Men, HD 88230 and HD 210277, which form part of the FGK stars sample of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme (OTKP) DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars). Our observations show small infrared excesses at 160 micron for all three stars. HD 210277 also shows a small excess at 100 micron. while the 100 micron fluxes of a Men and HD 88230 agree with the stellar photospheric predictions. We attribute these infrared excesses to a new class of cold, faint debris discs. alpha Men and HD 88230 are spatially resolved in the PACS 160 micron images, while HD 210277 is point-like at that wavelength. The projected linear sizes of the extended emission lie in the range from approximately 115 to <= 250 AU. The estimated black body temperatures from the 100 and 160 micron fluxes are approximately < 22 K, while the fractional luminosity of the cold dust is L(dust)/ L(star) approximates 10(exp -6), close to the luminosity of the Solar-System's Kuiper belt. These debris discs are the coldest and faintest discs discovered so far around mature stars and cannot easily be explained by invoking "classical" debris disc models.

  16. Properties of resonant trans-Neptunian objects based on Herschel Space Observatory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas Anikó, Takácsné; Kiss, Csaba; Mueller, Thomas G.; Mommert, Michael; Vilenius, Esa

    2016-10-01

    The goal of our work is to characterise the physical characteristics of resonant, detached and scattered disk objects in the trans-Neptunian region, observed in the framework of the "TNOs are Cool!" Herschel Open Time Key Program. Based on thermal emission measurements with the Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS instruments we were able to determine size, albedo, and surface thermal properties for 23 objects using radiometric modelling techniques. This is the first analysis in which the physical properties of objects in the outer resonances are determined for a larger sample. In addition to the results for individual objects, we have compared these characteristic with the bulk properties of other populations of the trans-Neptunian region. The newly analysed objects show e.g. a large variety of beaming factors, indicating diverse surfaces, and in general they follow the albedo-colour clustering identified earlier for Kuiper belt objects and Centaurs, further strengthening the evidence for a compositional discontinuity in the young solar system.

  17. OT1_sserje01_1: THE HERSCHEL-AKARI NEP DEEP SURVEY: the cosmological history of stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, S.

    2010-07-01

    We propose a far-IR and submm mapping survey of the premier AKARI deep field in the North Ecliptic Pole, in PACS/SPIRE parallel mode. This is the only major deep infrared field not yet covered by Herschel guaranteed or open time key projects. The outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage from AKARI, far better than equivalent Spitzer surveys, enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field (including Herschel HerMES/PEP fields), by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN dust tori. The investment by AKARI in the NEP represents ~10 percent of the entire pointed observations available throughout the lifetime of AKARI. Our proposal remedies the remarkable omission from Herschel's legacy surveys of the premier extragalactic deep field from another IR space telescope. We will simultaneously identify and find photometric redshifts for the Herschel point source population, make stacking analysis detections of the galaxies which dominate the submm extragalactic background light as a function of redshift, determine the bolometric power outputs of the galaxies that dominate the submm background, compare the UV/optical/mid-IR continuum/PAH/far-IR/submm/radio star formation rate estimator in the most comprehensive IR survey data set to date, and track the coupled stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion throughout most of the history of the Universe.

  18. The JOSE atmospheric seeing monitor at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Jacques, D.; Cox, G. C.; Baldwin, J. E.; Mackay, C. D.; Waldram, E. M.; Wilson, R. W.

    1997-09-01

    We have installed a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor at the William Herschel Telescope. The sensor has 8x8 subapertures and operates at frame rates up to 865 Hz. It is used to monitor those aspects of the seeing relevant to the design and optimization of the future WHT adaptive optics system. Here we describe its implementation and present some sample results.

  19. Herschel Hi-GAL imaging of massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguin, F. A.; Hoare, M. G.; Wheelwright, H. E.; Clay, S. J.; de Wit, W.-J.; Rafiq, I.; Pezzuto, S.; Molinari, S.

    2015-05-01

    We used Herschel Hi-GAL (Herschel infrared Galactic Plane survey) data to determine whether massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) are resolved at 70 μm and to study their envelope density distribution. Our analysis of three relatively isolated sources in the l = 30° and 59° Galactic fields show that the objects are partially resolved at 70 μm. The Herschel Hi-GAL survey data have a high scan velocity which makes unresolved and partially resolved sources appear elongated in the 70 μm images. We analysed the two scan directions separately and examine the intensity profile perpendicular to the scan direction. Spherically symmetric radiative transfer models with a power-law density distribution were used to study the circumstellar matter distribution. Single dish submm data were also included to study how different spatial information affects the fitted density distribution. The density distribution which best fits both the 70 μm intensity profile and spectral energy distribution has an average index of ˜0.5. This index is shallower than expected and is probably due to the dust emission from bipolar outflow cavity walls not accounted for in the spherical models. We conclude that 2D axisymmetric models and Herschel images at low scan speeds are needed to better constrain the matter distribution around MYSOs.

  20. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.; Orchiston, Wayne

    2011-11-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, which Herschel rejected. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston, FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston - not Herschel - who coined the term 'asteroid' to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  1. John Herschel's position in the post-Neptune discovery debates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerstrom, N.

    2005-08-01

    In the course of archiving Britain's Neptune correspondence I have transcribed letters by Herschel (from the Royal Society Library) that have been little appreciated by scholars. The great polemical debates took place chiefly within the RAS but also affecting the Royal Society and the British Association, and Herschel was very much at the centre of things. His views become especially interesting once the sceptical American view started to be heard some months after the discovery, that because the real Neptune was so very different in its motions from that predicted by Adams and LeVerrier, and because the 2:1 resonance between Uranus and Neptune is such a large effect and yet was wholly unknown to these two, the prediction had to have been a mere happy coincidence. Herschel's view that the synchrony involved was beneficial for public understanding of science remains of relevance today. During these intense debates, Herschel was completing his bestseller 'Outlines of Astronomy' that was to go through twelve editions.

  2. Identification of new transitional disk candidates in Lupus with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, I.; Merín, B.; Ribas, Á.; Bouy, H.; Prusti, T.; Pilbratt, G. L.; André, Ph.

    2015-06-01

    Context. New data from the Herschel Space Observatory are broadening our understanding of the physics and evolution of the outer regions of protoplanetary disks in star-forming regions. In particular they prove to be useful for identifying transitional disk candidates. Aims: The goals of this work are to complement the detections of disks and the identification of transitional disk candidates in the Lupus clouds with data from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. Methods: We extracted photometry at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm of all spectroscopically confirmed Class II members previously identified in the Lupus regions and analyzed their updated spectral energy distributions. Results: We have detected 34 young disks in Lupus in at least one Herschel band, from an initial sample of 123 known members in the observed fields. Using recently defined criteria, we have identified five transitional disk candidates in the region. Three of them are new to the literature. Their PACS-70 μm fluxes are systematically higher than those of normal T Tauri stars in the same associations, as already found in T Cha and in the transitional disks in the Chamaeleon molecular cloud. Conclusions: Herschel efficiently complements mid-infrared surveys for identifying transitional disk candidates and confirms that these objects seem to have substantially different outer disks than the T Tauri stars in the same molecular clouds. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Tables 5-7 and Figs. 3 and 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. "Heart" of Herschel to be presented to media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    The Herschel mission, equipped with the largest telescope ever launched in space (3.5 m diameter), will give astronomers their best capability yet to explore the universe at far-infrared and sub-millimetre wavelengths. By measuring the light at these wavelengths, scientists see the ‘cold’ universe. Herschel will give them an unprecedented view, allowing them to see deep into star forming regions, galactic centres and planetary systems. In order to achieve its objectives and to be able to detect the faint radiation coming from the coolest objects in the cosmos, otherwise ‘invisible’, Herschel’s detectors must operate at very low and stable temperatures. The spacecraft is equipped so as to cool them close to absolute zero (-273.15 ºC), ranging from -271 ºC to only a few tenths of a degree above absolute zero. To have achieved this particular feature alone is a remarkable accomplishment for European industry and science. The final integration of the various components of the Herschel spacecraft - payload module, cryostat, service module, telescope and solar arrays - will be completed in the next few months. This phase will be followed by a series of tests to get the spacecraft ready for launch at the end of July 2008. Herschel will be launched into space on an Ariane 5 ECA rocket. The launch is shared with Planck, ESA’s mission to study relic radiation from the Big Bang. Media interested to attend the press event are invited to fill in the reply form below. Note for editors The Prime Contractor for the Herschel spacecraft is Thales Alenia Space (Cannes, France). It leads a consortium of industrial partners with Astrium (Germany) responsible for the Extended Payload Module (EPLM, including the Herschel cryostat), Astrium (France) responsible for the telescope, and the Thales Alenia Space industry branch of Torino, Italy, responsible for the Service Module (SVM). There is also a host of subcontractors spread throughout Europe. The three Herschel

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cep OB2 Herschel/PACS view (Sicilia-Aguilar+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Roccatagliata, V.; Getman, K.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Birnstiel, T.; Merin, B.; Fang, M.; Henning, T.; Eiroa, C.; Currie, T.

    2015-02-01

    The Cep OB2 clusters, Tr 37 (centered at 21:38:09, +57:26:48, J2000) and NGC 7160 (centered at 21:53:40, 62:36:10, J2000), were observed with the ESA Herschel Space Observatory using the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), as part of the open time (OT) program "Disk dispersal in Cep OB2" (PI A. Sicilia-Aguilar). We obtained a total of 23h observing time in parallel mode at 70 and 160um. Observations took place between November 2012 and January 2013. (4 data files).

  5. Astronomy from Space: The Hubble, Herschel and James Webb Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Space-based astronomy is going through a renaissance, with three Great Observatories currently flying: Hubble in the visible and ultraviolet, Spitzer in the infrared and Chandra in X-rays. The future looks equally bright. The final servicing mission to Hubble will take place in February 2009 and promises to make the observatory more capable than ever with two new cameras, and refurbishment that will allow it to last at least five years. The upcoming launch of the Herschel Space Telescope will open the far-infrared to explore the cool and dusty Universe. Finally, we look forward to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope in 2013, which wil provide a successor to both Hubble and Spitzer. In this talk, the author discusses some of the highlights of scientific discovery in the last 10 years and reveals the promise to the next 10 years.

  6. OT2_eegami_5: Herschel Lensing Survey II: Completing the Herschel Legacy with the HST/MCT CLASH Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, E.

    2011-09-01

    For deep imaging longward of 100 um, confusion noise sets the fundamental sensitivity limits achievable with Herschel, and these limits cannot be improved by integrating longer. To penetrate through this confusion limit and detect faint high-redshift galaxies, gravitational lensing by massive galaxy clusters offers a very powerful and yet cheap solution. For this reason, our team has been conducting a PACS/SPIRE imaging survey of 44 massive lensing clusters as one of the Herschel Key Programs, "The Herschel Lensing Survey" (PI: Egami, 292.3 hrs). Deep PACS/SPIRE imaging data of massive clusters are quite rich with a variety of information, which allows us to study not only the properties of gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies but also those of cluster member galaxies and the intracluster medium through the analysis of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. In January 2010, a massive HST program targeting powerful lensing clusters was accepted as one of the three multi-cycle treasury (MCT) programs. This program, ``the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble'' (CLASH), has an allocation of 524 orbits, and will obtain deep ACS and WFC3 images of 25 massive galaxy clusters using 16 broad-band filters from near-UV (2250 A) to near-IR (1.6 um). These extensive multi-filter imaging observations will produce high-precision photometric redshifts (sigma/(1+z)<0.02). On average, the program spends 20 orbits per cluster. Considering this enormous investment of HST time, the CLASH program will define the ultimate sample of massive galaxy clusters on which future studies will focus. Here, we propose to obtain deep PACS and SPIRE images for 10 CLASH clusters that still lack such data (the other 15 clusters already have a good Herschel coverage). To fully exploit the combination of the Herschel and HST data, the HLS and CLASH teams are submitting this proposal jointly with the participation of key scientists from both teams.

  7. The Herschel/PACS view of the Cep OB2 region: Global protoplanetary disk evolution and clumpy star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Roccatagliata, Veronica; Getman, Konstantin; Rivière-Marichalar, Pablo; Birnstiel, Tilman; Merín, Bruno; Fang, Min; Henning, Thomas; Eiroa, Carlos; Currie, Thayne

    2015-01-01

    Context. The Cep OB2 region, with its two intermediate-aged clusters Tr 37 and NGC 7160, is a paradigm of sequential star formation and an ideal site for studies of protoplanetary disk evolution. Aims: We use Herschel data to study the protoplanetary disks and the star formation history of the region. Methods: Herschel/PACS observations at 70 and 160 μm probe the disk properties (mass, dust sizes, structure) and the evolutionary state of a large number of young stars. Far-IR data also trace the remnant cloud material and small-scale cloud structure. Results: We detect 95 protoplanetary disks at 70 μm, 41 at 160 μm, and obtain upper limits for more than 130 objects. The detection fraction at 70 μm depends on the spectral type (88% for K4 or earlier stars, 17% for M3 or later stars) and on the disk type (~50% for full and pre-transitional disks, ~35% for transitional disks, no low-excess/depleted disks detected). Non-accreting disks are not detected, suggesting significantly lower masses. Accreting transition and pre-transition disks have systematically higher 70 μm excesses than full disks, suggestive of more massive, flared and/or thicker disks. Herschel data also reveal several mini-clusters in Tr 37, which are small, compact structures containing a few young stars surrounded by nebulosity. Conclusions: Far-IR data are an excellent probe of the evolution of disks that are too faint for sub-millimetre observations. We find a strong link between far-IR emission and accretion, and between the inner and outer disk structure. Herschel confirms the dichotomy between accreting and non-accreting transition disks. Accretion is a powerful measure of global disk evolution: substantial mass depletion and global evolution need to occur to shut down accretion in a protoplanetary disk, even if the disk has inner holes. Disks likely follow different evolutionary paths: low disk masses do not imply opening inner holes, and having inner holes does not require low disk masses

  8. Herschel far-infrared observations of the Carina Nebula complex. III. Detailed cloud structure and feedback effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatagliata, V.; Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Gaczkowski, B.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The star formation process in large clusters/associations can be strongly influenced by the feedback from high-mass stars. Whether the resulting net effect of the feedback is predominantly negative (cloud dispersal) or positive (triggering of star formation due to cloud compression) is still an open question. Aims: The Carina Nebula complex (CNC) represents one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We use our Herschel far-infrared observations to study the properties of the clouds over the entire area of the CNC (with a diameter of ≈3.2°, which corresponds to ≈125 pc at a distance of 2.3 kpc). The good angular resolution (10''-36'') of the Herschel maps corresponds to physical scales of 0.1-0.4 pc, and allows us to analyze the small-scale (i.e., clump-size) structures of the clouds. Methods: The full extent of the CNC was mapped with PACS and SPIRE in the 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm bands. We determined temperatures and column densities at each point in these maps by modeling the observed far-infrared spectral energy distributions. We also derived a map showing the strength of the UV radiation field. We investigated the relation between the cloud properties and the spatial distribution of the high-mass stars and computed total cloud masses for different density thresholds. Results: Our Herschel maps resolve for the first time the small-scale structure of the dense clouds over the entire spatial extent of the CNC. Several particularly interesting regions, including the prominent pillars south of η Car, are analyzed in detail. We compare the cloud masses derived from the Herschel data with previous mass estimates based on sub-mm and molecular line data. Our maps also reveal a peculiar wave-like pattern in the northern part of the Carina Nebula. Finally, we characterize two prominent cloud complexes at the periphery of our Herschel maps, which are probably molecular clouds in the Galactic background. Conclusions: We find that the

  9. THE CDF ARCHIVE: HERSCHEL PACS AND SPIRE SPECTROSCOPIC DATA PIPELINE AND PRODUCTS FOR PROTOSTARS AND YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Joel D.; Yang, Yao-Lun; II, Neal J. Evans; Larson, Rebecca L.; Karska, Agata; Herczeg, Gregory; Dishoeck, Ewine F. van; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bouwman, Jeroen

    2016-03-15

    We present the COPS-DIGIT-FOOSH (CDF) Herschel spectroscopy data product archive, and related ancillary data products, along with data fidelity assessments, and a user-created archive in collaboration with the Herschel-PACS and SPIRE ICC groups. Our products include datacubes, contour maps, automated line fitting results, and best 1D spectra products for all protostellar and disk sources observed with PACS in RangeScan mode for two observing programs: the DIGIT Open Time Key Program (KPOT-nevans-1 and SDP-nevans-1; PI: N. Evans), and the FOOSH Open Time Program (OT1-jgreen02-2; PI: J. Green). In addition, we provide our best SPIRE-FTS spectroscopic products for the COPS Open Time Program (OT2-jgreen02-6; PI: J. Green) and FOOSH sources. We include details of data processing, descriptions of output products, and tests of their reliability for user applications. We identify the parts of the data set to be used with caution. The resulting absolute flux calibration has improved in almost all cases. Compared to previous reductions, the resulting rotational temperatures and numbers of CO molecules have changed substantially in some sources. On average, however, the rotational temperatures have not changed substantially (<2%), but the number of warm (T{sub rot} ∼ 300 K) CO molecules has increased by about 18%.

  10. Observations of Herbig Ae/Be Stars with Herschel/PACS: The Atomic and Molecular Contents of Their Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeus, G.; Montesinos, B.; Mendigutia, I.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W. F.; Eiroa, C.; Grady, C. A.; Mathews, G.; Sandell, G.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Brittain, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Howard, C.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.; Roberge, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Williams, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We observed a sample of 20 representative Herbig Ae/Be stars and 5 A-type debris discs with PACS onboard Herschel, as part of the GAS in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) project. The observations were done in spectroscopic mode, and cover the far-infrared lines of [OI], [CII], CO, CH+, H20, and OH. We have a [OI]63 micro/ detection rate of 100% for the Herbig Ae/Be and 0% for the debris discs. The [OI] 145 micron line is only detected in 25% and CO J = 18-17 in 45% (and fewer cases for higher J transitions) of the Herbig Ae/Be stars, while for [CII] 157 micron, we often find spatially variable background contamination. We show the first detection of water in a Herbig Ae disc, HD 163296, which has a settled disc. Hydroxyl is detected as well in this disc. First seen in HD 100546, CH+ emission is now detected for the second time in a Herbig Ae star, HD 97048. We report fluxes for each line and use the observations as line diagnostics of the gas properties. Furthermore, we look for correlations between the strength of the emission lines and either the stellar or disc parameters, such as stellar luminosity, ultraviolet and X-ray flux. accretion rate, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band strength, and flaring. We find that the stellar ultraviolet flux is the dominant excitation mechanism of [OI] 63 micron, with the highest line fluxes being found in objects with a large amount of flaring and among the largest PAH strengths. Neither the amount of accretion nor the X-ray luminosity has an influence on the line strength. We find correlations between the line flux of [OI]63 micron and [OI] 145 micron, CO J = IS-17 and [OI] 6300 A, and between the continuum flux at 63 micron and at 1.3 mm, while we find weak correlations between the line flux. of [OI] 63 micron and the PAH luminosity, the line flux of CO J = 3-2, the continuum flux at 63 pm, the stellar effective temperature, and the Br-gamma luminosity. Finally, we use a combination of the [OI] 63 micron and C(12)O J

  11. A Peculiar Class of Debris Disks from Herschel/DUNES: A Steep Fall Off in the Far Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertel, S.; Wolf, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.; Augereau, J. C.; Krivov, A. V.; Lohne, T.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Arevalo, M.; Bayo, A.; Bryden, G.; del Burgo, C.; Greaves, J.; Kennedy, G.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Maldonado, J.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.; White, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The existence of debris disks around old main sequence stars is usually explained by continuous replenishment of small dust grains through collisions from a reservoir of larger objects. Aims. We present photometric data of debris disks around HIP 103389 (HD199260), HIP 100350 (HN Peg, HD206860), and HIP 114948 (HD 219482), obtained in the context of our Herschel Open TIme Key Program DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars). Methods. We used Herschel/PACS to detect the thermal emission of the three debris disks with a 30 sigma sensitivity of a few mJy at l00 micron and 160 micron. In addition, we obtained Herschel/PACS photometric data at 70 micron for HIP 103389. These observations are complemented by a large variety of optical to far-infrared photometric data. Two different approaches are applied to reduce the Herschel data to investigate the impact of data reduction on the photometry. We fit analytical models to the available spectral energy distribution (SED) data using the fitting method of simulated therma1 annealing as well as a classical grid search method. Results. The SEDs of the three disks potentially exhibit an unusually steep decrease at wavelengths >= 70 micron. We investigate the significance of the peculiar shape of these SEDs and the impact on models of the disks provided it is real. Using grain compositions that have been applied successfully for modeling of many other debris disks, our modeling reveals that such a steep decrease of the SEDs in the long wavelength regime is inconsistent with a power-law exponent of the grain size distribution -3.5 expected from a standard equilibrium collisional cascade. In contrast, a steep grain size distribution or, alternatively an upper grain size in the range of few tens of micrometers are implied. This suggests that a very distinct range of grain sizes would dominate the thermal. emission of such disks. However, we demonstrate that the understanding of the data of faint sources obtained with Herschel is

  12. A "Large and Graceful Sinuosity": John Herschel's Graphical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, Thomas L.

    2006-12-01

    In 1833 John Herschel published a graphical method for determining the orbits of double stars. He argued that this method, which depended on human judgment rather than mathematical analysis, gave better results than computation, given the uncertainty in the data. Herschel found that astronomy and terrestrial physics were especially suitable for graphical treatment, and he expected that graphs would soon become important in all areas of science. He argued with William Whewell and James D. Forbes over the process of induction, over the application of probability, and over the moral content of science. Graphs entered into all these debates, but because they constituted a method, not a metaphysics, they were acceptable to most practicing scientists and became increasingly popular throughout the nineteenth century.

  13. A "large and graceful sinuosity". John Herschel's graphical method.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Thomas L

    2006-12-01

    In 1833 John Herschel published a graphical method for determining the orbits of double stars. He argued that his method, which depended on human judgment rather than mathematical analysis, gave better results than computation, given the uncertainty in the data. Herschel found that astronomy and terrestrial physics were especially suitable for graphical treatment, and he expected that graphs would soon become important in all areas of science. He argued with William Whewell and James D. Forbes over the process of induction, over the application of probability, and over the moral content of science. Graphs entered into all these debates; but because they constituted a method, not a metaphysics, they were acceptable to most practicing scientists and became increasingly popular throughout the nineteenth century.

  14. Herschel and Planck Power System Flight Return Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancetta, Ezio; Deplus, Nicolas; Zanella, Pietro; Neto, Alessandro; Fernandez, Emilio

    2014-08-01

    Herschel and Planck are space observatories managed by the European Space Agency. The two satellites were launched on May 14, 2009 by a single Ariane-5 launcher and operated in two different Lissajous orbits around the second Lagrangian point (L2), 1.5 million kilometres away from the Earth.Herschel completed its scientific operation in April 2013 and it was passivated on 17 June 2013; Planck has been passivated on 23 October 2013.This paper will first outline the power system design providing a description of the major design drivers, then will provide a synthesis of the behaviour of the Electrical Power System (EPS) in the whole 4-years mission, looking at the performance at launch and during major manoeuvres, verifying the Solar Array degradation with life compared to the expected one and summarizing the main lesson learnt.

  15. Simbol-X: Synergies with JWST, ALMA and Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiolino, R.

    2009-05-01

    I discuss the synergies between Simbol-X and three among the major astronomical facilities that, in the next decade, will be operative in the infrared-millimeter spectral range, namely JWST, Herschel and ALMA. I first provide a brief overview of the main features and observing capabilities offered by these facilities. Then I will discuss a few research fields (mostly extragalactic) that will geatly benefit of the joint exploitation of Simbol-X and these IR-mm observatories.

  16. OT2_smalhotr_3: Herschel Extreme Lensing Line Observations (HELLO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.

    2011-09-01

    We request 59.8 hours of Herschel time to observe 20 normal star-forming galaxies in the [CII] 158 micron and [OI] 63 micron lines. These galaxies lie at high redshift (1Herschel offers the unique opportunity to study both lines with high sensitivity throughout this epoch (using HIFI for [CII] and PACS for [OI]). These two lines are the main cooling lines of the atomic medium. By measuring their fluxes, we will measure (1) the cooling efficiency of gas, (2) gas densities and temperatures near starforming regions, and (3) gas pressures, which are important to drive the winds that provide feedback to starformation processes. By combining the proposed observations with existing multiwavelength data on these objects, we will obtain as complete a picture of galaxy-scale star formation and ISM physical conditions at high redshifts as we have at z=0. Then perhaps we can understand why star formation and AGN activity peaked at this epoch. In Herschel cycle OT1, 49 high redshift IR luminous galaxies were approved for spectroscopy, but only two so-called normal galaxies were included. This is an imbalance that should be corrected, to balance Herschel's legacy.

  17. Exploring science and technology through the Herschel space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minier, V.; Rouzé, M.

    2015-03-01

    Because modern astronomy associates the quest of our origins and high-tech instruments, communicating and teaching astronomy explore both science and technology. We report here on our work in communicating astronomy to the public through Web sites (www.herschel.fr), movies on Dailymotion (www.dailymotion.com/AstrophysiqueTV) and new ITC tools that describe interactively the technological dimension of a space mission for astrophysics.

  18. John Herschel and the Cape flora, 1834 - 1839.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, J. P.

    John Herschel's interest in botany was stimulated by his contact with the species-rich Cape flora while resident in Cape Town, 1834 - 1838. The comparative study of his extensive living collection of bulbous plants, mainly of the Iridaceae, Liliaceae, Amarayllidaceae and Orchidaceae led him to consider some basic aspects of the origin of species and of taxonomic theory, in letters to colleagues in Europe.

  19. Debris disks as seen by Herschel: statistics and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.; Marshall, J. P.; Augereau, J. C.; Eiroa, C.

    2011-10-01

    As leftovers of planet formation, debris disks represent an essential component of planetary systems. We first introduce the latest statistics obtained by the DUNES consortium, who are taking a census of extrasolar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt using the Herschel Space Observatory. Then we present a detailed study of the much younger debris disk surrounding the F5.5 star HD 181327. We derive strong constraints on the properties of its dust and we discuss its possible gaseous counterpart.

  20. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, most of which sound quite ludicrous. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston- not Herschel- who coined the term "asteroid" to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  1. The Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1 - II. Multi-wavelength counterparts to submillimetre sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Hoyos, C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Eales, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrae, E.; Baldry, I. K.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; Driver, S. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Grootes, M. W.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Liske, J.; Madore, B. F.; Popescu, C. C.; Robotham, A. G.; Rowlands, K.; Seibert, M.; Thompson, M. A.; Tuffs, R. J.; Viaene, S.; Wright, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is the second in a pair of papers presenting data release 1 (DR1) of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the largest single open-time key project carried out with the Herschel Space Observatory. The H-ATLAS is a wide-area imaging survey carried out in five photometric bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm covering a total area of 600 deg2. In this paper, we describe the identification of optical counterparts to submillimetre sources in DR1, comprising an area of 161 deg2 over three equatorial fields of roughly 12 × 4.5 deg centred at 9h, 12h and 14{^h.}5, respectively. Of all the H-ATLAS fields, the equatorial regions benefit from the greatest overlap with current multi-wavelength surveys spanning ultraviolet (UV) to mid-infrared regimes, as well as extensive spectroscopic coverage. We use a likelihood ratio technique to identify Sloan Digital Sky Survey counterparts at r < 22.4 for 250-μm-selected sources detected at ≥4σ (≈28 mJy). We find `reliable' counterparts (reliability R ≥ 0.8) for 44 835 sources (39 per cent), with an estimated completeness of 73.0 per cent and contamination rate of 4.7 per cent. Using redshifts and multi-wavelength photometry from GAMA and other public catalogues, we show that H-ATLAS-selected galaxies at z < 0.5 span a wide range of optical colours, total infrared (IR) luminosities and IR/UV ratios, with no strong disposition towards mid-IR-classified active galactic nuclei in comparison with optical selection. The data described herein, together with all maps and catalogues described in the companion paper, are available from the H-ATLAS website at www.h-atlas.org.

  2. Windblown Dunes on the Floor of Herschel Impact Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Herschel Basin, one of many meteor impact craters on Mars, has some dark material on its floor that appeared from earlier spacecraft missions to have been blown and/or deposited by wind. Herschel Basin was imaged at low resolution by the Mariner 9 and Viking orbiters ((A) above) in the 1970s, and again by the Phobos 2 orbiter in 1989.

    On June 14, 1998, Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera revealed that part of the dark surface on the floor of Herschel Basin consists of a field of sand dunes ((B) above). These dunes have a distinct crescent-like shape characteristic of dunes on Earth called barchan dunes. They result from winds that blow from a single dominant direction.

    In the case of Herschel Basin, the dunes indicate that the strongest winds blow approximately north-to-south. The crescent horns on the ends of some of the dunes in this image are elongated. This condition indicates that the dominant winds do not always blow in exactly the same direction-- sometimes the winds blow from the northeast, sometimes from the northwest, and sometimes from the north. The local topography probably influences the wind direction--and hence dune shape--because this dune field is located on a narrow, low plain between a high crater rim to the east, and a narrow mountain range-- the inner ring of the Herschel impact basin--to the west (see image (A)).

    MOC image 36507 was obtained on Mars Global Surveyor's 365th orbit around 10:51 a.m. PDT on June 14, 1998. This subframe is centered around 14.27oS, 231.68oW.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  3. 15N/14N Ratio Determination in the ISM with Herschel with High Resolution Spectroscopy of Nitrogen Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Bailleux, S.; Wlodarczak, G.; Pirali, O.; Martin-Drumel, M.-A.; Roy, P.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.

    2011-06-01

    The very high resolution of the HIFI instrument (134 kHz-1MHz) on board of Herschel needs very accurate laboratory measurements to detect unambiguously the signature of stable and unstable molecular species. Concerning the pure rotation spectra of new species, and particularly of open shell molecules, the first prediction could be far away and up to few hundred MHz. The 15N/14N ratio is not well measured in the ISM. However, the 15N/14N in the isotopomers is a potential tracer of the formation processes and the possible link with cometary molecules. Recent measurements include the detection of 15NH_2D N15NH+ and 15NH_3. The NH and NH_2 species are the simplest nitrogen radicals and are intermediate products in the NH_3 synthesis. They have been easily detected by Herschel and it therefore is interesting to now search for 15NH and 15NH_2. No spectrocopic data have been reported for these two radicals up to now. We present here the studies with high resolution spectroscopy in the THz range. The high sensitivity and the wide range of Synchrotron (0.6-6 THz) was essential to improve the prediction of the spectra of these two species in order to measure them in Lille (0.6-1 THz) with both a higher accuracy and resolution. The combined studies now give the most accurate predictions. ISM searches on these radicals are in progress in the HERSCHEL spectra. This work is supported by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS) M. Gerin, N. Marcellino, N. Biver, et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 498 (2009) 9. L. Bizzochi, P. Caselli, and L. Dore, Astron. & Astrophys. 510 (2010) L5. D. C. Lis, A. Wooten, M. Gerin and E. Roueff, Astrophys. J. 710 (2010) L49.

  4. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and MODIS to AERONET AOD and IMPROVE PM2.5 Mass at Bondville, Illinois Stratified by Chemical Composition, RH, Particle Size, and Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. C.; Kondragunta, S.; Ciren, P.

    2008-05-01

    The USEPA is interested in using satellite remote sensing data to estimate levels of PM2.5. Here we report on comparisons of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to IMPROVE network PM2.5 mass and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based AOD. Before we compare GASP and MODIS AOD to PM2.5, we first evaluate satellite AOD using the ground-based AERONET measurements and how it varies by aerosol chemical composition and size distribution. We focus attention on the Bondville, Illinois site because there is collocated IMPROVE sampling and an AERONET site. GASP provides aerosol optical depth at 0.55 um using top of atmosphere visible channel radiance measured from GOES east and GOES west. Time resolution is typically every 30 minutes during daylight hours. MODIS provides typically once per day AOD for any given location. The IMPROVE sampler provides a 24-hour integrated sample of PM10 mass, and PM2.5 mass and elemental composition on a one day in three schedule. AERONET provides aerosol optical depth at multiple wavelengths and aerosol size distribution as well as other derived parameters such as Angstrom exponent from ground based daytime measurements. We stratified cases by RH group, major chemical component, size distribution, and season. GOES AOD correlated best with PM2.5 mass during periods with mainly small particles, moderate RH, and sulfate dominated aerosol. It correlated poorly when RH is very high or low, aerosol is primarily organic, and when coarse to fine mass ratio is high. GASP AOD also correlated best with AERONET AOD when particles are mainly fine, suggesting the aerosol model assumptions (e.g. size distribution) may need to be varied geographically for GASP to achieve better AOD results.

  5. SPITZER-IRAC Identification of HERSCHEL-ATLAS SPIRE Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sam; Wardlow, Julie L.; Cooray, Asantha; Fleuren, S.; Sutherland, W.; Khostovan, A. A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bussmann, R. S.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Scott, D.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van der Werf, P.

    2012-09-01

    We use Spitzer-IRAC data to identify near-infrared counterparts to submillimeter galaxies detected with Herschel-SPIRE at 250 μm in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Using a likelihood ratio analysis we identify 146 reliable IRAC counterparts to 123 SPIRE sources out of the 159 in the survey area. We find that, compared to the field population, the SPIRE counterparts occupy a distinct region of the 3.6 and 4.5 μm color-magnitude space, and we use this property to identify 23 further counterparts to 13 SPIRE sources. The IRAC identification rate of 86% is significantly higher than those that have been demonstrated with wide-field ground-based optical and near-IR imaging of Herschel fields. We estimate a false identification rate of 3.6%, corresponding to 4-5 sources. Among the 73 counterparts that are undetected in Sloan Digital Sky Survey, 57 have both 3.6 and 4.5 μm coverage. Of these, 43 have [3.6] - [4.5] > 0, indicating that they are likely to be at z >~ 1.4. Thus, ~40% of identified SPIRE galaxies are likely to be high-redshift (z >~ 1.4) sources. We discuss the statistical properties of the IRAC-identified SPIRE galaxy sample including far-IR luminosities, dust temperatures, star formation rates, and stellar masses. The majority of our detected galaxies have 1010-1011 L ⊙ total IR luminosities and are not intense starbursting galaxies as those found at z ~ 2, but they have a factor of 2-3 above average specific star formation rates compared to near-IR selected galaxy samples.

  6. A new population of protostars discovered by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, A. M.; Tobin, J.; Fischer, W.; S. T. Megeath; Stanke, T.; Ali, B.; Henning, T.

    2012-03-01

    We present a newly discovered Herschel--detected class of very red protostars found in the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). In contrast to the known Orion protostars targeted with HOPS, the new sources are undetected or very faint in the Spitzer 24 μm imaging. A subset of these sources is redder than any of the known Orion Class 0 protostars, and appear similar in their 70 μm to 24 μm colors to the most extreme Class 0 objects known. These new Orion protostars are likely to be in a very early and short lived stage of protostellar evolution. As a sample of extremely red sources at a common distance, they represent an important new population of protostars. The majority of these reddest sources exhibit associated IRAC 4.5, and 5.8 μm extended emission that suggests the presence of an outflow, confirming their protostellar nature. In addition, many of these sources are located within classical filaments as traced by Spitzer absorption features and APEX 870 μm dust emission maps. Fits of the broad--band SEDs to radiative transfer models of protostars suggest that the extremely red 70 μm to 24 μm colors result from a combination of nearly edge--on viewing angles and high envelope infall rates. We analyze the properties of the filaments from which these sources form using sub--mm and IRAM 30 m N_2H^+ measurements. Finally, we present the initial results of a search for outflows using IRAM 30 m CO maps. As a population of cold protostars detected by Herschel but not Spitzer, the PBRS extend the Spitzer--identified sample to earlier stages of envelope evolution, allowing the most complete census yet of the Orion protostellar population.

  7. The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey: HerMES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, S.J.; Bock, J.; Altieri, B.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Babbedge, T.; Beelen, A.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Boselli, A.; Bridge, C.; Brisbin, D; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Cirasuolo, M.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Dwek, E.; Levenson, L.; Nguyen, H. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, HerMES, is a legacy program designed to map a set of nested fields totalling approx. 380 deg(exp 2). Fields range in size from 0.01 to approx. 20 deg (exp 2), using Herschel-SPIRE (at 250, 350 and 500 micron), and Herschel-PACS (at 100 and 160 micron), with an additional wider component of 270 deg. (exp. 2) with SPIRE alone. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the re-processed optical and ultra-violet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multi-wavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The survey will detect of order 100,000 galaxies at 5-sigma in some of the best studied fields in the sky. Additionally, HerMES is closely coordinated with the PACS Evolutionary Probe survey. Making maximum use of the full spectrum of ancillary data, from radio to X-ray wavelengths, it is designed to: facilitate redshift determination; rapidly identify unusual objects; and understand the relationships between thermal emission from dust and other processes. Scientific questions HerMES will be used to answer include: the total infrared emission of galaxies; the evolution of the luminosity function; the clustering properties of dusty galaxies; and the properties of populations of galaxies which lie below the confusion limit through lensing and statistical techniques. This paper defines the survey observations and data products, outlines the primary scientific goals of the HerMES team, and reviews some of the early results.

  8. The Era of Newton, Herschel and Lord Rosse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Jim

    2009-08-01

    In the eighteenth century England was dominant in building telescopes and instrumentation. This paper describes the contributions of the most important opticians and telescope builders, from Newton’s Opticks and the telescope design that bears his name, through various instrument makers who constructed ‘popular’ telescopes and published descriptions of mirror grinding (Smith, the Dollonds and their patent on achromatic lenses), to Herschel, who refined the description of his polishing procedures, and Lord Rosse, who attempted to communicate his through publication. The narrative of theory, practice and communication takes unexpected turns.

  9. Far Infrared dropout galaxies in the Herschel GOODS fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Lennox

    The most massively star-forming galaxies in the universe are dust enshrouded and radiate primarily in the far-infrared. At high redshifts these galaxies cannot be easily found with ultraviolet or optical searches and constitute a missing portion of the universal star formation history determined with conventional techniques. Current studies suggest that these obscured galaxies contain a substantial fraction (about 20%) of the star formation out to a redshift of at least five. The goals of the present proposal are to refine these measurements, to search for yet higher redshift dusty galaxies, to study the morphologies and other properties of these galaxies, and to determine how the star formation rates in these galaxies correlate with the X-ray luminosities. The deepest Herschel imaging observations are of the two GOODS fields. Here we propose to extend the wavelength range of these observations to 850 micron, which is sensitive to very high redshifts (z out to about 8) where the rest-frame wavelength of the observations lies close to the peak in the thermal dust spectrum. We are making the 850 micron observations with the powerful SCUBA-2 camera on the JCMT telescope. Combined with the Spitzer and Herschel data, we will be able to measure the long wavelength spectral energy distributions of the SCUBA-2 detected galaxies and search for the highest redshift galaxies, which should be faint in the Spitzer and shorter wavelength Herschel data (mid and far-infrared dropout galaxies). We can obtain the morphologies from HST for those galaxies that are visible at optical or nearinfrared wavelengths, and we can measure the star formation rates for those that are detected with Chandra. Submillimeter detected luminous dusty galaxies have the highest star formation rates in the universe, and determining their properties and redshift distribution is key to understanding the formation of the most massive galaxies in the universe. The proposed work will add value to the Spitzer

  10. Herschel survey of brown dwarf disks in ρ Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Oliveira, C.; Ábrahám, P.; Marton, G.; Pinte, C.; Kiss, Cs.; Kun, M.; Kóspál, Á.; André, P.; Könyves, V.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Young brown dwarfs are known to possess circumstellar disks, a characteristic that is fundamental to the understanding of their formation process, and raises the possibility that these objects harbour planets. Aims: We want to characterise the far-IR emission of disks around the young brown dwarf population of the ρ Ophiuchi cluster in LDN 1688. Methods: Recent observations of the ρ Ophiuchi cluster with the Herschel Space Observatory allow us to probe the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the brown dwarf population in the far-IR, where the disk emission peaks. We performed aperture photometry at 70, 100, and 160 μm, and constructed SEDs for all previously known brown dwarfs detected. These were complemented with ancillary photometry at shorter wavelengths. We compared the observed SEDs to a grid of synthetic disks produced with the radiative transfer code MCFOST, and used the relative figure of merit estimated from the Bayesian inference of each disk parameter to analyse the structural properties. Results: We detected 12 Class II brown dwarfs with Herschel, which corresponds to one-third of all currently known brown dwarf members of ρ Ophiuchi. We did not detect any of the known Class III brown dwarfs. Comparison to models reveals that the disks are best described by an inner radius between 0.01 and 0.07 AU, and a flared disk geometry with a flaring index between 1.05 and 1.2. Furthermore, we can exclude values of the disk scale-height lower than 10 AU (measured at a fiducial radius of 100 AU). We combined the Herschel data with recent ALMA observations of the brown dwarf GY92 204 (ISO-Oph 102), and by comparing its SED to the same grid of disk models, we derived an inner disk radius of 0.035 AU, a scale height of 15 AU with a flaring index of β ~ 1.15, an exponent for dust settling of -1.5, and a disk mass of 0.001 M⊙. This corresponds to a disk-to-central object mass ratio of ~1%. Conclusions: The structural parameters constrained by the

  11. The Photoconductor Array Camera & Spectrometer (PACS) instrument for Herschel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Babar; Frayer, D. T.; Fadda, D.; Appleton, P.; Latter, B.

    2007-05-01

    PACS is one of three science instruments for ESA ’ s Herschel Space Observatory (HSO, formerly known as FIRST). It operates either as an imaging photometer or an integral field spectrometer over the spectral band from 57 to 210 µm. PACS is being designed and built by a consortium of institutes and university departments from across Europe under the leadership of Principal Investigator Albrecht Poglitsch located at Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), Garching, Germany. Consortium members are: Austria: UVIE; Belgium: IMEC, KUL, CSL; France: CEA, OAMP; Germany: MPE, MPIA; Italy: IFSI, OAP/OAT, OAA/CAISMI, LENS, SISSA; Spain: IAC.

  12. Herschel observations of the debris disc around HIP 92043

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. P.; Krivov, A. V.; del Burgo, C.; Eiroa, C.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Ertel, S.; Bryden, G.; Liseau, R.; Augereau, J.-C.; Bayo, A.; Danchi, W.; Löhne, T.; Maldonado, J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Thebault, P.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Typical debris discs are composed of particles ranging from several micron sized dust grains to km sized asteroidal bodies, and their infrared emission peaks at wavelengths 60-100 μm. Recent Herschel DUNES observations have identified several debris discs around nearby Sun-like stars (F, G and K spectral type) with significant excess emission only at 160 μm. Aims: We observed HIP 92043 (110 Her, HD 173667) at far-infrared and sub-millimetre wavelengths with Herschel PACS and SPIRE. Identification of the presence of excess emission from HIP 92043 and the origin and physical properties of any excess was undertaken through analysis of its spectral energy distribution (SED) and the PACS images. Methods: The PACS and SPIRE images were produced using the HIPE photProject map maker routine. Fluxes were measured using aperture photometry. A stellar photosphere model was scaled to optical and near infrared photometry and subtracted from the far-infared and sub-mm fluxes to determine the presence of excess emission. Source radial profiles were fitted using a 2D Gaussian and compared to a PSF model based on Herschel observations of α Boo to check for extended emission. Results: Clear excess emission from HIP 92043 was observed at 70 and 100 μm. Marginal excess was observed at 160 and 250 μm. Analysis of the images reveals that the source is extended at 160 μm. A fit to the source SED is inconsistent with a photosphere and single temperature black body. Conclusions: The excess emission from HIP 92043 is consistent with the presence of an unresolved circumstellar debris disc at 70 and 100 μm, with low probability of background contamination. The extended 160 μm emission may be interpreted as an additional cold component to the debris disc or as the result of background contamination along the line of sight. The nature of the 160 μm excess cannot be determined absolutely from the available data, but we favour a debris disc interpretation, drawing parallels with

  13. OT2_sserje01_2: THE HERSCHEL-AKARI NEP DEEP SURVEY: the cosmological history of stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, S.

    2011-09-01

    We propose a far-IR and submm mapping survey of the premier AKARI deep field in the North Ecliptic Pole, in PACS/SPIRE parallel mode. This is the only major deep infrared field not yet covered by Herschel guaranteed or open time key projects. The outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage from AKARI, far better than equivalent Spitzer surveys, enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field (including Herschel HerMES/PEP fields), by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN dust tori. The investment by AKARI in the NEP represents ~10 percent of the entire pointed observations available throughout the lifetime of AKARI. Our proposal remedies the remarkable omission from Herschel's legacy surveys of the premier extragalactic deep field from another IR space telescope. We will simultaneously identify and find photometric redshifts for the Herschel point source population, make stacking analysis detections of the galaxies which dominate the submm extragalactic background light as a function of redshift, determine the bolometric power outputs of the galaxies that dominate the submm background, compare the UV/optical/mid-IR continuum/PAH/far-IR/submm/radio star formation rate estimator in the most comprehensive IR survey data set to date, and track the coupled stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion throughout most of the history of the Universe. In OT1 the HOTAC concluded "The science output from the proposed survey will be outstanding [...] The panel was convinced that these observations should be done" but it since became clear that priority 2 time is very unlikely to be executed, so we request reclassification to priority 1.

  14. Herschel/HIFI discovery of interstellar chloronium (H2Cl+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, D. C.; Pearson, J. C.; Neufeld, D. A.; Schilke, P.; Müller, H. S. P.; Gupta, H.; Bell, T. A.; Comito, C.; Phillips, T. G.; Bergin, E. A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Blake, G. A.; Bacmann, A.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A.; Black, J.; Boogert, A.; Bottinelli, S.; Cabrit, S.; Caselli, P.; Castets, A.; Caux, E.; Cernicharo, J.; Codella, C.; Coutens, A.; Crimier, N.; Crockett, N. R.; Daniel, F.; Demyk, K.; Dominic, C.; Dubernet, M.-L.; Emprechtinger, M.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Fuente, A.; Gerin, M.; Giesen, T. F.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Helmich, F.; Hennebelle, P.; Henning, Th.; Herbst, E.; Hily-Blant, P.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Hollenbach, D.; Jack, T.; Joblin, C.; Johnstone, D.; Kahane, C.; Kama, M.; Kaufman, M.; Klotz, A.; Langer, W. D.; Larsson, B.; Le Bourlot, J.; Lefloch, B.; Le Petit, F.; Li, D.; Liseau, R.; Lord, S. D.; Lorenzani, A.; Maret, S.; Martin, P. G.; Melnick, G. J.; Menten, K. M.; Morris, P.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, Z.; Nisini, B.; Ossenkopf, V.; Pacheco, S.; Pagani, L.; Parise, B.; Pérault, M.; Plume, R.; Qin, S.-L.; Roueff, E.; Salez, M.; Sandqvist, A.; Saraceno, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schuster, K.; Snell, R.; Stutzki, J.; Tielens, A.; Trappe, N.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; van Dishoeck, E.; Vastel, C.; Viti, S.; Wakelam, V.; Walters, A.; Wang, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Yorke, H. W.; Yu, S.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Delorme, Y.; Desbat, J.-P.; Güsten, R.; Krieg, J.-M.; Delforge, B.

    2010-10-01

    We report the first detection of chloronium, H2Cl+, in the interstellar medium, using the HIFI instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The 212-101 lines of ortho-H_235Cl+ and ortho-H_237Cl+ are detected in absorption towards NGC 6334I, and the 111-000 transition of para-H_235Cl+ is detected in absorption towards NGC 6334I and Sgr B2(S). The H2Cl+ column densities are compared to those of the chemically-related species HCl. The derived HCl/H2Cl+ column density ratios, ~1-10, are within the range predicted by models of diffuse and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs). However, the observed H2Cl+ column densities, in excess of 1013 cm-2, are significantly higher than the model predictions. Our observations demonstrate the outstanding spectroscopic capabilities of HIFI for detecting new interstellar molecules and providing key constraints for astrochemical models. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Table 1 and acknowledgments (page 5) are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Cryogenic Testing of the Herschel Flight Model Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, G.; Langfermann, M.; Wagner, K.; Hohn, R.; Demolder, B.; Jewell, C.; Linder, M.

    2010-04-01

    The `Herschel Space Observatory' is the fourth cornerstone mission in the `Horizons 2000' program of the European Space Agency (ESA), with the objectives to study the formation of galaxies in the early universe and the creation of stars. It will observe the chemical composition of surfaces and atmospheres of comets, planets and natural satellites, and examine the molecular chemistry of the universe. Herschel was launched into an operational Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 point by an Ariane 5 on May 14th 2009 to perform photometer and spectrometer measurements, covering the full far infrared to sub-millimeter wavelength range from 60 to 670 micrometers during its operational lifetime of more than four years. This paper gives a short overview of the cryogenic system and summarises the cryogenic aspects of the different phases of the acceptance test campaign, including the launch preparation phase as well as the post-launch transient cool-down of the system, the verification of the Passive Phase Separator performance and the evaluation of pressure drop measurements performed on the helium venting system. The impact of thermo-acoustic oscillations within the helium subsystem is described, which were present during the initial cool-down test phase. A comparison of measurements to numerical analysis results is shown.

  16. Spray Formation of Herschel-Bulkley Fluids using Impinging Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil; Gao, Jian; Chen, Jun; Sojka, Paul E.

    2015-11-01

    The impinging jet spray formation of two non-Newtonian, shear-thinning, Herschel-Bulkley fluids was investigated in this work. The water-based gelled solutions used were 1.0 wt.-% agar and 1.0 wt.-% kappa carrageenan. A rotational rheometer and a capillary viscometer were used to measure the strain-rate dependency of viscosity and the Herschel-Bulkley Extended (HBE) rheological model was used to characterize the shear-thinning behavior. A generalized HBE jet Reynolds number Rej , gen - HBE was used as the primary parameter to characterize the spray formation. A like-on-like impinging jet doublet was used to produce atomization. Shadowgraphs were captured in the plane of the sheet formed by the two jets using a CCD camera with an Nd:YAG laser beam providing the back-illumination. Typical behavior for impinging jet atomization using Newtonian liquids was not generally observed due to the non-Newtonian, viscous properties of the agar and kappa carrageenan gels. Instead various spray patterns were observed depending on Rej , gen - HBE. Spray characteristics of maximum instability wavelength and sheet breakup length were extracted from the shadowgraphs. Multi-University Research Initiative Grant Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  17. Star formation in Herschel's Monsters versus semi-analytic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppioni, C.; Calura, F.; Pozzi, F.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; De Lucia, G.; Fontanot, F.; Franceschini, A.; Marchetti, L.; Menci, N.; Monaco, P.; Vaccari, M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a direct comparison between the observed star formation rate functions (SFRFs) and the state-of-the-art predictions of semi-analytic models (SAMs) of galaxy formation and evolution. We use the PACS Evolutionary Probe Survey and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey data sets in the COSMOS and GOODS-South fields, combined with broad-band photometry from UV to sub-mm, to obtain total (IR+UV) instantaneous star formation rates (SFRs) for individual Herschel galaxies up to z ˜ 4, subtracted of possible active galactic nucleus (AGN) contamination. The comparison with model predictions shows that SAMs broadly reproduce the observed SFRFs up to z ˜ 2, when the observational errors on the SFR are taken into account. However, all the models seem to underpredict the bright end of the SFRF at z ≳ 2. The cause of this underprediction could lie in an improper modelling of several model ingredients, like too strong (AGN or stellar) feedback in the brighter objects or too low fallback of gas, caused by weak feedback and outflows at earlier epochs.

  18. Safe Operation of HIFI Local Oscillator Subsystem on Herschel Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, Malgorzata; Juchnikowski, Grzegorz; Klein, Thomas; Leinz, Christian; Nowosielski, Witold; Orleanski, Piotr; Ward, John

    The HIFI Local Oscillator Subsystem is part of the Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared (HIFI) dedicated for astronomical observations,to be mounted on the ESA satellite HER- SCHEL. The Subsystem provides the local oscillator signal (480-1910 GHz) to each of the fourteen HIFI input mixers. Part of LO, the Local Oscillator Control Unit (LCU) provides the main interface between Local Oscillator Subsystem and HIFI/Herschel power and telemetry buses. The unit supplies Local Oscillator, decodes the HIFI macro-commands, programs and monitors the parameters of Ka-Band Synthesizer and THz multiplier chains and controls the operation of the whole Local Oscillator Subsystem. The unique microwave components used in HF multipliers are extremely sensitive to the proper biasing (polarity, voltage, current, presence of HF power).The ESA strategy of this mission requires full safe operation of the instrument. This requirements is covered by complex protection system implemented inside LCU. In this paper, we present the general overview of the protection system of microwave components. The different levels of protection (hardware realization and software procedures) are described as well as various reliability aspects. The functionality of LO subsystem controlled by LCU was tested in 2007. Now the flight model of HIFI instrument is integrated with the satellite and will be launched with Herschel mission in July 2008.

  19. Long-term changes in UT/LS ozone between the late 1970s and the 1990s deduced from the GASP and MOZAIC aircraft programs and from ozonesondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnadt Poberaj, C.; Staehelin, J.; Brunner, D.; Thouret, V.; de Backer, H.; Stübi, R.

    2009-01-01

    We present ozone measurements of the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) performed from four commercial and one research aircraft in the late 1970s to compare them with respective measurements of the ongoing MOZAIC project. Climatologies of UT/LS ozone were built using the aircraft data sets (1975-1979 and 1994-2001), and long-term changes between the 1970s and 1990s were derived by comparison. The data were binned relative to the dynamical tropopause to separate between UT and LS air masses. LS data were analysed using equivalent latitudes. In the UT, pronounced increases are found over the Middle East and South Asia in the spring and summer seasons. Increases are also found over Japan, Europe, and the eastern parts of the Unites States depending on season. LS ozone over northern mid- and high latitudes was found to be lower in the 1990s compared to the 1970s in all seasons of the year. In addition, a comparison with long-term changes deduced from ozonesondes is presented. An altitude offset was applied to the sonde data to account for the slow response time of the ozone sensors. The early 1970s European Brewer-Mast (BM) sonde data agree with GASP within the range of uncertainty (UT) or measured slightly less ozone (LS). In contrast, the 1990s BM sensors show consistently and significantly higher UT/LS ozone values than MOZAIC. This unequal behaviour of aircraft/sonde comparisons in the 1970s and 1990s leads to differences in the estimated long-term changes over Europe: while the comparison between GASP and MOZAIC indicates ozone changes of -5% to 10% over Europe, the sondes suggest a much larger increase of 10%-35% depending on station and season, although statistical significance is not conclusive due to data sample limitations. In contrast to the BM sondes, the Electrochemical Cell (ECC) sonde at Wallops Island, USA, measured higher UT ozone than both GASP and MOZAIC. Hence, long-term changes from GASP/MOZAIC agree within the range of uncertainty with

  20. The JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Surveys: a comparison of SCUBA-2 and Herschel data of dense cores in the Taurus dark cloud L1495

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward-Thompson, D.; Pattle, K.; Kirk, J. M.; Marsh, K.; Buckle, J.; Hatchell, J.; Nutter, D. J.; Griffin, M. J.; Di Francesco, J.; André, P.; Beaulieu, S.; Berry, D.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J.; Pineda, J.; Quinn, C.; Sadavoy, S.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; White, G.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Palmeirim, P.; Pezzuto, S.

    2016-11-01

    We present a comparison of Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array-2 (SCUBA-2) 850-μm and Herschel 70-500-μm observations of the L1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud with the goal of characterizing the SCUBA-2 Gould Belt Survey (GBS) data set. We identify and characterize starless cores in three data sets: SCUBA-2 850-μm, Herschel 250-μm, and Herschel 250-μm spatially filtered to mimic the SCUBA-2 data. SCUBA-2 detects only the highest-surface-brightness sources, principally detecting protostellar sources and starless cores embedded in filaments, while Herschel is sensitive to most of the cloud structure, including extended low-surface-brightness emission. Herschel detects considerably more sources than SCUBA-2 even after spatial filtering. We investigate which properties of a starless core detected by Herschel determine its detectability by SCUBA-2, and find that they are the core's temperature and column density (for given dust properties). For similar-temperature cores, such as those seen in L1495, the surface brightnesses of the cores are determined by their column densities, with the highest-column-density cores being detected by SCUBA-2. For roughly spherical geometries, column density corresponds to volume density, and so SCUBA-2 selects the densest cores from a population at a given temperature. This selection effect, which we quantify as a function of distance, makes SCUBA-2 ideal for identifying those cores in Herschel catalogues that are closest to forming stars. Our results can now be used by anyone wishing to use the SCUBA-2 GBS data set.

  1. Philomaths, Herschel, and the myth of the self-taught man

    PubMed Central

    Winterburn, Emily

    2014-01-01

    The role of technicians and background characters in the historical practice of science is slowly gaining recognition. This paper looks at the collective effort involved in learning science, using as my case study the eighteenth-century musician turned astronomer, William Herschel. Lacking a university education, Herschel, like many contemporaries, presented himself as self-taught, thereby hiding his engagement with a rich network of didactic resources. Placing Herschel's story within the history of pedagogy, I argue that this network, previously discussed only in the context of popular or marketplace science, was an important resource for science education at its highest level. PMID:25254276

  2. Herschel Search for O2 toward the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Kaufman, Michael J.; Hollenbach, David J.; Black, John H.; Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith; Gerin, Maryvonne; Hjalmarson, Åke; Li, Di; Lis, Dariusz C.; Liseau, René; Neufeld, David A.; Pagani, Laurent; Snell, Ronald L.; van der Tak, Floris; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2012-06-01

    We report the results of a search for molecular oxygen (O2) toward the Orion Bar, a prominent photodissociation region at the southern edge of the H II region created by the luminous Trapezium stars. We observed the spectral region around the frequency of the O2 NJ = 33-12 transition at 487 GHz and the 54-34 transition at 774 GHz using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory. Neither line was detected, but the 3σ upper limits established here translate to a total line-of-sight O2 column density <1.5 × 1016 cm-2 for an emitting region whose temperature is between 30 K and 250 K, or <1 × 1016 cm-2 if the O2 emitting region is primarily at a temperature of lsim100 K. Because the Orion Bar is oriented nearly edge-on relative to our line of sight, the observed column density is enhanced by a factor estimated to be between 4 and 20 relative to the face-on value. Our upper limits imply that the face-on O2 column density is less than 4 × 1015 cm-2, a value that is below, and possibly well below, model predictions for gas with a density of 104-105 cm-3 exposed to a far-ultraviolet flux 104 times the local value, conditions inferred from previous observations of the Orion Bar. The discrepancy might be resolved if (1) the adsorption energy of O atoms to ice is greater than 800 K (2) the total face-on A V of the Bar is less than required for O2 to reach peak abundance; (3) the O2 emission arises within dense clumps with a small beam filling factor; or (4) the face-on depth into the Bar where O2 reaches its peak abundance, which is density dependent, corresponds to a sky position different from that sampled by our Herschel beams. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  3. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey - VIII. The Bright Galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Bianchi, S.; Cortese, L.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Pappalardo, C.; Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S.; Magrini, L.; Pohlen, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.

    2012-02-01

    We describe the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey and the first data that cover the complete survey area (four 4 × 4 deg2 regions). We use these data to measure and compare the global far-infrared properties of 78 optically bright galaxies that are selected at 500 μm and detected in all five far-infrared bands. We show that our measurements and calibration are broadly consistent with previous data obtained by the IRAS, ISO, Spitzer and Planck. We use SPIRE and PACS photometry data to produce 100-, 160-, 250-, 350- and 500-μm cluster luminosity distributions. These luminosity distributions are not power laws, but 'peaked', with small numbers of both faint and bright galaxies. We measure a cluster 100-500 μm far-infrared luminosity density of 1.6(7.0) ± 0.2 × 109 L⊙ Mpc-3. This compares to a cluster 0.4-2.5 μm optical luminosity density of 5.0(20.0) × 109 L⊙ Mpc-3, some 3.2(2.9) times larger than the far-infrared. A 'typical' photon originates from an optical depth of 0.4 ± 0.1. Most of our sample galaxies are well fitted by a single modified blackbody (β= 2), leading to a mean dust mass of log MDust= 7.31 M⊙ and temperature of 20.0 K. We also derive both stellar and atomic hydrogen masses from which we calculate mean values for the star-to-gas (atomic) and gas (atomic)-to-dust mass ratios of 15.1 and 58.2, respectively. Using our derived dust, atomic gas and stellar masses, we estimate cluster mass densities of 8.6(27.8) × 106, 4.6(13.9) × 108 and 7.8(29.7) × 109 M⊙ Mpc-3 for dust, atomic gas and stars, respectively. These values are higher than those derived for field galaxies by factors of 39(126), 6(18) and 34(129), respectively. In the above, the luminosity/mass densities are given using the whole sample with the values in brackets using just those galaxies that lie between 17 and 23 Mpc. We provide a data table of flux densities in all the Herschel bands for all 78 bright Virgo Cluster galaxies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science

  4. The chromosphere of α Cen A as seen by the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, B.; Liseau, R.; DUNES Team

    2015-05-01

    Chromospheres and coronae are common phenomena on solar-type stars. Understanding the heating of those layers requires the direct access to the relevant empirical data. In particular, the chromospheric temperature minimum, i.e. the region of the atmosphere where the temperature undergoes a reversal and starts increasing to reach values of the order of MK in the corona, can be observed directly in the far infrared and in the submillimetre spectral regime. In this paper we present the results of the observations obtained in those ranges of the solar twin α Cen A. Similar to the Sun, the far infrared emission of this star originates in the temperature minimum above the stellar photosphere. To our knowledge, this is the first time a temperature minimum has been directly measured on a main-sequence star other than the Sun. This contribution is a summary of the the results presented in ``α Centauri in the far infrared. First measurements of the temperature minimum of a star other than the Sun'' (Liseau et al 2013, A&A, 549, L7) based on results from the Herschel} Open Time Key Project DUNES and APEX/LABOCA observations.

  5. HERSCHEL's ''COLD DEBRIS DISKS'': BACKGROUND GALAXIES OR QUIESCENT RIMS OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Krivov, A. V.; Loehne, T.; Mutschke, H.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mustill, A. J.; Montesinos, B.; Del Burgo, C.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S.; Lebreton, J.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; Liseau, R.; Mora, A.; Pilbratt, G. L. [ESA Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics Missions Division, ESTEC and others

    2013-07-20

    Infrared excesses associated with debris disk host stars detected so far peak at wavelengths around {approx}100 {mu}m or shorter. However, 6 out of 31 excess sources studied in the Herschel Open Time Key Programme, DUNES, have been seen to show significant-and in some cases extended-excess emission at 160 {mu}m, which is larger than the 100 {mu}m excess. This excess emission has been attributed to circumstellar dust and has been suggested to stem from debris disks colder than those known previously. Since the excess emission of the cold disk candidates is extremely weak, challenging even the unrivaled sensitivity of Herschel, it is prudent to carefully consider whether some or even all of them may represent unrelated galactic or extragalactic emission, or even instrumental noise. We re-address these issues using several distinct methods and conclude that it is highly unlikely that none of the candidates represents a true circumstellar disk. For true disks, both the dust temperatures inferred from the spectral energy distributions and the disk radii estimated from the images suggest that the dust is nearly as cold as a blackbody. This requires the grains to be larger than {approx}100 {mu}m, even if they are rich in ices or are composed of any other material with a low absorption in the visible. The dearth of small grains is puzzling, since collisional models of debris disks predict that grains of all sizes down to several times the radiation pressure blowout limit should be present. We explore several conceivable scenarios: transport-dominated disks, disks of low dynamical excitation, and disks of unstirred primordial macroscopic grains. Our qualitative analysis and collisional simulations rule out the first two of these scenarios, but show the feasibility of the third one. We show that such disks can indeed survive for gigayears, largely preserving the primordial size distribution. They should be composed of macroscopic solids larger than millimeters, but smaller

  6. Herschel's "Cold Debris Disks": Background Galaxies or Quiescent Rims of Planetary Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivov, A. V.; Eiroa, C.; Löhne, T.; Marshall, J. P.; Montesinos, B.; del Burgo, C.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Augereau, J.-C.; Bayo, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; Ertel, S.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Mora, A.; Mustill, A. J.; Mutschke, H.; Neuhäuser, R.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Thébault, Ph.; Vitense, Ch.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2013-07-01

    Infrared excesses associated with debris disk host stars detected so far peak at wavelengths around ~100 μm or shorter. However, 6 out of 31 excess sources studied in the Herschel Open Time Key Programme, DUNES, have been seen to show significant—and in some cases extended—excess emission at 160 μm, which is larger than the 100 μm excess. This excess emission has been attributed to circumstellar dust and has been suggested to stem from debris disks colder than those known previously. Since the excess emission of the cold disk candidates is extremely weak, challenging even the unrivaled sensitivity of Herschel, it is prudent to carefully consider whether some or even all of them may represent unrelated galactic or extragalactic emission, or even instrumental noise. We re-address these issues using several distinct methods and conclude that it is highly unlikely that none of the candidates represents a true circumstellar disk. For true disks, both the dust temperatures inferred from the spectral energy distributions and the disk radii estimated from the images suggest that the dust is nearly as cold as a blackbody. This requires the grains to be larger than ~100 μm, even if they are rich in ices or are composed of any other material with a low absorption in the visible. The dearth of small grains is puzzling, since collisional models of debris disks predict that grains of all sizes down to several times the radiation pressure blowout limit should be present. We explore several conceivable scenarios: transport-dominated disks, disks of low dynamical excitation, and disks of unstirred primordial macroscopic grains. Our qualitative analysis and collisional simulations rule out the first two of these scenarios, but show the feasibility of the third one. We show that such disks can indeed survive for gigayears, largely preserving the primordial size distribution. They should be composed of macroscopic solids larger than millimeters, but smaller than a few

  7. Herschel's "Cold Debris Disks": Background Galaxies or Quiescent Rims of Planetary Systems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivov, A. V.; Eiroa, C.; Loehne, T.; Marshall, J. P.; Montesinos, B.; DelBurgo, C.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Augereau, J.-C.; Bayo, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; Ertel, S.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Mora, A.; Mustill, A. J.; Mutschke, H.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Thebault, Ph.; Vitense, Ch.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared excesses associated with debris disk host stars detected so far peak at wavelengths around approx, 100 micron or shorter. However, 6 out of 31 excess sources studied in the Herschel Open Time Key Programme, DUNES, have been seen to show significant-and in some cases extended-excess emission at 160 micron, which is larger than the 100 micron excess. This excess emission has been attributed to circumstellar dust and has been suggested to stem from debris disks colder than those known previously. Since the excess emission of the cold disk candidates is extremely weak, challenging even the unrivaled sensitivity of Herschel, it is prudent to carefully consider whether some or even all of them may represent unrelated galactic or extragalactic emission, or even instrumental noise. We re-address these issues using several distinct methods and conclude that it is highly unlikely that none of the candidates represents a true circumstellar disk. For true disks, both the dust temperatures inferred from the spectral energy distributions and the disk radii estimated from the images suggest that the dust is nearly as cold as a blackbody. This requires the grains to be larger than approx. 100 micron, even if they are rich in ices or are composed of any other material with a low absorption in the visible. The dearth of small grains is puzzling, since collisional models of debris disks predict that grains of all sizes down to several times the radiation pressure blowout limit should be present. We explore several conceivable scenarios: transport-dominated disks, disks of low dynamical excitation, and disks of unstirred primordial macroscopic grains. Our qualitative analysis and collisional simulations rule out the first two of these scenarios, but show the feasibility of the third one. We show that such disks can indeed survive for gigayears, largely preserving the primordial size distribution. They should be composed of macroscopic solids larger than millimeters, but

  8. Another look at the BL Lacertae flux and spectral variability. Observations by GASP-WEBT, XMM-Newton, and Swift in 2008-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Bruschini, L.; Capetti, A.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Larionov, V. M.; Romano, P.; Vercellone, S.; Agudo, I.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bach, U.; Berdyugin, A.; Blinov, D. A.; Böttcher, M.; Buemi, C. S.; Calcidese, P.; Carosati, D.; Casas, R.; Chen, W.-P.; Coloma, J.; Diltz, C.; di Paola, A.; Dolci, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Forné, E.; Gómez, J. L.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hakola, A.; Hovatta, T.; Hsiao, H. Y.; Jordan, B.; Jorstad, S. G.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, S. O.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionova, E. G.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Ligustri, R.; Marscher, A. P.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Ros, J. A.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sadun, A. C.; Sillanpää, A.; Sainio, J.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Troitsky, I. S.; Umana, G.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: In a previous study we suggested that the broad-band emission and variability properties of BL Lacertae can be accounted for by a double synchrotron emission component with related inverse-Compton emission from the jet, plus thermal radiation from the accretion disc. Here we investigate the matter with further data extending over a wider energy range. Methods: The GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP) of the whole earth blazar telescope (WEBT) monitored BL Lacertae in 2008-2009 at radio, near-IR, and optical frequencies to follow its flux behaviour. During this period, high-energy observations were performed by XMM-Newton, Swift, and Fermi. We analyse these data with particular attention to the calibration of Swift UV data, and apply a helical jet model to interpret the source broad-band variability. Results: The GASP-WEBT observations show an optical flare in 2008 February-March, and oscillations of several tenths of mag on a few-day time scale afterwards. The radio flux is only mildly variable. The UV data from both XMM-Newton and Swift seem to confirm a UV excess that is likely caused by thermal emission from the accretion disc. The X-ray data from XMM-Newton indicate a strongly concave spectrum, as well as moderate (~4-7%) flux variability on an hour time scale. The Swift X-ray data reveal fast (interday) flux changes, not correlated with those observed at lower energies. We compare the spectral energy distribution (SED) corresponding to the 2008 low-brightness state, which was characterised by a synchrotron dominance, to the 1997 outburst state, where the inverse-Compton emission was prevailing. A fit with an inhomogeneous helical jet model suggests that two synchrotron components are at work with their self inverse-Compton emission. Most likely, they represent the radiation from two distinct emitting regions in the jet. We show that the difference between the source SEDs in 2008 and 1997 can be explained in terms of pure geometrical variations. The

  9. SED fitting of nearby galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, L.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Cortese, L.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bock, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Bradford, M.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Chanial, P.; Charlot, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D.; Corbell, E.; Cooray, A.; Cormie, D.; Dariush, A.; Davies, J.; de Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S.; Elbaz, D.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Gear, W.; Giovanardi, C.; Glenn, J.; Gomez, H.; Griffin, M.; Grossi, M.; Hony, S.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L.; Isaak, K.; Jones, A.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Madden, S. C.; O'Halloran, B.; Okumura, K.; Oliver, S.; Page, M.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Parkin, T.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Rangwala, N.; Rigby, E.; Roussel, H.; Rykala, A.; Sabatini, S.; Sacchi, N.; Sauvage, M.; Schulz, B.; Schirm, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Stevens, J.; Sundar, S.; Symeonidis, M.; Trichas, M.; Vaccari, M.; Verstappen, J.; Vigroux, L.; Vlahakis, C.; Wilson, C.; Wozniak, H.; Wright, G.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zeilinger, W.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-12-01

    We compute UV to radio continuum spectral energy distributions of 51 nearby galaxies recently observed with SPIRE onboard Herschel and present infrared colours (in the 25-500 μm spectral range). SPIRE data of normal galaxies are well reproduced with a modified black body (β=2) of temperature T≃q 20 K. In ellipticals hosting a radio galaxy, the far-infrared (FIR) emission is dominated by the synchrotron nuclear emission. The colour temperature of the cold dust is higher in quiescent E-S0a than in star-forming systems probably because of the different nature of their dust heating sources (evolved stellar populations, X-ray, fast electrons) and dust grain properties.

  10. Spitzer Imaging of Herschel-atlas Gravitationally Lensed Submillimeter Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopwood, R.; Wardlow, J.; Cooray, A.; Khostovan, A. A.; Kim, S.; Negrello, M.; da Cunha, E.; Burgarella, D.; Aretxaga, I.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Barton, E.; Bertoldi, F.; Bonfield, D. G.; Blundell, R.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooke, J.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dunlop, J.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Frayer, D.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hughes, D. H.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Lagache, G.; Leeuw, L.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Omont, A.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Smail, I.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; Thompson, M. A.; Valtchanov, I.; van der Werf, P.; Verma, A.; Vieira, J. D.

    2011-02-01

    We present physical properties of two submillimeter selected gravitationally lensed sources, identified in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. These submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have flux densities >100 mJy at 500 μm, but are not visible in existing optical imaging. We fit light profiles to each component of the lensing systems in Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm data and successfully disentangle the foreground lens from the background source in each case, providing important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the background SMG at rest-frame optical-near-infrared wavelengths. The SED fits show that these two SMGs have high dust obscuration with A V ~ 4-5 and star formation rates of ~100 M sun yr-1. They have low gas fractions and low dynamical masses compared with 850 μm selected galaxies.

  11. Water vapor toward starless cores: The Herschel view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, P.; Keto, E.; Pagani, L.; Aikawa, Y.; Yıldız, U. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Tafalla, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Nisini, B.; Codella, C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bachiller, R.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A. O.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G. A.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Bruderer, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Doty, S. D.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Gaier, T.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Graauw, Th.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Jackson, B.; Jacq, T.; Javadi, H.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Kester, D.; Kristensen, L. E.; Laauwen, W.; Larsson, B.; Lis, D.; Liseau, R.; Luinge, W.; Marseille, M.; McCoey, C.; Megej, A.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J. C.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Santiago-García, J.; Saraceno, P.; Shipman, R.; Siegel, P.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2010-10-01

    Aims: Previous studies by the satellites SWAS and Odin provided stringent upper limits on the gas phase water abundance of dark clouds (x(H2O) < 7 × 10-9). We investigate the chemistry of water vapor in starless cores beyond the previous upper limits using the highly improved angular resolution and sensitivity of Herschel and measure the abundance of water vapor during evolutionary stages just preceding star formation. Methods: High spectral resolution observations of the fundamental ortho water (o-H2O) transition (557 GHz) were carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared onboard Herschel toward two starless cores: Barnard 68 (hereafter B68), a Bok globule, and LDN 1544 (L1544), a prestellar core embedded in the Taurus molecular cloud complex. Detailed radiative transfer and chemical codes were used to analyze the data. Results: The RMS in the brightness temperature measured for the B68 and L1544 spectra is 2.0 and 2.2 mK, respectively, in a velocity bin of 0.59 km s-1. The continuum level is 3.5 ± 0.2 mK in B68 and 11.4 ± 0.4 mK in L1544. No significant feature is detected in B68 and the 3σ upper limit is consistent with a column density of o-H2O N(o-H2O) < 2.5 × 1013 cm-2, or a fractional abundance x(o-H2O) < 1.3 × 10-9, more than an order of magnitude lower than the SWAS upper limit on this source. The L1544 spectrum shows an absorption feature at a 5σ level from which we obtain the first value of the o-H2O column density ever measured in dark clouds: N(o-H2O) = (8 ± 4) × 1012 cm-2. The corresponding fractional abundance is x(o-H2O) ≃ 5 × 10-9 at radii >7000 AU and ≃2 × 10-10 toward the center. The radiative transfer analysis shows that this is consistent with a x(o-H2O) profile peaking at ≃10-8, 0.1 pc away from the core center, where both freeze-out and photodissociation are negligible. Conclusions: Herschel has provided the first measurement of water vapor in dark regions. Column densities of o-H2O are low, but prestellar

  12. SPITZER IMAGING OF HERSCHEL-ATLAS GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED SUBMILLIMETER SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, R.; Negrello, M.; Wardlow, J.; Cooray, A.; Khostovan, A. A.; Kim, S.; Barton, E.; Da Cunha, E.; Cooke, J.; Burgarella, D.; Aretxaga, I.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Bonfield, D. G.; Blundell, R.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Dannerbauer, H.

    2011-02-10

    We present physical properties of two submillimeter selected gravitationally lensed sources, identified in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. These submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have flux densities >100 mJy at 500 {mu}m, but are not visible in existing optical imaging. We fit light profiles to each component of the lensing systems in Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data and successfully disentangle the foreground lens from the background source in each case, providing important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the background SMG at rest-frame optical-near-infrared wavelengths. The SED fits show that these two SMGs have high dust obscuration with A{sub V} {approx} 4-5 and star formation rates of {approx}100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. They have low gas fractions and low dynamical masses compared with 850 {mu}m selected galaxies.

  13. Herschel Shines Light on the Episodic Evolutionary Sequence of Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Joel D.; DIGIT; FOOSH; COPS Teams

    2014-01-01

    New far-infrared and submillimeter spectroscopic capabilities, along with moderate spatial and spectral resolution, provide the opportunity to study the diversity of shocks, accretion processes, and compositions of the envelopes of developing protostellar objects in nearby molecular clouds. We present the "COPS" (CO in Protostars) sample; a statistical analysis of the full sample of 30 Class 0/I protostars from the "DIGIT" Key project using Herschel-PACS/SPIRE 50-700 micron spectroscopy. We consider the sample as a whole in characteristic spectral lines, using a standardized data reduction procedure for all targets, and analyze the differences in the continuum and gas over the full sample, presenting an overview of trends. We compare the sources in evolutionary state, envelope mass, and gas properties to more evolved sources from the"FOOSH'' (FUor) samples.

  14. Alignment in star-debris disc systems seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, J. S.; Kennedy, G. M.; Thureau, N.; Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Maldonado, J.; Matthews, B. C.; Olofsson, G.; Barlow, M. J.; Moro-Martín, A.; Sibthorpe, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D. R.; Booth, M.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cameron, A. Collier; del Burgo, C.; Di Francesco, J.; Eislöffel, J.; Duchêne, G.; Ertel, S.; Holland, W. S.; Horner, J.; Kalas, P.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Vican, L.; Wilner, D. J.; Wolf, S.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2014-02-01

    Many nearby main-sequence stars have been searched for debris using the far-infrared Herschel satellite, within the DEBRIS, DUNES and Guaranteed-Time Key Projects. We discuss here 11 stars of spectral types A-M where the stellar inclination is known and can be compared to that of the spatially resolved dust belts. The discs are found to be well aligned with the stellar equators, as in the case of the Sun's Kuiper belt, and unlike many close-in planets seen in transit surveys. The ensemble of stars here can be fitted with a star-disc tilt of ≲ 10°. These results suggest that proposed mechanisms for tilting the star or disc in fact operate rarely. A few systems also host imaged planets, whose orbits at tens of au are aligned with the debris discs, contrary to what might be expected in models where external perturbers induce tilts.

  15. A search for debris disks in the Herschel-ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. A.; Smith, D. J. B.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Vidal Perez, E.; Marshall, J.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; White, G. J.; Leeuw, L.; Sibthorpe, B.; Baes, M.; González-Solares, E.; Scott, D.; Vieiria, J.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Bonfield, D. G.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maddox, S.; Negrello, M.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Samui, S.; Serjeant, S.; Temi, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Verma, A.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We aim to demonstrate that the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) is suitable for a blind and unbiased survey for debris disks by identifying candidate debris disks associated with main sequence stars in the initial science demonstration field of the survey. We show that H-ATLAS reveals a population of far-infrared/sub-mm sources that are associated with stars or star-like objects on the SDSS main-sequence locus. We validate our approach by comparing the properties of the most likely candidate disks to those of the known population. Methods: We use a photometric selection technique to identify main sequence stars in the SDSS DR7 catalogue and a Bayesian Likelihood Ratio method to identify H-ATLAS catalogue sources associated with these main sequence stars. Following this photometric selection we apply distance cuts to identify the most likely candidate debris disks and rule out the presence of contaminating galaxies using UKIDSS LAS K-band images. Results: We identify 78 H-ATLAS sources associated with SDSS point sources on the main-sequence locus, of which two are the most likely debris disk candidates: H-ATLAS J090315.8 and H-ATLAS J090240.2. We show that they are plausible candidates by comparing their properties to the known population of debris disks. Our initial results indicate that bright debris disks are rare, with only 2 candidates identified in a search sample of 851 stars. We also show that H-ATLAS can derive useful upper limits for debris disks associated with Hipparcos stars in the field and outline the future prospects for our debris disk search programme. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  16. Derivation of sideband gain ratio for Herschel/HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kester, Do; Higgins, Ronan; Teyssier, David

    2017-03-01

    Context. Heterodyne mixers are commonly used for high-resolution spectroscopy at radio telescopes. When used as a double sideband system, the accurate flux calibration of spectral lines acquired by those detectors is highly dependent on the system gains in the respective mixer sidebands via the so-called sideband gain ratio (SBR). As such, the SBR was one of the main contributors to the calibration uncertainty budget of the Herschel/HIFI instrument. Aims: We want to determine the HIFI instrument sideband gain ratio for all bands on a fine frequency grid and within an accuracy of a few percent. Methods: We introduce a novel technique involving in-orbit HIFI data that is bootstrapped onto standard methods involving laboratory data measurements of the SBR. We deconvolved the astronomical data to provide a proxy of the expected signal at every frequency channel, and extracted the sideband gain ratios from the residuals of that process. Results: We determine the HIFI sideband gain ratio to an accuracy varying between 1 and 4%, with degraded accuracy in higher frequency ranges, and at places where the reliability of the technique is lower. These figures were incorporated into the HIFI data processing pipeline and improved the overall flux uncertainty of the legacy data from this instrument. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a modified sideband deconvolution algorithm, using astronomical data in combination with gas cell measurements, can be used to generate an accurate and fine-granularity picture of the sideband gain ratio behaviour of a heterodyne receiver. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  17. JCMT in the Post-Herschel ERA of Alma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Doug

    2013-07-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), with a 15m dish, is the largest single-dish astronomical telescope in the world designed specifically to operate in the sub-mm wavelength regime. The JCMT is located close to the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, at an altitude of 4092m. The most recent addition to the JCMT's suite of instruments is the 10,000 bolometer sub-mm continuum instrument: SCUBA-2. SCUBA-2 operates simultaneously with 7' x7' foot print sub-arrays at both 450 and 850-microns. SCUBA-2's wide field surveying potential, combined with a 65% shared view of the sky from both sites, makes it the ideal instrument to provide complementary data for the ALMA Project. Furthermore, the SCUBA-2 sub-millimetre wavelength coverage and angular resolution complement existing Herschel observations. A set of comprehensive surveys of the submillimetre sky is underway at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) using SCUBA-2 and HARP, a heterodyne array receiver operating between 325 and 375 GHz. The JCMT Legacy Survey (JLS) is comprised of seven survey projects, and ranges in scope from the study of nearby debris disk systems, the study of star formation in nearby molecular cloud systems and more distant structures in our Galactic Plane, to the structure and composition of galaxies in our local neighbourhood and the number and evolution of submillimetre galaxies at high redshifts in the early Universe. In addition to the JLS, the COHR survey is imaging the Galactic plane in CO (3-2) and a JAC Staff-led project is using SCUBA-2 to survey the Galactic Centre. This poster highlights the significant survey capabilities of SCUBA-2 and HARP and reveals the continuing importance of the JCMT in a post-Herschel, ALMA world.

  18. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  19. Herschel Galactic Plane Survey of [NII] Fine Structure Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10-8-10-7 Wm-2 sr-1 level over the range -60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10-50 cm-3 with an average value of 29 cm-3 and N+ column densities 1016-1017 cm-2. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  20. Herschel DEBRIS survey of debris discs around A stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thureau, N.

    2014-11-01

    The Herschel DEBRIS survey (Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) brings a unique perspective to the study of debris discs around main-sequence A-type stars. We have observed a sample of 89 A-stars with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on the Herschel space telescope at 100 and 160 μm. A statistical analysis of the data shows a lower debris disc rate than has previously been found. The drop is due in part to the fact that some excess sources were resolved as background objects by the superior angular resolution (a factor of 2.5) of PACS-100 relative to that of Spitzer (MIPS-70). We found a 3-σ detection rate of 23 myblue which is similar to the the detection rate around main-sequence F, G and K stars. Most of the debris discs were detected around the youngest and hottest stars in our sample. The incidence of discs in single and multiple systems was similar. The debris discs in multiple systems ware found either in tight binary systems (<1 AU) or wide ones (>100 AU). Debris discs in both tight and wide binary systems have physical properties that are statistically similar to those of discs around single stars. We did not detect any debris discs in binary systems with intermediate separation, in which the orbit and the debris disc would be on the same scale. One possible explanation is that discs in intermediate systems have evolved much faster owing to the disc-companion interactions and they are now undetectable.

  1. Mapping water in Jupiter with Herschel/HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, Thibault; Hartogh, P.; Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R.; Jarchow, C.; Billebaud, F.; Orton, G.; Rengel, M.; Sagawa, H.; Lara, L.; Gonzalez, A.; HssO Team

    2010-10-01

    A major discovery of ISO was the detection of water in the upper atmospheres of the four giant planets and Titan (Feuchtgruber et al, 1997; Coustenis et al, 1998), implying the existence of external sources of water. This oxygen supply, which manifests itself also through the presence of CO2 and CO in these atmospheres, may have several sources: (i) a permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles produced from asteroid collisions and from comet activity (Prather et al,1978), (ii) local sources from planetary environments (rings, satellites) (Strobel and Yung, 1979; Prangé et al, 2006), (iii) cometary ``Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) type'’ impacts (Lellouch et al, 1995). Disentangling the various sources at Jupiter is a key objective of the Herschel Space Observatory key program HssO (Hartogh et al, 2009). Herschel/HIFI observed H2O in Jupiter at 1669 GHz in a 5x5 point map on July 7, 2010. From this observation, we will present and discuss the search for latitudinal variability of H2O in Jupiter. Acknowledgement: Research by T. Cavalié was supported by the Fondation des Amis des Sciences. References: Coustenis et al, A&A 336,L85-L89. Feuchtgruber et al, 1997. Nature 389, 159-162. Hartogh et al, 2009. Planet. Space Sci. 57, 1596-1606. Lellouch et al, 1995. Nature 373, 592-595. Prangé et al, 2006. Icarus 180, 379-392. Prather, 1978. ApJ 223, 1072-1081. Strobel & Yung, 1979. Icarus 37, 256-263.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M31 Herschel images (Viaene+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Fritz, J.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Cortese, L.; de Looze, I.; Gear, W. K.; Gentile, G.; Hughes, T. M.; Jarrett, T.; Karczewski, O. L.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Tamm, A.; Tempel, E.; Thilker, D.; Verstappen, J.

    2014-05-01

    We present new, reduced Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron observations of M31 taken has part of the Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (P.I.: J. Fritz) The PACS 100 and 160 observations were reduced with the Herschel Interactive Processing Environment (HIPE) v.8 and Scanamorphos v.15.0 (Roussel, 2012, ASCL, 1209.012). The SPIRE 250, 350, and 500 micron observations data were reduced with HIPE v.8 and BriGAdE (Smith, in preparation). Complete details on the data reduction may be found in our first paper (Fritz et al., 2012A&A...546A..34F). Image properties are summarised in images.dat. The raw data can be retrieved from the Herschel Science Archive (ESA). (2 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Herschel counterparts of SDC (Peretto+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretto, N.; Lenfestey, C.; Fuller, G. A.; Traficante, A.; Molinari, S.; Thompson, M. A.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to identify which of the clouds from the Spitzer Dark Cloud catalogue (Peretto & Fuller, 2009, Cat. J/A+A/505/405) are real, which are artefacts. For this we used Herschel Hi-GAL (Molinari et al., 2010PASP..122..314M) column density maps and search for spatial associations between Spitzer Dark Cloud and Herschel column density peaks. Description: This table provides some of the key properties of the Spitzer Dark Clouds that we estimated using the Herschel data and used to disentangle between real and spurious clouds. For each cloud of the Peretto & Fuller (2009, Cat. J/A+A/505/405) catalogue we give the cloud name, the cloud equivalent radius, the average Herschel column density within the boundaries of the SDCs, the average Herschel column density immediately outside the boundary of the SDCs, the Herschel column density noise at the position of the SDC, the Herschel column density peak within the boundaries of the SDCs, the value for criterion c1, the value for criterion c2, the value for criterion c3, and a tag that indicates if the cloud has been identified as real by our automated detection scheme based on the values of c1 and c2. This tag can take a number of values. These are: 'y' for yes; n for no; 'sat' for a SDC entirely located in a saturated portion of the Herschel images; 'ysat' for a cloud that is considered real despite being partially saturated; 'out' for a SDC that is not covered by Herschel images; 'yout' for a cloud that is considered real despite being partially covered by Herschel images; 'nout' for a cloud considered spurious despite being partially covered by Herschel images. Also, note that the column referring to the equivalent radius Req is the same quantity as the one quoted in Table 1 column 11 of Peretto & Fuller (2009, Cat. J/A+A/505/405). However, these latter values should be discarded since a mistake has been found in the calculation of the equivalent radius. Only the new values, the ones provided in Table 1

  4. Herschel Observations of the Pre-Collapse Phase of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, J.

    2012-03-01

    Stars form after compact gas cores condense out of larger molecular clouds and collapse. How these cores themselves form has been difficult to observe, given the limitations of detecting from the ground faint, diffuse sub-structure in clouds (e.g., clumps and filaments). With its sensitive, spaceborne instrumentation, however, Herschel has now detected these structures in numerous clouds out to several kiloparsecs from their continuum emission. Indeed, the continuum data from PACS and SPIRE are revolutionizing our understanding of the environments from which cores themselves arise. In this review, we will summarize the recent results of several Herschel Key Programmes whose goals include better physical understanding of these environments. The specific programmes with prestellar core targets include the Herschel Gould Belt Survey (GBS; PI: Ph. André), the Herschel OB Young Star survey (HOBYS; PI: F. Motte), Galactic Cold Cores (GCC; PI: M. Juvela), the Earliest Phases of Star Formation (EPoS; PI: O. Krause), and the Herschel Galactic Plane Survey (HiGAL; PI: S. Molinari). We show in general that filaments are found on many scales throughout the Galaxy, and are a key aspect to the pre-collapse phase of star formation not previously appreciated before Herschel. In addition, the continuum data are providing new direct probes of the thermal and density structures of pre-collapse star-forming objects.

  5. Long-term changes in UT/LS ozone between the late 1970s and the 1990s deduced from the GASP and MOZAIC aircraft programs and from ozonesondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnadt Poberaj, C.; Staehelin, J.; Brunner, D.; Thouret, V.; de Backer, H.; Stübi, R.

    2009-07-01

    We present ozone measurements of the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) performed from four commercial and one research aircraft in the late 1970s to compare them with respective measurements of the ongoing MOZAIC project. Multi-annual averages of UT/LS ozone were built using the aircraft data sets (1975-1979 and 1994-2001), and long-term changes between the 1970s and 1990s were derived by comparison. The data were binned relative to the dynamical tropopause to separate between UT and LS air masses. LS data were analysed using equivalent latitudes. In the UT, pronounced increases of 20-40% are found over the Middle East and South Asia in the spring and summer seasons. Increases are also found over Japan, Europe, and the eastern parts of the United States depending on season. LS ozone over northern mid- and high latitudes was found to be lower in the 1990s compared to the 1970s in all seasons of the year. In addition, a comparison with long-term changes deduced from ozonesondes is presented. The early 1970s European Brewer-Mast (BM) sonde data agree with GASP within the range of uncertainty (UT) or measured slightly less ozone (LS). In contrast, the 1990s BM sensors show consistently and significantly higher UT/LS ozone values than MOZAIC. This unequal behaviour of aircraft/sonde comparisons in the 1970s and 1990s leads to differences in the estimated long-term changes over Europe: while the comparison between GASP and MOZAIC indicates ozone changes of -5% to 10% over Europe, the sondes suggest a much larger increase of 10%-35% depending on station and season, although statistical significance is not conclusive due to data sample limitations. In contrast to the BM sondes, the Electrochemical Cell (ECC) sonde at Wallops Island, USA, measured higher UT ozone than both GASP and MOZAIC. Hence, long-term changes from GASP/MOZAIC agree within the range of uncertainty with the changes deduced from Wallops Island.

  6. Potential multi-component structure of the debris disk around HIP 17439 revealed by Herschel/DUNES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Augereau, J.-C.; Krivov, A. V.; Löhne, T.; Eiroa, C.; Mora, A.; del Burgo, C.; Montesinos, B.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; Kirchschlager, F.; Liseau, R.; Maldonado, J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Schüppler, Ch.; Thébault, Ph.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The dust observed in debris disks is produced through collisions of larger bodies left over from the planet/planetesimal formation process. Spatially resolving these disks permits to constrain their architecture and thus that of the underlying planetary/planetesimal system. Aims: Our Herschel open time key program DUNES aims at detecting and characterizing debris disks around nearby, sun-like stars. In addition to the statistical analysis of the data, the detailed study of single objects through spatially resolving the disk and detailed modeling of the data is a main goal of the project. Methods: We obtained the first observations spatially resolving the debris disk around the sun-like star HIP 17439 (HD 23484) using the instruments PACS and SPIRE on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Simultaneous multi-wavelength modeling of these data together with ancillary data from the literature is presented. Results: A standard single component disk model fails to reproduce the major axis radial profiles at 70 μm, 100 μm, and 160 μm simultaneously. Moreover, the best-fit parameters derived from such a model suggest a very broad disk extending from few au up to few hundreds of au from the star with a nearly constant surface density which seems physically unlikely. However, the constraints from both the data and our limited theoretical investigation are not strong enough to completely rule out this model. An alternative, more plausible, and better fitting model of the system consists of two rings of dust at approx. 30 au and 90 au, respectively, while the constraints on the parameters of this model are weak due to its complexity and intrinsic degeneracies. Conclusions: The disk is probably composed of at least two components with different spatial locations (but not necessarily detached), while a single, broad disk is possible, but less likely. The two spatially well-separated rings of dust in our best-fit model suggest the presence of at least one high mass

  7. Herschel Survey of the Trans-Neptunian Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas G.

    2015-08-01

    Transneptunian Objects (TNOs) are believed to retain the most pristine and least altered material of the Solar System. We studied a sample of more than 130 objects with Herschel as part of a key program "TNOs are Cool" and smaller projects related to prominent targets.Our sample includes TNOs in each of the dynamical classes, including Centaurs, and 2 satellites. The PACS data were used to determine diameters and albedos for over 100 of those targets. We were also able to constrain the temperature distribution on the surfaces of over 80 objects, in some cases by combining the Herschel data with shorter-wavelength Spitzer or WISE measurements. The temperature distribution is controlled by the thermal inertia and roughness of the surface, and so gives deeper insight into surface processes in the outer Solar System. We obtained thermal lightcurve observations for a few interesting targets like Haumea, Eris, Varuna, to discriminate between shape and surface variegation effects. For the characterization of dwarf planets (e.g. Makemake, Orcus, Quaoar) and other bright object we extented the wavelength coverage into the submm by using the SPIRE photometer. Also the two Centaurs with ring systems -Chariklo and Chiron- have been observed at far-IR wavelengths with very high photometric accuracy. We were also able to study a few Centaurs with extreme orbits, including the super-comet candidate 2013 AZ60 showing very perculiar properties.The diameters measured in this program have been combined with mass-determinations for binary systems to give an intriguing first-look at the density of TNOs as a function of size. The analysis of albedo data revealed the existence of two distinct types of surface among mid-sized TNOs: The colour-albedo diagram shows that the objects located in dynamically stable orbits within the classical Kuiper Belt region and beyond have high albedo and red colours, implying a formation further from the Sun than the dark, neutral-colour bodies.The results

  8. IRAC Snapshot Imaging of Massive-Cluster Gravitational Lenses Observed by the Herschel Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Eiichi; Rawle, Timothy; Cava, Antonio; Clement, Benjamin; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Ebeling, Harald; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Richard, Johan; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Schaerer, Daniel; Walth, Gregory

    2015-10-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory, our team has been conducting a large survey of the fields of massive galaxy clusters, 'The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS)' (PI: Egami; 419 hours). The main scientific goal is to penetrate the confusion limit of Herschel by taking advantage of the strong gravitational lensing power of these massive clusters and study the population of low-luminosity and/or high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies that are beyond the reach of field Herschel surveys. In the course of this survey, we have obtained deep PACS (100/160 um) and SPIRE (250/350/500 um) images for 54 clusters (HLS-deep) as well as shallower (but nearly confusion-limited) SPIRE images for 527 clusters (HLS-snapshot). The goal of this proposal is to obtain shallow (500 sec/band) 3.6/4.5 um images of 266 cluster fields that have been observed by the HLS-snapshot survey but do not have any corresponding IRAC data. The HLS-snapshot SPIRE images are deep enough to detect a large number of sources in the target cluster fields, many of which are distant star-forming galaxies lensed by the foreground clusters, and the large sample size of HLS-snapshot promises a great potential for making exciting discoveries. Yet, these Herschel images would be of limited use if we could not identify the counterparts of the Herschel sources accurately and efficiently. The proposed IRAC snapshot program will greatly enhance the utility of these Herschel data, and will feed powerful gound observing facilities like ALMA and NOEMA with interesting targets to follow up.

  9. The Footprint Database and Web Services of the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, László; Varga-Verebélyi, Erika; Verdugo, Eva; Teyssier, David; Exter, Katrina; Valtchanov, Ivan; Budavári, Tamás; Kiss, Csaba

    2016-10-01

    Data from the Herschel Space Observatory is freely available to the public but no uniformly processed catalogue of the observations has been published so far. To date, the Herschel Science Archive does not contain the exact sky coverage (footprint) of individual observations and supports search for measurements based on bounding circles only. Drawing on previous experience in implementing footprint databases, we built the Herschel Footprint Database and Web Services for the Herschel Space Observatory to provide efficient search capabilities for typical astronomical queries. The database was designed with the following main goals in mind: (a) provide a unified data model for meta-data of all instruments and observational modes, (b) quickly find observations covering a selected object and its neighbourhood, (c) quickly find every observation in a larger area of the sky, (d) allow for finding solar system objects crossing observation fields. As a first step, we developed a unified data model of observations of all three Herschel instruments for all pointing and instrument modes. Then, using telescope pointing information and observational meta-data, we compiled a database of footprints. As opposed to methods using pixellation of the sphere, we represent sky coverage in an exact geometric form allowing for precise area calculations. For easier handling of Herschel observation footprints with rather complex shapes, two algorithms were implemented to reduce the outline. Furthermore, a new visualisation tool to plot footprints with various spherical projections was developed. Indexing of the footprints using Hierarchical Triangular Mesh makes it possible to quickly find observations based on sky coverage, time and meta-data. The database is accessible via a web site http://herschel.vo.elte.hu and also as a set of REST web service functions, which makes it readily usable from programming environments such as Python or IDL. The web service allows downloading footprint data

  10. The Herschel/planck Programme Planck Pfm Testing Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reix, Jean-Michel; Rideau, Pascal; Gavila, Emmanuel; Chambelland, Jean-Philippe; Collaudin, Bernard; Passvogel, Thomas; Guillaume, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    The two science missions Herschel, an observatory-type mission, and Planck, a survey mission, are combined in one programme within ESAs long-term science programme. The objective for Planck is to image systematically the whole sky simultaneously with two scientific instruments in nine frequency channels between 30 and 900 GHz to unravel the temperature fluctuations, the anisotropy, of the cosmic background radiation. For both satellites, which have now been launched from the European Space Port in Kourou, French Guiana, on a single Ariane 5 launcher, the orbits will be Lissajous orbits around the 2nd Lagrange Point L2 of the Earth-Sun system. Having surpassed the technological problems and more generally the development phase, this paper focuses on the extensive assembly, integration and tests undertaken for the Proto-Flight Model (PFM) of the Planck Satellite. The paper details the early stages of the integration of the PFM until completeness of the assembly. It then describes the logic and the various tests implemented for the acceptance verification of the Planck PFM. It finally depicts the Launch campaign activities up to the launch from Kourou in the first half of May 2009.

  11. Herschel observations of Circinus X-1 during outburst and quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Buxton, Michelle; Fost, Tyler E-mail: dawn@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: tyler.fost@gmail.com

    2014-07-01

    We have used the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver instruments on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe Cir X-1 both in and out of outburst. We detected Cir X-1 during outburst at 70 μm. Unfortunately, a cold background source dominates Cir X-1 at longer wavelengths. We have assembled optical and infrared (IR) data for Cir X-1 to model its spectral energy distribution (SED) in both quiescence and outburst and find that in both states it is consistent with a heavily reddened, 10,000 K blackbody. We believe this behavior is completely consistent with previous suggestions that these outbursts are due to accretion disk events, not unlike those of dwarf novae. To explore the behavior of other low-mass X-ray binaries with reported synchrotron jets, we have extracted and/or compiled optical and near- and mid-IR data sets for five such systems to construct their SEDs. The Z-source GX 349+2 and the black hole system GRS 1915+105 have strong and variable mid-IR excesses that suggest synchrotron emission. The other Z-sources have rather weak (or no) IR excesses that can be explained as reddened blackbody spectra with the addition of either synchrotron or bremsstrahlung components.

  12. Herschel/HIFI reveals the first stages of stellar formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpin, F.; Bontemps, S.; Chavarria, L.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.; van Dishoeck, E.

    2010-12-01

    The understanding of the star formation is still on progress. Especially, the formation of high-mass stars is much less understood than the low-mass case: even the time order of observational phenomena is uncertain. Water, one of the most important molecules in the Universe, might elucidate key episodes in the process of stellar birth, and especially could be a major role in the formation of high-mass stars. For both types of stars, the source chemical composition is not well known and even less known is the chemical evolution of the interstellar matter throughout the various phases of star formation. This talk presents the first results of the various Herschel Space Observatory star formation key-programs. One of the instruments on-board HSO, HIFI, is the most powerful spectrometer never built, covering a huge frequency range, most of them unaccessible from ground. In particular, one of the KP, WISH, aims at following the process of star formation during the various stages and at using the water as a physical diagnostic throughout the evolution.

  13. Fan Noise Control Using Herschel-quincke Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Provenza, Andrew (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research effort proposed for this NASA NRA is mainly experimental. In addition, Virginia Tech is working in partnership with Goodrich Aerospace, Aerostructures Group for the analytical development needed to support the experimental endeavor, i.e. model development, design, and system studies. In this project, Herschel-Quincke (HQ)liner technology experiments will be performed at the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) facility. A schematic of both inlet and aft HQ-liner systems installed in the ANCF rig as well as a picture of the Glenn facility is shown. The main goal is to simultaneously test in both the inlet and bypass duct sections. The by-pass duct will have HQ-systems in both the inner and outer duct walls. The main advantages of performing tests at the ANCF facility are that the effect of the inlet HQ-system on the by-pass HQ-system and vice versa, can be accurately determined from the in-duct modal data. Another significant advantage is that it offers the opportunity to assess (on a common basis) the proposed noise reduction concept on the ANCF rig which in the past has been used for assessing other active and passive noise reduction strategies.

  14. Herschel Space Observatory Telescope characterization with Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovillaire, Guillaume; Wang, Yong; Toth, Rémy; Porcar-Guézénec, Raphael

    2012-09-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory Telescope is the first of its kind to cover the 60-670 μm far infrared spectral band. Its optical characterization, performed in the visible range, was a true technological challenge requiring very large dynamic range coupled to very high accuracy. A specific Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (HWFS) was designed to meet the demanding specifications of the measurement. The metrological system used by the EADS Astrium team to characterize the silicon car-bide based telescope will be presented as well as the main features of the specifically developed HWFS. The large expected wavefront error was measured in a double path set-up using the HWFS positioned in an extra-focal plane and a point source in the focal plane. The auto-collimation was carried out thanks to several liquid mirrors covering the M1 pupil plane and located in the conjugation plane of the HWFS sub-apertures. The results on the wavefront error obtained at the Centre Spatial de Liege (CSL) in Belgium will be shown as well as the simulated Point Spread Function to be compared to the real PSF obtained during on flight measurements. The thermally induced focal length variations are also presented as the telescope is meant to operate at 70°K in space.

  15. Winds of Binary AGB Stars as Observed by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Mečina, M.; Paladini, C.; Cox, N. L. J.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Pourbaix, D.; Mohamed, S.; Siopis, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of the large-scale environments of binary AGB stars as part of the Mass-loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample. From the literature we found 18 of the objects to be members of physically bound multiple systems. Several show a large-scale far-IR emission which differs significantly from spherical symmetry. A probable cause is the gravitational force of the companion on the stellar AGB wind and the mass-losing star itself. A spiral pattern is thereby imprinted in the dusty stellar wind. The most remarkable structures are found around o Ceti, W Aquilæ, R Aquarii, and π1 Gruis. The environments of o Cet and W Aql show a spiral pattern while the symbiotic nature of R Aqr is revealed as two opposing arms which reflect a nova outburst. The emission around π1 Gru is dominated by two structures, a disk and an arc, which are presumably not caused by the same companion. We found evidence that π1 Gru is a hierarchical triple system in which a close companion attracts the AGB wind onto the orbital plane and the outer companion forms a spiral arm. These far-IR observations underline the role of a companion as a major external influence in creating asymmetric winds in the AGB phase, even before the star becomes a planetary nebula (PN).

  16. Calibration of Herschel SPIRE FTS observations at different spectral resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchili, N.; Hopwood, R.; Fulton, T.; Polehampton, E. T.; Valtchanov, I.; Zaretski, J.; Naylor, D. A.; Griffin, M. J.; Imhof, P.; Lim, T.; Lu, N.; Makiwa, G.; Pearson, C.; Spencer, L.

    2017-01-01

    The SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer on-board the Herschel Space Observatory had two standard spectral resolution modes for science observations: high resolution (HR) and low resolution (LR), which could also be performed in sequence (H+LR). A comparison of the HR and LR resolution spectra taken in this sequential mode revealed a systematic discrepancy in the continuum level. Analysing the data at different stages during standard pipeline processing demonstrates that the telescope and instrument emission affect HR and H+LR observations in a systematically different way. The origin of this difference is found to lie in the variation of both the telescope and instrument response functions, while it is triggered by fast variation of the instrument temperatures. As it is not possible to trace the evolution of the response functions using housekeeping data from the instrument subsystems, the calibration cannot be corrected analytically. Therefore, an empirical correction for LR spectra has been developed, which removes the systematic noise introduced by the variation of the response functions.

  17. Advanced GLS map-making for the Herschel's photometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzo, Lorenzo; Raguso, Maria C.; Mastrogiuseppe, Marco; Calzoletti, Luca; Altieri, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    We discuss Generalised Least Squares (GLS) map-making for the data of the Herschel satellite's photometers, which is a difficult task, due to the many disturbances affecting the data, and requires appropriate pre- and post-processing. Taking an existing map-maker as a reference, we propose several advanced techniques, which can improve both the quality of the estimate and the efficiency of the software. As a main contribution we discuss two disturbances, which have not been studied yet and may be detrimental to the image quality. The first is a data shift, due to delays in the timing system or in the processing chain. The second is a random noise, termed pixel noise, due to the jitter and the approximation of the pointing information. For both these disturbances, we develop a mathematical model and propose a compensation method. As an additional contribution, we note that the performance can be improved by properly adapting the algorithm parameters to the data being processed and discuss an automatic setting method. We also provide a rich set of examples and experiments, illustrating the impact of the proposed techniques on the image quality and the execution speed.

  18. 'Land-marks of the universe': John Herschel against the background of positional astronomy.

    PubMed

    Case, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    John Herschel (1792-1871) was the leading British natural philosopher of the nineteenth century, widely known and regarded for his work in philosophy, optics and chemistry as well as his important research and popular publications on astronomy. To date, however, there exists no extended treatment of his astronomical career. This paper, part of a larger study exploring Herschel's contributions to astronomy, examines his work in the context of positional astronomy, the dominant form of astronomical practice throughout his lifetime. Herschel, who did not himself practice positional astronomy and who was known for his non-meridional observations of specific stellar objects, was nonetheless a strong advocate for positional astronomy-but for very different reasons than the terrestrial applications to which it was most often put. For Herschel, the star catalogues of positional astronomy were the necessary observational foundation upon which information about the stars as physical objects could be constructed. Positional astronomy practiced in the great national observatories was not about navigation or timekeeping; it was a way to standardize stellar observations and make them useful data for constructing theories of the stars themselves. For Herschel, the seeds of the new astronomy emerged from the practices of the old.

  19. The far-infrared view of M87 as seen by the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Clemens, M.; Xilouris, E. M.; Fritz, J.; Cotton, W. D.; Davies, J. I.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Cortese, L.; De Looze, I.; Pohlen, M.; Verstappen, J.; Böhringer, H.; Bomans, D. J.; Boselli, A.; Corbelli, E.; Dariush, A.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Vlahakis, C.; Zibetti, S.

    2011-02-01

    The origin of the far-infrared emission from the nearby radio galaxy M87 remains a matter of debate. Some studies find evidence of a far-infrared excess due to thermal dust emission, whereas others propose that the far-infrared emission can be explained by synchrotron emission without the need for an additional dust emission component. We observed M87 with PACS and SPIRE as part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We compare the new Herschel data with a synchrotron model based on infrared, submm and radio data to investigate the origin of the far-infrared emission. We find that both the integrated SED and the Herschel surface brightness maps are adequately explained by synchrotron emission. At odds with previous claims, we find no evidence of a diffuse dust component in M87.

  20. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey . II. Truncated dust disks in H I-deficient spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; Pohlen, M.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Boselli, A.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Verstappen, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Dariush, A.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    By combining Herschel-SPIRE observations obtained as part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey with 21 cm Hi data from the literature, we investigate the role of the cluster environment on the dust content of Virgo spiral galaxies. We show for the first time that the extent of the dust disk is significantly reduced in Hi-deficient galaxies, following remarkably well the observed “truncation” of the Hi disk. The ratio of the submillimetre-to-optical diameter correlates with the Hi-deficiency, suggesting that the cluster environment is able to strip dust as well as gas. These results provide important insights not only into the evolution of cluster galaxies but also into the metal enrichment of the intra-cluster medium. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. The Invisible Monster Has Two Faces: Observations of epsilon Aurigae with the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, D. W.; Ladjal, D.; Stencel, R. E.; Howell, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    We present Herschel Space Observatory photometric observations of the unique, long-period eclipsing binary star epsilon Aurigae. Its extended spectral energy distribution is consistent with our previously published cool (550 K) dust disk model. We also present an archival infrared spectral energy distribution of the side of the disk facing the bright F-type star in the binary, which is consistent with a warmer (1150 K) disk model. The lack of strong molecular emission features in the Herschel bands suggests that the disk has a low gas-to-dust ratio. The spectral energy distribution and Herschel images imply that the 250 GHz radio detection reported by Altenhoff et al. is likely contaminated by infrared-bright, extended background emission associated with a nearby nebular region and should be considered an upper limit to the true flux density of epsilon Aur.

  2. THE INVISIBLE MONSTER HAS TWO FACES: OBSERVATIONS OF {epsilon} AURIGAE WITH THE HERSCHEL SPACE OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, D. W.; Ladjal, D.; Stencel, R. E.; Howell, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    We present Herschel Space Observatory photometric observations of the unique, long-period eclipsing binary star {epsilon} Aurigae. Its extended spectral energy distribution is consistent with our previously published cool (550 K) dust disk model. We also present an archival infrared spectral energy distribution of the side of the disk facing the bright F-type star in the binary, which is consistent with a warmer (1150 K) disk model. The lack of strong molecular emission features in the Herschel bands suggests that the disk has a low gas-to-dust ratio. The spectral energy distribution and Herschel images imply that the 250 GHz radio detection reported by Altenhoff et al. is likely contaminated by infrared-bright, extended background emission associated with a nearby nebular region and should be considered an upper limit to the true flux density of {epsilon} Aur.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS): SEDs (Furlan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Stutz, A. M.; Stanke, T.; Tobin, J. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Osorio, M.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Poteet, C. A.; Booker, J.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Allen, L.

    2016-06-01

    To summarize, starting from a sample of 410 Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) targets (see section 2), but excluding likely contaminants and objects not observed or detected by PACS, there are 330 remaining objects that have Spitzer and Herschel data and are considered protostars (based on their Spitzer classification from Megeath et al. 2012, J/AJ/144/192). They form the sample studied in this work. In order to construct SEDs for our sample of 330 YSOs, we combined our own Herschel/PACS observations (see Proposal KPOTtmegeath2) with data from the literature and existing catalogs (see section 3.1). To extend the SEDs into the submillimeter, most of the YSOs were also observed in the continuum at 350 and 870um with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope (Stutz et al. 2013, J/ApJ/767/36). (5 data files).

  4. Experimental study of neutron-rich nuclei near the N = 82 closed shell using the {sub 40}{sup 96}Zr+{sub 50}{sup 124}Sn reaction with GASP and PRISMA-CLARA arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, W.; Torres, D. A.; Cristancho, F.; Medina, N. H.; Chapman, R.; Smith, J. F.; Mengoni, D.; Truesdale, V.; Grocutt, L.; Mulholland, K.; Kumar, V.; Hadinia, B.; Labiche, M.; Liang, X.; O'Donell, D.; Ollier, J.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K. M.; Wady, P.; and others

    2014-11-11

    In this contribution an experimental study of the deep-inelastic reaction {sub 40}{sup 96}Zr+{sub 50}{sup 124}Sn at 530 MeV, using the GASP and PRISMA-CLARA arrays, is presented. The experiments populate a wealth of projectile-like and target-like binary fragments, in a large neutron-rich region around N ≥ 50 and Z ≈ 40. Preliminary results on the study of the yrast and near-yrast states for {sup 95}Nb will be shown, along with a comparison of the experimental yields obtained in the experiments.

  5. Herschel-resolved Outer Belts of Two-belt Debris Disks—Evidence of Icy Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, F. Y.; Bryden, G.; Werner, M. W.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    2016-11-01

    We present dual-band Herschel/PACS imaging for 59 main-sequence stars with known warm dust (T warm ˜ 200 K), characterized by Spitzer. Of 57 debris disks detected at Herschel wavelengths (70 and/or 100 and 160 μm), about half have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that suggest two-ring disk architectures mirroring that of the asteroid-Kuiper Belt geometry; the rest are consistent with single belts of warm, asteroidal material. Herschel observations spatially resolve the outer/cold dust component around 14 A-type and 4 solar-type stars with two-belt systems, 15 of which for the first time. Resolved disks are typically observed with radii >100 AU, larger than expected from a simple blackbody fit. Despite the absence of narrow spectral features for ice, we find that the shape of the continuum, combined with resolved outer/cold dust locations, can help constrain the grain size distribution and hint at the dust’s composition for each resolved system. Based on the combined Spitzer/IRS+Multiband Imaging Photometer (5-to-70 μm) and Herschel/PACS (70-to-160 μm) data set, and under the assumption of idealized spherical grains, we find that over half of resolved outer/cold belts are best fit with a mixed ice/rock composition. Minimum grain sizes are most often equal to the expected radiative blowout limit, regardless of composition. Three of four resolved systems around the solar-type stars, however, tend to have larger minimum grains compared to expectation from blowout (f MB = a min/a BOS ˜ 5). We also probe the disk architecture of 39 Herschel-unresolved systems by modeling their SEDs uniformly, and find them to be consistent with 31 single- and 8 two-belt debris systems. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia, with important participation from NASA.

  6. Spitzer Imaging of Strongly lensed Herschel-selected Dusty Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Brian; Cooray, Asantha; Calanog, J. A.; Nayyeri, H.; Timmons, N.; Casey, C.; Baes, M.; Chapman, S.; Dannerbauer, H.; da Cunha, E.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Farrah, D.; Fu, Hai; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Magdis, G.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Riechers, D. A.; Scott, D.; Smith, M. W. L.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Vaccari, M.; Viaene, S.; Vieira, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    We present the rest-frame optical spectral energy distribution (SED) and stellar masses of six Herschel-selected gravitationally lensed dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at 1 < z < 3. These galaxies were first identified with Herschel/SPIRE imaging data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). The targets were observed with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. Due to the spatial resolution of the IRAC observations at the level of 2″, the lensing features of a background DSFG in the near-infrared are blended with the flux from the foreground lensing galaxy in the IRAC imaging data. We make use of higher resolution Hubble/WFC3 or Keck/NIRC2 Adaptive Optics imaging data to fit light profiles of the foreground lensing galaxy (or galaxies) as a way to model the foreground components, in order to successfully disentangle the foreground lens and background source flux densities in the IRAC images. The flux density measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, once combined with Hubble/WFC3 and Keck/NIRC2 data, provide important constraints on the rest-frame optical SED of the Herschel-selected lensed DSFGs. We model the combined UV- to millimeter-wavelength SEDs to establish the stellar mass, dust mass, star formation rate, visual extinction, and other parameters for each of these Herschel-selected DSFGs. These systems have inferred stellar masses in the range 8 × 1010-4 × 1011 M⊙ and star formation rates of around 100 M⊙ yr-1. This puts these lensed submillimeter systems well above the SFR-M* relation observed for normal star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The high values of SFR inferred for these systems are consistent with a major merger-driven scenario for star formation.

  7. The multiplicity of 250-μm Herschel sources in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, Jillian M.; Oliver, Seb; Hurley, Peter D.; Griffin, Matt; Sargent, Mark T.; Scott, Douglas; Wang, Lingyu; Wardlow, Julie L.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the multiplicity of extragalactic sources detected by the Herschel Space Observatory in the COSMOS field. Using 3.6- and 24-μm catalogues, in conjunction with 250-μm data from Herschel, we seek to determine if a significant fraction of Herschel sources are composed of multiple components emitting at 250 μm. We use the XID+ code, using Bayesian inference methods to produce probability distributions of the possible contributions to the observed 250-μm flux for each potential component. The fraction of Herschel flux assigned to the brightest component is highest for sources with total 250-μm fluxes <45 mJy; however, the flux in the brightest component is still highest in the brightest Herschel sources. The faintest 250-μm sources (30-45 mJy) have the majority of their flux assigned to a single bright component; the second brightest component is typically significantly weaker, and contains the remainder of the 250-μm source flux. At the highest 250-μm fluxes (45-110 mJy), the brightest and second brightest components are assigned roughly equal fluxes, and together are insufficient to reach 100 per cent of the 250-μm source flux. This indicates that additional components are required, beyond the brightest two components, to reproduce the observed flux. 95 per cent of the sources in our sample have a second component that contains more than 10 per cent of the total source flux. Particularly for the brightest Herschel sources, assigning the total flux to a single source may overestimate the flux contributed by around 150 per cent.

  8. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey - XVI. A cluster inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Bianchi, S.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Clemens, M.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Fuller, C.; Pappalardo, C.; Hughes, T. M.; Madden, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.

    2014-03-01

    Herschel far-infrared (FIR) observations are used to construct Virgo cluster galaxy luminosity functions and to show that the cluster lacks the very bright and the numerous faint sources detected in field galaxy surveys. The FIR spectral energy distributions are fitted to obtain dust masses and temperatures and the dust mass function. The cluster is overdense in dust by about a factor of 100 compared to the field. The same emissivity (β)-temperature relation applies for different galaxies as that found for different regions of M31. We use optical and H I data to show that Virgo is overdense in stars and atomic gas by about a factor of 100 and 20, respectively. Metallicity values are used to measure the mass of metals in the gas phase. The mean metallicity is ˜0.7 solar, and ˜50 per cent of the metals are in the dust. For the cluster as a whole, the mass density of stars in galaxies is eight times that of the gas and the gas mass density is 130 times that of the metals. We use our data to consider the chemical evolution of the individual galaxies, inferring that the measured variations in the effective yield are due to galaxies having different ages, being affected to varying degrees by gas loss. Four galaxy scaling relations are considered: mass-metallicity, mass-velocity, mass-star formation rate and mass-radius - we suggest that initial galaxy mass is the prime driver of a galaxy's ultimate destiny. Finally, we use X-ray observations and galaxy dynamics to assess the dark and baryonic matter content compared to the cosmological model.

  9. HERSCHEL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cigan, Phil; Young, Lisa; Cormier, Diane; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Madden, Suzanne; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce; Schruba, Andreas; Heesen, Volker; Collaboration: LITTLE THINGS Team

    2016-01-15

    We present far-infrared (FIR) spectral line observations of five galaxies from the Little Things sample: DDO 69, DDO 70, DDO 75, DDO 155, and WLM. While most studies of dwarfs focus on bright systems or starbursts due to observational constraints, our data extend the observed parameter space into the regime of low surface brightness dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and moderate star formation rates. Our targets were observed with Herschel at the [C ii] 158 μm, [O i] 63 μm, [O iii] 88 μm, and [N ii] 122 μm emission lines using the PACS Spectrometer. These high-resolution maps allow us for the first time to study the FIR properties of these systems on the scales of larger star-forming complexes. The spatial resolution in our maps, in combination with star formation tracers, allows us to identify separate photodissociation regions (PDRs) in some of the regions we observed. Our systems have widespread [C ii] emission that is bright relative to continuum, averaging near 0.5% of the total infrared (TIR) budget—higher than in solar-metallicity galaxies of other types. [N ii] is weak, suggesting that the [C ii] emission in our galaxies comes mostly from PDRs instead of the diffuse ionized interstellar medium (ISM). These systems exhibit efficient cooling at low dust temperatures, as shown by ([O i]+[C ii])/TIR in relation to 60 μm/100 μm, and low [O i]/[C ii] ratios which indicate that [C ii] is the dominant coolant of the ISM. We observe [O iii]/[C ii] ratios in our galaxies that are lower than those published for other dwarfs, but similar to levels noted in spirals.

  10. Gaussian beam measurement for HIFI instrument: Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaleev, Miroslav G.; Ermisch, Karsten; Fredrixon, Mathias; Svensson, Magnus; Belitsky, Victor

    2004-09-01

    The Heterodyne Instrument (HIFI) is part of the ESA Herschel Space Observatory Project. The instrument is intended for high-resolution spectroscopy and has a frequency coverage from 480 to 1250 GHz band in five receiver bands and 1410 to 1910 GHz in two additional bands. HIFI is built based on a modular principle: the mixers together with their respective optics are integrated into Mixer Sub-Assemblies (MSA). Each frequency band has two MSAs allocated for horizontal and vertical polarization. In this paper, we present the work done on the design and construction of a Gaussian beam measurement range. One of the unique features of the developed method is a possibility to measure the beam parameters of the MSAs in the absolute coordinate system referred to the device under test. This along with other methods should allow integration of the entire HIFI with the best possible coupling of the antenna beam to the receivers and achieving ultimate performance in such a complicated optical system. The range houses the measured MSA, which is at 4 K ambient temperature, and a continuous wave source placed on a precise scanner entirely under vacuum. Developed triangulation system provides mechanical reference data on the MSA, in-situ, after the entire system is evacuated and the cooling is finished. We adopted a scalar measurement approach where the test source scans the receiver input beam and the mixer IF power is measured. The data collected from 3-4 planar scans are used to calculate the orientation and position of the optical axis. We present results from the first beam measurements for MSA HIFI bands 1 and 2 (480 and 640 GHz), the measurement system performance and accuracy analysis.

  11. Herschel/SPIRE Submillimeter Spectra of Local Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Spinoglio, Luigi; Busquet, Gemma; Wilson, Christine D.; Glenn, Jason; Isaak, Kate G.; Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Baes, Maarten; Barlow, Michael J.; Boselli, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha; Cormier, Diane

    2013-05-01

    We present the submillimeter spectra from 450 to 1550 GHz of 11 nearby active galaxies observed with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE/FTS) on board Herschel. We detect CO transitions from J up = 4 to 12, as well as the two [C I] fine structure lines at 492 and 809 GHz and the [N II]1461 GHz line. We used radiative transfer models to analyze the observed CO spectral line energy distributions. The FTS CO data were complemented with ground-based observations of the low-J CO lines. We found that the warm molecular gas traced by the mid-J CO transitions has similar physical conditions (n_H_2 \\sim 103.2-103.9 cm-3 and T kin ~ 300-800 K) in most of our galaxies. Furthermore, we found that this warm gas is likely producing the mid-IR rotational H2 emission. We could not determine the specific heating mechanism of the warm gas, however, it is possibly related to the star formation activity in these galaxies. Our modeling of the [C I] emission suggests that it is produced in cold (T kin < 30 K) and dense (n_H_2 \\gt 10^3 cm-3) molecular gas. Transitions of other molecules are often detected in our SPIRE/FTS spectra. The HF J = 1-0 transition at 1232 GHz is detected in absorption in UGC 05101 and in emission in NGC 7130. In the latter, near-infrared pumping, chemical pumping, or collisional excitation with electrons are plausible excitation mechanisms likely related to the active galactic nucleus of this galaxy. In some galaxies, few H2O emission lines are present. Additionally, three OH+ lines at 909, 971, and 1033 GHz are identified in NGC 7130.

  12. HERSCHEL/SPIRE SUBMILLIMETER SPECTRA OF LOCAL ACTIVE GALAXIES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Spinoglio, Luigi; Busquet, Gemma; Wilson, Christine D.; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem; Isaak, Kate G.; Baes, Maarten; Barlow, Michael J.; Boselli, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha; Cormier, Diane

    2013-05-01

    We present the submillimeter spectra from 450 to 1550 GHz of 11 nearby active galaxies observed with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE/FTS) on board Herschel. We detect CO transitions from J{sub up} = 4 to 12, as well as the two [C I] fine structure lines at 492 and 809 GHz and the [N II]1461 GHz line. We used radiative transfer models to analyze the observed CO spectral line energy distributions. The FTS CO data were complemented with ground-based observations of the low-J CO lines. We found that the warm molecular gas traced by the mid-J CO transitions has similar physical conditions (n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx} 10{sup 3.2}-10{sup 3.9} cm{sup -3} and T{sub kin} {approx} 300-800 K) in most of our galaxies. Furthermore, we found that this warm gas is likely producing the mid-IR rotational H{sub 2} emission. We could not determine the specific heating mechanism of the warm gas, however, it is possibly related to the star formation activity in these galaxies. Our modeling of the [C I] emission suggests that it is produced in cold (T{sub kin} < 30 K) and dense (n{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) molecular gas. Transitions of other molecules are often detected in our SPIRE/FTS spectra. The HF J = 1-0 transition at 1232 GHz is detected in absorption in UGC 05101 and in emission in NGC 7130. In the latter, near-infrared pumping, chemical pumping, or collisional excitation with electrons are plausible excitation mechanisms likely related to the active galactic nucleus of this galaxy. In some galaxies, few H{sub 2}O emission lines are present. Additionally, three OH{sup +} lines at 909, 971, and 1033 GHz are identified in NGC 7130.

  13. Resolved imaging of the HR 8799 Debris disk with Herschel

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Brenda; Booth, Mark; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Marois, Christian; Kennedy, Grant; Wyatt, Mark; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Macintosh, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    We present Herschel far-infrared and submillimeter maps of the debris disk associated with the HR 8799 planetary system. We resolve the outer disk emission at 70, 100, 160, and 250 μm and detect the disk at 350 and 500 μm. A smooth model explains the observed disk emission well. We observe no obvious clumps or asymmetries associated with the trapping of planetesimals that is a potential consequence of planetary migration in the system. We estimate that the disk eccentricity must be <0.1. As in previous work by Su et al., we find a disk with three components: a warm inner component and two outer components, a planetesimal belt extending from 100 to 310 AU, with some flexibility (±10 AU) on the inner edge, and the external halo that extends to ∼2000 AU. We measure the disk inclination to be 26° ± 3° from face-on at a position angle of 64° E of N, establishing that the disk is coplanar with the star and planets. The spectral energy distribution of the disk is well fit by blackbody grains whose semi-major axes lie within the planetesimal belt, suggesting an absence of small grains. The wavelength at which the spectrum steepens from blackbody, 47 ± 30 μm, however, is short compared with other A star debris disks, suggesting that there are atypically small grains likely populating the halo. The PACS longer wavelength data yield a lower disk color temperature than do MIPS data (24 and 70 μm), implying two distinct halo dust-grain populations.

  14. K2 and Herschel/PACS photometry of irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Andras; Kiss, Csaba; Molnar, Laszlo; Mueller, Thomas G.; Sarneczky, Krisztian; Szabo, Robert; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Szabo, Gyula M.

    2016-10-01

    The combination of optical and far-infrared photometric measurements yields an unambiguous method for characterizing the basic physical and surface properties of minor bodies in the Solar System. In principle, an object with a certain visible brightness can either be an object with a small but bright or a large but dim surface. To resolve this issue, conducting thermal emission measurements can also be acquired since both larger and dimmer objects have higher infrared radiations. In addition, the precise modelling of thermal emission should certainly take into account the rotation period of these bodies - otherwise the presence of surface thermal inertia can result in inaccurate conclusions regarding to the physical size and albedo.Since early 2014, Kepler Space Telescope surveys fields close to the Ecliptic in a framework of quarterly campaigns of the K2 initiative. This program makes possible to continuously observe Solar System bodies during this period of 80-90 days and hence provide an uninterrupted photometric series of moving Solar System objects down to the magnitude range of R = 23.5. This instrument hence an ideal observatory now for Solar System studies. Due to the fact that the expected rotational periods of these objects are commensurable to the diurnal characteristics of ground-based observations, such uninterrupted light curves are rather valuable for the accurate determination of rotational characteristics - including the physical rotation period, the amplitude and the confirmation of the presence of double- or multiple peaked features.In this presentation we summarize our results of current K2 and legacy Herschel/PACS observations regarding to some of the irregular satellites of Uranus and Neptune, namely Caliban, Sycorax, Prospero, Setebos and Nereid. By comparing these results with similar kind of observations for trans-Neptunian objects (see Kiss et al., this DPS meeting), one can conclude how the formation and evolution of the outer Solar

  15. Candidate High Redshift Clusters of Dusty Galaxies from Herschel and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, D. L.; Greenslade, J.; Greenslade

    By examining Herschel images in the HerMES & H-ATLAS surveys at the position of Planck Catalog of Compact Source sources we are able to determine the nature of the Planck sources. Most are simply nearby, known, dusty galaxies, while others are foreground galactic `cirrus' dust. About 11% of sources, though, appear to be groups or clumps of fainter Herschel objects. Followup of a number of these indicates that they are galaxy clusters or protoclusters at z ~1-3 that contain a number of galaxies undergoing contemporaneous massive starbursts. These sources present challenges for current galaxy & cluster formation/evolution models.

  16. Pressure Distribution in a Porous Squeeze Film Bearing Lubricated with a Herschel-Bulkley Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walicka, A.; Jurczak, P.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of a wall porosity on the pressure distribution in a curvilinear squeeze film bearing lubricated with a lubricant being a viscoplastic fluid of a Herschel-Bulkley type is considered. After general considerations on the flow of the viscoplastic fluid (lubricant) in a bearing clearance and in a porous layer the modified Reynolds equation for the curvilinear squeeze film bearing with a Herschel-Bulkley lubricant is given. The solution of this equation is obtained by a method of successive approximation. As a result one obtains a formula expressing the pressure distribution. The example of squeeze films in a step bearing (modeled by two parallel disks) is discussed in detail.

  17. The Open University Opens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy, Ed.

    Conceived by the British Labor Government in the 1960's the Open University was viewed as a way to extend higher education to Britain's working class, but enrollment figures in classes that represent traditional academic disciplines show that the student population is predominantly middle class. Bringing education into the home presents numerous…

  18. GASP: A computer code for calculating the thermodynamic and transport properties for ten fluids: Parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. [enthalpy, entropy, thermal conductivity, and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Baron, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV subprogram called GASP is discussed which calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties for 10 pure fluids: parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. The pressure range is generally from 0.1 to 400 atmospheres (to 100 atm for helium and to 1000 atm for hydrogen). The temperature ranges are from the triple point to 300 K for neon; to 500 K for carbon monoxide, oxygen, and fluorine; to 600 K for methane and nitrogen; to 1000 K for argon and carbon dioxide; to 2000 K for hydrogen; and from 6 to 500 K for helium. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature and density as input conditions along with pressure, and either entropy or enthalpy. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. The subprogram design is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to the calculations.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Herschel-PACS and -SPIRE spectroscopy of 70 objects (Green+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. D.; Yang, Y.-L.; Evans, N. J., II; Karska, A.; Herczeg, G.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Lee, J.-E.; Larson, R. L.; Bouwman, J.

    2016-10-01

    We present the CDF (COPS-DIGIT-FOOSH) archive, with Herschel spectroscopic observations of 70 objects (protostars, young stellar objects, and FU Orionis objects) from the "Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time" (DIGIT) Key Project, FU Orionis Objects Surveyed with Herschel" Open Time Program (FOOSH OT1), and "CO in Protostars" Open Time Program (COPS OT2) Herschel programs. These have been delivered to the Herschel archive and are available. The full source list is shown in Table1. The full DIGIT spectroscopic sample consists of 63 sources: 24 Herbig Ae/Be stars (intermediate mass sources with circumstellar disks), 9 T Tauri stars (low mass young stars with circumstellar disks), and 30 protostars (young stars with significant envelope emission) observed with Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) spectroscopy. DIGIT also included an additional wTTS (weak-line T Tauri star) sample that was observed photometrically and delivered separately. The wTTS sample is fully described by Cieza et al. 2013ApJ...762..100C. The full DIGIT embedded protostellar sample consisted of 30 Class 0/I targets, drawn from previous studies, focusing on protostars with high-quality Spitzer-IRS 5-40μm spectroscopy (summarized by Lahuis et al. 2006 c2d Spectroscopy Explanatory Supplement; Pasadena, CA: Spitzer Science Center), and UV, optical, infrared, and submillimeter complementary data. These objects are selected from some of the nearest and best-studied molecular clouds: Taurus (140pc; 6 targets), Ophiuchus (125pc; 7 targets), Perseus (230-250pc; 7 targets), R Corona Australis (130pc; 3 targets), Serpens (429pc; 2 targets), Chamaeleon (178pc, 1 target), and 4 additional isolated cores. PACS is a 5*5 array of 9.4''*9.4'' spatial pixels (spaxels) covering the spectral range from 50 to 210μm with λ/Δλ~1000-3000, divided into four segments, covering λ~50-75, 70-105, 100-145, and 140-210μm. The PACS spatial resolution ranges from ~9'' at the shortest wavelengths (50μm) to ~18'' at the

  20. The Herschel Fornax Cluster Survey - I. The bright galaxy sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Bianchi, S.; Baes, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Clemens, M.; Davis, T. A.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fuller, C.; Fritz, J.; Hunt, L. K.; Serra, P.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Bomans, D.; Hughes, T.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Madden, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel Space Telescope observations of the nearby Fornax cluster at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm with a spatial resolution of 7-36 arcsec (10 arcsec ≈ 1 kpc at dFornax = 17.9 Mpc). We define a sample of 11 bright galaxies, selected at 500 μm, that can be directly compared with our past work on the Virgo cluster. We check and compare our results with previous observations made by IRAS and Planck, finding good agreement. The far-infrared luminosity density is higher, by about a factor of 3, in Fornax compared to Virgo, consistent with the higher number density of galaxies. The 100 μm (42.5-122.5 μm) luminosity is two orders of magnitude larger in Fornax than in the local field as measured by IRAS. We calculate stellar (L0.4-2.5) and far-infrared (L100-500) luminosities for each galaxy and use these to estimate a mean optical depth of τ = 0.4 ± 0.1 - the same value as we previously found for Virgo cluster galaxies. For 10 of the 11 galaxies (NGC 1399 excepted), we fit a modified blackbody curve (β = 2.0) to our observed flux densities to derive dust masses and temperatures of 106.54-8.35 M⊙ and T =14.6-24.2 K, respectively, values comparable to those found for Virgo. The derived stars-to-gas(atomic) and gas(atomic)-to-dust ratios vary from 1.1-67.6 to 9.8-436.5, respectively, again broadly consistent with values for Virgo. Fornax is a mass overdensity in stars and dust of about 120 when compared to the local field (30 for Virgo). Fornax and Virgo are both a factor of 6 lower overdensities in gas(atomic) than in stars and dust indicating loss of gas, but not dust and stars, in the cluster environment. We consider in more detail two of the sample galaxies. As the brightest source in either Fornax or Virgo, NGC 1365 is also detected by Planck. The Planck data fit the PACS/SPIRE spectral energy distribution out to 1382 μm with no evidence of other sources of emission (`spinning dust', free-free, synchrotron). At the opposite end of the scale, NGC

  1. The raft of the Saint-Jean River, Gaspé (Québec, Canada): A dynamic feature trapping most of the wood transported from the catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Maxime; Buffin-Bélanger, Thomas; Piégay, Hervé

    2015-02-01

    The rivers of the Gaspé Peninsula, Québec (Canada), a coastal drainage system of the St. Lawrence River, receive and transport vast quantities of large wood. The rapid rate of channel shifting caused by high-energy flows and noncohesive banks allows wood recruitment that in turn greatly influences river dynamics. The delta of the Saint-Jean River has accumulated wood since 1960, leading to frequent avulsions over that time period. The wood raft there is now more than 3-km in length, which is unusual but natural. This jam configuration allows a unique opportunity to estimate a wood budget at the scale of a long river corridor and to better understand the dynamics of large wood (LW) in rivers. A wood budget includes the evaluation of wood volumes (i) produced by bank erosion (input), (ii) still in transit in the river corridor (deposited on sand bars or channel edges), and (iii) accumulated in the delta (output). The budget is based on an analysis of aerial photos dating back to 1963 as well as surveys carried out in 2010, all of which were used to locate and describe large wood accumulations along a 60-km river section. The main results of this paper show that the raft formation in the delta is dynamic and can be massive, but it is a natural process. Considering the estimated wood volume trapped in the delta from 1963 to 2013 (≈ 25,000 m3), two important points are revealed by the quantification of the wood recruitment volume from 1963 to 2004 (≈ 27,000 m3 ± 400 m3) and of the wood volume stored on the bars in 2010 (≈ 5950 m3). First, the recruitment of large wood from lateral migration for the 40-year period can account for the volume of large wood in the delta and in transit. Second, the excess wood volume produced by lateral migration and avulsion represents a minimum estimation of the large wood trapped on the floodplain owing to wood volume that has decomposed and large wood that exited the river system. Rafts are major trapping structures that provide

  2. Herschel-ATLAS: first data release of the Science Demonstration Phase source catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, E. E.; Maddox, S. J.; Dunne, L.; Negrello, M.; Smith, D. J. B.; González-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.; López-Caniego, M.; Auld, R.; Buttiglione, S.; Baes, M.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Clements, D. L.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M.; Panuzzo, P.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rodighiero, G.; Serjeant, S.; Temi, P.; Thompson, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (Herschel-ATLAS) is a survey of 550 deg2 with the Herschel Space Observatory in five far-infrared and submillimetre bands. The first data for the survey, observations of a field 4 × 4 deg2 in size, were taken during the Science Demonstration Phase (SDP), and reach a 5σ noise level of 33.5 mJy beam-1 at 250 μm. This paper describes the source extraction methods used to create the corresponding SDP catalogue, which contains 6876 sources, selected at 250 μm, within ˜14 deg2. Spectral and Photometric Imaging REciever (SPIRE) sources are extracted using a new method specifically developed for Herschel data and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) counterparts of these sources are identified using circular apertures placed at the SPIRE positions. Aperture flux densities are measured for sources identified as extended after matching to optical wavelengths. The reliability of this catalogue is also discussed, using full simulated maps at the three SPIRE bands. These show that a significant number of sources at 350 and 500 μm have undergone flux density enhancements of up to a factor of ˜2, due mainly to source confusion. Correction factors are determined for these effects. The SDP data set and corresponding catalogue will be available from .

  3. The first release of data from the Herschel ATLAS: the SPIRE images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, E.; Auld, R.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Maddox, S.; Panuzzo, P.; Pohlen, M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dye, S.; de Zotti, G.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Leeuw, L.; López-Caniego, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Smith, M. W. L.; Temi, P.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.

    2011-07-01

    We have reduced the data taken with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) photometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory in the Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). We describe the data reduction, which poses specific challenges, both because of the large number of detectors which can have noise correlated in each array, and because only two scans are made for each region. We implement effective solutions to process the bolometric timelines into maps, and show that correlations among detectors are negligible, and that the photometer is stable on time scales up to 250 s. This is longer than the time the telescope takes to cross the observed sky region, and it allows us to use naive binning methods for an optimal reconstruction of the sky emission. The maps have equal contribution of confusion and white instrumental noise, and the former is estimated to 5.3, 6.4 and 6.7 mJy beam-1 (1σ), at 250, 350 and 500 μm, respectively. This pipeline is used to reduce other H-ATLAS observations, as they became available, and we discuss how it can be used with the optimal map maker implemented in the Herschel Interactive Processing Environment (HIPE), to improve computational efficiency and stability. The SDP data set is available from . Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  4. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. IV. Resolved dust analysis of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. W. L.; Vlahakis, C.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bomans, D. J.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Dariush, A.; Davies, J. I.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Sabatini, S.; Verstappen, J.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present a resolved dust analysis of three of the largest angular size spiral galaxies, NGC 4501 and NGC 4567/8, in the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) science demonstration field. Herschel has unprecedented spatial resolution at far-infrared wavelengths and with the PACS and SPIRE instruments samples both sides of the peak in the far infrared spectral energy distribution (SED). We present maps of dust temperature, dust mass, and gas-to-dust ratio, produced by fitting modified black bodies to the SED for each pixel. We find that the distribution of dust temperature in both systems is in the range ~19-22 K and peaks away from the centres of the galaxies. The distribution of dust mass in both systems is symmetrical and exhibits a single peak coincident with the galaxy centres. This Letter provides a first insight into the future analysis possible with a large sample of resolved galaxies to be observed by Herschel. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  5. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey . VI. The far-infrared view of M 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Clemens, M.; Xilouris, E. M.; Fritz, J.; Cotton, W. D.; Davies, J. I.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Cortese, L.; De Looze, I.; Pohlen, M.; Verstappen, J.; Böhringer, H.; Bomans, D. J.; Boselli, A.; Corbelli, E.; Dariush, A.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Vlahakis, C.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    The origin of the far-infrared emission from the nearby radio galaxy M 87 remains a matter of debate. Some studies find evidence of a far-infrared excess due to thermal dust emission, whereas others propose that the far-infrared emission can be explained by synchrotron emission without the need for an additional dust emission component. We present Herschel PACS and SPIRE observations of M 87, taken as part of the science demonstration phase observations of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. We compare these data with a synchrotron model based on mid-infrared, far-infrared, submm and radio data from the literature to investigate the origin of the far-infrared emission. Both the integrated SED and the Herschel surface brightness maps are adequately explained by synchrotron emission. At odds with previous claims, we find no evidence of a diffuse dust component in M 87, which is not unexpected in the harsh X-ray environment of this radio galaxy sitting at the core of the Virgo cluster. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  6. Thermal Emission of the Eris — Dysnomia System as Observed by Herschel/PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Cs.; Vilenius, E.; Müller, Th. G.; Pál, A.; Rengel, M.; Mommert, M.; Szalai, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Stansberry, J.

    2012-05-01

    We will present the physical characteristics of Eris (size, albedo, thermal inertia, etc.) based on our recent Herschel/PACS data, and will discuss the influence of Dysnomia in our system-integrated thermal data and constrain its size and albedo.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cold gas properties of Herschel Reference Survey (Boselli+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Cortese, L.; Boquien, M.

    2013-11-01

    12CO(1-0) and HI data for galaxies of the Herschel Reference (Boselli et al., 2010, Cat. J/PASP/122/261). The data are either collected in the literature, or taken from our own observations done with the 12m Keat Peak radio telescope. (7 data files).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: L1642 Herschel maps (Malinen+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, P. J.; Juvela, M.; Zahorecz, S.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Montillaud, J.; Arimatsu, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Doi, Y.; Haikala, L.; Kawabe, R.; Marton, G.; McGehee, P.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Shimajiri, Y.; Takita, S.; Toth, L. V.; Tsukagoshi, T.; Ysard, N.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced, zero-corrected and calibrated Herschel intensity maps at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500um (no background subtraction made). Colour temperature map calculated at 40" resolution with constant beta 1.8, using Markov chain Monte Carlo fitting and wavelengths 250-500um. (2 data files).

  9. How bright planets became dim stars: planetary speculations in John Herschel's double star astronomy.

    PubMed

    Case, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Previous research on the origins of double star astronomy in the early nineteenth century emphasized the role mathematical methods and instrumentation played in motivating early observations of these objects. The work of the British astronomer John Herschel, however, shows that questions regarding the physical nature of double stars were also important. In particular, an analysis of John Herschel's early work on double stars illustrates the way in which speculations regarding these objects were shaped by assumptions of the properties of stars themselves. For Herschel, a major consideration in double star astronomy was distinguishing between types of double stars. Optical doubles were useful in determining parallax while binary doubles were not. In practice, classification of a specific double star pair into one of these categories was based on the assumption that stars were of approximately the same luminosity and thus differences in relative brightness between stars were caused by difference in distances. Such assumptions, though ultimately abandoned, would lead Herschel in the 1830s to advance the possibility that the dim companion stars in certain double star pairs were not stars at all but in fact planets.

  10. Recent star formation in the Lupus clouds as seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, K. L. J.; Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; André, Ph.; Bernard, J. P.; White, G. J.; Polychroni, D.; Bontemps, S.; Cox, N. L. J.; Di Francesco, J.; Facchini, A.; Fallscheer, C.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Minier, V.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Peretto, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Sadavoy, S.; Schneider, N.; Spinoglio, L.; Testi, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the star formation histories of the Lupus I, III, and IV clouds using the Herschel 70-500 μm maps obtained by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey Key Project. By combining the new Herschel data with the existing Spitzer catalog we obtained an unprecedented census of prestellar sources and young stellar objects in the Lupus clouds, which allowed us to study the overall star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The high SFE of Lupus III, its decreasing SFR, and its large number of pre-main sequence stars with respect to proto- and prestellar sources, suggest that Lupus III is the most evolved cloud, and after having experienced a major star formation event in the past, is now approaching the end of its current star-forming cycle. Lupus I is currently undergoing a large star formation event, apparent by the increasing SFR, the large number of prestellar objects with respect to more evolved objects, and the high percentage of material at high extinction (e.g., above AV ≈ 8 mag). Also Lupus IV has an increasing SFR; however, the relative number of prestellar sources is much lower, suggesting that its star formation has not yet reached its peak. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. PDR properties and spatial structures probed by Herschel and Spitzer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Y.; Berné, O.; Pilleri, P.; Dedes, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Joblin, C.; Kramer, C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Mookerjea, B.; Röllig, M.

    2011-11-01

    We report the analysis of the mid-infrared spectral maps observed by Spitzer/IRS toward star-forming regions where the Herschel key program WADI has observed / will observe with HIFI and PACS. The IRS spectra are fitted using 4 components of small grains: PAH0, PAH+, PAHx, and evaporating VSG, and the spatial distributions of these components are derived.

  12. A Herschel resolved far-infrared dust ring around HD 207129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. P.; Löhne, T.; Montesinos, B.; Krivov, A. V.; Eiroa, C.; Absil, O.; Bryden, G.; Maldonado, J.; Mora, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Ardila, D.; Augereau, J.-Ch.; Bayo, A.; Del Burgo, C.; Danchi, W.; Ertel, S.; Fedele, D.; Fridlund, M.; Lebreton, J.; González-García, B. M.; Liseau, R.; Meeus, G.; Müller, S.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Thébault, P.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Dusty debris discs around main sequence stars are thought to be the result of continuous collisional grinding of planetesimals in the system. The majority of these systems are unresolved and analysis of the dust properties is limited by the lack of information regarding the dust location. Aims: The Herschel DUNES key program is observing 133 nearby, Sun-like stars (<20 pc, FGK spectral type) in a volume limited survey to constrain the absolute incidence of cold dust around these stars by detection of far infrared excess emission at flux levels comparable to the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt (EKB). Methods: We have observed the Sun-like star HD 207129 with Herschel PACS and SPIRE. In all three PACS bands we resolve a ring-like structure consistent with scattered light observations. Using α Boötis as a reference point spread function (PSF), we deconvolved the images, clearly resolving the inner gap in the disc at both 70 and 100 μm. Results: We have resolved the dust-producing planetesimal belt of a debris disc at 100 μm for the first time. We measure the radial profile and fractional luminosity of the disc, and compare the values to those of discs around stars of similar age and/or spectral type, placing this disc in context of other resolved discs observed by Herschel/DUNES. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  13. HERSCHEL/SCORE, imaging the solar corona in visible and EUV light: CCD camera characterization.

    PubMed

    Pancrazzi, M; Focardi, M; Landini, F; Romoli, M; Fineschi, S; Gherardi, A; Pace, E; Massone, G; Antonucci, E; Moses, D; Newmark, J; Wang, D; Rossi, G

    2010-07-01

    The HERSCHEL (helium resonant scattering in the corona and heliosphere) experiment is a rocket mission that was successfully launched last September from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, USA. HERSCHEL was conceived to investigate the solar corona in the extreme UV (EUV) and in the visible broadband polarized brightness and provided, for the first time, a global map of helium in the solar environment. The HERSCHEL payload consisted of a telescope, HERSCHEL EUV Imaging Telescope (HEIT), and two coronagraphs, HECOR (helium coronagraph) and SCORE (sounding coronagraph experiment). The SCORE instrument was designed and developed mainly by Italian research institutes and it is an imaging coronagraph to observe the solar corona from 1.4 to 4 solar radii. SCORE has two detectors for the EUV lines at 121.6 nm (HI) and 30.4 nm (HeII) and the visible broadband polarized brightness. The SCORE UV detector is an intensified CCD with a microchannel plate coupled to a CCD through a fiber-optic bundle. The SCORE visible light detector is a frame-transfer CCD coupled to a polarimeter based on a liquid crystal variable retarder plate. The SCORE coronagraph is described together with the performances of the cameras for imaging the solar corona.

  14. HerMES: ALMA Imaging of Herschel-selected Dusty Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, R. S.; Riechers, D.; Fialkov, A.; Scudder, J.; Hayward, C. C.; Cowley, W. I.; Bock, J.; Calanog, J.; Chapman, S. C.; Cooray, A.; De Bernardis, F.; Farrah, D.; Fu, Hai; Gavazzi, R.; Hopwood, R.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M.; Lacey, C.; Loeb, A.; Oliver, S. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Rigopoulou, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Scott, Douglas; Smith, A. J.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.

    2015-10-01

    The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) has identified large numbers of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) over a wide range in redshift. A detailed understanding of these DSFGs is hampered by the limited spatial resolution of Herschel. We present 870 μm 0.″45 resolution imaging obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of a sample of 29 HerMES DSFGs that have far-infrared (FIR) flux densities that lie between the brightest of sources found by Herschel and fainter DSFGs found via ground-based surveys in the submillimeter region. The ALMA imaging reveals that these DSFGs comprise a total of 62 sources (down to the 5σ point-source sensitivity limit in our ALMA sample; σ ≈ 0.2 {mJy}). Optical or near-infrared imaging indicates that 36 of the ALMA sources experience a significant flux boost from gravitational lensing (μ \\gt 1.1), but only six are strongly lensed and show multiple images. We introduce and make use of uvmcmcfit, a general-purpose and publicly available Markov chain Monte Carlo visibility-plane analysis tool to analyze the source properties. Combined with our previous work on brighter Herschel sources, the lens models presented here tentatively favor intrinsic number counts for DSFGs with a break near 8 {mJy} at 880 μ {{m}} and a steep fall-off at higher flux densities. Nearly 70% of the Herschel sources break down into multiple ALMA counterparts, consistent with previous research indicating that the multiplicity rate is high in bright sources discovered in single-dish submillimeter or FIR surveys. The ALMA counterparts to our Herschel targets are located significantly closer to each other than ALMA counterparts to sources found in the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey. Theoretical models underpredict the excess number of sources with small separations seen in our ALMA sample. The high multiplicity rate and small projected separations between sources seen in our sample argue in favor of interactions

  15. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. IX. Dust-to-gas mass ratio and metallicity gradients in four Virgo spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, L.; Bianchi, S.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Hunt, L.; Smith, M.; Vlahakis, C.; Davies, J.; Bendo, G. J.; Baes, M.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Casasola, V.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T.; Madden, S.; Pappalardo, C.; Pohlen, M.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Verstappen, J.

    2011-11-01

    Context. Using Herschel data from the open time key project the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS), we investigated the relationship between the metallicity gradients expressed by metal abundances in the gas phase as traced by the chemical composition of HII regions, and in the solid phase, as traced by the dust-to-gas mass ratio. Aims: We derived the radial gradient of the dust-to-gas mass ratio for all galaxies observed by HeViCS whose metallicity gradients are available in the literature. They are all late type Sbc galaxies, namely NGC 4254, NGC 4303, NGC 4321, and NGC 4501. Methods: We fitted PACS and SPIRE observations with a single-temperature modified blackbody, inferred the dust mass, and calculated two dimensional maps of the dust-to-gas mass ratio, with the total mass of gas from available HI and CO maps. HI moment-1 maps were used to derive the geometric parameters of the galaxies and extract the radial profiles. We examined different dependencies on metallicity of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor (XCO), used to transform the 12CO observations into the amount of molecular hydrogen. Results: We found that in these galaxies the dust-to-gas mass ratio radial profile is extremely sensitive to choice of the XCO value, since the molecular gas is the dominant component in the inner parts. We found that for three galaxies of our sample, namely NGC 4254, NGC 4321, and NGC 4501, the slopes of the oxygen and of the dust-to-gas radial gradients agree up to ~0.6-0.7 R25 using XCO values in the range 1/3-1/2 Galactic XCO. For NGC 4303 a lower value of XCO ~ 0.1 × 1020 is necessary. Conclusions: We suggest that such low XCO values might be due to a metallicity dependence of XCO (from close to linear for NGC 4254, NGC 4321, and NGC 4501 to superlinear for NGC 4303), especially in the radial regions RG < 0.6-0.7 R25 where the molecular gas dominates. On the other hand, the outer regions, where the atomic gas component is dominant, are less affected by the choice of

  16. Herschel-ATLAS: Dusty early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S.

    2015-03-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) are thought to be devoid of dust and star-formation, having formed most of their stars at early epochs. We present the detection of the dustiest ETGs in a large-area blind submillimetre survey with Herschel (H-ATLAS, Eales et al. 2010), where the lack of pre-selection in other bands makes it the first unbiased survey for cold dust in ETGs. The parent sample of 1087 H-ATLAS galaxies in this study have a >= 5σ detection at 250μm, a reliable optical counterpart to the submillimetre source (Smith et al. 2011) and a spectroscopic redshift from the GAMA survey (Driver et al. 2011). Additionally, we construct a control sample of 1052 optically selected galaxies undetected at 250μm and matched in stellar mass to the H-ATLAS parent sample to eliminate selection effects. ETGs were selected from both samples via visual classifications using SDSS images. Further details can be found in Rowlands et al. (2012). Physical parameters are derived for each galaxy using the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting code of da Cunha, Charlot and Elbaz (2008), Smith et al. 2012, using an energy balance argument. We investigate the differences between the dusty ETGs and the general ETG population, and find that the H-ATLAS ETGs are more than an order of magnitude dustier than the control ETGs. The mean dust mass of the 42 H-ATLAS ETGs is 5.5 × 107M⊙ (comparable to the dust mass of spirals in our sample), whereas the dust mass of the 233 control ETGs inferred from stacking at optical positions on the 250μm map is (0.8 - 4.0) × 106M⊙ for 25-15 K dust. The average star-formation rate of the H-ATLAS ETGs is 1.0 dex higher than that of control ETGs, and the mean r-band light-weighted age of the H-ATLAS ETGs is 1.8 Gyr younger than the control ETGs. The rest-frame NUV - r colours of the H-ATLAS ETGs are 1.0 magnitudes bluer than the control ETGs, and some ETGs may be transitioning from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Some H-ATLAS ETGs

  17. KPGT_ebergin_1: HEXOS: Herschel Observations of Extra-Ordinary Sources: The Orion and Sgr B2 Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergin, E.

    2007-04-01

    As a GT Key Program we propose to perform full HIFI and PACS line surveys of 5 sources in the giant molecular clouds Orion and Sagittarius B2. These extraordinary star-forming regions contain the best studied examples of physical and chemical processes prevalent in the interstellar medium, including gravitational compression, thermal and turbulent pressure support, photodissociation, gas and grain chemistry in dense and diffuse quiescent gas, and shocks. With high excitation, rich chemistry, and large molecular column they give the highest chance for new detections in a sensitive search for new molecules. Line surveys of sources (Orion KL, Orion S, Orion Bar, Sgr B2 N+M) defined by these phenomena form the backbone of this proposed program. Herschel offers unprecedented sensitivity and relative calibration accuracy, as well as continuous spectral coverage across the gaps imposed by the atmosphere, opening up a largely unexplored wavelength regime to high resolution spectroscopy. These data will take line surveys to a new level and we will use them to comprehensively characterize the physics (density, thermal balance, kinematics, radiation field) and chemistry (chemical assay, ionization, deuterium fractionation, water ortho/para ratio) of star-forming molecular gas in a manner not previously possible. The opening of this spectral range is also an opportunity to detect the bending transitions of carbon chains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, along with the rotational transitions of complex organics. Given that these sources have the richest emission spectra seen for star-forming regions in the Galaxy, we anticipate that the proposed observations will define the sub-millimeter/far infrared region of the spectrum and that these data will form a lasting Herschel legacy.

  18. SDP_ebergin_3: HEXOS: Herschel Observations of Extra-Ordinary Sources: The Orion and Sgr B2 Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergin, E.

    2010-07-01

    As a GT Key Program we propose to perform full HIFI and PACS line surveys of 5 sources in the giant molecular clouds Orion and Sagittarius B2. These extraordinary star-forming regions contain the best studied examples of physical and chemical processes prevalent in the interstellar medium, including gravitational compression, thermal and turbulent pressure support, photodissociation, gas and grain chemistry in dense and diffuse quiescent gas, and shocks. With high excitation, rich chemistry, and large molecular column they give the highest chance for new detections in a sensitive search for new molecules. Line surveys of sources (Orion KL, Orion S, Orion Bar, Sgr B2 N+M) defined by these phenomena form the backbone of this proposed program. Herschel offers unprecedented sensitivity and relative calibration accuracy, as well as continuous spectral coverage across the gaps imposed by the atmosphere, opening up a largely unexplored wavelength regime to high resolution spectroscopy. These data will take line surveys to a new level and we will use them to comprehensively characterize the physics (density, thermal balance, kinematics, radiation field) and chemistry (chemical assay, ionization, deuterium fractionation, water ortho/para ratio) of star-forming molecular gas in a manner not previously possible. The opening of this spectral range is also an opportunity to detect the bending transitions of carbon chains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, along with the rotational transitions of complex organics. Given that these sources have the richest emission spectra seen for star-forming regions in the Galaxy, we anticipate that the proposed observations will define the sub-millimeter/far infrared region of the spectrum and that these data will form a lasting Herschel legacy.

  19. AOTVAL_ebergin_2: HEXOS: Herschel Observations of Extra-Ordinary Sources: The Orion and Sgr B2 Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergin, E.

    2010-07-01

    As a GT Key Program we propose to perform full HIFI and PACS line surveys of 5 sources in the giant molecular clouds Orion and Sagittarius B2. These extraordinary star-forming regions contain the best studied examples of physical and chemical processes prevalent in the interstellar medium, including gravitational compression, thermal and turbulent pressure support, photodissociation, gas and grain chemistry in dense and diffuse quiescent gas, and shocks. With high excitation, rich chemistry, and large molecular column they give the highest chance for new detections in a sensitive search for new molecules. Line surveys of sources (Orion KL, Orion S, Orion Bar, Sgr B2 N+M) defined by these phenomena form the backbone of this proposed program. Herschel offers unprecedented sensitivity and relative calibration accuracy, as well as continuous spectral coverage across the gaps imposed by the atmosphere, opening up a largely unexplored wavelength regime to high resolution spectroscopy. These data will take line surveys to a new level and we will use them to comprehensively characterize the physics (density, thermal balance, kinematics, radiation field) and chemistry (chemical assay, ionization, deuterium fractionation, water ortho/para ratio) of star-forming molecular gas in a manner not previously possible. The opening of this spectral range is also an opportunity to detect the bending transitions of carbon chains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, along with the rotational transitions of complex organics. Given that these sources have the richest emission spectra seen for star-forming regions in the Galaxy, we anticipate that the proposed observations will define the sub-millimeter/far infrared region of the spectrum and that these data will form a lasting Herschel legacy.

  20. Upper atmosphere pollution measurements (GASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The environmental effects are discussed of engine effluents of future large fleets of aircraft operating in the stratosphere. Topics discussed include: atmospheric properties, aircraft engine effluents, upper atmospheric measurements, global air sampling, and data reduction and analysis

  1. Surface Properties of Extreme TNOs Based on Herschel/PACS measurements: The Case of Sedna and 2010 EK139

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Muller, Th. G.; Vilenius, E.; Rengel, M.; Mommert, M.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Stansberry, J.

    2012-05-01

    Using Herschel/PACS measurements, our findings for Sedna and 2010 EK139 agree with the suspected correlation between diameter and albedo for detached objects. However, this relation is due to completely different physical and surface processes.

  2. SPITZER IMAGING OF STRONGLY LENSED HERSCHEL-SELECTED DUSTY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Brian; Cooray, Asantha; Calanog, J. A.; Nayyeri, H.; Timmons, N.; Casey, C.; Baes, M.; Chapman, S.; Dannerbauer, H.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Farrah, D.; Fu, Hai; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Riechers, D. A.; Scott, D.; and others

    2015-11-20

    We present the rest-frame optical spectral energy distribution (SED) and stellar masses of six Herschel-selected gravitationally lensed dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at 1 < z < 3. These galaxies were first identified with Herschel/SPIRE imaging data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). The targets were observed with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. Due to the spatial resolution of the IRAC observations at the level of 2″, the lensing features of a background DSFG in the near-infrared are blended with the flux from the foreground lensing galaxy in the IRAC imaging data. We make use of higher resolution Hubble/WFC3 or Keck/NIRC2 Adaptive Optics imaging data to fit light profiles of the foreground lensing galaxy (or galaxies) as a way to model the foreground components, in order to successfully disentangle the foreground lens and background source flux densities in the IRAC images. The flux density measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, once combined with Hubble/WFC3 and Keck/NIRC2 data, provide important constraints on the rest-frame optical SED of the Herschel-selected lensed DSFGs. We model the combined UV- to millimeter-wavelength SEDs to establish the stellar mass, dust mass, star formation rate, visual extinction, and other parameters for each of these Herschel-selected DSFGs. These systems have inferred stellar masses in the range 8 × 10{sup 10}–4 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙} and star formation rates of around 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. This puts these lensed submillimeter systems well above the SFR-M* relation observed for normal star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The high values of SFR inferred for these systems are consistent with a major merger-driven scenario for star formation.

  3. Herschel observations of extraordinary sources: Analysis of the full Herschel/HIFI molecular line survey of sagittarius B2(N)

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, Justin L.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Crockett, Nathan R.; Favre, Cécile; Anderson, Dana E.; Burkhardt, Andrew M.; McNeill, Trevor D.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Emprechtinger, Martin; Monje, Raquel R.; Phillips, Thomas G.; Schilke, Peter; Comito, Claudia; Qin, Sheng-Li; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Harris, Brent J.; Steber, Amanda L.; Vasyunina, Tatiana; Lord, Steven D.; McGuire, Brett A. E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu; and others

    2014-07-01

    A sensitive broadband molecular line survey of the Sagittarius B2(N) star-forming region has been obtained with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory, offering the first high spectral resolution look at this well-studied source in a wavelength region largely inaccessible from the ground (625-157 μm). From the roughly 8000 spectral features in the survey, a total of 72 isotopologues arising from 44 different molecules have been identified, ranging from light hydrides to complex organics, and arising from a variety of environments from cold and diffuse to hot and dense gas. We present a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model to the spectral signatures of each molecule, constraining the source sizes for hot core species with complementary Submillimeter Array interferometric observations and assuming that molecules with related functional group composition are cospatial. For each molecule, a single model is given to fit all of the emission and absorption features of that species across the entire 480-1910 GHz spectral range, accounting for multiple temperature and velocity components when needed to describe the spectrum. As with other HIFI surveys toward massive star-forming regions, methanol is found to contribute more integrated line intensity to the spectrum than any other species. We discuss the molecular abundances derived for the hot core where the LTE approximation is generally found to describe the spectrum well, in comparison to abundances derived for the same molecules in the Orion KL region from a similar HIFI survey. Notably, we find significantly higher abundances of amine- and amide-bearing molecules (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}NH, and NH{sub 2}CHO) toward Sgr B2(N) than Orion KL and lower abundances of some complex oxygen-bearing molecules (CH{sub 3}OCHO in particular). In addition to information on the chemical composition of the hot core, the strong far-infrared dust continuum allows

  4. HELGA: The Herschel Exploitation of the Local Galaxy Andromeda: Sub-mm Morphology and Dust Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Smith, M. W. L.; Kirk, J.; Helga Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The results from a large-field Far-Infrared (FIR) and sub-millimeter (sub-mm) survey of our neighbor galaxy M31 are presented. We have obtained Herschel images of a ˜ 5.5 × 2.5 degree area centered on Andromeda. Using 21-cm atomic hydrogen maps, we are able to disentangle genuine emission from M31 from that for foreground Galactic cirrus, allowing us to recognize dusty structures out to ˜ 31 kpc from the center. We first characterize the FIR and sub-mm morphology and then, by de-projecting Herschel maps and running an ad-hoc source extraction algorithm, we reconstruct the intrinsic morphology and the spatial distribution of the molecular complexes. Finally, we study the spatially resolved properties of the dust (temperature, emissivity, mass, etc.) by means of a pixel-by-pixel SED fitting approach.

  5. Analytical Modeling of Herschel-Quincke Concept Applied to Inlet Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallez, Raphael F.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Gerhold, Carl H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the period from January 1999 to December 2000 on the project 'Investigation of an Adaptive Herschel-Quincke Tube Concept for the Reduction of Tonal and Broadband Noise from Turbofan Engines', funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The Herschel-Quincke (HQ) tube concept is a developing technique the consists of circumferential arrays of tubes around the duct. The analytical model is developed to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of the HQ concept to turbofan engine inlets. An infinite duct model is developed and used to provide insight into attenuation mechanisms and design strategies. Based on this early model, the NASA-developed TBIEM3D code is modified for the HQ system. This model allows for investigation of the HQ system combined with a passive liner.

  6. De Herschel à Alma. Les galaxies dévoilent enfin leurs secrets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, David

    2016-08-01

    With deep surveys, one can measure the amount of stars born in slices of the Universe and infer a "cosmic rate of star formation." The latest estimates from the Herschel satellite show a rapid drop of star formation in galaxies since ten billion years. To understand the cause of this fall, we can now measure the interstellar reservoirs of galaxies by combining observations from Herschel and the millimeter interferometer ALMA. Early results suggest that this fall comes from the rapid consumption of interstellar matter which served as reservoir to galaxies. Thanks to the technique of interferometry, ALMA can map interstellar dust within galaxies observed at the time of the peak of cosmic star formation, ten billion years ago. We discover that the stars of the most massive galaxies are born not only at very high rates but also with an extreme concentration.

  7. ALMA observation of high-z extreme star-forming environments discovered by Planck/Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Comic Microwave Background satellite Planck with its High Frequency Instrument has surveyed the mm/sub-mm sky in six frequency channels from 100 to 900 GHz. A sample of 228 cold sources of the Cosmic Infrared Background was observed in follow-up with Herschel SPIRE. The majority of sources appear to be over-densities of star-forming galaxies matching the size of high-z proto-cluster regions, while a 3% fraction are individual bright, lensed galaxies. A large observing program is underway with the aim of resolving the regions into the constituent members of the Planck sources. First ALMA data have been received on one Planck/Herschel proto-cluster candidate, showing the expected large over-abundance of bright mm/sub-mm sources within the cluster region. ALMA long baseline data of the brightest lensed galaxy in the sample with > 1 Jy at 350 μm are also forthcoming.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: FIR spectra of AGNs from Herschel (Fernandez-Ontiveros+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Ontiveros, J. A.; Spinoglio, L.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Malkan, M. A.; Andreani, P.; Dasyra, K. M.

    2016-11-01

    The combination of Herschel/PACS during its 3.5yr of operational life and Spitzer/IRS allows us to cover the fine-structure emission lines from the mid- to the far-IR (10-200um in the rest-frame) for all the galaxies in the sample. This database was completed with the Herschel/SPIRE published values of the [NII]205um, and [CI]371,609um line fluxes (mainly from Kamenetzky+ 2016ApJ...829...93K). Table 8 collects published mid-IR (10-35um) fine-structure line fluxes measured with Spitzer/IRS for our samples of AGN and starburst galaxies. These values were complemented with unpublished IRS observations from the Spitzer archive. (10 data files).

  9. Experimental Investigation of the Herschel-Quincke Tube Concept on the Honeywell TFE731-60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerome P.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Gerhold, Carl H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the period from January 1999 to December 2000 on the project 'Investigation of an Adaptive Herschel-Quincke Tube Concept for the Reduction of Tonal and Broadband Noise from Turbofan Engines', funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The Herschel-Quincke (HQ) tube concept is a developing technique that consists of circumferential arrays of tubes around the duct. A fixed array of tubes is installed on the inlet duct of the Honeywell TFE731-60 engine. Two array designs are incorporated into the inlet treatment, each designed for a different circumferential mode order which is expected to be cut on in the duct. Far field and in-duct noise measurement data are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the HQ concept for array 1, array 2, and both operating simultaneously.

  10. The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS): A Bright Lensed Submillimeter Galaxy in the Field of Abell 773

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawle, Tim; Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Combes, F.; Boone, F.; Smail, I.; Lensing Survey, Herschel

    2012-05-01

    The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS; PI: Egami) is observing more than 50 massive galaxy clusters with deep PACS and SPIRE (100-500um) imaging, and a further 500 clusters in a SPIRE snapshot program ( 20 deg^2 of far-infrared cluster observations in total). Here, we present a discussion of an exceptionally bright ( 200mJy at 500um) source behind the cluster Abell 773, which is a strongly lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) at z=5.2. The source has an intrinsic infrared luminosity L_FIR 1e13 L_sun, with a total magnification factor of 11. We combine Herschel-SMA-IRAM observations of the dust continuum and gas excitation line emission, including multiple CO transitions, [CII] and [NII] (detected for the first time at high-z), to explore the morphology, star formation and ISM in this SMG.

  11. ALMA observation of high-z extreme star-forming environments discovered by Planck/Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, R.

    2016-05-01

    The Comic Microwave Background satellite Planck with its High Frequency Instrument has surveyed the mm/sub-mm sky in six frequency channels from 100 to 900 GHz. A sample of 228 cold sources of the Cosmic Infrared Background was observed in follow-up with Herschel SPIRE. The majority of sources appear to be over-densities of star-forming galaxies matching the size of high-z proto-cluster regions, while a 3% fraction are individual bright, lensed galaxies. A large observing program is underway with the aim of resolving the regions into the constituent members of the Planck sources. First ALMA data have been received on one Planck/Herschel proto-cluster candidate, showing the expected large over-abundance of bright mm/sub-mm sources within the cluster region. ALMA long baseline data of the brightest lensed galaxy in the sample with > 1 Jy at 350 μm are also forthcoming.

  12. Performances Of Herschel/PACS Bolometer Arrays And Future Developments At CEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Babar; Billot, N.; Rodriguez, L.; Okumura, K.; Sauvage, M.; Agnese, P.

    2009-01-01

    The PACS Photometer of the Herschel Space Observatory is equipped with filled bolometer arrays developed by CEA/LETI and CEA/SAp. These innovative detectors allow to dispense with bulky light concentrators and to instantaneously sample the field of view without altering the optical coupling of the detectors to the telescope beam. CEA/LETI opted for an all-silicon design to allow for the collective manufacturing of 16x16 bolometer arrays. Being 3-side buttable these arrays are now the building blocks for making large focal planes necessary for the next generation of wide-field sub-mm cameras. We present the unique architecture of CEA filled bolometer arrays and we report on the latest performance measurements of the Herschel/PACS Photometer. We also present current and future developments at CEA for ground-based, balloon borne and space telescopes.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (Oliver+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, S. J.; Bock, J.; Altieri, B.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Babbedge, T.; Beelen, A.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Boselli, A.; Bridge, C.; Brisbin, D.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Cirasuolo, M.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Dubois, E. N.; Dwek, E.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Elbaz, D.; Farrah, D.; Feltre, A.; Ferrero, P.; Fiolet, N.; Fox, M.; Franceschini, A.; Gear, W.; Giovannoli, E.; Glenn, J.; Gong, Y.; Gonzalez Solares, E. A.; Griffin, M.; Halpern, M.; Harwit, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Heinis, S.; Hurley, P.; Hwang, H. S.; Hyde, A.; Ibar, E.; Ilbert, O.; Isaak, K.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Le Floc'h, E.; Levenson, L.; Faro, B. L.; Lu, N.; Madden, S.; Maffei, B.; Magdis, G.; Mainetti, G.; Marchetti, L.; Marsden, G.; Marshall, J.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Halloran, B.; Omont, A.; Page, M. J.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Patel, H.; Pearson, C. P.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Rawlings, J. I.; Raymond, G.; Rigopoulou, D.; Riguccini, L.; Rizzo, D.; Rodighier!, O. G.; Ros Eboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Schulz, B.; Scott, D.; Seymour, N.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Stevens, J. A.; Symeonidis, M.; Trichas, M.; Tugwell, K. E.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J. D.; Viero, M.; Vigroux, L.; Wang, L.; Ward, R.; Wardlow, J.; Wright, G.; Xu, C. K.; Zemcov, M.

    2017-03-01

    SPIRE maps (250, 350 and 500 microns) and PACS maps (100 and 160 microns) covering an area of more than 385 square degrees in the sky resulting from observations taken as part of HerMES (KPGTsoliver1), a Herschel Key Project whose main objective was to chart the formation and evolution of infrared galaxies throughout cosmic history, measuring the bolometric emission of infrared galaxies and their clustering properties. The associated catalogues extracted from these maps include over 1,200,000 entries representing over 340,000 galaxies. They consist of 'blind extraction' catalogues containing photometric information derived directly from these maps, 'band merged' catalogues extracted at SPIRE 250 micron positions plus 'cross-identification' catalogues based on prior Spitzer MIPS 24 micron source positions. The latest data releases contain also information derived from the complementary Herschel programmes HeLMS (GT2mviero1) and HeRS (OT2mviero2). (4 data files).

  14. Observations of H2O in Titan's atmosphere with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, R.; Lellouch, E.; Lara, L. M.; Courtin, R.; Hartogh, P.; Rengel, M.

    2012-04-01

    Disk averaged observations of several H2O far infrared lines in Titan’s atmosphere were performed with the Herschel Space Observatory, as part of the guaranteed time key program "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System" (HssO, see Hartogh et al 2011). Two instruments were used: (i) HIFI, a heterodyne instrument (R~ 106 ) in the sub-millimeter, which measured the H2O(110-101) rotational transition at 557 GHz on June 10 and Dec. 31, 2010 (ii) PACS, a photoconductor spectrometer (R~103) which measured three water lines at 108.1, 75.4 and 66.4 microns on June 22, 2010. Additional PACS measurements at 66.4 microns on Dec. 15 and 22, 2010 and on July 09, 2011, do not show any significant line intensity variation with time, nor between the leading/trailing sides (i.e. longitude). Spectra were analyzed with a line-by-line radiative transfer code accounting for spherical geometry (Moreno et al. 2011). This model considers the H2O molecular opacity from JPL catalog (Pickett et al. 1998) and also includes collision-induced opacities N2-N2, N2-CH4 and CH4-CH4 (Borysow and Frommhold 1986, 1987, Borysow and Tang 1993). Far infrared aerosol opacities derived by CIRS were included, following Anderson and Samuelson (2011) for their vertical distribution and spectral dependencies. Analysis of the 557 GHz narrow line (FWHM ~ 2 MHz) indicates that it originates at altitudes above 300 km, while lines measured with PACS probe mainly deeper levels (80-150 km). The HIFI and PACS observations are fitted simultaneously, considering a vertical distribution of H2O mixing ratio which follows a power law dependency q=q0(P/P0)n, where q0 is the mixing ratio at some reference pressure level P0, taken near the expected condensation level. Model fits will be presented, and compared with previously proposed H2O vertical distributions. We show in particular that both the steep profile proposed by Lara et al. (1996) (and adopted by Coustenis et al. (1998) to model the first detection of H2O

  15. Herschel-ATLAS: counterparts from the ultraviolet-near-infrared in the science demonstration phase catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J. B.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Eales, S.; Bonfield, D. G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Sutherland, W.; Fleuren, S.; Rigby, E. E.; Thompson, M. A.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Fritz, J.; Hill, D. T.; Hopkins, A.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L.; Leeuw, L.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Madore, B. F.; Norberg, P.; Panuzzo, P.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Robotham, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Seibert, M.; Sharp, R.; Temi, P.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P.; van Kampen, E.

    2011-09-01

    We present a technique to identify optical counterparts of 250-μm-selected sources from the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Of the 6621 250 μm > 32-mJy sources in our science demonstration catalogue we find that ˜60 per cent have counterparts brighter than r = 22.4 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Applying a likelihood ratio technique we are able to identify 2423 of the counterparts with a reliability R > 0.8. This is approximately 37 per cent of the full 250-μm catalogue. We have estimated photometric redshifts for each of these 2423 reliable counterparts, while 1099 also have spectroscopic redshifts collated from several different sources, including the GAMA survey. We estimate the completeness of identifying counterparts as a function of redshift, and present evidence that 250-μm-selected Herschel-ATLAS galaxies have a bimodal redshift distribution. Those with reliable optical identifications have a redshift distribution peaking at z ≈ 0.25 ± 0.05, while submillimetre colours suggest that a significant fraction with no counterpart above the r-band limit have z > 1. We also suggest a method for selecting populations of strongly lensed high-redshift galaxies. Our identifications are matched to UV-NIR photometry from the GAMA survey, and these data are available as part of the Herschel-ATLAS public data release. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  16. The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey: Herschel Image Atlas and Aperture Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jason K.; Sanders, D. B.; Larson, K. L.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Howell, J. H.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Xu, K. C.; Paladini, R.; Schulz, B.; Shupe, D.; Appleton, P.; Armus, L.; Billot, N.; Chan, B. H. P.; Evans, A. S.; Fadda, D.; Frayer, D. T.; Haan, S.; Ishida, C. M.; Iwasawa, K.; Kim, D.-C.; Lord, S.; Murphy, E.; Petric, A.; Privon, G. C.; Surace, J. A.; Treister, E.

    2017-04-01

    Far-infrared images and photometry are presented for 201 Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies [LIRGs: log ({L}{IR}/{L}ȯ )=11.00{--}11.99, ULIRGs: log ({L}{IR}/{L}ȯ )=12.00{--}12.99], in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), based on observations with the Herschel Space Observatory Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instruments. The image atlas displays each GOALS target in the three PACS bands (70, 100, and 160 μm) and the three SPIRE bands (250, 350, and 500 μm), optimized to reveal structures at both high and low surface brightness levels, with images scaled to simplify comparison of structures in the same physical areas of ∼100 × 100 kpc2. Flux densities of companion galaxies in merging systems are provided where possible, depending on their angular separation and the spatial resolution in each passband, along with integrated system fluxes (sum of components). This data set constitutes the imaging and photometric component of the GOALS Herschel OT1 observing program, and is complementary to atlases presented for the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory. Collectively, these data will enable a wide range of detailed studies of active galactic nucleus and starburst activity within the most luminous infrared galaxies in the local universe. Based on Herschel Space Observatory observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by the European-led Principal Investigator consortia, and important participation from NASA.

  17. Brown dwarf disks with Herschel: Linking far-infrared and (sub)-mm fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daemgen, Sebastian; Natta, Antonella; Scholz, Alexander; Testi, Leonardo; Jayawardhana, Ray; Greaves, Jane; Eastwood, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Brown dwarf disks are excellent laboratories to test our understanding of disk physics in an extreme parameter regime. In this paper we investigate a sample of 29 well-characterized brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, for which Herschel far-infrared fluxes and (sub)-mm fluxes are available. We measured new Herschel/PACS fluxes for 11 objects and complement these with (sub)-mm data and Herschel fluxes from the literature. We analyze their spectral energy distributions in comparison with results from radiative transfer modeling. Fluxes in the far-infrared are strongly affected by the shape and temperature of the disk (and hence stellar luminosity), whereas the (sub)-mm fluxes mostly depend on disk mass. Nevertheless, there is a clear correlation between far-infrared and (sub)-mm fluxes. We argue that the link results from the combination of the stellar mass-luminosity relation and a scaling between disk mass and stellar mass. We find strong evidence of dust settling to the disk midplane. The spectral slopes between near- and far-infrared are mostly between -0.5 and -1.2 in our sample, which is comparable to more massive T Tauri stars; this may imply that the disk shapes are similar as well, although highly flared disks are rare among brown dwarfs. We find that dust temperatures in the range of 7-15 K, calculated with T ≈ 25 (L/L⊙)0.25 K, are appropriate for deriving disk masses from (sub)-mm fluxes for these low luminosity objects. About half of our sample hosts disks with at least one Jupiter mass, confirming that many brown dwarfs harbor sufficient material for the formation of Earth-mass planets in their midst. Herschel is a ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  18. Antecedents to Fechner's law: the astronomers J. Herschel, W. R. Dawes, and N. R. Pogson

    PubMed Central

    Pliskoff, Stanley S.

    1977-01-01

    The history of the stellar magnitude scale is briefly traced from the second century b.c. until the middle of the nineteenth century. It becomes clear that astronomers formulated “Fechner's Law” by about 1850. While Fechner is credited with the grander view of things, the contention is made that the astronomers John Herschel, W. R. Dawes, and N. R. Pogson have not been given their due by historians of psychology. PMID:16812026

  19. Results from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey in the Ophiuchus Main Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladjelate, Bilal; André, Philippe; Könyves, Vera; Men'shchikov, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Results from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey in the Ophiuchus Main CloudThe Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud is a well documented star-forming cloud located ~140 pc from the Sun. It is therefore an excellent laboratory for dense core search and classification. Harbouring low-mass star formation, its protostellar population have been studied for about three decades from the near infrared to the millimeter and radio range.As part of the Herschel Gould Belt Survey (http://www.herschel.fr/cea/gouldbelt/), extensive submillimeter images of the Ophiuchus Main Cloud (L1688) were produced and a deep census of both prestellar cores and young protostars was obtained using the multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm, getsources (Mensh'chikov et al. 2012).About 300 starless cores were extracted, including ~100 candidates gravitationally bound prestellar cores. The prestellar cores are primarily found in high column density filamentary structures above AV~7. Based on these data we discuss, the properties of the prestellar core mass function (CMF) as well as its variations in the various clumps of the cloud. The peak of the prestellar CMF appears to be close to 0.3 Solar masses in L1688.Conceptually, the low-mass end of the prestellar CMF is populated by pre-brown dwarf cores, the prototype of which is Oph-B11, a 20 Jovian masses object identified with SCUBA and IRAM (Greaves et al. 2003, André et al. 2012). Our Herschel census of dense cores in L1688 contains a few other candidate ultra low-mass cores under the hydrogen-burning limit (0.08 M⊙) which will be discussed.

  20. Using Herschel Far-Infrared Photometry to Constrain Star Formation Rates in CLASH Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Rebecca L.; Postman, Marc; Fogarty, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) program obtained broadband images of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 16 passbands from the UV to the near-IR. The data was taken with the Wide-field Camera 3 (WFC3), and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These 25 clusters have also been observed in the mid-IR by Spitzer IRAC, the far-IR by the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE, and in the x-ray by the Chandra and XMM observatories. We focused on the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the survey (MACS1931.8-2653 and RXJ1532.9+3021) that have reddening-corrected UV-derived star formation rates (SFRs) > 100 M⊙ yr-1 as measured by Fogarty et al (2015). The inclusion of Herschel data provides unique constraints on dust content and independent estimates of the star formation rates in these interesting galaxies. We performed photometry on the five Herschel bands (100-500μm), and removed any contamination from other cluster members. We fit a UV-FIR SED to each galaxy to measure the bolometric dust luminosity (Lbol), which we use to derive the FIR obscured SFR. We calculate the sum of the measured UV unobscured SFR from the HST photometry and the FIR obscured SFR from the Herschel photometry to get a total SFR for these two BCGs. We compared this to the reddening-corrected SFRs and found they were in agreement within error. This confirms that the Kennicutt and Calzetti methods for calculating star formation rates are both applicable for these highly star-forming massive cluster galaxies.

  1. Resolving the stellar components of the massive multiple system Herschel 36 with AMBER/VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Alberdi, A.; Schödel, R.; Hummel, C. A.; Arias, J. I.; Barbá, R. H.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Pott, J.-U.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Massive stars are extremely important for the evolution of the galaxies; there are large gaps in our understanding of their properties and formation, however, mainly because they evolve rapidly, are rare, and distant. Recent findings suggest that most O-stars belong to multiple systems. It may well be that almost all massive stars are born as triples or higher multiples, but their large distances require very high angular resolution to directly detect the companions at milliarcsecond scales. Aims: Herschel 36 is a young massive system located at 1.3 kpc. It has a combined smallest predicted mass of 45 M⊙. Multi-epoch spectroscopic data suggest the existence of at least three gravitationally bound components. Two of them, system Ab, are tightly bound in a spectroscopic binary, and the third one, component Aa, orbits in a wider orbit. Our aim was to image and obtain astrometric and photometric measurements of components Aa and Ab using, for the first time, long-baseline optical interferometry to further constrain its nature. Methods: We observed Herschel 36 with the near-infrared instrument AMBER attached to the ESO VLT Interferometer, which provides an angular resolution of ~2 mas. We used the code BSMEM to perform the interferometric image reconstruction. We fitted the interferometric observables using proprietary IDL routines and the code LitPro. Results: We imaged the Aa + Ab components of Herschel 36 in H and K filters. Component Ab is located at a projected distance of 1.81 mas, at a position angle of ~222° east of north, the flux ratio between components Aa and Ab is close to one. These findings agree with previous predictions about the properties of Herschel 36. The small measured angular separation indicates that system Ab and Ab may be approaching the periastron of their orbits. These results, only achievable with long-baseline near-infrared interferometry, constitute the first step toward a thorough understanding of this massive triple system.

  2. A COOL DUST FACTORY IN THE CRAB NEBULA: A HERSCHEL STUDY OF THE FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, H. L.; Clark, C. J. R.; Gomez, E. L.; Gear, W. K.; Krause, O.; Besel, M.-A.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, Th.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Owen, P. J.; Matsuura, M.; Rho, J.; Ivison, R. J.; Sibthorpe, B.; Polehampton, E. T.

    2012-11-20

    Whether supernovae are major sources of dust in galaxies is a long-standing debate. We present infrared and submillimeter photometry and spectroscopy from the Herschel Space Observatory of the Crab Nebula between 51 and 670 {mu}m as part of the Mass Loss from Evolved StarS program. We compare the emission detected with Herschel with multiwavelength data including millimeter, radio, mid-infrared, and archive optical images. We carefully remove the synchrotron component using the Herschel and Planck fluxes measured in the same epoch. The contribution from line emission is removed using Herschel spectroscopy combined with Infrared Space Observatory archive data. Several forbidden lines of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are detected where multiple velocity components are resolved, deduced to be from the nitrogen-depleted, carbon-rich ejecta. No spectral lines are detected in the SPIRE wavebands; in the PACS bands, the line contribution is 5% and 10% at 70 and 100 {mu}m and negligible at 160 {mu}m. After subtracting the synchrotron and line emission, the remaining far-infrared continuum can be fit with two dust components. Assuming standard interstellar silicates, the mass of the cooler component is 0.24{sup +0.32} {sub -0.08} M {sub Sun} for T = 28.1{sup +5.5} {sub -3.2} K. Amorphous carbon grains require 0.11 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} of dust with T = 33.8{sup +2.3} {sub -1.8} K. A single temperature modified blackbody with 0.14 M {sub Sun} and 0.08 M {sub Sun} for silicate and carbon dust, respectively, provides an adequate fit to the far-infrared region of the spectral energy distribution but is a poor fit at 24-500 {mu}m. The Crab Nebula has condensed most of the relevant refractory elements into dust, suggesting the formation of dust in core-collapse supernova ejecta is efficient.

  3. New HErschel Multi-wavelength Extragalactic Survey of Edge-on Spirals (NHEMESES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Bianchi, S.; Baes, M.; de Jong, R. S.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Radburn-Smith, D.; Gordon, K.; Xilouris, M.

    2012-08-01

    Edge-on spiral galaxies offer a unique perspective on the vertical structure of spiral disks, both stars and the iconic dark dustlanes. The thickness of these dustlanes can now be resolved for the first time with Herschel in far-infrared and sub-mm emission. We present NHEMESES, an ongoing project that targets 12 edge-on spiral galaxies with the PACS and SPIRE instruments on Herschel. These vertically resolved observations of edge-on spirals will impact on several current topics. First and foremost, these Herschel observations will settle whether or not there is a phase change in the vertical structure of the ISM with disk mass. Previously, a dramatic change in dustlane morphology was observed as in massive disks the dust collapses into a thin lane. If this is the case, the vertical balance between turbulence and gravity dictates the ISM structure and consequently star-formation and related phenomena (spiral arms, bars etc.). We specifically target lower mass nearby edge-ons to complement existing Herschel observations of high-mass edge-on spirals (the HEROES project). Secondly, the combined data-set, together with existing Spitzer observations, will drive a new generation of spiral disk Spectral Energy Distribution models. These model how dust reprocesses starlight to thermal emission but the dust geometry remains the critical unknown. And thirdly, the observations will provide an accurate and unbiased census of the cold dusty structures occasionally seen extending out of the plane of the disk, when backlit by the stellar disk. To illustrate the NHEMESES project, we present early results on NGC 4244 and NGC 891, two well studies examples of a low and high-mass edge-on spiral.

  4. Herschel-Resolved Outer Belts of Two-Belt Debris Disks--Evidence of Icy Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Farisa Y.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Werner, Michael W.; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2015-12-01

    We present dual-band Herschel/PACS imaging for 57 main sequence stars (42 A-type and 15 solar-type) with previously known warm dust (Twarm ~200K) detected and characterized by Spitzer. About half of the star-disk systems in our sample have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that suggest two-ring disk architectures that mirror that of the asteroid-Kuiper belt geometry of our own solar system. The Herschel observations at 70 and/or 100 micron spatially resolve the cold/outer dust component for 18 two-belt debris systems (15 for the first time; 10 are also resolved at 160 micron), finding evidence of planetesimals at >100 AU, i.e. larger size than assumed from a simple blackbody fit to the SED. By breaking the degeneracy between the grain properties and the dust's radial location, the resolved images help constrain the grain size distribution and hint at the dust's composition for each system. Based on the combined Spitzer/IRS+MIPS (5 to 70 micron), the Herschel/PACS (70 and/or 100 and 160 micron) dataset, and under the assumption of idealized spherical grains, we find that the majority of resolved cold/outer belts of star+disk systems are well fit with a mixed ice/rock composition, rather than pure rocky grains. In the absence of spectral features for ice, we find that the behavior of the continuum can help constrain the composition of the grains well (of icy nature and not pure rocky material) given the Herschel-resolved locations of the cold/outer dust belts. We have also begin to identify the presence of candidate companions via Keck direct imaging, which may be interacting with the observed dust.

  5. Herschel-ATLAS: far-infrared properties of radio-selected galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, M. J.; Virdee, J. S.; Jarvis, M. J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Dunne, L.; Rawlings, S.; Stevens, J. A.; Christopher, N. M.; Heywood, I.; Mauch, T.; Rigopoulou, D.; Verma, A.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S. P.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S. M.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hill, D. T.; Hughes, D.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jones, D. H.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Negrello, M.; Norberg, P.; Pohlen, M.; Prescott, M.; Rigby, E. E.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Sharp, R.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van Kampen, E.

    2010-11-01

    We use the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (ATLAS) science demonstration data to investigate the star formation properties of radio-selected galaxies in the GAMA-9h field as a function of radio luminosity and redshift. Radio selection at the lowest radio luminosities, as expected, selects mostly starburst galaxies. At higher radio luminosities, where the population is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN), we find that some individual objects are associated with high far-infrared luminosities. However, the far-infrared properties of the radio-loud population are statistically indistinguishable from those of a comparison population of radio-quiet galaxies matched in redshift and K-band absolute magnitude. There is thus no evidence that the host galaxies of these largely low-luminosity (Fanaroff-Riley class I), and presumably low-excitation, AGN, as a population, have particularly unusual star formation histories. Models in which the AGN activity in higher luminosity, high-excitation radio galaxies is triggered by major mergers would predict a luminosity-dependent effect that is not seen in our data (which only span a limited range in radio luminosity) but which may well be detectable with the full Herschel-ATLAS data set. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. E-mail: m.j.hardcastle@herts.ac.uk

  6. Detailed models of a sample of debris disks: from Herschel, KIN and Spitzer to the JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.; Beichman, C.; Augereau, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Dusty debris disks surrounding main sequence stars are extrasolar equivalents to the Solar System populations of asteroids, icy bodies and dust grains. Many were observed in thermal emission by Herschel with unprecedented wavelength coverage and spatial resolution, complementing available scattered light images, mid-infrared spectra and interferometric measurements. We present detailed models of the HD 181327 and HD 32297 disks obtained with the GRaTer radiative transfer code and made possible thanks to Herschel. We then focus on the intriguing case of the nearby F2V star η Corvi that shows strong infrared excess despite an estimated age of 1.4 Gyr. We establish a detailed model of its disk from the sub-AU scale to its outermost regions based on observations from the Keck Interferometer Nuller, Herschel and Spitzer. These bright and extended disks will be of prime interest for future observations with the JWST. We finally discuss new debris disks science that will be addressed with the NIRCam and MIRI instruments.

  7. HERSCHEL AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF SLOWLY ROTATING, NEARBY ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Posselt, B.; Pavlov, G. G.; Popov, S.; Wachter, S.

    2014-11-01

    Supernova fallback disks around neutron stars have been suspected to influence the evolution of the diverse neutron star populations. Slowly rotating neutron stars are the most promising places to find such disks. Searching for the cold and warm debris of old fallback disks, we carried out Herschel PACS (70 μm, 160 mu m) and Spitzer IRAC (3.6 μm, 4.5 μm) observations of eight slowly rotating (P ≈ 3-11 s) nearby (<1 kpc) isolated neutron stars. Herschel detected 160 μm emission (>5σ) at locations consistent with the positions of the neutron stars RX J0806.4-4123 and RX J2143.0+0654. No other significant infrared emission was detected from the eight neutron stars. We estimate probabilities of 63%, 33%, and 3% that, respectively, none, one, or both Herschel PACS 160 μm detections are unrelated excess sources due to background source confusion or an interstellar cirrus. If the 160 μm emission is indeed related to cold (10-22 K) dust around the neutron stars, this dust is absorbing and re-emitting ∼10% to ∼20% of the neutron stars' X-rays. Such high efficiencies would be at least three orders of magnitude larger than the efficiencies of debris disks around nondegenerate stars. While thin dusty disks around the neutron stars can be excluded as counterparts of the 160 μm emission, dusty asteroid belts constitute a viable option.

  8. THROES: A caTalogue of HeRschel Observations of Evolved Stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Medina, J.; Sánchez-Contreras, C.; García-Lario, P.

    2017-03-01

    We are building a catalogue of interactively reprocessed observations of all evolved stars observed with Herschel. The catalogue will offer not only the reduced PACS spectroscopic data for each observation, but also complementary information from other infrared observatories. As a first step, we are concentrating our efforts on two main activities: 1) the reprocessing and data-reduction of more than 120 individual sources, observed by Herschel/PACS in the 55-210 micron range, available in the Herschel Science Archive (HSA). 2) the creation of a catalogue, accesible via a web-based interface and through the Virtual Observatory (VO). Our ultimate goal is to carry out a comprehensive and systematic study of the far infrared properties of low-and intermediate-mass evolved stars using these data. These objects cover the whole range of possible evolutionary stages in this short-lived phase of stellar evolu- tion, from AGB phase to the PN stage, displaying a wide variety of chemical and physical properties.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CO, [CI] and [NII] lines from Herschel spectra (Kamenetzky+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetzky, J.; Rangwala, N.; Glenn, J.; Maloney, P. R.; Conley, A.

    2016-11-01

    We compiled a list of successful extragalactic Herschel/SPIRE FTS proposals (301 spectra) and searched the Herschel Science Archive (HSA) for the available data. Table 1 lists the basic galaxy information and observation IDs for all galaxies for which at least one FTS line measurement or upper limit is reported. The bandpass of the Herschel FTS starts around the CO J=4-3 line, but the majority of the molecular mass in galaxies is cool and populates the lower rotational levels. We complement the line fluxes derived from the FTS with the CO J=1-0, J=2-1, and J=3-2 lines available from ground-based observatories. Many of these galaxies have already been studied in the literature, particularly in large CO surveys. For some galaxies, we also performed single-dish measurements using the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Measurements of the CO J=1-0 line were conducted with the 12m dish on Kitt Peak in 2015 May, and those of CO J=2-1 and J=3-2 were conducted with the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) located on Mt. Graham from 2014 November to 2015 February. (4 data files).

  10. Recent Star Formation in the Lupus Clouds as Seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, Kazi L. J.; Benedettini, Milena

    We present a study of the star formation histories of the Lupus I, III, and IV clouds using the Herschel 70-500 μm maps obtained by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey Key-Project. By combining the new Herschel data with the existing Spitzer catalog we obtained an unprecedented census of prestellar sources and young stellar objects in the Lupus clouds, which allowed us to study the overall star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The high SFE of Lupus III and its decreasing SFR suggest that Lupus III is the most evolved cloud, that after having experienced a major star formation event, is now approaching the end of its current star-forming cycle. Lupus I is currently undergoing a large star formation event, apparent by the increasing SFR. Also Lupus IV has an increasing SFR, however, the relative number of prestellar sources is much lower than in Lupus I, suggesting that its star formation has not yet reached its peak.

  11. Herschel observations of near-Earth objects: Encounters with the spacecraft and with the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, L.; Müller, T.; Altieri, B.; Kiss, C.; Kùppers, M.; Barucci, M.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B.; Dotto, E.; Yoshikawa, M.; Carry, B.; Kidger, M.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Vavrek, R.; Teyssier, D.; Marston, A.

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel MACH-11 (Measurements of 11 Asteroids & Comets with Herschel) Programme has as its prime goal to observe those asteroids & comets which have been or will be visited by spacecraft or those which are being studied with a similar goal in mind. The following near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) form part of the list of targets making up this program and will be addressed in this analysis: - 1999 JU_3 (Hayabusa 2 mission target) - 1999 RQ_{36} (OSIRIS-REx mission target) - 1996 FG_3 (Marco-Polo R backup mission target) - (99942) Apophis (Study target) An additional NEA (not part of the MACH-11 program) will also be reviewed, namely 2005 YU_{55}. Each target was observed using the PACS Photometer of the Herschel Space Observatory (Pilbratt et al 2010). The extracted fluxes from each observation campaign were fed into a thermophysical model which has been validated against a large database of asteroids including targets of other spacecraft missions. In all cases, radiometric properties of each target have been derived and will be presented, with their impact on already published data being analysed & discussed.

  12. Herschel Observations and Updated Spectral Energy Distributions of Five Sunlike Stars with Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Bryden, Geoff; Harvey, Paul; Green, Joel D.

    2016-12-01

    Observations from the Herschel Space Observatory have more than doubled the number of wide debris disks orbiting Sunlike stars to include over 30 systems with R > 100 AU. Here, we present new Herschel PACS and reanalyzed Spitzer MIPS photometry of five Sunlike stars with wide debris disks, from Kuiper Belt size to R > 150 AU. The disk surrounding HD 105211 is well resolved, with an angular extent of >14″ along the major axis, and the disks of HD 33636, HD 50554, and HD 52265 are extended beyond the PACS point-spread function size (50% of energy enclosed within radius 4.″23). HD 105211 also has a 24 μm infrared excess, which was previously overlooked, because of a poorly constrained photospheric model. Archival Spitzer IRS observations indicate that the disks have small grains of minimum radius a min ˜ 3 μm, although a min is larger than the radiation-pressure blowout size in all systems. If modeled as single-temperature blackbodies, the disk temperatures would all be <60 K. Our radiative transfer models predict actual disk radii approximately twice the radius of a model blackbody disk. We find that the Herschel photometry traces dust near the source population of planetesimals. The disk luminosities are in the range 2 × 10-5 ⩽ L/L ⊙ ⩽ 2 × 10-4, consistent with collisions in icy planetesimal belts stirred by Pluto-size dwarf planets.

  13. LENS MODELS OF HERSCHEL-SELECTED GALAXIES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Calanog, J. A.; Cooray, A.; Ma, B.; Casey, C. M.; Fu, Hai; Wardlow, J.; Amber, S.; Baker, A. J.; Baes, M.; Bock, J.; Bourne, N.; Dye, S.; Bussmann, R. S.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 μm bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (∼17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and previous lensing models for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). For four new sources that also have high-resolution submillimeter maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 μm magnification factor (μ{sub 880}) is ∼1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (μ{sub NIR}), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ∼2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.

  14. Herschel Far-IR Observations of the Giant H II Region NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cecco, Alessandra; Faustini, Fabiana; Paresce, Francesco; Correnti, Matteo; Calzoletti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We observed the giant H II region around the NGC 3603 YC with the five broad bands (70, 160, 250, 350, 500 μm) of the SPIRE and PACS instruments, on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Together with what is currently known of the stellar, atomic, molecular, and warm dust components, this additional and crucial information should allow us to better understand the details of the star-formation history in this region. The main objective of the investigation is to study, at high spatial resolution, the distribution and main physical characteristics of the cold dust. By reconstructing the temperature and density maps, we found, respectively, a mean value of 36 K and log10 N H = 22.0 ± 0.1 cm-2. We carried out a photometric analysis detecting 107 point-like sources, mostly confined to the north and south of the cluster. By comparing our data with spectral energy distribution models, we found that 35 sources are well represented by young stellar objects in early evolutionary phases, from Class 0 to Class I. The Herschel detections also provided far-IR counterparts for 4 H2O masers and 11 objects previously known from mid-IR observations. The existence of so many embedded sources confirms the hypothesis of intense and ongoing star-formation activity in the region around NGC 3603 YC. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led principal investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  15. Herschel and Spitzer Observations of Slowly Rotating, Nearby Isolated Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, B.; Pavlov, G. G.; Popov, S.; Wachter, S.

    2014-11-01

    Supernova fallback disks around neutron stars have been suspected to influence the evolution of the diverse neutron star populations. Slowly rotating neutron stars are the most promising places to find such disks. Searching for the cold and warm debris of old fallback disks, we carried out Herschel PACS (70 μm, 160 μm) and Spitzer IRAC (3.6 μm, 4.5 μm) observations of eight slowly rotating (P ≈ 3-11 s) nearby (<1 kpc) isolated neutron stars. Herschel detected 160 μm emission (>5σ) at locations consistent with the positions of the neutron stars RX J0806.4-4123 and RX J2143.0+0654. No other significant infrared emission was detected from the eight neutron stars. We estimate probabilities of 63%, 33%, and 3% that, respectively, none, one, or both Herschel PACS 160 μm detections are unrelated excess sources due to background source confusion or an interstellar cirrus. If the 160 μm emission is indeed related to cold (10-22 K) dust around the neutron stars, this dust is absorbing and re-emitting ~10% to ~20% of the neutron stars' X-rays. Such high efficiencies would be at least three orders of magnitude larger than the efficiencies of debris disks around nondegenerate stars. While thin dusty disks around the neutron stars can be excluded as counterparts of the 160 μm emission, dusty asteroid belts constitute a viable option.

  16. Open Content in Open Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Kansa, Eric C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the challenges and rewards of sharing research content through a discussion of Open Context, a new open access data publication system for field sciences and museum collections. Open Context is the first data repository of its kind, allowing self-publication of research data, community commentary through tagging, and clear…

  17. Unsteady solute dispersion in Herschel-Bulkley fluid in a tube with wall absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Jyotirmoy; Murthy, P. V. S. N.

    2016-11-01

    The axial dispersion of solute in a pulsatile flow of Herschel-Bulkley fluid through a straight circular tube is investigated considering absorption/reaction at the tube wall. The solute dispersion process is described by adopting the generalized dispersion model suggested by Sankarasubramanian and Gill ["Unsteady convective diffusion with interphase mass transfer," Proc. R. Soc. A 333, 115-132 (1973)]. Firstly the exchange, convection, and dispersion coefficients are determined for small and large time, and then the axial mean concentration of a solute in the tube is determined. The effect of power-law index l, yield stress of fluid τy, wall absorption parameter β, amplitude of fluctuating pressure component e, and Womersley frequency parameter α on the convection, dispersion, and mean concentration of solute is discussed for a Herschel-Bulkley fluid in the tube. The single frequency period in the oscillation of dispersion coefficient K2 is observed for small values of α while the double frequency period is noticed for large values of α at small time. Only positive dispersion occurs for small values of α. Both positive and negative dispersion is seen for large values of α. Also, the occurrence of negative dispersion is influenced by the parameters l, τy, β, and e for large values of α. A comparative study of the convection, dispersion, and mean concentration of solute among the Newtonian and non-Newtonian Herschel-Bulkley, power-law, Bingham, and Casson [J. Rana and P. V. S. N. Murthy, "Solute dispersion in pulsatile casson fluid flow in a tube with wall absorption," J. Fluid Mech. 793, 877-914 (2016)] fluid models is presented at small and large time. Also, large time behaviour of non-Newtonian Carreau and Carreau-Yasuda fluid models [J. Rana and P. V. S. N. Murthy, "Unsteady solute dispersion in non-Newtonian fluid flow in a tube with wall absorption," Proc. R. Soc. A 472, 20160294 (2016)] is considered for comparison with other discussed fluid models

  18. HERSCHEL FINDS EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR WIND PARTICLES IN A PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPE: IS THIS WHAT HAPPENED TO THE YOUNG SUN?

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, C.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Dominik, C.; Kama, M.; Padovani, M.; Caux, E.; Caselli, P.

    2014-07-20

    There is evidence that the young Sun emitted a high flux of energetic (≥10 MeV) particles. The collisions of these particles with the material at the inner edge of the Protosolar Nebula disk induced spallation reactions that formed short-lived radionuclei, like {sup 10}Be, whose trace is now visible in some meteorites. However, it is poorly known exactly when this happened, and whether and how it affected the solar system. Here, we present indirect evidence for an ejection of energetic particles in the young protostar, OMC-2 FIR 4, similar to that experienced by the young solar system. In this case, the energetic particles collide with the material in the protostellar envelope, enhancing the abundance of two molecular ions, HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, whose presence is detected via Herschel observations. The flux of energetic particles at a distance of 1 AU from the emitting source, estimated from the measured abundance ratio of HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, can easily account for the irradiation required by meteoritic observations. These new observations demonstrate that the ejection of ≥10 MeV particles is a phenomenon occurring very early in the life of a protostar, before the disappearance of the envelope from which the future star accretes. The whole envelope is affected by the event, which sets constraints on the magnetic field geometry in the source and opens up the possibility that the spallation reactions are not limited to the inner edge of the Protosolar Nebula disk.

  19. FIR MEASUREMENTS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx}< 1.0: DUST ATTENUATION FROM PACS-HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Oteo, I.; Bongiovanni, A.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Cepa, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Pintos-Castro, I.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Altieri, B.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pozzi, F.; Daddi, E.; Riguccini, L.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Cimatti, A.

    2011-07-01

    One remaining open question regarding the physical properties of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) is their dust content and evolution with redshift. The variety of results is large and with those reported by now it is difficult to establish clear relations between dust, other fundamental parameters of galaxies (star formation rate, metallicity, or age), and redshift. In this Letter, we report Herschel PACS-100 {mu}m, PACS-160 {mu}m, and Spitzer MIPS-24 {mu}m detections of a sample of spectroscopically GALEX selected LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 and {approx}1.0. Five out of ten and one out of two LAEs are detected in, at least, one PACS band at z {approx} 0.3 and {approx}1.0, respectively. These measurements have a great importance given that they allow us to quantify, for the first time, the dust content in LAEs from direct FIR observations. MIPS-24 {mu}m detections allow us to determine the IR properties of the PACS-undetected LAEs. We obtain that mid-IR/FIR-detected star-forming (SF) LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 have dust content within 0.75 {approx}< A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 2.0, with a median value of A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx} 1.1. This range broadens up to 0.75 {approx}< A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 2.5 when considering the LAEs at z {approx} 1.0. Only one SF LAE is undetected both in MIPS-24 {mu}m and PACS, with A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 0.75. These results seem to be larger than those reported for high-redshift LAEs and, therefore, although an evolutionary trend is not clearly seen, it could point out that low-redshift LAEs are dustier than high-redshift ones. However, the diverse methods used could introduce a systematic offset in the results.

  20. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  1. A Comprehensive Study of ULIRGs in the Herschel Very Wide Field Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haojing

    Extreme starbursting galaxies exist at all redshifts, and most of them are so heavily obscured by dust that they are Ultra-Luminous InfraRed Galaxies (ULIRGs) while being faint in optical to near-IR. The latest example is at record-high z=6.337, approaching the end of the reionization. There have been numerous suggestions that understanding ULIRG is critical in constructing a comprehensive picture of galaxy formation history. These range from the hypothesis three decades ago that the ULIRG phase is the prelude to QSO and large ellipticals, to the recent tentative evidence that ULIRG could make a large (if not dominant) contribution to the global star formation rate density (GSFRD) at z>1. However, the exact nature of ULIRG and their role in galaxy assembly still remain illusive, largely due to the limited sample size and the severe source confusion problem in the far-IR (FIR). The very wide field surveys by Herschel have provided the best opportunity to date to systematically study ULIRG beyond the local universe, most importantly because of their wide coverage and high sensitivity to probe large volumes to high redshifts and the multiple FIR bands that allow for direct measurement of the IR luminosities. We propose to construct the largest possible ULIRG sample in these fields at all redshifts, and to study the evolution of ULIRGs. We will concentrate on the HerMES, the H-ATLAS and the HerS programs whose data are already public. While the confusion problem still persists in these Herschel data, we have demonstrated that it is possible to directly use the position priors from optical images to decompose the candidate contributors to a given Herschel source if its S/N suffices (Yan et al. 2014). This is a significant improvement over previous studies where higher-resolution mid-IR (mostly Spitzer MIPS 24-micron) data had to be used as the proxies to the FIR source locations, because (1) such proxy images also suffer from the blending problem in the first place and

  2. HERschel key program heritage: A far-infrared source catalog for the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Seale, Jonathan P.; Meixner, Margaret; Sewiło, Marta; Babler, Brian; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Gordon, Karl; Roman-Duval, Julia; Hony, Sacha; Okumura, Koryo; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Sauvage, Marc; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Matsuura, Mikako; Oliveira, Joana M.; Loon, Jacco Th. van; Srinivasan, Sundar; and others

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) have been used to identify dusty populations of sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). We conducted the study using the HERITAGE catalogs of point sources available from the Herschel Science Center from both the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; 100 and 160 μm) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE; 250, 350, and 500 μm) cameras. These catalogs are matched to each other to create a Herschel band-merged catalog and then further matched to archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS catalogs from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) and SAGE-SMC surveys to create single mid- to far-infrared (far-IR) point source catalogs that span the wavelength range from 3.6 to 500 μm. There are 35,322 unique sources in the LMC and 7503 in the SMC. To be bright in the FIR, a source must be very dusty, and so the sources in the HERITAGE catalogs represent the dustiest populations of sources. The brightest HERITAGE sources are dominated by young stellar objects (YSOs), and the dimmest by background galaxies. We identify the sources most likely to be background galaxies by first considering their morphology (distant galaxies are point-like at the resolution of Herschel) and then comparing the flux distribution to that of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (ATLAS) survey of galaxies. We find a total of 9745 background galaxy candidates in the LMC HERITAGE images and 5111 in the SMC images, in agreement with the number predicted by extrapolating from the ATLAS flux distribution. The majority of the Magellanic Cloud-residing sources are either very young, embedded forming stars or dusty clumps of the interstellar medium. Using the presence of 24 μm emission as a tracer of star formation, we identify 3518 YSO candidates in the LMC and 663 in the SMC. There are far fewer far-IR bright YSOs in the SMC than the LMC

  3. Herschel-ATLAS: the link between accretion luminosity and star formation in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfield, D. G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Cooray, A.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Page, M. J.; Stevens, J. A.; de Zotti, G.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Dariush, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E. E.; Rodighiero, G.; Serjeant, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van der Werf, P.

    2011-09-01

    We use the science demonstration field data of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey to study how star formation, traced by the far-infrared Herschel data, is related to both the accretion luminosity and redshift of quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the 2dF-SDSS luminous red galaxy (LRG) and Quasar Spectroscopic Catalogue survey. By developing a maximum-likelihood estimator to investigate the presence of correlations between the far-infrared and optical luminosities, we find evidence that the star formation in quasar hosts is correlated with both redshift and quasar accretion luminosity. Assuming a relationship of the form LIR∝LθQSO(1 +z)ζ, we find θ= 0.22 ± 0.08 and ζ= 1.6 ± 0.4, although there is substantial additional uncertainty in ζ of the order of ±1, due to uncertainties in the host galaxy dust temperature. We find evidence for a large intrinsic dispersion in the redshift dependence, but no evidence for intrinsic dispersion in the correlation between LQSO and LIR, suggesting that the latter may be due to a direct physical connection between star formation and black hole accretion. This is consistent with the idea that both the quasar activity and star formation are dependent on the same reservoir of cold gas, so that they are both affected by the influx of cold gas during mergers or heating of gas via feedback processes. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  4. Insights into the earliest stages of star cluster formationfrom Herschel Gould Belt survey observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Philippe; Ladjelate, Bilal; Könyves, Vera

    2015-08-01

    For a long time, the conventional wisdom has been that "clustered star formation" and "isolated (or distributed) star formation" represent two fundamentally distinct modes of the star formation process. Recent detailed infrared studies of the spatial distribution of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the solar neighborhood, however, suggest that there is a continuous distribution of YSO surface densities from a diffuse population to the densest groups or clusters, with no evidence for discrete modes of star formation (e.g. Bressert et al. 2010). Based on the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr) toward the nearest regions of "clustered" and "distributed" star formation, including the Ophiuchus and Taurus clouds, we will show how these two seemingly opposing views can be reconciled.The Herschel results point to the key role of the quasi-universal filamentary structure pervading the cold ISM (cf. André et al. 2014, Protostars and Planets VI). Indeed, a large fraction of the dense molecular gas is found to be in the form of filaments and most prestellar cores are located within dense, "supercritical" filaments. To a large extent, therefore, the spatial distribution of YSOs is inherited from the filamentary texture of molecular clouds, which is partly hierarchical and shaped by a combination of turbulent, magnetic, and gravitational effects. Wherever gravity dominates on large scales, a "hub-filament" system develops (cf. Myers 2009) and a protocluster is generated at the "hub" or junction of a converging network of filaments. More distributed star formation occurs along individual filaments with marginally supercritical masses per unit length.

  5. HELP: XID+, the probabilistic de-blender for Herschel SPIRE maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, P. D.; Oliver, S.; Betancourt, M.; Clarke, C.; Cowley, W. I.; Duivenvoorden, S.; Farrah, D.; Griffin, M.; Lacey, C.; Le Floc'h, E.; Papadopoulos, A.; Sargent, M.; Scudder, J. M.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Wang, L.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a new prior-based source extraction tool, XID+, to carry out photometry in the Herschel SPIRE (Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver) maps at the positions of known sources. XID+ is developed using a probabilistic Bayesian framework that provides a natural framework in which to include prior information, and uses the Bayesian inference tool Stan to obtain the full posterior probability distribution on flux estimates. In this paper, we discuss the details of XID+ and demonstrate the basic capabilities and performance by running it on simulated SPIRE maps resembling the COSMOS field, and comparing to the current prior-based source extraction tool DESPHOT. Not only we show that XID+ performs better on metrics such as flux accuracy and flux uncertainty accuracy, but we also illustrate how obtaining the posterior probability distribution can help overcome some of the issues inherent with maximum-likelihood-based source extraction routines. We run XID+ on the COSMOS SPIRE maps from Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey using a 24-μm catalogue as a positional prior, and a uniform flux prior ranging from 0.01 to 1000 mJy. We show the marginalized SPIRE colour-colour plot and marginalized contribution to the cosmic infrared background at the SPIRE wavelengths. XID+ is a core tool arising from the Herschel Extragalactic Legacy Project (HELP) and we discuss how additional work within HELP providing prior information on fluxes can and will be utilized. The software is available at https://github.com/H-E-L-P/XID_plus. We also provide the data product for COSMOS. We believe this is the first time that the full posterior probability of galaxy photometry has been provided as a data product.

  6. Feasibility and performances of compressed sensing and sparse map-making with Herschel/PACS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbey, N.; Sauvage, M.; Starck, J.-L.; Ottensamer, R.; Chanial, P.

    2011-03-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory of ESA was launched in May 2009 and has been in operation ever since. From its distant orbit around L2, it needs to transmit a huge quantity of information through a very limited bandwidth. This is especially true for the PACS imaging camera, which needs to compress its data far more than what can be achieved with lossless compression. This is currently solved by including lossy averaging and rounding steps onboard. Recently, a new theory called compressed sensing has emerged from the statistics community. This theory makes use of the sparsity of natural (or astrophysical) images to optimize the acquisition scheme of the data needed to estimate those images. Thus, it can lead to high compression factors. A previous article by Bobin et al. (2008, IEEE J. Selected Topics Signal Process., 2, 718) has shown how the new theory could be applied to simulated Herschel/PACS data to solve the compression requirement of the instrument. In this article, we show that compressed sensing theory can indeed be successfully applied to actual Herschel/PACS data and significantly improves over the standard pipeline. To fully use the redundancy present in the data, we perform a full sky-map estimation and decompression at the same time, which cannot be done in most other compression methods. We also demonstrate that the various artifacts affecting the data (pink noise and glitches, whose behavior is a priori not very compatible with compressed sensing) can also be handled in this new framework. Finally, we compare the methods from the compressed sensing scheme and data acquired with the standard compression scheme. We discuss improvements that can be made on Earth for the creation of sky maps from the data.

  7. Herschel-ATLAS: the surprising diversity of dust-selected galaxies in the local submillimetre Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, C. J. R.; Dunne, L.; Gomez, H. L.; Maddox, S.; De Vis, P.; Smith, M. W. L.; Eales, S. A.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Grootes, M. W.; Ivison, R. J.; Schofield, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Rowlands, K.; Valiante, E.; Vlahakis, C.; van der Werf, P.; Wright, A. H.; de Zotti, G.

    2015-09-01

    We present the properties of the first 250 μm blind sample of nearby galaxies (15 < D < 46 Mpc) containing 42 objects from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Herschel's sensitivity probes the faint end of the dust luminosity function for the first time, spanning a range of stellar mass (7.4 < M⋆ < 11.3 log10 M⊙), star formation activity (-11.8 < SSFR < -8.9 log10 yr-1), gas fraction (3-96 per cent), and colour (0.6 < FUV-KS < 7.0 mag). The median cold dust temperature is 14.6 K, colder than in the Herschel Reference Survey (18.5 K) and Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (17.7 K). The mean dust-to-stellar mass ratio in our sample is higher than these surveys by factors of 3.7 and 1.8, with a dust mass volume density of (3.7 ± 0.7) × 105 M⊙ Mpc-3. Counter-intuitively, we find that the more dust rich a galaxy, the lower its UV attenuation. Over half of our dust-selected sample are very blue in FUV-KS colour, with irregular and/or highly flocculent morphology; these galaxies account for only 6 per cent of the sample's stellar mass but contain over 35 per cent of the dust mass. They are the most actively star-forming galaxies in the sample, with the highest gas fractions and lowest UV attenuation. They also appear to be in an early stage of converting their gas into stars, providing valuable insights into the chemical evolution of young galaxies.

  8. An Analysis of the Environments of FU Orionis Objects with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J., II; Kóspál, Ágnes; Herczeg, Gregory; Quanz, Sascha P.; Henning, Thomas; van Kempen, Tim A.; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Dunham, Michael M.; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Bouwman, Jeroen; Chen, Jo-hsin; Güdel, Manuel; Skinner, Stephen L.; Liebhart, Armin; Merello, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    We present Herschel-HIFI, SPIRE, and PACS 50-670 μm imaging and spectroscopy of six FU Orionis-type objects and candidates (FU Orionis, V1735 Cyg, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, V1331 Cyg, and HBC 722), ranging in outburst date from 1936 to 2010, from the "FOOSH" (FU Orionis Objects Surveyed with Herschel) program, as well as ancillary results from Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. In their system properties (L bol, T bol, and line emission), we find that FUors are in a variety of evolutionary states. Additionally, some FUors have features of both Class I and II sources: warm continuum consistent with Class II sources, but rotational line emission typical of Class I, far higher than Class II sources of similar mass/luminosity. Combining several classification techniques, we find an evolutionary sequence consistent with previous mid-IR indicators. We detect [O I] in every source at luminosities consistent with Class 0/I protostars, much greater than in Class II disks. We detect transitions of 13CO (J up of 5-8) around two sources (V1735 Cyg and HBC 722) but attribute them to nearby protostars. Of the remaining sources, three (FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, and V1331 Cyg) exhibit only low-lying CO, but one (V1057 Cyg) shows CO up to J = 23 → 22 and evidence for H2O and OH emission, at strengths typical of protostars rather than T Tauri stars. Rotational temperatures for "cool" CO components range from 20 to 81 K, for ~ 1050 total CO molecules. We detect [C I] and [N II] primarily as diffuse emission. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. The Search for Molecular Outflows in Local Volume AGNs with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Veilleux, S.; Meléndez, M.; Sturm, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; González-Alfonso, E.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results from a systematic search for galactic-scale, molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows in a sample of 52 Local Volume (d\\lt 50 Mpc) Burst Alert Telescope detected active galactic nuclei (BAT AGNs) with Herschel-PACS. We combine the results from our analysis of the BAT AGNs with the published Herschel/PACS data of 43 nearby (z\\lt 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. The objects in our sample of BAT AGNs have, on average, ˜ 10{--}100 times lower AGN luminosities, star formation rates, and stellar masses than those of the ULIRG and QSO samples. OH 119 μm is detected in 42 of our BAT AGN targets. Evidence for molecular outflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than -50 km s-1 and/or blueshifted wings with 84% velocities less than -300 km s-1) is seen in only four BAT AGNs (NGC 7479 is the most convincing case). Evidence for molecular inflows (i.e., OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than 50 km s-1) is seen in seven objects, although an inverted P-Cygni profile is detected unambiguously in only one object (Circinus). Our data show that both the starburst and AGN contribute to driving OH outflows, but the fastest OH winds require AGNs with quasar-like luminosities. We also confirm that the total absorption strength of OH 119 μm is a good proxy for dust optical depth as it correlates strongly with the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature, a measure of obscuration originating in both the nuclear torus and host galaxy disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  10. Herschel Extreme Lensing Line Observations: [CII] Variations in Galaxies at Redshifts z=1–3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Finkelstein, K.; Yang, Huan; Carilli, Chris; Combes, Françoise; Dassas, Karine; Finkelstein, Steven; Frye, Brenda; Gerin, Maryvonne; Guillard, Pierre; Nesvadba, Nicole; Rigby, Jane; Shin, Min-Su; Spaans, Marco; Strauss, Michael A.; Papovich, Casey

    2017-01-01

    We observed the [C ii] line in 15 lensed galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 3 using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory and detected 14/15 galaxies at 3σ or better. High magnifications enable even modestly luminous galaxies to be detected in [C ii] with Herschel. The [C ii] luminosity in this sample ranges from 8 × 107 L⊙ to 3.7 × 109 L⊙ (after correcting for magnification), confirming that [C ii] is a strong tracer of the ISM at high redshifts. The ratio of the [C ii] line to the total far-infrared (FIR) luminosity serves as a measure of the ratio of gas to dust cooling and thus the efficiency of the grain photoelectric heating process. It varies between 3.3% and 0.09%. We compare the [C ii]/FIR ratio to that of galaxies at z = 0 and at high redshifts and find that they follow similar trends. The [C ii]/FIR ratio is lower for galaxies with higher dust temperatures. This is best explained if increased UV intensity leads to higher FIR luminosity and dust temperatures, but gas heating does not rise due to lower photoelectric heating efficiency. The [C ii]/FIR ratio shows weaker correlation with FIR luminosity. At low redshifts highly luminous galaxies tend to have warm dust, so the effects of dust temperature and luminosity are degenerate. Luminous galaxies at high redshifts show a range of dust temperatures, showing that [C ii]/FIR correlates most strongly with dust temperature. The [C ii] to mid-IR ratio for the HELLO sample is similar to the values seen for low-redshift galaxies, indicating that small grains and PAHs dominate the heating in the neutral ISM, although some of the high [CII]/FIR ratios may be due to turbulent heating. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. Unraveling the Evolution of Protostars in Diverse Environments: The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, S. Thomas; the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey Team

    2014-01-01

    The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS), a 200 hour PACS imaging and spectroscopy OTKP, is the cornerstone of a large multi-observatory campaign combining Herschel data with observations from Spitzer,Hubble, APEX, and other facilities. HOPS has produced well sampled 1-870 micron SEDs of over 300 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds, the most extensive such survey of a single cloud complex to date, and has obtained PACS spectra of 36 protostars to observe line emission from CO, OH, and H2O. We will present the major HOPS discoveries that demonstrate Herschel's contributions to an emerging picture of protostellar evolution within the diverse environments of the Orion A & B molecular clouds. Among these, the HOPS team has discovered protostars undetected by Spitzer that appear to be the youngest protostars in Orion (Stutz et al. 2013). We have found that the luminosities of high-J CO lines are correlated with protostellar luminosities, but the excitation temperatures are not, indicating that these lines form in high-temperature gas within outflows (Manoj et al. 2013). We have also constructed and modeled the first 1-70 um SED of a protostellar FU Ori object before and after its outburst, finding an atypically low post-outburst luminosity (Fischer et al. 2012). Finally, we have identified systematic variations in the spacing and luminosity of protostars between the different environments found in Orion (Megeath, Stanke, in prep.). More generally, the HOPS team is now determining the fundamental protostellar properties (envelope mass and density, system luminosity, and outflow cavity geometry) of the 300 Orion protostars by a comparison of the SEDs to radiative transfer models. We will summarize the prospects of using these fundamental properties to construct a detailed sequence for the physical evolution of protostars as they dissipate their envelopes, accounting for the influence of the diverse environments found within Orion.

  12. The Discovery of Extremely Young Protostars in Orion with Herschel and APEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia; Tobin, John; Stanke, Thomas; Megeath, Tom; Fischer, Will; Robitaille, Thomas; Henning, Thomas; Ali, Babar; Di Francesco, James; Furlan, Elise; Osorio, Mayra; HOPS Team

    2013-07-01

    We perform a census of the reddest, and potentially youngest, protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using 24 um - 870 um imaging obtained with the Spitzer, Herschel, and APEX telescopes as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). We find a sample of 15 new extremely red protostar candidates that can reliably identified as protostars (Stutz et al., 2013). Taking the previously known sample of 300 Spitzer protostars and the new sample of 15 Herschel identified protostars together, we find 18 extremely red protostars (i.e., log λFλ70 / λFλ24 > 1.65). These are the reddest protostars known in Orion and we name them "PACS Bright Red sources", or PBRS. Our analysis reveals that the PBRs sample is composed of Class 0 like sources with very red spectral energy distributions (SEDs; Tbol < 45 K) and large sub-millimeter fluxes (Lsmm/Lbol > 0.6%). Modified blackbody fits to the SEDs provide lower limits to the envelope masses of 0.2 Msun - 2 Msun and luminosities of 0.7 Lsun - 10 Lsun. Based on these properties, and a comparison of the SEDs with radiative transfer models of protostars, we conclude that the PBRs are most likely extreme Class 0 objects distinguished by higher than typical envelope densities and possibly high mass infall rates. We estimate the ages of the PBRs to be between 5000 and 25000 years. We find that the fraction of PBRS is more than 5 times higher in the Orion B cloud than in Orion A; this may be due to differences in the star formation histories or in the star forming environment.

  13. What Determines the Density Structure of Molecular Clouds? A Case Study of Orion B with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; André, Ph.; Könyves, V.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Federrath, C.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Arzoumanian, D.; Benedettini, M.; Bressert, E.; Didelon, P.; Di Francesco, J.; Griffin, M.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Palmeirim, P.; Pezzuto, S.; Peretto, N.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G.

    2013-04-01

    A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this Letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until A V ~ 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a ρvpropr -2 profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at A V > 1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We conclude that (1) the point where the PDF deviates from the lognormal form does not trace a universal A V -threshold for star formation, (2) statistical density fluctuations, intermittency, and magnetic fields can cause excess from the lognormal PDF at an early cloud formation stage, (3) core formation and/or global collapse of filaments and a non-isothermal gas distribution lead to a power-law tail, and (4) external compression broadens the column density PDF, consistent with numerical simulations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  14. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVIII. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in a cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S. C.; Hughes, T. M.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Pappalardo, C.; Pierini, D.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2015-02-01

    To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of a total 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than mB = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by β = 1.5, with a median dust temperature Td = 22.4 K. Assuming β = 1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 μm in excess of the modified black-body model. The fraction of galaxies with a submillimetre excess decreases for lower values of β, while a similarly high fraction (54%) is found if a β-free SED modelling is applied. The excess is inversely correlated with SFR and stellar masses. To study the variations in the global properties of our sample that come from environmental effects, we compare the Virgo dwarfs to other Herschel surveys,such as the Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH), the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), and the HeViCS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (BGC). We explore the relations between stellar mass and Hi fraction, specific star formation rate, dust fraction, gas-to-dust ratio over a wide range of stellar masses (from 107 to 1011 M⊙) for both dwarfs and spirals. Highly Hi-deficient Virgo dwarf galaxies are mostly characterised by quenched star formation activity and lower dust fractions giving hints for dust stripping in cluster dwarfs. However, to explain the

  15. Herschel-ATLAS: the far-infrared-radio correlation at z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Matt J.; Smith, D. J. B.; Bonfield, D. G.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Falder, J. T.; Stevens, J. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S. P.; Bourne, N.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hill, D. T.; Hopwood, R.; Hughes, D. H.; Ibar, E.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L.; Lawrence, A.; Leeuw, L.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Negrello, M.; Norberg, P.; Pohlen, M.; Prescott, M.; Rigby, E. E.; Robotham, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Sharp, R.; Temi, P.; Thompson, M. A.; van der Werf, P.; van Kampen, E.; Vlahakis, C.; White, G.

    2010-11-01

    We use data from the Herschel-ATLAS to investigate the evolution of the far-infrared-radio correlation over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.5. Using the total far-infrared luminosity of all >5σ sources in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Field and cross-matching these data with radio data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimetres (FIRST) survey and the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) Northern Sky Survey (NVSS), we obtain 104 radio counterparts to the Herschel sources. With these data we find no evidence for evolution in the far-infrared-radio correlation over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.5, where the median value for the ratio between far-infrared and radio luminosity, qIR, over this range is qIR = 2.40 +/- 0.12 (and a mean of qIR = 2.52 +/- 0.03 accounting for the lower limits), consistent with both the local value determined from IRAS and values derived from surveys targeting the high-redshift Universe. By comparing the radio fluxes of our sample measured from both FIRST and NVSS we show that previous results suggesting an increase in the value of qIR from high to low redshift may be the result of resolving out extended emission of the low-redshift sources with relatively high-resolution interferometric data, although contamination from active galactic nuclei could still play a significant role. We also find tentative evidence that the longer wavelength cooler dust is heated by an evolved stellar population which does not trace the star formation rate as closely as the shorter wavelength <~ 250μm emission or the radio emission, supporting suggestions based on detailed models of individual galaxies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. E-mail: m.j.jarvis@herts.ac.uk

  16. The Herschel ATLAS: Evolution of the 250 Micrometer Luminosity Function Out to z = 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Blain, A. W.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bremer, M.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cameron, E.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Frayer, D.; Leeuw, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the luminosity function of 250 micrometer-selected galaxies detected in the approximately equal to 14 deg(sup 2) science demonstration region of the Herschel-ATLAS project out to a redshift of z = 0.5. Our findings very clearly show that the luminosity function evolves steadily out to this redshift. By selecting a sub-group of sources within a fixed luminosity interval where incompleteness effects are minimal, we have measured a smooth increase in the comoving 250 micrometer luminosity density out to z = 0.2 where it is 3.6(sup +1.4) (sub -0.9) times higher than the local value.

  17. The first step of interstellar chemistry revealed by Herschel/HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgarone, E.; Gerin, M.; Godard, B.; de Luca, M.

    2010-12-01

    Absorption spectroscopy performed with Herschel/HIFI in the direction of bright star-forming regions of the inner Galaxy provides a new probe of the interstellar medium. The ground-state transition of several light hydrides are found to have large optical depths and are therefore sensitive tracers of gas components that are poorly known such as gas of low density containing only a small fraction of molecular hydrogen. The large observed abundances of HF, CH^+, OH^+, H_2O^+ among others, provide new clues on the processes leading to the incorporation of heavy elements into interstellar chemistry.

  18. Feedback from deeply embedded low- and high-mass protostars. Surveying hot molecular gas with Herschel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karska, Agata

    2014-09-01

    Protostars interact violently with their natal cocoons within dense molecular clouds. Characterizing this feedback is key to understanding the efficiency of the star formation process and the chemical processing of material that will be available for planet formation. In this thesis, the imprints of physical processes on molecular gas are analyzed using state-of-the-art far-infrared spectroscopy from Herschel / PACS. Interpretation of the origin of far-infrared line emission allows us to quantify the physical conditions and the role of shocks and ultraviolet radiation during the 'kindergarten years' of low- and high-mass protostars.

  19. Results of the JOSE site evaluation project for adaptive optics at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R.

    1998-11-01

    Results are presented from a long-term study of the seeing properties at the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. The measurements have been made over a two-year period using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with high frame-rate CCD camera. The aim of the campaign is to characterize those aspects of the seeing relevant to the design and performance of astronomical adaptive optical systems for the WHT. Statistical results are presented for the value of Fried's parameter, power spectra of Zernike mode coefficients, isoplanatism and the outer scale of turbulence.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of dense cores in Aquila from Herschel (Konyves+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyves, V.; Andre, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; Schneider, N.; Roy, A.; Didelon, P.; Maury, A.; Shimajiri, Y.; Di, Francesco J.; Bontemps, S.; Peretto, N.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J.-P.; Elia, D.; Griffin, M. J.; Hill, T.; Kirk, J.; Ladjelate, B.; Marsh, K.; Martin, P. G.; Motte, F.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Pezzuto, S.; Roussel, H.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Schisano, E.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    Based on Herschel Gould Belt survey (Andre et al., 2010A&A...518L.102A) observations of the Aquila cloud complex, and using the multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm getsources (Men'shchikov et al., 2012A&A...542A..81M), we identified a total of 749 dense cores, including 685 starless cores and 64 protostellar cores. The observed properties of all dense cores are given in tablea1.dat, and their derived properties are listed in tablea2.dat. (4 data files).

  1. Multi-wavelength SEDs of Herschel-selected Galaxies in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, D. B.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Hung, Chao-Ling; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Ilbert, Olivier; Aussel, Hervé; Capak, Peter; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Roseboom, Isaac; Salvato, Mara; Aravena, M.; Berta, S.; Bock, J.; Oliver, S. J.; Riguccini, L.; Symeonidis, M.

    2013-12-01

    We combine Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver maps of the full 2 deg2 Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field with existing multi-wavelength data to obtain template and model-independent optical-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 4218 Herschel-selected sources with log(L IR/L ⊙) = 9.4-13.6 and z = 0.02-3.54. Median SEDs are created by binning the optical to far-infrared (FIR) bands available in COSMOS as a function of infrared luminosity. Herschel probes rest-frame wavelengths where the bulk of the infrared radiation is emitted, allowing us to more accurately determine fundamental dust properties of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies. We find that the SED peak wavelength (λpeak) decreases and the dust mass (M dust) increases with increasing total infrared luminosity (L IR). In the lowest infrared luminosity galaxies (log(L IR/L ⊙) = 10.0-11.5), we see evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features (λ ~ 7-9 μm), while in the highest infrared luminosity galaxies (L IR > 1012 L ⊙) we see an increasing contribution of hot dust and/or power-law emission, consistent with the presence of heating from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We study the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies and find no evidence that Herschel-selected galaxies follow the SFR/M * "main sequence" as previously determined from studies of optically selected, star-forming galaxies. Finally, we compare the mid-infrared to FIR properties of our infrared luminous galaxies using the previously defined diagnostic, IR8 ≡ L IR/L 8, and find that galaxies with L IR >~ 1011.3 L ⊙ tend to systematically lie above (× 3-5) the IR8 "infrared main sequence," suggesting either suppressed PAH emission or an increasing contribution from AGN heating.

  2. A Herschel-SPIRE Survey of the MonR2 Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Riwaj; Gutermuth, Robert; Ali, Babar; Megeath, Thomas; Pipher, Judith; Myers, Philip; Fischer, William; Henning, Thomas; Wolk, Scott; Allen, Lori; Tobin, John

    2015-08-01

    We present a new survey of the MonR2 giant molecular cloud with SPIRE on the Herschel Space Observatory. We cross-calibrated SPIRE data with Planck-HFI and accounted for its absolute offset and zero point correction. We fixed emissivity with the help of flux-error and flux ratio plots. As the best representation of cold dusty molecular clouds, we did greybody fits of the SEDs. We studied the nature of distribution of column densities above and below certain critical limit, followed by the mass and temperature distributions for different regions. We used dendrograms as a technique to study the hierarchical structures in the GMC.

  3. A Herschel-SPIRE Survey of the MonR2 Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Riwaj; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Ali, Babar; Megeath, S. Thomas; Pipher, Judith; Myers, Philip C.; Fischer, William J.; Henning, Thomas; Wolk, Scott J.; Allen, Lori; Tobin, John J.

    2014-06-01

    We present a new survey of the MonR2 giant molecular cloud with SPIRE on the Herschel Space Observatory. We cross-calibrated SPIRE data with Planck-HFI and accounted for its absolute offset and zero point correction. We fixed emissivity with the help of flux-error and flux ratio plots. As the best representation of cold dusty molecular clouds, we did greybody fits of the SEDs. We studied the nature of distribution of column densities above and below certain critical limit, followed by the mass and temperature distributions for different regions. We isolated the filaments and studied radial column density profile in this cloud.

  4. Multi-wavelength seds of Herschel-selected galaxies in the cosmos field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, D. B.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Hung, Chao-Ling; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, Peter; Bock, J.; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Aussel, Hervé; Ilbert, Olivier; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Roseboom, Isaac; Oliver, S. J.; Salvato, Mara; Aravena, M.; Berta, S.; Riguccini, L.; Symeonidis, M.

    2013-12-01

    We combine Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver maps of the full 2 deg{sup 2} Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field with existing multi-wavelength data to obtain template and model-independent optical-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 4218 Herschel-selected sources with log(L {sub IR}/L {sub ☉}) = 9.4-13.6 and z = 0.02-3.54. Median SEDs are created by binning the optical to far-infrared (FIR) bands available in COSMOS as a function of infrared luminosity. Herschel probes rest-frame wavelengths where the bulk of the infrared radiation is emitted, allowing us to more accurately determine fundamental dust properties of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies. We find that the SED peak wavelength (λ{sub peak}) decreases and the dust mass (M {sub dust}) increases with increasing total infrared luminosity (L {sub IR}). In the lowest infrared luminosity galaxies (log(L {sub IR}/L {sub ☉}) = 10.0-11.5), we see evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features (λ ∼ 7-9 μm), while in the highest infrared luminosity galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) we see an increasing contribution of hot dust and/or power-law emission, consistent with the presence of heating from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We study the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies and find no evidence that Herschel-selected galaxies follow the SFR/M {sub *} 'main sequence' as previously determined from studies of optically selected, star-forming galaxies. Finally, we compare the mid-infrared to FIR properties of our infrared luminous galaxies using the previously defined diagnostic, IR8 ≡ L {sub IR}/L {sub 8}, and find that galaxies with L {sub IR} ≳ 10{sup 11.3} L {sub ☉} tend to systematically lie above (× 3-5) the IR8 'infrared main sequence', suggesting either suppressed PAH emission or an increasing contribution from

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: YSOs in Herschel-Hi-GAL survey (Veneziani+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziani, M.; Elia, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Carey, S.; Faimali, A.; Molinari, S.; Pestalozzi, M.; Piacentini, F.; Schisano, E.

    2012-09-01

    File yso.dat contains the photometry and distances of the identified Young Stellar Objects (YSO) in two 2x2 tiles of the Herschel-Hi-GAL survey. The fields are centered in (l,b)=(30,0) and (l,b)=(59,0). The detection and photometry from 24 micron to 500 micron have been extracted with the CuTEX algorithm (Molinari et al., 2011A&A...530A.133M) while the kinematic distances have been estimated by Russeil et al. (2011, Cat. J/A+A/526/A151). (1 data file).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Local SDSS galaxies in Herschel Stripe 82 (Rosario+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; Mendel, J. T.; Ellison, S. L.; Lutz, D.; Trump, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We draw on the extensive set of measurements (redshifts, stellar masses, line fluxes, etc.) available from the SDSS/MPA-JHU data base to define and classify our sample of galaxies for study, and to understand their range of observed properties. Where possible, we employ Herschel and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry to constrain the TIR using spectral energy distribution (SED) fits, and GALEX FUV photometry to correct for stellar emission not absorbed by dust. These data are brought to bear on the cross-assessment of infrared (IR), UV and optical SFRs. (1 data file).

  7. The Herschel Cold Debris Disks: Confusion with the Extragalactic Background at 160 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gáspár, András; Rieke, George H.

    2014-03-01

    The Herschel "DUst around NEarby Stars" (DUNES) survey has found a number of debris disk candidates that are apparently very cold, with temperatures near 22 K. It has proven difficult to fit their spectral energy distributions with conventional models for debris disks. Given this issue, we carefully examine the alternative explanation that the detections arise from confusion with infrared cirrus and/or background galaxies that are not physically associated with the foreground stars. We find that such an explanation is consistent with all of these detections.

  8. The on-board software of the HERSCHEL/PACS instrument: three successful years of in-flight operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzuto, Stefano; Ottensamer, Roland; Mazy, Alain; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Vandenbussche, Bart; Benedettini, Milena; Liu, Scige John; Molinari, Sergio; Schito, Daniele

    2012-09-01

    PACS is one of the three instruments of the ESA space mission Herschel. Its warm electronics consists of 4 computers connected through 1355 links. Each computer is equipped with a DSP-21020 microprocessor, each running its own software. In this poster we describe the main features of the dierent software with some emphasis on the FDIR (Failure Detection Isolation and Recovery) procedures implemented on-board: we describe the FDIR design and we show how the few anomalies that occurred since the Herschel launch three years ago, have been succesfully handled autonomously by the instrument.

  9. A Search for O2 in CO-Depleted Molecular Cloud Cores With Herschel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstroem, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The general lack of molecular oxygen in molecular clouds is an outstanding problem in astrochemistry. Extensive searches with the Submillimeter Astronomical Satellite, Odin, and Herschel have only produced two detections; upper limits to the O2 abundance in the remaining sources observed are about 1000 times lower than predicted by chemical models. Previous atomic oxygen observations and inferences from observations of other molecules indicated that high abundances of O atoms might be present in dense cores exhibiting large amounts of CO depletion. Theoretical arguments concerning the oxygen gas-grain interaction in cold dense cores suggested that, if O atoms could survive in the gas after most of the rest of the heavy molecular material has frozen out onto dust, then O2 could be formed efficiently in the gas. Using Herschel HIFI, we searched a small sample of four depletion cores-L1544, L694-2, L429, and Oph D-for emission in the low excitation O2 N(sub J)?=?3(sub 3)-1(sub 2) line at 487.249 GHz. Molecular oxygen was not detected and we derive upper limits to its abundance in the range of N(O2)/N (H2) approx. = (0.6-1.6) x10(exp -7). We discuss the absence of O2 in the light of recent laboratory and observational studies.

  10. The bolometric and UV attenuation in normal spiral galaxies of the Herschel Reference Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Cortese, L.; De Looze, I.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Madden, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.

    2016-02-01

    The dust in nearby galaxies absorbs a fraction of the UV-optical-near-infrared radiation produced by stars. This energy is consequently re-emitted in the infrared. We investigate the portion of the stellar radiation absorbed by spiral galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS) by modelling their UV-to-submillimetre spectral energy distributions. Our models provide an attenuated and intrinsic spectral energy distribution (SED), from which we find that on average 32% of all starlight is absorbed by dust. We define the UV heating fraction as the percentage of dust luminosity that comes from absorbed UV photons and find this to be 56%, on average. This percentage varies with morphological type, with later types having significantly higher UV heating fractions. We find a strong correlation between the UV heating fraction and specific star formation rate and provide a power-law fit. Our models allow us to revisit the IRX - AFUV relations, and derive these quantities directly within a self-consistent framework. We calibrate this relation for different bins of NUV - r colour and provide simple relations to relate these parameters. We investigated the robustness of our method and conclude that the derived parameters are reliable within the uncertainties that are inherent to the adopted SED model. This calls for a deeper investigation of how well extinction and attenuation can be determined through panchromatic SED modelling. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. Herschel-ATLAS/GAMA: spatial clustering of low-redshift submm galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kampen, E.; Smith, D. J. B.; Maddox, S.; Hopkins, A. M.; Valtchanov, I.; Peacock, J. A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Norberg, P.; Eales, S.; Dunne, L.; Liske, J.; Baes, M.; Scott, D.; Rigby, E.; Robotham, A.; van der Werf, P.; Ibar, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Loveday, J.; Auld, R.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Cameron, E.; Croom, S.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dariush, A.; Fritz, J.; Ivison, R. J.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rodighiero, G.; Temi, P.; Bonfield, D. G.; Hill, D.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L.; Parkinson, H.; Prescott, M.; Sharp, R.; de Zotti, G.; Serjeant, S.; Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2012-11-01

    We have measured the clustering properties of low-redshift (z < 0.3) submm galaxies detected at 250 μm in the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration phase field. We selected a sample for which we have high-quality spectroscopic redshifts, obtained from reliably matching the 250-μm sources to a complete (for r < 19.4) sample of galaxies from the GAMA data base. Both the angular and spatial clustering strength are measured for all z < 0.3 sources as well as for five redshift slices with thickness Δz = 0.05 in the range 0.05 < z < 0.3. Our measured spatial clustering length r0 is comparable to that of optically selected, moderately star-forming (blue) galaxies: we find values around 5 Mpc. One of the redshift bins contains an interesting structure, at z = 0.164. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey . VII. Dust in cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, I.; Baes, M.; Zibetti, S.; Fritz, J.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; Verstappen, J.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Clemens, M.; Bomans, D. J.; Boselli, A.; Corbelli, E.; Dariush, A.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2010-07-01

    We use the science demonstration phase data of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey to search for dust emission of early-type dwarf galaxies in the central regions of the Virgo cluster as an alternative way of identifying the interstellar medium. We present the first possible far-infrared detection of cluster early-type dwarf galaxies: VCC 781 and VCC 951 are detected at the 10σ level in the SPIRE 250 μm image. Both detected galaxies have dust masses of the order of 105 M_⊙ and average dust temperatures ≈20 K. The detection rate (less than 1%) is quite high compared to the 1.7% detection rate for Hi emission, considering that dwarfs in the central regions are more Hi deficient. We conclude that the removal of interstellar dust from dwarf galaxies resulting from ram pressure stripping, harassment, or tidal effects must be as efficient as the removal of interstellar gas. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  13. The Herschel-ATLAS: Extragalatic Number Counts from 250 to 500 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, D. L.; Rigby, E.; Maddox, S.; Dunne, L.; Mortier, A.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Bonfield, D.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Leeuw, L.; Sibthorpe, B.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims.The Herschel-ATLAS survey (H-ATLAS) will be the largest area survey to be undertaken by the Herschel Space Observatory. It will cover 550 sq. deg. of extragalactic sky at wavelengths of 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns when completed, reaching flux limits (50-) from 32 to 145mJy. We here present galaxy number counts obtained for SPIRE observations of the first -14 sq. deg. observed at 250, 350 and 500 m. Methods. Number counts are a fundamental tool in constraining models of galaxy evolution. We use source catalogs extracted from the H-ATLAS maps as the basis for such an analysis. Correction factors for completeness and flux boosting are derived by applying our extraction method to model catalogs and then applied to the raw observational counts. Results. We find a steep rise in the number counts at flux levels of 100-200mJy in all three SPIRE bands, consistent with results from BLAST. The counts are compared to a range of galaxy evolution models. None of the current models is an ideal fit to the data but all ascribe the steep rise to a population of luminous, rapidly evolving dusty galaxies at moderate to high redshift.

  14. HELP: The Herschel Extragalactic Legacy Project and The Coming of Age of Multi-wavelength Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccari, M.

    How did galaxies form and evolve? This is one of the most challenging questions in astronomy today. Answering it requires a careful combination of observational and theoretical work to reliably determine the observed properties of cosmic bodies over large portions of the distant Universe on the one hand, and accurately model the physical processes driving their evolution on the other. Most importantly, it requires bringing together disparate multi-wavelength and multi-resolution spectro-photometric datasets in an homogeneous and well-characterized manner so that they are suitable for a rigorous statistical analysis. The Herschel Extragalactic Legacy Project (HELP) funded by the EC FP7 SPACE program aims to achieve this goal by combining the expertise of optical, infrared and radio astronomers to provide a multi-wavelength database for the distant Universe as an accessible value-added resource for the astronomical community. It will do so by bringing together multi-wavelength datasets covering the 1,000 deg2 mapped by Herschel extragalactic surveys in an homogeneous and well-characterized manner, creating a joint lasting legacy from several ambitious sky surveys.

  15. Physical characteristics of Cenaturs and trans-Neptunian objects from combined K2 and Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Csaba; Pal, Andras; Farkas Anikó, Takácsné; Marciniak, Anna; Mueller, Thomas G.; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Szabo, Gyula M.; Szabo, Robert; Sarneczky, Krisztian; Molnar, Laszlo

    2016-10-01

    Here we present the results of a comprehensive rotational and radiometric analysis of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) observed with the Kepler Space Observatory in the K2 mission and earlier with the Herschel Space Observatory at infrared wavelengths. The combined optical light curves and thermal emission data revealed a slow rotation rate of ~45h for the large Kuiper belt object 2007 OR10, and we obtained a diameter of ~1535 km that makes 2007 OR10 the third largest TNO after Pluto and Eris. The large size also implies a relatively dark surface, unusual among the dwarf planets in the outer Solar system. We also present rotational curves, physical characteristics and shape models for the Centaur 2002 KY14, for three Classical Kuiper belt objects, 1998 SN165, 2001 QT322 and 2003 QW90, and for two resonant TNOs, 2001 YH140 and 2005 RS43. In the case of 2003 QW90, 2001 YH140 and 2005 RS43 our results are based on so far unpublished thermal emission data from Herschel and Spitzer observations.

  16. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) - next step after Spitzer/Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, Hans

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a Boeing 747B fitted with a powerful 2.5m infrared telescope that operates at altitudes of 12-14km and observes light from the near-IR to the far-IR wavelength range that is blocked to reach the ground by the Earth's atmosphere (mainly due to water vapor). SOFIA is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Agency (DLR). This new airborne Observatory started early science observations in 2010 and has recently reached full operational capability, with a suite fo currently 4 instruments (and two more to be commissioned) in Cycle 2. Scientific highlights will be presented which include mid-IR broad-band imaging and far-IR high-resolution spectroscopic results which go beyond those of Spitzer and Herschel (star formation studies and astrochemistry). SOFIA will have a projected lifetime of 20 yrs and will be the premier mid- and far-infrared facility in the post-Spitzer and post-Herschel era for many years to come.

  17. Far-Infrared Herschel-PACS flux observations of OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Diez, M. M.; Najarro, F.; Traficante, A.; Cazoletti, L.; Puls, J.; Figer, D.; Sundqvist, J.; Herrero, A.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Trombley, C.

    2013-06-01

    Recent evidence indicates that currently accepted mass-loss rates may need to be revised downwards when small-scale density inhomogeneities (clumping) are taken into account. Only a consistent treatment of ALL possible diagnostics from the UV through radio, scanning different regions of the stellar wind, and analyzed by means of state of the art model atmospheres, will allow to determine the true mass-loss rates. To this end we have assembled a variety of multi-wavelength data for a carefully selected sample of 28 O4-B8 stars. However, one crucial observational set was missing: far-IR diagnostics of free-free emission, which uniquely constrain the clumping properties of the wind at intermediate regions. We have used Herschel/PACS photometric mode to fill this crucial gap, studying the 70 and 100 micron fluxes. Here, we present preliminary photometric Herschel/PACS flux measurements of our sample as well as a first detailed analyses for some of the sources.

  18. A Herschel PACS and SPIRE study of the dust content of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, M. J.; Krause, O.; Swinyard, B. M.; Sibthorpe, B.; Besel, M.-A.; Wesson, R.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunne, L.; Gear, W. K.; Gomez, H. L.; Hargrave, P. C.; Henning, Th.; Leeks, S. J.; Lim, T. L.; Olofsson, G.; Polehampton, E. T.

    2010-07-01

    Using the 3.5-m Herschel Space Observatory, imaging photometry of Cas A has been obtained in six bands between 70 and 500 μm with the PACS and SPIRE instruments, with angular resolutions ranging from 6 to 37”. In the outer regions of the remnant the 70-μm PACS image resembles the 24-μm image Spitzer image, with the emission attributed to the same warm dust component, located in the reverse shock region. At longer wavelengths, the three SPIRE bands are increasingly dominated by emission from cold interstellar dust knots and filaments, particularly across the central, western and southern parts of the remnant. Nonthermal emission from the northern part of the remnant becomes prominent at 500 μm. We have estimated and subtracted the contributions from the nonthermal, warm dust and cold interstellar dust components. We confirm and resolve for the first time a cool (~35 K) dust component, emitting at 70-160 μm, that is located interior to the reverse shock region, with an estimated mass of 0.075 M_⊙. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Figure 3 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Lessons learned from the microbial analysis of the Herschel spacecraft during assembly, integration, and test operations.

    PubMed

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Pukall, Rüdiger; Probst, Alexander J; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Schwendner, Petra; Mora, Maximilian; Barczyk, Simon; Bohmeier, Maria; Rettberg, Petra

    2013-12-01

    Understanding microbial diversity in spacecraft assembly clean rooms is of major interest with respect to planetary protection considerations. A coordinated screening of different clean rooms in Europe and South America by three German institutes [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Leibniz-Institut DSMZ-Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH (DSMZ), and the Institute of Microbiology and Archaea Center, University of Regensburg] took place during the assembly, test, and launch operations of the Herschel spacecraft in 2006-2009. Through this campaign, we retrieved critical information regarding the microbiome within these clean rooms and on the Herschel spacecraft, which served as a model for upcoming ESA mission preparations. This "lessons learned" document summarizes and discusses the data we obtained during this sampling campaign. Additionally, we have taken the opportunity to create a database that includes all 16S rRNA gene sequences ever retrieved from molecular and cultivable diversity studies of spacecraft assembly clean rooms to compare the microbiomes of US, European, and South American facilities.

  20. Opto-mechanical modeling of the Herschel Space Telescope at ESA/ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, S.; Doyle, D.; Catanzaro, B.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper the opto-mechanical modeling of the Herschel infrared space telescope at ESA/ESTEC is presented. The aim of the paper is to give an overview of all modeling activities that took place between 2006 and 2010. In 2006 ESA commissioned a Tiger Team to review the discrepancy between the prediction and measurement of the change in telescope back focal length of the Herschel infrared space telescope. The understanding of the discrepancy was essential since the telescope did not have a refocusing mechanism and hence had to be shimmed to the focus position at cryogenic operational temperature. A team of 16 engineers and scientists collocated at ESA/ESTEC to review the finite element models, optical models and test data used for the prediction of the telescope back focal length. The methodology of prediction, the uncertainties and the obtained results were critically assessed. The team used various modeling techniques including paraxial optical models, first order linear thermal expansion models, full system and metrology ray tracing, deterministic and stochastic thermo-elastic finite element analyses. The opto-mechanical analysis techniques, assumptions and results are discussed. In addition the impact of new measurements of coefficients of thermal expansion, performed after shimming of the telescope flight model, are addressed.

  1. Candidate Gravitationally Lensed Dusty Star-forming Galaxies in the Herschel Wide Area Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, H.; Keele, M.; Cooray, A.; Riechers, D. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Harris, A. I.; Frayer, D. T.; Baker, A. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Fu, H.; Marchetti, L.; Marques-Chaves, R.; Martinez-Navajas, P. I.; Oliver, S. J.; Omont, A.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Scott, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vieira, J.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a list of candidate gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) from the HerMES Large Mode Survey and the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey. Together, these partially overlapping surveys cover 372 deg2 on the sky. After removing local spiral galaxies and known radio-loud blazars, our candidate list of lensed DSFGs is composed of 77 sources with 500 μm flux densities (S 500) greater than 100 mJy. Such sources are dusty starburst galaxies similar to the first bright sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) discovered with SCUBA. We expect a large fraction of this list to be strongly lensed, with a small fraction made up of bright SMG-SMG mergers that appear as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies ({L}{IR}\\gt {10}13 {L}⊙ ). Thirteen of the 77 candidates have spectroscopic redshifts from CO spectroscopy with ground-based interferometers, putting them at z\\gt 1 and well above the redshift of the foreground lensing galaxies. The surface density of our sample is 0.21 ± 0.03 deg-2. We present follow-up imaging of a few of the candidates to confirm their lensing nature. The sample presented here is an ideal tool for higher-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations to understand the detailed properties of starburst phenomena in distant galaxies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  2. HERSCHEL FAR-IR OBSERVATIONS OF THE GIANT H II REGION NGC 3603

    SciTech Connect

    Cecco, Alessandra Di; Faustini, Fabiana; Calzoletti, Luca; Paresce, Francesco; Correnti, Matteo

    2015-01-20

    We observed the giant H II region around the NGC 3603 YC with the five broad bands (70, 160, 250, 350, 500 μm) of the SPIRE and PACS instruments, on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Together with what is currently known of the stellar, atomic, molecular, and warm dust components, this additional and crucial information should allow us to better understand the details of the star-formation history in this region. The main objective of the investigation is to study, at high spatial resolution, the distribution and main physical characteristics of the cold dust. By reconstructing the temperature and density maps, we found, respectively, a mean value of 36 K and log{sub 10} N {sub H} = 22.0 ± 0.1 cm{sup –2}. We carried out a photometric analysis detecting 107 point-like sources, mostly confined to the north and south of the cluster. By comparing our data with spectral energy distribution models, we found that 35 sources are well represented by young stellar objects in early evolutionary phases, from Class 0 to Class I. The Herschel detections also provided far-IR counterparts for 4 H{sub 2}O masers and 11 objects previously known from mid-IR observations. The existence of so many embedded sources confirms the hypothesis of intense and ongoing star-formation activity in the region around NGC 3603 YC.

  3. DDT_thmuelle_5: Herschel's first observation of a potentially hazardous object: 2005 YU55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müeller, T.

    2011-10-01

    We propose to observe the Apollo- and C-type asteroid 2005 YU55, which is on a Mars-Earth-Venus crossing orbit, during its upcoming exceptional Earth approach. In November 2011 it will pass within 0.85 lunar distances (0.85 LD) of the Earth, during which it will have a brief (less than one OD) observing window for Herschel. No asteroid of that size has ever been observed to pass inside 1 LD (and it will not happen again before 2028) although, according to recent orbit simulations, it does not pose any risk of an impact with Earth for the next 100 years. The proposed 0.3 hours of Herschel-PACS observations will allow us to characterize the object's size and its albedo. In combination with the foreseen radar measurements we will also be able to derive thermal surface properties which are strongly influencing non-gravitational forces, considered as one of the reasons for the large uncertainties in long-term orbit studies.

  4. OT1_jgreen02_2: FOOSH: FU Orionis Objects Surveyed with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J.

    2010-07-01

    We propose to utilize the unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity of Herschel at far-infrared and submm wavelengths to observe nearly all known FU Orionis objects, the dramatic result of burst accretion events in protostellar disks. The known FUors represent a vital window into a key process of star formation rather than a rare and peculiar event in the lives of a few stars. In addition, FUors provide a natural laboratory that probes the effect on enhanced heating on disk composition and structure. Our objectives are to (1) Study the structure of known envelopes and constrain the amount of remnant envelope material around the remainder; (2) characterize the physical and chemical properties of the disks and envelope, the parameters that set the initial conditions for planet formation in T Tauri disks; (3) observe solid-state, atomic, and molecular spectral features toward FUors in order to determine the effects of increased luminosity on mineralogy, disk chemistry, and envelope material. In order to do this we will use all three instruments onboard Herschel, providing a comprehensive survey of FUors.

  5. MODELING THE HD 32297 DEBRIS DISK WITH FAR-INFRARED HERSCHEL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, J. K.; Lebreton, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; Krivov, A. V.

    2013-07-20

    HD 32297 is a young A-star ({approx}30 Myr) 112 pc away with a bright edge-on debris disk that has been resolved in scattered light. We observed the HD 32297 debris disk in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, populating the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 63 to 500 {mu}m. We aimed to determine the composition of dust grains in the HD 32297 disk through SED modeling, using geometrical constraints from the resolved imaging to break the degeneracies inherent in SED modeling. We found the best fitting SED model has two components: an outer ring centered around 110 AU, seen in the scattered light images, and an inner disk near the habitable zone of the star. The outer disk appears to be composed of grains >2 {mu}m consisting of silicates, carbonaceous material, and water ice with an abundance ratio of 1:2:3 respectively and 90% porosity. These grains appear consistent with cometary grains, implying the underlying planetesimal population is dominated by comet-like bodies. We also discuss the 3.7{sigma} detection of [C II] emission at 158 {mu}m with the Herschel PACS instrument, making HD 32297 one of only a handful of debris disks with circumstellar gas detected.

  6. Expansion of canopy-forming willows over the twentieth century on Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, Canada.

    PubMed

    Myers-Smith, Isla H; Hik, David S; Kennedy, Catherine; Cooley, Dorothy; Johnstone, Jill F; Kenney, Alice J; Krebs, Charles J

    2011-09-01

    Canopy-forming shrubs are reported to be increasing at sites around the circumpolar Arctic. Our results indicate expansion in canopy cover and height of willows on Herschel Island located at 70 degrees north on the western Arctic coast of the Yukon Territory. We examined historic photographs, repeated vegetation surveys, and conducted monitoring of long-term plots and found evidence of increases of each of the dominant canopy-forming willow species (Salix richardsonii, Salix glauca and Salix pulchra), during the twentieth century. A simple model of patch initiation indicates that the majority of willow patches for each of these species became established between 1910 and 1960, with stem ages and maximum growth rates indicating that some patches could have established as late as the 1980s. Collectively, these results suggest that willow species are increasing in canopy cover and height on Herschel Island. We did not find evidence that expansion of willow patches is currently limited by herbivory, disease, or growing conditions.

  7. Modeling the HD 32297 Debris Disk With Far-Infrared Herschel Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, J.K.; Lebreton, J.; Roberge, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Krivov, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    HD 32297 is a young A-star (approx. 30 Myr) 112 pc away with a bright edge-on debris disk that has been resolved in scattered light. We observed the HD 32297 debris disk in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, populating the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 63 to 500 micron..We aimed to determine the composition of dust grains in the HD 32297 disk through SED modeling, using geometrical constraints from the resolved imaging to break the degeneracies inherent in SED modeling. We found the best fitting SED model has two components: an outer ring centered around 110 AU, seen in the scattered light images, and an inner disk near the habitable zone of the star. The outer disk appears to be composed of grains>2 micron consisting of silicates, carbonaceous material, and water ice with an abundance ratio of 1:2:3 respectively and 90% porosity. These grains appear consistent with cometary grains, implying the underlying planetesimal population is dominated by comet-like bodies. We also discuss the 3.7 sigma detection of [C ii] emission at 158 micron with the Herschel PACS instrument, making HD 32297 one of only a handful of debris disks with circumstellar gas detected

  8. Determining properties of halo dust for the Herschel EDGE-on galaxy Survey (HEDGES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzato, Jacklyn M.; Murphy, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    The Herschel EDGE-on galaxy Survey (HEDGES) is studying the distribution of dust in the halos of nearby spiral galaxies. More specifically, its goals are to determine the physical characteristics of this dust, what relationship there might be between halo dust content and star formation activity, how halo dust might expose information about the far-infrared (FIR)-Radio correlation, and how the physical distribution of this dust might relate to that of other gas tracers. The work presented here aims to investigate the physical characteristics of this halo dust and how they change with height above and below the plane of the six galaxies in the HEDGES sample: NGC 0891, NGC 3628, NGC 4244, NGC 4517, NGC 4565 and NGC 4631. To achieve this goal, code has been written that, for each galaxy, can extract vertical profiles and photometric data from nine different bands (taken using the Herschel Space Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope) in the FIR part of the electromagnetic spectrum. These photometric data are then used to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) that is fit to dust models.

  9. Investigating star formation properties of galaxies in massive clusters with Herschel and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, John F.; Baker, Andrew J.; Aguirre, Paula; Barkats, D.; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hughes, John Patrick; Infante, Leopoldo; Lindner, Robert; Marriage, Tobias; Menanteau, Felipe; Sifon, Cristobal; Weiss, Axel; ACT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I will present results from an investigation of star formation properties of galaxies residing in two massive z ~ 1 clusters (including the 'El Gordo' merger) that were initially selected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich decrements by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. This study uses new Herschel Space Observatory and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 2 observations, which provide information about the dust and cold gas content of galaxies in our targeted clusters. We have detected CO (4-3) and [CI] in individual star-forming cluster galaxies, and also measured stacked continuum and spectral line fluxes at long (e.g., far-infrared, submillimeter, and radio) wavelengths. We use these results to explore the relations between star formation and local environment and cluster dynamical state.This work has been supported by (i) an award issued by JPL/Caltech in association with Herschel, which is a European Space Agency Cornerstone Mission with significant participation by NASA, and (ii) the National Science Foundation through award GSSP SOSPA2-018 from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  10. A Herschel-resolved Debris Disk Around the Nearby G Star HIP 32480

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Bryden, G.; Eiroa, C.; Herschel/DUNES Key Project Team

    2012-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory is providing unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution in the far-infrared. The DUNES Key Project (DUst around NEarby Stars, PI Carlos Eiroa) has finished its survey of 133 FGK stars within 25 pc of the Sun using the PACS photometer at 100 and 160 microns. We report the detection of a resolved debris ring around HIP 32480, a G0 star 16.5 parsecs distant. The ring is almost 300 AU in diameter and inclined 30 degrees from edge-on. We present a thermal emission model for the system that fits the Spitzer spectroscopy and Herschel images of the system. We find a minimum grainsize of 4 microns in the main ring and a distinct warm dust population interior to it. Faint detached emission features just outside the ring may trace a separate, more distant ring in the system. The non-detection of the ring in archival HST/ACS coronagraphic images limits the dust grain albedo in the ring to be no more than 10%.

  11. A Herschel-Resolved Debris Disk Around the Nearby G Star HIP 32480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, K.

    2011-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory is providing unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution in the far-infrared. The DUNES Key Project (DUst around NEarby Stars, PI Carlos Eiroa) has finished its survey of 133 FGK stars within 25 pc of the Sun using the PACS photometer at 100 and 160 microns. We report the detection of a resolved debris ring around HIP 32480, a G0 star 16.5 parsecs distant. The ring is almost 300 AU in diameter and inclined 30 degrees from edge-on. We present a thermal emission model for the system that fits the Spitzer spectroscopy and Herschel images of the system. We find a minimum grainsize of approximately 4 microns in the main ring and a distinct warm dust population interior to it. Faint detached emission features just outside the ring may trace a separate, more distant ring in the system. The non-detection of the ring in archival HST/ACS coronagraphic images limits the dust grain albedo in the ring to be no more than 10%.

  12. Growing evidence for a core formation threshold traced in Herschel Gould Belt survey clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves , V.; André, Ph.; Schneider, N.; Palmeirim, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; Men'shchikov, A.

    2013-11-01

    It has already been suggested that a threshold in column density - or in visual extinction - may need to be exceeded to form dense cores and then protostars. Based on Herschel Gould Belt survey results in the Aquila and Orion B molecular cloud complexes we observe clear connection between the locations of the detected prestellar cores and their background column density values. This finding appears to support a core formation scenario where such threshold corresponds to the extinction above which interstellar filaments become gravitationally unstable and fragment into cores. In these two actively star-forming regions we find the vast majority of the gravitationally bound prestellar cores above a high column density of about (6-7) × 1021 cm-2 (AV ˜ 6-7). This limit similarly appears in the column density probability distribution function (PDF) of the regions as well. The spatial distribution of the protostars and young stellar objects (YSOs) also shows a tight connection with the densest sites of both clouds, as more than 70 % of them appear above the mentioned AV thresholds. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  13. Herschel+Hubble Observations of a Multiply-Lensed Sub-millimeter Galaxy at z~3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, Hooshang; Cooray, Asantha R.; Calanog, Jae Alyson B.; Riechers, Dominik A.; Frayer, David T.; Herschel HERMES, H-ATLAS

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of our deep Keck/NIRC2 and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations of an extremely star forming lensed dusty Sub-Millimeter Galaxy (SMG) identified from the Herschel Astrohysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). The object under study forms a complex lensing system that consists of four foreground aligned galaxies at z ~ 1 (measured from Keck/DEIMOS observations) with multiple lensing features that consist of giant arcs and counter images. Molecular line observations of the background source with Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) put it at a redshift of 2.685. Multi-band data from Keck, HST and Herschel yields a Star Formation Rate in excess of 1000 Solar masses per year putting this system among the most intensely star forming systems at z>2. The measured SFR puts this system well above the main sequence of star forming galaxies at z ~ 3. The measured gas fraction and molecular gas surface density measurements from long wavelength observations are consistent with theoretical models and observational trends of gas rich SMGs at high redshifts.

  14. The Herschel Reference Survey: Dust in Early-type Galaxies and across the Hubble Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. W. L.; Gomez, H. L.; Eales, S. A.; Ciesla, L.; Boselli, A.; Cortese, L.; Bendo, G. J.; Baes, M.; Bianchi, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A. R.; Davies, J. I.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Gear, W. K.; Madden, S.; Mentuch, E.; Panuzzo, P.; Pohlen, M.; Spinoglio, L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.; Wilson, C. D.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    We present Herschel observations of 62 early-type galaxies (ETGs), including 39 galaxies morphologically classified as S0+S0a and 23 galaxies classified as ellipticals using SPIRE at 250, 350, and 500 μm as part of the volume-limited Herschel Reference Survey (HRS). We detect dust emission in 24% of the ellipticals and 62% of the S0s. The mean temperature of the dust is langTd rang = 23.9 ± 0.8 K, warmer than that found for late-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. The mean dust mass for the entire detected early-type sample is logMd = 6.1 ± 0.1 M ⊙ with a mean dust-to-stellar-mass ratio of log(Md /M *) = -4.3 ± 0.1. Including the non-detections, these parameters are logMd = 5.6 ± 0.1 and log(Md /M *) = -5.1 ± 0.1, respectively. The average dust-to-stellar-mass ratio for the early-type sample is fifty times lower, with larger dispersion, than the spiral galaxies observed as part of the HRS, and there is an order-of-magnitude decline in Md /M * between the S0s and ellipticals. We use UV and optical photometry to show that virtually all the galaxies lie close to the red sequence yet the large number of detections of cool dust, the gas-to-dust ratios, and the ratios of far-infrared to radio emission all suggest that many ETGs contain a cool interstellar medium similar to that in late-type galaxies. We show that the sizes of the dust sources in S0s are much smaller than those in early-type spirals and the decrease in the dust-to-stellar-mass ratio from early-type spirals to S0s cannot simply be explained by an increase in the bulge-to-disk ratio. These results suggest that the disks in S0s contain much less dust (and presumably gas) than the disks of early-type spirals and this cannot be explained simply by current environmental effects, such as ram-pressure stripping. The wide range in the dust-to-stellar-mass ratio for ETGs and the lack of a correlation between dust mass and optical luminosity suggest that much of the dust in the ETGs detected by Herschel has

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Panchromatic SED of Herschel sources (Berta+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

    2016-06-01

    Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 micron spectral energy distributions of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near- infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected 10 restframe color space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multi-variate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-IR luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z~1 Lyα-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eight other popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Panchromatic SED of Herschel sources (Berta+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

    2013-01-01

    Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 micron spectral energy distributions of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near- infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected 10 restframe color space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multi-variate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-IR luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z~1 Lyα-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eight other popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather

  17. OT1_mthomp01_1: Confirming a sample of luminous debris disk candidates identified in the Herschel ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.

    2010-07-01

    Debris disks are the remains of planetary system formation, tracing the existence of planetesimal-sized objects in orbit around main sequence stars. Current and planned surveys of debris disks (including the Herschel Key Projects DEBRIS and DUNES) are deep surveys aimed at characterising the typical population of disks and targeted at samples of a few hundred nearby objects. These deep narrow surveys are relatively insensitive to the rarities in the debris disk population, some of which may be luminous and/or massive disks that have undergone recent disruptive collisional events. We have recently shown that the primarily extragalactic Key Project, the Herschel-ATLAS, can be used as a wide and shallow survey of debris disks by combining its excellent optical coverage and statistical techniques more commonly employed to identify galaxies. The combination of Herschel-ATLAS, DEBRIS and DUNES thus forms a powerful nested tier of surveys that will be sensitive to disks across the spectrum from exosolar analogues to rare disks that cannot be inferred from local populations. In this proposal we seek time to image the three candidate disks that we discovered in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase with PACS so that we may confirm them as true debris disks and model their SEDs to extract mass, temperature and fractional luminosity. We will confirm whether these disk candidates are in fact the most luminous disks yet detected.

  18. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  19. Opening remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.G.

    1994-09-01

    Included in this paper are the opening remarks of S.G. Hildebrand, from Environmental Science Division, ORNL, to a conference on water resources and water resource issues. Wetlands are the focus of this talk, with an emphasis on conservation and land use to conserve wetland functions and values.

  20. Open Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Annette; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Adult adoptees are increasingly challenging the practice of sealing their birth records. The authors examine the historical roots of adoptive practices in this country and suggest that the time has come for open adoption to gain acceptance as an alternative. (Author)

  1. William Herschel during the 1780-1810 era: A natural historian studies "maturation" of stars over immeasurable time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woody

    2015-01-01

    (A) William Herschel (1738-1822) considered himself a natural historian, different only from the usual natural historians in that his focus was on stars and nebulae rather than plants, animals, and minerals. In this regard, he developed ideas concerning changes over very long times, inferred from his catalogues of 2500 star clusters and nebulae. By assuming that all the observed types of star clusters and morphologies of nebulae represented different stages in the formation of stars and clusters under the action of gravity, Herschel argued for a sequence of "maturation," or evolution as we would call it. He could put no definite time scale on these dynamic processes, but inspired by contemporary geologists such as James Hutton and John Michell (yes, he was a geologist, too!), he felt that the time scales must be very long. In further support, he photometrically estimated that the very faintest stars that he could see in his giant 40-ft telescope were about two million light-years distant. Herschel's findings on the structure and age of the Milky Way system, his "construction of the heavens," were also influenced by geological notions of the formation and subsequent warping of strata over long times, and the geologists' attempts to uncover the interior and distant past of the Earth. (B) Herschel was a very successful professional musician for two decades, primarily in the fashionable resort city of Bath, England. And then he discovered Uranus in 1781 at age 43, an event that catapulted him into celebrity and allowed him immediately to transform himself into a full-time astronomer. He composed over twenty symphonies, many concertos, and a large number of organ and choral works. During this session, a chorus of University of Washington students will present a short concert featuring Herschel's most popular composition, a novelty number called "The Eccho Catch," as well as contemporary pieces with astronomical themes by other composers.

  2. HERschel Observations of Edge-on Spirals (HEROES). I. Far-infrared morphology and dust mass determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstappen, J.; Fritz, J.; Baes, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Allaert, F.; Bianchi, S.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; De Geyter, G.; De Looze, I.; Gentile, G.; Gordon, K. D.; Holwerda, B. W.; Viaene, S.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Edge-on spiral galaxies with prominent dust lanes provide us with an excellent opportunity to study the distribution and properties of the dust within them. The HEROES project was set up to observe a sample of seven large edge-on galaxies across various wavelengths for this investigation. Aims: Within this first paper, we present the Herschel observations and perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis on them, and we derive some global properties of the far infrared and submillimetre emission. Methods: We determine horizontal and vertical profiles from the Herschel observations of the galaxies in the sample and describe the morphology. Modified black-body fits to the global fluxes, measured using aperture photometry, result in dust temperatures and dust masses. The latter values are compared to those that are derived from radiative transfer models taken from the literature. Results: On the whole, our Herschel flux measurements agree well with archival values. We find that the exponential horizontal dust distribution model often used in the literature generally provides a good description of the observed horizontal profiles. Three out of the seven galaxies show signatures of extended vertical emission at 100 and 160 μm at the 5σ level, but in two of these it is probably due to deviations from an exactly edge-on orientation. Only for NGC 4013, a galaxy in which vertically extended dust has already been detected in optical images, we can detect vertically extended dust, and the derived scaleheight agrees with the value estimated through radiative transfer modelling. Our analysis hints at a correlation between the dust scaleheight and its degree of clumpiness, which we infer from the difference between the dust masses as calculated from modelling of optical data and from fitting the spectral energy distribution of Herschel datapoints. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia

  3. A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J.; Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Burgarella, D.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ivison, R. J.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG

  4. Spatial distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter from observations with the Herschel space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, T.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; de Val-Borro, M.; Jarchow, C.; Moreno, R.; Hartogh, P.; Orton, G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Billebaud, F.; Dobrijevic, M.; Lara, L. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    Water in the atmospheres of the outer planets has both an internal and an external source (e.g., [1] and [2] for Jupiter). These sources are separated by a condensation layer, the tropopause cold trap, which acts as a transport barrier between the troposphere and the stratosphere. Thus, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the stratosphere of the giant planets has an external origin [3]. This external supply of water may have several sources: (i) a permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles produced from asteroid collisions and from comet activity [4], (ii) local sources from planetary environments (rings, satellites) [5], (iii) cometary "Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) type" impacts [6]. In the past 15 years, several studies suggested that water in the stratosphere of Jupiter originated from the SL9 comet impacts in July 1994, but a direct proof was missing. We will report the first high S/N spatially resolved mapping observations of water in Jupiter's stratosphere carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) [7] and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) [8] instruments onboard the ESA Herschel Space Observatory [9]. These observations have been obtained in the framework of the Guaranteed Time Key Program "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System", also known as "Herschel Solar System Observations" (HssO) [10]. In parallel, we have monitored Jupiter's stratospheric temperature with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to separate temperature from water variability. We will present the results recently published by our team [11]. Water is found to be restricted to pressures lower than 2mbar. Its column density decreases by a factor of 2-3 between southern and northern latitudes (see Fig. 1), consistently between the HIFI and the PACS 66.4μm maps. Latitudinal temperature variability cannot explain the global north-south asymmetry in the water maps. From the latitudinal and vertical

  5. Herschel view of the large-scale structure in the Chamaeleon dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Oliveira, C.; Schneider, N.; Merín, B.; Prusti, T.; Ribas, Á.; Cox, N. L. J.; Vavrek, R.; Könyves, V.; Arzoumanian, D.; Puga, E.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Kóspál, Á.; André, Ph.; Didelon, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Royer, P.; Waelkens, C.; Bontemps, S.; Winston, E.; Spezzi, L.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest star-forming sites and encompasses three molecular clouds (Cha I, II, and III) that have a different star-formation history, from quiescent (Cha III) to actively forming stars (Cha II), and one that reaches the end of star-formation (Cha I). Aims: We aim at characterising the large-scale structure of the three sub-regions of the Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex by analysing new far-infrared images taken with the Herschel Space Observatory. Methods: We derived column density and temperature maps using PACS and SPIRE observations from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey and applied several tools, such as filament tracing, power-spectra, Δ-variance, and probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the column density, to derive the physical properties. Results: The column density maps reveal a different morphological appearance for each of the three clouds, with a ridge-like structure for Cha I, a clump-dominated regime for Cha II, and an intricate filamentary network for Cha III. The filament width is measured to be about 0.12 ± 0.04 pc in the three clouds, and the filaments are found to be gravitationally unstable in Cha I and II, but mostly subcritical in Cha III. Faint filaments (striations) are prominent in Cha I and are mostly aligned with the large-scale magnetic field. The PDFs of all regions show a lognormal distribution at low column densities. For higher densities, the PDF of Cha I shows a turnover indicative of an extended higher density component and culminates in a power-law tail. Cha II shows a power-law tail with a slope characteristic of gravity. The PDF of Cha III can be best fit by a single lognormal. Conclusions: The turbulence properties of the three regions are found to be similar, pointing towards a scenario where the clouds are impacted by large-scale processes. The magnetic field might possibly play an important role for the star formation efficiency in the Chamaeleon clouds

  6. FAR-INFRARED LINE SPECTRA OF SEYFERT GALAXIES FROM THE HERSCHEL-PACS SPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Busquet, Gemma; Dasyra, Kalliopi M.; Calzoletti, Luca; Malkan, Matthew A.; Tommasin, Silvia

    2015-01-20

    We observed the far-IR fine-structure lines of 26 Seyfert galaxies with the Herschel-PACS spectrometer. These observations are complemented with Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and Herschel SPIRE spectroscopy. We used the ionic lines to determine electron densities in the ionized gas and the [C I] lines, observed with SPIRE, to measure the neutral gas densities, while the [O I] lines measure the gas temperature, at densities below ∼10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}. Using the [O I]145 μm/63 μm and [S III]33/18 μm line ratios, we find an anti-correlation of the temperature with the gas density. Various fine-structure line ratios show density stratifications in these active galaxies. On average, electron densities increase with the ionization potential of the ions. The infrared lines arise partly in the narrow line region, photoionized by the active galactic nucleus (AGN), partly in H II regions photoionized by hot stars, and partly in photo-dissociated regions. We attempt to separate the contributions to the line emission produced in these different regions by comparing our observed emission line ratios to theoretical values. In particular, we tried to separate the contribution of AGNs and star formation by using a combination of Spitzer and Herschel lines, and we found that besides the well-known mid-IR line ratios, the line ratio of [O III]88 μm/[O IV]26 μm can reliably discriminate the two emission regions, while the far-IR line ratio of [C II]157 μm/[O I]63 μm is only able to mildly separate the two regimes. By comparing the observed [C II]157 μm/[N II]205 μm ratio with photoionization models, we also found that most of the [C II] emission in the galaxies we examined is due to photodissociation regions.

  7. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey - XIV. Transition-type dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Boselli, Alessandro; Cortese, Luca; Fritz, Jacopo; Auld, Robbie; Bendo, George J.; Bianchi, Simone; Boquien, Médéric; Clemens, Marcel; Ciesla, Laure; Davies, Jonathan; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; Grossi, Marco; Jones, Anthony; Madden, Suzanne C.; Pappalardo, Ciro; Pierini, Daniele; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Verstappen, Joris; Vlahakis, Catherine; Zibetti, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    We use dust scaling relations to investigate the hypothesis that Virgo cluster transition-type dwarfs are infalling star-forming field galaxies, which is argued based on their optical features (e.g. discs, spiral arms and bars) and kinematic properties similar to late-type galaxies. After their infall, environmental effects gradually transform them into early-type galaxies through the removal of their interstellar medium and quenching of all star formation activity. In this paper, we aim to verify whether this hypothesis holds using far-infrared diagnostics based on Herschel observations of the Virgo cluster taken as part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. We select transition-type objects in the nearest cluster, Virgo, based on spectral diagnostics indicative for their residual or ongoing star formation. We detect dust (Md ˜ 105-6 M⊙) in 36 per cent of the transition-type dwarfs located on the high end of the stellar mass distribution. This suggests that the dust reservoirs present in non-detections fall just below the Herschel detection limit (≲1.1 × 105 M⊙). Dust scaling relations support the hypothesis of a transformation between infalling late-type galaxies to quiescent low-mass spheroids governed by environmental effects, with dust-to-stellar mass fractions for transition-type dwarfs in between values characteristic for late-type objects and the lower dust fractions observed in early-type galaxies. Several transition-type dwarfs demonstrate blue central cores, hinting at the radially outside-in removal of gas and quenching of star formation activity. The fact that dust is also confined to the inner regions suggests that metals are stripped in the outer regions along with the gas. In the scenario of most dust being stripped from the galaxy along with the gas, we argue that the ejected metals by transition-type dwarfs significantly contribute to the enrichment of the intracluster medium over the lifetime of the Virgo cluster. The accretion of gas

  8. Coastal Hazard Vulnerability Assessment: A Case Study of Erosion and Flooding on Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radosavljevic, B.; Lantuit, H.; Overduin, P. P.; Fritz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal infrastructure, cultural, and archeological sites are increasingly vulnerable to erosion and flooding along permafrost coasts. Amplified warming of the Arctic, sea level rise, lengthening of the open water period, and a predicted increase in frequency of major storms compound these threats. Mitigation necessitates decision-making tools at an appropriate scale. We present a study of coastal erosion combining it with a flooding risk assessment for the culturally important historic settlement on Herschel Island, a UNESCO World Heritage candidate site. The resulting map may help local stakeholders devise management strategies to cope with rapidly changing environmental conditions. We analyzed shoreline movement using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) after digitizing shorelines from 1952, 1970, and 2011. Using these data, forecasts of shoreline positions were made for 20 and 50 years into the future. Flooding risk was assessed using a cost-distance map based on a high-resolution Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset and current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change sea level estimates. Widespread erosion characterizes the study area. The rate of shoreline movement for different periods of the study ranges from -5.5 to 2.7 m·a-1 (mean -0.6 m·a-1). Mean coastal retreat decreased from -0.6 m·a-1 to -0.5 m·a-1, for 1952-1970 and 1970-2000, respectively, and increased to -1.3 m·a-1 in the period 2000-2011. Ice-rich coastal sections, and coastal sections most exposed to wave attack exhibited the highest rates of coastal retreat. The geohazard map resulting from shoreline projections and flood risk analysis indicates that most of the area occupied by the historic settlement is at extreme or very high risk of flooding, and some buildings are vulnerable to coastal erosion. The results of this study indicate a greater threat by coastal flooding than erosion. Our assessment may be applied in other locations where limited data are available.

  9. Opening education.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marshall S

    2009-01-02

    Spurred by the publication of Massachusetts Institute of Technology OpenCourseWare in 2002, the open educational resources (OER) movement, which has rapidly expanded and captured the imagination and energy of millions of creators and users throughout the world, now faces many opportunities and substantial challenges as it moves to become an integral part of the world's educational environment. The confluence of the Web and a spirit of sharing intellectual property have fueled a worldwide movement to make knowledge and education materials open to all for use. OER are content (courses, books, lesson plans, articles, etc.), tools (virtual laboratories, simulations, and games), and software that support learning and educational practice. OER are free on the Web, and most have licenses that allow copyright holders to retain ownership while providing specified rights for use in original and modified forms. At the least, OER have helped to level the distribution of knowledge across the world. A second promise of OER is to help transform educational practices. This article explores the history of and promises and challenges for OER.

  10. Herschel and JCMT observations of the early-type dwarf galaxy NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, I.; Baes, M.; Parkin, T. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Fritz, J.; Galliano, F.; Gear, W.; Gentile, G.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S. C.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Verstappen, J.; Young, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present Herschel dust continuum, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope CO (3-2) observations and a search for [C II] 158 ?m and [O I] 63 ?m spectral line emission for the brightest early-type dwarf satellite of Andromeda, NGC 205. While direct gas measurements [Mg˜ 1.5 × 106 M⊙, H I+ CO (1-0)] have proven to be inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the current gas reservoir in NGC 205 (>107 M⊙), we revise the missing interstellar medium mass problem based on new gas mass estimates (CO (3-2), [C II], [O I]) and indirect measurements of the interstellar medium content through dust continuum emission. Based on Herschel observations, covering a wide wavelength range from 70 to 500 ?m, we are able to probe the entire dust content in NGC 205 (? M⊙ at Td˜ 18-22 K) and rule out the presence of a massive cold dust component (? M⊙, Td˜ 12 K), which was suggested based on millimetre observations from the inner 18.4 arcsec. Assuming a reasonable gas-to-dust ratio of ˜400, the dust mass in NGC 205 translates into a gas mass Mg˜ 4-7 × 106 M⊙. The non-detection of [O I] and the low L[C II]-to-LCO(1-0) line intensity ratio (˜1850) imply that the molecular gas phase is well traced by CO molecules in NGC 205. We estimate an atomic gas mass of 1.5 × 104 M⊙ associated with the [C II] emitting photodissociation regions in NGC 205. From the partial CO (3-2) map of the northern region in NGC 205, we derive a molecular gas mass of ? M⊙. Upon comparison with the molecular gas mass estimated from CO (1-0) observations (? M⊙), we find most of the H2 gas in NGC 205 to be locked in diffuse regions of low density and/or temperature, characteristic for an interstellar medium with little star formation activity. New total gas mass estimates from Herschel dust continuum (4-7 × 106 M⊙), Herschel [C II] line spectroscopic mapping (1.5 × 104 M⊙) and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope CO (3-2) observations (7 × 105 M⊙), including the H I mass (? M⊙) and a correction

  11. Progress and Perspectives in Solid State Astrophysics-From ISO to Herschel (With 11 Figures)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Thomas; et al.

    2006-01-01

    During the final stages of their evolution, stars with low to intermediate masses produce huge quantities - up to the order of earth masses per year - of dust grains. This production of solid particles is of crucial importance both for the physico-chemical conditions in the respective circumstellar environments and for the cosmic cycle of matter. The branch of astronomy dealing with cosmic dust - sometimes referred to as solid state astrophysics - uses three principal methods: astronomical infrared spectroscopy, laboratory measurements of optical properties of solids and modelling the chemical and physical processes going on in the atmospheres of evolved stars. Considerable progress has been achieved, during the past decade, in solid state astropyhsics; specific questions have arisen which necessitate new, dedicated measurements and observations. Here we highlight some aspects of this progress and then proceed to outlining insights in this field which are about to be attained by means of new satellite facilities such as Spitzer and Herschel.

  12. New information on solar activity, 1779-1818, from Sir William Herschel's unpublished notebooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1992-01-01

    Herschel's observations are analyzed in order to determine the level of solar activity for solar cycle 5. It is concluded that solar cycle 5 may have peaked as early as 1801 based upon the average number of groups with a probable secondary maximum in 1804. Depending on the technique adopted, the peak for solar cycle 5 occurred sometime between 1801 and 1804, rather than 1805.2, as commonly assumed. Instead of a solar cycle of 17 yrs, a cycle length of 14 yrs is found. It is also found that the peak yearly mean sunspot number is only about 38 rather than 45, as deduced by Wolf (1855). A technique for making early solar observations homogeneous with modern sunspot observations is proposed.

  13. Verification of Commercial Motor Performance for WEAVE at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, J.; Dalton, G.; Lewis, I.

    2016-10-01

    WEAVE is a 1000-fiber multi-object spectroscopic facility for the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. It will feature a double-headed pick-and-place fiber positioning robot comprising commercially available robotic axes. This paper presents results on the performance of these axes, obtained by testing a prototype system in the laboratory. Positioning accuracy is found to be better than the manufacturer's published values for the tested cases, indicating that the requirement for a maximum positioning error of 8.0 microns is achievable. Field reconfiguration times well within the planned 60 minute observation window are shown to be likely when individual axis movements are combined in an efficient way.

  14. Developments in fiber-positioning technology for the WEAVE instrument at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schallig, Ellen; Lewis, Ian J.; Gilbert, James; Dalton, Gavin; Brock, Matthew; Abrams, Don Carlos; Middleton, Kevin; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Carrasco, Esperanza; Trager, Scott C.; Vallenari, Antonella

    2016-08-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on La Palma in the Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick-and-place" fibre-fed spectrograph with a 1000 fibre multiplex behind a new dedicated 2° prime focus corrector. The WEAVE positioner concept uses two robots working in tandem in order to reconfigure a fully populated field within the expected 1 hour dwell-time for the instrument (a good match between the required exposure times and the limit of validity for a given configuration due to the effects of differential refraction). In this paper we describe some of the final design decisions arising from the prototyping phase of the instrument design and provide an update on the current manufacturing status of the fibre positioner system.

  15. Star formation towards the Galactic H II region RCW 120. Herschel observations of compact sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, M.; Zavagno, A.; Deharveng, L.; Russeil, D.; Anderson, L. D.; Men'shchikov, A.; Schneider, N.; Hill, T.; Motte, F.; Mège, P.; LeLeu, G.; Roussel, H.; Bernard, J.-P.; Traficante, A.; Paradis, D.; Tigé, J.; André, P.; Bontemps, S.; Abergel, A.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The expansion of H ii regions can trigger the formation of stars. An overdensity of young stellar objects is observed at the edges of H ii regions but the mechanisms that give rise to this phenomenon are not clearly identified. Moreover, it is difficult to establish a causal link between H ii -region expansion and the star formation observed at the edges of these regions. A clear age gradient observed in the spatial distribution of young sources in the surrounding might be a strong argument in favor of triggering. Aims: We aim to characterize the star formation observed at the edges of H ii regions by studying the properties of young stars that form there. We aim to detect young sources, derive their properties and their evolution stage in order to discuss the possible causal link between the first-generation massive stars that form the H ii region and the young sources observed at their edges. Methods: We have observed the Galactic H ii region RCW 120 with Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometers at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm. We produced temperature and H2 column density maps and use the getsources algorithm to detect compact sources and measure their fluxes at Herschel wavelengths. We have complemented these fluxes with existing infrared data. Fitting their spectral energy distributions with a modified blackbody model, we derived their envelope dust temperature and envelope mass. We computed their bolometric luminosities and discuss their evolutionary stages. Results: The overall temperatures of the region (without background subtraction) range from 15 K to 24 K. The warmest regions are observed towards the ionized gas. The coldest regions are observed outside the ionized gas and follow the emission of the cold material previously detected at 870 μm and 1.3 mm. The H2 column density map reveals the distribution of the cold medium to be organized in filaments and highly structured. Column densities range from 7 × 1021 cm-2 up to 9 × 1023 cm-2

  16. Herschel photometry of disks around low-mass stars in the R CrA cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Paul M.; Henning, Thomas; Liu, Yao; Wolf, Sebastian E-mail: nje@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: yliu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: yliu@pmo.ac.cn

    2014-11-01

    We report photometric results from a subset of a Herschel-PACS program to observe cool dust in disks around low-mass stars as a complement to our earlier program to measure far-infrared emission from brown dwarfs. In this latest study we observed five low-mass objects in the nearby R Corona Australis region and detected at least three at 70 μm. Using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code we have investigated the disk masses and geometry based on detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling, and we compare these new results to those from our earlier larger sample of brown dwarfs. In particular, our SED analysis for these five objects shows again that disk geometries of brown dwarfs or low-mass stars are generally similar to their higher mass counterparts like T Tauri disks, but the range of disk mass extends to well below the value found in T Tauri stars.

  17. Herschel Legacy Survey of Hydrogen Fluoride and Water Towards Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Monje, Raquel

    Hydride molecules, molecules containing just one heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms, play an importance role in interstellar chemistry, as they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains theorized to form gas phase molecules. This makes hydride molecules a sensitive test of these chemical models, as well as potential tracers of molecular hydrogen. Due to the low moment of inertia, hydrides have their fundamental rotational transitions in the submillimeter band, blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and in most cases, only accessible with the past NASA mission, Herschel Space Observatory. Two of the key results from Herschel observations are: the first detection of the fundamental J = 1 - 0 rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at 1.232 THz (243 μm) and the discovery of HF's ubiquitous nature in the Milky Way. HF has not only been observed toward almost every bright continuum source in the Galactic plane, but also in some nearby ultra luminous galaxies, establishing its importance outside the Milky Way as well. Despite fluorine's (F) relative low abundance in the interstellar medium (ISM) (about four times lower than carbon), F plays an important role in the interstellar chemistry due to the unique thermochemistry of the reaction between F and molecular hydrogen (H2). F is the only atom that reacts exothermically with H2, to form the compound HF. Once formed, HF becomes the main reservoir of fluorine in the ISM, with a strong bond only destroyed by reactions with low abundance ions H3+, C+ and He+, or photodissociation. This unusual stability allows the build up of large amounts of HF in the ISM, which has now been confirmed by Herschel. Chemical model predicted that the ground state rotational transition line of HF J = 1 - 0 would yield an extremely sensitive probe of the diffuse molecular gas along the line-of-sight to background far-infrared continuum sources and a

  18. Development of Cryogenic Filter Wheels for the HERSCHEL Photodetector Array Camera & Spectrometer (PACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerner, Christian; Kampf, Dirk; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Schubert, Josef; Ruppert, U.; Schoele, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the two PACS Filter Wheels that are direct-drive rotational mechanisms operated at a temperature below 5K inside the PACS focal plane unit of the Herschel Satellite. The purpose of the mechanisms is to switch between filters. The rotation axis is pivoted to the support structure via a slightly preloaded pair of ball bearings and driven by a Cryotorquer. Position sensing is realized by a pair of Hall effect sensors. Powerless positioning at the filter positions is achieved by a magnetic ratchet system. The key technologies are the Cryotorquer design and the magnetic ratchet design in the low temperature range. Furthermore, we will report on lessons learned during the development and qualification of the mechanism and the paint.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Herschel FIR observations of NGC3603 (Di Cecco+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cecco, A.; Faustini, F.; Paresce, F.; Correnti, M.; Calzoletti, L.

    2015-06-01

    The cloud complex surrounding NGC 3603 YC was observed by Herschel SPIRE/PACS during the Hi-GAL Survey (Molinari et al. 2010A&A...518L.100M, 2010PASP..122..314M), a Key Programme that mapped the Galactic plane in five photometric bands (70, 160, 250, 350, and 500um). The MSX (Egan et al. 2003AAS...203.5708E) images were taken at (wavelengths) 8.3, 12.1, 14.7, and 21.3um using the scan observing mode, and the WISE (Wright et al. 2010AJ....140.1868W) images were acquired in freeze-frame scan mode at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22um. (2 data files).

  20. High-J CO survey of low-mass protostars observed with Herschel-HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, U. A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; San José-García, I.; Karska, A.; Harsono, D.; Tafalla, M.; Fuente, A.; Visser, R.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2013-08-01

    Context. In the deeply embedded stage of star formation, protostars start to heat and disperse their surrounding cloud cores. The evolution of these sources has traditionally been traced through dust continuum spectral energy distributions (SEDs), but the use of CO excitation as an evolutionary probe has not yet been explored due to the lack of high-J CO observations. Aims: The aim is to constrain the physical characteristics (excitation, kinematics, column density) of the warm gas in low-mass protostellar envelopes using spectrally resolved Herschel data of CO and compare those with the colder gas traced by lower excitation lines. Methods: Herschel-HIFI observations of high-J lines of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (up to Ju = 10, Eu up to 300 K) are presented toward 26 deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 and Class I young stellar objects, obtained as part of the Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) key program. This is the first large spectrally resolved high-J CO survey conducted for these types of sources. Complementary lower J CO maps were observed using ground-based telescopes, such as the JCMT and APEX and convolved to matching beam sizes. Results: The 12CO 10-9 line is detected for all objects and can generally be decomposed into a narrow and a broad component owing to the quiescent envelope and entrained outflow material, respectively. The 12CO excitation temperature increases with velocity from ~60 K up to ~130 K. The median excitation temperatures for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O derived from single-temperature fits to the Ju = 2-10 integrated intensities are ~70 K, 48 K and 37 K, respectively, with no significant difference between Class 0 and Class I sources and no trend with Menv or Lbol. Thus, in contrast to the continuum SEDs, the spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) do not show any evolution during the embedded stage. In contrast, the integrated line intensities of all CO isotopologs show a clear decrease with evolutionary stage as the envelope is

  1. Herschel reveals a molecular outflow in a z = 2.3 ULIRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, R. D.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Hopwood, R.; Stanley, F.; Swinyard, B. M.; Valtchanov, I.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2014-08-01

    We report the results from a 19-h integration with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) Fourier Transform Spectrometer aboard the Herschel Space Observatory which has revealed the presence of a molecular outflow from the Cosmic Eyelash (SMM J2135-0102) via the detection of blueshifted OH absorption. Detections of several fine-structure emission lines indicate low-excitation H II regions contribute strongly to the [C II] luminosity in this z = 2.3 ultra-luminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG). The OH feature suggests a maximum wind velocity of 700 km s- 1, which is lower than the expected escape velocity of the host dark matter halo, ≈ 1000 km s- 1. A large fraction of the available molecular gas could thus be converted into stars via a burst protracted by the resulting gas fountain, until an active galactic nucleus (AGN)-driven outflow can eject the remaining gas.

  2. CO luminosity function from Herschel-selected galaxies and the contribution of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2016-02-01

    We derive the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosity function (LF) for different rotational transitions [i.e. (1-0), (3-2), (5-4)] starting from the Herschel LF by Gruppioni et al. and using appropriate LCO-LIR conversions for different galaxy classes. Our predicted LFs fit the data so far available at z ≈ 0 and 2. We compare our results with those obtained by semi-analytical models (SAMs): while we find a good agreement over the whole range of luminosities at z ≈ 0, at z ≈ 1 and z ≈ 2, the tension between our LFs and SAMs in the faint and bright ends increases. We finally discuss the contribution of luminous active galactic nucleus (LX > 1044 erg s- 1) to the bright end of the CO LF concluding that they are too rare to reproduce the actual CO LF at z ≈ 2.

  3. GT1_mbaes_1: HERschel Observations of Edge-on Spirals (HEROES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.

    2010-03-01

    We propose to use PACS and SPIRE to map the dust distribution in a sample of seven large edge-on spiral galaxies with regular dust lanes. We will look for the presence of cold dust at large galactocentric radii and investigate the link between dust, gas and metallicity as a function of radius. We will also constrain the vertical distribution of the dust and particularly look for dust emission at large heights above the plane of the galaxies. We will compare the observed Herschel maps with simulated maps resulting from detailed radiative transfer models based on optical and near-infrared images. This will enable us to investigate whether we can confirm the existence of a dust energy balance problem suggested by previous observations (the dust seen in absorption in optical maps underestimates the dust seen in emission) and investigate possible ways to alleviate this potential problem.

  4. Preliminary Results of the Herschel Gould Belt Survey in the Orion B Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe; Palmeirim, Pedro; Schneider, Nicola; Arzoumanian, Doris; Men'shchikov, Alexander

    As a preliminary result of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (André et al. 2010) in the Orion B cloud complex we find a clear connection between the locations of the detected prestellar cores and the column density values. We find that the vast majority of the gravitationally bound prestellar cores are detected above a high column density of about 6-7 × 1021 cm-2 (A V ˜ 6-7). This is in very good agreement with dense core formation thresholds found in other regions. For Orion B, a similar limit appears both in the distribution of background column density values of the prestellar cores, and in the column density PDF of the region. Within our core formation scenario, the found threshold can be translated as the column density above which the filaments become gravitationally unstable and fragment into cores.

  5. L'CO/LFIR Relations with CO Rotational Ladders of Galaxies Across the Herschel SPIRE Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamenetzky, J.; Rangwala, N.; Glenn, J.; Maloney, P. R.; Conley, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a catalog of all CO (carbon monoxide) (J (total angular momentum quantum number) equals 1-0 through J equals 13-12), [CI], and [NII] lines available from extragalactic spectra from the Herschel SPIRE (Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) archive combined with observations of the low-J CO lines from the literature and from the Arizona Radio Observatory. This work examines the relationships between L (sub FIR (Far Infra Red)), L prime (sub CO), and L (sub CO) / L (sub CO, 1-0). We also present a new method for estimating probability distribution functions (PDFs) from marginal signal-to-noise ratio Herschel FTS spectra, which takes into account the instrumental "ringing" and the resulting highly correlated nature of the spectra. The slopes of Log (L (sub FIR)) versus Log (L prime (sub CO)) are linear for all mid- to high-J CO lines. The mid- to high-J CO luminosity relative to CO J equals 1-0 increases with increasing L (sub FIR), indicating higher excitement of the molecular gas, though these ratios do not exceed approximately 100. The luminosities relative to CO J equals 1-0 remain relatively at from J equals 6-5 through J equals13-2, across many orders of magnitude of L (sub FIR). Qualitative comparisons to current theoretical models do not match these flat SLED (spectral line energy distributions) shapes, indicating the need for more comprehensive modeling of the excitation processes of warm molecular gas in nearby galaxies.

  6. Herschel-ATLAS: rapid evolution of dust in galaxies over the last 5 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, L.; Gomez, H. L.; da Cunha, E.; Charlot, S.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Maddox, S. J.; Rowlands, K.; Smith, D. J. B.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bourne, N.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Fritz, J.; Geach, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kelvin, L.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Popescu, C.; Rigby, E. E.; Robotham, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Sansom, A. E.; Serjeant, S.; Temi, P.; Thompson, M.; Tuffs, R.; van der Werf, P.; Vlahakis, C.

    2011-10-01

    We present the first direct and unbiased measurement of the evolution of the dust mass function of galaxies over the past 5 billion years of cosmic history using data from the Science Demonstration Phase of the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (Herschel-ATLAS). The sample consists of galaxies selected at 250 ?m which have reliable counterparts from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at z < 0.5, and contains 1867 sources. Dust masses are calculated using both a single-temperature grey-body model for the spectral energy distribution and also a model with multiple temperature components. The dust temperature for either model shows no trend with redshift. Splitting the sample into bins of redshift reveals a strong evolution in the dust properties of the most massive galaxies. At z= 0.4-0.5, massive galaxies had dust masses about five times larger than in the local Universe. At the same time, the dust-to-stellar mass ratio was about three to four times larger, and the optical depth derived from fitting the UV-sub-mm data with an energy balance model was also higher. This increase in the dust content of massive galaxies at high redshift is difficult to explain using standard dust evolution models and requires a rapid gas consumption time-scale together with either a more top-heavy initial mass function (IMF), efficient mantle growth, less dust destruction or combinations of all three. This evolution in dust mass is likely to be associated with a change in overall interstellar medium mass, and points to an enhanced supply of fuel for star formation at earlier cosmic epochs.

  7. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XV. Planck submillimetre sources in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Herranz, D.; Bianchi, S.; Ciesla, L.; Clemens, M.; De Zotti, G.; Allaert, F.; Auld, R.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Gentile, G.; González-Nuevo, J.; Hughes, T.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2014-02-01

    We cross-correlate the Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) with the fully sampled 84 deg2Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) fields. We search for and identify the 857 and 545 GHz PCCS sources in the HeViCS fields by studying their FIR/submm and optical counterparts. We find 84 and 48 compact Planck sources in the HeViCS fields at 857 and 545 GHz, respectively. Almost all sources correspond to individual bright Virgo Cluster galaxies. The vast majority of the Planck detected galaxies are late-type spirals, with the Sc class dominating the numbers, while early-type galaxies are virtually absent from the sample, especially at 545 GHz. We compare the HeViCS SPIRE flux densities for the detected galaxies with the four different PCCS flux density estimators and find an excellent correlation with the aperture photometry flux densities, even at the highest flux density levels. We find only seven PCCS sources in the HeViCS fields without a nearby galaxy as obvious counterpart, and conclude that all of these are dominated by Galactic cirrus features or are spurious detections. No Planck sources in the HeViCS fields seem to be associated to high-redshift proto-clusters of dusty galaxies or strongly lensed submm sources. Finally, our study is the first empirical confirmation of the simulation-based estimated completeness of the PCCS, and provides a strong support of the internal PCCS validation procedure. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. The gas-to-dust mass ratio of Centaurus A as seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, T. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Foyle, K.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Boselli, A.; Boquien, M.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Davies, J. I.; Eales, S. A.; Galametz, M.; Gomez, H. L.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S.; Mentuch, E.; Page, M. J.; Pohlen, M.; Remy, A.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.

    2012-05-01

    We present photometry of the nearby galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) observed with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instruments on board the Herschel Space Observatory, at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm, as well as new CO J= 3-2 observations taken with the HARP-B instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Using a single-component modified blackbody, we model the dust spectral energy distribution within the disc of the galaxy using all five Herschel wavebands and find dust temperatures of ˜30 K towards the centre of the disc and a smoothly decreasing trend to ˜20 K with increasing radius. We find a total dust mass of (1.59 ± 0.05) × 107 M⊙ and a total gas mass of (2.7 ± 0.2) × 109 M⊙. The average gas-to-dust mass ratio is 103 ± 8, but we find an interesting increase in this ratio to approximately 275 towards the centre of Cen A. We discuss several possible physical processes that may be causing this effect, including dust sputtering, jet entrainment and systematic variables such as the XCO factor. Dust sputtering by X-rays originating in the active galactic nucleus or the removal of dust by the jets is our most favoured explanation. a PACS values are divisive and SPIRE values are multiplicative. b These uncertainties are for the pixels at their native pixel scale, as listed in this table. c We have ignored the fact that the SPIRE calibration errors are correlated between all three bands and our total 7 per cent error comprises 5 per cent correlated error and 5 per cent uncorrelated error.

  9. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Constraining Protostellar Models with Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Elise; HOPS Team

    2013-01-01

    During the protostellar stage of star formation, a young star is surrounded by a large infalling envelope of dust and gas; the material falls onto a circumstellar disk and is eventually accreted by the central star. The dust in the disk and envelope emits prominently at mid- to far-infrared wavelengths; at 10 micron, absorption by small silicate grains causes a broad absorption feature. By modeling the near- to far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostars, properties of their disks and envelopes can be derived; in particular, mid-IR spectroscopy reveals the detailed emission around the silicate absorption feature and thus provides additional constraints for the models. Here we present results from modeling a sample of protostars in the Orion star-forming region that were observed as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). These protostars represent a subsample of HOPS; they have Spitzer/IRS spectra, which cover the mid-IR SED from 5 to 35 micron, and photometry in the near-IR (2MASS), mid-IR (Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS), and far-IR (Herschel/PACS). We show the importance of adding Spitzer/IRS spectra with appropriate weights in determining the best fit to the SED from a large grid of protostellar models. The 10 micron silicate absorption feature and the mid- to far-IR SED slope provide key constraints for the inclination angle of the object and its envelope density, with a deep absorption feature and steep SED slope for the most embedded and highly inclined objects. We show a few examples that illustrate our SED fitting method and present preliminary results from our fits.

  10. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Constraining Protostellar Models with Near- to Far-Infrared Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Elise; Ali, Babar; Fischer, Will; Tobin, John; Stutz, Amy; Megeath, Tom; Allen, Lori; HOPS Team

    2013-07-01

    During the protostellar stage of star formation, a young star is surrounded by a large infalling envelope of dust and gas; the material falls onto a circumstellar disk and is eventually accreted by the central star. The dust in the disk and envelope emits prominently at mid- to far-infrared wavelengths; at 10 micron, absorption by small silicate grains typically causes a broad absorption feature. By modeling the near- to far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostars, properties of their disks and envelopes can be derived. As part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS; PI: S. T. Megeath), we have observed a large sample of protostars in the Orion star-forming complex at 70 and 160 micron with the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. For most objects, we also have photometry in the near-IR (2MASS), mid-IR (Spitzer/ IRAC and MIPS), at 100 micron (PACS data from the Gould Belt Survey), sub-mm (APEX/SABOCA and LABOCA), and mid-infrared spectra (Spitzer/IRS). For the interpretation of the SEDs, we have constructed a large grid of protostellar models using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Here we present our SED fitting techniques to determine the best-fit model for each object. We show the importance of including IRS spectra with appropriate weights, in addition to the constraints provided by the PACS measurements, which probe the peak of the SED. The 10 micron silicate absorption feature and the mid- to far-IR SED slope provide key constraints for the inclination angle of the object and its envelope density, with a deep absorption feature and steep SED slope for the most embedded and highly inclined objects. We show a few examples that illustrate our SED fitting method and present some preliminary results from our fits.

  11. A HERSCHEL AND APEX CENSUS OF THE REDDEST SOURCES IN ORION: SEARCHING FOR THE YOUNGEST PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Robitaille, Thomas; Henning, Thomas; Krause, Oliver; Tobin, John J.; Stanke, Thomas; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Furlan, Elise; Hartmann, Lee; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, Thomas L.; Allen, Lori; Manoj, P.

    2013-04-10

    We perform a census of the reddest, and potentially youngest, protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using data obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory and the LABOCA and SABOCA instruments on APEX as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). A total of 55 new protostar candidates are detected at 70 {mu}m and 160 {mu}m that are either too faint (m{sub 24} > 7 mag) to be reliably classified as protostars or undetected in the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m band. We find that the 11 reddest protostar candidates with log {lambda}F{sub {lambda}}70/{lambda}F{sub {lambda}}24 > 1.65 are free of contamination and can thus be reliably explained as protostars. The remaining 44 sources have less extreme 70/24 colors, fainter 70 {mu}m fluxes, and higher levels of contamination. Taking the previously known sample of Spitzer protostars and the new sample together, we find 18 sources that have log {lambda}F{sub {lambda}}70/{lambda}F{sub {lambda}}24 > 1.65; we name these sources 'PACS Bright Red sources', or PBRs. Our analysis reveals that the PBR sample is composed of Class 0 like sources characterized by very red spectral energy distributions (SEDs; T{sub bol} < 45 K) and large values of sub-millimeter fluxes (L{sub smm}/L{sub bol} > 0.6%). Modified blackbody fits to the SEDs provide lower limits to the envelope masses of 0.2-2 M{sub Sun} and luminosities of 0.7-10 L{sub Sun }. Based on these properties, and a comparison of the SEDs with radiative transfer models of protostars, we conclude that the PBRs are most likely extreme Class 0 objects distinguished by higher than typical envelope densities and hence, high mass infall rates.

  12. AN ANALYSIS OF THE ENVIRONMENTS OF FU ORIONIS OBJECTS WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II; Merello, Manuel; Kospal, Agnes; Herczeg, Gregory; Quanz, Sascha P.; Henning, Thomas; Bouwman, Jeroen; Van Kempen, Tim A.; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Dunham, Michael M.; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Chen, Jo-hsin; Guedel, Manuel; Liebhart, Armin; Skinner, Stephen L.

    2013-08-01

    We present Herschel-HIFI, SPIRE, and PACS 50-670 {mu}m imaging and spectroscopy of six FU Orionis-type objects and candidates (FU Orionis, V1735 Cyg, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, V1331 Cyg, and HBC 722), ranging in outburst date from 1936 to 2010, from the 'FOOSH' (FU Orionis Objects Surveyed with Herschel) program, as well as ancillary results from Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. In their system properties (L{sub bol}, T{sub bol}, and line emission), we find that FUors are in a variety of evolutionary states. Additionally, some FUors have features of both Class I and II sources: warm continuum consistent with Class II sources, but rotational line emission typical of Class I, far higher than Class II sources of similar mass/luminosity. Combining several classification techniques, we find an evolutionary sequence consistent with previous mid-IR indicators. We detect [O I] in every source at luminosities consistent with Class 0/I protostars, much greater than in Class II disks. We detect transitions of {sup 13}CO (J{sub up} of 5-8) around two sources (V1735 Cyg and HBC 722) but attribute them to nearby protostars. Of the remaining sources, three (FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, and V1331 Cyg) exhibit only low-lying CO, but one (V1057 Cyg) shows CO up to J = 23 {yields} 22 and evidence for H{sub 2}O and OH emission, at strengths typical of protostars rather than T Tauri stars. Rotational temperatures for 'cool' CO components range from 20 to 81 K, for {approx} 10{sup 50} total CO molecules. We detect [C I] and [N II] primarily as diffuse emission.

  13. Spatially Resolved Imaging of the Two-component η Crv Debris Disk with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchêne, G.; Arriaga, P.; Wyatt, M.; Kennedy, G.; Sibthorpe, B.; Lisse, C.; Holland, W.; Wisniewski, J.; Clampin, M.; Kalas, P.; Pinte, C.; Wilner, D.; Booth, M.; Horner, J.; Matthews, B.; Greaves, J.

    2014-04-01

    We present far-infrared and submillimeter images of the η Crv debris disk system obtained with Herschel and SCUBA-2, as well as Hubble Space Telescope visible and near-infrared coronagraphic images. In the 70 μm Herschel image, we clearly separate the thermal emission from the warm and cold belts in the system, find no evidence for a putative dust population located between them, and precisely determine the geometry of the outer belt. We also find marginal evidence for azimuthal asymmetries and a global offset of the outer debris ring relative to the central star. Finally, we place stringent upper limits on the scattered light surface brightness of the outer ring. Using radiative transfer modeling, we find that it is impossible to account for all observed properties of the system under the assumption that both rings contain dust populations with the same properties. While the outer belt is in reasonable agreement with the expectations of steady-state collisional cascade models, albeit with a minimum grain size that is four times larger than the blow-out size, the inner belt appears to contain copious amounts of small dust grains, possibly below the blow-out size. This suggests that the inner belt cannot result from a simple transport of grains from the outer belt and rather supports a more violent phenomenon as its origin. We also find that the emission from the inner belt has not declined over three decades, a much longer timescale than its dynamical timescale, which indicates that the belt is efficiently replenished.

  14. Herschel/HIFI line surveys: Discovery of interstellar chloronium (H{sub 2}Cl{sup +})

    SciTech Connect

    Lis, Dariusz C.

    2015-01-22

    Prior to the launch of Herschel, HCl was the only chlorine-containing molecule detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, chemical models have identified chloronium, H{sub 2}Cl{sup +}, as a relatively abundant species that is potentially detectable. H{sub 2}Cl{sup +} was predicted to be most abundant in the environments where the ultraviolet radiation is strong: in diffuse clouds, or near the surfaces of dense clouds illuminated by nearby O and B stars. The HIFI instrument on Herschel provided the first detection of H{sub 2}Cl{sup +} in the ISM. The 2{sub 12}-1{sub 01} lines of ortho-H{sub 2}{sup 35}Cl{sup +} and ortho-H{sub 2}{sup 37}Cl{sup +} were detected in absorption toward NGC 6334I, and the 1{sub 11}-0{sub 00} transition of para-H{sub 2}{sup 35}Cl{sup +} was detected in absorption toward NGC 6334I and Sgr B2(S). The derived HCl/H{sub 2}Cl{sup +} column density ratios, ∼1-10, are within the range predicted by models of diffuse and dense Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs). However, the observed H{sub 2}Cl{sup +} column densities, in excess of 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}, are significantly higher than the model predictions. These observations demonstrate the outstanding spectroscopic capabilities of HIFI for detecting new interstellar molecules and providing key constraints for astrochemical models.

  15. OT2_emurph01_3: The Herschel EDGE-on galaxy Survey (HEDGES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, E.

    2011-09-01

    We propose deep PACS and SPIRE imaging for all (6) normal, edge-on (i >85 deg) galaxies with d<10Mpc as part of the Herschel EDGEon galaxy Survey (HEDGES). These data will allow us, for the first time, to characterize variations in the far-infrared (FIR) spectral energy distribution (SED) among and within halos for an energetically diverse sample of nearby, edge-on galaxies as a function of height above the disk. The proper sampling of the halo dust SEDs (i.e., 6 bands between 70500um), will allow us to take inventory of the dust content of halos and illuminate the signatures of dust processing imprinted in the dust SED and its variations. These observations will provide a way to address a number of outstanding questions related to the processes governing the interchange of disk/halo material such as: (1) How does halo dust content relate to disk star formation activity? (2) What are the physical characteristics of halo dust (i.e., temperature(s), mass, emissivity, PAH mass fraction, and what does their variation with height from the plane tell us about grain modification by the energetic processes responsible for disk-halo cycling? (3) What can dust and radio continuum halos tell us about transport effects that are important for understanding the FIR-Radio correlation? (4) How does the distribution of halo dust compare to that of other gas tracers, and hence what can we learn about how such dust is associated with various gas phases? The HEDGES sample galaxies have a treasury of ancillary data (e.g., radio, Spitzer, optical, gas), and the addition of these deep Herschel data will make HEDGES the definitive sample to study multi-phase disk/halo feedback processes arising from the accretion, expulsion, and/or cycling of material between disks and halos into the foreseeable future.

  16. WHAT DETERMINES THE DENSITY STRUCTURE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS? A CASE STUDY OF ORION B WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Andre, Ph.; Koenyves, V.; Motte, F.; Arzoumanian, D.; Didelon, P.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Roy, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Bressert, E.; Di Francesco, J.; Griffin, M.; and others

    2013-04-01

    A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this Letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until A{sub V} {approx} 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -2} profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at A{sub V} > 1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We conclude that (1) the point where the PDF deviates from the lognormal form does not trace a universal A{sub V} -threshold for star formation, (2) statistical density fluctuations, intermittency, and magnetic fields can cause excess from the lognormal PDF at an early cloud formation stage, (3) core formation and/or global collapse of filaments and a non-isothermal gas distribution lead to a power-law tail, and (4) external compression broadens the column density PDF, consistent with numerical simulations.

  17. PEP: First Herschel probe of dusty galaxy evolution up to z ~ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Andreani, P.; Rodighiero, G.; Cimatti, A.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brisbin, D.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Daddi, E.; Dominguez-Sanchez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Förster Schreiber, N.; Genzel, R.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lutz, D.; Magdis, G.; Magliocchetti, M.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Nordon, R.; Peréz-García, A. M.; Poglitsch, A.; Popesso, P.; Riguccini, L.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Shao, L.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L.; Valtchanov, I.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We exploit the deepest existing far-infrared (FIR) data obtained so far by Herschel at 100 and 160 μm in the GOODS-N, as part of the PACS evolutionary probe (PEP) survey, to derive for the first time the evolution of the rest-frame 60-μm, 90-μm, and total IR luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies and AGNs from z = 0 to unprecedented high redshifts (z ~ 2-3). Methods: The PEP LFs were computed using the 1/Vmax method. The FIR sources were classified by means of a detailed broad-band SED-fitting analysis and spectral characterisation. Based on the best-fit model results, k-correction and total IR (8-1000 μm) luminosity were obtained for each source. LFs (monochromatic and total) were then derived for various IR populations separately in different redshift bins and compared to backward evolution model predictions. Results: We detect strong evolution in the LF to at least z ~ 2. Objects with SEDs similar to local spiral galaxies are the major contributors to the star formation density (SFD) at z ≲ 0.3, then, as redshift increases, moderate SF galaxies - most likely containing a low-luminosity AGN - start dominating up to z ≃ 1.5. At z ≳ 1.5 the SFD is dominated by the contributions of starburst galaxies. In agreement with previous findings, the comoving IR LD derived from our data evolves approximately as (1 + z)3.8±0.3 up to z ~ 1, there being some evidence of flattening up to z ~ 2. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Tables 1-4 and Figures 5-7 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Herschel/HIFI⋆ observations of the circumstellar ammonia lines in IRC+10216

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M. R.; He, J. H.; Szczerba, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Justtanont, K.; Teyssier, D.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Olofsson, H.; Planesas, P.; Marston, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.; de Koter, A.; Schöier, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Context A discrepancy exists between the abundance of ammonia (NH3) derived previously for the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of IRC+10216 from far-IR submillimeter rotational lines and that inferred from radio inversion or mid-infrared (MIR) absorption transitions. Aims To address the discrepancy described above, new high-resolution far-infrared (FIR) observations of both ortho- and para-NH3 transitions toward IRC+10216 were obtained with Herschel, with the goal of determining the ammonia abundance and constraining the distribution of NH3 in the envelope of IRC+10216. Methods We used the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board Herschel to observe all rotational transitions up to the J = 3 level (three ortho- and six para-NH3 lines). We conducted non-LTE multilevel radiative transfer modelling, including the effects of near-infrared (NIR) radiative pumping through vibrational transitions. The computed emission line profiles are compared with the new HIFI data, the radio inversion transitions, and the MIR absorption lines in the ν2 band taken from the literature. Results We found that NIR pumping is of key importance for understanding the excitation of rotational levels of NH3. The derived NH3 abundances relative to molecular hydrogen were (2.8 ± 0.5) × 10−8 for ortho-NH3 and (3.2−0.6+0.7)×10−8 for para-NH3, consistent with an ortho/para ratio of 1. These values are in a rough agreement with abundances derived from the inversion transitions, as well as with the total abundance of NH3 inferred from the MIR absorption lines. To explain the observed rotational transitions, ammonia must be formed near to the central star at a radius close to the end of the wind acceleration region, but no larger than about 20 stellar radii (1σ confidence level). PMID:28065983

  19. A Herschel Study of 24 μμm-Selected AGNs and Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Rieke, G. H.; Egami, E.; Pereira, M. J.; Haines, C. P.; Smith, G. P.

    2015-08-01

    We present a sample of 290 24 μm-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) mostly at z ˜ 0.3-2.5, within 5.2 {{deg}}2 distributed as 25\\prime × 25\\prime fields around each of 30 galaxy clusters in the Local Cluster Substructure Survey. The sample is nearly complete to 1 mJy at 24 μm, and has a rich multiwavelength set of ancillary data; 162 are detected by Herschel. We use spectral templates for AGNs, stellar populations, and infrared (IR) emission by star-forming galaxies to decompose the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these AGNs and their host galaxies, and estimate their star formation rates, AGN luminosities, and host galaxy stellar masses. The set of templates is relatively simple: a standard Type-1 quasar template; another for the photospheric output of the stellar population; and a far-infrared star-forming template. For the Type-2 AGN SEDs, we substitute templates including internal obscuration, and some Type-1 objects require a warm component (T≳ 50 K). The individually Herschel-detected Type-1 AGNs and a subset of 17 Type-2 AGNs typically have luminosities \\gt {10}45 {ergs} {{{s}}}-1, and supermassive black holes of ˜ 3× {10}8 {M}⊙ emitting at ˜10% of the Eddington rate. We find them in about twice the numbers of AGNs identified in SDSS data in the same fields, i.e., they represent typical high-luminosity AGNs, not an IR-selected minority. These AGNs and their host galaxies are studied further in an accompanying paper.

  20. Modelling the huge, Herschel-resolved debris ring around HD 207129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhne, T.; Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.; Mora, A.; Absil, O.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Thébault, P.; Bayo, A.; Del Burgo, C.; Danchi, W.; Krivov, A. V.; Lebreton, J.; Letawe, G.; Magain, P.; Maldonado, J.; Montesinos, B.; Pilbratt, G. L.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2012-01-01

    Debris disks, which are inferred from the observed infrared excess to be ensembles of dust, rocks, and probably planetesimals, are common features of stellar systems. As the mechanisms of their formation and evolution are linked to those of planetary bodies, they provide valuable information. The few well-resolved debris disks are even more valuable because they can serve as modelling benchmarks and help resolve degeneracies in modelling aspects such as typical grain sizes and distances. Here, we present an analysis of the HD 207129 debris disk, based on its well-covered spectral energy distribution and Herschel/PACS images obtained in the framework of the DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars) programme. We use an empirical power-law approach to the distribution of dust and we then model the production and removal of dust by means of collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces. The resulting best-fit model contains a total of nearly 10-2 Earth masses in dust, with typical grain sizes in the planetesimal belt ranging from 4 to 7 μm. We constrain the dynamical excitation to be low, which results in very long collisional lifetimes and a drag that notably fills the inner gap, especially at 70 μm. The radial distribution stretches from well within 100 AU in an unusual, outward-rising slope towards a rather sharp outer edge at about 170-190 AU. The inner edge is therefore smoother than that reported for Fomalhaut, but the contribution from the extended halo of barely bound grains is similarly small. Both slowly self-stirring and planetary perturbations could potentially have formed and shaped this disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Spectral Energy Distributions and Fits Using a Grid of Protostellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Stutz, A. M.; Stanke, T.; Tobin, J. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Osorio, M.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Poteet, C. A.; Booker, J.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Allen, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and submillimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2-870 μm and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ˜100 μm. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate constraints on protostellar envelope properties. We find that most protostars, and in particular the flat-spectrum sources, are well fit. The median envelope density and median inclination angle decrease from Class 0 to Class I to flat-spectrum protostars, despite the broad range in best-fit parameters in each of the three categories. We also discuss degeneracies in our model parameters. Our results confirm that the different protostellar classes generally correspond to an evolutionary sequence with a decreasing envelope infall rate, but the inclination angle also plays a role in the appearance, and thus interpretation, of the SEDs.

  2. Far-infrared photometric observations of the outer planets and satellites with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T. G.; Balog, Z.; Nielbock, M.; Moreno, R.; Klaas, U.; Moór, A.; Linz, H.; Feuchtgruber, H.

    2016-04-01

    We present all Herschel-PACS photometer observations of Mars, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Callisto, Ganymede, and Titan. All measurements were carefully inspected for quality problems, were reduced in a (semi-)standard way, and were calibrated. The derived flux densities are tied to the standard PACS photometer response calibration, which is based on repeated measurements of five fiducial stars. The overall absolute flux uncertainty is dominated by the estimated 5% model uncertainty of the stellar models in the PACS wavelength range between 60 and 210 μm. A comparison with the corresponding planet and satellite models shows excellent agreement for Uranus, Neptune, and Titan, well within the specified 5%. Callisto is brighter than our model predictions by about 4-8%, Ganymede by about 14-21%. We discuss possible reasons for the model offsets. The measurements of these very bright point-like sources, together with observations of stars and asteroids, demonstrate the high reliability of the PACS photometer observations and the linear behavior of the PACS bolometer source fluxes over more than four orders of magnitude (from mJy levels up to more than 1000 Jy). Our results show the great potential of using the observed solar system targets for cross-calibration purposes with other ground-based, airborne, and space-based instruments and projects. At the same time, the PACS results will lead to improved model solutions for future calibration applications. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  3. Opening the Dutch Open Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.; de Wijn, A. G.; Sütterlin, P.; Bettonvil, F. C. M.; Hammerschlag, R. H.

    2002-10-01

    We hope to "open the DOT" to the international solar physics community as a facility for high-resolution tomography of the solar atmosphere. Our aim is to do so combining peer-review time allocation with service-mode operation in a "hands-on-telescope" education program bringing students to La Palma to assist in the observing and processing. The largest step needed is considerable speedup of the DOT speckle processing.

  4. Open University

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  5. Spitzer/IRAC Imaging of Exceptionally Bright Cluster-Lensed Submillimeter Galaxies Discovered by the Herschel Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald; Rawle, Timothy; Clement, Benjamin; Walth, Gregory; Pereira, Maria; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, discoveries of exceptionally bright (e.g., observed S_peak > 100 mJy in the Herschel/SPIRE bands) gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have generated great excitement. This is because these gravitationally lensed SMGs are so bright that they enable us to perform a variety of follow-up observations using a suite of observing facilities in the submillimeter, millimeter, and radio now available on the ground. Using Herschel, our team has been conducting a survey of such bright lensed galaxies in the fields of massive galaxy clusters: ``The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS)'' (PI: Egami; 419 hours). This large Herschel program targets a total of 581 X-ray/SZ-selected massive clusters, and is currently 80% complete. Cluster lenses are often more powerful than galaxy lenses, producing larger magnifications. For example, typical magnification factors for galaxy-lensed Herschel sources are x10 or less while cluster-lensed systems can often produce magnification factors of x20-30 and even above x100. Cluster lenses will therefore allow us to detect and study intrinsically less-luminous and/or more distant sources with the ability to provide a view of finer-scale (i.e., sub-kpc) structures. Here, we propose to conduct Spitzer/IRAC imaging of 56 bright lensed SMG candidates we have identified in the ~470 HLS cluster fields observed so far. The main scientific goal is twofold: (1) to locate the underlying stellar component, and (2) to study its properties (e.g., stellar mass, specific star-formation rate) by constraining the rest-frame near-infrared SED and comparing with the Herschel and other submillimeter/millimeter data (e.g., SMA, PdB, ALMA, etc.). These rare bright lensed SMGs will allow us to probe the population of heavily dust-obscured vigorously star-forming galaxies at high redshift (z>1), which is thought to play an important role in the cosmic star-formation history of the Universe and yet has been difficult to study due to the

  6. Revealing the ISM in high redshift starburst galaxies: An analysis of Herschel PACS and SPIRE FTS spectroscopic observations of HerMES and H-ATLAS-selected lensed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha

    In the quest to develop a fundamental understanding of galaxy formation and evolution, observations of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) promise significant progress this decade. The importance of DSFGs is highlighted by the fact that half of the energy emitted by extragalactic sources emerges as dust-reprocessed light at infrared (IR) to sub millimeter wavelength. In the post-herschel\\ era, we are now at a unique position to tackle some of the key questions on galaxy formation and evolution because of the large area Herschel's Key Project surveys (HerMES and H-ATLAS). In particular those surveys have allowed us to identify a sample of 250 strongly gravitationally lensed DSFGs at z > 1. They give us a unique opportunity to dissect the detailed structures and kinematics of DSFGs. The Herschel Science Archive also contains individual follow up data on 44 and 25 of the brightest sources with SPIRE-FTS and PACS, respectively, in the spectroscopy mode, taking over 250 hours in four open-time programs. Only one of the 44 SPIRE FTS targets has yet to appear in the published literature. One of the four include an open-time 2 PACS spectroscopy program that was led at UCI by a former postdoc from the PI's group. That program was initially approved at Priority 2 in 2011, but was triggered in late 2012 and achieved 100% completion during the last two weeks of Herschel lifetime in May 2013. This archival analysis, interpretation, and modeling program involves two parts: (i) PACS spectroscopy in 50 to 200 microns of 25 lensed galaxies in the fine-structure emission lines [SiII]34, [SIII]33, [OIV]26, [OIII]52, [NIII]57 and [OI]63, and the molecular hydrogen H_2 S(0) and S(1). (ii) SPIRE FTS spectroscopy of 44 lensed galaxies, including above 25, over the wavelength range of 200 to 600 microns targeting [CII]158, [OIII]88, [OI]63/145, and [NI]122. The analysis will lead to a better understanding of the ISM of starbursting galaxies that span 1 < z < 3.1 range in redshift and a

  7. The Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA). VI. The Distribution and Properties of Molecular Cloud Associations in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. M.; Gear, W. K.; Fritz, J.; Smith, M. W. L.; Ford, G.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; De Looze, I.; Eales, S. A.; Gentile, G.; Gomez, H. L.; Gordon, K.; O'Halloran, B.; Madden, S. C.; Roman-Duval, J.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Boselli, A.; Cooray, A.; Lebouteiller, V.; Spinoglio, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a catalog of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Andromeda (M31) galaxy extracted from the Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA) data set. GMCs are identified from the Herschel maps using a hierarchical source extraction algorithm. We present the results of this new catalog and characterize the spatial distribution and spectral energy properties of its clouds based on the radial dust/gas properties found by Smith et al. A total of 326 GMCs in the mass range 104-107 M ⊙ are identified; their cumulative mass distribution is found to be proportional to M -2.34, in agreement with earlier studies. The GMCs appear to follow the same correlation of cloud mass to L CO observed in the Milky Way. However, comparison between this catalog and interferometry studies also shows that the GMCs are substructured below the Herschel resolution limit, suggesting that we are observing associations of GMCs. Following Gordon et al., we study the spatial structure of M31 by splitting the observed structure into a set of spiral arms and offset rings. We fit radii of 10.3 and 15.5 kpc to the two most prominent rings. We then fit a logarithmic spiral with a pitch angle of 8.°9 to the GMCs not associated with either ring. Last, we comment on the effects of deprojection on our results and investigate the effect different models for M31's inclination will have on the projection of an unperturbed spiral arm system. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  8. OpenER, a Dutch Initiative in Open Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuwer, Robert; Mulder, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Over the period 2006-2008, the Dutch Open Universiteit Nederland conducted an experiment in which Open Educational Resources (OER) were offered in an effort to bridge the gap between informal and formal learning and to establish a new style of entry portal to higher education with no barriers at all. OpenER received considerable attention both in…

  9. Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey: detection of a far-infrared population around galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, K. E. K.; Geach, J. E.; Smail, Ian; Dunne, L.; Edge, A. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Jarvis, M.; Michałowski, M. J.; Murphy, D. N. A.; Negrello, M.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van der Werf, P.

    2011-09-01

    We report the detection of a significant excess in the surface density of far-infrared sources from the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey within ˜1 Mpc of the centres of 66 optically selected clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with ˜ 0.25. From the analysis of the multiwavelength properties of their counterparts we conclude that the far-infrared emission is associated with dust-obscured star formation and/or active galactic nuclei (AGN) within galaxies in the clusters themselves. The excess reaches a maximum at a radius of ˜0.8 Mpc, where we find 1.0 ± 0.3 S250 > 34 mJy sources on average per cluster above what would be expected for random field locations. If the far-infrared emission is dominated by star formation (as opposed to AGN) then this corresponds to an average star formation rate of ˜7 M⊙ yr-1 per cluster in sources with LIR > 5 × 1010 L⊙. Although lensed sources make a negligible contribution to the excess signal, a fraction of the sources around the clusters could be gravitationally lensed, and we have identified a sample of potential cases of cluster-lensed Herschel sources that could be targeted in follow-up studies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  10. PACS photometry of the Herschel Reference Survey - far-infrared/submillimetre colours as tracers of dust properties in nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Fritz, J.; Bianchi, S.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Roussel, H.; Baes, M.; Buat, V.; Clemens, M.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Davies, J. I.; De Looze, I.; Eales, S. A.; Fuller, C.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S.; Munoz-Mateos, J.; Pappalardo, C.; Pierini, D.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Sauvage, M.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Vaccari, M.; Vlahakis, C.

    2014-05-01

    We present Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 μm integrated photometry for the 323 galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS), a K-band, volume-limited sample of galaxies in the local Universe. Once combined with the Herschel/SPIRE observations already available, these data make the HRS the largest representative sample of nearby galaxies with homogeneous coverage across the 100-500 μm wavelength range. In this paper, we take advantage of this unique data set to investigate the properties and shape of the far-infrared/submillimetre spectral energy distribution in nearby galaxies. We show that, in the stellar mass range covered by the HRS (8 ≲ log (M*/M⊙) ≲ 12), the far-infrared/submillimetre colours are inconsistent with a single modified blackbody having the same dust emissivity index β for all galaxies. In particular, either β decreases or multiple temperature components are needed, when moving from metal-rich/gas-poor to metal-poor/gas-rich galaxies. We thus investigate how the dust temperature and mass obtained from a single modified blackbody depend on the assumptions made on β. We show that, while the correlations between dust temperature, galaxy structure and star formation rate are strongly model dependent, the dust mass scaling relations are much more reliable, and variations of β only change the strength of the observed trends.

  11. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. III. A constraint on dust grain lifetime in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, M. S.; Jones, A. P.; Bressan, A.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bomans, D. J.; Boselli, A.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Dariush, A.; Davies, J. I.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    Passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) provide an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay between dust formation around evolved stars and its subsequent destruction in a hot gas. Using Spitzer-IRS and Herschel data we compare the dust production rate in the envelopes of evolved AGB stars with a constraint on the total dust mass. Early-type galaxies which appear to be truly passively evolving are not detected by Herschel. We thus derive a distance independent upper limit to the dust grain survival time in the hostile environment of ETGs of <46±25 Myr for amorphous silicate grains. This implies that ETGs which are detected at far-infrared wavelengths have acquired a cool dusty medium via interaction. Given likely time-scales for ram-pressure stripping, this also implies that only galaxies with dust in a cool (atomic) medium can release dust into the intra-cluster medium. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. Comparing Herschel dust emission structures, magnetic fields observed by Planck, and dynamics: high-latitude star forming cloud L1642

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The nearby high-latitude cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. This cloud is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g., of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642, and also combine these with dynamic information from molecular line observations. The high-resolution Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central blob with elongated extensions, low density striations, "fishbone" like structures with a spine and perpendicular striations, and a spiraling "tail". The Planck polarization data reveal an ordered magnetic field that pervades the cloud and is aligned with the surrounding low density striations. We show that there is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large scale magnetic fields revealed by Planck polarization data at 10' resolution. This suggests that the magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. We see a clear transition from aligned to perpendicular structures approximately at a column density of NH = 2x10^21 cm-2. We conclude that Planck polarization data revealing the large scale magnetic field orientation can be very useful even when comparing to the finest structures in higher resolution data, e.g. Herschel at ~18" resolution.

  13. Deep observations of O2 toward a low-mass protostar with Herschel-HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Umut A.; Acharyya, Kinsuk; Goldsmith, Paul F.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Melnick, Gary; Snell, Ronald; Liseau, René; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Pagani, Laurent; Bergin, Edwin; Caselli, Paola; Herbst, Eric; Kristensen, Lars E.; Visser, Ruud; Lis, Dariusz C.; Gerin, Maryvonne

    2013-10-01

    Context. According to traditional gas-phase chemical models, O2 should be abundant in molecular clouds, but until recently, attempts to detect interstellar O2 line emission with ground- and space-based observatories have failed. Aims: Following the multi-line detections of O2 with low abundances in the Orion and ρ Oph A molecular clouds with Herschel, it is important to investigate other environments, and we here quantify the O2 abundance near a solar-mass protostar. Methods: Observations of molecular oxygen, O2, at 487 GHz toward a deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 protostar, NGC 1333-IRAS 4A, are presented, using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Observatory. Complementary data of the chemically related NO and CO molecules are obtained as well. The high spectral resolution data are analysed using radiative transfer models to infer column densities and abundances, and are tested directly against full gas-grain chemical models. Results: The deep HIFI spectrum fails to show O2 at the velocity of the dense protostellar envelope, implying one of the lowest abundance upper limits of O2/H2 at ≤6 × 10-9 (3σ). The O2/CO abundance ratio is less than 0.005. However, a tentative (4.5σ) detection of O2 is seen at the velocity of the surrounding NGC 1333 molecular cloud, shifted by 1 km s-1 relative to the protostar. For the protostellar envelope, pure gas-phase models and gas-grain chemical models require a long pre-collapse phase (~0.7-1 × 106 years), during which atomic and molecular oxygen are frozen out onto dust grains and fully converted to H2O, to avoid overproduction of O2 in the dense envelope. The same model also reproduces the limits on the chemically related NO molecule if hydrogenation of NO on the grains to more complex molecules such as NH2OH, found in recent laboratory experiments, is included. The tentative detection of O2 in the surrounding cloud is consistent with a low-density PDR model with small changes in

  14. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVII. SPIRE point-source catalogs and number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Ciro; Bendo, George J.; Bianchi, Simone; Hunt, Leslie; Zibetti, Stefano; Corbelli, Edvige; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; Grossi, Marco; Davies, Jonathan; Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse; Fritz, Jacopo; Pohlen, Michael; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Verstappen, Joris; Boquien, Médéric; Boselli, Alessandro; Cortese, Luca; Hughes, Thomas; Viaene, Sebastien; Bizzocchi, Luca; Clemens, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We present three independent catalogs of point-sources extracted from SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 μm, acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory as a part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). The catalogs have been cross-correlated to consistently extract the photometry at SPIRE wavelengths for each object. Methods: Sources have been detected using an iterative loop. The source positions are determined by estimating the likelihood to be a real source for each peak on the maps, according to the criterion defined in the sourceExtractorSussextractor task. The flux densities are estimated using the sourceExtractorTimeline, a timeline-based point source fitter that also determines the fitting procedure with the width of the Gaussian that best reproduces the source considered. Afterwards, each source is subtracted from the maps, removing a Gaussian function in every position with the full width half maximum equal to that estimated in sourceExtractorTimeline. This procedure improves the robustness of our algorithm in terms of source identification. We calculate the completeness and the flux accuracy by injecting artificial sources in the timeline and estimate the reliability of the catalog using a permutation method. Results: The HeViCS catalogs contain about 52 000, 42 200, and 18 700 sources selected at 250, 350, and 500 μm above 3σ and are ~75%, 62%, and 50% complete at flux densities of 20 mJy at 250, 350, 500 μm, respectively. We then measured source number counts at 250, 350, and 500 μm and compare them with previous data and semi-analytical models. We also cross-correlated the catalogs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the redshift distribution of the nearby sources. From this cross-correlation, we select ~2000 sources with reliable fluxes and a high signal-to-noise ratio, finding an average redshift z ~ 0.3 ± 0.22 and 0.25 (16-84 percentile). Conclusions: The number counts at 250, 350, and 500 μm show an increase in

  15. Structure formation in a colliding flow: The Herschel view of the Draco nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Salomé, Q.; Martin, P. G.; Joncas, G.; Blagrave, K.; Dassas, K.; Abergel, A.; Beelen, A.; Boulanger, F.; Lagache, G.; Lockman, F. J.; Marshall, D. J.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The Draco nebula is a high Galactic latitude interstellar cloud observed at velocities corresponding to the intermediate velocity cloud regime. This nebula shows unusually strong CO emission and remarkably high-contrast small-scale structures for such a diffuse high Galactic latitude cloud. The 21 cm emission of the Draco nebula reveals that it is likely to have been formed by the collision of a cloud entering the disk of the Milky Way. Such physical conditions are ideal to study the formation of cold and dense gas in colliding flows of diffuse and warm gas. Aims: The objective of this study is to better understand the process of structure formation in a colliding flow and to describe the effects of matter entering the disk on the interstellar medium. Methods: We conducted Herschel-SPIRE observations of the Draco nebula. The clumpfind algorithm was used to identify and characterize the small-scale structures of the cloud. Results: The high-resolution SPIRE map reveals the fragmented structure of the interface between the infalling cloud and the Galactic layer. This front is characterized by a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability structure. From the determination of the typical length of the periodic structure (2.2 pc) we estimated the gas kinematic viscosity. This allowed us to estimate the dissipation scale of the warm neutral medium (0.1 pc), which was found to be compatible with that expected if ambipolar diffusion were the main mechanism of turbulent energy dissipation. The statistical properties of the small-scale structures identified with clumpfind are found to be typical of that seen in molecular clouds and hydrodynamical turbulence in general. The density of the gas has a log-normal distribution with an average value of 103 cm-3. The typical size of the structures is 0.1-0.2 pc, but this estimate is limited by the resolution of the observations. The mass of these structures ranges from 0.2 to 20 M⊙ and the distribution of the more massive structures

  16. Herschel-HIFI view of mid-IR quiet massive protostellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpin, F.; Chavarría, L.; Jacq, T.; Braine, J.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Baudry, A.; Bontemps, S.; Kristensen, L.; Schmalzl, M.; Mata, J.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present Herschel/HIFI observations of 14 water lines in a small sample of Galactic massive protostellar objects: NGC 6334I(N), DR21(OH), IRAS 16272-4837, and IRAS 05358+3543. Using water as a tracer of the structure and kinematics, we individually study each of these objects with the aim to estimate the amount of water around them, but to also to shed light on the high-mass star formation process. Methods: We analyzed the gas dynamics from the line profiles using Herschel-HIFI observations acquired as part of the WISH key-project of 14 far-IR water lines (H_216O, H_217O, H_218O) and several other species. Then through modeling the observations using the RATRAN radiative transfer code, we estimated outflow, infall, turbulent velocities, and molecular abundances and investigated the correlation with the evolutionary status of each source. Results: The four sources (and the previously studied W43-MM1) have been ordered in terms of evolution based on their spectral energy distribution from youngest to older: 1) NGC 64334I(N); 2) W43-MM1; 3) DR21(OH); 4) IRAS 16272-4837; 5) IRAS 05358+3543. The molecular line profiles exhibit a broad component coming from the shocks along the cavity walls that is associated with the protostars, and an infalling (or expanding, for IRAS 05358+3543) and passively heated envelope component, with highly supersonic turbulence that probably increases with the distance from the center. Accretion rates between 6.3 × 10-5 and 5.6 × 10-4M⊙ yr-1 are derived from the infall observed in three of our sources. The outer water abundance is estimated to be at the typical value of a few 10-8, while the inner abundance varies from 1.7 × 10-6 to 1.4 × 10-4 with respect to H2 depending on the source. Conclusions: We confirm that regions of massive star formation are highly turbulent and that the turbulence probably increases in the envelope with the distance to the star. The inner abundances are lower than the expected, 10-4, perhaps because

  17. Openness initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  18. Deep O2 observations toward a low-mass protostar with Herschel-HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Umut; Acharyya, Kinsuk; Goldsmith, Paul; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Melnick, Gary; Snell, Ronald; Liseau, Rene; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Pagani, Laurent; Bergin, Edwin; Caselli, Paola; Herbst, Eric; Kristensen, Lars; Visser, Ruud; Lis, Dariusz; Gerin, Maryvonne

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen is the third most abundant element in the Universe, after hydrogen and helium. According to traditional gas-phase chemical models, O2 should be abundant in molecular clouds (X(O2)~7e-5 relative to H2), but until recently, attempts to detect interstellar O2 line emission with ground- and space-based observatories have failed. Following the multi-line detection of O2 with low abundances in the Orion and rho OphA molecular clouds with Herschel, it is important to investigate other environments, and we here quantify the O2 abundance near a solar-mass protostar. Observations of molecular oxygen, O2, at 487 GHz toward a deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 protostar, NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, are presented, using the HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory. The high spectral resolution data are analysed using radiative transfer models to infer column densities and abundances, and are tested directly against full gas-grain chemical models. The deep HIFI spectrum (rms=1.3 mK) fails to show O2 at the velocity of the dense protostellar envelope, implying one of the deepest abundance upper limits of O2/H2 at <6x10e-9 (3 sigma). The O2/CO abundance ratio is less than 0.005. However, a tentative (4.5 sigma) detection of O2 is seen at the velocity of the surrounding NGC~1333 cloud, shifted by 1 km/s relative to the protostar. Pure gas-phase models and gas-grain chemical models require a long pre-collapse phase (~0.7-1x10e6 years) during which atomic and molecular oxygen are frozen out onto dust grains and fully converted to H2O to avoid overproduction of O2 in the dense envelope. The tentative detection of O2 in the surrounding cloud is consistent with a low-density PDR model with a small enhancement of the water-ice photodesorption yield of a factor of two. The low O2 abundance in the collapsing envelope around a low-mass protostar suggests that the gas and ice entering protoplanetary disks is very poor in O2. This research is described in Yildiz et al. (2013, A&A, astro-ph: 1307.8031).

  19. The Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA). II. Dust and Gas in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. W. L.; Eales, S. A.; Gomez, H. L.; Roman-Duval, J.; Fritz, J.; Braun, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A. R.; Cortese, L.; De Looze, I.; Ford, G. P.; Gear, W. K.; Gentile, G.; Gordon, K. D.; Kirk, J.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S.; Mentuch, E.; O'Halloran, B.; Page, M. J.; Schulz, B.; Spinoglio, L.; Verstappen, J.; Wilson, C. D.; Thilker, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    We present an analysis of the dust and gas in Andromeda, using Herschel images sampling the entire far-infrared peak. We fit a modified-blackbody model to ~4000 quasi-independent pixels with spatial resolution of ~140 pc and find that a variable dust-emissivity index (β) is required to fit the data. We find no significant long-wavelength excess above this model, suggesting there is no cold dust component. We show that the gas-to-dust ratio varies radially, increasing from ~20 in the center to ~70 in the star-forming ring at 10 kpc, consistent with the metallicity gradient. In the 10 kpc ring the average β is ~1.9, in good agreement with values determined for the Milky Way (MW). However, in contrast to the MW, we find significant radial variations in β, which increases from 1.9 at 10 kpc to ~2.5 at a radius of 3.1 kpc and then decreases to 1.7 in the center. The dust temperature is fairly constant in the 10 kpc ring (ranging from 17 to 20 K), but increases strongly in the bulge to ~30 K. Within 3.1 kpc we find the dust temperature is highly correlated with the 3.6 μm flux, suggesting the general stellar population in the bulge is the dominant source of dust heating there. At larger radii, there is a weak correlation between the star formation rate and dust temperature. We find no evidence for "dark gas" in M31 in contrast to recent results for the MW. Finally, we obtained an estimate of the CO X-factor by minimizing the dispersion in the gas-to-dust ratio, obtaining a value of (1.9 ± 0.4) × 1020 cm-2 [K km s-1]-1. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  20. Herschel-ATLAS: Toward a Sample of ~1000 Strongly Lensed Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Nuevo, J.; Lapi, A.; Fleuren, S.; Bressan, S.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.; Negrello, M.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Fan, L.; Sutherland, W.; Baes, M.; Baker, A. J.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Frayer, D. T.; Harris, A. I.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; López-Caniego, M.; Rodighiero, G.; Rowlands, K.; Serjeant, S.; Scott, D.; van der Werf, P.; Auld, R.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Dariush, A.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Maddox, S.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Smith, D.; Temi, P.

    2012-04-01

    While the selection of strongly lensed galaxies (SLGs) with 500 μm flux density S 500 > 100 mJy has proven to be rather straightforward, for many applications it is important to analyze samples larger than the ones obtained when confining ourselves to such a bright limit. Moreover, only by probing to fainter flux densities is it possible to exploit strong lensing to investigate the bulk of the high-z star-forming galaxy population. We describe HALOS (the Herschel-ATLAS Lensed Objects Selection), a method for efficiently selecting fainter candidate SLGs, reaching a surface density of ~= 1.5-2 deg-2, i.e., a factor of about 4-6 higher than that at the 100 mJy flux limit. HALOS will allow the selection of up to ~1000 candidate SLGs (with amplifications μ >~ 2) over the full H-ATLAS survey area. Applying HALOS to the H-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase field (sime 14.4 deg2) we find 31 candidate SLGs, whose candidate lenses are identified in the VIKING near-infrared catalog. Using the available information on candidate sources and candidate lenses we tentatively estimate a ~= 72% purity of the sample. As expected, the purity decreases with decreasing flux density of the sources and with increasing angular separation between candidate sources and lenses. The redshift distribution of the candidate lensed sources is close to that reported for most previous surveys for lensed galaxies, while that of candidate lenses extends to redshifts substantially higher than found in the other surveys. The counts of candidate SLGs are also in good agreement with model predictions. Even though a key ingredient of the method is the deep near-infrared VIKING photometry, we show that H-ATLAS data alone allow the selection of a similarly deep sample of candidate SLGs with an efficiency close to 50%; a slightly lower surface density (sime 1.45 deg-2) can be reached with a ~70% efficiency. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal

  1. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XI. Environmental effects on molecular gas and dust in spiral disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, C.; Bianchi, S.; Corbelli, E.; Giovanardi, C.; Hunt, L.; Bendo, G. J.; Boselli, A.; Cortese, L.; Magrini, L.; Zibetti, S.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Davies, J.; Baes, M.; Ciesla, L.; Clemens, M.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Grossi, M.; Pohlen, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.

    2012-09-01

    Aims: We investigate the dust-to-gas mass ratio and the environmental effects on the various components of the interstellar medium for a spatially resolved sample of Virgo spirals. Methods: We have used the IRAM-30 m telescope to map over their full extent NGC 4189, NGC 4298, NGC 4388, and NGC 4299 in the 12CO(1-0) and the 12CO(2-1) lines. We observed the same lines in selected regions of NGC 4351, NGC 4294, and NGC 4424. The CO observations are combined with Herschel maps in 5 bands between 100-500 μm from the HeViCS survey, and with HI data from the VIVA survey, to obtain spatially resolved dust and gas distributions. We studied the environmental dependencies by adding to our sample eight galaxies with 12CO(1-0) maps from the literature. Results: We estimate the integrated mass of molecular hydrogen for the galaxies observed in the CO lines. We find molecular-to-total gas mass fractions between 0.04 ≤ fmol ≤ 0.65, with the lowest values for the dimmest galaxy in the B-band. The integrated dust-to-gas ratio ranges between 0.011 and 0.004. For the 12 mapped galaxies we derive the radial distributions of the atomic gas, molecular gas, and dust. We also study the effect of different CO-to-H2 conversion factors. Both the molecular gas and the dust distributions show steeper radial profiles for HI-deficient galaxies and the average dust-to-gas ratio for these galaxies increases or stays radially constant. On scales of ~3 kpc, we find a strong correlation between the molecular gas and the 250 μm surface brightness that is tighter than average for non-deficient galaxies. The correlation becomes linear if we consider the total gas surface mass density. However, the inclusion of atomic hydrogen does not improve the statistical significance of the correlation. Conclusions: The environment can modify the distributions of molecules and dust within a galaxy, although these components are more tightly bound than the atomic gas. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with

  2. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XX. Dust and gas in the foreground Galactic cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, S.; Giovanardi, C.; Smith, M. W. L.; Fritz, J.; Davies, J. I.; Haynes, M. P.; Giovanelli, R.; Baes, M.; Bocchio, M.; Boissier, S.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Casasola, V.; Clark, C. J. R.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Grossi, M.; Jones, A. P.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S.; Magrini, L.; Pappalardo, C.; Ysard, N.; Zibetti, S.

    2017-01-01

    We study the correlation between far-infrared/submm dust emission and atomic gas column density in order to derive the properties of the high Galactic latitude, low density, Milky Way cirrus in the foreground of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Dust emission maps from 60 to 850 μm are obtained from observations with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and carried out within the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS); these are complemented by IRAS and Planck maps. Data from the Arecibo legacy Fast ALFA Survey is used to derive atomic gas column densities for two broad velocity components: low and intermediate velocity clouds. Dust emissivities are derived for each gas component and each far-infrared/submm band. For the low velocity clouds, we measure an average emissivity ɛLVCν = (0.79 ± 0.08) × 10-20 MJy sr-1 cm2 at 250 μm. After fitting a modified blackbody to the available bands, we estimated a dust absorption cross section of τLVCν/NH i = (0.49 ± 0.13) × 10-25 cm2 H-1 at 250 μm (with dust temperature T = 20.4 ± 1.5 K and spectral index β = 1.53 ± 0.17). The results are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Planck over a much larger coverage of the high Galactic latitude cirrus (50% of the sky versus 0.2% in our work). For dust associated with intermediate velocity gas, we confirm earlier Planck results and find a higher temperature and lower emissivity and cross section. After subtracting the modeled components, we find regions at scales smaller than 20' in which the residuals deviate significantly from the average scatter, which is dominated by cosmic infrared background. These large residuals are most likely due to local variations in the cirrus dust properties or to high-latitude molecular clouds with average NH2 ≲ 1020 cm-2. We find no conclusive evidence for intracluster dust emission in Virgo. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and

  3. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, Cdms, in Times of Herschel, SOFIA, and Alma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Stutzki, Jürgen; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2009-06-01

    The CDMS provides in its catalog section atomic and molecular line lists for species that have been or may be observed in space by radio astronomical means. The line list of each molecule is gathered in an individual entry; minor isotopologs have separate entries, and the same applies to excited vibrational states with the exception of some diatomic molecules. With 5 to 10 new or updated entries each month, the CDMS catalog has been growing rapidly over the past 10 years: since February 2009, there have been more than 500 entries in the CDMS - with many more entries to be created. Entries are generated from fitting (mostly) laboratory data to accepted Hamiltonian models. Despite many dedicated laboratory spectroscopic investigations in recent years, accurate data is still lacking frequently - in particular at higher frequencies, for minor isotopic species, for excited vibrational states, or for somewhat larger molecules. While high frequency data are of special concern for the Herschel satellite, scheduled to be launched in mid-April 2009, or for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the remaining issues mentioned above are important especially for telecope arrays such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The main features of the CDMS catalog will be described, including recent developments concerning new entries as well as available and planned features. In particular, we will discuss issues relevant for generating a consolidated database that also takes into account information from other databases. Attention will be given to laboratory spectroscopic needs for missions such as Herschel and SOFIA on one hand and for ALMA, the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), and other facilities on the other, both, in terms of general aspects and in terms of specific examples. Selected contributions from the Cologne spectroscopy laboratories to address these needs will be presented. H. S. P. Müller, S. Thorwirth, D. A. Roth, G. Winnewisser

  4. Herschel observations of the Marco Polo-R asteroid 175706 (1996 FG3).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, L.; Barucci, A.; Gònzalez-Garcìa, B.; Dotto, E.; Küppers, M.

    2012-09-01

    Background: The Marco Polo-R mission has been selected for the assessment study phase of the ESA M3 missions. This ESA-led sample return mission to the binary asteroid 1996 FG3 (launch window between 2020 and 2024) is proposed with a design that allows it to fit within the pre-defined cost cap of a M-class mission. The binary nature of the target will allow more precise measurements of mass, gravity, and density than for a single object, as well as additional insights into the geology and geophysics of the system. The asteroid has been classified by Binzel et al. [1] as a C-type. It is considered to be a typical example of a primitive object [2]. Dynamically, this is an Apollo asteroid with semimajor axis a of 1.054 AU, eccentricity e of 0.35, and and inclination i of 1.98 degrees. Measurements of the albedo derived from thermal infrared observations give a value of pV = 0.042 (+0.035 -0.017), and a combined diameter of D = 1.84 (+0.56 -0.47) km [3]. The Herschel observations : The MACH-11 (Measurements of 11 Asteroids & Comets) Programme observed this binary asteroid in two occasions in November of 2012. The observations performed had a duration of 0.6 hours with the asteroid pair moving rapidly at 6'/hr thus making removal of the background quite straightforward. The observations were performed in two observing blocks; the first block consisted of a 2 repetition blue/red map, the second block consisted of a 2 repetition green/red map, with the intention to observe the target at different phase angles. Our Results : Our measurements will serve to update the known radiometric properties for this binary asteroid through their inclusion into a thermophysical model (TPM) [4] which has been validated against a large database of asteroids including targets of other spacecraft mission e.g. Lutetia [5], Itokawa [6]. Using existing sets of published thermal observations (Spitzer, TNG NICS), combined with our Herschel observations, applied within this thermophysical model

  5. Disk radii and grain sizes in Herschel-resolved debris disks

    SciTech Connect

    Pawellek, Nicole; Krivov, Alexander V.; Marshall, Jonathan P.; Montesinos, Benjamin; Ábrahám, Péter; Moór, Attila; Bryden, Geoffrey; Eiroa, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The radii of debris disks and the sizes of their dust grains are important tracers of the planetesimal formation mechanisms and physical processes operating in these systems. Here we use a representative sample of 34 debris disks resolved in various Herschel Space Observatory (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) programs to constrain the disk radii and the size distribution of their dust. While we modeled disks with both warm and cold components, and identified warm inner disks around about two-thirds of the stars, we focus our analysis only on the cold outer disks, i.e., Kuiper-belt analogs. We derive the disk radii from the resolved images and find a large dispersion for host stars of any spectral class, but no significant trend with the stellar luminosity. This argues against ice lines as a dominant player in setting the debris disk sizes, since the ice line location varies with the luminosity of the central star. Fixing the disk radii to those inferred from the resolved images, we model the spectral energy distribution to determine the dust temperature and the grain size distribution for each target. While the dust temperature systematically increases toward earlier spectral types, the ratio of the dust temperature to the blackbody temperature at the disk radius decreases with the stellar luminosity. This is explained by a clear trend of typical sizes increasing toward more luminous stars. The typical grain sizes are compared to the radiation pressure blowout limit s {sub blow} that is proportional to the stellar luminosity-to-mass ratio and thus also increases toward earlier spectral classes. The grain sizes in the disks of G- to A-stars are inferred to be several times s {sub blow} at all stellar luminosities, in agreement with collisional models of debris disks. The sizes, measured in the units of s {sub blow}, appear to decrease

  6. Constraining the ISM Properties of the Cloverleaf Quasar Host Galaxy with Herschel Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzgil, Bade D.; Bradford, C. Matt; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve; Maloney, Philip R.; Aguirre, James E.

    2016-12-01

    We present Herschel observations of the far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure (FS) lines [C ii]158 μm, [O i]63 μm, [O iii]52 μm, and [Si ii]35 μm in the z = 2.56 Cloverleaf quasar, and combine them with published data in an analysis of the dense interstellar medium (ISM) in this system. Observed [C ii]158 μm, [O i]63 μm, and FIR continuum flux ratios are reproduced with photodissociation region (PDR) models characterized by moderate far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation fields with {G}0 = 0.3-1 × 103 and atomic gas densities {n}{{H}} = 3-5 × 103 cm-3, depending on contributions to [C ii]158 μm from ionized gas. We assess the contribution to the [C ii]158 μm flux from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) narrow line region (NLR) using ground-based measurements of the [N ii]122 μm transition, finding that the NLR can contribute at most 20%-30% of the observed [C ii]158 μm flux. The PDR density and far-UV radiation fields inferred from the atomic lines are not consistent with the CO emission, indicating that the molecular gas excitation is not solely provided via UV heating from local star formation (SF), but requires an additional heating source. X-ray heating from the AGN is explored, and we find that X-ray-dominated region (XDR) models, in combination with PDR models, can match the CO cooling without overproducing the observed FS line emission. While this XDR/PDR solution is favored given the evidence for both X-rays and SF in the Cloverleaf, we also investigate alternatives for the warm molecular gas, finding that either mechanical heating via low-velocity shocks or an enhanced cosmic-ray ionization rate may also contribute. Finally, we include upper limits on two other measurements attempted in the Herschel program: [C ii]158 μm in FSC 10214 and [O i]63 μm in APM 08279+5255.

  7. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XIII. Dust in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Serego Alighieri, S.; Bianchi, S.; Pappalardo, C.; Zibetti, S.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G.; Corbelli, E.; Davies, J. I.; Davis, T.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Magrini, L.; Pierini, D.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2013-04-01

    Aims: We study the dust content of a large optical input sample of 910 early-type galaxies (ETG) in the Virgo cluster, also extending to the dwarf ETG, and examine the results in relation to those on the other cold ISM components. Methods: We have searched for far-infrared emission in all galaxies in the input sample using the 250 μm image of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). This image covers a large fraction of the cluster with an area of ~55 square degrees. For the detected ETG we measured fluxes in five bands from 100 to 500 μm, and estimated the dust mass and temperature with modified black-body fits. Results: Dust is detected above the completeness limit of 25.4 mJy at 250 μm in 46 ETG, 43 of which are in the optically complete part of the input sample. In addition, dust is present at fainter levels in another six ETG. We detect dust in the four ETG with synchrotron emission, including M 87. Dust appears to be much more concentrated than stars and more luminous ETG have higher dust temperatures. Considering only the optically complete input sample and correcting for the contamination by background galaxies, dust detection rates down to the 25.4 mJy limit are 17% for ellipticals, about 40% for lenticulars (S0 + S0a), and around 3% for dwarf ETG. Dust mass does not correlate clearly with stellar mass and is often much greater than expected for a passive galaxy in a closed-box model. The dust-to-stars mass ratio anticorrelates with galaxy luminosity, and for some dwarf ETG reaches values as high as for dusty late-type galaxies. In the Virgo cluster slow rotators appear more likely to contain dust than fast ones. Comparing the dust results with those on Hi there are only eight ETG detected both in dust and in Hi in the HeViCS area; 39 have dust but only an upper limit on Hi, and eight have Hi but only an upper limit on dust. The locations of these galaxies in the cluster are different, with the dusty ETG concentrated in the densest regions, while the

  8. Dust temperature maps of the Galactic plane: The Herschel spectral energy distribution fitting with Cloudy predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiali; Huang, Maohai

    2014-04-01

    Context. Dust grains absorb the interstellar far ultra-violet and visible photons and re-emit them in far-infrared (FIR) wavebands. The dust FIR continuum can be predicted by a grid of models using various values of the interstellar radiation field. Aims: We analyze the dust continuum emission in two Hi-GAL science-demonstration phase (SDP) fields using both the radiative transfer code, Cloudy, and the DustEM dust model, to explore the effect of radiative transfer on dust temperature. The 500 μm sub-millimeter excess emission and the very small grain (VSG) contribution to the 70 μm intensity are investigated by spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting using the Cloudy model. Methods: By comparing the observation with the model prediction, we derive dust temperature maps of the two SDP fields by fitting the dust SED with 4-band data (SPIRE bands plus PACS 160 μm) using both Cloudy and DustEM models. Considering radiative transfer and grain physics simultaneously, we investigate the existence of a 500 μm excess and estimate the VSG contribution to the 70 μm intensity by fitting the dust SED with 3-band data (160, 250, and 350 μm) and 5-band data (SPIRE and PACS bands), respectively. Results: We confirm that the field with star formation activities have a higher temperature (18.7 ± 0.9 K) than the quiescent region (15.2 ± 0.6 K). We find that the radiative transfer affects the FIR SED of the SDP fields and results in a higher temperature distribution than the dust-only model fit. There is no significant detection of a 500 μm excess in the two SDP fields. The relative contribution from the VSGs to the 70 μm intensity can be up to 50%. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Reduced Herschel maps (FITS) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  9. Tracing the sites of obscured star formation in the Antennae galaxies with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaas, U.; Nielbock, M.; Haas, M.; Krause, O.; Schreiber, J.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: FIR imaging of interacting galaxies allows locating even hidden sites of star formation and measuring of the relative strength of nuclear and extra-nuclear star formation. We want to resolve the star-forming sites in the nearby system of the Antennae. Methods: Thanks to the unprecedented sharpness and depth of the PACS camera onboard ESA's Herschel Space Observatory, it is possible for the first time to achieve a complete assessment of individual star-forming knots in the FIR with scan maps at 70, 100, and 160 μm. We used clump extraction photometry and SED diagnostics to derive the properties related to star-forming activity. Results: The PACS 70, 100, and 160 μm maps trace the knotty structure of the most recent star formation along an arc between the two nuclei in the overlap area. The resolution of the starburst knots and additional multi-wavelength data allow their individual star formation history and state to be analysed. In particular, the brightest knot in the mid-infrared (K1), east of the southern nucleus, exhibits the highest activity by far in terms of dust heating and star formation rate, efficiency, and density. With only 2 kpc in diameter, this area has a 10-1000 μm luminosity, which is as high as that of our Milky Way. It shows the highest deficiency in radio emission in the radio-to-FIR luminosity ratio and a lack of X-ray emission, classifying it as a very young complex. The brightest 100 and 160 μm emission region (K2), which is close to the collision front and consists of 3 knots, also shows a high star formation density and efficiency and lack of X-ray emission in its most obscured part, but an excess in the radio-to-FIR luminosity ratio. This suggests a young stage, too, but different conditions in its interstellar medium. Our results provide important checkpoints for numerical simulations of interacting galaxies when modelling the star formation and stellar feedback. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments

  10. Herschel observations of the debris cloud of C/2010 X1 (Elenin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, Mark Richard; Altieri, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    We report Herschel observations of defunct Comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin), aimed at detecting its infrared ghost: the debris cloud and any remaining inert cometessimals that may have been released in the break-up of the nucleus, taking advantage of the comet’s very close pass to Earth in mid-October 2011. These observations would have allowed us to detect both individual surviving fragments of the nucleus of »100m diameter and the expanding dust cloud, being particularly sensitive to coarse dust and boulders in the millimetre to metre size range. No discrete bodies were detected by Herschel to this limiting size, although there is a possible, very low signal-to-noise, detection of the debris cloud.Although most comets exhibit a (relatively) predictable behaviour, a minority of objects deviate considerably from the norm, either by showing sudden outbursts in brightness or, more rarely, by fading unexpectedly. The archetypal event in this latter category was the intensely observed sudden disruption of Comet C/1999 S4 (LINEAR) in July 2000 as it passed perihelion: it was found to have disintegrated into a cloud of cometessimals plus an expanding dust cloud, which faded rapidly, becoming undetectable within 20 days of disruption. Observations of Comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin) in August 2011 showed a similar pattern of evolution of coma morphology into an expanding, amorphous cloud of rapidly decreasing surface brightness (Mattiazzo & McNaught, 2011, CBET 2801) shortly before perihelion passage. However, the comet’s difficult viewing geometry at the time of disruption made it impossible to study the event using high-resolution imaging techniques and, in particular, to measure the ratio of dust to cometessimals which gives information on the internal structure of the nucleus before disruption. Our observations allow us to put a strong upper limit on the maximum size of the building blocks of the nucleus and to contrast this with the predictions of the rubble pile model

  11. The initial conditions for stellar protocluster formation. III. The Herschel counterparts of the Spitzer Dark Cloud catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretto, N.; Lenfestey, C.; Fuller, G. A.; Traficante, A.; Molinari, S.; Thompson, M. A.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galactic plane surveys of pristine molecular clouds are key for establishing a Galactic-scale view of star formation. For this reason, an unbiased sample of infrared dark clouds in the 10° < | l | < 65°, | b | < 1° region of the Galactic plane was built using Spitzer 8 μm extinction. However, intrinsic fluctuations in the mid-infrared background can be misinterpreted as foreground clouds. Aims: The main goal of this study is to disentangle real clouds in the Spitzer Dark Cloud (SDC) catalogue from artefacts due to fluctuations in the mid-infrared background. Methods: We constructed H2 column density maps at ~18″ resolution using the 160 μm and 250 μm data from the Herschel Galactic plane survey Hi-GAL. We also developed an automated detection scheme that confirms the existence of a SDC through its association with a peak on these Herschel column density maps. Detection simulations, along with visual inspection of a small sub-sample of SDCs, have been performed to get more insight into the limitations of our automated identification scheme. Results: Our analysis shows that 76( ± 19)% of the catalogued SDCs are real. This fraction drops to 55( ± 12)% for clouds with angular diameters larger than ~1 arcmin. The contamination of the PF09 catalogue by large spurious sources reflects the large uncertainties associated to the construction of the 8 μm background emission, a key stage in identiying SDCs. A comparison of the Herschel confirmed SDC sample with the BGPS and ATLASGAL samples shows that SDCs probe a unique range of cloud properties, reaching down to more compact and lower column density clouds than any of these two (sub-)millimetre Galactic plane surveys. Conclusions: Even though about half of the large SDCs are spurious sources, the vast majority of the catalogued SDCs do have a Herschel counterpart. The Herschel-confirmed sample of SDCs offers a unique opportunity to study the earliest stages of both low- and high-mass star formation across

  12. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovini, L.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen To quote Mr Jean Terrien: "Physics must be one step ahead of metrology". A long-serving Director of the BIPM, he said these words when visiting the IMGC in 1970 as a member of the scientific board of our Institute. At that time it was still an open question whether the IMGC should start research work on the absolute measurement of silicon lattice spacing. Mr Terrien underlined the revolutionary character of x-ray interferometry and, eventually, he caused the balance needle to lean towards the ... right direction. Mr Terrien correctly foresaw that, like Michelson's interferometer of 1880, x-ray interferometry could have a prominent place in today's science and technology. And while, in the first case, after more than a century we can see instruments based on electromagnetic wave interaction within every one's reach in laboratories and, sometimes, in workshops, in the second case, twenty-five years since the first development of an x-ray interferometer we can witness its role in nanometrology. Today and tomorrow we meet to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal place in the value of the Avogadro constant. We are aware that the quest for this achievement requires the cooperation of scientists with complementary capabilities. I am sure that the present workshop is a very good opportunity to present and discuss results and to improve and extend existing cooperation. The new adjustment of fundamental constants envisaged by the CODATA Task Group is redoubling scientists' efforts to produce competitive values of NA. The results of the measurements of the silicon lattice spacing in terms of an optical wavelength, which were available for the 1986 adjustment, combined with the determination of silicon molar volume, demonstrate how such an NA determination produces a consistent set of other constants and opens the way to a possible redefinition of the kilogram. We shall see in these two days how far we have progressed along this road. For us at the

  13. The environment and characteristics of low-redshift galaxies detected by the Herschel-ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariush, A.; Cortese, L.; Eales, S.; Pascale, E.; Smith, M. W. L.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Scott, D.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dezotti, G.; Driver, S.; Fritz, J.; Gomez, H. L.; Hopkins, A.; Hopwood, R.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Madore, B. F.; Michałowski, M. J.; Norberg, P.; Phillipps, S.; Pohlen, M.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Rigby, E.; Robotham, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Seibert, M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the ultraviolet and optical properties and environment of low-redshift galaxies detected in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) science demonstration data. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey seventh release and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly data base to select galaxies with ? mag in the redshift range 0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.2 and look for their submillimetre counterparts in H-ATLAS. Our results show that at low redshift, H-ATLAS detects mainly blue/star-forming galaxies with a minor contribution from red systems which are highly obscured by dust. In addition we find that the colour of a galaxy rather than the local density of its environment determines whether it is detectable by H-ATLAS. The average dust temperature of galaxies that are simultaneously detected by both PACS and SPIRE is 25 ± 4 K, independent of environment. This analysis provides a glimpse of the potential of the H-ATLAS data to investigate the submillimetre properties of galaxies in the local universe.

  14. Herschel *-ATLAS: deep HST/WFC3 imaging of strongly lensed submillimetre galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrello, M.; Hopwood, R.; Dye, S.; Cunha, E. da; Serjeant, S.; Fritz, J.; Rowlands, K.; Fleuren, S.; Bussmann, R. S.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Lapi, A.; Omont, A.; Amber, S.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Danese, L.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Kim, S.; Leeuw, L.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Massardi, M.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Smith, D. J. B.; Sutherland, W.; Temi, P.; Wardlow, J.

    2014-05-01

    We report on deep near-infrared observations obtained with the Wide Field Camera-3 (WFC3) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the first five confirmed gravitational lensing events discovered by the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). We succeed in disentangling the background galaxy from the lens to gain separate photometry of the two components. The HST data allow us to significantly improve on previous constraints of the mass in stars of the lensed galaxy and to perform accurate lens modelling of these systems, as described in the accompanying paper by Dye et al. We fit the spectral energy distributions of the background sources from near-IR to millimetre wavelengths and use the magnification factors estimated by Dye et al. to derive the intrinsic properties of the lensed galaxies. We find these galaxies to have star-formations rates (SFR) ˜ 400-2000 M⊙ yr-1, with ˜(6-25) × 1010 M⊙ of their baryonic mass already turned into stars. At these rates of star formation, all remaining molecular gas will be exhausted in less than ˜100 Myr, reaching a final mass in stars of a few 1011 M⊙. These galaxies are thus proto-ellipticals caught during their major episode of star formation, and observed at the peak epoch (z ˜ 1.5-3) of the cosmic star formation history of the Universe.

  15. Preparation for the solar system observations with Herschel: Simulation of Jupiter observations with PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, Hideo; Hartogh, Paul; Rengel, Miriam; de Lange, Arno; Cavalié, Thibault

    2010-11-01

    Observations of the water inventory as well as other chemically important species on Jupiter will be performed in the frame of the guaranteed time key project of the Herschel Space Observatory entitled "Water and related chemistry in the Solar system". Among other onboard instruments, PACS (Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer) will provide new data of the spectral atlas in a wide region covering the far-infrared and submillimetre domains, with an improved spectral resolution and a higher sensitivity compared to previous observations carried out by Cassini/CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) and by ISO (Infrared Space Observatory). In order to optimise the observational plan and to prepare for the data analysis, we have simulated the expected spectra of PACS Jupiter observations. Our simulation shows that PACS will promisingly detect several H 2O emission lines. As PACS is capable of spatially resolving the Jovian disk, we will be able to discern the external oxygen sources in the giant planets by exploring the horizontal distribution of water. In addition to H 2O lines, some absorption lines due to tropospheric CH 4, HD, PH 3 and NH 3 lines will be observed with PACS. Furthermore, owing to the high sensitivity of the instrument, the current upper limit on the abundance of hydrogen halides such as HCl will be also improved.

  16. Hi-fidelity multi-scale local processing for visually optimized far-infrared Herschel images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li Causi, G.; Schisano, E.; Liu, S. J.; Molinari, S.; Di Giorgio, A.

    2016-07-01

    In the context of the "Hi-Gal" multi-band full-plane mapping program for the Galactic Plane, as imaged by the Herschel far-infrared satellite, we have developed a semi-automatic tool which produces high definition, high quality color maps optimized for visual perception of extended features, like bubbles and filaments, against the high background variations. We project the map tiles of three selected bands onto a 3-channel panorama, which spans the central 130 degrees of galactic longitude times 2.8 degrees of galactic latitude, at the pixel scale of 3.2", in cartesian galactic coordinates. Then we process this image piecewise, applying a custom multi-scale local stretching algorithm, enforced by a local multi-scale color balance. Finally, we apply an edge-preserving contrast enhancement to perform an artifact-free details sharpening. Thanks to this tool, we have thus produced a stunning giga-pixel color image of the far-infrared Galactic Plane that we made publicly available with the recent release of the Hi-Gal mosaics and compact source catalog.

  17. EXTREME CONDITIONS IN A CLOSE ANALOG TO THE YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM: HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF ε ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, J. S.; Sibthorpe, B.; Holland, W. S.; Acke, B.; Vandenbussche, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Pantin, E. E.; Dominik, C.; Barlow, M. J.; Bendo, G. J.; Dent, W. R. F.; Di Francesco, J.; Fridlund, M.; Gear, W. K.; Harvey, P. M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ivison, R. J.; and others

    2014-08-10

    Far-infrared Herschel images of the ε Eridani system, seen at a fifth of the Sun's present age, resolve two belts of debris emission. Fits to the 160 μm PACS image yield radial spans for these belts of 12-16 and 54-68 AU. The south end of the outer belt is ≈10% brighter than the north end in the PACS+SPIRE images at 160, 250, and 350 μm, indicating a pericenter glow attributable to a planet ''c''. From this asymmetry and an upper bound on the offset of the belt center, this second planet should be mildly eccentric (e{sub c} ≈ 0.03-0.3). Compared to the asteroid and Kuiper Belts of the young Sun, the ε Eri belts are intermediate in brightness and more similar to each other, with up to 20 km sized collisional fragments in the inner belt totaling ≈5% of an Earth mass. This reservoir may feed the hot dust close to the star and could send many impactors through the Habitable Zone, especially if it is being perturbed by the suspected planet ε Eri b, at semi-major axis ≈3 AU.

  18. Nonlinear wave evolution in pressure-driven stratified flow of Newtonian and Herschel-Bulkley fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Prashant; Sahu, Kirti; Ding, Hang; Spelt, Peter; Matar, Omar; Lawrence, Chris

    2007-11-01

    Pressure-driven stratified channel flow of a Newtonian fluid flowing over a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) fluid is considered. The effects of yield stress and shear-thinning rheology on the nonlinear wave evolution are studied using numerical simulations; the HB rheology is regularized at low shear rates using a bi-viscosity formulation. Two different numerical methods were used to carry out the computations: a level-set method (based on that by Spelt, J. Comput. Phys. 2005) and a diffuse-interface method (based on that by Ding et al., J. Comput. Phys., in press). The simulations, which account for fluid inertia, surface tension and gravity are validated against linear theory predictions at early times. The results at later times show the spatio-temporal evolution into the nonlinear regime wherein waves are strongly deformed, leading to the onset of drop entrainment. It is shown that the apparent viscosity in the region of the HB fluid directly involved in the onset of entrainment is almost constant; unyielded regions are confined to wave troughs at late stages of the nonlinear evolution.

  19. THE EXTRAORDINARY FAR-INFRARED VARIATION OF A PROTOSTAR: HERSCHEL/PACS OBSERVATIONS OF LRLL54361

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, Zoltan; Detre, Örs H.; Bouwmann, Jeroen; Nielbock, Markus; Klaas, Ulrich; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Muzerolle, James; Flaherty, Kevin; Furlan, Elise; Gutermuth, Rob; Juhasz, Attila; Bally, John; Marton, Gabor

    2014-07-10

    We report Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) photometric observations at 70 μm and 160 μm of LRLL54361—a suspected binary protostar that exhibits periodic (P = 25.34 days) flux variations at shorter wavelengths (3.6 μm and 4.5 μm) thought to be due to pulsed accretion caused by binary motion. The PACS observations show unprecedented flux variation at these far-infrared wavelengths that are well correlated with the variations at shorter wavelengths. At 70 μm the object increases its flux by a factor of six while at 160 μm the change is about a factor of two, consistent with the wavelength dependence seen in the far-infrared spectra. The source is marginally resolved at 70 μm with varying FWHM. Deconvolved images of the sources show elongations exactly matching the outflow cavities traced by the scattered light observations. The spatial variations are anti-correlated with the flux variation, indicating that a light echo is responsible for the changes in FWHM. The observed far-infrared flux variability indicates that the disk and envelope of this source is periodically heated by the accretion pulses of the central source, and suggests that such long wavelength variability in general may provide a reasonable proxy for accretion variations in protostars.

  20. HERSCHEL/HIFI OBSERVATIONS OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE TOWARD SAGITTARIUS B2(M)

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Emprechtinger, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Bell, T. A.; Neufeld, D. A.; Sonnentrucker, P.

    2011-06-10

    Herschel/HIFI observations have revealed the presence of widespread absorption by hydrogen fluoride (HF) J = 1-0 rotational transition, toward a number of Galactic sources. We present observations of HF J = 1-0 toward the high-mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2(M). The spectrum obtained shows a complex pattern of absorption, with numerous features covering a wide range of local standard of rest velocities (-130 to 100 km {sup -1}). An analysis of this absorption yields HF abundances relative to H{sub 2} of {approx}1.3 x 10{sup -8}, in most velocity intervals. This result is in good agreement with estimates from chemical models, which predict that HF should be the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine under a wide variety of interstellar conditions. Interestingly, we also find velocity intervals in which the HF spectrum shows strong absorption features that are not present, or are very weak, in spectra of other molecules, such as {sup 13}CO (1-0) and CS (2-1). HF absorption reveals components of diffuse clouds with small extinction that can be studied for the first time. Another interesting observation is that water is significantly more abundant than hydrogen fluoride over a wide range of velocities toward Sagittarius B2(M), in contrast to the remarkably constant H{sub 2}O/HF abundance ratio with average value close to unity measured toward other Galactic sources.

  1. AN EXTERNAL ORIGIN FOR CARBON MONOXIDE ON URANUS FROM HERSCHEL/SPIRE?

    SciTech Connect

    Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J. E-mail: irwin@atm.ox.ac.uk

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an external source of CO on Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. However, it has not been possible to demonstrate this on Uranus because of its low CO abundance, low upper-tropospheric temperatures, and low stratospheric thermal gradient, which make detection very challenging. Here we use 17 Herschel/SPIRE observation sequences spanning 3 yr (2009-2012), which cover 14.6-51.8 cm{sup –1} with a combined integration time of 5 hr. These spectra were originally taken for routine calibration purposes, so were corrected for continuum offsets prior to analysis. The final stacked spectra had an extremely low noise level of 10-50 pW cm{sup –2} sr{sup –1}/cm{sup –1}. Despite this, CO was not observed, but we were able to obtain stringent 3σ upper limits at the 0.1-0.2 bar level of 2.1 ppb for a uniform profile, and 9.4 ppb for a stratosphere-only profile—an order of magnitude improvement over previous studies. Comparison with observed CO fluorescence by Encrenaz et al. suggests the majority of Uranus' stratospheric CO has an external origin. It thus appears that external supply of oxygen species—via comets, micrometeorites, or dust—is an important process on all giant planets in our solar system.

  2. Herschel-ATLAS: A Binary HyLIRG Pinpointing a Cluster of Starbursting Protoellipticals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivison, R.J.; Swinbank, A.M.; Smail, Ian; Harris, A. I.; Bussmann, R. S.; Cooray, A.; Cox, P.; Fu, H.; Kovacs, A.; Krips, M.; Narayanan, D.; Negrello, M.; Neri, R.; Penarrubia, J.; Richard, J.; Riechers, D. A.; Rowlands, K.; Staguhn, J. G.; Targett, T. A.; Amber, S.; Baker, A. J.; Bourne, N.; Bertoldi, F.; Bremer, M.; Calanog, J. A.; Clements, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    Panchromatic observations of the best candidate hyperluminous infrared galaxies from the widest Herschel extragalactic imaging survey have led to the discovery of at least four intrinsically luminous z = 2.41 galaxies across an ˜100 kpc region-a cluster of starbursting protoellipticals. Via subarcsecond interferometric imaging we have measured accurate gas and star formation surface densities. The two brightest galaxies span 3 kpc FWHM in submillimeter/radio continuum and CO J = 4-3, and double that in CO J = 1-0. The broad CO line is due partly to the multitude of constituent galaxies and partly to large rotational velocities in two counter-rotating gas disks-a scenario predicted to lead to the most intense starbursts, which will therefore come in pairs. The disks have Mdyn of several ×10(sup 11) solar Mass, and gas fractions of 40%. Velocity dispersions are modest so the disks are unstable, potentially on scales commensurate with their radii: these galaxies are undergoing extreme bursts of star formation, not confined to their nuclei, at close to the Eddington limit. Their specific star formation rates place them greater than or approx. equal to 5 × above the main sequence, which supposedly comprises large gas disks like these. Their high star formation efficiencies are difficult to reconcile with a simple volumetric star formation law. N-body and dark matter simulations suggest that this system is the progenitor of a B(inary)-type ˜10(sup 14.6) -solar mass cluster.

  3. Creeping flow of Herschel-Bulkley fluids in collapsible channels: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Ali; Eghtesad, Amir Saman; Sadeghy, Kayvan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the steady flow of a viscoplastic fluid is modeled in a planar channel equipped with a deformable segment in the middle of an otherwise rigid plate. The fluid is assumed to obey the Herschel-Bulkley model which accounts for both the yield stress and the shear-thinning behavior of physiological fluids such as blood. To accommodate the large deformations of the flexible segment, it is assumed to obey the twoparameter Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model. The so-called fluid-structure interaction problem is then solved numerically, under creeping-flow conditions, using the finite element package, COMSOL. It is found that the yield stress leads to a larger wall deformation and a higher pressure drop as compared with Newtonian fluids. This behavior is predicted to intensify if the fluid is shear-thinning. That is, for a given yield stress, the pressure drop and the wall deformation both increase with an increase in the degree of the fluid's shear-thinning behavior.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Herschel-VVDS-CFHTLS-D1 detections (Lemaux+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaux, B. C.; Le Floc'h, E.; Le Fevre, O.; Ilbert, O.; Tresse, L.; Lubin, L. M.; Zamorani, G.; Gal, R. R.; Ciliegi, P.; Cassata, P.; Kocevski, D. D.; McGrath, E. J.; Bardelli, S.; Zucca, E.; Squires, G. K.

    2014-10-01

    Parameters for all 11012 objects detected in the Herschel/SPIRE imaging regardless of significance. The parameters given in this file are SPIRE identification number, SPIRE, optical, X-ray, and radio equatorial coordinates, optical/NIR/MIR observed magnitudes, SPIRE flux densities and associated errors, k-corrected X-ray luminosities, k-corrected radio power densities, radio spectral slope, photometric and spectroscopic redshift (when available), SFRs, stellar masses, luminosity-weighted stellar ages, stellar continuum dust extinction, absolute magnitudes, and a variety of different flags used to keep track of various populations or selections. Magnitudes in the u*g'r'i'z'JHKs bands are MAGAUTO. Spitzer magnitudes are corrected aperture magnitudes. All magnitudes are in AB and corrected for Galactic extinction. Errors on magnitudes available on request. SFRs come from the SED fitting process, not from the TIR luminosity. Both SFRs and stellar masses are estimated assuming a Chabrier (2003PASP..115..763C) initial mass function. In all cases where a source had a reliable spectroscopic redshift (flags = 2,3,4 or some iteration thereof from VVDS or flags = -1,3,4 from ORELSE) or a reliable photometric redshift (i'<25.5), the best available redshift was used to fix the redshift for the TIR portion of the spectral energy distribution fitting (reliable spectroscopic redshifts were preferred when available). All logarithms are base 10. (1 data file).

  5. The properties of diffuse interstellar dust clouds as determined from GALEX and infrared (IRAS, Herschel) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armengot, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    Dust grain properties are known to vary in the interstellar medium depending on the density, the ultraviolet radiation field and the local abundances of metal elements. Though there are plenty of studies addressing the atomic and molecular gas component or the infrared radiation of dust grains, there are very few studies that address the spatial distribution of small large grains and large molecules such as the Polyaromathic Hydrocarbons (PAHs).In this work, we make use of the GALEX survey of the Galaxy to identify the absorption produced in the GALEX far UV (write in the spectral range) and new UV (write in the spectral range) by well know infrared cirrus and compare the absorption produced in the UV by the thin cirrus with the infrared dust emissivity in various bands; (describe the IRAS bands used and whether there is any Herschel band in this study). As the spatial resolution of GALEX images is significantly larger than that of IRAS images data handling has required mosaicking and and rescaling GALEX data as well as transforming the images form equinox 1950 to equinox 2000. We describe in this work the computational procedures used to generate the ultraviolet and infrared maps. Also we present our first results that show there is an anticorrelation between UV and infrared (IR) emission, as other wise expected. The largest concentrations of dust grains radiate IR photons and absorb UV photons.

  6. THz Instrumentation for the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. C.; Mehdi, I.; Ward, J. S.; Maiwald, F.; Ferber, R. R.; Leduc, H. G.; Schlecht, E. T.; Gill, J. J.; Hatch, W. A.; Kawamura, J. H.; Stern, J. A.; Gaier, T. C.; Samoska, L. A.; Weinreb, S.; Bumble, B.; Pukala, D. M.; Javadi, H. H.; Finamore, B. P.; Lin, R. H.; Dengler, R. J.; Velebir, J. R.; Luong, E. M.; Tsang, R.; Peralta, A .; Wells, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared (HIFI) on ESA's Herschel Space Observatory utilizes a variety of novel RF components in its five SIS receiver channels covering 480-1250 GHz and two HEB receiver channels covering 1410-1910 GHz. The local oscillator unit will be passively cooled while the focal plane unit is cooled by superfluid helium and cold helium vapors. HIFI employs W-band GaAs amplifiers, InP HEMT low noise IF amplifiers, fixed tuned broadband planar diode multipliers, high power W-bapd Isolators, and novel material systems in the SIS mixers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the development of the highest frequency (1119-1250 GHz) SIS mixers, the local oscillators oscillators for the three highest frequency receivers as well as W-band power amplifiers, high power W-band isolators, varactor diode devices for all high frequency multipliers and InP HEMT components for all the receiver channels intermediate frequency amplifiers. The NASA developed components represent a significant advancement in the available performance. This paper presents an update of the performance and the current state of development.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LMC & SMC evolved stars detected with Herschel (Jones+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. C.; Meixner, M.; Sargent, B. A.; Boyer, M. L.; Sewilo, M.; Hony, S.; Roman-Duval, J.

    2016-01-01

    Far-IR and sub-mm observations of the MC were taken as part of the HERITAGE Key Project (Meixner et al. 2013, J/AJ/146/62) using the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) on the Herschel Space Observatory. The optical UBVI and near-IR JHKs photometry comes from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS; Zaritsky et al. 1997AJ....114.1002Z); the Infrared Survey Facility (IRSF) MC Point Source Survey (Kato et al. 2007, II/288), the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS; Skrutskie et al. 2006, VII/233), and the 2MASS 6X Deep Point Source Catalog (6X2MASS; Cutri & 2MASS Team 2004, II/281). We also obtained supplementary mid-IR data from the AKARI LMC point source catalog (Kato et al. 2007, II/288; Ita et al. 2008PASJ...60S.435I) and the WISE all-sky catalog (Wright et al. 2010, II/311). (1 data file).

  8. First extragalactic detection of submillimeter CH rotational lines from the Herschel space observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Wilson, Christine D.; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira Santaella, Miguel

    2014-06-20

    We present the first extragalactic detections of several CH rotational transitions in the far-infrared in four nearby galaxies, NGC 1068, Arp 220, M82, and NGC 253, using the Herschel Space Observatory. The CH lines in all four galaxies are a factor of 2-4 brighter than the adjacent HCN and HCO{sup +} J = 6-5 lines (also detected in the same spectra). In the star-formation-dominated galaxies, M82, NGC 253, and Arp 220, the CH/CO abundance ratio is low (∼10{sup –5}), implying that the CH is primarily arising in diffuse and translucent gas where the chemistry is driven by UV radiation as found in the Milky Way interstellar matter. In NGC 1068, which has a luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN), the CH/CO ratio is an order of magnitude higher, suggesting that CH formation is driven by an X-ray-dominated region (XDR). Our XDR models show that both the CH and CO abundances in NGC 1068 can be explained by an XDR-driven chemistry for gas densities and molecular hydrogen column densities that are well constrained by the CO observations. We conclude that the CH/CO ratio may a good indicator of the presence of AGN in galaxies. We also discuss the feasibility of detecting CH in intermediate- to high-z galaxies with ALMA.

  9. The Bright and Dark Sides of High-redshift Starburst Galaxies from Herschel and Subaru Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, A.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Silverman, J. D.; Kashino, D.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Mancini, C.; Mainieri, V.; Man, A.; Franceschini, A.; Valentino, F.; Calabrò, A.; Jin, S.; Darvish, B.; Maier, C.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Sanders, D. B.

    2017-04-01

    We present rest-frame optical spectra from the FMOS-COSMOS survey of 12 z ∼ 1.6 Herschel starburst galaxies, with star formation rate (SFR) elevated by ×8, on average, above the star-forming main sequence (MS). Comparing the Hα to IR luminosity ratio and the Balmer decrement, we find that the optically thin regions of the sources contain on average only ∼10% of the total SFR, whereas ∼90% come from an extremely obscured component that is revealed only by far-IR observations and is optically thick even in Hα. We measure the [N ii]6583/Hα ratio, suggesting that the less obscured regions have a metal content similar to that of the MS population at the same stellar masses and redshifts. However, our objects appear to be metal-rich outliers from the metallicity–SFR anticorrelation observed at fixed stellar mass for the MS population. The [S ii]6732/[S ii]6717 ratio from the average spectrum indicates an electron density n e ∼ 1100 cm‑3 , larger than what was estimated for MS galaxies but only at the 1.5σ level. Our results provide supporting evidence that high-z MS outliers are analogous of local ULIRGs and are consistent with a major-merger origin for the starburst event.

  10. Molecular Cooling as a Probe of Star Formation: Spitzer Looking Forward to Herschel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, Edwin A.; Maret, Sebastien; Yuan, Yuan; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Green, Joel D.; Watson, Dan M.; Harwit, Martin O.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Werner, Michael W.; Willacy, Karen

    2009-01-01

    We explore here the question of how cloud physics can be more directly probed when one observes the majority of cooling emissions from molecular gas. For this purpose we use results from a recent Spitzer Space Telescope study of the young cluster of embedded objects in NGC1333. For this study we mapped the emission from eight pure H2 rotational lines, from S(0) to S(7). The H2 emission appears to be associated with the warm gas shocked by the multiple outflows present in the region. The H2 lines are found to contribute to 25 - 50% of the total outflow luminosity, and can be used to more directly ascertain the importance of star formation feedback on the natal cloud. From these lines, we determine the outflow mass loss rate and, indirectly, the stellar infall rate, the outflow momentum and the kinetic energy injected into the cloud over the embedded phase. The latter is found to exceed the binding energy of individual cores, suggesting that outflows could be the main mechanism for cores disruption. Given the recent launch of Herschel and the upcoming operational lifetime of SOFIA we discuss how studies of molecular cooling can take a step beyond understanding thermal balance to exploring the origin, receipt, and transfer of energy in atomic and molecular gas in a wide range of physical situations.

  11. Herschel SPIRE observations of the TWA brown dwarf disc 2MASSW J1207334-393254

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, B.; Lodato, G.; Stamatellos, D.; Gizis, J. E.

    2012-05-01

    We present Herschel/SPIRE observations for the 2MASS 1207334-393254 (2M1207) system. Based on radiative transfer modelling of near-infrared to submillimetre data, we estimate a disc mass of 3 ± 2 MJup and an outer disc radius of 50-100 au for the 2M1207A disc. The relative disc mass for 2M1207A is similar to the T Tauri star TW Hya, which indicates that massive discs are not underabundant around substellar objects. In probing the various formation mechanisms for this system, we find that core accretion is highly uncertain mainly due to the large separation between the primary and the companion. Disc fragmentation could be a likely scenario based on analytical models, and if the disc initially was more massive than its current estimate. Considering that the TW Hydrae Association (TWA) is sparsely populated, this system could have formed via one of the known binary formation mechanisms (e.g. turbulent fragmentation of a core) and survived disruption at an early stage.

  12. A HERSCHEL SEARCH FOR COLD DUST IN BROWN DWARF DISKS: FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Paul M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Henning, Thomas; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Cieza, Lucas A.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Merin, Bruno E-mail: nje@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: menard@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr E-mail: wolf@astrophysik.uni-kiel.de E-mail: lcieza@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: Bruno.Merin@sciops.esa.int

    2012-01-15

    We report initial results from a Herschel program to search for far-infrared emission from cold dust around a statistically significant sample of young brown dwarfs. The first three objects in our survey are all detected at 70 {mu}m, and we report the first detection of a brown dwarf at 160 {mu}m. The flux densities are consistent with the presence of substantial amounts of cold dust in the outer disks around these objects. We modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with two different radiative transfer codes. We find that a broad range of model parameters provide a reasonable fit to the SEDs, but that the addition of our 70 {mu}m, and especially the 160 {mu}m, detection enables strong lower limits to be placed on the disk masses since most of the mass is in the outer disk. We find likely disk masses in the range of a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun }. Our models provide a good fit to the SEDs and do not require dust settling.

  13. Herschel Observations of C+ in the Vicinity of Star Forming Complexes in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Jorge; Velusamy, T.; Langer, W.; Goldsmith, P.; Li, D.; Yorke, H.

    2010-05-01

    The CII fine-structure line at 158 um, is an excellent tracer of the warm diffuse gas and the hot, dense Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs). We can, therefore, use the CII emission as a probe to understand the effects of star formation on their interstellar environment. Here we present the first results from the Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOT C+), a Herschel Key Project study of CII fine structure emission in the vicinity of star forming complexes. In the Priority Science Phase of HIFI observations, the GOT C+ project collects data along a dozen lines of sight passing near star forming regions in the inner Galaxy from longitude 310 degrees to 25 degrees. We discuss our first results on the transition between dense and hot gas (traced by CII) and dense and cold gas (traced by 12CO and 13CO). This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. JLP was supported under the NASA Postdoctoral Program at JPL, Caltech, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA, and is currently supported as a Caltech-JPL Postdoc.

  14. The CDMS view on molecular data needs of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Endres, C. P.; Stutzki, J.; Schlemmer, S.

    2013-07-01

    The catalog section of the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, contains mostly rotational transition frequencies, with auxiliary information, of molecules observable in space. The frequency lists are generated mostly from critically evaluated laboratory data employing established Hamiltonian models. The CDMS has been online publicly for more than 12 years, e.g., via the short-cut http://www.cdms.de. Initially constructed as ascii tables, its inclusion into a database environment within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC, http://www.vamdc.eu) has begun in June 2008. A test version of the new CDMS is about to be released. The CDMS activities have been part of the extensive laboratory spectroscopic investigations in Cologne. Moreover, these activities have also benefit from collaborations with other laboratory spectroscopy groups as well as with astronomers. We will provide some basic information on the CDMS and its participation in the VAMDC project. In addition, some recent detections of molecules as well as spectroscopic studies will be discussed to evaluate the spectroscopic data needs of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA in particular in terms of light hydrides, complex molecules, and metal containing species.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LRLL54361 protostar Herschel/PACS fluxes (Balog+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, Z.; Muzerolle, J.; Flaherty, K.; Detre, O. H.; Bouwmann, J.; Furlan, E.; Gutermuth, R.; Juhasz, A.; Bally, J.; Nielbock, M.; Klaas, U.; Krause, O.; Henning, T.; Marton, G.

    2017-03-01

    We observed a 14'x14' area in IC348 with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; Poglitsch et al. 2010A&A...518L...2P) Herschel Space Observatory (Pilbratt et al. 2010A&A...518L...1P) simultaneously at 70 and 160um 24 times in scan map mode. An additional five epoch were observed during a later pulse phase of LRLL54361 in all three PACS photometer bands. The PACS spectrograph consists of a 5x5 array of 9.4" x 9.4" spatial pixels (hereafter referred to as spaxels) covering the spectral range from 52-210 um with λ/δλ ~1000-3000. Spectra were obtained in two spectral orders simultaneously, with the second order ranging from 51 to 105um and the first order from 102 to 210um. The spatial resolution of PACS-S ranges from ~9'' at 50um to ~18'' at 210um. Our target was observed in the standard range-scan spectroscopy mode with a grating step size corresponding to Nyquist sampling (see further Poglitsch et al. 2010A&A...518L...2P). (1 data file).

  16. Herschel/SPIRE observations of water production rates and ortho-to-para ratios in comets★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas G.; Rawlings, Jonathan M. C.; Swinyard, Bruce M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents Herschel/SPIRE (Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver) spectroscopic observations of several fundamental rotational ortho- and para-water transitions seen in three Jupiter-family comets and one Oort-cloud comet. Radiative transfer models that include excitation by collisions with neutrals and electrons, and by solar infrared radiation, were used to produce synthetic emission line profiles originating in the cometary coma. Ortho-to-para ratios (OPRs) were determined and used to derived water production rates for all comets. Comparisons are made with the water production rates derived using an OPR of 3. The OPR of three of the comets in this study is much lower than the statistical equilibrium value of 3; however they agree with observations of comets 1P/Halley and C/2001 A2 (LINEAR), and the protoplanetary disc TW Hydrae. These results provide evidence suggesting that OPR variation is caused by post-sublimation gas-phase nuclear-spin conversion processes. The water production rates of all comets agree with previous work and, in general, decrease with increasing nucleocentric offset. This could be due to a temperature profile, additional water source or OPR variation in the comae, or model inaccuracies.

  17. Open Education Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bough, Max, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal provides 12 brief articles focused on open education. Topics explored include (1) open education and reading, (2) mainstreaming, (3) characteristics of an open teacher, (4) administration of an open concept school, (5) an existential methodology in the language arts, (6) social studies in open education, (7) open education in early…

  18. Open Standards, Open Source, and Open Innovation: Harnessing the Benefits of Openness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee for Economic Development, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Digitization of information and the Internet have profoundly expanded the capacity for openness. This report details the benefits of openness in three areas--open standards, open-source software, and open innovation--and examines the major issues in the debate over whether openness should be encouraged or not. The report explains each of these…

  19. Can Dust Emission be Used to Estimate the Mass of the Interstellar Medium in Galaxies—A Pilot Project with the Herschel Reference Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eales, Stephen; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Auld, Robbie; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Bianchi, Simone; Boselli, Alessandro; Ciesla, Laure; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Cortese, Luca; Davies, Jon; De Looze, Ilse; Galametz, Maud; Gear, Walter; Gentile, Gianfranco; Gomez, Haley; Fritz, Jacopo; Hughes, Tom; Madden, Suzanne; Magrini, Laura; Pohlen, Michael; Spinoglio, Luigi; Verstappen, Joris; Vlahakis, Catherine; Wilson, Christine D.

    2012-12-01

    The standard method for estimating the mass of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a galaxy is to use the 21 cm line to trace the atomic gas and the CO 1-0 line to trace the molecular gas. In this paper, we investigate the alternative technique of using the continuum dust emission to estimate the mass of gas in all phases of the ISM. Using Herschel observations of 10 galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, we show that the emission detected by Herschel is mostly from dust that has a temperature and emissivity index similar to that of dust in the local ISM in our galaxy, with the temperature generally increasing toward the center of each galaxy. We calibrate the dust method using the CO and 21 cm observations to provide an independent estimate of the mass of hydrogen in each galaxy, solving the problem of the uncertain "X-factor" for the CO observations by minimizing the dispersion in the ratio of the masses estimated using the two methods. With the calibration for the dust method and the estimate of the X-factor produced in this way, the dispersion in the ratio of the two gas masses is 25%. The calibration we obtain for the dust method is similar to those obtained from Herschel observations of M31 and from Planck observations of the Milky Way. We discuss the practical problems in using this method.

  20. CAN DUST EMISSION BE USED TO ESTIMATE THE MASS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN GALAXIES-A PILOT PROJECT WITH THE HERSCHEL REFERENCE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Eales, Stephen; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Auld, Robbie; Davies, Jon; Gear, Walter; Gomez, Haley; Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse; Gentile, Gianfranco; Fritz, Jacopo; Bendo, George J.; Bianchi, Simone; Boselli, Alessandro; Ciesla, Laure; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Cortese, Luca; Galametz, Maud; Hughes, Tom; Madden, Suzanne [Laboratoire AIM, CEA and others

    2012-12-20

    The standard method for estimating the mass of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a galaxy is to use the 21 cm line to trace the atomic gas and the CO 1-0 line to trace the molecular gas. In this paper, we investigate the alternative technique of using the continuum dust emission to estimate the mass of gas in all phases of the ISM. Using Herschel observations of 10 galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, we show that the emission detected by Herschel is mostly from dust that has a temperature and emissivity index similar to that of dust in the local ISM in our galaxy, with the temperature generally increasing toward the center of each galaxy. We calibrate the dust method using the CO and 21 cm observations to provide an independent estimate of the mass of hydrogen in each galaxy, solving the problem of the uncertain ''X-factor'' for the CO observations by minimizing the dispersion in the ratio of the masses estimated using the two methods. With the calibration for the dust method and the estimate of the X-factor produced in this way, the dispersion in the ratio of the two gas masses is 25%. The calibration we obtain for the dust method is similar to those obtained from Herschel observations of M31 and from Planck observations of the Milky Way. We discuss the practical problems in using this method.

  1. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  2. Squeezed between shells? The origin of the Lupus I molecular cloud. APEX/LABOCA, Herschel, and Planck observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaczkowski, B.; Preibisch, T.; Stanke, T.; Krause, M. G. H.; Burkert, A.; Diehl, R.; Fierlinger, K.; Kroell, D.; Ngoumou, J.; Roccatagliata, V.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The Lupus I cloud is found between the Upper Scorpius (USco) and the Upper Centaurus-Lupus (UCL) subgroups of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, where the expanding USco H I shell appears to interact with a bubble currently driven by the winds of the remaining B-stars of UCL. Aims: We want to study how collisions of large-scale interstellar gas flows form and influence new dense clouds in the ISM. Methods: We performed LABOCA continuum sub-mm observations of Lupus I that provide for the first time a direct view of the densest, coldest cloud clumps and cores at high angular resolution. We complemented these data with Herschel and Planck data from which we constructed column density and temperature maps. From the Herschel and LABOCA column density maps we calculated probability density functions (PDFs) to characterize the density structure of the cloud. Results: The northern part of Lupus I is found to have, on average, lower densities, higher temperatures, and no active star formation. The center-south part harbors dozens of pre-stellar cores where density and temperature reach their maximum and minimum, respectively. Our analysis of the column density PDFs from the Herschel data show double-peak profiles for all parts of the cloud, which we attribute to an external compression. In those parts with active star formation, the PDF shows a power-law tail at high densities. The PDFs we calculated from our LABOCA data trace the denser parts of the cloud showing one peak and a power-law tail. With LABOCA we find 15 cores with masses between 0.07 and 1.71 M⊙ and a total mass of ≈8 M⊙. The total gas and dust mass of the cloud is ≈164 M⊙ and hence ~5% of the mass is in cores. From the Herschel and Planck data we find a total mass of ≈174 M⊙ and ≈171 M⊙, respectively. Conclusions: The position, orientation, and elongated shape of Lupus I, the double-peak PDFs and the population of pre-stellar and protostellar cores could be explained by the

  3. Infrared emission of young HII regions: a Herschel/Hi-GAL study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Pestalozzi, M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Hoare, M. G.; Molinari, S.; Olmi, L.; Smith, M. D.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Testi, L.; Thompson, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Investigating the relationship between radio and infrared emission of Hii regions may help shed light on the nature of the ionizing stars and the formation mechanism of early-type stars in general. Aims: We have taken advantage of recent unbiased surveys of the Galactic plane such as Herschel/Hi-GAL and VLA/CORNISH to study a bona fide sample of young Hii regions located in the Galactic longitude range 10°-65° by comparing the mid- and far-IR continuum emission to the radio free-free emission at 5 GHz. Methods: We have identified the Hi-GAL counterparts of 230 CORNISH Hii regions and reconstructed the spectral energy distributions of 204 of these by complementing the Hi-GAL fluxes with ancillary data at longer and shorter wavelengths. Using literature data, we obtained a kinematical distance estimate for 200 Hii regions with Hi-GAL counterparts and determined their luminosities by integrating the emission of the corresponding spectral energy distributions. We have also estimated the mass of the associated molecular clumps from the (sub)millimeter flux densities. Results: Our main finding is that for ~1/3 of the Hii regions the Lyman continuum luminosity appears to be greater than the value expected for a zero-age main-sequence star with the same bolometric luminosity. This result indicates that a considerable fraction of young, embedded early-type stars presents a "Lyman excess" possibly due to UV photons emitted from shocked material infalling onto the star itself and/or a circumstellar disk. Finally, by comparing the bolometric and Lyman continuum luminosities with the mass of the associated clump, we derive a star formation efficiency of 5%. Conclusions: The results obtained suggest that accretion may still be present during the early stages of the evolution of Hii regions, with important effects on the production of ionizing photons and thus on the circumstellar environment. More reliable numerical models describing the accretion process onto massive

  4. Linking low- to high-mass young stellar objects with Herschel-HIFI observations of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San José-García, I.; Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Braine, J.; Herpin, F.; Johnstone, D.; van Kempen, T. A.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Water probes the dynamics in young stellar objects (YSOs) effectively, especially