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Sample records for heterodimers alter borrelia

  1. TLR1/TLR2 heterodimers play an important role in the recognition of Borrelia spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Marije; Ter Hofstede, Hadewych; Sturm, Patrick; Adema, Gosse J; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; van der Meer, Jos W M; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2011-01-01

    After infection with Borrelia species, the risk for developing Lyme disease varies significantly between individuals. Recognition of Borrelia by the immune system is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as TLRs. While TLR2 is the main recognition receptor for Borrelia spp., little is known about the role of TLR1 and TLR6, which both can form functionally active heterodimers with TLR2. Here we investigated the recognition of Borrelia by both murine and human TLR1 and TLR6. Peritoneal macrophages from TLR1- and TLR6- gene deficient mice were isolated and exposed to Borrelia. Human PBMCs were stimulated with Borrelia with or without specific TLR1 and TLR6 blocking using specific antibodies. Finally, the functional consequences of TLR polymorphisms on Borrelia-induced cytokine production were assessed. Splenocytes isolated from both TLR1-/- and TLR6-/- mice displayed a distorted Th1/Th2 cytokine balance after stimulation with B.burgdorferi, while no differences in pro-inflammatory cytokine production were observed. In contrast, blockade of TLR1 with specific neutralizing antibodies led to decreased cytokine production by human PBMCs after exposure to B.burgdorferi. Blockade of human TLR6 did not lead to suppression of cytokine production. When PBMCs from healthy individuals bearing polymorphisms in TLR1 were exposed to B.burgdorferi, a remarkably decreased in vitro cytokine production was observed in comparison to wild-type controls. TLR6 polymorphisms lead to a minor modified cytokine production. This study indicates a dominant role for TLR1/TLR2 heterodimers in the induction of the early inflammatory response by Borrelia spirochetes in humans. PMID:21998742

  2. Amino acid 72 of mouse and human GDF9 mature domain is responsible for altered homodimer bioactivities but has subtle effects on GDF9:BMP15 heterodimer activities.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jia; Wigglesworth, Karen; Rangarajan, Adithya; Eppig, John J; Thompson, Thomas B; Matzuk, Martin M

    2014-12-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) are oocyte-secreted paralogs of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily. In mammals, these two growth factors play critical roles in folliculogenesis. As previously reported, an arginine in the pre-helix loop of GDF5 defines the high binding specificity to its type 1 receptor. Interestingly, bioactive mouse GDF9 and human BMP15 share the conserved arginine in the pre-helix loop, but their low-activity counterparts (mouse BMP15 and human GDF9) have a glycine or a proline instead. To address the question of whether the arginine residue defines the different activities of GDF9 and BMP15 homodimers and their heterodimers in human and mouse, we used site-directed mutagenesis to change the species-specific residues in human and mouse proteins, and examined their activities in our in vitro assays. Although amino acid 72 of mature GDF9 is responsible for altered homodimer bioactivities, neither the corresponding BMP15 amino acid 62 nor the intact pre-helix loop is indispensable for BMP15 homodimer activity. However, amino acid 72 in GDF9 only has only subtle effects on GDF9:BMP15 heterodimer activity. Based on previous studies and our recent findings, we provide hypothetical models to understand the molecular mechanism to define activities of the homodimeric and heterodimeric ligands. The arginine residue in the pre-helix loop of GDF9 homodimer may prevent the inhibition from its pro-domain or directly alter receptor binding, but this residue in GDF9 does not significantly affect the heterodimer activity, because of suggested conformational changes during heterodimer formation.

  3. Amino Acid 72 of Mouse and Human GDF9 Mature Domain Is Responsible for Altered Homodimer Bioactivities but Has Subtle Effects on GDF9:BMP15 Heterodimer Activities1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jia; Wigglesworth, Karen; Rangarajan, Adithya; Eppig, John J.; Thompson, Thomas B.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) are oocyte-secreted paralogs of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily. In mammals, these two growth factors play critical roles in folliculogenesis. As previously reported, an arginine in the pre-helix loop of GDF5 defines the high binding specificity to its type 1 receptor. Interestingly, bioactive mouse GDF9 and human BMP15 share the conserved arginine in the pre-helix loop, but their low-activity counterparts (mouse BMP15 and human GDF9) have a glycine or a proline instead. To address the question of whether the arginine residue defines the different activities of GDF9 and BMP15 homodimers and their heterodimers in human and mouse, we used site-directed mutagenesis to change the species-specific residues in human and mouse proteins, and examined their activities in our in vitro assays. Although amino acid 72 of mature GDF9 is responsible for altered homodimer bioactivities, neither the corresponding BMP15 amino acid 62 nor the intact pre-helix loop is indispensable for BMP15 homodimer activity. However, amino acid 72 in GDF9 only has only subtle effects on GDF9:BMP15 heterodimer activity. Based on previous studies and our recent findings, we provide hypothetical models to understand the molecular mechanism to define activities of the homodimeric and heterodimeric ligands. The arginine residue in the pre-helix loop of GDF9 homodimer may prevent the inhibition from its pro-domain or directly alter receptor binding, but this residue in GDF9 does not significantly affect the heterodimer activity, because of suggested conformational changes during heterodimer formation. PMID:25253739

  4. Interleukin-10 alters effector functions of multiple genes induced by Borrelia burgdorferi in macrophages to regulate Lyme disease inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Aarti; Dixit, Saurabh; Philipp, Mario T; Singh, Shree R; Morici, Lisa A; Kaushal, Deepak; Dennis, Vida A

    2011-12-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates inflammatory responses elicited in vitro and in vivo by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete. How IL-10 modulates these inflammatory responses still remains elusive. We hypothesize that IL-10 inhibits effector functions of multiple genes induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammation. Because macrophages are essential in the initiation of inflammation, we used mouse J774 macrophages and live B. burgdorferi spirochetes as the model target cell and stimulant, respectively. First, we employed transcriptome profiling to identify genes that were induced by stimulation of cells with live spirochetes and that were perturbed by addition of IL-10 to spirochete cultures. Spirochetes significantly induced upregulation of 347 genes at both the 4-h and 24-h time points. IL-10 inhibited the expression levels, respectively, of 53 and 65 of the 4-h and 24-h genes, and potentiated, respectively, at 4 h and 24 h, 65 and 50 genes. Prominent among the novel identified IL-10-inhibited genes also validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, IRAK3, TRAF1, IRG1, PTGS2, MMP9, IFI44, IFIT1, and CD40. Proteome analysis using a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed the IL-10 modulation/and or potentiation of RANTES/CCL5, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2)/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10, MIP-1α/CCL3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)/CSF3, CXCL1, CXCL5, CCL2, CCL4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1α, IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-9. Similar results were obtained using sonicated spirochetes or lipoprotein as stimulants. Our data show that IL-10 alters effectors induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammatory responses. Moreover, for the first time, this study provides global insight into potential mechanisms used by IL-10 to control Lyme disease inflammation.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequences of Borrelia bissettii Borrelia valaisiana and Borrelia spielmanii

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer S. E.; Dunn J.; Fraser-Liggett C. M.; Qiu W.-G.; Kraiczy P.; Mongodin E. F.; Luft B. J.; Casjens S. R.

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for decades that human Lyme disease is caused by the three spirochete species Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia afzelii, and Borrelia garinii. Recently, Borrelia valaisiana, Borrelia spielmanii, and Borrelia bissettii have been associated with Lyme disease. We report the complete genome sequences of B. valaisiana VS116, B. spielmanii A14S, and B. bissettii DN127.

  6. Interleukin-10 Alters Effector Functions of Multiple Genes Induced by Borrelia burgdorferi in Macrophages To Regulate Lyme Disease Inflammation ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; Dixit, Saurabh; Philipp, Mario T.; Singh, Shree R.; Morici, Lisa A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Dennis, Vida A.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates inflammatory responses elicited in vitro and in vivo by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete. How IL-10 modulates these inflammatory responses still remains elusive. We hypothesize that IL-10 inhibits effector functions of multiple genes induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammation. Because macrophages are essential in the initiation of inflammation, we used mouse J774 macrophages and live B. burgdorferi spirochetes as the model target cell and stimulant, respectively. First, we employed transcriptome profiling to identify genes that were induced by stimulation of cells with live spirochetes and that were perturbed by addition of IL-10 to spirochete cultures. Spirochetes significantly induced upregulation of 347 genes at both the 4-h and 24-h time points. IL-10 inhibited the expression levels, respectively, of 53 and 65 of the 4-h and 24-h genes, and potentiated, respectively, at 4 h and 24 h, 65 and 50 genes. Prominent among the novel identified IL-10-inhibited genes also validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, IRAK3, TRAF1, IRG1, PTGS2, MMP9, IFI44, IFIT1, and CD40. Proteome analysis using a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed the IL-10 modulation/and or potentiation of RANTES/CCL5, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2)/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10, MIP-1α/CCL3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)/CSF3, CXCL1, CXCL5, CCL2, CCL4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1α, IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-9. Similar results were obtained using sonicated spirochetes or lipoprotein as stimulants. Our data show that IL-10 alters effectors induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammatory responses. Moreover, for the first time, this study provides global insight into potential mechanisms used by IL-10 to control Lyme disease inflammation. PMID

  7. Substitution of specific cysteine residues in E1 glycoprotein of classical swine fever virus strain Brescia affects formation of E1-E2 heterodimers and alters virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E1, along with E^rns and E2, is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E1 and E2 are anchored to the virus envelope at their carboxyl termini and E^rns loosely associates with the viral envelope. In infected cells, E2 forms homodimers and heterodimers with E1,...

  8. Enhancing Antibody Fc Heterodimer Formation through Electrostatic Steering Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekaran, Kannan; Pentony, Martin; Shen, Min; Garrett, Logan; Forte, Carla; Woodward, Anne; Ng, Soo Bin; Born, Teresa; Retter, Marc; Manchulenko, Kathy; Sweet, Heather; Foltz, Ian N.; Wittekind, Michael; Yan, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring IgG antibodies are bivalent and monospecific. Bispecific antibodies having binding specificities for two different antigens can be produced using recombinant technologies and are projected to have broad clinical applications. However, co-expression of multiple light and heavy chains often leads to contaminants and pose purification challenges. In this work, we have modified the CH3 domain interface of the antibody Fc region with selected mutations so that the engineered Fc proteins preferentially form heterodimers. These novel mutations create altered charge polarity across the Fc dimer interface such that coexpression of electrostatically matched Fc chains support favorable attractive interactions thereby promoting desired Fc heterodimer formation, whereas unfavorable repulsive charge interactions suppress unwanted Fc homodimer formation. This new Fc heterodimer format was used to produce bispecific single chain antibody fusions and monovalent IgGs with minimal homodimer contaminants. The strategy proposed here demonstrates the feasibility of robust production of novel Fc-based heterodimeric molecules and hence broadens the scope of bispecific molecules for therapeutic applications. PMID:20400508

  9. Coexistence of Phases in a Protein Heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Liwo, Adam; Niemi, Antti J.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    A heterodimer consisting of two or more different kinds of proteins can display an enormous number of distinct molecular architectures. The conformational entropy is an essential ingredient in the Helmholtz free energy and, consequently, these heterodimers can have a very complex phase structure. Here, it is proposed that there is a state of proteins, in which the different components of a heterodimer exist in different phases. For this purpose, the structures in the protein data bank (PDB) have been analyzed, with radius of gyration as the order parameter. Two major classes of heterodimers with their protein components coexisting in different phases have been identified. An example is the PDB structure 3DXC. This is a transcriptionally active dimer. One of the components is an isoform of the intra-cellular domain of the Alzheimer-disease related amyloid precursor protein (AICD), and the other is a nuclear multidomain adaptor protein in the Fe65 family. It is concluded from the radius of gyration that neither of the two components in this dimer is in its own collapsed phase, corresponding to a biologically active protein. The UNRES energy function has been utilized to confirm that, if the two components are separated from each other, each of them collapses. The results presented in this work show that heterodimers whose protein components coexist in different phases, can have intriguing physical properties with potentially important biological consequences. PMID:22830730

  10. Intramolecular Singlet Fission in Oligoacene Heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Samuel N; Kumarasamy, Elango; Pun, Andrew B; Steigerwald, Michael L; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Campos, Luis M

    2016-03-01

    We investigate singlet fission (SF) in heterodimers comprising a pentacene unit covalently bonded to another acene as we systematically vary the singlet and triplet pair energies. We find that these energies control the SF process, where dimers undergo SF provided that the resulting triplet pair energy is similar or lower in energy than the singlet state. In these systems the singlet energy is determined by the lower-energy chromophore, and the rate of SF is found to be relatively independent of the driving force. However, triplet pair recombination in these heterodimers follows the energy gap law. The ability to tune the energies of these materials provides a key strategy to study and design new SF materials-an important process for third-generation photovoltaics. PMID:26836223

  11. Intramolecular Singlet Fission in Oligoacene Heterodimers

    DOE PAGES

    Sanders, Samuel N.; Kumarasamy, Elango; Pun, Andrew B.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Sfeir, Matthew L.; Campos, Luis M.

    2016-02-02

    In this Communication we investigate singlet fission (SF) in heterodimers comprising a pentacene unit covalently bonded to another acene as we systematically vary the singlet and triplet pair energies. We find that these energies control the SF process, where dimers undergo SF provided that the resulting triplet pair energy is similar or lower in energy than the singlet state. In these systems the singlet energy is determined by the lower energy chromophore, and the rate of SF is found to be relatively independent of the driving force. However, triplet pair recombination in these heterodimers follows the energy gap law. Themore » ability to tune the energies of these materials provides a key strategy to study and design new SF materials – an important process for third generation photovoltaics.« less

  12. Heterogeneity of Borrelia burgdorferi in the skin.

    PubMed

    Aberer, E; Kersten, A; Klade, H; Poitschek, C; Jurecka, W

    1996-12-01

    The reliability of various in vitro techniques to identify Borrelia burgdorferi infection is still unsatisfactory. Using a high-power resolution videomicroscope and staining with the borrelia genus-specific monoclonal flagellar antibody H9724, we identified borrelial structures in skin biopsies of erythema chronicum migrans (from which borrelia later was cultured), of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, and of morphea. In addition to typical borreliae, we noted stained structures of varying shapes identical to borreliae found in a "borrelia-injected skin" model; identical to agar-embedded borreliae; and identical to cultured borreliae following exposure to hyperimmune sera and/or antibiotics. We conclude that the H9724-reactive structures represent various forms of B. burgdorferi rather than staining artifacts. These "atypical" forms of B. burgdorferi may represent in vivo morphologic variants of this bacterium.

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi Infections in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, Warren R.

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the clinical presentation of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi varies greatly between different parts of the world. A growing number of European and Asian isolates of Lyme borreliae, differing from the American strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, have been identified in several different disorders. In light of the increasing number of reports describing an association between various cutaneous disorders and infection with Borrelia burgdorferi and the controversy that still remains over where Borrelia burgdorferi is truly pathogenic in these diseases, this review of the literature assesses the significance of these reports in substantiating these hypotheses, as such associations are important both diagnostically and therapeutically. PMID:22916311

  14. Genetics of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Dustin; Drecktrah, Dan; Eggers, Christian H.; Samuels, D. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The spirochetes in the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato genospecies group cycle in nature between tick vectors and vertebrate hosts. The current assemblage of B. burgdorferi sensu lato, of which three species cause Lyme disease in humans, originated from a rapid species radiation that occurred near the origin of the clade. All of these species share a unique genome structure that is highly segmented and predominantly composed of linear replicons. One of the circular plasmids is a prophage that exists as several isoforms in each cell and can be transduced to other cells, likely contributing to an otherwise relatively anemic level of horizontal gene transfer, which nevertheless appears to be adequate to permit strong natural selection and adaptation in populations of B. burgdorferi. Although the molecular genetic toolbox is meager, several antibiotic-resistant mutants have been isolated, and the resistance alleles, as well as some exogenous genes, have been fashioned into markers to dissect gene function. Genetic studies have probed the role of the outer membrane lipoprotein OspC, which is maintained in nature by multiple niche polymorphisms and negative frequency-dependent selection. One of the most intriguing genetic systems in B. burgdorferi is vls recombination, which generates antigenic variation during infection of mammalian hosts. PMID:22974303

  15. Asymptomatic infection with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C; Sikand, Vijay K; Schoen, Robert T; Nowakowski, John

    2003-08-15

    The natural history of asymptomatic seroconversion to Borrelia burgdorferi has been unclear. We report here, on the basis of a post hoc assessment, the frequency and outcome of asymptomatic seroconversion to B. burgdorferi in participants of a large Lyme disease vaccine trial. We show that infection with B. burgdorferi may be asymptomatic but that asymptomatic infection is unusual in the United States.

  16. Recombinant constructs of Borrelia burgdorferi

    DOEpatents

    Dattwyler, Raymond J.; Gomes-Solecki, Maria J. C.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Dunn, John J.

    2007-02-20

    Novel chimeric nucleic acids, encoding chimeric Borrelia proteins comprising OspC or an antigenic fragment thereof and OspA or an antigenic fragment thereof, are disclosed. Chimeric proteins encoded by the nucleic acid sequences are also disclosed. The chimeric proteins are useful as vaccine immunogens against Lyme borreliosis, as well as for immunodiagnostic reagents.

  17. Comparison of Growth of Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto at Five Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Veinović, Gorana; Ružić-Sabljić, Eva; Strle, Franc; Cerar, Tjaša

    2016-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, a fastidious bacterium that replicates slowly and requires special conditions to grow in the laboratory. Borrelia isolation from clinical material is a golden standard for microbiological diagnosis of borrelial infection. Important factors that affect in vitro borrelia growth are temperature of incubation and number of borrelia cells in the sample. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of temperature on borrelia growth and survival by evaluation and comparison of growth of 31 different borrelia strains at five different temperatures and to determine the influence of different inoculums on borrelia growth at different temperatures. Borreliae were cultured in the MKP medium; the initial and final number of spirochetes was determined by dark field microscopy using Neubauer counting chamber. The growth of borrelia was defined as final number of cells/mL after three days of incubation. For all three Borrelia species, the best growth was found at 33°C, followed by 37, 28, and 23°C, while no growth was detected at 4°C (P<0.05). The growth of B. afzelii species was weaker in comparison to the other two species at 23, 28, 33 and 37°C (P<0.05), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the growth of B. garinii and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto at 28, 33, and 37°C (P>0.05), respectively. Inoculum had statistically significant influence on growth of all three Borrelia species at all tested temperatures except at 4°C. PMID:27310556

  18. Small Heterodimer Partner and Innate Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyo Sun

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily consists of the steroid and non-steroid hormone receptors and the orphan nuclear receptors. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan family nuclear receptor that plays an essential role in the regulation of glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Recent studies reported a previously unidentified role for SHP in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation. The innate immune system has a critical function in the initial response against a variety of microbial and danger signals. Activation of the innate immune response results in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to promote anti-microbial effects. An excessive or uncontrolled inflammatory response is potentially harmful to the host, and can cause tissue damage or pathological threat. Therefore, the innate immune response should be tightly regulated to enhance host defense while preventing unwanted immune pathologic responses. In this review, we discuss recent studies showing that SHP is involved in the negative regulation of toll-like receptor-induced and NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3)-mediated inflammatory responses in innate immune cells. Understanding the function of SHP in innate immune cells will allow us to prevent or modulate acute and chronic inflammation processes in cases where dysregulated innate immune activation results in damage to normal tissues. PMID:26754583

  19. Structural mechanism for signal transduction in RXR nuclear receptor heterodimers

    PubMed Central

    Kojetin, Douglas J.; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hughes, Travis S.; Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Chalmers, Michael J.; Marciano, David P.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Shulman, Andrew I.; Rance, Mark; Griffin, Patrick R.; Bruning, John B.; Nettles, Kendall W.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of nuclear receptors (NRs) function as obligate heterodimers with retinoid X receptor (RXR), allowing integration of ligand-dependent signals across the dimer interface via an unknown structural mechanism. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, x-ray crystallography and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry, here we show an allosteric mechanism through which RXR co-operates with a permissive dimer partner, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, while rendered generally unresponsive by a non-permissive dimer partner, thyroid hormone (TR) receptor. Amino acid residues that mediate this allosteric mechanism comprise an evolutionarily conserved network discovered by statistical coupling analysis (SCA). This SCA network acts as a signalling rheostat to integrate signals between dimer partners, ligands and coregulator-binding sites, thereby affecting signal transmission in RXR heterodimers. These findings define rules guiding how NRs integrate two ligand-dependent signalling pathways into RXR heterodimer-specific responses. PMID:26289479

  20. Multilocus sequence analysis of Borrelia bissettii strains from North America reveals a new Borrelia species, Borrelia kurtenbachii

    PubMed Central

    Margos, Gabriele; Hojgaard, Andrias; Lane, Robert S.; Cornet, Muriel; Fingerle, Volker; Rudenko, Nataliia; Ogden, Nicholas; Aanensen, David M.; Fish, Durland; Piesman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Using multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA), we investigated the phylogenetic relationship of spirochaete strains from North America previously assigned to the genospecies Borrelia bissettii. We amplified internal fragments of 8 housekeeping genes (clpA, clpX, nifS, pepX, pyrG, recG, rplB, and uvrA) located on the main linear chromosome by polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences of the 8 loci showed that the B. bissettii clade consisted of 4 closely related clusters which included strains from California (including the type strain DN127-Cl9-2/p7) and Colorado that were isolated from Ixodes pacificus, I. spinipalpis, or infected reservoir hosts. Several strains isolated from I. scapularis clustered distantly from B. bissettii. Genetic distance analyses confirmed that these strains are more distant to B. bissettii than they are to B. carolinensis, a recently described Borrelia species, which suggests that they constitute a new Borrelia genospecies. We propose that it be named Borrelia kurtenbachii sp. nov. in honour of the late Klaus Kurtenbach. The data suggest that ecological differences between B. bissettii and the new Borrelia genospecies reflect different transmission cycles. In view of these findings, the distinct vertebrate host-tick vector associations and the distributions of B. bissettii and B. kurtenbachii require further investigation. PMID:21157575

  1. Comparative analysis of the Borrelia garinii genome.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, G; Lehmann, R; Romualdi, A; Pradella, S; Schulte-Spechtel, U; Schilhabel, M; Wilske, B; Sühnel, J; Platzer, M

    2004-01-01

    Three members of the genus Borrelia (B.burgdorferi, B.garinii, B.afzelii) cause tick-borne borreliosis. Depending on the Borrelia species involved, the borreliosis differs in its clinical symptoms. Comparative genomics opens up a way to elucidate the underlying differences in Borrelia species. We analysed a low redundancy whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly of a B.garinii strain isolated from a patient with neuroborreliosis in comparison to the B.burgdorferi genome. This analysis reveals that most of the chromosome is conserved (92.7% identity on DNA as well as on amino acid level) in the two species, and no chromosomal rearrangement or larger insertions/deletions could be observed. Furthermore, two collinear plasmids (lp54 and cp26) seem to belong to the basic genome inventory of Borrelia species. These three collinear parts of the Borrelia genome encode 861 genes, which are orthologous in the two species examined. The majority of the genetic information of the other plasmids of B.burgdorferii is also present in B.garinii although orthology is not easy to define due to a high redundancy of the plasmid fraction. Yet, we did not find counterparts of the B.burgdorferi plasmids lp36 and lp38 or their respective gene repertoire in the B.garinii genome. Thus, phenotypic differences between the two species could be attributable to the presence or absence of these two plasmids as well as to the potentially positively selected genes. PMID:15547252

  2. Borrelia burgdorferi tissue morphologies and imaging methodologies.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A B

    2013-08-01

    This manuscript offers an image presentation of diverse forms of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes which are not spiral or corkscrew shaped. Explanations are offered to justify the legitimacy of tissue forms of Borrelia which may confuse the inexperienced microscopic examiner and which may lead to the misdiagnosis of non-spiral forms as artifacts. Images from the author's personal collection of Borrelia burgdorferi images and a few select images of Borrelia burgdorferi from the peer-reviewed published literature are presented. A commentary justifying each of the image profiles and a survey of the imaging modalities utilized provides the reader with a frame of reference. Regularly spiraled Borrelia are rarely seen in solid tissues. A variety of straightened, undulating, and clipped-off profiles are demonstrated, and the structural basis for each image is explained. Tissue examination is a diagnostic tool and a quality control for judging the eradication or the persistence of borreliosis following attempts to eradicate the infection with antibiotic therapy. The presence or absence of chronic Lyme borreliosis may be objectively adjudicated by tissue examinations which demonstrate or which fail to show pathogenic microbes in patients who have received a full course of antibiotics.

  3. Borrelia burgdorferi tissue morphologies and imaging methodologies.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A B

    2013-08-01

    This manuscript offers an image presentation of diverse forms of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes which are not spiral or corkscrew shaped. Explanations are offered to justify the legitimacy of tissue forms of Borrelia which may confuse the inexperienced microscopic examiner and which may lead to the misdiagnosis of non-spiral forms as artifacts. Images from the author's personal collection of Borrelia burgdorferi images and a few select images of Borrelia burgdorferi from the peer-reviewed published literature are presented. A commentary justifying each of the image profiles and a survey of the imaging modalities utilized provides the reader with a frame of reference. Regularly spiraled Borrelia are rarely seen in solid tissues. A variety of straightened, undulating, and clipped-off profiles are demonstrated, and the structural basis for each image is explained. Tissue examination is a diagnostic tool and a quality control for judging the eradication or the persistence of borreliosis following attempts to eradicate the infection with antibiotic therapy. The presence or absence of chronic Lyme borreliosis may be objectively adjudicated by tissue examinations which demonstrate or which fail to show pathogenic microbes in patients who have received a full course of antibiotics. PMID:23479042

  4. Agonist ligands mediate the transcriptional response of nuclear receptor heterodimers through distinct stoichiometric assemblies with coactivators.

    PubMed

    Pavlin, Mark Remec; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Fernandez, Elias J

    2014-09-01

    The constitutive androstane (CAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR) are ligand-mediated transcription factors of the nuclear receptor protein superfamily. Functional CAR:RXR heterodimers recruit coactivator proteins, such as the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC1). Here, we show that agonist ligands can potentiate transactivation through both coactivator binding sites on CAR:RXR, which distinctly bind two SRC1 molecules. We also observe that SRC1 transitions from a structurally plastic to a compact form upon binding CAR:RXR. Using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) we show that the CAR(tcp):RXR(9c)·SRC1 complex can encompass two SRC1 molecules compared with the CAR(tcp):RXR·SRC1, which binds only a single SRC1. Moreover, sedimentation coefficients and molecular weights determined by analytical ultracentrifugation confirm the SAXS model. Cell-based transcription assays show that disrupting the SRC1 binding site on RXR alters the transactivation by CAR:RXR. These data suggest a broader role for RXR within heterodimers, whereas offering multiple strategies for the assembly of the transcription complex.

  5. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of DNA from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Ixodes ricinus ticks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, Cristina M.; Stefan, Razvan; Bindea, Maria; Cozma, Vasile

    2013-06-01

    In this work we present a method for detection of motile and immotile Borrelia burgdorferi genomic DNA, in relation with infectious and noninfectious spirochetes. An FT-IR study of DNA isolated from B. burgdorferi sensu lato strains and from positive and negative Ixodes ricinus ticks, respectively, is reported. Motile bacterial cells from the species B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii and Borrelia afzelii were of interest. Also, FT-IR absorbance spectra of DNA from immotile spirochetes of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, in the absence and presence of different antibiotics (doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, penicillin V or phenoxymethylpenicillin, tetracycline, respectively) were investigated. FT-IR spectra, providing a high molecular structural information, have been analyzed in the wavenumber range 400-1800 cm-1. FT-IR signatures, spectroscopic band assignments and structural interpretations of these DNAs are reported. Spectral differences between FT-IR absorbances of DNAs from motile bacterial cells and immotile spirochetes, respectively, have been found. Particularly, alterations of the sugar-phosphate B-form chain in the case of DNA from Borrelia immotile cells, as compared with DNA from B. burgdorferi sensu lato motile cells have been observed. Based on this work, specific B. burgdorferi sensu lato and I. ricinus DNA-ligand interactions, respectively, might be further investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  6. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Dunn, John J.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Schutzer, Steve E.

    2011-01-01

    Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04. PMID:22123755

  7. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Schutzer, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04.

  8. Quantifying the parameters of Prusiner's heterodimer model for prion replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. R.; Liu, G. R.; Mi, D.

    2005-02-01

    A novel approach for the determination of parameters in prion replication kinetics is developed based on Prusiner's heterodimer model. It is proposed to employ a simple 2D HP lattice model and a two-state transition theory to determine kinetic parameters that play the key role in the prion replication process. The simulation results reveal the most important facts observed in the prion diseases, including the long incubation time, rapid death following symptom manifestation, the effect of inoculation size, different mechanisms of the familial and infectious prion diseases, etc. Extensive simulation with various thermodynamic parameters shows that the Prusiner's heterodimer model is applicable, and the putative protein X plays a critical role in replication of the prion disease.

  9. Resonance coupling in plasmonic nanomatryoshka homo- and heterodimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Sinha, Raju; Pala, Nezih

    2016-06-01

    Here, we examine the electromagnetic (EM) energy coupling and hybridization of plasmon resonances between closely spaced concentric nanoshells known as "nanomatryoshka" (NM) units in symmetric and antisymmetric compositions using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis. Utilizing plasmon hybridization model, we calculated the energy level diagrams and verified that, in the symmetric dimer (in-phase mode in a homodimer), plasmonic bonding modes are dominant and tunable within the considered bandwidth. In contrast, in the antisymmetric dimer (out-of-phase mode in a heterodimer), due to the lack of the geometrical symmetry, new antibonding modes appear in the extinction profile, and this condition gives rise to repeal of dipolar field coupling. We also studied the extinction spectra and positions of the antibonding and bonding modes excited due to the energy coupling between silver and gold NM units in a heterodimer structure. Our analysis suggest abnormal shifts in the higher energy modes. We propose a method to analyze the behavior of multilayer concentric nanoshell particles in an antisymmetric orientation employing full dielectric function calculations and the Drude model based on interband transitions in metallic components. This study provides a method to predict the behavior of the higher energy plasmon resonant modes in entirely antisymmetric structures such as compositional heterodimers.

  10. Enhancing antibody Fc heterodimer formation through electrostatic steering effects: applications to bispecific molecules and monovalent IgG.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Kannan; Pentony, Martin; Shen, Min; Garrett, Logan; Forte, Carla; Woodward, Anne; Ng, Soo Bin; Born, Teresa; Retter, Marc; Manchulenko, Kathy; Sweet, Heather; Foltz, Ian N; Wittekind, Michael; Yan, Wei

    2010-06-18

    Naturally occurring IgG antibodies are bivalent and monospecific. Bispecific antibodies having binding specificities for two different antigens can be produced using recombinant technologies and are projected to have broad clinical applications. However, co-expression of multiple light and heavy chains often leads to contaminants and pose purification challenges. In this work, we have modified the CH3 domain interface of the antibody Fc region with selected mutations so that the engineered Fc proteins preferentially form heterodimers. These novel mutations create altered charge polarity across the Fc dimer interface such that coexpression of electrostatically matched Fc chains support favorable attractive interactions thereby promoting desired Fc heterodimer formation, whereas unfavorable repulsive charge interactions suppress unwanted Fc homodimer formation. This new Fc heterodimer format was used to produce bispecific single chain antibody fusions and monovalent IgGs with minimal homodimer contaminants. The strategy proposed here demonstrates the feasibility of robust production of novel Fc-based heterodimeric molecules and hence broadens the scope of bispecific molecules for therapeutic applications.

  11. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia lonestari in birds in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Jordan, B E; Onks, K R; Hamilton, S W; Hayslette, S E; Wright, S M

    2009-01-01

    Lyme disease in the United States is caused by the bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi s.s. (Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt, and Brenner), which is transmitted by tick vectors Ixodes scapularis (Say) and I. pacificus (Cooley and Kohls). Borrelia lonestari, transmitted by the tick Amblyomma americanum L., may be associated with a related syndrome, southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI). Borrelia lonestari sequences, reported primarily in the southeastern states, have also been detected in ticks in northern states. It has been suggested that migratory birds may have a role in the spread of Lyme disease spirochetes. This study evaluated both migratory waterfowl and nonmigratory wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris, Eastern wild turkey) for B. burgdorferi and B. lonestari DNA sequences. A total of 389 avian blood samples (163 migratory birds representing six species, 125 wild turkeys harvested in habitats shared with migratory birds, 101 wild turkeys residing more distant from migratory flyways) were extracted, amplified, and probed to determine Borrelia presence and species identity. Ninety-one samples were positive for Borrelia spp. Among migratory birds and turkeys collected near migration routes, B. burgdorferi predominated. Among turkeys residing further away from flyways, detection of B. lonestari was more common. All A. americanum ticks collected from these areas were negative for Borrelia DNA; no I. scapularis were found. To our knowledge, this represents the first documentation of B. lonestari among any birds.

  12. Occurrence of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato in Ixodes ricinus Ticks with First Identification of Borrelia miyamotoi in Vojvodina, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Kleinerman, Gabriela; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Savić, Sara; Vračar, Vuk; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Jurišić, Aleksandar; Rojas, Alicia; Petrović, Aleksandra; Ivanović, Ivana; Harrus, Shimon; Baneth, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis is the most common tick-borne infectious disease in Eurasia. Borrelia miyamotoi is the only known relapsing fever Borrelia group spirochete transmitted by Ixodes species. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Lyme Borrelia spp. and relapsing fever Borrelia spp. in Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from dogs and the vegetation from different parts of Vojvodina, Serbia. A total of 71 Ixodes ricinus ticks were collected and screened for the presence of Lyme Borrelia spp. group and relapsing fever Borrelia spp. by real-time PCR for the Borrelia flagellin B (flaB) gene followed by DNA sequencing of PCR products. Species identification was verified by PCR of the outer surface protein A (ospA) gene for Lyme Disease Borrelia spp. and by PCR of the glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (glpQ) gene for relapsing fever Borrelia spp. Lyme Borrelia spp. were found in 15/71 (21.13%) of the ticks evaluated and included B. luisitaniae (11.3%), B. afzelii (7%), B. valaisiana (1.4%), and B. garinii (1.4%). Borrelia miyamotoi, from the relapsing fever Borrelia complex, was found, for the first time in Serbia, in one (1.4%) nymph collected from the environment. Co-infections between Borrelia species in ticks were not detected. These results suggest that the dominance of species within B. burgdorferi s.l. complex in I. ricinus ticks may vary over time and in different geographic regions. Further systematic studies of Borrelia species in vectors and reservoir hosts are needed to understand eco-epidemiology of these zoonotic infections and how to prevent human infection in the best way.

  13. Occurrence of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato in Ixodes ricinus Ticks with First Identification of Borrelia miyamotoi in Vojvodina, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Kleinerman, Gabriela; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Savić, Sara; Vračar, Vuk; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Jurišić, Aleksandar; Rojas, Alicia; Petrović, Aleksandra; Ivanović, Ivana; Harrus, Shimon; Baneth, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis is the most common tick-borne infectious disease in Eurasia. Borrelia miyamotoi is the only known relapsing fever Borrelia group spirochete transmitted by Ixodes species. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Lyme Borrelia spp. and relapsing fever Borrelia spp. in Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from dogs and the vegetation from different parts of Vojvodina, Serbia. A total of 71 Ixodes ricinus ticks were collected and screened for the presence of Lyme Borrelia spp. group and relapsing fever Borrelia spp. by real-time PCR for the Borrelia flagellin B (flaB) gene followed by DNA sequencing of PCR products. Species identification was verified by PCR of the outer surface protein A (ospA) gene for Lyme Disease Borrelia spp. and by PCR of the glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (glpQ) gene for relapsing fever Borrelia spp. Lyme Borrelia spp. were found in 15/71 (21.13%) of the ticks evaluated and included B. luisitaniae (11.3%), B. afzelii (7%), B. valaisiana (1.4%), and B. garinii (1.4%). Borrelia miyamotoi, from the relapsing fever Borrelia complex, was found, for the first time in Serbia, in one (1.4%) nymph collected from the environment. Co-infections between Borrelia species in ticks were not detected. These results suggest that the dominance of species within B. burgdorferi s.l. complex in I. ricinus ticks may vary over time and in different geographic regions. Further systematic studies of Borrelia species in vectors and reservoir hosts are needed to understand eco-epidemiology of these zoonotic infections and how to prevent human infection in the best way. PMID:27574731

  14. Small Heterodimer Partner (NR0B2) Coordinates Nutrient Signaling and the Circadian Clock in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Kim, Kang Ho; Zhou, Ying; Lee, Jae Man; Kettner, Nicole M; Mamrosh, Jennifer L; Choi, Sungwoo; Fu, Loning; Moore, David D

    2016-09-01

    Circadian rhythm regulates multiple metabolic processes and in turn is readily entrained by feeding-fasting cycles. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the peripheral clock senses nutrition availability remain largely unknown. Bile acids are under circadian control and also increase postprandially, serving as regulators of the fed state in the liver. Here, we show that nuclear receptor Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), a regulator of bile acid metabolism, impacts the endogenous peripheral clock by directly regulating Bmal1. Bmal1-dependent gene expression is altered in Shp knockout mice, and liver clock adaptation is delayed in Shp knockout mice upon restricted feeding. These results identify SHP as a potential mediator connecting nutrient signaling with the circadian clock. PMID:27427832

  15. Oligoarthritis caused by Borrelia bavariensis, Austria, 2014.

    PubMed

    Markowicz, Mateusz; Ladstatter, Stefan; Schotta, Anna M; Reiter, Michael; Pomberger, Gerhard; Stanek, Gerold

    2015-06-01

    A case of Lyme oligoarthritis occurred in an 11-year-old boy in Vienna, Austria. DNA of Borrelia bavariensis was detected by PCR in 2 aspirates obtained from different joints. Complete recovery was achieved after a 4-week course with amoxicillin. Lyme arthritis must be considered in patients from Europe who have persisting joint effusions.

  16. Oligoarthritis Caused by Borrelia bavariensis, Austria, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Ladstätter, Stefan; Schötta, Anna M.; Reiter, Michael; Pomberger, Gerhard; Stanek, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    A case of Lyme oligoarthritis occurred in an 11-year-old boy in Vienna, Austria. DNA of Borrelia bavariensis was detected by PCR in 2 aspirates obtained from different joints. Complete recovery was achieved after a 4-week course with amoxicillin. Lyme arthritis must be considered in patients from Europe who have persisting joint effusions. PMID:25992945

  17. Vasopressor meets vasodepressor: The AT1-B2 receptor heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Quitterer, Ursula; AbdAlla, Said

    2014-04-01

    The AT1 receptor for the vasopressor angiotensin II is one of the most important drug targets for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Sensitization of the AT1 receptor system is a common feature contributing to the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular disorders but underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. More than a decade ago, evidence was provided for control of AT1R activation by heterodimerization with the B2 receptor for the vasodepressor peptide, bradykinin, a physiological counterpart of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. AT1-B2 receptor heterodimerization was shown to enhance AT1R-stimulated signaling under pathophysiological conditions such as experimental and human pregnancy hypertension. Notably, AT1R signal sensitization of patients with preeclampsia hypertension was attributed to AT1R-B2R heterodimerization. Vice versa, transgenic mice lacking the AT1-B2 receptor heterodimer due to targeted deletion of the B2R gene showed a significantly reduced AT1R-stimulated vasopressor response compared to transgenic mice with abundant AT1R-B2R heterodimerization. Biophysical methods such as BRET and FRET confirmed those data by demonstrating efficient AT1-B2 receptor heterodimerization in transfected cells and transgenic mice. Recently, a study on AT1R-specific biased agonism directed the focus to the AT1-B2 receptor heterodimer again. The β-arrestin-biased [Sar1,Ile4,Ile8]-angiotensin II promoted not only the recruitment of β-arrestin to the AT1R but also stimulated the down-regulation of the AT1R-associated B2 receptor by co-internalization. Thereby specific targeting of the AT1R-B2R heterodimer became feasible and could open the way to a new class of drugs, which specifically interfere with pathological angiotensin II-AT1 receptor system activation.

  18. Novel insights about the MDM2/MDM4 heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Fabiola

    2016-03-01

    MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and MDM4 (double minute 4 human homolog, also known as MDMX) inhibit the activity of tumor protein p53 (TP53, best known as p53) through their heterodimerization. New evidence indicates that under stress conditions the heterodimer is modified, leading to different activities of the single molecules. In particular, following lethal DNA damage, MDM2 and MDM4 dissociate and MDM4 promotes the stabilization of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) and the phosphorylation of p53, resulting in transcriptional repression of antiapoptotic targets of p53/HIPK2. PMID:27308591

  19. Virulence of recurrent infestations with Borrelia-infected ticks in a Borrelia-amplifying bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylen, Dieter J. A.; Müller, Wendt; Vermeulen, Anke; Sprong, Hein; Matthysen, Erik

    2015-11-01

    Lyme disease cases caused by Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. bacteria is increasing steadily in Europe, in part due to the expansion of the vector, Ixodes ricinus. Wild reservoir hosts are typically recurrently infested. Understanding the impact of these cumulative parasite exposures on the host’s health is, therefore, central to predict the distribution of tick populations and their pathogens. Here, we have experimentally investigated the symptoms of disease caused by recurrent infestations in a common songbird (Parus major). Birds were exposed three times in succession to ticks collected in a Borrelia endemic area. Health and immune measures were analyzed in order to investigate changes in response to tick infestation and Borrelia infection rate. Nitric oxide levels increased with the Borrelia infection rate, but this effect was increasingly counteracted by mounting tick infestation rates. Tick infestations equally reduced haematocrit during each cycle. But birds overcompensated in their response to tick feeding, having higher haematocrit values during tick-free periods depending on the number of ticks they had been previously exposed to. Body condition showed a similar overshooting response in function of the severity of the Borrelia infection. The observed overcompensation increases the bird’s energetic needs, which may result in an increase in transmission events.

  20. Virulence of recurrent infestations with Borrelia-infected ticks in a Borrelia-amplifying bird.

    PubMed

    Heylen, Dieter J A; Müller, Wendt; Vermeulen, Anke; Sprong, Hein; Matthysen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease cases caused by Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. bacteria is increasing steadily in Europe, in part due to the expansion of the vector, Ixodes ricinus. Wild reservoir hosts are typically recurrently infested. Understanding the impact of these cumulative parasite exposures on the host's health is, therefore, central to predict the distribution of tick populations and their pathogens. Here, we have experimentally investigated the symptoms of disease caused by recurrent infestations in a common songbird (Parus major). Birds were exposed three times in succession to ticks collected in a Borrelia endemic area. Health and immune measures were analyzed in order to investigate changes in response to tick infestation and Borrelia infection rate. Nitric oxide levels increased with the Borrelia infection rate, but this effect was increasingly counteracted by mounting tick infestation rates. Tick infestations equally reduced haematocrit during each cycle. But birds overcompensated in their response to tick feeding, having higher haematocrit values during tick-free periods depending on the number of ticks they had been previously exposed to. Body condition showed a similar overshooting response in function of the severity of the Borrelia infection. The observed overcompensation increases the bird's energetic needs, which may result in an increase in transmission events. PMID:26553505

  1. Virulence of recurrent infestations with Borrelia-infected ticks in a Borrelia-amplifying bird

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Dieter J. A.; Müller, Wendt; Vermeulen, Anke; Sprong, Hein; Matthysen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease cases caused by Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. bacteria is increasing steadily in Europe, in part due to the expansion of the vector, Ixodes ricinus. Wild reservoir hosts are typically recurrently infested. Understanding the impact of these cumulative parasite exposures on the host’s health is, therefore, central to predict the distribution of tick populations and their pathogens. Here, we have experimentally investigated the symptoms of disease caused by recurrent infestations in a common songbird (Parus major). Birds were exposed three times in succession to ticks collected in a Borrelia endemic area. Health and immune measures were analyzed in order to investigate changes in response to tick infestation and Borrelia infection rate. Nitric oxide levels increased with the Borrelia infection rate, but this effect was increasingly counteracted by mounting tick infestation rates. Tick infestations equally reduced haematocrit during each cycle. But birds overcompensated in their response to tick feeding, having higher haematocrit values during tick-free periods depending on the number of ticks they had been previously exposed to. Body condition showed a similar overshooting response in function of the severity of the Borrelia infection. The observed overcompensation increases the bird’s energetic needs, which may result in an increase in transmission events. PMID:26553505

  2. RNA recognition by the DNA end-binding Ku heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Andrew B; Goodrich, Karen J; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-06-01

    Most nucleic acid-binding proteins selectively bind either DNA or RNA, but not both nucleic acids. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku heterodimer is unusual in that it has two very different biologically relevant binding modes: (1) Ku is a sequence-nonspecific double-stranded DNA end-binding protein with prominent roles in nonhomologous end-joining and telomeric capping, and (2) Ku associates with a specific stem-loop of TLC1, the RNA subunit of budding yeast telomerase, and is necessary for proper nuclear localization of this ribonucleoprotein enzyme. TLC1 RNA-binding and dsDNA-binding are mutually exclusive, so they may be mediated by the same site on Ku. Although dsDNA binding by Ku is well studied, much less is known about what features of an RNA hairpin enable specific recognition by Ku. To address this question, we localized the Ku-binding site of the TLC1 hairpin with single-nucleotide resolution using phosphorothioate footprinting, used chemical modification to identify an unpredicted motif within the hairpin secondary structure, and carried out mutagenesis of the stem-loop to ascertain the critical elements within the RNA that permit Ku binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the Ku-binding site is present in additional budding yeast telomerase RNAs and discuss the possibility that RNA binding is a conserved function of the Ku heterodimer.

  3. Blood-Borne Candidatus Borrelia algerica in a Patient with Prolonged Fever in Oran, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Fotso Fotso, Aurélien; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Mouffok, Nadjet; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2015-11-01

    To improve the knowledge base of Borrelia in north Africa, we tested 257 blood samples collected from febrile patients in Oran, Algeria, between January and December 2012 for Borrelia species using flagellin gene polymerase chain reaction sequencing. A sequence indicative of a new Borrelia sp. named Candidatus Borrelia algerica was detected in one blood sample. Further multispacer sequence typing indicated this Borrelia sp. had 97% similarity with Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia recurrentis. In silico comparison of Candidatus B. algerica spacer sequences with those of Borrelia hispanica and Borrelia garinii revealed 94% and 89% similarity, respectively. Candidatus B. algerica is a new relapsing fever Borrelia sp. detected in Oran. Further studies may help predict its epidemiological importance.

  4. Borrelia burgdorferi stimulates macrophages to secrete higher levels of cytokines and chemokines than Borrelia afzelii or Borrelia garinii.

    PubMed

    Strle, Klemen; Drouin, Elise E; Shen, Shiqian; El Khoury, Joseph; McHugh, Gail; Ruzic-Sabljic, Eva; Strle, Franc; Steere, Allen C

    2009-12-15

    To delineate the inflammatory potential of the 3 pathogenic species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, we stimulated monocyte-derived macrophages from healthy human donors with 10 isolates each of B. burgdorferi, Borrelia afzelii, or Borrelia garinii recovered from erythema migrans skin lesions of patients with Lyme borreliosis from the United States or Slovenia. B. burgdorferi isolates from the United States induced macrophages to secrete significantly higher levels of interleukin (IL)-8, CCL3, CCL4, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor than B. garinii or B. afzelii isolates. Consistent with this response in cultured macrophages, chemokine and cytokine levels in serum samples of patients from whom the isolates were obtained were significantly greater in B. burgdorferi-infected patients than in B. afzelii- or B. garinii-infected patients. These results demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that B. burgdorferi has greater inflammatory potential than B. afzelii and B. garinii, which may account in part for variations in the clinical manifestations of Lyme borreliosis.

  5. [Criteria for evaluation of immunoblots using Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto for diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Honegr, K; Havlasová, J; Gebouský, P; Dostál, V; Pellantová, V; Skrabková, Z; Hulínská, D

    2001-11-01

    The immunoblot was prepared from genotypes Borrelia afzelii (KC 90), Borrelia garinii (M 192) and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (B 31). Sera of 63 patients with different forms of Lyme borreliosis were examined and 40 healthy donors in the endemic area of the disease. In class IgM in the group of patients significantly more frequently antibodies against OspC, p39, p41 B. afzelii, p39, p41, p66, p83 B. garinii and OspC1, OspA, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto were found. In class IgG there were antibodies against p39, p41, p93 B. afzelii, p14, p41, p93 B. garinii and OspA, OspC p93 B. burgdorferi sensu lato. Based on the assembled results by means of discrimination analysis and logistic regression the most suitable combinations of antigens for evaluation of immunoblots in different genotypes were determined. Furthermore evaluation was suggested using a combination of antigens of several genotypes which led to an increased sensitivity and specificity of the immunoblot. Tables were prepared for easier evaluation of newly examined sera samples.

  6. [Heterogeneity of the gene P83/100 of Borrelia borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex].

    PubMed

    Fomenko, N V; Sabitova, Iu B; Khasnatinov, M A; Gol'tsova, N A; Danchinova, G A; Bataa, Zh; Ambed, D; Stronin, O V

    2007-01-01

    The 35 full-length Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex a83/100 gene nucleotide sequences were determined. High level of homology was observed in the nucleotide sequences corresponding to the strains and isolates of Borrelia fzelii. The analysis of the nucleotide sequences revealed two groups of Borrelia garinii. The most variable p83/100 gene region containing species-typical insertions and deletions was demonstrated to be included into the region where the antigenic determinants of protein were encoded. According to the data obtained in this work, the modification of the P83/100 protein structure and immunological properties could be suggested to exist even within species. The results of this work could be used for receiving recombinant P83/100 proteins useful for diagnostic applications.

  7. Laboratory Cultivation and Maintenance of Borrelia miyamotoi.

    PubMed

    Stone, Brandee L; Brissette, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a relapsing fever tick-borne pathogen found in Ixodes spp. (hard) ticks. In vitro culturing has proven difficult despite initial reports of cultures maintained in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly-II (BSK-II) medium. The ability to culture in vitro opens many avenues for investigating the genetics and physiology of bacterial species. This unit describes methods for the maintenance and cultivation of B. miyamotoi in liquid medium. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27517334

  8. Purine Salvage Pathways among Borrelia Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Jonas; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Guyard, Cyril; Lawrence, Kevin; Gherardini, Frank C.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2007-01-01

    Genome sequencing projects on two relapsing fever spirochetes, Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia turicatae, revealed differences in genes involved in purine metabolism and salvage compared to those in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The relapsing fever spirochetes contained six open reading frames that are absent from the B. burgdorferi genome. These genes included those for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hpt), adenylosuccinate synthase (purA), adenylosuccinate lyase (purB), auxiliary protein (nrdI), the ribonucleotide-diphosphate reductase alpha subunit (nrdE), and the ribonucleotide-diphosphate reductase beta subunit (nrdF). Southern blot assays with multiple Borrelia species and isolates confirmed the presence of these genes in the relapsing fever group of spirochetes but not in B. burgdorferi and related species. TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the chromosomal genes (hpt, purA, and purB) were transcribed in vitro and in mice. Phosphoribosyltransferase assays revealed that, in general, B. hermsii exhibited significantly higher activity than did the B. burgdorferi cell lysate, and enzymatic activity was observed with adenine, hypoxanthine, and guanine as substrates. B. burgdorferi showed low but detectable phosphoribosyltransferase activity with hypoxanthine even though the genome lacks a discernible ortholog to the hpt gene in the relapsing fever spirochetes. B. hermsii incorporated radiolabeled hypoxanthine into RNA and DNA to a much greater extent than did B. burgdorferi. This complete pathway for purine salvage in the relapsing fever spirochetes may contribute, in part, to these spirochetes achieving high cell densities in blood. PMID:17502392

  9. Is Localized Scleroderma Caused by Borrelia burgdorferi?

    PubMed

    Zinchuk, Alexander N; Kalyuzhna, Lidiya D; Pasichna, Iryna A

    2016-09-01

    Despite considerable achievements in the study of localized scleroderma, the etiology of the disease has not been investigated completely. Borrelia burgdorferi-the agent of Lyme disease-is suggested to be one of the possible etiological factors of localized scleroderma. However, among scientists, this hypothesis is quite controversial. We have conducted investigations of the level of IgM and IgG class antibodies to B. burgdorferi in the serum of patients with localized scleroderma. To rationally substantiate the role of B. burgdorferi in the occurrence of localized scleroderma, thirty-two patients with localized scleroderma treated at an in-patient department were examined. The level of anti-Borrelia antibodies was determined in ELISA. Diagnostic levels of IgM and/or IgG were detected in 18.8% of patients with localized scleroderma, which is more than in the population (p < 0.01). Positive levels of anti-Borrelia antibodies in patients with localized scleroderma confirm the borreliosis nature of the disease, requiring conduction of complex antimicrobial treatment. PMID:27387068

  10. A phylogenomic and molecular marker based proposal for the division of the genus Borrelia into two genera: the emended genus Borrelia containing only the members of the relapsing fever Borrelia, and the genus Borreliella gen. nov. containing the members of the Lyme disease Borrelia (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex).

    PubMed

    Adeolu, Mobolaji; Gupta, Radhey S

    2014-06-01

    The genus Borrelia contains two groups of organisms: the causative agents of Lyme disease and their relatives and the causative agents of relapsing fever and their relatives. These two groups are morphologically indistinguishable and are difficult to distinguish biochemically. In this work, we have carried out detailed comparative genomic analyses on protein sequences from 38 Borrelia genomes to identify molecular markers in the forms of conserved signature inserts/deletions (CSIs) that are specifically found in the Borrelia homologues, and conserved signature proteins (CSPs) which are uniquely present in Borrelia species. Our analyses have identified 31 CSIs and 82 CSPs that are uniquely shared by all sequenced Borrelia species, providing molecular markers for this group of organisms. In addition, our work has identified 7 CSIs and 21 CSPs which are uniquely found in the Lyme disease Borrelia species and eight CSIs and four CSPs that are specific for members of the relapsing fever Borrelia group. Additionally, 38 other CSIs, in proteins which are uniquely found in Borrelia species, also distinguish these two groups of Borrelia. The identified CSIs and CSPs provide novel and highly specific molecular markers for identification and distinguishing between the Lyme disease Borrelia and the relapsing fever Borrelia species. We also report the results of average nucleotide identity (ANI) analysis on Borrelia genomes and phylogenetic analysis for these species based upon 16S rRNA sequences and concatenated sequences for 25 conserved proteins. These analyses also support the distinctness of the two Borrelia clades. On the basis of the identified molecular markers, the results from ANI and phylogenetic studies, and the distinct pathogenicity profiles and arthropod vectors used by different Borrelia spp. for their transmission, we are proposing a division of the genus Borrelia into two separate genera: an emended genus Borrelia, containing the causative agents of relapsing

  11. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  12. Convergent Synthesis of Two Fluorescent Ebselen-Coumarin Heterodimers

    PubMed Central

    Küppers, Jim; Schulz-Fincke, Anna Christina; Palus, Jerzy; Giurg, Mirosław; Skarżewski, Jacek; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The organo-seleniumdrug ebselen exhibits a wide range of pharmacological effects that are predominantly due to its interference with redox systems catalyzed by seleno enzymes, e.g., glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase. Moreover, ebselen can covalently interact with thiol groups of several enzymes. According to its pleiotropic mode of action, ebselen has been investigated in clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of different ailments. Fluorescence-labeled probes containing ebselen are expected to be suitable for further biological and medicinal studies. We therefore designed and synthesized two coumarin-tagged activity-based probes bearing the ebselen warhead. The heterodimers differ by the nature of the spacer structure, for which—in the second compound—a PEG/two-amide spacer was introduced. The interaction of this probe and of ebselen with two cysteine proteases was investigated. PMID:27399725

  13. Engineering coherence among excited states in synthetic heterodimer systems.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Dugan; Griffin, Graham B; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-06-21

    The design principles that support persistent electronic coherence in biological light-harvesting systems are obscured by the complexity of such systems. Some electronic coherences in these systems survive for hundreds of femtoseconds at physiological temperatures, suggesting that coherent dynamics may play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer. Coherent effects may increase energy transfer efficiency relative to strictly incoherent transfer mechanisms. Simple, tractable, manipulable model systems are required in order to probe the fundamental physics underlying these persistent electronic coherences, but to date, these quantum effects have not been observed in small molecules. We have engineered a series of rigid synthetic heterodimers that can serve as such a model system and observed quantum beating signals in their two-dimensional electronic spectra consistent with the presence of persistent electronic coherences.

  14. Convergent Synthesis of Two Fluorescent Ebselen-Coumarin Heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Küppers, Jim; Schulz-Fincke, Anna Christina; Palus, Jerzy; Giurg, Mirosław; Skarżewski, Jacek; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The organo-seleniumdrug ebselen exhibits a wide range of pharmacological effects that are predominantly due to its interference with redox systems catalyzed by seleno enzymes, e.g., glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase. Moreover, ebselen can covalently interact with thiol groups of several enzymes. According to its pleiotropic mode of action, ebselen has been investigated in clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of different ailments. Fluorescence-labeled probes containing ebselen are expected to be suitable for further biological and medicinal studies. We therefore designed and synthesized two coumarin-tagged activity-based probes bearing the ebselen warhead. The heterodimers differ by the nature of the spacer structure, for which-in the second compound-a PEG/two-amide spacer was introduced. The interaction of this probe and of ebselen with two cysteine proteases was investigated. PMID:27399725

  15. A new diketopiperazine heterodimer from an endophytic fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Bin; Li, Yue-Lan; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Yuan, Hui-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    One new diketopiperazine heterodimer, asperazine A (1), and eight known compounds, asperazine (2), cyclo(d-Phe-l-Trp) (3), cyclo(l-Trp-l-Trp) (4), 4-(hydroxymethyl)-5,6-dihydro-pyran-2-one (5), walterolactone A (6), and campyrones A-C (7-9), were isolated from an endophytic fungus Aspergillus niger. Their structures were determined unequivocally on the basis of extensive spectroscopic data analysis. This is the first report of the presence of compound 3 as a natural product. Cytotoxicity test against human cancer cell lines PC3, A2780, K562, MBA-MD-231, and NCI-H1688 revealed that compounds 1 and 2 had weak activities.

  16. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    PubMed

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  17. A heterodimer-selective agonist shows in vivo relevance of G protein-coupled receptor dimers.

    PubMed

    Waldhoer, Maria; Fong, Jamie; Jones, Robert M; Lunzer, Mary M; Sharma, Shiv K; Kostenis, Evi; Portoghese, Philip S; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2005-06-21

    There has been much speculation regarding the functional relevance of G protein-coupled receptor heterodimers, primarily because demonstrating their existence in vivo has proven to be a considerable challenge. Here we show that the opioid agonist ligand 6'-guanidinonaltrindole (6'-GNTI) has the unique property of selectively activating only opioid receptor heterodimers but not homomers. Importantly, 6'-GNTI is an analgesic, thereby demonstrating that opioid receptor heterodimers are indeed functionally relevant in vivo. However, 6'-GNTI induces analgesia only when it is administered in the spinal cord but not in the brain, suggesting that the organization of heterodimers is tissue-specific. This study demonstrates a proof of concept for tissue-selective drug targeting based on G protein-coupled receptor heterodimerization. Importantly, targeting opioid heterodimers could provide an approach toward the design of analgesic drugs with reduced side effects.

  18. Structural Basis of the Heterodimer Formation between Cell Shape-Determining Proteins Csd1 and Csd2 from Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    An, Doo Ri; Im, Ha Na; Jang, Jun Young; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Jieun; Yoon, Hye Jin; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar; Kim, Soon-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the human gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori requires its high motility, which depends on the helical cell shape. In H. pylori, several genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5, and csd6) play key roles in determining the cell shape by alteration of cross-linking or by trimming of peptidoglycan stem peptides. H. pylori Csd1, Csd2, and Csd3/HdpA are M23B metallopeptidase family members and may act as d,d-endopeptidases to cleave the d-Ala4-mDAP3 peptide bond of cross-linked dimer muropeptides. Csd3 functions also as the d,d-carboxypeptidase to cleave the d-Ala4-d-Ala5 bond of the muramyl pentapeptide. To provide a basis for understanding molecular functions of Csd1 and Csd2, we have carried out their structural characterizations. We have discovered that (i) Csd2 exists in monomer-dimer equilibrium and (ii) Csd1 and Csd2 form a heterodimer. We have determined crystal structures of the Csd2121–308 homodimer and the heterodimer between Csd1125–312 and Csd2121–308. Overall structures of Csd1125–312 and Csd2121–308 monomers are similar to each other, consisting of a helical domain and a LytM domain. The helical domains of both Csd1 and Csd2 play a key role in the formation of homodimers or heterodimers. The Csd1 LytM domain contains a catalytic site with a Zn2+ ion, which is coordinated by three conserved ligands and two water molecules, whereas the Csd2 LytM domain has incomplete metal ligands and no metal ion is bound. Structural knowledge of these proteins sheds light on the events that regulate the cell wall in H. pylori. PMID:27711177

  19. Genomic Characteristics of Chinese Borrelia burgdorferi Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xuexia; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Huixin; Liu, Wei; Chen, Chen; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    In China, B. burgdorferi, B.garinii, B. afzelii and B. yangtze sp. nov have been reported; B.garinii and B. afzelii are the main pathogenic genotypes. But until now only one Chinese strain was reported with whole genome sequence. In order to further understand the genomic characteristics and diversity of Chinese Borrelia strains, 5 isolates from China were sequenced and compared with the whole genome sequences of strains in other areas. The results showed a high degree of conservation within the linear chromosome of Chinese strains, whereas plasmid showed a much larger diversity according to the majority genomic information of plasmids. The genome sequences of the five Chinese strains were compared with the corresponding reference strains, respectively, according to the genospecies. Pairwise analysis demonstrates that there are only 70 SNPs between the genomes of CS4 and B31. However, there are many more SNPs between the genomes of QX-S13 and VS116, PD91 and PBi, FP1 and PKo, R9 and Pko, respectively. Gene comparison showed some important different genes. OspA was one of the important different genes. Comparative genomic studies have found that OspA gene sequences of PD91 and R9 had great differences compared with the sequence of B31. OspA gene sequence of R9 had a 96bp deletion; OspA gene of PD91 had two deletions: 9bp and 10 bp. To conclude, we showed the genomic characteristics of four genotype Chinese B. burgdorferi strains. The genomic sequence of B. yangtze sp. nov and differences from B. valaisiana were first reported. Comparative analysis of Chinese strains with the different Borrelia species from other areas will help us to understand evolution and pathogenesis of Chinese Borrelia burgdorferi strains. PMID:27093540

  20. Relapsing Fever Borreliae: A Global Review.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Sally J

    2015-12-01

    Relapsing fever borreliae were notorious and feared infectious agents that earned their place in history through their devastating impact as causes of both epidemic and endemic infection. They are now considered more as an oddity, and their burden of infection is largely overshadowed by other infections such as malaria, which presents in a similar clinical way. Despite this, they remain the most common bacterial infection in some developing countries. Transmitted by soft ticks or lice, these fascinating spirochetes have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to survive within their diverse environments. PMID:26593261

  1. Borrelia infection and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Melbye, Mads; Munksgaard, Lars; Smedby, Karin Ekström; Rostgaard, Klaus; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Roos, Göran; Hansen, Mads; Adami, Hans-Olov; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Reports of the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi DNA in malignant lymphomas have raised the hypothesis that infection with B burgdorferi may be causally related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) development. We conducted a Danish-Swedish case-control study including 3055 NHL patients and 3187 population controls. History of tick bite or Borrelia infection was ascertained through structured telephone interviews and through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serum analyses for antibodies against B burgdorferi in a subset of 1579 patients and 1358 controls. Statistical associations with risk of NHL, including histologic subtypes, were assessed by logistic regression. Overall risk of NHL was not associated with self-reported history of tick bite (odds ratio [OR] = 1.0; 95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.1), Borrelia infection (OR = 1.3 [0.96-1.8]) or the presence of anti-Borrelia antibodies (OR = 1.3 [0.9-2.0]). However, in analyses of NHL subtypes, self-reported history of B burgdorferi infection (OR = 2.5 [1.2-5.1]) and seropositivity for anti-Borrelia antibodies (OR = 3.6 [1.8-7.4]) were both associated with risk of mantle cell lymphoma. Notably, this specific association was also observed in persons who did not recall Borrelia infection yet tested positive for anti-Borrelia antibodies (OR = 4.2 [2.0-8.9]). Our observations suggest a previously unreported association between B burgdorferi infection and risk of mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:18424667

  2. The NF45/NF90 Heterodimer Contributes to the Biogenesis of 60S Ribosomal Subunits and Influences Nucleolar Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wandrey, Franziska; Montellese, Christian; Koos, Krisztian; Badertscher, Lukas; Bammert, Lukas; Cook, Atlanta G.; Zemp, Ivo; Horvath, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin enhancer binding factors ILF2 (NF45) and ILF3 (NF90/NF110) have been implicated in various cellular pathways, such as transcription, microRNA (miRNA) processing, DNA repair, and translation, in mammalian cells. Using tandem affinity purification, we identified human NF45 and NF90 as components of precursors to 60S (pre-60S) ribosomal subunits. NF45 and NF90 are enriched in nucleoli and cosediment with pre-60S ribosomal particles in density gradient analysis. We show that association of the NF45/NF90 heterodimer with pre-60S ribosomal particles requires the double-stranded RNA binding domains of NF90, while depletion of NF45 and NF90 by RNA interference leads to a defect in 60S biogenesis. Nucleoli of cells depleted of NF45 and NF90 have altered morphology and display a characteristic spherical shape. These effects are not due to impaired rRNA transcription or processing of the precursors to 28S rRNA. Consistent with a role of the NF45/NF90 heterodimer in nucleolar steps of 60S subunit biogenesis, downregulation of NF45 and NF90 leads to a p53 response, accompanied by induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21/CIP1, which can be counteracted by depletion of RPL11. Together, these data indicate that NF45 and NF90 are novel higher-eukaryote-specific factors required for the maturation of 60S ribosomal subunits. PMID:26240280

  3. Structure-guided development of heterodimer-selective GPCR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Harald; Schellhorn, Tamara; Gienger, Marie; Schaab, Carolin; Kaindl, Jonas; Leeb, Laurin; Clark, Timothy; Möller, Dorothee; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand complexes allow a rational design of novel molecular probes and drugs. Here we report the structure-guided design, chemical synthesis and biological investigations of bivalent ligands for dopamine D2 receptor/neurotensin NTS1 receptor (D2R/NTS1R) heterodimers. The compounds of types 1–3 consist of three different D2R pharmacophores bound to an affinity-generating lipophilic appendage, a polyethylene glycol-based linker and the NTS1R agonist NT(8-13). The bivalent ligands show binding affinity in the picomolar range for cells coexpressing both GPCRs and unprecedented selectivity (up to three orders of magnitude), compared with cells that only express D2Rs. A functional switch is observed for the bivalent ligands 3b,c inhibiting cAMP formation in cells singly expressing D2Rs but stimulating cAMP accumulation in D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. Moreover, the newly synthesized bivalent ligands show a strong, predominantly NTS1R-mediated β-arrestin-2 recruitment at the D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. PMID:27457610

  4. The Role of Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP) in NAFLD Improvement after Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Myronovych, Andriy; Salazar-Gonzales, Rosa-Maria; Ryan, Karen K.; Miles, Lili; Zhang, Wujuan; Jha, Pinky; Wang, Li; Setchell, Kenneth DR; Seeley, Randy J; Kohli, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Objective Bile acids (BA) are elevated after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR) is critical to the success of murine VSG. BA down-regulate hepatic lipogenesis by activating the FXR-small heterodimer partner (SHP) pathway. We tested the role of SHP in fatty liver disease (NAFLD) improvement after VSG. Design and Methods Wild type (WT), SHP liver-transgenic (SHP-Tg) and SHP knockout (SHP-KO) high-fat diet (HFD) fed mice underwent either VSG or Sham surgery. Body weight, BA level & composition, steatosis and BA metabolism gene expression were evaluated. Results Obese WT mice post-VSG lost weight, reduced steatosis, decreased plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), had more BA absorptive ileal area, and elevated serum BA. Obese SHP-Tg mice post-VSG also lost weight and had decreased steatosis. SHP-KO mice were however resistant to steatosis despite weight gain on a HFD. Further SHP-KO mice that underwent VSG lost weight but developed hepatic inflammation and had increased ALT. Conclusions VSG produces weight loss independent of SHP status. SHP ablation creates a pro-inflammatory phenotype which is exacerbated after VSG despite weight loss. These inflammatory alterations are possibly related to factors extrinsic to a direct manifestation of NASH. PMID:25376397

  5. The lipid raft proteome of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Pérez, Alberto; Coleman, James L; Benach, Jorge L

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that have significant amounts of cholesterol and a selective set of proteins that have been associated with multiple biological functions. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is one of an increasing number of bacterial pathogens that incorporates cholesterol onto its membrane, and form cholesterol glycolipid domains that possess all the hallmarks of eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this study, we isolated lipid rafts from cultured B. burgdorferi as a detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction on density gradients, and characterized those molecules that partitioned exclusively or are highly enriched in these domains. Cholesterol glycolipids, the previously known raft-associated lipoproteins OspA and OpsB, and cholera toxin partitioned into the lipid rafts fraction indicating compatibility with components of the DRM. The proteome of lipid rafts was analyzed by a combination of LC-MS/MS or MudPIT. Identified proteins were analyzed in silico for parameters that included localization, isoelectric point, molecular mass and biological function. The proteome provided a consistent pattern of lipoproteins, proteases and their substrates, sensing molecules and prokaryotic homologs of eukaryotic lipid rafts. This study provides the first analysis of a prokaryotic lipid raft and has relevance for the biology of Borrelia, other pathogenic bacteria, as well as for the evolution of these structures. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002365 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002365).

  6. Proteome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Response to Environmental Change

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Nicora, Carrie D.; Camp, David G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-11-02

    We examined global changes in protein expression in the B31 strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, in response to two environmental cues (pH and temperature) chosen for their reported similarity to those encountered at different stages of the organism’s life cycle. Multidimensional nano-liquid chromatographic separations coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to examine the array of proteins (i.e., the proteome) of B. burgdorferi for different pH and temperature culture conditions. Changes in pH and temperature elicited in vitro adaptations of this spirochete known to cause Lyme disease and led to alterations in protein expression that are associated with increased microbial pathogenesis. We identified 1031 proteins that represent 59% of the annotated genome of B. burgdorferi and elucidated a core proteome of 414 proteins that were present in all environmental conditions investigated. Observed changes in protein abundances indicated varied replicon usage, as well as proteome functional distributions between the in vitro cell culture conditions. Surprisingly, the pH and temperature conditions that mimicked B. burgdorferi residing in the gut of a fed tick showed a marked reduction in protein diversity. Additionally, the results provide us with leading candidates for exploring how B. burgdorferi adapts to and is able to survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions and lay a foundation for planned in situ studies of B. burgdorferi isolated from the tick midgut and infected animals.

  7. Bacteriolytic activity of selected vertebrate sera for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia bissettii.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Amy J; Lane, Robert S; Kurtenbach, Klaus; Miller, Michael; Schriefer, Martin E; Zeldner, Nordin; Piesman, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    An in vitro assay to evaluate the bacteriolytic activity of the complement pathway was applied to 2 strains of Borrelia bissettii, CO501 and DN127, and compared with that of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto B31. Sera from mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and the Western Fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) were completely borreliacidal for B. burgdorferi and for both strains of B. bissettii. Serum from Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) was nonlytic for B. burgdorferi and partially lytic for B. bissettii strains, CO-501 and DN127. Serum from a New Zealand White rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was partially lytic for all 3 strains of Borrelia, whereas serum from white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) were nonlytic for all 3 Borrelia strains. The spectrum of complement sensitivity of B. bissettii appears to be similar to that of European B. afzelii in that tested rodent serum is not lytic to these 2 genospecies. Interestingly, both B. bissettii and B. afzelii have been found to be closely associated with rodents. Complement sensitivity demonstrated in these experiments may suggest and possibly predict specific reservoir-host associations. PMID:14740924

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi Stimulates Macrophages to Secrete Higher Levels of Cytokines and Chemokines than Borrelia afzelii or Borrelia garinii

    PubMed Central

    Strle, Klemen; Drouin, Elise E.; Shen, Shiqian; El Khoury, Joseph; McHugh, Gail; Ruzic-Sabljic, Eva; Strle, Franc; Steere, Allen C.

    2009-01-01

    To delineate the inflammatory potential of the 3 pathogenic species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, we stimulated monocyte-derived macrophages from healthy human donors with 10 isolates each of B. burgdorferi, B. afzelii, or B. garinii recovered from erythema migrans (EM) skin lesions of Lyme borreliosis patients from the United States or Slovenia. U.S. B. burgdorferi isolates induced macrophages to secrete significantly higher levels of IL-8, CCL3, CCL4, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF than B. garinii or B. afzelii isolates. Consistent with this response in cultured macrophages, the cytokine levels in sera of patients from whom the isolates were obtained were significantly greater in B. burgdorferi-infected patients than in B. afzelii- or B. garinii-infected patients. These results demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that B. burgdorferi has greater inflammatory potential than B. afzelii and B. garinii, which may account in part for variations in the clinical manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:19909078

  9. Autophagy suppresses host adaptive immune responses toward Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Buffen, Kathrin; Oosting, Marije; Li, Yang; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy increased the Borrelia burgdorferi induced innate cytokine production in vitro, but little is known regarding the effect of autophagy on in vivo models of Borrelia infection. Here, we showed that ATG7-deficient mice that were intra-articular injected with Borrelia spirochetes displayed increased joint swelling, cell influx, and enhanced interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 production by inflamed synovial tissue. Because both interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 are linked to the development of adaptive immune responses, we examine the function of autophagy on Borrelia induced adaptive immunity. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with autophagy inhibitors showed an increase in interleukin-17, interleukin-22, and interferon-γ production in response to exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi. Increased IL-17 production was dependent on IL-1β release but, interestingly, not on interleukin-23 production. In addition, cytokine quantitative trait loci in ATG9B modulate the Borrelia induced interleukin-17 production. Because high levels of IL-17 have been found in patients with confirmed, severe, chronic borreliosis, we propose that the modulation of autophagy may be a potential target for anti-inflammatory therapy in patients with persistent Lyme disease. PMID:27101991

  10. Experimental Borrelia burgdorferi infection in Peromyscus leucopus.

    PubMed

    Moody, K D; Terwilliger, G A; Hansen, G M; Barthold, S W

    1994-04-01

    We evaluated the susceptibility of laboratory-reared adult and infant white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) to a known pathogenic isolate of Borrelia burgdorferi (N40). Two-month-old and 3-day-old Peromyscus were inoculated intradermally with 10(6) to 10(7) spirochetes. At 21 days for adults or 30 days for infants post inoculation, mice were killed, and tissues were cultured for spirochetes and examined microscopically. Based on serology and culture, adult mice became infected but did not have any gross or microscopic lesions. Mice inoculated as infants became infected, and also developed carditis and multifocal arthritis. Contact transmission between inoculated infants and their naive mothers was not observed. Age at inoculation appeared to be a critical factor in inducing Lyme borreliosis lesions in Peromyscus leucopus, as in other species.

  11. Diversity and Distribution of Borrelia hermsii

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Porcella, Stephen F.

    2007-01-01

    Borrelia hermsii is the most common cause of tickborne relapsing fever in North America. DNA sequences of the 16S–23S rDNA noncoding intergenic spacer (IGS) region were determined for 37 isolates of this spirochete. These sequences distinguished the 2 genomic groups of B. hermsii identified previously with other loci. Multiple IGS genotypes were identified among isolates from an island, which suggested that birds might play a role in dispersing these spirochetes in nature. In support of this theory, all stages of the tick vector Ornithodoros hermsi fed successfully on birds in the laboratory and advanced in their life cycle. B. hermsii produced a detectable spirochetemia in 1 chicken inoculated subcutaneously. Additional work is warranted to explore the role of birds as enzootic hosts for this relapsing fever spirochete. PMID:17552097

  12. Biomechanics of Borrelia burgdorferi Vascular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ebady, Rhodaba; Niddam, Alexandra F; Boczula, Anna E; Kim, Yae Ram; Gupta, Nupur; Tang, Tian Tian; Odisho, Tanya; Zhi, Hui; Simmons, Craig A; Skare, Jon T; Moriarty, Tara J

    2016-09-01

    Systemic dissemination of microbes is critical for progression of many infectious diseases and is associated with most mortality due to bacterial infection. The physical mechanisms mediating a key dissemination step, bacterial association with vascular endothelia in blood vessels, remain unknown. Here, we show that endothelial interactions of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi under physiological shear stress mechanistically resemble selectin-dependent leukocyte rolling. Specifically, these interactions are mediated by transfer of mechanical load along a series of adhesion complexes and are stabilized by tethers and catch bond properties of the bacterial adhesin BBK32. Furthermore, we found that the forces imposed on adhesive bonds under flow may be small enough to permit active migration driven by bacterial flagellar motors. These findings provide insight into the biomechanics of bacterial-vascular interactions and demonstrate that disseminating bacteria and circulating host immune cells share widely conserved mechanisms for interacting with endothelia under physiological shear stress. PMID:27568563

  13. Whole-genome sequencing of Borrelia garinii BgVir, isolated from Taiga ticks (Ixodes persulcatus).

    PubMed

    Brenner, Evgeniy V; Kurilshikov, Alexander M; Stronin, Oleg V; Fomenko, Nataliya V

    2012-10-01

    Most Lyme borreliosis cases in Russia result from Borrelia garinii NT29 group infection. Borrelias of this group circulate exclusively in Ixodes persulcatus ticks, which are seldom found beyond Russia and the far east. Here we report the whole-genome sequence of Borrelia garinii BgVir isolated from an I. persulcatus female.

  14. New Borrelia species detected in ixodid ticks in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about Borrelia species transmitted by hard ticks in Ethiopia. The present study was conducted from November 2011 through March 2014 to address the occurrence and molecular identity of these bacteria in ixodid ticks infesting domestic animals in Oromia, Ethiopia. A total of 767 ixodid ticks collected from domestic animals were screened for Borrelia DNA by quantitative (q) real-time PCR followed by standard PCR and sequencing to identify the species. Overall, 3.8% (29/767) of the tested ticks were positive for Borrelia DNA, including 8/119 (6.7%) Amblyomma cohaerens, 1/42 (2.4%) Am. gemma, 3/53 (5.7%) Am. variegatum, 5/22 (22.7%) Amblyomma larvae, 3/60 (5%) Amblyomma nymphs, 2/139 (1.4%) Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, 2/31 (6.4%) Rh. decoloratus nymphs, and 5/118 (4.2%) Rh. pulchellus using 16S genus-specific qPCR. The prevalence of Borrelia DNA was significantly higher in genus Amblyomma (20/298, 6.7%) than in the genus Rhipicephalus (9/417, 2.1%) ticks (P=0.001). Sequencing of PCR products from the flaB and 16S rRNA genes of Borrelia spp. from Amblyomma ticks showed the presence of a new species between the relapsing fever and Lyme disease groups. However, Borrelia sp. detected in Rhipicephalus ticks clustered with B. theileri/B. lonestari. The human pathogenicity of the Borrelia sp. detected in Amblyomma ticks from Ethiopia has not yet been investigated, whereas the Borrelia sp. detected in Rhipicephalus ticks in our study is the causative agent of bovine borreliosis in cattle and may have veterinary importance in different parts of Ethiopia. Furthermore, the detection of previously unrecognized Borrelia species in Amblyomma and Rhipicephalus ticks in Ethiopia generates additional questions concerning the bacterial fauna in hard ticks and will prompt researchers to perform detailed studies for better understanding of ixodid ticks associated bacteria.

  15. New Borrelia species detected in ixodid ticks in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about Borrelia species transmitted by hard ticks in Ethiopia. The present study was conducted from November 2011 through March 2014 to address the occurrence and molecular identity of these bacteria in ixodid ticks infesting domestic animals in Oromia, Ethiopia. A total of 767 ixodid ticks collected from domestic animals were screened for Borrelia DNA by quantitative (q) real-time PCR followed by standard PCR and sequencing to identify the species. Overall, 3.8% (29/767) of the tested ticks were positive for Borrelia DNA, including 8/119 (6.7%) Amblyomma cohaerens, 1/42 (2.4%) Am. gemma, 3/53 (5.7%) Am. variegatum, 5/22 (22.7%) Amblyomma larvae, 3/60 (5%) Amblyomma nymphs, 2/139 (1.4%) Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, 2/31 (6.4%) Rh. decoloratus nymphs, and 5/118 (4.2%) Rh. pulchellus using 16S genus-specific qPCR. The prevalence of Borrelia DNA was significantly higher in genus Amblyomma (20/298, 6.7%) than in the genus Rhipicephalus (9/417, 2.1%) ticks (P=0.001). Sequencing of PCR products from the flaB and 16S rRNA genes of Borrelia spp. from Amblyomma ticks showed the presence of a new species between the relapsing fever and Lyme disease groups. However, Borrelia sp. detected in Rhipicephalus ticks clustered with B. theileri/B. lonestari. The human pathogenicity of the Borrelia sp. detected in Amblyomma ticks from Ethiopia has not yet been investigated, whereas the Borrelia sp. detected in Rhipicephalus ticks in our study is the causative agent of bovine borreliosis in cattle and may have veterinary importance in different parts of Ethiopia. Furthermore, the detection of previously unrecognized Borrelia species in Amblyomma and Rhipicephalus ticks in Ethiopia generates additional questions concerning the bacterial fauna in hard ticks and will prompt researchers to perform detailed studies for better understanding of ixodid ticks associated bacteria. PMID:25843811

  16. Global ecology and epidemiology of Borrelia garinii spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Comstedt, Pär; Jakobsson, Tobias; Bergström, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a tick-transmitted infectious disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s. l.). In Europe, three different Borrelia species are the main causative agents of LB: B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), Borrelia afzelii, and Borrelia garinii. The latter depends heavily on birds as its main reservoir hosts. In fact, birds can act both as biological carriers of Borrelia and transporters of infected ticks. The seasonal migration of many bird species not only aid in the spread of B. garinii to new foci but also influence the high level of diversity found within this species. B. garinii have been isolated not only from terrestrial birds in Europe, but also from seabirds worldwide, and homology between isolates in these two different infection cycles suggests an overlap and exchange of strains. In addition, it has been shown that birds can maintain and spread B. garinii genotypes associated with LB in humans. This review article discusses the importance of birds in the ecology and epidemiology of B. garinii spirochetes. PMID:22957111

  17. Transstadial Transmission of Borrelia turcica in Hyalomma aegyptium Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Kalmár, Zsuzsa; Cozma, Vasile; Sprong, Hein; Jahfari, Setareh; D’Amico, Gianluca; Mărcuțan, Daniel I.; Ionică, Angela M.; Magdaş, Cristian; Modrý, David; Mihalca, Andrei D.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia turcica comprises the third major group of arthropod-transmitted borreliae and is phylogenetically divergent from other Borrelia groups. The novel group of Borrelia was initially isolated from Hyalomma aegyptium ticks in Turkey and it was recently found in blood and multiple organs of tortoises exported from Jordan to Japan. However, the ecology of these spirochetes and their development in ticks or the vertebrate hosts were not investigated in detail; our aims were to isolate the pathogen and to evaluate the possibility of transstadial transmission of Borrelia turcica by H. aegyptium ticks. Ticks were collected from Testudo graeca tortoises during the summer of 2013 from southeastern Romania. Engorged nymphs were successfully molted to the adult stage. Alive B. turcica was isolated from molted ticks by using Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK) II medium. Four pure cultures of spirochetes were obtained and analyzed by PCR and sequencing. Sequence analysis of glpQ, gyrB and flaB revealed 98%–100% similarities with B. turcica. H. aegyptium ticks collected from T. graeca tortoises were able to pass the infection with B. turcica via transstadial route, suggesting its vectorial capacity. PMID:25695663

  18. Growth differentiation factor 9:bone morphogenetic protein 15 heterodimers are potent regulators of ovarian functions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jia; Li, Qinglei; Wigglesworth, Karen; Rangarajan, Adithya; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Peterson, Randall T; Eppig, John J; Thompson, Thomas B; Matzuk, Martin M

    2013-02-19

    The TGF-β superfamily is the largest family of secreted proteins in mammals, and members of the TGF-β family are involved in most developmental and physiological processes. Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), oocyte-secreted paralogs of the TGF-β superfamily, have been shown genetically to control ovarian physiology. Although previous studies found that GDF9 and BMP15 homodimers can modulate ovarian pathways in vitro, the functional species-specific significance of GDF9:BMP15 heterodimers remained unresolved. Therefore, we engineered and produced purified recombinant mouse and human GDF9 and BMP15 homodimers and GDF9:BMP15 heterodimers to compare their molecular characteristics and physiological functions. In mouse granulosa cell and cumulus cell expansion assays, mouse GDF9 and human BMP15 homodimers can up-regulate cumulus expansion-related genes (Ptx3, Has2, and Ptgs2) and promote cumulus expansion in vitro, whereas mouse BMP15 and human GDF9 homodimers are essentially inactive. However, we discovered that mouse GDF9:BMP15 heterodimer is ∼10- to 30-fold more biopotent than mouse GDF9 homodimer, and human GDF9:BMP15 heterodimer is ∼1,000- to 3,000-fold more bioactive than human BMP15 homodimer. We also demonstrate that the heterodimers require the kinase activities of ALK4/5/7 and BMPR2 to activate SMAD2/3 but unexpectedly need ALK6 as a coreceptor in the signaling complex in granulosa cells. Our findings that GDF9:BMP15 heterodimers are the most bioactive ligands in mice and humans compared with homodimers explain many puzzling genetic and physiological data generated during the last two decades and have important implications for improving female fertility in mammals.

  19. Serological survey of Borrelia infection of dogs in Sapporo, Japan, where Borrelia garinii infection was previously detected

    PubMed Central

    UESAKA, Karin; MAEZAWA, Masaki; INOKUMA, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    A serological survey of Borrelia infection of dogs was performed in Sapporo, Japan, where Borrelia garinii infection in dogs was detected in 2011. A total of 314 serum samples were collected from dogs that visited three animal hospitals in Sapporo from 2012 to 2014. The two-step evaluation method, involving screening ELISA followed by Western blot analysis, was used to detect antibodies against Borrelia species. A total of 34 samples were positive by ELISA. Among those 34 samples, 32 were positive for Borrelia spp. by Western blot. These findings suggest that the 32 dogs (10.2%) generated antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, such as B. garinii or B. afzelii. Antibody positivity was 7.6% and 13.3% for dogs living in urban and rural areas, respectively. Dogs with a history of tick infestation showed a positive rate of 16.7%, which was higher, although not significantly, than the 6.7% among dogs without a history. PMID:26522809

  20. Rickettsiae and Borrelia burgdorferi in ixodid ticks.

    PubMed Central

    Magnarelli, L A; Andreadis, T G; Stafford, K C; Holland, C J

    1991-01-01

    Nymphs and adults of hard-bodied ticks were collected in Connecticut and tested by direct and indirect immunofluorescence staining methods for rickettsiae and Borrelia burgdorferi. Of the 609 Ixodes dammini ticks examined, 59 (9.7%) harbored rickettsialike microorganisms in hemocytes (blood cells). These bacteria reacted with fluorescein-conjugated antiserum to Ehrlichia canis, the etiologic agent of with fluorescein-conjugated antiserum to Ehrlichia canis, the etiologic agent of canine ehrlichiosis. Prevalence of infection ranged from 6.8 to 12.7% for males and females, respectively. Although the specific identities of the hemocytic rickettsialike organisms are unknown, they share antigens with ehrlichiae. Electron microscopy revealed rickettsiae in ovarian tissues of I. dammini that also had infected hemocytes. Rickettsialike organisms were also observed in the hemocytes of 5 (6.9%) of 73 Dermacentor variabilis ticks. In analyses for B. burgdorferi, 146 (23.7%) of 617 I. dammini ticks harbored these spirochetes in midguts. Hemocytic rickettsialike microorganisms coexisted with B. burgdorferi in 36 (6.7%) of the 537 nymphs and adults of I. dammini examined. I. dammini, with its broad host range, has the potential to acquire multiple microorganisms. Images PMID:1757551

  1. Borrelia burgdorferi infection surrounding La Crosse, Wis.

    PubMed Central

    Callister, S M; Agger, W A; Schell, R F; Ellingson, J L

    1988-01-01

    This investigation defined the extent of Borrelia burgdorferi infection surrounding La Crosse, Wis. White-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus or P. maniculatis, were captured from sites in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa and cultured for B. burgdorferi to define the local boundaries of the midwestern Lyme disease area. All foci of B. burgdorferi infection (N1, N2, N3, and N4) were located north of interstate highway 90 except focus S2, which was south of the highway near Fort McCoy, Wis. The interstate highway may have been a barrier to deer movement which slowed the southward dispersal of Ixodes dammini. B. burgdorferi was isolated from 12 (63%) of the mice captured from site N4, which was adjacent to the western border of Fort McCoy. Unexpectedly, no B. burgdorferi-infected mice were isolated at site N0, located north of interstate highway 90 and enclosed by areas in which B. burgdorferi infection is endemic. This site is surrounded by natural barriers which may have slowed the spread of I. dammini by deer. The Wisconsin area in which B. burgdorferi is endemic should now include the surrounding area north of interstate highway 90 west from Fort McCoy to the Mississippi River. Additional studies are needed to define the rapidity, limits, and means of I. dammini dispersal into southern Wisconsin. PMID:3230137

  2. Minimal-Change Disease Secondary to Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Gołembiewska, Edyta; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz; Kędzierska, Karolina

    2012-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a chronic illness caused by tick-transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Borreliosis can be extremely threatening if it is not diagnosed and treated in early stages. Kidneys are not typically involved in the disease. However, in infected dogs, Lyme nephritis is present in 5–10% of cases. It is associated with rapidly progressing renal failure. Histopathological examination shows mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with diffuse tubular necrosis, (Dambach et al. (1997)). In available literature, there were reports of human's glomerulonephritis associated with Borrelia burgdorferi infection. These cases refer to membranous and mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (Kirmizis and Chatzidimitriou (2010), Zachäus (2008), and Kirmizis et al. (2004)). In this paper, we present the case of minimal-change disease (MCD) as a result of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. PMID:24527240

  3. Molecular Typing of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato: Taxonomic, Epidemiological, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiqing; van Dam, Alje P.; Schwartz, Ira; Dankert, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the spirochete that causes human Lyme borreliosis (LB), is a genetically and phenotypically divergent species. In the past several years, various molecular approaches have been developed and used to determine the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity within the LB-related spirochetes and their potential association with distinct clinical syndromes. These methods include serotyping, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, DNA-DNA reassociation analysis, rRNA gene restriction analysis (ribotyping), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, plasmid fingerprinting, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting analysis, species-specific PCR and PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and other conserved genes. On the basis of DNA-DNA reassociation analysis, 10 different Borrelia species have been described within the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex: B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia japonica, Borrelia andersonii, Borrelia valaisiana, Borrelia lusitaniae, Borrelia tanukii, Borrelia turdi, and Borrelia bissettii sp. nov. To date, only B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii are well known to be responsible for causing human disease. Different Borrelia species have been associated with distinct clinical manifestations of LB. In addition, Borrelia species are differentially distributed worldwide and may be maintained through different transmission cycles in nature. In this paper, the molecular methods used for typing of B. burgdorferi sensu lato are reviewed. The current taxonomic status of B. burgdorferi sensu lato and its epidemiological and clinical implications, especiallly correlation between the variable clinical presentations and the infecting Borrelia species, are discussed in detail. PMID:10515907

  4. Blackbirds Turdus merula as competent reservoirs for Borrelia turdi and Borrelia valaisiana in Portugal: evidence from a xenodiagnostic experiment.

    PubMed

    Norte, Ana C; Lopes de Carvalho, Isabel; Núncio, Maria S; Ramos, Jaime A; Gern, Lise

    2013-08-01

    To confirm that thrushes, such as blackbirds Turdus merula, play a role as reservoir for some Borrelia genospecies, we performed a xenodiagnostic experiment with blackbirds captured in a mixed wood located in Western Portugal where Borrelia turdi, an uncommon genospecies in Europe, was the most prevalent genospecies associated with birds. Two out of five birds harboured B. turdi infected Ixodes frontalis at the time of capture. Four out of five birds transmitted spirochaetes to Ixodes ricinus xenodiagnostic ticks: two birds transmitted Borrelia valaisiana to 25.7% and 10.5% of ticks, and two transmitted B. turdi to 6.4% and 5.4% of ticks. Our results showed that blackbirds transmit B. valaisiana and B. turdi to I. ricinus feeding larvae, acting as reservoir hosts for these genospecies in nature.

  5. Blackbirds Turdus merula as competent reservoirs for Borrelia turdi and Borrelia valaisiana in Portugal: evidence from a xenodiagnostic experiment.

    PubMed

    Norte, Ana C; Lopes de Carvalho, Isabel; Núncio, Maria S; Ramos, Jaime A; Gern, Lise

    2013-08-01

    To confirm that thrushes, such as blackbirds Turdus merula, play a role as reservoir for some Borrelia genospecies, we performed a xenodiagnostic experiment with blackbirds captured in a mixed wood located in Western Portugal where Borrelia turdi, an uncommon genospecies in Europe, was the most prevalent genospecies associated with birds. Two out of five birds harboured B. turdi infected Ixodes frontalis at the time of capture. Four out of five birds transmitted spirochaetes to Ixodes ricinus xenodiagnostic ticks: two birds transmitted Borrelia valaisiana to 25.7% and 10.5% of ticks, and two transmitted B. turdi to 6.4% and 5.4% of ticks. Our results showed that blackbirds transmit B. valaisiana and B. turdi to I. ricinus feeding larvae, acting as reservoir hosts for these genospecies in nature. PMID:23864576

  6. Function of a p24 Heterodimer in Morphogenesis and Protein Transport in Penicillium oxalicum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangzhong; Liu, Kuimei; Han, Lijuan; Jiang, Baojie; Wang, Mingyu; Fang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The lignocellulose degradation capacity of filamentous fungi has been widely studied because of their cellulase hypersecretion. The p24 proteins in eukaryotes serve important functions in this secretory pathway. However, little is known about the functions of the p24 proteins in filamentous fungi. In this study, four p24 proteins were identified in Penicillium oxalicum. Six p24 double-deletion strains were constructed, and further studies were carried out with the ΔerpΔpδ strain. The experimental results suggested that Erp and Pδ form a p24 heterodimer in vivo. This p24 heterodimer participates in important morphogenetic events, including sporulation, hyphal growth, and lateral branching. The results suggested that the p24 heterodimer mediates protein transport, particularly that of cellobiohydrolase. Analysis of the intracellular proteome revealed that the ΔerpΔpδ double mutant is under secretion stress due to attempts to remove proteins that are jammed in the endomembrane system. These results suggest that the p24 heterodimer participates in morphogenesis and protein transport. Compared with P. oxalicum Δerp, a greater number of cellular physiological pathways were impaired in ΔerpΔpδ. This finding may provide new insights into the secretory pathways of filamentous fungi. PMID:26149342

  7. Function of a p24 Heterodimer in Morphogenesis and Protein Transport in Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangzhong; Liu, Kuimei; Han, Lijuan; Jiang, Baojie; Wang, Mingyu; Fang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The lignocellulose degradation capacity of filamentous fungi has been widely studied because of their cellulase hypersecretion. The p24 proteins in eukaryotes serve important functions in this secretory pathway. However, little is known about the functions of the p24 proteins in filamentous fungi. In this study, four p24 proteins were identified in Penicillium oxalicum. Six p24 double-deletion strains were constructed, and further studies were carried out with the ΔerpΔpδ strain. The experimental results suggested that Erp and Pδ form a p24 heterodimer in vivo. This p24 heterodimer participates in important morphogenetic events, including sporulation, hyphal growth, and lateral branching. The results suggested that the p24 heterodimer mediates protein transport, particularly that of cellobiohydrolase. Analysis of the intracellular proteome revealed that the ΔerpΔpδ double mutant is under secretion stress due to attempts to remove proteins that are jammed in the endomembrane system. These results suggest that the p24 heterodimer participates in morphogenesis and protein transport. Compared with P. oxalicum Δerp, a greater number of cellular physiological pathways were impaired in ΔerpΔpδ. This finding may provide new insights into the secretory pathways of filamentous fungi. PMID:26149342

  8. Binding of retinoic acid receptor heterodimers to DNA. A role for histones NH2 termini.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Formstecher, P

    1998-05-15

    The retinoic acid signaling pathway is controlled essentially through two types of nuclear receptors, RARs and RXRs. Ligand dependent activation or repression of retinoid-regulated genes is dependent on the binding of retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/9-cis-retinoic acid receptor (RXR) heterodimers to retinoic acid response element (RARE). Although unliganded RXR/RAR heterodimers bind constitutively to DNA in vitro, a clear in vivo ligand-dependent occupancy of the RARE present in the RARbeta2 gene promoter has been reported (Dey, A., Minucci, S., and Ozato, K. (1994) Mol. Cell. Biol. 14, 8191-8201). Nucleosomes are viewed as general repressors of the transcriptional machinery, in part by preventing the access of transcription factors to DNA. The ability of hRXRalpha/hRARalpha heterodimers to bind to a nucleosomal template in vitro has therefore been examined. The assembly of a fragment from the RARbeta2 gene promoter, which contains a canonical DR5 RARE, into a nucleosome core prevented hRXRalpha/hRARalpha binding to this DNA, in conditions where a strong interaction is observed with a linear DNA template. However, histone tails removal by limited proteolysis and histone hyperacetylation yielded nucleosomal RAREs able to bind to hRXRalpha/hRARalpha heterodimers. These data establish therefore the role of histones NH2 termini as a major impediment to retinoid receptors access to DNA, and identify histone hyperacetylation as a potential physiological regulator of retinoid-induced transcription.

  9. Structural and spectropotentiometric analysis of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutant reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, Nina S.; Li, Liang; Marino, Antony R.; Tereshko, Valentina; Ostafin, Agnes; Popova, Julia A.; Bylina, Edward J.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Norris, Jr., James R.

    2010-07-22

    Heterodimer mutant reaction centers (RCs) of Blastochloris viridis were crystallized using microfluidic technology. In this mutant, a leucine residue replaced the histidine residue which had acted as a fifth ligand to the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) of the primary electron donor dimer M site (HisM200). With the loss of the histidine-coordinated Mg, one bacteriochlorophyll of the special pair was converted into a bacteriopheophytin (BPhe), and the primary donor became a heterodimer supermolecule. The crystals had dimensions 400 x 100 x 100 {micro}m, belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, and were isomorphous to the ones reported earlier for the wild type (WT) strain. The structure was solved to a 2.5 {angstrom} resolution limit. Electron-density maps confirmed the replacement of the histidine residue and the absence of Mg. Structural changes in the heterodimer mutant RC relative to the WT included the absence of the water molecule that is typically positioned between the M side of the primary donor and the accessory BChl, a slight shift in the position of amino acids surrounding the site of the mutation, and the rotation of the M194 phenylalanine. The cytochrome subunit was anchored similarly as in the WT and had no detectable changes in its overall position. The highly conserved tyrosine L162, located between the primary donor and the highest potential heme C{sub 380}, revealed only a minor deviation of its hydroxyl group. Concomitantly to modification of the BChl molecule, the redox potential of the heterodimer primary donor increased relative to that of the WT organism (772 mV vs. 517 mV). The availability of this heterodimer mutant and its crystal structure provides opportunities for investigating changes in light-induced electron transfer that reflect differences in redox cascades.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of HER2-mediated Effects on HER2 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Endocytosis: DISTRIBUTION OF HOMO- AND HETERODIMERS DEPENDS ON RELATIVE HER2 LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee ); Wiley, H Steven ); Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-05-15

    Endocytic trafficking plays an important role in the regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. Many cell types express multiple EGFR family members (including EGFR, HER2, HER3 and/or HER4) that interact to form an array of homo- and hetero-dimers. Differential trafficking of these receptors should strongly affect signaling through this system by changing substrate access and heterodimerization efficiency. Because of the complexity of these dynamic processes we used a quantitative, computational model to understand this system. As a test case, parameters characterizing EGFR and HER2 interactions were derived using experimental data obtained from mammary epithelial cells constructed to express different levels of HER2. With this data we were able to estimate receptor-specific internalization rate constants and dimer uncoupling rate constants. These parameters were not otherwise experimentally accessible due to the complex system interplay. Our models indicated that HER2:EGFR heterodimers traffic as single entities. Direct experiments using EGF and anti-HER2 and anti-EGFR antibodies using independently derived cell lines confirmed many of the predictions of the model. Furthermore, our model could predict the relationship between HER2 expression levels and the transient distribution of EGFR homodimers and heterodimers. Our results suggest that the levels of HER2 found on normal cells are barely at the threshold necessary to drive efficient heterodimerization. Thus, altering local HER2 concentrations in membrane microdomains could serve as an effective mechanism for regulating HER2 heterodimerization and could explain why HER2 overexpression found in some cancers have such a profound effect on cell physiology.

  11. Geographic Differences in Genetic Locus Linkages for Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Travinsky, Bridgit; Bunikis, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Borrelia burdorferi genotype in the northeastern United States is associated with Lyme borreliosis severity. Analysis of DNA sequences of the outer surface protein C gene and rrs-rrlA intergenic spacer from extracts of Ixodes spp. ticks in 3 US regions showed linkage disequilibrium between the 2 loci within a region but not consistently between regions. PMID:20587192

  12. Borrelia miyamotoi–Associated Neuroborreliosis in Immunocompromised Person

    PubMed Central

    Lobenstein, Sabine; Hermann, Beate; Margos, Gabriele; Fingerle, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a newly recognized human pathogen in the relapsing fever group of spirochetes. We investigated a case of B. miyamotoi infection of the central nervous system resembling B. burgdorferi–induced Lyme neuroborreliosis and determined that this emergent agent of central nervous system infection can be diagnosed with existing methods. PMID:27533748

  13. Borrelia miyamotoi-Associated Neuroborreliosis in Immunocompromised Person.

    PubMed

    Boden, Katharina; Lobenstein, Sabine; Hermann, Beate; Margos, Gabriele; Fingerle, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a newly recognized human pathogen in the relapsing fever group of spirochetes. We investigated a case of B. miyamotoi infection of the central nervous system resembling B. burgdorferi-induced Lyme neuroborreliosis and determined that this emergent agent of central nervous system infection can be diagnosed with existing methods. PMID:27533748

  14. Large linear plasmids of Borrelia species that cause relapsing fever.

    PubMed

    Miller, Shelley Campeau; Porcella, Stephen F; Raffel, Sandra J; Schwan, Tom G; Barbour, Alan G

    2013-08-01

    Borrelia species of relapsing fever (RF) and Lyme disease (LD) lineages have linear chromosomes and both linear and circular plasmids. Unique to RF species, and little characterized to date, are large linear plasmids of ∼160 kb, or ∼10% of the genome. By a combination of Sanger and next-generation methods, we determined the sequences of large linear plasmids of two New World species: Borrelia hermsii, to completion of its 174-kb length, and B. turicatae, partially to 114 kb of its 150 kb. These sequences were then compared to corresponding sequences of the Old World species B. duttonii and B. recurrentis and to plasmid sequences of LD Borrelia species. The large plasmids were largely colinear, except for their left ends, about 27 kb of which was inverted in New World species. Approximately 60% of the B. hermsii lp174 plasmid sequence was repetitive for 6 types of sequence, and half of its open reading frames encoded hypothetical proteins not discernibly similar to proteins in the database. The central ∼25 kb of all 4 linear plasmids was syntenic for orthologous genes for plasmid maintenance or partitioning in Borrelia species. Of all the sequenced linear and circular plasmids in Borrelia species, the large plasmid's putative partition/replication genes were most similar to those of the 54-kb linear plasmids of LD species. Further evidence for shared ancestry was the observation that two of the hypothetical proteins were predicted to be structurally similar to the LD species' CspA proteins, which are encoded on the 54-kb plasmids.

  15. DNA sequencing diagnosis of off-season spirochetemia with low bacterial density in Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia miyamotoi infections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S; Vigliotti, Veronica S; Jones, William; Moorcroft, Thomas A; Lantsman, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    A highly conserved 357-bp segment of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rDNA) of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and the correspondent 358-bp segment of the Borrelia miyamotoi gene were amplified by a single pair of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for detection, and the amplicons were used as the templates for direct Sanger DNA sequencing. Reliable molecular diagnosis of these borreliae was confirmed by sequence alignment analysis of the hypervariable regions of the PCR amplicon, using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) provided by the GenBank. This methodology can detect and confirm B. burgdorferi and B. miyamotoi in blood samples of patients with off-season spirochetemia of low bacterial density. We found four B. miyamotoi infections among 14 patients with spirochetemia, including one patient co-infected by both B. miyamotoi and B. burgdorferi in a winter month when human exposure to tick bites is very limited in the Northeast of the U.S.A. We conclude that sensitive and reliable tests for these two Borrelia species should be implemented in the microbiology laboratory of hospitals located in the disease-endemic areas, for timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the patients at an early stage of the infection to prevent potential tissue damages.

  16. Frequency of Borrelia in Morphea Lesion by Polymerase Chain Reaction in Northeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Mohhamad Javad; Sharifi, Norieh; Khooei, Alireza; Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Khaje-Daluee, Mohammad; Shamsi, Azadeh; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2015-01-01

    Background: The etiology of morphea is still unknown. Borrelia spp. as a causative agent of morphea has been discussed since 1985, but the relationship remains uncertain. Objectives: We aimed to find the frequency of Borrelia in morphea lesions by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in northeast of Iran. Patients and Methods: Sixty six patients with morphea were prospectively included in the present study. For each patient, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of skin lesion biopsies were examined for Borrelia spp. DNA using PCR. Results: No Borrelia DNA was detected by PCR in skin lesions of patients with morphea. Conclusions: The result of this study showed no relationship between Borrelia infection and morphea lesions and in other word indicated that morphea, at least in Iran, is not caused by Borrelia spp. PMID:26468360

  17. The patterns of binding of RAR, RXR and TR homo- and heterodimers to direct repeats are dictated by the binding specificites of the DNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Mader, S; Chen, J Y; Chen, Z; White, J; Chambon, P; Gronemeyer, H

    1993-01-01

    We show here that, in addition to generating an increase in DNA binding efficiency, heterodimerization of retinoid X receptor (RXR) with either retinoic acid receptor (RAR) or thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alters the binding site repertoires of RAR, RXR and TR homodimers. The binding site specificities of both homo- and heterodimers appear to be largely determined by their DNA binding domains (DBDs), and are dictated by (i) homocooperative DNA binding of the RXR DBD, (ii) heterocooperative DNA binding of RXR/RAR and RXR/TR DBDs, and (iii) steric hindrance. No homodimerization domain exists in the DBDs of TR and RAR. The dimerization function which is located in the ligand binding domain further stabilizes, but in general does not change, the repertoire dictated by the corresponding DBD(s). The binding repertoire can be further modified by the actual sequence of the binding site. We also provide evidence supporting the view that the cooperative binding of the RXR/RAR and RXR/TR DBDs to directly repeated elements is anisotropic, with interactions between the dimerization interfaces occurring only with RXR bound to the 5' located motif. This polarity, which appears to be maintained in the full-length receptor heterodimers, may constitute a novel parameter in promoter-specific transactivation. Images PMID:8262045

  18. Lack of serum antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Swedo, Susan E; Thurm, Audrey; Bayat, Ahmad; Levin, Andrew E; Marques, Adriana; Iadarola, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    It has been proposed that Borrelia burgdorferi infection is present in ∼25% of children with autism spectrum disorders. In this study, antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi were assessed in autistic (n = 104), developmentally delayed (n = 24), and healthy control (n = 55) children. No seropositivity against Borrelia burgdorferi was detected in the children with and without autism. There was no evidence of an association between Lyme disease and autism. PMID:23658391

  19. Whole genome sequence of an unusual Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolate

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W. G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    Human Lyme disease is caused by a number of related Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species. We report here the complete genome sequence of Borrelia sp. isolate SV1 from Finland. This isolate is to date the closest known relative of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, but it is sufficiently genetically distinct from that species that it and its close relatives warrant its candidacy for new-species status. We suggest that this isolate should be named 'Borrelia finlandensis.'

  20. Retinoic acid-induced developmental defects are mediated by RARbeta/RXR heterodimers in the pharyngeal endoderm.

    PubMed

    Matt, Nicolas; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Wendling, Olivia; Chambon, Pierre; Mark, Manuel

    2003-05-01

    Fusion and hypoplasia of the first two branchial arches, a defect typically observed in retinoic acid (RA) embryopathy, is generated in cultured mouse embryos upon treatment with BMS453, a synthetic compound that exhibits retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta) agonistic properties in transfected cells. By contrast, no branchial arch defects are observed following treatment with synthetic retinoids that exhibit RARalpha or RARgamma agonistic properties. The BMS453-induced branchial arch defects are mediated through RAR activation, as they are similar to those generated by a selective pan-RAR agonist, are prevented by a selective pan-RAR antagonist and cannot be mimicked by exposure to a pan-RXR agonist alone. They are enhanced in the presence of a pan-RXR agonist, and cannot be generated in Rarb-null embryos. Furthermore, they are accompanied, in the morphologically altered region, by ectopic expression of Rarb and of several other direct RA target genes. Therefore, craniofacial abnormalities characteristic of the RA embryopathy are mediated through ectopic activation of RARbeta/RXR heterodimers, in which the ligand-dependent activity of RXR is subordinated to that of RARbeta. Endodermal cells lining the first two branchial arches respond to treatment with the RARbeta agonist, in contrast to neural crest cells and ectoderm, which suggests that a faulty endodermal regionalization is directly responsible for RA-induced branchial arch dysmorphologies. Additionally, we provide the first in vivo evidence that the synthetic RARbeta agonist BMS453 exhibits an antagonistic activity on the two other RAR isotypes. PMID:12668623

  1. Fano resonance assisting plasmonic circular dichroism from nanorice heterodimers for extrinsic chirality

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li; Huang, Yingzhou; Fang, Liang; Chen, Guo; Wei, Hua; Fang, Yurui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the circular dichroisms (CD) of nanorice heterodimers consisting of two parallel arranged nanorices with the same size but different materials are investigated theoretically. Symmetry-breaking is introduced by using different materials and oblique incidence to achieve strong CD at the vicinity of Fano resonance peaks. We demonstrate that all Au-Ag heterodimers exhibit multipolar Fano resonances and strong CD effect. A simple quantitative analysis shows that the structure with larger Fano asymmetry factor has stronger CD. The intensity and peak positions of the CD effect can be flexibly tuned in a large range by changing particle size, shape, the inter-particle distance and surroundings. Furthermore, CD spectra exhibit high sensitivity to ambient medium in visible and near infrared regions. Our results here are beneficial for the design and application of high sensitive CD sensors and other related fields. PMID:26538460

  2. Quantum Dot–Bridge–Fullerene Heterodimers with Controlled Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, M.; Xu, Z.

    2011-06-27

    A series of donor-bridge-acceptor systems in the form of core/shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-bridge-fullerene heterodimers (see picture) with varying bridge length and varying quantum dot size were self-assembled by a surface-based stepwise method to demonstrate control of the rate and of the magnitude of fluctuations of photoinduced electron transfer at the single-molecule level.

  3. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1-β1-α2-β2-α3-αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {(1)H}-(15)N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27-34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  4. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  5. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J; Kresin, Vitaly V

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N-H···N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  6. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1–β1–α2–β2–α3–αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {1H}-15N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27–34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  7. Binary Toxin Subunits of Lysinibacillus sphaericus Are Monomeric and Form Heterodimers after In Vitro Activation.

    PubMed

    Surya, Wahyu; Chooduang, Sivadatch; Choong, Yeu Khai; Torres, Jaume; Boonserm, Panadda

    2016-01-01

    The binary toxin from Lysinibacillus sphaericus has been successfully used for controlling mosquito-transmitted diseases. An activation step shortens both subunits BinA and BinB before their interaction with membranes and internalization in midgut cells, but the precise role of this activation step is unknown. Herein, we show conclusively using three orthogonal biophysical techniques that protoxin subunits form only monomers in aqueous solution. However, in vitro activated toxins readily form heterodimers. This oligomeric state did not change after incubation of these heterodimers with detergent. These results are consistent with the evidence that maximal toxicity in mosquito larvae is achieved when the two subunits, BinA and BinB, are in a 1:1 molar ratio, and directly link proteolytic activation to heterodimerization. Formation of a heterodimer must thus be necessary for subsequent steps, e.g., interaction with membranes, or with a suitable receptor in susceptible mosquito species. Lastly, despite existing similarities between BinB C-terminal domain with domains 3 and 4 of pore-forming aerolysin, no aerolysin-like SDS-resistant heptameric oligomers were observed when the activated Bin subunits were incubated in the presence of detergents or lipidic membranes.

  8. The crystal structure of the signal recognition particle Alu RNA binding heterodimer, SRP9/14.

    PubMed Central

    Birse, D E; Kapp, U; Strub, K; Cusack, S; Aberg, A

    1997-01-01

    The mammalian signal recognition particle (SRP) is an 11S cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein that plays an essential role in protein sorting. SRP recognizes the signal sequence of the nascent polypeptide chain emerging from the ribosome, and targets the ribosome-nascent chain-SRP complex to the rough endoplasmic reticulum. The SRP consists of six polypeptides (SRP9, SRP14, SRP19, SRP54, SRP68 and SRP72) and a single 300 nucleotide RNA molecule. SRP9 and SRP14 proteins form a heterodimer that binds to the Alu domain of SRP RNA which is responsible for translation arrest. We report the first crystal structure of a mammalian SRP protein, that of the mouse SRP9/14 heterodimer, determined at 2.5 A resolution. SRP9 and SRP14 are found to be structurally homologous, containing the same alpha-beta-beta-beta-alpha fold. This we designate the Alu binding module (Alu bm), an additional member of the family of small alpha/beta RNA binding domains. The heterodimer has pseudo 2-fold symmetry and is saddle like, comprising a strongly curved six-stranded amphipathic beta-sheet with the four helices packed on the convex side and the exposed concave surface being lined with positively charged residues. PMID:9233785

  9. Binary Toxin Subunits of Lysinibacillus sphaericus Are Monomeric and Form Heterodimers after In Vitro Activation

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Yeu Khai; Torres, Jaume; Boonserm, Panadda

    2016-01-01

    The binary toxin from Lysinibacillus sphaericus has been successfully used for controlling mosquito-transmitted diseases. An activation step shortens both subunits BinA and BinB before their interaction with membranes and internalization in midgut cells, but the precise role of this activation step is unknown. Herein, we show conclusively using three orthogonal biophysical techniques that protoxin subunits form only monomers in aqueous solution. However, in vitro activated toxins readily form heterodimers. This oligomeric state did not change after incubation of these heterodimers with detergent. These results are consistent with the evidence that maximal toxicity in mosquito larvae is achieved when the two subunits, BinA and BinB, are in a 1:1 molar ratio, and directly link proteolytic activation to heterodimerization. Formation of a heterodimer must thus be necessary for subsequent steps, e.g., interaction with membranes, or with a suitable receptor in susceptible mosquito species. Lastly, despite existing similarities between BinB C-terminal domain with domains 3 and 4 of pore-forming aerolysin, no aerolysin-like SDS-resistant heptameric oligomers were observed when the activated Bin subunits were incubated in the presence of detergents or lipidic membranes. PMID:27341696

  10. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Ketene Heterodimer β-Lactones: Scope and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Ibrahim, Ahmad A; Peraino, Nicholas J; Nalla, Divya; Mondal, Mukulesh; Van Raaphorst, Maxwell; Kerrigan, Nessan J

    2016-09-01

    In this article we describe extensive studies of the catalytic asymmetric heterodimerization of ketenes to give ketene heterodimer β-lactones. The optimal catalytic system was determined to be a cinchona alkaloid derivative (TMS-quinine or Me-quinidine). The desired ketene heterodimer β-lactones were obtained in good to excellent yields (up to 90%), with excellent levels of enantioselectivity (≥90% ee for 33 Z and E isomer examples), good to excellent (Z)-olefin isomer selectivity (≥90:10 for 20 examples), and excellent regioselectivity (only one regioisomer formed). Full details of catalyst development studies, catalyst loading investigations, substrate scope exploration, protocol innovations (including double in situ ketene generation for 7 examples), and an application to a cinnabaramide A intermediate are described. The addition of lithium perchlorate (1-2 equiv) as an additive to the alkaloid catalyst system was found to favor formation of the E isomer of the ketene heterodimer. Ten examples were formed with moderate to excellent (E)-olefin isomer selectivity (74:25 to 97:3) and with excellent enantioselectivity (84-98% ee). PMID:27490092

  11. Synthesis of heterodimer radionuclide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance and single-photon emission computed tomography dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Bin; Tian, Jian; Wang, Jiaqing; Chong, Yu; Wang, Xin; Deng, Yaoyao; Tang, Minghua; Li, Yonggang; Ge, Cuicui; Pan, Yue; Gu, Hongwei

    2015-02-28

    We report a facile synthesis of bifunctional Fe3O4-Ag(125)I heterodimers for use as dual-modality imaging agents in magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We introduced (125)I, which is a clinically used radioisotope, as a SPECT reporter, into Fe3O4-Ag heterodimer nanoparticles to provide a new type of bifunctional contrast agent for MRI and SPECT imaging.

  12. Borrelia burgdorferi has minimal impact on the Lyme disease reservoir host Peromyscus leucopus.

    PubMed

    Schwanz, Lisa E; Voordouw, Maarten J; Brisson, Dustin; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2011-02-01

    The epidemiology of vector-borne zoonotic diseases is determined by encounter rates between vectors and hosts. Alterations to the behavior of reservoir hosts caused by the infectious agent have the potential to dramatically alter disease transmission and human risk. We examined the effect of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease, on one of its most important reservoir hosts, the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus. We mimic natural infections in mice using the vector (Black-legged ticks, Ixodes scapularis) and examine the immunological and behavioral responses of mouse hosts. Despite producing antibodies against B. burgdorferi, infected mice did not have elevated white blood cells compared with uninfected mice. In addition, infected and uninfected mice did not differ in their wheel-running activity. Our results suggest that infection with the spirochete B. burgdorferi has little impact on the field activity of white-footed mice. Lyme disease transmission appears to be uncomplicated by pathogen-altered behavior of this reservoir host. PMID:20569016

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi has minimal impact on the Lyme disease reservoir host Peromyscus leucopus.

    PubMed

    Schwanz, Lisa E; Voordouw, Maarten J; Brisson, Dustin; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2011-02-01

    The epidemiology of vector-borne zoonotic diseases is determined by encounter rates between vectors and hosts. Alterations to the behavior of reservoir hosts caused by the infectious agent have the potential to dramatically alter disease transmission and human risk. We examined the effect of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease, on one of its most important reservoir hosts, the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus. We mimic natural infections in mice using the vector (Black-legged ticks, Ixodes scapularis) and examine the immunological and behavioral responses of mouse hosts. Despite producing antibodies against B. burgdorferi, infected mice did not have elevated white blood cells compared with uninfected mice. In addition, infected and uninfected mice did not differ in their wheel-running activity. Our results suggest that infection with the spirochete B. burgdorferi has little impact on the field activity of white-footed mice. Lyme disease transmission appears to be uncomplicated by pathogen-altered behavior of this reservoir host.

  14. Isolation and characterization of Borrelia burgdorferi from Illinois Ixodes dammini.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A; Bouseman, J K; Kitron, U; Callister, S M; Harrison, B; Bankowski, M J; Peeples, M E; Newton, B J; Anderson, J F

    1991-08-01

    Ixodes dammini ticks from two northwestern Illinois sites were found to be infected with Borrelia burgdorferi at rates of 19 and 32%. B. burgdorferi isolates, one from each site, had protein and antigenic patterns similar to those of the B-31 strain. An indirect immunofluorescence method proved to be more sensitive than dark-field microscopy in detection of these spirochetes. A modified BSK medium containing rifampin was found to be more efficient for spirochete isolation than unsupplemented BSK medium. PMID:1761698

  15. Fluoroimmunoassay studies with solubilized antigens from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Hechemy, K E; Harris, H L; Wethers, J A; Stevens, R W; Stock, B R; Reilly, A A; Benach, J L

    1989-01-01

    Sodium deoxycholate-solubilized Borrelia burgdorferi antigen was prepared for use in a solid-phase fluoroimmunoassay (FIA-L) to detect antibodies in Lyme disease. Serum specimens were tested by FIA-L and by a microimmunofluorescence test. The FIA-L results are comparable to those of the standard microimmunofluorescence test. The overall agreement was 0.98. Moreover, the FIA-L procedure is simple and rapid; fluorescence is objectively determined and is proportional to antibody titer. Images PMID:2671034

  16. Absence of lipopolysaccharide in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, K; Rothenberg, R J; Barbour, A G

    1987-01-01

    We were unable to demonstrate the presence of the classic enterobacterium-type lipopolysaccharide in the cells of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi B31. This finding was primarily based on chemical analysis and the absence of free lipid A upon mild acid hydrolysis of the appropriate cell extracts. These results do not preclude the possible existence of an unusual lipopolysaccharide-like compound(s) in B. burgdorferi. Images PMID:3623705

  17. [Diagnostic aspects of Borrelia-infections in dogs].

    PubMed

    Hovius, K E; Houwers, D J

    2007-08-15

    This paper discusses the problem of diagnosing borreliosis (Lyme disease) in dogs. A prospective cohort study in the Kempen district, a known Borrelia focus in The Netherlands, showed that dogs with the presumptive symptoms of borreliosis, episodic malaise and lameness, had significantly higher and longer lasting anti-Borrelia IgG titers than asymptomatic dogs. A small part of these dogs also had antibodies directed against the IR6 (C6) antigen which indicates persistent active Borrelia infection. A few typical case histories are presented. Dogs with episodic malaise and lameness with persistent high IgG titers are suspect of suffering from borreliosis. IR6 antibodies make this diagnosis likely. Initially, such patients should be treated with doxycyclin (10 mg/kg 1dd) for 10 days. If the symptoms recurr within a few months, a longer treatment (eg 6 weeks) should be considered. Bernese mountain dogs were strongly over-represented among the borreliosis patients in the cohort study and most high titered samples among those submitted for--diagnostic--serology appear to come from this breed, which suggests that these dogs have difficulties with clearing this tick-borne infection. PMID:17849909

  18. Mutagenesis of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I (gI) identifies a cysteine residue critical for gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI structure, and virulence in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Rajamani, Jaya; Vlaycheva-Beisheim, Leonssia; Stamatis, Shaye; Cheng, Jason; Jones, Carol; Zehnder, James; Arvin, Ann M

    2011-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the alphaherpesvirus that causes chicken pox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). The two VZV glycoproteins gE and gI form a heterodimer that mediates efficient cell-to-cell spread. Deletion of gI yields a small-plaque-phenotype virus, ΔgI virus, which is avirulent in human skin using the xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. In the present study, 10 mutant viruses were generated to determine which residues were required for the typical function of gI. Three phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain of gI were not required for VZV virulence in vivo. Two deletion mutants mapped a gE binding region in gI to residues 105 to 125. A glycosylation site, N116, in this region did not affect virulence. Substitution of four cysteine residues highly conserved in the Alphaherpesvirinae established that C95 is required for gE/gI heterodimer formation. The C95A and Δ105-125 (with residues 105 to 125 deleted) viruses had small-plaque phenotypes with reduced replication kinetics in vitro similar to those of the ΔgI virus. The Δ105-125 virus was avirulent for human skin in vivo. In contrast, the C95A mutant replicated in vivo but with significantly reduced kinetics compared to those of the wild-type virus. In addition to abolished gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI from the C95A or the Δ105-125 mutant was not recognized by monoclonal antibodies that detect the canonical conformation of gI, demonstrating structural disruption of gI in these viruses. This alteration prevented gI incorporation into virus particles. Thus, residues C95 and 105 to 125 are critical for gI structure required for gE/gI heterodimer formation, virion incorporation, and ultimately, effective viral spread in human skin.

  19. An Invasive Mammal (the Gray Squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis) Commonly Hosts Diverse and Atypical Genotypes of the Zoonotic Pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato

    PubMed Central

    Magierecka, Agnieszka; Gilbert, Lucy; Edoff, Alissa; Brereton, Amelia; Kilbride, Elizabeth; Denwood, Matt; Birtles, Richard; Biek, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Invasive vertebrate species can act as hosts for endemic pathogens and may alter pathogen community composition and dynamics. For the zoonotic pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the agent of Lyme borreliosis, recent work shows invasive rodent species can be of high epidemiological importance and may support host-specific strains. This study examined the role of gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) (n = 679), an invasive species in the United Kingdom, as B. burgdorferi sensu lato hosts. We found that gray squirrels were frequently infested with Ixodes ricinus, the main vector of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the United Kingdom, and 11.9% were infected with B. burgdorferi sensu lato. All four genospecies that occur in the United Kingdom were detected in gray squirrels, and unexpectedly, the bird-associated genospecies Borrelia garinii was most common. The second most frequent infection was with Borrelia afzelii. Genotyping of B. garinii and B. afzelii produced no evidence for strains associated with gray squirrels. Generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) identified tick infestation and date of capture as significant factors associated with B. burgdorferi sensu lato infection in gray squirrels, with infection elevated in early summer in squirrels infested with ticks. Invasive gray squirrels appear to become infected with locally circulating strains of B. burgdorferi sensu lato, and further studies are required to determine their role in community disease dynamics. Our findings highlight the fact that the role of introduced host species in B. burgdorferi sensu lato epidemiology can be highly variable and thus difficult to predict. PMID:25888168

  20. Cooperation of Doxycycline with Phytochemicals and Micronutrients Against Active and Persistent Forms of Borrelia sp

    PubMed Central

    Goc, Anna; Niedzwiecki, Alexandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemicals and micronutrients represent a growing theme in antimicrobial defense; however, little is known about their anti-borreliae effects of reciprocal cooperation with antibiotics. A better understanding of this aspect could advance our knowledge and help improve the efficacy of current approaches towards Borrelia sp. In this study, phytochemicals and micronutrients such as baicalein, luteolin, 10-HAD, iodine, rosmarinic acid, and monolaurin, as well as, vitamins D3 and C were tested in a combinations with doxycycline for their in vitro effectiveness against vegetative (spirochetes) and latent (rounded bodies, biofilm) forms of Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia garinii. Anti-borreliae effects were evaluated according to checkerboard assays and supported by statistical analysis. The results showed that combination of doxycycline with flavones such as baicalein and luteolin exhibited additive effects against all morphological forms of studied Borrelia sp. Doxycycline combined with iodine demonstrated additive effects against spirochetes and biofilm, whereas with fatty acids such as monolaurin and 10-HAD it produced FICIs of indifference. Additive anti-spirochetal effects were also observed when doxycycline was used with rosmarinic acid and both vitamins D3 and C. Antagonism was not observed in any of the cases. This data revealed the intrinsic anti-borreliae activity of doxycycline with tested phytochemicals and micronutrients indicating that their addition may enhance efficacy of this antibiotic in combating Borrelia sp. Especially the addition of flavones balcalein and luteolin to a doxycycline regimen could be explored further in defining more effective treatments against these bacteria. PMID:27570483

  1. Cooperation of Doxycycline with Phytochemicals and Micronutrients Against Active and Persistent Forms of Borrelia sp.

    PubMed

    Goc, Anna; Niedzwiecki, Alexandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemicals and micronutrients represent a growing theme in antimicrobial defense; however, little is known about their anti-borreliae effects of reciprocal cooperation with antibiotics. A better understanding of this aspect could advance our knowledge and help improve the efficacy of current approaches towards Borrelia sp. In this study, phytochemicals and micronutrients such as baicalein, luteolin, 10-HAD, iodine, rosmarinic acid, and monolaurin, as well as, vitamins D3 and C were tested in a combinations with doxycycline for their in vitro effectiveness against vegetative (spirochetes) and latent (rounded bodies, biofilm) forms of Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia garinii. Anti-borreliae effects were evaluated according to checkerboard assays and supported by statistical analysis. The results showed that combination of doxycycline with flavones such as baicalein and luteolin exhibited additive effects against all morphological forms of studied Borrelia sp. Doxycycline combined with iodine demonstrated additive effects against spirochetes and biofilm, whereas with fatty acids such as monolaurin and 10-HAD it produced FICIs of indifference. Additive anti-spirochetal effects were also observed when doxycycline was used with rosmarinic acid and both vitamins D3 and C. Antagonism was not observed in any of the cases. This data revealed the intrinsic anti-borreliae activity of doxycycline with tested phytochemicals and micronutrients indicating that their addition may enhance efficacy of this antibiotic in combating Borrelia sp. Especially the addition of flavones balcalein and luteolin to a doxycycline regimen could be explored further in defining more effective treatments against these bacteria. PMID:27570483

  2. Evidence of In Vivo Existence of Borrelia Biofilm in Borrelial Lymphocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Sapi, E.; Balasubramanian, K.; Poruri, A.; Maghsoudlou, J. S.; Socarras, K. M.; Timmaraju, A. V.; Filush, K. R.; Gupta, K.; Shaikh, S.; Theophilus, P. A. S.; Luecke, D. F.; MacDonald, A.; Zelger, B.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, has grown into a major public health problem. We recently identified a novel morphological form of B. burgdorferi, called biofilm, a structure that is well known to be highly resistant to antibiotics. However, there is no evidence of the existence of Borrelia biofilm in vivo; therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine the presence of Borrelia biofilm in infected human skin tissues. Archived skin biopsy tissues from borrelial lymphocytomas (BL) were reexamined for the presence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato using Borrelia-specific immunohistochemical staining (IHC), fluorescent in situ hybridization, combined fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)–IHC, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and fluorescent and atomic force microscopy methods. Our morphological and histological analyses showed that significant amounts of Borrelia-positive spirochetes and aggregates exist in the BL tissues. Analyzing structures positive for Borrelia showed that aggregates, but not spirochetes, expressed biofilm markers such as protective layers of different mucopolysaccharides, especially alginate. Atomic force microscopy revealed additional hallmark biofilm features of the Borrelia/alginate-positive aggregates such as inside channels and surface protrusions. In summary, this is the first study that demonstrates the presence of Borrelia biofilm in human infected skin tissues. PMID:27141311

  3. Arthritis is developed in Borrelia-primed and -infected mice deficient of interleukin-17.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Joseph; Warner, Thomas F; Munson, Erik L; Nardelli, Dean T; Schell, Ronald F

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been shown to participate in the development of Lyme arthritis in experimental mice. For example, neutralization of IL-17 with antibodies inhibits induction of arthritis in Borrelia-primed and -infected C57BL/6 wild-type mice. We hypothesized that mice lacking IL-17 would fail to develop Borrelia-induced arthritis. IL-17-deficient and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were primed with heat-inactivated Borrelia and then infected with viable spirochetes 3 weeks later. No swelling or major histopathological changes of the hind paws were detected in IL-17-deficient or wild-type mice that were primed with Borrelia or infected with viable spirochetes. By contrast, IL-17-deficient and wild-type mice that were primed and subsequently infected with heterologous Borrelia developed severe swelling and histopathological changes of the hind paws. In addition, Borrelia-primed and -infected IL-17-deficient mice exhibited elevated gamma-interferon (IFN-γ) levels in sera and increased frequencies of IFN-γ-expressing lymphocytes in popliteal lymph nodes compared to Borrelia-primed and -infected wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that IL-17 is not required for development of severe pathology in response to infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, but may contribute to disease through an interaction with IFN-γ. PMID:27493062

  4. Variable exposure and immunological response to Lyme disease Borrelia among North Atlantic seabird species

    PubMed Central

    Staszewski, V; McCoy, K.D; Boulinier, T

    2008-01-01

    Colonial seabirds often breed in large aggregations. These individuals can be exposed to parasitism by the tick Ixodes uriae, but little is known about the circulation of pathogens carried by this ectoparasite, including Lyme disease Borrelia. Here we investigated the prevalence of antibodies (Ab) against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in seabird species sampled at eight locations across the North Atlantic. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests, we found that the prevalence of anti-Borrelia Ab in adult seabirds was 39.6% on average (over 444 individuals), but that it varied among colonies and species. Common guillemots showed higher seroprevalence (77.1%±5.9) than black-legged kittiwakes (18.6%±6.7) and Atlantic puffins (22.6%±6.3). Immunoblot-banding patterns of positive individuals, reflecting the variability of Borrelia antigens against which Ab were produced, also differed among locations and species, and did not tightly match the prevalence of Borrelia phylogroups previously identified in ticks collected from the same host individuals. These results represent the first report of the widespread prevalence of Ab against Borrelia within an assemblage of seabird species and demonstrate that Borrelia is an integrated aspect in the interaction between seabirds and ticks. More detailed studies on the dynamics of Borrelia within and among seabird species at different spatial scales will now be required to better understand the implications of this interaction for seabird ecology and the epidemiology of Lyme disease. PMID:18577503

  5. Associations of passerine birds, rabbits, and ticks with Borrelia miyamotoi and Borrelia andersonii in Michigan, U.S.A.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wild birds contribute to maintenance and dissemination of vectors and microbes, including those that impact human, domestic animal, and wildlife health. Here we elucidate roles of wild passerine birds, eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), and Ixodes dentatus ticks in enzootic cycles of two spirochetes, Borrelia miyamotoi and B. andersonii in a region of Michigan where the zoonotic pathogen B. burgdorferi co-circulates. Methods Over a four-year period, wild birds (n = 19,631) and rabbits (n = 20) were inspected for tick presence and ear tissue was obtained from rabbits. Samples were tested for Borrelia spirochetes using nested PCR of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (IGS) and bidirectional DNA sequencing. Natural xenodiagnosis was used to implicate wildlife reservoirs. Results Ixodes dentatus, a tick that specializes on birds and rabbits and rarely bites humans, was the most common tick found, comprising 86.5% of the 12,432 ticks collected in the study. The relapsing fever group spirochete B. miyamotoi was documented for the first time in ticks removed from wild birds (0.7% minimum infection prevalence; MIP, in I. dentatus), and included two IGS strains. The majority of B. miyamotoi-positive ticks were removed from Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis). Borrelia andersonii infected ticks removed from birds (1.6% MIP), ticks removed from rabbits (5.3% MIP), and rabbit ear biopsies (5%) comprised twelve novel IGS strains. Six species of wild birds were implicated as reservoirs for B. andersonii. Frequency of I. dentatus larval and nymphal co-feeding on birds was ten times greater than expected by chance. The relatively well-studied ecology of I. scapularis and the Lyme disease pathogen provides a context for understanding how the phenology of bird ticks may impact B. miyamotoi and B. andersonii prevalence and host associations. Conclusions Given the current invasion of I. scapularis, a human biting species that serves as a

  6. Serum levels of copper, selenium and manganese in forestry workers testing IgG positive for Brucella, Borrelia, and Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Simona; Giorgianni, Concetto; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Brecciaroli, Renato; Catanoso, Rosaria; Alibrando, Carmela; Spatari, Giovanna; Gangemi, Silvia; Abbate, Carmelo

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the alterations in the trace levels of serum copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and manganese (Mn) in forestry workers testing immunoglobulin G (IgG)-positive for Brucella, Borrelia, and Rickettsia. The study was conducted on a sample of 758 subjects (560 male and 198 female). All the subjects underwent medical examinations, which investigated particularly the presence of clinical signs compatible with zoonoses, and routine blood tests from venous blood sample, which tested previous immunisation versus cited microorganisms and serum concentration of Cu, Se, and Mn. The subjects were divided according to IgG positivity versus the cited microorganisms. The group of subjects with IgG positive versus Brucella showed statistically significant higher Cu levels than controls, while the Mn levels were not; the group of subjects with IgG positive versus Rickettsia showed higher levels of all three tested metals. The concentration of the examined metals did not show statistically significant difference between IgG-positive subjects versus subjects with Borrelia compared to controls. These data could confirm the role of both Cu and Se  in the regulation of immune response.

  7. Engineering of Immunoglobulin Fc Heterodimers Using Yeast Surface-Displayed Combinatorial Fc Library Screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye-Ji; Kim, Ye-Jin; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin Fc heterodimers, which are useful scaffolds for the generation of bispecific antibodies, have been mostly generated through structure-based rational design methods that introduce asymmetric mutations into the CH3 homodimeric interface to favor heterodimeric Fc formation. Here, we report an approach to generate heterodimeric Fc variants through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. We developed a combinatorial heterodimeric Fc library display system by mating two haploid yeast cell lines, one haploid cell line displayed an Fc chain library (displayed FcCH3A) with mutations in one CH3 domain (CH3A) on the yeast cell surface, and the other cell line secreted an Fc chain library (secreted FcCH3B) with mutations in the other CH3 domain (CH3B). In the mated cells, secreted FcCH3B is displayed on the cell surface through heterodimerization with the displayed FcCH3A, the detection of which enabled us to screen the library for heterodimeric Fc variants. We constructed combinatorial heterodimeric Fc libraries with simultaneous mutations in the homodimer-favoring electrostatic interaction pairs K370-E357/S364 or D399-K392/K409 at the CH3 domain interface. High-throughput screening of the libraries using flow cytometry yielded heterodimeric Fc variants with heterodimer-favoring CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, some of them showed high heterodimerization yields (~80–90%) with previously unidentified CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, such as hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions. Our study provides a new approach for engineering Fc heterodimers that could be used to engineer other heterodimeric protein-protein interactions through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. PMID:26675656

  8. Engineering of Immunoglobulin Fc Heterodimers Using Yeast Surface-Displayed Combinatorial Fc Library Screening.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye-Ji; Kim, Ye-Jin; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin Fc heterodimers, which are useful scaffolds for the generation of bispecific antibodies, have been mostly generated through structure-based rational design methods that introduce asymmetric mutations into the CH3 homodimeric interface to favor heterodimeric Fc formation. Here, we report an approach to generate heterodimeric Fc variants through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. We developed a combinatorial heterodimeric Fc library display system by mating two haploid yeast cell lines, one haploid cell line displayed an Fc chain library (displayed FcCH3A) with mutations in one CH3 domain (CH3A) on the yeast cell surface, and the other cell line secreted an Fc chain library (secreted FcCH3B) with mutations in the other CH3 domain (CH3B). In the mated cells, secreted FcCH3B is displayed on the cell surface through heterodimerization with the displayed FcCH3A, the detection of which enabled us to screen the library for heterodimeric Fc variants. We constructed combinatorial heterodimeric Fc libraries with simultaneous mutations in the homodimer-favoring electrostatic interaction pairs K370-E357/S364 or D399-K392/K409 at the CH3 domain interface. High-throughput screening of the libraries using flow cytometry yielded heterodimeric Fc variants with heterodimer-favoring CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, some of them showed high heterodimerization yields (~80-90%) with previously unidentified CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, such as hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions. Our study provides a new approach for engineering Fc heterodimers that could be used to engineer other heterodimeric protein-protein interactions through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. PMID:26675656

  9. Discovery of novel Myc-Max heterodimer disruptors with a three-dimensional pharmacophore model.

    PubMed

    Mustata, Gabriela; Follis, Ariele Viacava; Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Metallo, Steven J; Wang, Huabo; Prochownik, Edward V; Lazo, John S; Bahar, Ivet

    2009-03-12

    A three-dimensional pharmacophore model was generated utilizing a set of known inhibitors of c-Myc-Max heterodimer formation. The model successfully identified a set of structurally diverse compounds with potential inhibitory activity against c-Myc. Nine compounds were tested in vitro, and four displayed affinities in the micromolar range and growth inhibitory activity against c-Myc-overexpressing cells. These studies demonstrate the applicability of pharmacophore modeling to the identification of novel and potentially more puissant inhibitors of the c-Myc oncoprotein.

  10. Circadian clock control of hepatic lipid metabolism: role of small heterodimer partner (Shp).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2016-10-01

    Hepatic steatosis, the accumulation of triglyceride droplets in the hepatocytes, is a common hepatic pathology seen in subjects with obesity/metabolic syndrome and those with excessive alcohol use. The pathogenesis underlying hepatic steatosis is complex. Recent studies have shown the specific role played by the molecular clock mechanism in the control of lipid metabolism and that the disruption of these tissue clocks may lead to the disturbances in lipid homeostasis. This review reports a novel role of small heterodimer partner in maintaining triglyceride and lipoprotein homeostasis through neuronal PAS domain protein 2. PMID:27473715

  11. Heterodimer Autorepression Loop: A Robust and Flexible Pulse-Generating Genetic Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannoo, B.; Carlon, E.; Lefranc, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the heterodimer autorepression loop (HAL), a small genetic module in which a protein A acts as an autorepressor and binds to a second protein B to form an A B dimer. For suitable values of the rate constants, the HAL produces pulses of A alternating with pulses of B . By means of analytical and numerical calculations, we show that the duration of A pulses is extremely robust against variation of the rate constants while the duration of the B pulses can be flexibly adjusted. The HAL is thus a minimal genetic module generating robust pulses with a tunable duration, an interesting property for cellular signaling.

  12. Immunoglobulin Fc Heterodimer Platform Technology: From Design to Applications in Therapeutic Antibodies and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ji-Hee; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The monospecific and bivalent characteristics of naturally occurring immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies depend on homodimerization of the fragment crystallizable (Fc) regions of two identical heavy chains (HCs) and the subsequent assembly of two identical light chains (LCs) via disulfide linkages between each HC and LC. Immunoglobulin Fc heterodimers have been engineered through modifications to the CH3 domain interface, with different mutations on each domain such that the engineered Fc fragments, carrying the CH3 variant pair, preferentially form heterodimers rather than homodimers. Many research groups have adopted different strategies to generate Fc heterodimers, with the goal of high heterodimerization yield, while retaining biophysical and biological properties of the wild-type Fc. Based on their ability to enforce heterodimerization between the two different HCs, the established Fc heterodimers have been extensively exploited as a scaffold to generate bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) in full-length IgG and IgG-like formats. These have many of the favorable properties of natural IgG antibodies, such as high stability, long serum half-life, low immunogenicity, and immune effector functions. As of July 2016, more than seven heterodimeric Fc-based IgG-format bsAbs are being evaluated in clinical trials. In addition to bsAbs, heterodimeric Fc technology is very promising for the generation of Fc-fused proteins and peptides, as well as cytokines (immunocytokines), which can present the fusion partners in the natural monomeric or heterodimeric form rather than the artificial homodimeric form with wild-type Fc. Here, we present relevant concepts and strategies for the generation of heterodimeric Fc proteins, and their application in the development of bsAbs in diverse formats for optimal biological activity. In addition, we describe wild-type Fc-fused monomeric and heterodimeric proteins, along with the difficulties associated with their preparations, and discuss the

  13. Heterologous Expression of Fluostatin Gene Cluster Leads to a Bioactive Heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfang; Huang, Chunshuai; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhu, Yiguang; Zhang, Changsheng

    2015-11-01

    The biosynthesis gene cluster (fls) for atypical angucycline fluostatins was identified from the marine derived Micromonospora rosaria SCSIO N160 and was confirmed by gene knockouts and the biochemical characterization of a bifunctional oxygenase FlsO2. The absolute configuration of the key biosynthetic intermediate prejadomycin was determined for the first time by Cu Kα X-ray analysis. Heterologous expression of the intact fls-gene cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor YF11 in the presence of 3% sea salts led to the isolation of two new compounds: fluostatin L (1) and difluostatin A (2). Difluostatin A (2), an unusual heterodimer, exhibited antibacterial activities.

  14. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and co-infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Rickettsia spp. in Ixodes ricinus in Hamburg, Germany.

    PubMed

    May, K; Jordan, D; Fingerle, V; Strube, C

    2015-12-01

    To obtain initial data on Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) in Ixodes ricinus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) ticks in Hamburg, Germany, 1400 questing ticks were collected by flagging at 10 different public recreation areas in 2011 and analysed using probe-based quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The overall rate of infection with B. burgdorferi s.l. was 34.1%; 30.0% of adults were infected (36.7% of females and 26.0% of males), as were 34.5% of nymphs. Significant differences in tick infection rates were observed between the spring and summer/autumn months, as well as among sampling locations. Borrelia genospecies identification by reverse line blotting was successful in 43.6% of positive tick samples. The most frequent genospecies was Borrelia garinii/Borrelia bavariensis, followed by Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia valaisiana, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia spielmanii, Borrelia bissettii and Borrelia lusitaniae. Based on previously published data, co-infection of Borrelia and Rickettsiales spp. was determined in 25.8% of ticks. Overall, 22.9% of ticks were co-infected with Rickettsia spp. (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae), 1.7% with Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), and 1.2% with both pathogens. Study results show a high prevalence of Borrelia-positive ticks in recreation areas in the northern German city of Hamburg and the potential health risk to humans in these areas should not be underestimated.

  15. Differential tick burdens may explain differential Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii infection rates among four, wild, rodent species in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kyle R; Takano, Ai; Konnai, Satoru; Shimozuru, Michito; Kawabata, Hiroki; Tsubota, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The ecologies of Lyme disease Borrelia spp. are very specific to location, as they are dependent upon the spirochete species and genotypes, the vectors and the host vertebrates present. In Hokkaido, Japan, where two human pathogenic, Lyme disease Borrelia spp. are present, and human cases are reported annually, the ecologies have been poorly studied. Our goal was to determine whether variation in borrelial infection rates among rodent species sharing an environment, is due to immunological or ecological differences. To this end, we examined the relationships between tick burden and borrelial infection, by including examination of agreement between nested PCR, as a test for infection, and serology, as a test for exposure. We collected 868 rodents, comprised of four species commonly found in Hokkaido, and tested for infection rates with Borrelia spp. using PCR for the borrelial flaB gene, seroprevalence of Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii using ELISA, and attachment of ticks by direct counts. We noted a correlation between differential nymph and larval burdens and the borrelial infection rates found among the four rodent species. Furthermore, there was significant correlation between infection and seroprevalence of B. afzelii and B. garinii (P<0.01), between infection and Ixodes persulcatus nymph burden (P<0.01), and between seroprevalence and I. persulcatus nymph burden (P<0.01). The close agreement among rodent species seroprevalences with infection rates and tick burdens suggest the differences in infection rates of Borrelia spp. may largely be a direct consequence of differential exposure to vectors.

  16. Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Represses Cytochrome P450 2D6 Expression by Upregulating Small Heterodimer Partner.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xian; Lee, Yoon-Kwang; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a major drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for eliminating approximately 20% of marketed drugs. Studies have shown that differential transcriptional regulation of CYP2D6 may contribute to large interindividual variability in CYP2D6-mediated drug metabolism. However, the factors governing CYP2D6 transcription are largely unknown. We previously demonstrated small heterodimer partner (SHP) as a novel transcriptional repressor of CYP2D6 expression. SHP is a representative target gene of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The objective of this study is to investigate whether an agonist of FXR, 3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-4-(3'-carboxy-2-chlorostilben-4-yl)oxymethyl-5-isopropylisoxazole (GW4064), alters CYP2D6 expression and activity. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic mice, GW4064 decreased hepatic CYP2D6 expression and activity (by 2-fold) while increasing SHP expression (by 2-fold) and SHP recruitment to the CYP2D6 promoter. CYP2D6 repression by GW4064 was abrogated in Shp(-/-);CYP2D6 mice, indicating a critical role of SHP in CYP2D6 regulation by GW4064. Also, GW4064 decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 2-fold) in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that the results obtained in CYP2D6-humanized transgenic mice can be translated to humans. This proof of concept study provides evidence for CYP2D6 regulation by an inducer of SHP expression, namely, the FXR agonist GW4064.

  17. Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Represses Cytochrome P450 2D6 Expression by Upregulating Small Heterodimer Partner

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xian; Lee, Yoon-Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a major drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for eliminating approximately 20% of marketed drugs. Studies have shown that differential transcriptional regulation of CYP2D6 may contribute to large interindividual variability in CYP2D6-mediated drug metabolism. However, the factors governing CYP2D6 transcription are largely unknown. We previously demonstrated small heterodimer partner (SHP) as a novel transcriptional repressor of CYP2D6 expression. SHP is a representative target gene of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The objective of this study is to investigate whether an agonist of FXR, 3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-4-(3′-carboxy-2-chlorostilben-4-yl)oxymethyl-5-isopropylisoxazole (GW4064), alters CYP2D6 expression and activity. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic mice, GW4064 decreased hepatic CYP2D6 expression and activity (by 2-fold) while increasing SHP expression (by 2-fold) and SHP recruitment to the CYP2D6 promoter. CYP2D6 repression by GW4064 was abrogated in Shp(−/−);CYP2D6 mice, indicating a critical role of SHP in CYP2D6 regulation by GW4064. Also, GW4064 decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 2-fold) in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that the results obtained in CYP2D6-humanized transgenic mice can be translated to humans. This proof of concept study provides evidence for CYP2D6 regulation by an inducer of SHP expression, namely, the FXR agonist GW4064. PMID:25926433

  18. Borrelia miyamotoi Disease: Neither Lyme Disease Nor Relapsing Fever.

    PubMed

    Telford, Sam R; Goethert, Heidi K; Molloy, Philip J; Berardi, Victor P; Chowdri, Hanumara Ram; Gugliotta, Joseph L; Lepore, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi disease (BMD) is a newly recognized borreliosis globally transmitted by ticks of the Ixodes persulcatus species complex. Once considered to be a tick symbiont with no public health implications, B miyamotoi is increasingly recognized as the agent of a nonspecific febrile illness often misdiagnosed as acute Lyme disease without rash, or as ehrlichiosis. The frequency of its diagnosis in the northeastern United States is similar to that of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis. A diagnosis of BMD is confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of acute blood samples, or by seroconversion using a recombinant glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme immunoassay. BMD is successfully treated with oral doxycycline or amoxicillin. PMID:26593262

  19. Whole-Genome Sequences of Thirteen Isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer S. E.; Dunn J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Casjens, S. R.; Qiu, W.-G.; Mongodin, E. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2011-02-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a causative agent of Lyme disease in North America and Eurasia. The first complete genome sequence of B. burgdorferi strain 31, available for more than a decade, has assisted research on the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Because a single genome sequence is not sufficient to understand the relationship between genotypic and geographic variation and disease phenotype, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 13 additional B. burgdorferi isolates that span the range of natural variation. These sequences should allow improved understanding of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for novel detection, diagnosis, and prevention strategies.

  20. Borrelia miyamotoi Disease: Neither Lyme Disease Nor Relapsing Fever.

    PubMed

    Telford, Sam R; Goethert, Heidi K; Molloy, Philip J; Berardi, Victor P; Chowdri, Hanumara Ram; Gugliotta, Joseph L; Lepore, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi disease (BMD) is a newly recognized borreliosis globally transmitted by ticks of the Ixodes persulcatus species complex. Once considered to be a tick symbiont with no public health implications, B miyamotoi is increasingly recognized as the agent of a nonspecific febrile illness often misdiagnosed as acute Lyme disease without rash, or as ehrlichiosis. The frequency of its diagnosis in the northeastern United States is similar to that of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis. A diagnosis of BMD is confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of acute blood samples, or by seroconversion using a recombinant glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme immunoassay. BMD is successfully treated with oral doxycycline or amoxicillin.

  1. The Roadblock light chains are ubiquitous components of cytoplasmic dynein that form homo- and heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Nikulina, Karina; Patel-King, Ramila S; Takebe, Sachiko; Pfister, K Kevin; King, Stephen M

    2004-04-01

    The Roadblock/LC7 class of light chains associate with the intermediate chains at the base of the soluble dynein particle. In mammals, there are two Roadblock isoforms (Robl1 and Robl2), one of which (Robl2) is differentially expressed in a tissue-dependent manner and is especially prominent in testis. Here we define the alpha helical content of Robl and demonstrate using both the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro biochemistry that Robl1 and Robl2 are capable of forming homo- and heterodimers. This is the first report of heterodimer formation by any cytoplasmic dynein component, and it further enlarges the number of potential cytoplasmic dynein isoforms available for binding specific cellular cargoes. In addition, we have generated an antibody that specifically recognizes Robl light chains and shows a 5-10 fold preference for Robl2 over Robl1. Using this antibody, we show that Robl is a ubiquitous cytoplasmic dynein component, being found in samples purified from brain, liver, kidney, and testis. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals that Robl is present in punctate organelles in rat neuroblastoma cells. In testis, Robl is found in Leydig cells, spermatocytes, and sperm flagella.

  2. Subunits of the Drosophila actin-capping protein heterodimer regulate each other at multiple levels.

    PubMed

    Amândio, Ana Rita; Gaspar, Pedro; Whited, Jessica L; Janody, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The actin-Capping Protein heterodimer, composed of the α and β subunits, is a master F-actin regulator. In addition to its role in many cellular processes, Capping Protein acts as a main tumor suppressor module in Drosophila and in humans, in part, by restricting the activity of Yorkie/YAP/TAZ oncogenes. We aimed in this report to understand how both subunits regulate each other in vivo. We show that the levels and capping activities of both subunits must be tightly regulated to control F-actin levels and consequently growth of the Drosophila wing. Overexpressing capping protein α and β decreases both F-actin levels and tissue growth, while expressing forms of Capping Protein that have dominant negative effects on F-actin promote tissue growth. Both subunits regulate each other's protein levels. In addition, overexpressing one of the subunit in tissues knocked-down for the other increases the mRNA and protein levels of the subunit knocked-down and compensates for its loss. We propose that the ability of the α and β subunits to control each other's levels assures that a pool of functional heterodimer is produced in sufficient quantities to restrict the development of tumor but not in excess to sustain normal tissue growth.

  3. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains

    PubMed Central

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  4. Analysis of the Ketosynthase-Chain Length Factor Heterodimer from the Fredericamycin Polyketide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Szu, Ping-Hui; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Meehan, Michael J.; Das, Abhirup; Nguyen, Don D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Minshull, Jeremy; Khosla, Chaitan

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The pentadecaketide fredericamycin has the longest carbon chain backbone among polycyclic aromatic polyketide antibiotics whose biosynthetic genes have been sequenced. This backbone is synthesized by the bimodular fdm polyketide synthase (PKS). The initiation module is thought to synthesize a C6 intermediate that is then transferred onto the elongation PKS module, which extends it into a C30 poly-β-ketoacyl product. Here we demonstrate that the bimodular fdm PKS as well as its elongation module alone synthesize undecaketides and dodecaketides. Thus, unlike other homologues, the fdm ketosynthase – chain length factor (KS-CLF) heterodimer does not exclusively control the backbone length of its natural product. Using sequence- and structure-based approaches, 48 multiple mutants of the CLF were engineered and analyzed. Unexpectedly, the I134F mutant was unable to turn over, but could initiate and at least partially elongate the polyketide chain. This unprecedented mutant suggests that the KS-CLF heterodimer harbors an as yet uncharacterized chain termination mechanism. Together, our findings reveal fundamental mechanistic differences between the fdm PKS and its well-studied homologues. PMID:21867917

  5. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  6. Borrelia infection in Ixodes pararicinus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Nava, Santiago; Barbieri, Amalia M; Maya, Leticia; Colina, Rodney; Mangold, Atilio J; Labruna, Marcelo B; Venzal, José M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to describe for the first time the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infecting ticks in Argentina. Unfed specimens of Ixodes pararicinus collected from vegetation in Jujuy Province were tested for Borrelia infection by PCR targeting the gene flagellin (fla), the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer region (IGS) and the 16S rDNA (rrs) gene. One male and one female of I. pararicinus collected in Jujuy were found to be positive to Borrelia infection with the three molecular markers tested. Phylogenetically, the Borrelia found in I. pararicinus from Jujuy belongs to the B. burgdorferi s.l complex, and it was similar to one of the genospecies detected in I. aragaoi from Uruguay. Also, this genospecies is closely related to two genospecies known from USA, Borrelia americana and the Borrelia sp. genospecies 1. The epidemiological risk that implies the infection with Borrelia in I. paracinus ticks from Argentina appears to be low because the genospecies detected is not suspected of having clinical relevance and there are no records of Ixodes ticks biting humans in the southern cone of South America. Further studies are needed to assess accurately if there is risk of borreliosis transmitted by ticks in South America. PMID:24979685

  7. Identification of Borrelia Species after Creation of an In-House MALDI-TOF MS Database

    PubMed Central

    Calderaro, Adriana; Gorrini, Chiara; Piccolo, Giovanna; Montecchini, Sara; Buttrini, Mirko; Rossi, Sabina; Piergianni, Maddalena; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Medici, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a multisystemic disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (sl) complex transmitted to humans by Ixodes ticks. B. burgdorferi sl complex, currently comprising at least 19 genospecies, includes the main pathogenic species responsible for human disease in Europe: B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (ss), B. afzelii, and B. garinii. In this study, for the first time, MALDI-TOF MS was applied to Borrelia spp., supplementing the existing database, limited to the species B. burgdorferi ss, B. spielmanii and B. garinii, with the species B. afzelii, in order to enable the identification of all the species potentially implicated in LB in Europe. Moreover, we supplemented the database also with B. hermsii, which is the primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in western North America, B. japonica, circulating in Asia, and another reference strain of B. burgdorferi ss (B31 strain). The dendrogram obtained by analyzing the protein profiles of the different Borrelia species reflected Borrelia taxonomy, showing that all the species included in the Borrelia sl complex clustered in a unique branch, while Borrelia hermsii clustered separately. In conclusion, in this study MALDI-TOF MS proved a useful tool suitable for identification of Borrelia spp. both for diagnostic purpose and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:24533160

  8. Borrelia infection in Ixodes pararicinus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Nava, Santiago; Barbieri, Amalia M; Maya, Leticia; Colina, Rodney; Mangold, Atilio J; Labruna, Marcelo B; Venzal, José M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to describe for the first time the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infecting ticks in Argentina. Unfed specimens of Ixodes pararicinus collected from vegetation in Jujuy Province were tested for Borrelia infection by PCR targeting the gene flagellin (fla), the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer region (IGS) and the 16S rDNA (rrs) gene. One male and one female of I. pararicinus collected in Jujuy were found to be positive to Borrelia infection with the three molecular markers tested. Phylogenetically, the Borrelia found in I. pararicinus from Jujuy belongs to the B. burgdorferi s.l complex, and it was similar to one of the genospecies detected in I. aragaoi from Uruguay. Also, this genospecies is closely related to two genospecies known from USA, Borrelia americana and the Borrelia sp. genospecies 1. The epidemiological risk that implies the infection with Borrelia in I. paracinus ticks from Argentina appears to be low because the genospecies detected is not suspected of having clinical relevance and there are no records of Ixodes ticks biting humans in the southern cone of South America. Further studies are needed to assess accurately if there is risk of borreliosis transmitted by ticks in South America.

  9. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato in Ticks from Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Juan; Ling, Feng; Chai, Chengliang; Lu, Ye; Yu, Xianghua; Lin, Junfen; Sun, Jimin; Chang, Yue; Ye, Xiaodong; Gu, Shiping; Pang, Weilong; Wang, Chengwei; Zheng, Xiaohua; Jiang, Jianmin; Chen, Zhiping; Gong, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    To explore the tick distribution and prevalence of Borrelia in Zhejiang Province, we performed a survey in nine sites. A total of 447 adult ticks of 11 species were captured and the dominant tick species were Haemaphysalis longicornis and Ixodes sinensis and the abundance of tick species in different areas varied significantly. Overall, 4.70% of the ticks were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for Borrelia. The average PCR positive rates were 5.19% for H. longicornis, 3.45% for Amblyomma testudinarium, 1.06% for I. sinensis, 5.00% for Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, and 19.44% for Ixodes granulatus, respectively. No Borrelia DNA was detected in Rhiphicephalus haemaphysaloides, Haemaphysalis yeni, Dermacentor taiwanensis, Haemaphysalis hystricis, Hyalomna asiaticum, and Ixodes ovatus. The prevalence of Borrelia was significantly different among tick species and the prevalence in I. granulatus was significantly higher than that in other tick species. Of note, experimentally confirmed vectors for B. burgdorferi s.l. including I. sinensis and I. granulatus were found in Zhejiang Province. Two species of B. burgdorferi s.l. exist in Zhejiang Province of which 12 sequences were most similar to the sequence of Borrelia garinii and nine sequences were most similar to the sequence of Borrelia valaisiana or Borrelia yangtze sp. nov. PMID:25548382

  10. Infection of Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in North Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhioua, E.; Bouattour, A.; Hu, C.M.; Gharbi, M.; Aeschliman, A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gern, L.

    1999-01-01

    Free-living adult Ixodes ricinus L. were collected in Amdoun, situated in the Kroumiry mountains in northwestern Tunisia (North Africa). Using direct fluorescence antibody assay, the infection rate of field-collected I. ricinus by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was 30.5% (n = 72). No difference in infection rate was observed between male and female ticks. Spirochetes that had been isolated from I. ricinus from Ain Drahim (Kroumiry Mountains) in 1988 were identified as Borrelia lusitaniae (formerly genospecies PotiB2). This is the first identification of a genospecies of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato from the continent of Africa.

  11. Case Report: Bilateral diaphragmatic dysfunction due to Borrelia Burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Basunaid, Suhail; van der Grinten, Chris; Cobben, Nicole; Otte, Astrid; Sprooten, Roy; Gernot, Rohde

    2014-01-01

    Summary: In this case report we describe a rare case of bilateral diaphragmatic dysfunction due to Lyme disease. Case report: A 62-years-old male presented to the hospital because of flu-like symptoms. During initial evaluation a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness with orthopnea and nocturnal hypoventilation was observed, without a known aetiology. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis was confirmed by fluoroscopy with a positive sniff test. The patient was referred to our centre for chronic non-invasive nocturnal ventilation (cNPPV). Subsequent investigations revealed evidence of anti- Borrelia seroactivity in EIA-IgG and IgG-blot, suggesting a recent infection with Lyme disease, and resulted in a 4-week treatment with oral doxycycline. The symptoms of nocturnal hypoventilation were successfully improved with cNPPV. However, our patient still shows impaired diaphragmatic function but he is no longer fully dependent on nocturnal ventilatory support.     Conclusion: Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diaphragmatic dysfunction. It is a tick-borne illness caused by one of the three pathogenic species of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, present in Europe. A delay in recognizing the symptoms can negatively affect the success of treatment. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) is considered a treatment option for patients with diaphragmatic paralysis. PMID:25671085

  12. Borrelia, Rickettsia, and Ehrlichia species in bat ticks, France, 2010.

    PubMed

    Socolovschi, Cristina; Kernif, Tahar; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Argas vespertilionis, an argasid tick associated with bats and bat habitats in Europe, Africa, and Asia has been reported to bite humans; however, studies investigating the presence of vector-borne pathogens in these ticks are lacking. Using molecular tools, we tested 5 A. vespertilionis ticks collected in 2010 from the floor of a bat-infested attic in southwestern France that had been converted into bedrooms. Rickettsia sp. AvBat, a new genotype of spotted fever group rickettsiae, was detected and cultivated from 3 of the 5 ticks. A new species of the Ehrlichia canis group, Ehrlichia sp. AvBat, was also detected in 3 ticks. Four ticks were infected with Borrelia sp. CPB1, a relapsing fever agent of the Borrelia group that caused fatal borreliosis in a bat in the United Kingdom. Further studies are needed to characterize these new agents and determine if the A. vespertilionis tick is a vector and/or reservoir of these agents. PMID:23171714

  13. Borrelia, Rickettsia, and Ehrlichia Species in Bat Ticks, France, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Socolovschi, Cristina; Kernif, Tahar; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Argas vespertilionis, an argasid tick associated with bats and bat habitats in Europe, Africa, and Asia has been reported to bite humans; however, studies investigating the presence of vector-borne pathogens in these ticks are lacking. Using molecular tools, we tested 5 A. vespertilionis ticks collected in 2010 from the floor of a bat-infested attic in southwestern France that had been converted into bedrooms. Rickettsia sp. AvBat, a new genotype of spotted fever group rickettsiae, was detected and cultivated from 3 of the 5 ticks. A new species of the Ehrlichia canis group, Ehrlichia sp. AvBat, was also detected in 3 ticks. Four ticks were infected with Borrelia sp. CPB1, a relapsing fever agent of the Borrelia group that caused fatal borreliosis in a bat in the United Kingdom. Further studies are needed to characterize these new agents and determine if the A. vespertilionis tick is a vector and/or reservoir of these agents. PMID:23171714

  14. Borrelia burgdorferi needs chemotaxis to establish infection in mammals and to accomplish its enzootic cycle.

    PubMed

    Sze, Ching Wooen; Zhang, Kai; Kariu, Toru; Pal, Utpal; Li, Chunhao

    2012-07-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, can be recovered from different organs of infected animals and patients, indicating that the spirochete is very invasive. Motility and chemotaxis contribute to the invasiveness of B. burgdorferi and play important roles in the process of the disease. Recent reports have shown that motility is required for establishing infection in mammals. However, the role of chemotaxis in virulence remains elusive. Our previous studies showed that cheA₂, a gene encoding a histidine kinase, is essential for the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi. In this report, the cheA₂ gene was inactivated in a low-passage-number virulent strain of B. burgdorferi. In vitro analyses (microscopic observations, computer-based bacterial tracking analysis, swarm plate assays, and capillary tube assays) showed that the cheA₂ mutant failed to reverse and constantly ran in one direction; the mutant was nonchemotactic to attractants. Mouse needle infection studies showed that the cheA₂ mutant failed to infect either immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice and was quickly eliminated from the initial inoculation sites. Tick-mouse infection studies revealed that although the mutant was able to survive in ticks, it failed to establish a new infection in mice via tick bites. The altered phenotypes were completely restored when the mutant was complemented. Collectively, these data demonstrate that B. burgdorferi needs chemotaxis to establish mammalian infection and to accomplish its natural enzootic cycle.

  15. Signaling through CD14 attenuates the inflammatory response to Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Wroblewski, Danielle; Akhtar, Muhammad Naveed; Patel, Raina A; Lavezzi, Wendy; Gangloff, Sophie C; Goyert, Sanna M; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D; Sellati, Timothy J

    2005-02-01

    Lyme disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder caused by the spirochetal bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi. In vitro evidence suggests that binding of spirochetal lipoproteins to CD14, a pattern recognition receptor expressed on monocytes/macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells, is a critical requirement for cellular activation and the subsequent release of proinflammatory cytokines that most likely contribute to symptomatology and clinical manifestations. To test the validity of this notion, we assessed the impact of CD14 deficiency on Lyme disease in C3H/HeN mice. Contrary to an anticipated diminution in pathology, CD14(-/-) mice exhibited more severe and persistent inflammation than did CD14(+/+) mice. This disparity reflects altered gene regulation within immune cells that may engender the higher bacterial burden and serum cytokine levels observed in CD14(-/-) mice. Comparing their in vitro stimulatory activity, live spirochetes, but not lysed organisms, were a potent CD14-independent stimulus of cytokine production, triggering an exaggerated response by CD14(-/-) macrophages. Collectively, our in vivo and in vitro findings support the provocative notion that: 1) pattern recognition by CD14 is entirely dispensable for elaboration of an inflammatory response to B. burgdorferi, and 2) CD14-independent signaling pathways are inherently more destructive than CD14-dependent pathways. Continued study of CD14-independent signaling pathways may provide mechanistic insight into the inflammatory processes that underlie development of chronic inflammation.

  16. PER and TIM inhibit the DNA binding activity of a Drosophila CLOCK-CYC/dBMAL1 heterodimer without disrupting formation of the heterodimer: a basis for circadian transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Bae, K; Edery, I

    1999-08-01

    The Drosophila CLOCK (dCLOCK) and CYCLE (CYC) (also referred to as dBMAL1) proteins are members of the basic helix-loop-helix PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) superfamily of transcription factors and are required for high-level expression of the circadian clock genes period (per) and timeless (tim). Several lines of evidence indicate that PER, TIM, or a PER-TIM heterodimer somehow inhibit the transcriptional activity of a putative dCLOCK-CYC complex, generating a negative-feedback loop that is a core element of the Drosophila circadian oscillator. In this report we show that PER and/or TIM inhibits the binding of a dCLOCK-CYC heterodimer to an E-box-containing DNA fragment that is present in the 5' nontranscribed region of per and acts as a circadian enhancer element. Surprisingly, inhibition of this DNA binding activity by PER, TIM, or both is not accompanied by disruption of the association between dCLOCK and CYC. The results suggest that the interaction of PER, TIM, or both with the dCLOCK-CYC heterodimer induces a conformational change or masks protein regions in the heterodimer, leading to a reduction in DNA binding activity. Together with other findings, our results strongly suggest that daily cycles in the association of PER and TIM with the dCLOCK-CYC complex probably contribute to rhythmic expression of per and tim.

  17. Niche partitioning of Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia miyamotoi in the same tick vector and mammalian reservoir species.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Alan G; Bunikis, Jonas; Travinsky, Bridgit; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A; Fish, Durland; Tsao, Jean I

    2009-12-01

    The Lyme borreliosis agent Borrelia burgdorferi and the relapsing fever group species Borrelia miyamotoi co-occur in the United States. We used species-specific, quantitative polymerase chain reaction to study both species in the blood and skin of Peromyscus leucopus mice and host-seeking Ixodes scapularis nymphs at a Connecticut site. Bacteremias with B. burgdorferi or B. miyamotoi were most prevalent during periods of greatest activity for nymphs or larvae, respectively. Whereas B. burgdorferi was 30-fold more frequent than B. miyamotoi in skin biopsies and mice had higher densities of B. burgdorferi densities in the skin than in the blood, B. miyamotoi densities were higher in blood than skin. In a survey of host-seeking nymphs in 11 northern states, infection prevalences for B. burgdorferi and B. miyamotoi averaged approximately 0.20 and approximately 0.02, respectively. Co-infections of P. leucopus or I. scapularis with both B. burgdorferi and B. miyamotoi were neither more nor less common than random expectations. PMID:19996447

  18. Detection of relapsing fever spirochetes (Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia coriaceae) in free-ranging mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from Nevada, United States.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Nathan C; Teglas, Mike B; Stewart, Kelley M; Wasley, Tony; Wolff, Peregrine L

    2012-02-01

    Surveillance of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus, Rafinesque, 1917) populations for tick-borne diseases has helped define the distribution of these pathogens and their subsequent risk of transmission to humans and domestic animals. We surveyed three mule deer herds across the state of Nevada for infection with relapsing fever Borrelia spp. spirochetes. Bacterial prevalence varied by the county where deer were sampled but Borrelia spirochetes were detected in 7.7% of all deer sampled. Infected deer were identified in every location from which mule deer samples were obtained. Sequencing of the Borrelia intergenic spacer gene (IGS) revealed that one individual was infected with Borrelia coriaceae and all others were infected with Borrelia hermsii. The vector of B. hermsii, Ornithodoros hermsi (Acari: Argasidae, Wheeler, Herms, and Meyer, 1935), feeds primarily on wild rodents and has not been identified infesting deer. Additionally, Ornithodoros coriaceus (Acari: Argasidae, Koch, 1844), which readily feeds on deer and is frequently infected with B. coriaceae, has not been shown to be a competent vector for B. hermsii. Our data represent the first sylvatic evidence of B. hermsii infection in mule deer. Additionally, our data provide evidence that infection with relapsing fever spirochetes in Nevada is wide ranging in the state's deer populations.

  19. Tau stabilizes microtubules by binding at the interface between tubulin heterodimers

    PubMed Central

    Kadavath, Harindranath; Hofele, Romina V.; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Tepper, Katharina; Urlaub, Henning; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The structure, dynamic behavior, and spatial organization of microtubules are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins. An important microtubule-associated protein is the protein Tau, because its microtubule interaction is impaired in the course of Alzheimer’s disease and several other neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we show that Tau binds to microtubules by using small groups of evolutionary conserved residues. The binding sites are formed by residues that are essential for the pathological aggregation of Tau, suggesting competition between physiological interaction and pathogenic misfolding. Tau residues in between the microtubule-binding sites remain flexible when Tau is bound to microtubules in agreement with a highly dynamic nature of the Tau–microtubule interaction. By binding at the interface between tubulin heterodimers, Tau uses a conserved mechanism of microtubule polymerization and, thus, regulation of axonal stability and cell morphology. PMID:26034266

  20. Cytotoxic Xanthone-Anthraquinone Heterodimers from an Unidentified Fungus of the Order Hypocreales (MSX 17022)

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Sloan; Graf, Tyler N.; Adcock, Audrey F.; Kroll, David J.; Shen, Qi; Swanson, Steven M.; Matthew, Susan; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Wani, Mansukh C.; Darveaux, Blaise A.; Pearce, Cedric J.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2011-01-01

    Two new xanthone-anthraquinone heterodimers, acremoxanthone C (5) and acremoxanthone D (2), have been isolated from an extract of an unidentified fungus of the Order Hypocreales (MSX 17022) by bioactivity-directed fractionation as part of a search for anticancer leads from filamentous fungi. Two known related compounds, acremonidin A (4) and acremonidin C (3) were also isolated, as was a known benzophenone, moniliphenone (1). The structures of these isolates were determined via extensive use of spectroscopic and spectrometric tools in conjunction with comparisons to the literature. All compounds (1–5) were evaluated against a suite of biological assays, including those for cytotoxicity, inhibition of the 20S proteasome, mitochondria transmembrane potential, and NF-κB. PMID:22068158

  1. Borrelia crocidurae in Ornithodoros ticks from northwestern Morocco: a range extension in relation to climatic change?

    PubMed

    Souidi, Yassine; Boudebouch, Najma; Ezikouri, Sayeh; Belghyti, Driss; Trape, Jean-François; Sarih, M'hammed

    2014-12-01

    Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is caused by Borrelia spirochetes transmitted to humans by Argasid soft ticks of the genus Ornithodoros. We investigated the presence of Ornithodoros ticks in rodent burrows in nine sites of the Gharb region of northwestern Morocco where we recently documented a high incidence of TBRF in humans. We assessed the Borrelia infection rate by nested PCR and sequencing. All sites investigated were colonized by ticks of the Ornithodoros marocanus complex and a high proportion of burrows (38.4%) were found to be infested. Borrelia infections were observed in 6.8% of the ticks tested. Two Borrelia species were identified by sequencing: B. hispanica and B. crocidurae. The discovery in northwestern Morocco of Ornithodoros ticks infected by B. crocidurae represents a 350 km range extension of this Sahelo-Saharan spirochete in North Africa. The spread of B. crocidurae may be related to the increasing aridity of northwestern Morocco in relation to climate change.

  2. The ToxR protein of Vibrio cholerae forms homodimers and heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Ottemann, K M; Mekalanos, J J

    1996-01-01

    The ToxR protein of Vibrio cholerae regulates the expression of several virulence factors that play important roles in the pathogenesis of cholera. Previous experiments with ToxR-alkaline phosphatase (ToxR-PhoA) fusion proteins suggested a model for gene regulation in which the inactive form of ToxR was a monomer and the active form of ToxR was a dimer (V. L. Miller, R. K. Taylor, and J. J. Mekalanos, Cell 48:271-279, 1987). In order to examine whether ToxR exists in a dimeric form in vivo, biochemical cross-linking analyses were carried out. Different dimeric cross-linked species were detected depending on the expression level of ToxR: when overexpressed, ToxR+ToxR homodimers and ToxR+ToxS heterodimers were detected, and when ToxR was expressed at normal levels, exclusively ToxR+ToxS heterodimers were detected. The amount of overexpression was quantitated by using ToxR-PhoA fusion proteins and was found to correspond to 2.7-fold the normal level of ToxR. The formation of both homodimeric ToxR species and heterodimeric ToxR+ToxS species is consistent with previously reported genetic data that suggested that both types of ToxR oligomeric interactions occur. However, variation in the amount of either the homodimeric or heterodimeric form detectable by this cross-linking analysis was not observed to correlate with laboratory culture conditions known to modulate ToxR activity. Thus, genetic and biochemical data indicate that ToxR is able to interact with both itself and ToxS but that these interactions may not explain mechanistically the observed changes in ToxR activity that occur in response to environmental conditions. PMID:8550410

  3. Response regulator heterodimer formation controls a key stage in Streptomyces development.

    PubMed

    Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M; Bibb, Maureen J; Bush, Matthew J; Chandra, Govind; Buttner, Mark J

    2014-08-01

    The orphan, atypical response regulators BldM and WhiI each play critical roles in Streptomyces differentiation. BldM is required for the formation of aerial hyphae, and WhiI is required for the differentiation of these reproductive structures into mature spores. To gain insight into BldM function, we defined the genome-wide BldM regulon using ChIP-Seq and transcriptional profiling. BldM target genes clustered into two groups based on their whi gene dependency. Expression of Group I genes depended on bldM but was independent of all the whi genes, and biochemical experiments showed that Group I promoters were controlled by a BldM homodimer. In contrast, Group II genes were expressed later than Group I genes and their expression depended not only on bldM but also on whiI and whiG (encoding the sigma factor that activates whiI). Additional ChIP-Seq analysis showed that BldM Group II genes were also direct targets of WhiI and that in vivo binding of WhiI to these promoters depended on BldM and vice versa. We go on to demonstrate that BldM and WhiI form a functional heterodimer that controls Group II promoters, serving to integrate signals from two distinct developmental pathways. The BldM-WhiI system thus exemplifies the potential of response regulator heterodimer formation as a mechanism to expand the signaling capabilities of bacterial cells.

  4. Response Regulator Heterodimer Formation Controls a Key Stage in Streptomyces Development

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M.; Bibb, Maureen J.; Bush, Matthew J.; Chandra, Govind; Buttner, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    The orphan, atypical response regulators BldM and WhiI each play critical roles in Streptomyces differentiation. BldM is required for the formation of aerial hyphae, and WhiI is required for the differentiation of these reproductive structures into mature spores. To gain insight into BldM function, we defined the genome-wide BldM regulon using ChIP-Seq and transcriptional profiling. BldM target genes clustered into two groups based on their whi gene dependency. Expression of Group I genes depended on bldM but was independent of all the whi genes, and biochemical experiments showed that Group I promoters were controlled by a BldM homodimer. In contrast, Group II genes were expressed later than Group I genes and their expression depended not only on bldM but also on whiI and whiG (encoding the sigma factor that activates whiI). Additional ChIP-Seq analysis showed that BldM Group II genes were also direct targets of WhiI and that in vivo binding of WhiI to these promoters depended on BldM and vice versa. We go on to demonstrate that BldM and WhiI form a functional heterodimer that controls Group II promoters, serving to integrate signals from two distinct developmental pathways. The BldM-WhiI system thus exemplifies the potential of response regulator heterodimer formation as a mechanism to expand the signaling capabilities of bacterial cells. PMID:25101778

  5. Blood feeding on large grazers affects the transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato by Ixodes ricinus.

    PubMed

    Pacilly, F C A; Benning, M E; Jacobs, F; Leidekker, J; Sprong, H; Van Wieren, S E; Takken, W

    2014-10-01

    The presence of Ixodes ricinus and their associated Borrelia infections on large grazers was investigated. Carcases of freshly shot red deer, mouflon and wild boar were examined for the presence of any stage of I. ricinus. Questing ticks were collected from locations where red deer and wild boar are known to occur. Presence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. DNA was examined in a fraction of the collected ticks. Larvae, nymphs and adult ticks were found on the three large grazers. Red deer had the highest tick burden, with many of the nymphs and adult females attached for engorgement. Most larvae had not attached. The mean number of ticks on the animals varied from 13 to 67. Ticks were highly aggregated amongst the animals: some animals had no ticks, while others had high numbers. Larvae and nymphs were mostly found on the ears, while adult ticks were attached to the axillae. The Borrelia infection rate of questing nymphs was 8.5%. Unengorged wandering nymphs on deer had a Borrelia infection rate of 12.5%, while only 0.9% of feeding nymphs carried a Borrelia infection. The infection rate of unengorged adult male ticks was 4.5%, and that of feeding female ticks was 0.7%. The data suggest that ticks feeding on red deer and wild boar lose their Borrelia infections. The implications of the results are discussed with respect to Borrelia epidemiology and maintenance of a Borrelia reservoir as well as the role of reproductive hosts for Ixodes ricinus. PMID:25113977

  6. Synthesis of heterodimer radionuclide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance and single-photon emission computed tomography dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Bin; Tian, Jian; Wang, Jiaqing; Chong, Yu; Wang, Xin; Deng, Yaoyao; Tang, Minghua; Li, Yonggang; Ge, Cuicui; Pan, Yue; Gu, Hongwei

    2015-02-01

    We report a facile synthesis of bifunctional Fe3O4-Ag125I heterodimers for use as dual-modality imaging agents in magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We introduced 125I, which is a clinically used radioisotope, as a SPECT reporter, into Fe3O4-Ag heterodimer nanoparticles to provide a new type of bifunctional contrast agent for MRI and SPECT imaging.We report a facile synthesis of bifunctional Fe3O4-Ag125I heterodimers for use as dual-modality imaging agents in magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We introduced 125I, which is a clinically used radioisotope, as a SPECT reporter, into Fe3O4-Ag heterodimer nanoparticles to provide a new type of bifunctional contrast agent for MRI and SPECT imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of general experimental procedures, TEM image. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07255c

  7. A heterodimer of human 3'-phospho-adenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (PAPS) synthases is a new sulphate activating complex.

    PubMed

    Grum, Daniel; van den Boom, Johannes; Neumann, Daniel; Matena, Anja; Link, Nina M; Mueller, Jonathan W

    2010-05-01

    3'-Phospho-adenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (PAPS) synthases are fundamental to mammalian sulphate metabolism. These enzymes have recently been linked to a rising number of human diseases. Despite many studies, it is not yet understood how the mammalian PAPS synthases 1 and 2 interact with each other. We provide first evidence for heterodimerisation of these two enzymes by pull-down assays and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Kinetics of dimer dissociation/association indicates that these heterodimers form as soon as PAPSS1 and -S2 encounter each other in solution. Affinity of the homo- and heterodimers were found to be in the low nanomolar range using anisotropy measurements employing proteins labelled with the fluorescent dye IAEDANS that--in spite of its low quantum yield--is well suited for anisotropy due to its large Stokes shift. Within its kinase domain, the PAPS synthase heterodimer displays similar substrate inhibition by adenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (APS) as the homodimers. Due to divergent catalytic efficacies of PAPSS1 and -S2, the heterodimer might be a way of regulating PAPS synthase function within mammalian cells.

  8. A heterodimer of human 3'-phospho-adenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (PAPS) synthases is a new sulphate activating complex

    SciTech Connect

    Grum, Daniel; Boom, Johannes van den; Neumann, Daniel; Matena, Anja; Link, Nina M.; Mueller, Jonathan W.

    2010-05-07

    3'-Phospho-adenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (PAPS) synthases are fundamental to mammalian sulphate metabolism. These enzymes have recently been linked to a rising number of human diseases. Despite many studies, it is not yet understood how the mammalian PAPS synthases 1 and 2 interact with each other. We provide first evidence for heterodimerisation of these two enzymes by pull-down assays and Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Kinetics of dimer dissociation/association indicates that these heterodimers form as soon as PAPSS1 and -S2 encounter each other in solution. Affinity of the homo- and heterodimers were found to be in the low nanomolar range using anisotropy measurements employing proteins labelled with the fluorescent dye IAEDANS that - in spite of its low quantum yield - is well suited for anisotropy due to its large Stokes shift. Within its kinase domain, the PAPS synthase heterodimer displays similar substrate inhibition by adenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (APS) as the homodimers. Due to divergent catalytic efficacies of PAPSS1 and -S2, the heterodimer might be a way of regulating PAPS synthase function within mammalian cells.

  9. Photoluminescence Enhancement in CdSe/ZnS–DNA linked–Au Nanoparticle Heterodimers Probed by Single Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, M.; Maye, M.M.; Gang, O.

    2010-07-26

    Photoluminescence enhancement of up to 20 fold is demonstrated at the single molecule level for heterodimers composed of a core/shell CdSe/ZnS semiconductive quantum dot and a gold nanoparticle of 60 nm size separated by a 32 nm-long dsDNA linker when employing optical excitation at wavelengths near the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticle.

  10. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi species and identification of Borrelia valaisiana in questing Ixodes ricinus in the Lyon region of France as determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Quessada, T; Martial-Convert, F; Arnaud, S; Leudet De La Vallee, H; Gilot, B; Pichot, J

    2003-03-01

    Many cases of Lyme borreliosis have been reported over the years in the region of Lyon, France. The identification and prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Ixodes ricinus were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the flagellin gene and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Questing Ixodes ricinus larvae, nymphs and adults were collected by the flagging method from deciduous forests in four areas in the Lyon region of France between October 1994 and September 1995 and in June 1998. The overall prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was 13.2% (91/688). No significant differences in prevalence were observed between the different stages and sex of the ixodids or between collection areas. The majority of infections were simple infections (82.4%; 75/91), most of which were due to Borrelia afzelii (41.4%), while coinfections (12.1%) were predominantly (54.5%) a combination of Borrelia valaisiana and Borrelia garinii. No tick was infected with more than two borrelial species, nor was Borrelia lusitaniae identified. The Borrelia valaisiana species was detected for the first time in France, confirming its widespread presence in Europe. This study confirms that the surroundings of Lyon are risk areas for contracting Lyme disease and that no particular clinical manifestations predominate due to the heterogeneous distribution of Borrelia genospecies. Moreover, the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis is a rapid and easy method for genotyping of Borrelia species.

  11. Recognition of Borrelia burgdorferi by NOD2 is central for the induction of an inflammatory reaction.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Marije; Berende, Anneleen; Sturm, Patrick; Ter Hofstede, Hadewych J M; de Jong, Dirk J; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; van der Meer, Jos W M; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2010-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) plays an important role in the recognition of Borrelia bacteria, the causative agent of Lyme disease, but the existence and importance of additional receptors in this process has been hypothesized. In the present study, we confirmed the role played by TLR2 in the recognition of Borrelia bacteria but also demonstrated a crucial role for the intracellular peptidoglycan receptor NOD2 for sensing the spirochete. Cells from individuals who were homozygous for the loss-of-function mutation 3020insC in the NOD2 gene were defective with respect to cytokine release after stimulation with Borrelia species, and this was confirmed in peritoneal macrophages from mice lacking RICK, the adaptor molecule used by NOD2. In contrast, NOD1 played no major role in the recognition of Borrelia spirochetes. This raises the intriguing possibility that recognition of Borrelia spirochetes is exerted by TLR2 in combination with NOD2 and that both receptors are necessary for an effective induction of cytokines by Borrelia species. The interplay between TLR2 and NOD2 might not only be necessary for the induction of a proper immune response but may also contribute to inflammatory-induced pathology. PMID:20441518

  12. Sylvatic maintenance of Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales) in Northern California: untangling the web of transmission.

    PubMed

    Brown, R N; Peot, M A; Lane, R S

    2006-07-01

    Lyme borreliosis is associated with several genospecies of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) (Spirochaetales), but human disease has been associated only with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner in the western United States. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of rrf-rrl amplicons from 124 tick and mammalian isolates from various habitats yielded 13 RFLP patterns. Of these patterns, six were patterns previously associated either with Borrelia bissettii Postic, Marti Ras, Lane, Hendson & Baranton or Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., and the remaining seven patterns belonged to diverse and previously uncharacterized Borrelia spp. Uncharacterized Borrelia spp. were cultured most frequently from Ixodes spinipalpis Hadwen & Nuttall and California kangaroo rats, Dipodomys californicus Merriam, inhabiting grasslands, and B. bissettii from I. spinipalpis and dusky-footed woodrats, Neotoma fuscipes Baird, associated with oak woodlands or chaparral. B. burgdorferi s.s. typically was isolated from host-seeking Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls collected in dense oak woodlands, woodland-grass, or redwood forests. Although some isolates of B. burgdorferi s.s. were cultured from woodrats, there was no clear association of this human pathogen with any vertebrate host. These findings, along with recent evidence indicating that the western gray squirrel, Sciurus griseus Ord, may be an important reservoir of B. burgdorferi s.s. in Californian oak woodlands, suggest that our earlier hypothesis implicating an enzootic cycle involving woodrats and I. spinipalpis is insufficient to account for observed patterns of infection in nature.

  13. Borrelia Species in Host-Seeking Ticks and Small Mammals in Northern Florida

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kerry

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve understanding of several factors related to the ecology and environmental risk of Borrelia infection in northern Florida. Small mammals and host-seeking adult ticks were collected at several sites, and specimens were tested for the presence of Borrelia species, primarily by PCR amplification. Tissues from some vertebrates and ticks were initially cultured in BSK-H medium to isolate spirochetes, but none were recovered. However, comparison of partial flagellin (flaB), 66-kDa protein (p66), and outer surface protein A (ospA) gene sequences from DNAs amplified from small mammals and ticks confirmed the presence of several Borrelia species. Borrelia lonestari DNA was detected among lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) at four sites. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strains were detected in all small mammal species tested and in A. americanum, Ixodes affinis, and Ixodes scapularis ticks. Borrelia bissettii was found in a cotton mouse and cotton rats and in I. affinis ticks. The study findings extend the known geographic distributions of B. lonestari in A. americanum and of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in A. americanum, I. affinis, I. scapularis, and small mammals to new sites in Florida. The presence of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strains in host-seeking lone star ticks at two sites in Florida suggests that A. americanum should still be considered a possible vector of B. burgdorferi sensu lato. PMID:15528699

  14. An OspC-specific monoclonal antibody passively protects mice from tick-transmitted infection by Borrelia burgdorferi B31.

    PubMed

    Mbow, M L; Gilmore, R D; Titus, R G

    1999-10-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody directed against Borrelia burgdorferi B31 outer surface protein C (OspC) antigen was generated by a method whereby borreliae were inoculated into the mouse via the natural transmission mode of tick feeding. Passive immunization with this antibody resulted in protection of C3H/HeJ and outbred mice from a tick-transmitted challenge infection. Immunofluorescence staining of borrelia cells indicated surface exposure of the OspC epitope reactive with the monoclonal antibody.

  15. Synanthropic birds influence the distribution of Borrelia species: analysis of Ixodes ricinus ticks feeding on passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Dubska, Lenka; Literak, Ivan; Kocianova, Elena; Taragelova, Veronika; Sverakova, Veronika; Sychra, Oldrich; Hromadko, Miloslav

    2011-02-01

    Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from 835 birds and from vegetation in the Czech Republic were analyzed. Host-seeking ticks (n = 427) were infected predominantly by Borrelia afzelii (25%). Ticks (n = 1,012) from songbirds (Passeriformes) were infected commonly by Borrelia garinii (12.1%) and Borrelia valaisiana (13.4%). Juveniles of synanthropic birds, Eurasian blackbirds (Turdus merula) and song thrushes (Turdus philomelos), were major reservoir hosts of B. garinii. PMID:21148704

  16. Type IV Pilus Alignment Subcomplex Proteins PilN and PilO Form Homo- and Heterodimers in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Leighton, Tiffany L; Yong, Daniel H; Howell, P Lynne; Burrows, Lori L

    2016-09-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections and is resistant to many antibiotics. Type IV pili (T4P) are among the key virulence factors used by P. aeruginosa for host cell attachment, biofilm formation, and twitching motility, making this system a promising target for novel therapeutics. Point mutations in the conserved PilMNOP alignment subcomplex were previously shown to have distinct effects on assembly and disassembly of T4P, suggesting that it may function in a dynamic manner. We introduced mutations encoding Cys substitutions into pilN and/or pilO on the chromosome to maintain normal stoichiometry and expression levels and captured covalent PilNO heterodimers, as well as PilN and PilO homodimers, in vivo Most covalent PilN or PilO homodimers had minimal functional impact in P. aeruginosa, suggesting that homodimers are a physiologically relevant state. However, certain covalent homo- or heterodimers eliminated twitching motility, suggesting that specific PilNO configurations are essential for T4P function. These data were verified using soluble N-terminal truncated fragments of PilN and PilO Cys mutants, which purified as a mixture of homo- and heterodimers at volumes consistent with a tetramer. Deletion of genes encoding alignment subcomplex components, PilM or PilP, but not other T4P components, including the motor ATPases PilB or PilT, blocked in vivo formation of disulfide-bonded PilNO heterodimers, suggesting that both PilM and PilP influence the heterodimer interface. Combined, our data suggest that T4P function depends on rearrangements at PilN and PilO interfaces. PMID:27474743

  17. Evolution of Northeastern and Midwestern Borrelia burgdorferi, United States

    PubMed Central

    Vandermause, Mary F.; Meece, Jennifer K.; Reed, Kurt D.; Dykhuizen, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    The per capita incidence of human Lyme disease in the northeastern United States is more than twice that in the Midwest. However, the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, in the tick vector is nearly identical in the 2 regions. The disparity in human Lyme disease incidence may result from a disparity in the human invasiveness of the bacteria in the Northeast and Midwest caused by fundamentally different evolutionary histories. B. burgdorferi populations in the Northeast and Midwest are geographically isolated, enabling evolutionary divergence in human invasiveness. However, we found that B. burgdorferi populations in the Northeast and Midwest shared a recent common ancestor, which suggests that substantial evolutionary divergence in human invasiveness has not occurred. We propose that differences in either animal ecology or human behavior are the root cause of the differences in human incidence between the 2 regions. PMID:20507740

  18. Bullying Borrelia: When the Culture of Science is Under Attack

    PubMed Central

    Auwaerter, Paul G.; Melia, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Although Lyme disease responds to short courses of antibiotics, tick-borne Borrelia burgdorferi has been advanced by some as a frequent explanation for medically unexplained symptoms such as continual fatigue, musculoskeletal pains, and subjective neurocognitive dysfunction. Often called “chronic Lyme disease” by adherents of this philosophy, it is loosely defined, and practitioners liberally prescribe nostrums, including prolonged antimicrobial therapies, in a belief that this eradicates suspected infection. Perhaps due to the lack of supportive data, proponents of this theory have developed their own meetings, literature, activist groups, and substantial internet activities to advance their views. Forces motivating this movement are explored, as are tactics used to advance non-scientific ideas that have included legal action and garnering legislative endorsement. While neither logical nor evidence-based, “chronic Lyme disease” harnesses corrosive energies that taint modern medicine and society. PMID:23303970

  19. Bullying Borrelia: when the culture of science is under attack.

    PubMed

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Melia, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Although Lyme disease responds to short courses of antibiotics, tick-borne Borrelia burgdorferi has been advanced by some as a frequent explanation for medically unexplained symptoms such as continual fatigue, musculoskeletal pains, and subjective neurocognitive dysfunction. Often called "chronic Lyme disease" by adherents of this philosophy, it is loosely defined, and practitioners liberally prescribe nostrums, including prolonged antimicrobial therapies, in a belief that this eradicates suspected infection. Perhaps due to the lack of supportive data, proponents of this theory have developed their own meetings, literature, activist groups, and substantial internet activities to advance their views. Forces motivating this movement are explored, as are tactics used to advance non-scientific ideas that have included legal action and garnering legislative endorsement. While neither logical nor evidence-based, "chronic Lyme disease" harnesses corrosive energies that taint modern medicine and society. PMID:23303970

  20. Vaccination against Lyme disease caused by diverse Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Fikrig, E; Telford, S R; Wallich, R; Chen, M; Lobet, Y; Matuschka, F R; Kimsey, R B; Kantor, F S; Barthold, S W; Spielman, A; Flavell, R A

    1995-01-01

    Diversity and mutations in the genes for outer surface proteins (Osps) A and B of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi), the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, suggests that a monovalent OspA or OspB vaccine may not provide protection against antigenically variable naturally occurring B. burgdorferi. We now show that OspA or OspB immunizations protect mice from tick-borne infection with heterogeneous B. burgdorferi from different geographic regions. This result is in distinct contrast to in vitro killing analyses and in vivo protection studies using syringe injections of B. burgdorferi as the challenge inoculum. Evaluations of vaccine efficacy against Lyme disease and other vector-borne infections should use the natural mode of transmission and not be predicated on classification systems or assays that do not rely upon the vector to transmit infection.

  1. Persister Development by Borrelia burgdorferi Populations In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline is an antibiotic commonly used to treat Lyme disease and other bacterial infections. The MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for Borrelia burgdorferi have been investigated by different groups but were experimentally established in this study as a function of input cell density. We demonstrated that B. burgdorferi treated in the stationary phase has a higher probability of regrowth following removal of antibiotic. In addition, we determined experimentally and mathematically that the spirochetes which persist posttreatment do not have a longer lag phase but exhibit a lower growth rate than untreated spirochetes. Finally, we found that treating the spirochetes by pulse-dosing did not eliminate growth or reduce the persister population in vitro. From these data, we propose that B. burgdorferi persister development is stochastic and driven by slowed growth. PMID:26248368

  2. Nanoscopic Localization of Surface-Exposed Antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Lemgruber, Leandro; Sant'Anna, Celso; Griffths, Caron; Abud, Yuri; Mhlanga, Musa; Wallich, Reinhard; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2015-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the causative agent of Lyme disease, is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Ixodes spp. ticks. Successful infection of vertebrate hosts necessitates sophisticated means of the pathogen to escape the vertebrates' immune system. One strategy employed by Lyme disease spirochetes to evade adaptive immunity involves a highly coordinated regulation of the expression of outer surface proteins that is vital for infection, dissemination, and persistence. Here we characterized the expression pattern of bacterial surface antigens using different microscopy techniques, from fluorescent wide field to super-resolution and immunogold-scanning electron microscopy. A fluorescent strain of B. burgdorferi spirochetes was labeled with monoclonal antibodies directed against various bacterial surface antigens. Our results indicate that OspA is more evenly distributed over the surface than OspB and OspC that were present as punctate areas. PMID:25739645

  3. BB0744 Affects Tissue Tropism and Spatial Distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Wager, Beau; Shaw, Dana K; Groshong, Ashley M; Blevins, Jon S; Skare, Jon T

    2015-09-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, produces a variety of proteins that promote survival and colonization in both the Ixodes species vector and various mammalian hosts. We initially identified BB0744 (also known as p83/100) by screening for B. burgdorferi strain B31 proteins that bind to α1β1 integrin and hypothesized that, given the presence of a signal peptide, BB0744 may be a surface-exposed protein. In contrast to this expectation, localization studies suggested that BB0744 resides in the periplasm. Despite its subsurface location, we were interested in testing whether BB0744 is required for borrelial pathogenesis. To this end, a bb0744 deletion was isolated in a B. burgdorferi strain B31 infectious background, complemented, and queried for the role of BB0744 following experimental infection. A combination of bioluminescent imaging, cultivation of infected tissues, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) demonstrated that Δbb0744 mutant B. burgdorferi bacteria were attenuated in the ability to colonize heart tissue, as well as skin locations distal to the site of infection. Furthermore, qPCR indicated a significantly reduced spirochetal load in distal skin and joint tissue infected with Δbb0744 mutant B. burgdorferi. Complementation with bb0744 restored infectivity, indicating that the defect seen in Δbb0744 mutant B. burgdorferi was due to the loss of BB0744. Taken together, these results suggest that BB0744 is necessary for tissue tropism, particularly in heart tissue, alters the ability of B. burgdorferi to disseminate efficiently, or both. Additional studies are warranted to address the mechanism employed by BB0744 that alters the pathogenic potential of B. burgdorferi.

  4. Molecular identification of Borrelia genus in questing hard ticks from Portugal: Phylogenetic characterization of two novel Relapsing Fever-like Borrelia sp.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Mónica; Parreira, Ricardo; Maia, Carla; Lopes, Nádia; Fingerle, Volker; Vieira, M Luísa

    2016-06-01

    In the last decades, several studies have reported pathogenic species of Borrelia related to those that cause Tick-borne Relapsing Fever (RF), but unexpectedly suggesting their transmission by hard ticks, known vectors of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi s.l.) species, rather than by soft ticks. This study was designed to update the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. species in ticks from several districts of mainland Portugal, where Ixodes ricinus had been previously described. Ticks (a total of 2915 specimens) were collected in seven districts throughout the country, and analyzed using molecular methods. Three nested-PCR protocols, targeting the flagellin gene (flaB), the intergenic spacer region (IGS) located between 5S and 23S rRNA, and the glpQ gene, and a conventional PCR targeting the 16S rRNA, were used for Borrelia DNA detection. Borrelia DNA was detected in 3% of the ticks from Braga, Vila Real, Lisboa, Setúbal, Évora and Faro districts. The obtained amplicons were sequenced and analyzed by BLASTn, and 15/63 (24%) matched with homologous sequences from Borrelia lusitaniae and 15/63 (24%) with B. garinii, being these the most prevalent species. DNA from B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), B. valaisiana and B. afzelii were detected in 7/63 (11%), 6/63 (10%), and 2/63 (3%) of the specimens, respectively. Unexpectedly, DNA sequence (flaB) analysis from eight (13%) samples, two from Rhipicephalus sanguineus and six from Haemaphysalis punctata tick species, revealed high homology with RF-like Borrelia. Phylogenetic analyses obtained from three genetic markers (16S rRNA, flaB, and glpQ) confirmed their congruent inclusion in a strongly supported RF cluster, where they segregated in two subgroups which differ from the other Relapsing Fever species. Therefore, the results confirm the circulation of multiple species of B. burgdorferi s.l. over a wide geographic range, covering most of the Portuguese mainland territory. Surprisingly, the obtained data

  5. Molecular identification of Borrelia genus in questing hard ticks from Portugal: Phylogenetic characterization of two novel Relapsing Fever-like Borrelia sp.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Mónica; Parreira, Ricardo; Maia, Carla; Lopes, Nádia; Fingerle, Volker; Vieira, M Luísa

    2016-06-01

    In the last decades, several studies have reported pathogenic species of Borrelia related to those that cause Tick-borne Relapsing Fever (RF), but unexpectedly suggesting their transmission by hard ticks, known vectors of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi s.l.) species, rather than by soft ticks. This study was designed to update the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. species in ticks from several districts of mainland Portugal, where Ixodes ricinus had been previously described. Ticks (a total of 2915 specimens) were collected in seven districts throughout the country, and analyzed using molecular methods. Three nested-PCR protocols, targeting the flagellin gene (flaB), the intergenic spacer region (IGS) located between 5S and 23S rRNA, and the glpQ gene, and a conventional PCR targeting the 16S rRNA, were used for Borrelia DNA detection. Borrelia DNA was detected in 3% of the ticks from Braga, Vila Real, Lisboa, Setúbal, Évora and Faro districts. The obtained amplicons were sequenced and analyzed by BLASTn, and 15/63 (24%) matched with homologous sequences from Borrelia lusitaniae and 15/63 (24%) with B. garinii, being these the most prevalent species. DNA from B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), B. valaisiana and B. afzelii were detected in 7/63 (11%), 6/63 (10%), and 2/63 (3%) of the specimens, respectively. Unexpectedly, DNA sequence (flaB) analysis from eight (13%) samples, two from Rhipicephalus sanguineus and six from Haemaphysalis punctata tick species, revealed high homology with RF-like Borrelia. Phylogenetic analyses obtained from three genetic markers (16S rRNA, flaB, and glpQ) confirmed their congruent inclusion in a strongly supported RF cluster, where they segregated in two subgroups which differ from the other Relapsing Fever species. Therefore, the results confirm the circulation of multiple species of B. burgdorferi s.l. over a wide geographic range, covering most of the Portuguese mainland territory. Surprisingly, the obtained data

  6. Uncovering Divergence of Rice Exon Junction Complex Core Heterodimer Gene Duplication Reveals Their Essential Role in Growth, Development, and Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Gong, Pichang; He, Chaoying

    2014-05-12

    The exon junction complex (EJC) plays important developmental roles in animals; however, its role in plants is not well known. Here, we show various aspects of the divergence of each duplicated MAGO NASHI (MAGO) and Y14 gene pair in rice (Oryza sativa) encoding the putative EJC core subunits that form the obligate MAGO-Y14 heterodimers. OsMAGO1, OsMAGO2, and OsY14a were constitutively expressed in all tissues, while OsY14b was predominantly expressed in embryonic tissues. OsMAGO2 and OsY14b were more sensitive to different stresses than OsMAGO1 and OsY14a, and their encoded protein pair shared 93.8% and 46.9% sequence identity, respectively. Single MAGO down-regulation in rice did not lead to any phenotypic variation; however, double gene knockdowns generated short rice plants with abnormal flowers, and the stamens of these flowers showed inhibited degradation and absorption of both endothecium and tapetum, suggesting that OsMAGO1 and OsMAGO2 were functionally redundant. OsY14a knockdowns phenocopied OsMAGO1OsMAGO2 mutants, while down-regulation of OsY14b failed to induce plantlets, suggesting the functional specialization of OsY14b in embryogenesis. OsMAGO1OsMAGO2OsY14a triple down-regulation enhanced the phenotypes of OsMAGO1OsMAGO2 and OsY14a down-regulated mutants, indicating that they exert developmental roles in the MAGO-Y14 heterodimerization mode. Modified gene expression was noted in the altered developmental pathways in these knockdowns, and the transcript splicing of UNDEVELOPED TAPETUM1 (OsUDT1), a key regulator in stamen development, was uniquely abnormal. Concomitantly, MAGO and Y14 selectively bound to the OsUDT1 premessenger RNA, suggesting that rice EJC subunits regulate splicing. Our work provides novel insights into the function of the EJC locus in growth, development, and reproduction in angiosperms and suggests a role for these genes in the adaptive evolution of cereals.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Sub-Cellular Asymmetry of Fat-Dachsous Heterodimer for Generation of Planar Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Sinha, Pradip

    2014-01-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of animal tissues marked by coordinated polarization of cells or structures in the plane of a tissue. In insect wing epithelium, for instance, PCP is characterized by en masse orientation of hairs orthogonal to its apical-basal axis and pointing along the proximal-distal axis of the organ. Directional cue for PCP has been proposed to be generated by complex sets of interactions amongst three proteins - Fat (Ft), Dachsous (Ds) and Four-jointed (Fj). Ft and Ds are two atypical cadherins, which are phosphorylated by Fj, a Golgi kinase. Ft and Ds from adjacent cells bind heterophilically via their tandem cadherin repeats, and their binding affinities are regulated by Fj. Further, in the wing epithelium, sub-cellular levels of Ft-Ds heterodimers are seen to be elevated at the distal edges of individual cells, prefiguring their PCP. Mechanisms generating this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer in proximal and distal edges of cells, however, have not been resolved yet. Using a mathematical modeling approach, here we provide a framework for generation of this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. First, we explain how the known interactions within Ft-Ds-Fj system translate into sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Second, we show that this asymmetric localization of Ft-Ds heterodimer is lost when tissue-level gradient of Fj is flattened, or when phosphorylation of Ft by Fj is abolished, but not when tissue-level gradient of Ds is flattened or when phosphorylation of Ds is abrogated. Finally, we show that distal enrichment of Ds also amplifies Ft-Ds asymmetry. These observations reveal that gradient of Fj expression, phosphorylation of Ft by Fj and sub-cellular distal accumulation of Ds are three critical elements required for generating sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Our model integrates the known experimental data and presents testable predictions for future

  8. High-level production of a functional immunoglobulin heterodimer in a baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Hasemann, C A; Capra, J D

    1990-01-01

    A murine immunoglobulin heterodimer has been expressed in a baculovirus expression system. This was achieved by using both double infection of insect cells with separate heavy- and light-chain-expressing viruses and infection with a double-recombinant virus containing both the immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain cDNAs. In both cases, the polypeptide chains were correctly processed, glycosylated, and assembled into normal H2L2 (H = heavy, L = light) immunoglobulin monomers. These molecules bound antigen and expressed both polyclonal idiotype and monoclonal idiotopes. Furthermore, the transfer vectors described have been modified to contain the F1 origin of replication for the production of single-stranded DNA, which facilitates site-specific mutations of either the polyhedrin promoter or the inserted foreign gene. Use of this system should significantly advance the analysis of the structural bases for both idiotype expression and antigen binding by immunoglobulin. More importantly, it provides a generic method for the high-level expression of antibodies of diverse interest. Images PMID:2111022

  9. NXF1/p15 heterodimers are essential for mRNA nuclear export in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Herold, A; Klymenko, T; Izaurralde, E

    2001-01-01

    The conserved family of NXF proteins has been implicated in the export of messenger RNAs from the nucleus. In metazoans, NXFs heterodimerize with p15. The yeast genome encodes a single NXF protein (Mex67p), but there are multiple nxf genes in metazoans. Whether metazoan NXFs are functionally redundant, or their multiplication reflects an adaptation to a greater substrate complexity or to tissue-specific requirements has not been established. The Drosophila genome encodes one p15 homolog and four putative NXF proteins (NXF1 to NXF4). Here we show that depletion of the endogenous pools of NXF1 or p15 from Drosophila cells inhibits growth and results in a rapid and robust accumulation of polyadenylated RNAs within the nucleus. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations show that export of both heat-shock and non-heat-shock mRNAs, as well as intron-containing and intronless mRNAs is inhibited. Depleting endogenous NXF2 or NXF3 has no apparent phenotype. Moreover, NXF4 is not expressed at detectable levels in cultured Drosophila cells. We conclude that Dm NXF1/p15 heterodimers only (but not NXF2-NXF4) mediate the export of the majority of mRNAs in Drosophila cells and that the other members of the NXF family play more specialized or different roles. PMID:11780633

  10. The Smc5-Smc6 heterodimer associates with DNA through several independent binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Marc-André; Dhanaraman, Thillaivillalan; D’Amours, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The Smc5-6 complex is required for the maintenance of genome integrity through its functions in DNA repair and chromosome biogenesis. However, the specific mode of action of Smc5 and Smc6 in these processes remains largely unknown. We previously showed that individual components of the Smc5-Smc6 complex bind strongly to DNA as monomers, despite the absence of a canonical DNA-binding domain (DBD) in these proteins. How heterodimerization of Smc5-6 affects its binding to DNA, and which parts of the SMC molecules confer DNA-binding activity is not known at present. To address this knowledge gap, we characterized the functional domains of the Smc5-6 heterodimer and identify two DBDs in each SMC molecule. The first DBD is located within the SMC hinge region and its adjacent coiled-coil arms, while the second is found in the conserved ATPase head domain. These DBDs can independently recapitulate the substrate preference of the full-length Smc5 and Smc6 proteins. We also show that heterodimerization of full-length proteins specifically increases the affinity of the resulting complex for double-stranded DNA substrates. Collectively, our findings provide critical insights into the structural requirements for effective binding of the Smc5-6 complex to DNA repair substrates in vitro and in live cells. PMID:25984708

  11. Yeast surface display of a noncovalent MHC class II heterodimer complexed with antigenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Bill, Jerome R; Nields, Andrew W; Marrack, Philippa C; Kappler, John W

    2005-11-20

    Microbial protein display technologies have enabled directed molecular evolution of binding and stability properties in numerous protein systems. In particular, dramatic improvements to antibody binding affinity and kinetics have been accomplished using these tools in recent years. Examples of successful application of display technologies to other immunological proteins have been limited to date. Herein, we describe the expression of human class II major histocompatibility complex allele (MHCII) HLA-DR4 on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a noncovalently associated heterodimer. The yeast-displayed MHCII is fully native as assessed by binding of conformationally specific monoclonal antibodies; failure of antibodies specific for empty HLA-DR4 to bind yeast-displayed protein indicates antigenic peptide is bound. This report represents the first example of a noncovalent protein dimer displayed on yeast and of successful display of wild-type MHCII. Results further point to the potential for using yeast surface display for engineering and analyzing the antigen binding properties of MHCII.

  12. The small heterodimer partner is a gonadal gatekeeper of sexual maturation in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Volle, David H.; Duggavathi, Rajesha; Magnier, Benjamin C.; Houten, Sander M.; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A.; Verhoeven, Guido; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an atypical nuclear receptor known mainly for its role in bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic tract. We explore here the role of SHP in the testis. SHP is expressed in the interstitial compartment of the adult testes, which contain the Leydig cells. SHP there inhibits the expression of steroidogenic genes, on the one hand by inhibiting the expression of the nuclear receptors steroidogenic factor-1 and liver receptor homolog-1 (lrh-1), and on the other hand by directly repressing the transcriptional activity of LRH-1. Consequently, in SHP knockout mice, testicular testosterone synthesis is increased independently of the hypothalamus–pituitary axis. Independent of its action on androgen synthesis, SHP also determines the timing of germ cell differentiation by controlling testicular retinoic acid metabolism. Through the inhibition of the transcriptional activity of retinoic acid receptors, SHP controls the expression of stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (stra8)—a gene that is indispensable for germ cell meiosis and differentiation. Together, our data demonstrate new roles for SHP in testicular androgen and retinoic acid metabolism, making SHP a testicular gatekeeper of the timing of male sexual maturation. PMID:17289919

  13. Interleukin-10 anti-inflammatory response to Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease: a possible role for suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Vida A; Jefferson, Ayanna; Singh, Shree R; Ganapamo, Frédéric; Philipp, Mario T

    2006-10-01

    It has been established that interleukin-10 (IL-10) inhibits inflammatory cytokines produced by macrophages in response to Borrelia burgdorferi or its lipoproteins. The mechanism by which IL-10 exerts this anti-inflammatory effect is still unknown. Recent findings indicate that suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are induced by cytokines and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated stimuli, and in turn they can down-regulate cytokine and TLR signaling in macrophages. Because it is known that SOCS are induced by IL-10 and that B. burgdorferi and its lipoproteins most likely interact via TLR2 or the heterodimers TLR2/1 and/or TLR2/6, we hypothesized that SOCS are induced by IL-10 and B. burgdorferi and its lipoproteins in macrophages and that SOCS may mediate the inhibition by IL-10 of concomitantly elicited cytokines. We report here that mouse J774 macrophages incubated with IL-10 and added B. burgdorferi spirochetes (freeze-thawed, live, or sonicated) or lipidated outer surface protein A (L-OspA) augmented their SOCS1/SOCS3 mRNA and protein expression, with SOCS3 being more abundant. Pam(3)Cys, a synthetic lipopeptide, also induced SOCS1/SOCS3 expression under these conditions, but unlipidated OspA was ineffective. Neither endogenous IL-10 nor the translation inhibitor cycloheximide blocked SOCS1/SOCS3 induction by B. burgdorferi and its lipoproteins, indicating that the expression of other genes is not required. This temporally correlated with the IL-10-mediated inhibition of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-18, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Our data are evidence to suggest that expression of SOCS is part of the mechanism of IL-10-mediated inhibition of inflammatory cytokines elicited by B. burgdorferi and its lipoproteins.

  14. One-pot synthesis and characterization of size-controlled bimagnetic FePt-iron oxide heterodimer nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Albert; Fiore, Angela; Di Corato, Riccardo; Falqui, Andrea; Giannini, Cinzia; Micotti, Edoardo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Corti, Maurizio; Cingolani, Roberto; Pellegrino, Teresa; Cozzoli, Pantaleo Davide; Manna, Liberato

    2008-01-30

    A one-pot, two-step colloidal strategy to prepare bimagnetic hybrid nanocrystals (HNCs), comprising size-tuned fcc FePt and inverse spinel cubic iron oxide domains epitaxially arranged in a heterodimer configuration, is described. The HNCs have been synthesized in a unique surfactant environment by temperature-driven sequential reactions, involving the homogeneous nucleation of FePt seeds and the subsequent heterogeneous growth of iron oxide. This self-regulated mechanism offers high versatility in the control of the geometric features of the resulting heterostructures, circumventing the use of more elaborate seeded growth techniques. It has been found that, as a consequence of the exchange coupling between the two materials, the HNCs exhibit tunable single-phase-like magnetic behavior, distinct from that of their individual components. In addition, the potential of the heterodimers as effective contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging techniques has been examined.

  15. Blackbirds and song thrushes constitute a key reservoir of Borrelia garinii, the causative agent of borreliosis in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Taragel'ová, Veronika; Koci, Juraj; Hanincová, Klára; Kurtenbach, Klaus; Derdáková, Markéta; Ogden, Nick H; Literák, Ivan; Kocianová, Elena; Labuda, Milan

    2008-02-01

    Blackbirds (Turdus merula) and song thrushes (Turdus philomelos) were found to carry 95% of all spirochete-infected tick larvae among 40 bird species captured in Central Europe. More than 90% of the infections were typed as Borrelia garinii and Borrelia valaisiana. We conclude that thrushes are key players in the maintenance of these spirochete species in this region of Central Europe.

  16. Amino acid sequence heterogeneity of the chromosomal encoded Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato major antigen P100.

    PubMed

    Fellinger, W; Farencena, A; Redl, B; Sambri, V; Cevenini, R; Stöffler, G

    1995-04-01

    The entire nucleotide sequence of the chromosomal encoded major antigen p100 of the European Borrelia garinii isolate B29 was determined and the deduced amino acid sequence was compared to the homologous antigen p83 of the North American Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31 and the p100 of the European Borrelia afzelii (group VS461) strain PKo. p100 of strain B29 shows 87% amino acid sequence identity to strain B31 and 79.2% to strain PKo, p100 of strain B31 and PKo shows 62.5% identity to each other. In addition, partial nucleotide sequences of the most heterogeneous region of the p100 gene of two other Borrelia garinii isolates (PBi and VS286) have been determined and the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with all p100 of Borrelia garinii published so far. We found an amino acid sequence identity between 88.6 and 100% within the same genospecies. The N-terminal part of the p100 proteins is highly conserved whereas a striking heterogeneous region within the C-terminal part of the proteins was observed.

  17. Occurrence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. in different genera of mosquitoes (Culicidae) in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Melaun, Christian; Zotzmann, Sina; Santaella, Vanesa Garcia; Werblow, Antje; Zumkowski-Xylander, Helga; Kraiczy, Peter; Klimpel, Sven

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. Some stages of the borrelial transmission cycle in ticks (transstadial, feeding and co-feeding) can potentially occur also in insects, particularly in mosquitoes. In the present study, adult as well as larval mosquitoes were collected at 42 different geographical locations throughout Germany. This is the first study, in which German mosquitoes were analyzed for the presence of Borrelia spp. Targeting two specific borrelial genes, flaB and ospA encoding for the subunit B of flagellin and the outer surface protein A, the results show that DNA of Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia bavariensis and Borrelia garinii could be detected in ten Culicidae species comprising four distinct genera (Aedes, Culiseta, Culex, and Ochlerotatus). Positive samples also include adult specimens raised in the laboratory from wild-caught larvae indicating that transstadial and/or transovarial transmission might occur within a given mosquito population.

  18. Unique cistrome defined as CsMBE is strictly required for Nrf2-sMaf heterodimer function in cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akihito; Suzuki, Mikiko; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Tsuchida, Kouhei; Suda, Hiromi; Morita, Masanobu; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    Nrf2-small Maf (sMaf) heterodimer is essential for the inducible expression of cytoprotective genes upon exposure to oxidative and xenobiotic stresses. While the Nrf2-sMaf heterodimer recognizes DNA sequences referred to as the antioxidant/electrophile responsive element (ARE/EpRE), we here define these DNA sequences collectively as CNC-sMaf binding element (CsMBE). In contrast, large and small Maf proteins are able to form homodimers that recognize the Maf recognition element (MARE). CsMBE and MARE share a conserved core sequence but they differ in the 5'-adjacent nucleotide neighboring the core. Because of the high similarity between the CsMBE and MARE sequences, it has been unclear how many target binding sites and target genes are shared by the Nrf2-sMaf heterodimers and Maf homodimers. To address this issue, we introduced a substitution mutation of alanine to tyrosine at position 502 in Nrf2, which rendered the DNA-binding domain structure of Nrf2 similar to Maf, and generated knock-in mice expressing the Nrf2(A502Y) mutant. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing analyses showed that binding sites of Nrf2(A502Y)-sMaf were dramatically changed from CsMBE to MARE in vivo. Intriguingly, however, one-quarter of the Nrf2(A502Y)-sMaf binding sites also bound Nrf2-sMaf commonly and vice versa. RNA-sequencing analyses revealed that Nrf2(A502Y)-sMaf failed to induce expression of major cytoprotective genes upon stress stimulation, which increased the sensitivity of Nrf2(A502Y) mutant mice to acute acetaminophen toxicity. These results demonstrate that the unique cistrome defined as CsMBE is strictly required for the Nrf2-sMaf heterodimer function in cytoprotection and that the roles played by CsMBE differ sharply from those of MARE. PMID:26677805

  19. Differences in binding behavior of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate to β-lactoglobulin heterodimers (AB) compared to homodimers (A) and (B).

    PubMed

    Keppler, Julia K; Martin, Dierk; Garamus, Vasil M; Schwarz, Karin

    2015-11-01

    The lipocalin β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) exists in different natural genetic variants--of which β-LG A and B are predominant in bovine milk. At physiological conditions the protein dimerizes--building homodimers of β-LG A and β-LG B and heterodimers of β-LG AB. Although β-LG is one of the most intensely characterized lipocalins, the interaction behavior of ligands with hetero- and homodimers of β-LG is largely unknown. The present findings revealed significant differences for hetero- and homodimers regarding ligand binding capacity as tested with a model ligand (i.e. surface binding (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)). These findings were confirmed using FT-IR, where the addition of EGCG influenced the β-sheet backbone of homodimer A and B with significantly higher intensity compared to heterodimer AB. Further, shape analysis by SAXS revealed oligomerization of both types of dimers upon addition of EGCG; however, homodimer A and B produced significantly larger aggregates compared to the heterodimer AB. In summary, the present study revealed that EGCG showed significantly different interaction reactivity (binding sites, aggregation size and conformational changes) to the hetero and homodimers of β-LG in the order β-LG A > B > AB. The results suggest that conformational differences between homodimers and heterodimers strongly influence the EGCG binding ability. This may also occur with other polyphenols and ligands of β-LG and gives not only important information for β-LG binding studies, but may also apply for polymorphisms of other self-aggregating lipocalins. PMID:26038095

  20. Differential regulation of Hand1 homodimer and Hand1-E12 heterodimer activity by the cofactor FHL2.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alison A; Riley, Paul R

    2004-11-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor Hand1 plays an essential role in cardiac morphogenesis, and yet its precise function remains unknown. Protein-protein interactions involving Hand1 provide a means of determining how Hand1-induced gene expression in the developing heart might be regulated. Hand1 is known to form either heterodimers with near-ubiquitous E-factors and other lineage-restricted class B bHLH proteins or homodimers with itself in vitro. To date, there have been no reported Hand1 protein interactions involving non-bHLH proteins. Heterodimer-versus-homodimer choice is mediated by the phosphorylation status of Hand1; however, little is known about the in vivo function of these dimers or, importantly, how they are regulated. In an effort to understand how Hand1 activity in the heart might be regulated postdimerization, we have investigated tertiary Hand1-protein interactions with non-bHLH factors. We describe a novel interaction of Hand1 with the LIM domain protein FHL2, a known transcriptional coactivator and corepressor expressed in the developing cardiovascular system. FHL2 interacts with Hand1 via the bHLH domain and is able to repress Hand1/E12 heterodimer-induced transcription but has no effect on Hand1/Hand1 homodimer activity. This effect of FHL2 is not mediated either at the level of dimerization or via an effect of Hand1/E12 DNA binding. In summary, our data describe a novel differential regulation of Hand1 heterodimers versus homodimers by association of the cofactor FHL2 and provide insight into the potential for a tertiary level of control of Hand1 activity in the developing heart.

  1. Differences in binding behavior of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate to β-lactoglobulin heterodimers (AB) compared to homodimers (A) and (B).

    PubMed

    Keppler, Julia K; Martin, Dierk; Garamus, Vasil M; Schwarz, Karin

    2015-11-01

    The lipocalin β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) exists in different natural genetic variants--of which β-LG A and B are predominant in bovine milk. At physiological conditions the protein dimerizes--building homodimers of β-LG A and β-LG B and heterodimers of β-LG AB. Although β-LG is one of the most intensely characterized lipocalins, the interaction behavior of ligands with hetero- and homodimers of β-LG is largely unknown. The present findings revealed significant differences for hetero- and homodimers regarding ligand binding capacity as tested with a model ligand (i.e. surface binding (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)). These findings were confirmed using FT-IR, where the addition of EGCG influenced the β-sheet backbone of homodimer A and B with significantly higher intensity compared to heterodimer AB. Further, shape analysis by SAXS revealed oligomerization of both types of dimers upon addition of EGCG; however, homodimer A and B produced significantly larger aggregates compared to the heterodimer AB. In summary, the present study revealed that EGCG showed significantly different interaction reactivity (binding sites, aggregation size and conformational changes) to the hetero and homodimers of β-LG in the order β-LG A > B > AB. The results suggest that conformational differences between homodimers and heterodimers strongly influence the EGCG binding ability. This may also occur with other polyphenols and ligands of β-LG and gives not only important information for β-LG binding studies, but may also apply for polymorphisms of other self-aggregating lipocalins.

  2. Insights into MHC class I peptide loading from the structure of the Tapasin-ERp57 thiol oxidoreductase heterodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, G.; Wearsch, P.A.; Peaper, D.R.; Cresswell, P.; Reinisch, K.M.

    2009-03-02

    Tapasin is a glycoprotein critical for loading major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with high-affinity peptides. It functions within the multimeric peptide-loading complex (PLC) as a disulfide-linked, stable heterodimer with the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57, and this covalent interaction is required to support optimal PLC activity. Here, we present the 2.6 {angstrom} resolution structure of the tapasin-ERp57 core of the PLC. The structure revealed that tapasin interacts with both ERp57 catalytic domains, accounting for the stability of the heterodimer, and provided an example of a protein disulfide isomerase family member interacting with substrate. Mutational analysis identified a conserved surface on tapasin that interacted with MHC class I molecules and was critical for peptide loading and editing functions of the tapasin-ERp57 heterodimer. By combining the tapasin-ERp57 structure with those of other defined PLC components, we present a molecular model that illuminates the processes involved in MHC class I peptide loading.

  3. Requirements for the construction of antibody heterodimers for the direction of lysis of tumors by human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C F; Blättler, W A; Lambert, J M; Kalish, R S; Morimoto, C; Schlossman, S F

    1988-01-01

    We constructed a series of MAb heterodimers consisting of the J5 (anti-common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen [CALLA]) antibody and antibodies to a variety of structures present on the surface of activated human T cells, including CD3 antigen (T cell receptor-associated glycoproteins), CD2 antigen (T11/E-rosette receptor), CD25 antigen (IL-2 receptor), and the transferrin receptor. We tested the ability of these heterodimers to direct a CD2 + CD3 + CD8 + CD4 - CD25 + transferrin receptor + MHC-restricted human cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone to lyse a CALLA + human tumor in vitro. Only heterodimers containing an anti-CD3 antibody or activating antibodies to CD2 could direct the clone to lyse these human tumor targets, even when the clone was additionally activated with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 antibodies. Our findings may have implications in the design of strategies for the use of such reagents in the treatment of human neoplasia. Images PMID:2966815

  4. Maf nuclear oncoprotein recognizes sequences related to an AP-1 site and forms heterodimers with both Fos and Jun.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Noda, M; Nishizawa, M

    1994-01-01

    The v-maf oncogene, identified from AS42 avian retrovirus, encodes a nuclear bZip protein. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of cell transformation induced by this oncogene, we determined the specific binding sequences of its product. Maf protein recognized two types of relatively long palindromic consensus sequences, TGCTGACTCAGCA and TGCTGACGTCAGCA, at roughly equal efficiency. The middle parts of these Maf-binding sequences completely match with two binding sequences for AP-1 transcription factor, i.e., phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate-13-acetate (TPA)-responsive element (TRE) and cyclic AMP responsive element, suggesting partial overlapping of the target genes for Maf and AP-1. Furthermore, Maf efficiently formed heterodimers with the components of AP-1, Fos and Jun, through their leucine zipper structures, and these heterodimers show binding specificities distinct from those for Maf-Maf and Jun-Jun homodimers. Thus, a multiple combination of the dimers should generate a greatly expanded repertoire of transcriptional regulatory potential. DNA data base search for the Maf-binding consensus sequences suggested that some of the TRE-like cis elements reported previously may actually be the targets for Maf family proteins or their heterodimers with other bZip proteins. Images PMID:8264639

  5. Effect of heterodimer partner RXR{alpha} on PPAR{gamma} activation function-2 helix in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jianyun Chen Minghe; Stanley, Susan E.; Li, Ellen

    2008-01-04

    The structural mechanism of allosteric communication between retinoid X receptor (RXR) and its heterodimer partners remains controversial. As a first step towards addressing this question, we report a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the GW1929-bound peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) ligand-binding domain (LBD) with and without the 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA)-bound RXR{alpha} LBD. Sequence-specific {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, and {sup 13}CO resonance assignments have been established for over 95% of the 275 residues in the PPAR{gamma} LBD monomer. The {sup 1}HN, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}CO chemical shift perturbations induced by the RXR{alpha} LBD binding are located at not only the heterodimer interface that includes the C-terminal residue Y477 but also residues Y473 and K474 in the activation function-2 (AF-2) helix. This result suggests that 9cRA-bound RXR{alpha} can affect the PPAR{gamma} AF-2 helix in solution and demonstrates that NMR is a powerful new tool for studying the mechanism of allosteric ligand activation in RXR heterodimers.

  6. Rrp2, a prokaryotic enhancer-like binding protein, is essential for viability of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Groshong, Ashley M; Gibbons, Nora E; Yang, X Frank; Blevins, Jon S

    2012-07-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, exists in two diverse niches (i.e., an arthropod tick vector and mammalian host) during its enzootic life cycle. To effectively adapt to these unique environments, the bacterium alters the expression of numerous genes, including several major outer surface (lipo)proteins that are required for infection and transmission. An enhancer-binding protein (EBP), known as Rrp2, is one identified activator of the RpoN/RpoS alternative sigma factor cascade. Because initial efforts to generate an rrp2 deletion strain were unsuccessful, the role of Rrp2 in the activation of the RpoN/RpoS pathway was first defined using a strain of B. burgdorferi carrying an rrp2 point mutant that was defective in its ability to activate RpoN-dependent transcription. The fact that subsequent attempts to disrupt rrp2 have also been unsuccessful has led investigators to hypothesize that Rrp2 has other undefined functions which are essential for B. burgdorferi survival and independent of its EBP function. We used a lac-based inducible expression system to generate a conditional rrp2 mutant in virulent B. burgdorferi. In this strain, an isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside-inducible copy of the rrp2 gene is expressed in trans from a borrelial shuttle vector. We found that the chromosomal copy of rrp2 could be inactivated only when rrp2 was induced, and the maintenance of rrp2 expression was required for the growth of the mutants. In addition, the overexpression of rrp2 is detrimental to B. burgdorferi growth in a manner that is independent of the RpoN/RpoS pathway. These studies provide the first direct evidence that rrp2 is an essential gene in B. burgdorferi.

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, Jeffrey; Nickell, Steven P.

    1999-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is introduced into human hosts via tick bites. Among the cell types present in the skin which may initially contact spirochetes are mast cells. Since spirochetes are known to activate a variety of cell types in vitro, we tested whether B. burgdorferi spirochetes could activate mast cells. We report here that freshly isolated rat peritoneal mast cells or mouse MC/9 mast cells cultured in vitro with live or freeze-thawed B. burgdorferi spirochetes undergo low but detectable degranulation, as measured by [5-3H] hydroxytryptamine release, and they synthesize and secrete the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In contrast to findings in previous studies, where B. burgdorferi-associated activity was shown to be dependent upon protein lipidation, mast cell TNF-α release was not induced by either lipidated or unlipidated recombinant OspA. This activity was additionally shown to be protease sensitive and surface expressed. Finally, comparisons of TNF-α-inducing activity in known low-, intermediate-, and high-passage B. burgdorferi B31 isolates demonstrated passage-dependent loss of activity, indicating that the activity is probably plasmid encoded. These findings document the presence in low-passage B. burgdorferi spirochetes of a novel lipidation-independent activity capable of inducing cytokine release from host cells. PMID:10024550

  8. Virulent strain associated outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Skare, J T; Shang, E S; Foley, D M; Blanco, D R; Champion, C I; Mirzabekov, T; Sokolov, Y; Kagan, B L; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated and purified outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Borrelia burgdorferi strain B31 based on methods developed for isolation of Treponema pallidum OMV. Purified OMV exhibited distinct porin activities with conductances of 0.6 and 12.6 nano-Siemen and had no detectable beta-NADH oxidase activity indicating their outer membrane origin and their lack of inner membrane contamination, respectively. Hydrophobic proteins were identified by phase partitioning with Triton X-114. Most of these hydrophobic membrane proteins were not acylated, suggesting that they are outer membrane-spanning proteins. Identification of palmitate-labeled lipoproteins revealed that several were enriched in the OMV, several were enriched in the protoplasmic cylinder inner membrane fraction, and others were found exclusively associated with the inner membrane. The protein composition of OMV changed significantly with successive in vitro cultivation of strain B31. Using antiserum with specificity for virulent strain B31, we identified OMV antigens on the surface of the spirochete and identified proteins whose presence in OMV could be correlated with virulence and protective immunity in the rabbit Lyme disease model. These virulent strain associated outer membrane-spanning proteins may provide new insight into the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Images PMID:7593626

  9. Morphological and biochemical features of Borrelia burgdorferi pleomorphic forms

    PubMed Central

    Herranen, Anni; Schwarzbach, Armin; Gilbert, Leona

    2015-01-01

    The spirochaete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in the northern hemisphere. There is a long-standing debate regarding the role of pleomorphic forms in Lyme disease pathogenesis, while very little is known about the characteristics of these morphological variants. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of B. burgdorferi pleomorphic formation in different culturing conditions at physiological temperature. Interestingly, human serum induced the bacterium to change its morphology to round bodies (RBs). In addition, biofilm-like colonies in suspension were found to be part of B. burgdorferi’s normal in vitro growth. Further studies provided evidence that spherical RBs had an intact and flexible cell envelope, demonstrating that they are not cell wall deficient, or degenerative as previously implied. However, the RBs displayed lower metabolic activity compared with spirochaetes. Furthermore, our results indicated that the different pleomorphic variants were distinguishable by having unique biochemical signatures. Consequently, pleomorphic B. burgdorferi should be taken into consideration as being clinically relevant and influence the development of novel diagnostics and treatment protocols. PMID:25564498

  10. Distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi in host mice in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed Central

    Lord, R D; Lord, V R; Humphreys, J G; McLean, R G

    1994-01-01

    Host mice (Peromyscus leucopus and Peromyscus maniculatus) were sampled throughout the state of Pennsylvania to determine the geographical and ecological distribution of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. All 67 counties of the state were sampled. A total of 1,619 mice were captured from a total of 157 sites during the period 1990 to 1993 for an overall capture rate of 29.69%. A total of 112 (6.92%) isolations of B. burgdorferi were made. The distribution of isolations revealed the reason for the correlated distribution of human cases of Lyme disease in the state. Significantly more mice were captured and significantly more isolations were made from hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) habitat than from deciduous species forest. Nevertheless, high isolation rates from counties of the southeastern corner of the state illustrate well that hemlock habitat is not essential. Evidence suggests that in some areas, transmission between mice is occurring in some way other than through ticks as vectors. Host mice proved useful for determining the geographical and ecological distribution of B. burgdorferi. PMID:7814489

  11. Serological Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi among Horses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Yun, Sun-Hee; Choi, Eunsang; Park, Yong-Soo; Lee, Sang-Eun; Cho, Gil-Jae; Kwon, Oh-Deog; Kwak, Dongmi

    2016-02-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne zoonotic infectious disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. The present study assessed the infection status of B. burgdorferi among horses reared in Korea using ELISA and PCR. Between 2009 and 2013, blood samples were collected from 727 horses throughout Korea. Data for each animal including age, gender, breed, and region of sample collection were used for epidemiological analysis. Overall, 38 (5.2%; true prevalence: 5.5%) of 727 horses were seropositive by ELISA. There were statistically significant differences according to breed and region (P<0.001) whose differences might be attributed to the ecology of vector ticks and climate conditions. Using 2 nested PCR, none of the samples tested positive for B. burgdorferi. Thus, a positive ELISA result can indicate only that the tested horse was previously exposed to B. burgdorferi, with no certainty over the time of exposure. Since global warming is likely to increase the abundance of ticks in Korea, continuous monitoring of tick-borne diseases in Korean horses is needed. PMID:26951987

  12. Distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi in host mice in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Lord, R D; Lord, V R; Humphreys, J G; McLean, R G

    1994-10-01

    Host mice (Peromyscus leucopus and Peromyscus maniculatus) were sampled throughout the state of Pennsylvania to determine the geographical and ecological distribution of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. All 67 counties of the state were sampled. A total of 1,619 mice were captured from a total of 157 sites during the period 1990 to 1993 for an overall capture rate of 29.69%. A total of 112 (6.92%) isolations of B. burgdorferi were made. The distribution of isolations revealed the reason for the correlated distribution of human cases of Lyme disease in the state. Significantly more mice were captured and significantly more isolations were made from hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) habitat than from deciduous species forest. Nevertheless, high isolation rates from counties of the southeastern corner of the state illustrate well that hemlock habitat is not essential. Evidence suggests that in some areas, transmission between mice is occurring in some way other than through ticks as vectors. Host mice proved useful for determining the geographical and ecological distribution of B. burgdorferi.

  13. Serological Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi among Horses in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Yun, Sun-Hee; Choi, Eunsang; Park, Yong-Soo; Lee, Sang-Eun; Cho, Gil-Jae; Kwon, Oh-Deog; Kwak, Dongmi

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne zoonotic infectious disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. The present study assessed the infection status of B. burgdorferi among horses reared in Korea using ELISA and PCR. Between 2009 and 2013, blood samples were collected from 727 horses throughout Korea. Data for each animal including age, gender, breed, and region of sample collection were used for epidemiological analysis. Overall, 38 (5.2%; true prevalence: 5.5%) of 727 horses were seropositive by ELISA. There were statistically significant differences according to breed and region (P<0.001) whose differences might be attributed to the ecology of vector ticks and climate conditions. Using 2 nested PCR, none of the samples tested positive for B. burgdorferi. Thus, a positive ELISA result can indicate only that the tested horse was previously exposed to B. burgdorferi, with no certainty over the time of exposure. Since global warming is likely to increase the abundance of ticks in Korea, continuous monitoring of tick-borne diseases in Korean horses is needed. PMID:26951987

  14. In vitro activities of faropenem, ertapenem, imipenem and meropenem against Borrelia burgdorferi s.l.

    PubMed

    Rödel, Rebecca; Freyer, Alexandra; Bittner, Thomas; Schäfer, Volker; Hunfeld, Klaus-Peter

    2007-07-01

    Little is known about the in vitro activity of penems and carbapenems against the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Here, faropenem, ertapenem, imipenem and meropenem as well as the third-generation cephalosporin ceftriaxone and tobramycin were tested in vitro against 11 isolates of the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex. On a microg/mL basis, ertapenem was the most potent carbapenem (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) range: 0.015-0.125 microg/mL), with in vitro activity comparable with that of ceftriaxone against Borrelia. These findings are supported by the results of time-kill experiments in a Borrelia afzelii skin isolate, demonstrating a >3 log10 unit (99.9%) reduction of the inoculum after 96 h of exposure to either drug at a concentration of three log2 unit dilutions above the respective MIC. PMID:17512703

  15. High-prevalence Borrelia miyamotoi infection among [corrected] wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Scott, M C; Rosen, M E; Hamer, S A; Baker, E; Edwards, H; Crowder, C; Tsao, J I; Hickling, G J

    2010-11-01

    During spring and fall 2009, 60 wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) harvested by Tennessee hunters were surveyed for Borrelia spp. by sampling their blood, tissue, and attached ticks. In both seasons, 70% of turkeys were infested with juvenile Amblyomma americanum; one spring turkey hosted an adult female Ixodes brunneus. Polymerase chain reaction assays followed by DNA sequencing indicated that 58% of the turkeys were positive for the spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi, with tissue testing positive more frequently than blood (P = 0.015). Sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer indicated > or = 99% similarity to previously published sequences of the North American strain of this spirochete. Positive turkeys were present in both seasons and from all seven middle Tennessee counties sampled. No ticks from the turkeys tested positive for any Borrelia spp. This is the first report of B. miyamotoi in birds; the transmission pathways and epidemiological significance of this high-prevalence spirochetal infection remain uncertain.

  16. The anti-borreliae efficacy of phytochemicals and micronutrients: an update

    PubMed Central

    Goc, Anna; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring substances have been used for centuries to fight against various pathogens. They serve as a source for new chemical entities or provide options to already existing therapeutics. While there is an increasing interest in studying antimicrobial properties of naturally derived agents, little is known about their effects against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the causative pathogens of Lyme disease. A better understanding of this aspect could advance knowledge about pathophysiology of these bacteria and help improve the efficacy of current approaches against Lyme disease. Here, we review all naturally occurring substances scientifically evaluated to date, including plant extracts, their metabolites, and micronutrients, against vegetative (spirochetes) and latent (rounded bodies, biofilm) forms of Borrelia sp. This summary reveals the potent anti-borreliae activity of several of these natural compounds indicating their potential in enhancing the efficacy of current treatments for Lyme disease, and offering new options to already existing therapeutic regiments. PMID:27536352

  17. The anti-borreliae efficacy of phytochemicals and micronutrients: an update.

    PubMed

    Goc, Anna; Rath, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Naturally occurring substances have been used for centuries to fight against various pathogens. They serve as a source for new chemical entities or provide options to already existing therapeutics. While there is an increasing interest in studying antimicrobial properties of naturally derived agents, little is known about their effects against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the causative pathogens of Lyme disease. A better understanding of this aspect could advance knowledge about pathophysiology of these bacteria and help improve the efficacy of current approaches against Lyme disease. Here, we review all naturally occurring substances scientifically evaluated to date, including plant extracts, their metabolites, and micronutrients, against vegetative (spirochetes) and latent (rounded bodies, biofilm) forms of Borrelia sp. This summary reveals the potent anti-borreliae activity of several of these natural compounds indicating their potential in enhancing the efficacy of current treatments for Lyme disease, and offering new options to already existing therapeutic regiments. PMID:27536352

  18. The polar 2e/12c bond in phenalenyl-azaphenalenyl hetero-dimers: Stronger stacking interaction and fascinating interlayer charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Rong-Lin; Xu, Hong-Liang; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2016-08-01

    An increasing number of chemists have focused on the two-electron/multicenter bond (2e/mc) that was first introduced to interpret the bonding mechanism of radical dimers. Herein, we report the polar two-electron/twelve center (2e/12c) bonding character in a series of phenalenyl-azaphenalenyl radical hetero-dimers. Interestingly, the bonding energy of weaker polar hetero-dimer (P-TAP) is dominated by the overlap of the two different singly occupied molecular orbital of radicals, while that of stronger polar hetero-dimer (P-HAP) is dominated by the electrostatic attraction. Results show that the difference between the electronegativity of the monomers plays a prominent role in the essential attribution of the polar 2e/12c bond. Correspondingly, a stronger stacking interaction in the hetero-dimer could be effectively achieved by increasing the difference of nitrogen atoms number between the monomers. It is worthy of note that an interesting interlayer charge transfer character is induced in the polar hetero-dimers, which is dependent on the difference between the electronegativity of the monomers. It is our expectation that the new knowledge about the bonding nature of radical hetero-dimers might provide important information for designing radical based functional materials with various applications.

  19. Small heterodimer partner overexpression partially protects against liver tumor development in farnesoid X receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guodong; Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Le; Williams, Jessica A.; Tawfik, Ossama; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Wang, Li; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-10-15

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) and small heterodimer partner (SHP, Nr0b2) are nuclear receptors that are critical to liver homeostasis. Induction of SHP serves as a major mechanism of FXR in suppressing gene expression. Both FXR{sup −/−} and SHP{sup −/−} mice develop spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SHP is one of the most strongly induced genes by FXR in the liver and is a tumor suppressor, therefore, we hypothesized that deficiency of SHP contributes to HCC development in the livers of FXR{sup −/−} mice and therefore, increased SHP expression in FXR{sup −/−} mice reduces liver tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated FXR{sup −/−} mice with overexpression of SHP in hepatocytes (FXR{sup −/−}/SHP{sup Tg}) and determined the contribution of SHP in HCC development in FXR{sup −/−} mice. Hepatocyte-specific SHP overexpression did not affect liver tumor incidence or size in FXR{sup −/−} mice. However, SHP overexpression led to a lower grade of dysplasia, reduced indicator cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. All tumor-bearing mice had increased serum bile acid levels and IL-6 levels, which was associated with activation of hepatic STAT3. In conclusion, SHP partially protects FXR{sup −/−} mice from HCC formation by reducing tumor malignancy. However, disrupted bile acid homeostasis by FXR deficiency leads to inflammation and injury, which ultimately results in uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in the liver. - Highlights: • SHP does not prevent HCC incidence nor size in FXR KO mice but reduces malignancy. • Increased SHP promotes apoptosis. • Bile acids and inflammation maybe critical for HCC formation with FXR deficiency.

  20. Human cyclooxygenase-2 is a sequence homodimer that functions as a conformational heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Vecchio, Alex J; Sharma, Narayan P; Jurban, Brice J; Malkowski, Michael G; Smith, William L

    2011-05-27

    Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases 1 and 2, also known as cyclooxygenases (COXs) 1 and 2, convert arachidonic acid (AA) to prostaglandin endoperoxide H(2). Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases are targets of nonspecific nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and COX-2-specific inhibitors called coxibs. PGHS-2 is a sequence homodimer. Each monomer has a peroxidase and a COX active site. We find that human PGHS-2 functions as a conformational heterodimer having a catalytic monomer (E(cat)) and an allosteric monomer (E(allo)). Heme binds tightly only to the peroxidase site of E(cat), whereas substrates, as well as certain inhibitors (e.g. celecoxib), bind the COX site of E(cat). E(cat) is regulated by E(allo) in a manner dependent on what ligand is bound to E(allo). Substrate and nonsubstrate fatty acids (FAs) and some COX inhibitors (e.g. naproxen) preferentially bind to the COX site of E(allo). AA can bind to E(cat) and E(allo), but the affinity of AA for E(allo) is 25 times that for E(cat). Palmitic acid, an efficacious stimulator of human PGHS-2, binds only E(allo) in palmitic acid/murine PGHS-2 co-crystals. Nonsubstrate FAs can potentiate or attenuate actions of COX inhibitors depending on the FA and whether the inhibitor binds E(cat) or E(allo). Our studies suggest that the concentration and composition of the free FA pool in the environment in which PGHS-2 functions in cells, the FA tone, is a key factor regulating PGHS-2 activity and its responses to COX inhibitors. We suggest that differences in FA tone occurring with different diets will likely affect both base-line prostanoid synthesis and responses to COX inhibitors. PMID:21467029

  1. Borrelia infection in small mammals in West Africa and its relationship with tick occurrence inside burrows.

    PubMed

    Diatta, Georges; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Granjon, Laurent; Bâ, Khalilou; Chauvancy, Gilles; Ndiaye, Mady; Trape, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is a zoonotic disease caused by several Borrelia species transmitted to humans by Ornithodoros tick vectors. In West Africa, Borrelia crocidurae is a common cause of disease in many rural populations. Small mammals act as reservoirs of infection. We report here the results of surveys that investigated the occurrence of B. crocidurae infection in rodents and insectivores from eight countries of West and Central Africa. Animals were identified at the species level and tested for Borrelia either by examination of thick blood film, intra-peritoneal inoculation of blood or brain tissues into laboratory mice, or by molecular techniques. A total of 4358 small mammals belonging to 38 species and 7 families were collected, including 3225 specimens collected in areas where the occurrence of Ornithodoros sonrai tick in rodent burrows was documented, and 1133 in areas where this tick was absent. In areas with O. sonrai, Borrelia infection was demonstrated in 287 of 3109 (9.2%) small mammals tested, and none was documented in 1004 animals tested from other areas. There was no relationship between the occurrence of Rhipicephalus, Hyaloma and Argas ticks in burrows and the distribution of Borrelia infection in small mammals. The 287 specimens infected by Borrelia belonged to 15 rodent and shrew species, including three Saharo-Sahelian species - Gerbillus gerbillus, Gerbillus occiduus and Gerbillus tarabuli - identified as reservoirs for TBRF with a distribution restricted to this area. In Sudan and Sudano-Sahelian areas, Arvicanthis niloticus, Mastomys erythroleucus and Mastomys huberti were the main reservoir of infection. Although most small mammals species collected had a large distribution in West and Central Africa, the fact that only animals collected in areas with O. sonrai were found infected suggest that this tick is the only vector of TBRF in rodents and insectivores in this part of Africa. PMID:26327444

  2. Risk indicators for the tick Ixodes ricinus and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Jaenson, T G T; Eisen, L; Comstedt, P; Mejlon, H A; Lindgren, E; Bergström, S; Olsen, B

    2009-09-01

    The distributional area of the tick Ixodes ricinus (L.), the primary European vector to humans of Lyme borreliosis spirochaetes (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato) and tick-borne encephalitis virus, appears to be increasing in Sweden. It is therefore important to determine which environmental factors are most useful to assess risk of human exposure to this tick and its associated pathogens. The geographical distribution of I. ricinus in Sweden was analysed with respect to vegetation zones and climate. The northern limit of I. ricinus and B. burgdorferi s.l. in Sweden corresponds roughly to the northern limit of the southern boreal vegetation zone, and is characterized climatically by snow cover for a mean duration of 150 days and a vegetation period averaging 170 days. The zoogeographical distribution of I. ricinus in Sweden can be classified as southerly-central, with the centre of the distribution south of the Limes Norrlandicus. Ixodes ricinus nymphs from 13 localities in different parts of Sweden were examined for the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. and found to be infected with Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii. Tick sampling localities were characterized on the basis of the density of Borrelia-infected I. ricinus nymphs, presence of specific mammals, dominant vegetation and climate. Densities of I. ricinus nymphs and Borrelia-infected nymphs were significantly correlated, and nymphal density can thus serve as a general indicator of risk for exposure to Lyme borreliosis spirochaetes. Analysis of data from this and other studies suggests that high densities of Borrelia-infected nymphs typically occur in coastal, broadleaf vegetation and in mixed deciduous/spruce vegetation in southern Sweden. Ixodes ricinus populations consistently infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. can occur in: (a) biotopes with shrews, rodents, hares and birds; (b) biotopes with shrews, rodents, hares, deer and birds, and (c) island locations where the varying hare (Lepus timidus) is the

  3. Heterodimers formed through a partial anionic exchange process: scanning tunneling spectroscopy to monitor bands across the junction vis-à-vis photoinduced charge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Abhijit; Saha, Sudip K.; Pal, Amlan J.

    2015-10-01

    We report controlled formation of heterodimers and their charge separation properties. CdS|CdTe heterodimers were formed through an anionic exchange process of CdS nanostructures. With control over the duration of the anionic exchange process, bulk|dot, bulk|bulk, and then dot|bulk phases of the semiconductors could be observed to have formed. A mapping of density of states as derived from scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) brought out conduction and valence band-edges along the nanostructures and heterodimers. The CdS|CdTe heterodimers evidenced a type-II band-alignment between the semiconductors along with the formation of a depletion region at the interface. The width (of the depletion region) and the energy-offset at the interface depended on the size of the semiconductors. We report that the width that is instrumental for photoinduced charge separation in the heterodimers has a direct correlation with the performance of hybrid bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on the nanostructures in a polymer matrix.We report controlled formation of heterodimers and their charge separation properties. CdS|CdTe heterodimers were formed through an anionic exchange process of CdS nanostructures. With control over the duration of the anionic exchange process, bulk|dot, bulk|bulk, and then dot|bulk phases of the semiconductors could be observed to have formed. A mapping of density of states as derived from scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) brought out conduction and valence band-edges along the nanostructures and heterodimers. The CdS|CdTe heterodimers evidenced a type-II band-alignment between the semiconductors along with the formation of a depletion region at the interface. The width (of the depletion region) and the energy-offset at the interface depended on the size of the semiconductors. We report that the width that is instrumental for photoinduced charge separation in the heterodimers has a direct correlation with the performance of hybrid bulk

  4. Two Boundaries Separate Borrelia burgdorferi Populations in North America

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jean I.; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago; Girard, Yvette A.; Hamer, Sarah A.; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Lane, Robert S.; Raper, Steve L.; Ogden, Nicholas H.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the spread of infectious diseases is crucial for implementing effective control measures. For this, it is important to obtain information on the contemporary population structure of a disease agent and to infer the evolutionary processes that may have shaped it. Here, we investigate on a continental scale the population structure of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis (LB), a tick-borne disease, in North America. We test the hypothesis that the observed population structure is congruent with recent population expansions and that these were preceded by bottlenecks mostly likely caused by the near extirpation in the 1900s of hosts required for sustaining tick populations. Multilocus sequence typing and complementary population analytical tools were used to evaluate B. burgdorferi samples collected in the Northeastern, Upper Midwestern, and Far-Western United States and Canada. The spatial distribution of sequence types (STs) and inferred population boundaries suggest that the current populations are geographically separated. One major population boundary separated western B. burgdorferi populations transmitted by Ixodes pacificus in California from Eastern populations transmitted by I. scapularis; the other divided Midwestern and Northeastern populations. However, populations from all three regions were genetically closely related. Together, our findings suggest that although the contemporary populations of North American B. burgdorferi now comprise three geographically separated subpopulations with no or limited gene flow among them, they arose from a common ancestral population. A comparative analysis of the B. burgdorferi outer surface protein C (ospC) gene revealed novel linkages and provides additional insights into the genetic characteristics of strains. PMID:22729536

  5. Patterns and regulation of ribosomal RNA transcription in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Borrelia burgdorferi contains one 16S and two tandem sets of 23S-5S ribosomal (r) RNA genes whose patterns of transcription and regulation are unknown but are likely to be critical for survival and persistence in its hosts. Results RT-PCR of B. burgdorferi N40 and B31 revealed three rRNA region transcripts: 16S rRNA-alanine transfer RNA (tRNAAla); tRNAIle; and both sets of 23S-5S rRNA. At 34°C, there were no differences in growth rate or in accumulation of total protein, DNA and RNA in B31 cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK)-H whether rabbit serum was present or not. At 23°C, B31 grew more slowly in serum-containing BSK-H than at 34°C. DNA per cell was higher in cells in exponential as compared to stationary phase at either temperature; protein per cell was similar at both temperatures in both phases. Similar amounts of rRNA were produced in exponential phase at both temperatures, and rRNA was down-regulated in stationary phase at either temperature. Interestingly, a relBbu deletion mutant unable to generate (p)ppGpp did not down-regulate rRNA at transition to stationary phase in serum-containing BSK-H at 34°C, similar to the relaxed phenotype of E. coli relA mutants. Conclusions We conclude that rRNA transcription in B. burgdorferi is complex and regulated both by growth phase and by the stringent response but not by temperature-modulated growth rate. PMID:21251259

  6. Systemic disease in Peromyscus leucopus associated with Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

    PubMed

    Burgess, E C; French, J B; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, A

    1990-03-01

    Sixteen wild Peromyscus leucopus, trapped for the establishment of a breeding colony, developed signs of neurological damage (trembling, incoordination, circling, head tilt, and lameness of the rear legs) 2-47 days after capture in southern Wisconsin. Spirochetes were cultured from the brain of 5/11 mice, and Borrelia burgdorferi was cultured from 1 brain. A spirochete was isolated from the bladder of 1 mouse. The spirochete was identified by fluorescent antibody staining with the monoclonal antibody specific for B. burgdorferi, H5332. Serum antibodies to the spirochete were found in 14/15 mice. Negative results were obtained in all tests for viruses and bacteria, including Listeria (2/2), Mycoplasma (2/2), mouse hepatitis virus (10/10), Theilers's encephalomyelitis virus (GD VII) (8/8), REO 3 virus (2/2), and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (4/4). There was no bacterial growth from brains cultured on eosin methylene blue or blood agar (3/3). Histologic lesions included nonsuppurative cellular infiltrates in the brain, kidney, liver, and lung. Three outbred Swiss-Webster mice were inoculated orally with a suspension of the brain in BSKII medium, and 3 were inoculated with unpassed B. burgdorferi cultured from the brain of a P. leucopus with motor dysfunction. Five of the inoculated mice developed antibody titers of 1:128; one mouse was positive at 1:256. Motor signs of neurologic damage developed in 3/6 mice 2-24 weeks post-inoculation, and B. burgdorferi was detected in the brains of 2 mice by isolation and by fluorescent antibody.

  7. Differential Expression of Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins during Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Philipp, Mario T.

    1998-01-01

    In an earlier paper we described the transcriptionally regulated differential levels of expression of two lipoproteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, P35 and P7.5, during growth of the spirochetes in culture from logarithmic phase to stationary phase (K. J. Indest, R. Ramamoorthy, M. Solé, R. D. Gilmore, B. J. B. Johnson, and M. T. Philipp, Infect. Immun. 65:1165–1171, 1997). Here we further assess this phenomenon by investigating whether the expression of other antigens of B. burgdorferi, including some well-characterized ones, are also regulated in a growth-phase-dependent manner in vitro. These studies revealed 13 additional antigens, including OspC, BmpD, and GroEL, that were upregulated 2- to 66-fold and a 28-kDa protein that was downregulated 2- to 10-fold, during the interval between the logarithmic- and stationary-growth phases. Unlike with these in vitro-regulated proteins, the levels of expression of OspA, OspB, P72, flagellin, and BmpA remained unchanged throughout growth of the spirochetes in culture. Furthermore, ospAB, bmpAB, groEL, and fla all exhibited similar mRNA profiles, which is consistent with the constitutive expression of these genes. By contrast, the mRNA and protein profiles of ospC and bmpD indicated regulated expression of these genes. While bmpD exhibited a spike in mRNA expression in early stationary phase, ospC maintained a relatively higher level of mRNA throughout culture. These findings demonstrate that there are additional genes besides P7.5 and P35 whose regulated expression can be investigated in vitro and which may thus serve as models to facilitate the study of regulatory mechanisms in an organism that cycles between an arthropod and a vertebrate host. PMID:9784512

  8. Borrelia hermsii Acquisition Order in Superinfected Ticks Determines Transmission Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, Sandra J.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing of Borrelia hermsii isolates reveals its divergence into two major genomic groups (GG), but no differences in transmission efficiency or host pathogenicity are associated with these genotypes. To compare GGI and GGII in the tick-host infection cycle, we first determined if spirochetes from the two groups could superinfect the tick vector Ornithodoros hermsi. We infected mice with isolates from each group and fed ticks sequentially on these mice. We then fed the infected ticks on naive mice and measured GGI and GGII spirochete densities in vector and host, using quantitative PCR of genotype-specific chromosomal DNA sequences. Sequential feedings resulted in dual tick infections, showing that GGI or GGII primary acquisition did not block superinfection by a secondary agent. On transmission to naive mice at short intervals after acquisition, ticks with primary GGI and secondary GGII spirochete infections caused mixed GGI and GGII infections in mice. However, ticks with primary GGII and secondary GGI spirochete infections caused only GGII infections with all isolate pairs examined. At longer intervals after acquisition, the exclusion of GGI by GGII spirochetes declined and cotransmission predominated. We then examined GGI and GGII spirochetemia in mice following single inoculation and coinoculation by needle and found that GGI spirochete densities were reduced on multiple days when coinoculated with GGII. These findings indicate that dual GGI-GGII spirochete infections can persist in ticks and that transmission to a vertebrate host is dependent on the order of tick acquisition and the interval between acquisition and transmission events. PMID:23716615

  9. HLA-DR alleles determine responsiveness to Borrelia burgdoferi antigens

    PubMed Central

    Iliopoulou, Bettina Panagiota; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Huber, Brigitte T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Arthritis is a prominent manifestation of Lyme disease, caused upon infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). Persistent chronic Lyme arthritis, even after antibiotic treatment, is linked to HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4) and related alleles. On the contrary, Lyme patients who resolve arthritis within 3 months post-infection show an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*1101 (DR11). The aim of this study was to analyze the underlying mechanism by which HLA-DR alleles confer genetic susceptibility or resistance to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Methods We generated DR11 transgenic (tg) mice on a murine class II−/− background and compared their immune response to Bb-antigens to that of DR4 tg mice after immunization with Bb outer surface protein (Osp)A or infection with live Bb. Results We report that the T cells of OspA-immunized and Bb-infected DR11 tg mice were defective in IFN-γ production compared to those of DR4 mice. On the other hand, DR11 tg mice developed higher titers of anti-OspA and anti-Bb Abs, respectively, than DR4 mice. In accordance with this observation, we found that Bb-infected DR11 tg mice had decreased spirochetal burden compared to DR4 mice, measured by qPCR. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence that in the presence of HLA-DR11 the immune response against Bb-antigens is directed towards a protective Ab response. In contrast, an inflammatory Th1 response is induced in the presence of DR4. These observations offer an explanation for the differential genetic susceptibility of DR4+ and DR11+ individuals for the development of chronic Lyme arthritis and eventually the progression to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:19950279

  10. Atomic Simulation of Complex DNA DSBs and the Interactions with the Ku70/80 Heterodimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) usually contain modified bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and thymine glycol, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, 2-deoxyribonolactone, or single-strand breaks (SSBs). The presence of such lesions in close proximity to the DSB terminus makes the DNA nicks more difficult to repair and rejoin than endogenously induced simple DSBs, and as such a major determinant of the biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation as encountered in space travel. In this study we conducted molecular dynamics simulations on a series of DNA duplexes with various complex lesions of 8-oxoG and AP sites, in an effort to investigate the effects of such lesions to the structural integrity and stability of DNA after insulted by IR. We also simulated the interaction of such complex DSBs with the Ku70/80 heterodimer, the first protein in mammalian cells to embark the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway. The results indicate, compared to DNA with simple DSBs, the complex lesions can enhance the hydrogen bonds opening rate at the DNA terminus, and increase the mobility of the whole duplex, thus they present more deleterious effects to the genome integrity if not captured and repaired promptly in cells. Simulations also demonstrate the binding of Ku drastically reduces structural disruption and flexibility caused by the complex lesions, and the interactions of Ku with complex DSBs have a different potential energy landscape from the bound structure with simple DSB. In all complex DSBs systems, the binding of DSB terminus with Ku70 is softened while the binding of the middle duplex with Ku80 is tightened. This energy shift may help the Ku protein to secure at the DSB terminus for a longer time, so that other end processing factors or repair pathways can proceed at the lesions before NHEJ repair process starts. These atomic simulations may provide valuable new insight into the

  11. A relapsing fever group Borrelia sp. similar to Borrelia lonestari found among wild sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis) and Haemaphysalis spp. ticks in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyunglee; Takano, Ai; Taylor, Kyle; Sashika, Mariko; Shimozuru, Michito; Konnai, Satoru; Kawabata, Hiroki; Tsubota, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    A relapsing fever Borrelia sp. similar to Borrelia lonestari (herein referred to as B. lonestari-like) was detected from wild sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis) and Haemaphysalis ticks in the eastern part of Hokkaido, Japan. The total prevalence of this Borrelia sp. in tested deer blood samples was 10.6% using conventional PCR and real-time PCR. The prevalence was significantly higher in deer fawns compared to adults (21.9% and 9.4%, respectively). Additionally, there was significant regional difference between our two sampling areas, Shiretoko and Shibetsu with 17% and 2.8% prevalence, respectively. Regional differences were also found in tick species collected from field and on deer. In the Shiretoko region, Haemaphysalis spp. were more abundant than Ixodes spp., while in Shibetsu, Ixodes spp. were more abundant. Using real-time PCR analysis, B. lonestari-like was detected from 2 out of 290 adult Haemaphysalis spp. ticks and 4 out of 76 pools of nymphs. This is the first report of a B. lonestari-like organism in Haemaphysalis spp. ticks, and the first phylogenetic analysis of this B. lonestari-like organism in Asia. Based on our results, Haemaphysalis spp. are the most likely candidates to act as a vector for B. lonestari-like; furthermore, regional variation of B. lonestari-like prevalence in sika deer may be dependent on the population distribution of these ticks. PMID:25108784

  12. Chromosome and Plasmids of the Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever Agent Borrelia hermsii

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The zoonotic pathogen Borrelia hermsii bears its multiple paralogous genes for variable antigens on several linear plasmids. Application of combined long-read and short-read next-generation sequencing provided complete sequences for antigen-encoding plasmids as well as other linear and circular plasmids and the linear chromosome of the genome. PMID:27284141

  13. Treatment with Doxycycline of Generalized Annular Elastolytic Giant Cell Granuloma Associated with Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tas, B; Caglar, A; Ozdemir, B

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This is a case of generalized annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma (AEGCG) associated with borrelia infection and genes of p-30, p-31, p-39. A possible cross-mediated reaction from the T-cell type which might have induced the AEGCG is discussed from the concept of “heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and molecular mimicry”. PMID:26624605

  14. No evidence for the diagnostic value of Borrelia serology in patients with sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Renée; Aarts, Mark C J; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; Rovers, Maroeska M

    2012-04-01

    In this evidence-based case report, we address the following clinical question: What is the predictive value of serological testing for Borrelia for diagnosing neuroborreliosis in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss? We searched for relevant articles in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We retrieved 49 unique publications and screened the title and abstract of these articles for relevance. We included 2 of 12 studies initially considered relevant to answer our question. These 2 studies reported a seroprevalence of antibodies against Borrelia of 16% in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SHL) as compared with 13.5% in the general population, but in neither patients with definite neuroborreliosis were they found. To date, there is no evidence regarding the added value of routine diagnostic serologic testing for Borrelia in diagnosing neuroborreliosis in patients with sudden SHL. Neuroborreliosis seems to be a rare cause of sudden SHL, and routine screening of patients for borrelia antibodies in serum should therefore not be recommended.

  15. Borrelia miyamotoi Infection in Patients from Upper Midwestern United States, 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Dean A.; Lovrich, Steven D.; Oldenburg, Darby G.; Kowalski, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    We confirmed Borrelia miyamotoi infection in 7 patients who had contracted an illness while near La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA, an area where Ixodes scapularis ticks are endemic. B. miyamatoi infection should now be considered among differential diagnoses for patients from the midwestern United States who have signs and symptoms suggestive of tickborne illness. PMID:27434048

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Lyme Disease: Global Protein Comparison of Three Strains of Borrelia burgdorferi

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Yang, Xiaohua; Luft, Benjamin J.; Dunn, John J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-04-01

    The Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. It has been studied extensively to help understand its pathogenicity of infection and how it can persist in different mammalian hosts. We report the proteomic analysis of the archetype B. burgdorferi B31 strain and two other strains (ND40, and JD-1) having different Borrelia pathotypes using strong cation exchange fractionation of proteolytic peptides followed by high-resolution, reversed phase capillary liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Protein identification was facilitated by the availability of the complete B31 genome sequence. A total of 665 Borrelia proteins were identified representing ~38 % coverage of the theoretical B31 proteome. A significant overlap was observed between the identified proteins in direct comparisons between any two strains (>72%), but distinct differences were observed among identified hypothetical and outer membrane proteins of the three strains. Such a concurrent proteomic overview of three Borrelia strains based upon only the B31 genome sequence is shown to provide significant insights into the presence or absence of specific proteins and a broad overall comparison among strains.

  17. Frequency and Distribution of Rickettsiae, Borreliae, and Ehrlichiae Detected in Human-Parasitizing Ticks, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Elizabeth A; Williamson, Phillip C; Billingsley, Peggy M; Seals, Janel P; Ferguson, Erin E; Allen, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    To describe the presence and distribution of tickborne bacteria and their vectors in Texas, USA, we screened ticks collected from humans during 2008-2014 for Rickettsia, Borrelia, and Ehrlichia spp. Thirteen tick species were identified, and 23% of ticks carried bacterial DNA from at least 1 of the 3 genera tested.

  18. Frequency and Distribution of Rickettsiae, Borreliae, and Ehrlichiae Detected in Human-Parasitizing Ticks, Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Elizabeth A.; Williamson, Phillip C.; Billingsley, Peggy M.; Seals, Janel P.; Ferguson, Erin E.

    2016-01-01

    To describe the presence and distribution of tickborne bacteria and their vectors in Texas, USA, we screened ticks collected from humans during 2008–2014 for Rickettsia, Borrelia, and Ehrlichia spp. Thirteen tick species were identified, and 23% of ticks carried bacterial DNA from at least 1 of the 3 genera tested. PMID:26811941

  19. Large Scale Spatial Risk and Comparative Prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi and Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato in Ixodes pacificus

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Kerry; Bonilla, Denise; Kjemtrup, Anne; Vilcins, Inger-Marie; Yoshimizu, Melissa Hardstone; Hui, Lucia; Sola, Milagros; Quintana, Miguel; Kramer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a newly described emerging pathogen transmitted to people by Ixodes species ticks and found in temperate regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. There is limited understanding of large scale entomological risk patterns of B. miyamotoi and of Borreila burgdorferi sensu stricto (ss), the agent of Lyme disease, in western North America. In this study, B. miyamotoi, a relapsing fever spirochete, was detected in adult (n = 70) and nymphal (n = 36) Ixodes pacificus ticks collected from 24 of 48 California counties that were surveyed over a 13 year period. Statewide prevalence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato (sl), which includes B. burgdorferi ss, and B. miyamotoi were similar in adult I. pacificus (0.6% and 0.8%, respectively). In contrast, the prevalence of B. burgdorferi sl was almost 2.5 times higher than B. miyamotoi in nymphal I. pacificus (3.2% versus 1.4%). These results suggest similar risk of exposure to B. burgdorferi sl and B. miyamotoi from adult I. pacificus tick bites in California, but a higher risk of contracting B. burgdorferi sl than B. miyamotoi from nymphal tick bites. While regional risk of exposure to these two spirochetes varies, the highest risk for both species is found in north and central coastal California and the Sierra Nevada foothill region, and the lowest risk is in southern California; nevertheless, tick-bite avoidance measures should be implemented in all regions of California. This is the first study to comprehensively evaluate entomologic risk for B. miyamotoi and B. burgdorferi for both adult and nymphal I. pacificus, an important human biting tick in western North America. PMID:25333277

  20. Divergence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes could be driven by the host: diversity of Borrelia strains isolated from ticks feeding on a single bird

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The controversy surrounding the potential impact of birds in spirochete transmission dynamics and their capacity to serve as a reservoir has existed for a long time. The majority of analyzed bird species are able to infect larval ticks with Borrelia. Dispersal of infected ticks due to bird migration is a key to the establishment of new foci of Lyme borreliosis. The dynamics of infection in birds supports the mixing of different species, the horizontal exchange of genetic information, and appearance of recombinant genotypes. Methods Four Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato strains were cultured from Ixodes minor larvae and four strains were isolated from Ixodes minor nymphs collected from a single Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus). A multilocus sequence analysis that included 16S rRNA, a 5S-23S intergenic spacer region, a 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer, flagellin, p66, and ospC separated 8 strains into 3 distinct groups. Additional multilocus sequence typing of 8 housekeeping genes, clpA, clpX, nifS, pepX, pyrG, recG, rplB, and uvrA was used to resolve the taxonomic status of bird-associated strains. Results Results of analysis of 14 genes confirmed that the level of divergence among strains is significantly higher than what would be expected for strains within a single species. The presence of cross-species recombination was revealed: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto housekeeping gene nifS was incorporated into homologous locus of strain, previously assigned to B. americana. Conclusions Genetically diverse Borrelia strains are often found within the same tick or same vertebrate host, presenting a wide opportunity for genetic exchange. We report the cross-species recombination that led to incorporation of a housekeeping gene from the B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain into a homologous locus of another bird-associated strain. Our results support the hypothesis that recombination maintains a majority of sequence polymorphism within Borrelia

  1. Genotypic Variation and Mixtures of Lyme Borrelia in Ixodes Ticks from North America and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Chris D.; Matthews, Heather E.; Schutzer, Steven; Rounds, Megan A.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Nolte, Oliver; Campbell, Scott R.; Phillipson, Curtis A.; Li, Feng; Sampath, Ranga; Ecker, David J.; Eshoo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lyme disease, caused by various species of Borrelia, is transmitted by Ixodes ticks in North America and Europe. Studies have shown the genotype of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) or the species of B. burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) affects the ability of the bacteria to cause local or disseminated infection in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a multilocus PCR electrospray mass spectrometry assay to determine the species and genotype Borrelia from ticks collected in New York, Connecticut, Indiana, Southern Germany, and California and characterized isolates from parts of the United States and Europe. These analyses identified 53 distinct genotypes of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto with higher resolution than ospC typing. Genotypes of other members of the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex were also identified and genotyped including B. afzelii, B. garinii, B. lusitaniae, B. spielmanii, and B. valaisiana. While each site in North America had genotypes unique to that location, we found genotypes shared between individual regions and two genotypes found across the United States. Significant B. burgdorferi s.s. genotypic diversity was observed between North America and Europe: only 6.6% of US genotypes (3 of 45) were found in Europe and 27% of the European genotypes (3 of 11) were observed in the US. Interestingly, 39% of adult Ixodes scapularis ticks from North America were infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi s.s. and 22.2% of Ixodes ricinus ticks from Germany were infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi s.l. Conclusions/Significance The presence of multiple Borrelia genotypes in ticks increases the probability that a person will be infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi, potentially increasing the risks of disseminated Lyme disease. Our study indicates that the genotypic diversity of Borrelia in ticks in both North America and Europe is higher then previously reported and can have

  2. Borrelia crocidurae infection of Ornithodoros erraticus (Lucas, 1849) ticks in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bouattour, Ali; Garnier, Martine; M'Ghirbi, Youmna; Sarih, M'hammed; Gern, Lise; Ferquel, Elisabeth; Postic, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel

    2010-11-01

    Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is caused by Borrelia species transmitted to humans by infected Ornithodoros sp. ticks. The disease has been rarely described in North Africa, and in Tunisia the local transmission of TBRF seems to have disappeared or is undiagnosed. A longitudinal study was conducted in 14 sites located in four different bioclimatic zones of Tunisia to assess both the distribution of Ornithodoros sp. and their infection rate with the relapsing fever Borrelia sp. Three polymerase chain reaction methods targeting the 16S rRNA, the intergenic spacer, and the fla (flagellin) genes were used and phylogenetic analyses were carried out. Three hundred and fifty-eight specimens of Ornithodoros were collected: O. erraticus (previously termed "small variety") (n = 190) and O. normandi (n = 168). Borrelia crocidurae DNA was detected in 15.1% of O. erraticus (small variety) (24 out of the 159 randomly selected for testing) collected in rodent burrows situated in the arid and Saharan areas in southern Tunisia. Molecular analysis targeting the 16S rRNA gene and the noncoding intergenic spacer domain showed good resolution for this Borrelia sp., although no molecular polymorphism was evidenced according to location. In contrast, none of the 133 O. normandi, also randomly selected for testing, was infected by Borrelia sp. and these ticks were restricted to the subhumid and semiarid zones in northern Tunisia. Both O. erraticus (small variety) and O. normandi were found in Tunisia and the high B. crocidurae infection rate found in O. erraticus highlights the risk of TBRF transmission in the southern part of the country.

  3. Determination of dissociation constant of the NFκB p50/p65 heterodimer using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy in the living cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Manisha; Mikuni, Shintaro; Muto, Hideki; Kinjo, Masataka

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We used two-laser-beam FCCS to determine the dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of IPT domain of p50/p65 heterodimer in living cell. •Interaction of p50 and p65 was analyzed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of single living cell. •Binding affinity of p50/p65 heterodimer is higher in cytoplasm than that of nucleus. -- Abstract: Two-laser-beam fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) is promising technique that provides quantitative information about the interactions of biomolecules. The p50/p65 heterodimer is the most abundant and well understood of the NFκB dimers in most cells. However, the quantitative value of affinity, namely the K{sub d}, for the heterodimer in living cells is not known yet. To quantify the heterodimerization of the IPT domain of p50/p65 in the living cell, we used two-laser-beam FCCS. The K{sub d} values of mCherry{sub 2}- and EGFP-fused p50 and p65 were determined to be 0.46 μM in the cytoplasm and 1.06 μM in the nucleus of the living cell. These results suggest the different binding affinities of the p50/p65 heterodimer in the cytoplasm and nucleus of the living cell and different complex formation in each region.

  4. The prodomain of BMP4 is necessary and sufficient to generate stable BMP4/7 heterodimers with enhanced bioactivity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Judith M.; Kwon, Sunjong; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Donley, Nathan; Tilak, Anup; Sopory, Shailaja; Christian, Jan L.

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins 4 and 7 (BMP4 and BMP7) are morphogens that signal as either homodimers or heterodimers to regulate embryonic development and adult homeostasis. BMP4/7 heterodimers exhibit markedly higher signaling activity than either homodimer, but the mechanism underlying the enhanced activity is unknown. BMPs are synthesized as inactive precursors that dimerize and are then cleaved to generate both the bioactive ligand and prodomain fragments, which lack signaling activity. Our study reveals a previously unknown requirement for the BMP4 prodomain in promoting heterodimer activity. We show that BMP4 and BMP7 precursor proteins preferentially or exclusively form heterodimers when coexpressed in vivo. In addition, we show that the BMP4 prodomain is both necessary and sufficient for generation of stable heterodimeric ligands with enhanced activity and can enable homodimers to signal in a context in which they normally lack activity. Our results suggest that intrinsic properties of the BMP4 prodomain contribute to the relative bioactivities of homodimers versus heterodimers in vivo. These findings have clinical implications for the use of BMPs as regenerative agents for the treatment of bone injury and disease. PMID:25902523

  5. Transcriptional Profiling the 150 kb Linear Megaplasmid of Borrelia turicatae Suggests a Role in Vector Colonization and Initiating Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, Hannah K.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Barbour, Alan G.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Vaisvil, Benjamin; Kapatral, Vinayak; Schmitt, Daniel P.; Schwan, Tom G.; Lopez, Job E.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is key for survival as vector-borne pathogens transmit between the arthropod and vertebrate, and temperature change is an environmental signal inducing alterations in gene expression of tick-borne spirochetes. While plasmids are often associated with adaptation, complex genomes of relapsing fever spirochetes have hindered progress in understanding the mechanisms of vector colonization and transmission. We utilized recent advances in genome sequencing to generate the most complete version of the Borrelia turicatae 150 kb linear megaplasmid (lp150). Additionally, a transcriptional analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) in lp150 was conducted and identified regions that were up-regulated during in vitro cultivation at tick-like growth temperatures (22°C), relative to bacteria grown at 35°C and infected murine blood. Evaluation of the 3’ end of lp150 identified a cluster of ORFs that code for putative surface lipoproteins. With a microbe’s surface proteome serving important roles in pathogenesis, we confirmed the ORFs expression in vitro and in the tick compared to spirochetes infecting murine blood. Transcriptional evaluation of lp150 indicates the plasmid likely has essential roles in vector colonization and/or initiating mammalian infection. These results also provide a much needed transcriptional framework to delineate the molecular mechanisms utilized by relapsing fever spirochetes during their enzootic cycle. PMID:26845332

  6. Functional outcomes in patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection.

    PubMed

    Jares, Tyler M; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kowalski, Todd J

    2014-02-01

    When Lyme disease is treated with appropriate antibiotic therapy in the early stages, long-term outcomes are good. However, a few patients have persistent symptoms despite appropriate therapy. Whether these patients' symptoms are any different from those of patients with reinfection is unclear. Our objective was to compare long-term symptoms and functional outcomes of patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection with those of patients with only 1 episode of infection and with no history of infection. We compared outcomes of Lyme reinfection patients, characterized by recurrent erythema migrans (EM) lesions, with those of patients with 1 episode of Lyme disease (Lyme control) and with no history of Lyme disease (non-Lyme control) by retrospective medical record review and a survey consisting of a 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and a 10-item symptom questionnaire. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for continuous variables and χ(2) analysis for categorical variables were used. In cases of low cell counts, Fisher's exact tests were used. Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons when ANOVA was significant. Reinfection was identified in 23/673 (3.4%) patients who had a diagnosis of Lyme disease in our health system during 2000-2004. Of the 23, 15 had long-term follow-up data and were age- and sex-matched to 45 Lyme control and 60 non-Lyme control group patients. Clinical characteristics were similar in the reinfection and Lyme control groups. SF-36 results were similar between groups for all domains except energy/vitality (VT). The SF-36 domain of VT was significantly different between groups: 63.0 vs. 54.5 vs. 64.5 in the reinfection, Lyme control, and non-Lyme control groups, respectively (p=0.047). Clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with recurrent EM lesions were similar to those of the control groups and consistent with B. burgdorferi reinfection, not persistent infection. Patients with Lyme reinfection should be treated with

  7. Functional outcomes in patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection.

    PubMed

    Jares, Tyler M; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kowalski, Todd J

    2014-02-01

    When Lyme disease is treated with appropriate antibiotic therapy in the early stages, long-term outcomes are good. However, a few patients have persistent symptoms despite appropriate therapy. Whether these patients' symptoms are any different from those of patients with reinfection is unclear. Our objective was to compare long-term symptoms and functional outcomes of patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection with those of patients with only 1 episode of infection and with no history of infection. We compared outcomes of Lyme reinfection patients, characterized by recurrent erythema migrans (EM) lesions, with those of patients with 1 episode of Lyme disease (Lyme control) and with no history of Lyme disease (non-Lyme control) by retrospective medical record review and a survey consisting of a 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and a 10-item symptom questionnaire. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for continuous variables and χ(2) analysis for categorical variables were used. In cases of low cell counts, Fisher's exact tests were used. Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons when ANOVA was significant. Reinfection was identified in 23/673 (3.4%) patients who had a diagnosis of Lyme disease in our health system during 2000-2004. Of the 23, 15 had long-term follow-up data and were age- and sex-matched to 45 Lyme control and 60 non-Lyme control group patients. Clinical characteristics were similar in the reinfection and Lyme control groups. SF-36 results were similar between groups for all domains except energy/vitality (VT). The SF-36 domain of VT was significantly different between groups: 63.0 vs. 54.5 vs. 64.5 in the reinfection, Lyme control, and non-Lyme control groups, respectively (p=0.047). Clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with recurrent EM lesions were similar to those of the control groups and consistent with B. burgdorferi reinfection, not persistent infection. Patients with Lyme reinfection should be treated with

  8. IL-8 single-chain homodimers and heterodimers: interactions with chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR2, and DARC.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, S. R.; Lowman, H. B.; Liu, J.; Shire, S.; Deforge, L. E.; Gillece-Castro, B. L.; McDowell, R.; Hébert, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Covalent single-chain dimers of the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) have been designed to mimic the dimeric form of IL-8 in solution and facilitate the production of heterodimer variants of IL-8. Physical studies indicated that use of a simple peptide linker to join two subunits, while allowing receptor binding and activation, led to self-association of the tethered dimers. However, addition of a single disulfide crosslink between the tethered subunits prevented this multimer from forming, yielding a species of dimer molecular weight. Crosslinked single-chain dimers bind to both IL-8 neutrophil receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 as well as to DARC, as does a double disulfide-linked dimer with no peptide linker. In addition, neutrophil response to these dimers as measured by chemotaxis or beta-glucuronidase release is similar to that elicited by wild-type IL-8, providing evidence that the dissociation of the dimeric species is not required for these biologically relevant activities. Finally, through construction of single-chain heterodimer mutants, we show that only the first subunit's ELR motif is the single-chain variants. PMID:9070443

  9. ThWRKY4 from Tamarix hispida Can Form Homodimers and Heterodimers and Is Involved in Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liuqiang; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Chunrui; Wang, Yucheng; Lu, Mengzhu; Gao, Caiqiu

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are a large family of transcription factors that are involved in diverse developmental processes and abiotic stress responses in plants. However, our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of WRKYs participation in protein–protein interactions is still fragmentary, and such protein–protein interactions are fundamental in understanding biological networks and the functions of proteins. In this study, we report that a WRKY protein from Tamarix hispida, ThWRKY4, can form both homodimers and heterodimers with ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3. In addition, ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3 can both bind to W-box motif with binding affinities similar to that of ThWRKY4. Further, the expression patterns of ThWRKY2 and ThWRKY3 are similar to that of ThWRKY4 when plants are exposed to abscisic acid (ABA). Subcellular localization shows that these three ThWRKY proteins are nuclear proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ThWRKY4 is a dimeric protein that can form functional homodimers or heterodimers that are involved in abiotic stress responses. PMID:26580593

  10. Free IL-12p40 Monomer is a Polyfunctional Adapter for Generating Novel IL-12-Like Heterodimers Extracellularly

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Kaveh; Singh, Nevil J.; Spooner, Eric; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Radaev, Sergei; Lantz, Larry; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Matzinger, Polly; Sun, Peter D.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2014-01-01

    IL-12p40 partners with the p35 and p19 polypeptides to generate the heterodimeric cytokines IL-12 and IL-23 respectively. These cytokines play critical and distinct roles in host defense. The assembly of these heterodimers is thought to take place within the cell, resulting in the secretion of fully functional cytokines. Although the p40 subunit alone can also be rapidly secreted in response to inflammatory signals, its biological significance remains unclear. Here, we show that the secreted p40 monomer can generate de novo IL-12-like activities by combining extracellulary with p35 released from other cells. Surprisingly, an unbiased proteomic analysis reveals multiple such extracellular binding partners for p40 in the serum of mice after an endotoxin challenge. We biochemically validate the binding of one of these novel partners—the CD5 antigen-like glycoprotein CD5L— to the p40 monomer. Nevertheless, the assembled p40-CD5L heterodimer does not recapitulate the biological activity of IL-12. These findings underscore the plasticity of secreted free p40 monomer, suggesting that p40 functions as an adapter which is able to generate multiple de novo composites in combination with other locally available polypeptide partners, post secretion. PMID:24821971

  11. Low temperature and peptides favor the formation of class I heterodimers on RMA-S cells at the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Rock, K L; Gramm, C; Benacerraf, B

    1991-01-01

    RMA-S murine cells have a mutation that interferes with the assembly of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) heterodimers and are deficient in the expression of class I molecules on the cell surface. The mutant phenotype has been reported to be normalized upon incubation of RMA-S cells at 25 degrees C. We find that much of the increased expression of class I heterodimers is dependent on culturing RMA-S cells in bovine serum or with purified bovine beta 2-microglobulin. Furthermore, epitopes that are associated with class I MHC molecules that have bound xenogeneic beta 2-microglobulin are preferentially formed on RMA-S cells cultured at 25 degrees C. These heterologous class I molecules are thermolabile. Increased expression of class I molecules has also been observed on RMA-S cells incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence of class I-restricted peptides. We find that the increased expression of Db molecules induced by influenza virus nucleoprotein residues 365-380 is similarly dependent on culturing RMA-S cells in bovine serum or with purified bovine beta 2-microglobulin. Images PMID:1709736

  12. Heterodimers reveal that two arabinose molecules are required for the normal arabinose response of AraC.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Michael E; Schleif, Robert

    2012-10-16

    AraC protein, which regulates expression of the l-arabinose operon in Escherichia coli, is a dimer whose DNA binding affinity for pairs of DNA half-sites is controlled by arabinose. Here we have addressed the question of whether the arabinose response of AraC requires the binding of one or two molecules of arabinose. This was accomplished by measuring the DNA dissociation rates of wild-type AraC and heterodimeric AraC constructs in which one subunit is capable of binding arabinose and the other subunit does not bind arabinose. Solutions consisting entirely of heterodimers were formed by spontaneous subunit exchange between two different homodimers, with heterodimers being trapped by the formation of an intersubunit disulfide bond between cysteine residues strategically positioned within the dimerization interface. We found that the normal arabinose response of AraC requires the binding of two arabinose molecules. These results provide additional constraints on mechanistic models for the action of AraC.

  13. KARP-1 works as a heterodimer with Ku70, but the function of KARP-1 cannot perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-01

    Ku, the heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, plays an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Two isoforms of Ku80 encoded by the same genes, namely, Ku80 and KARP-1 are expressed and function in primate cells, but not in rodent cells. Ku80 works as a heterodimer with Ku70. However, it is not yet clear whether KARP-1 forms a heterodimer with Ku70 and works as a heterodimer. Although KARP-1 appears to work in NHEJ, its physiological role remains unclear. In this study, we established and characterized EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cell lines, EGFP-KARP-1/xrs-6. We found that nuclear localization signal (NLS) of KARP-1 is localized in the C-terminal region. Our data showed that KARP-1 localizes within the nucleus in NLS-dependent and NLS-independent manner and forms a heterodimer with Ku70, and stabilizes Ku70. On the other hand, EGFP-KARP-1 could not perfectly complement the radiosensitivity and DSB repair activity of Ku80-deficient xrs-6 cells. Furthermore, KARP-1 could not accumulate at DSBs faster than Ku80, although EGFP-KARP-1 accumulates at DSBs. Our data demonstrate that the function of KARP-1 could not perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair, although KARP-1 has some biochemical properties, which resemble those of Ku80, and works as a heterodimer with Ku70. On the other hand, the number of EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cells showing pan-nuclear γ-H2AX staining significantly increases following X-irradiation, suggesting that KARP-1 may have a novel role in DSB response.

  14. KARP-1 works as a heterodimer with Ku70, but the function of KARP-1 cannot perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-01

    Ku, the heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, plays an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Two isoforms of Ku80 encoded by the same genes, namely, Ku80 and KARP-1 are expressed and function in primate cells, but not in rodent cells. Ku80 works as a heterodimer with Ku70. However, it is not yet clear whether KARP-1 forms a heterodimer with Ku70 and works as a heterodimer. Although KARP-1 appears to work in NHEJ, its physiological role remains unclear. In this study, we established and characterized EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cell lines, EGFP-KARP-1/xrs-6. We found that nuclear localization signal (NLS) of KARP-1 is localized in the C-terminal region. Our data showed that KARP-1 localizes within the nucleus in NLS-dependent and NLS-independent manner and forms a heterodimer with Ku70, and stabilizes Ku70. On the other hand, EGFP-KARP-1 could not perfectly complement the radiosensitivity and DSB repair activity of Ku80-deficient xrs-6 cells. Furthermore, KARP-1 could not accumulate at DSBs faster than Ku80, although EGFP-KARP-1 accumulates at DSBs. Our data demonstrate that the function of KARP-1 could not perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair, although KARP-1 has some biochemical properties, which resemble those of Ku80, and works as a heterodimer with Ku70. On the other hand, the number of EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cells showing pan-nuclear {gamma}-H2AX staining significantly increases following X-irradiation, suggesting that KARP-1 may have a novel role in DSB response.

  15. An Ixodes minor and Borrelia carolinensis enzootic cycle involving a critically endangered Mojave Desert rodent

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Janet; Ott-Conn, Caitlin; Worth, Joy; Poulsen, Amanda; Clifford, Deana

    2014-01-01

    Microtus californicus scirpensis is an endangered, isolated subspecies of California vole. It requires water pools and riparian bulrush (Schoenoplectus americanus) and occupies some of the rarest habitat of any North American mammal. The minimally vegetated, extremely arid desert surrounding the pools is essentially uninhabitable for Ixodes species ticks. We describe an enzootic cycle of Borrelia carolinensis in Ixodes minor ticks at a site 3500 km distant from the region in which I. minor is known to occur in Tecopa Host Springs, Inyo County, eastern Mojave Desert, California. Voles were live-trapped, and ticks and blood samples queried by PCR and DNA sequencing for identification and determination of the presence of Borrelia spp. Between 2011–2013, we found 21 Ixodes minor ticks (prevalence 4–8%) on Amargosa voles and Reithrodontomys megalotis. DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA from ticks yielded 99% identity to I. minor. There was 92% identity with I. minor in the calreticulin gene fragment. Three ticks (23.1%), 15 (24%) voles, three (27%) house mice, and one (7%) harvest mice were PCR positive for Borrelia spp. Sequencing of the 5S-23S intergenic spacer region and flagellin gene assigned Amargosa vole Borrelia strains to B. carolinensis. Ixodes minor, first described in 1902 from a single Guatemalan record, reportedly occurs only in the southeast American on small mammals and birds. The source of this tick in the Mojave Desert and time scale for introduction is not known but likely via migratory birds. Borrelia strains in the Amargosa ecosystem most closely resemble B. carolinensis. B. carolinensis occurs in a rodent-I. minor enzootic cycle in the southeast U.S. although its epidemiological significance for people or rodents is unknown. The presence of a tick and Borrelia spp. only known from southeast U.S. in this extremely isolated habitat on the other side of the continent is of serious concern because it suggests that the animals in the

  16. An Ixodes minor and Borrelia carolinensis enzootic cycle involving a critically endangered Mojave Desert rodent.

    PubMed

    Foley, Janet; Ott-Conn, Caitlin; Worth, Joy; Poulsen, Amanda; Clifford, Deana

    2014-03-01

    Microtus californicus scirpensis is an endangered, isolated subspecies of California vole. It requires water pools and riparian bulrush (Schoenoplectus americanus) and occupies some of the rarest habitat of any North American mammal. The minimally vegetated, extremely arid desert surrounding the pools is essentially uninhabitable for Ixodes species ticks. We describe an enzootic cycle of Borrelia carolinensis in Ixodes minor ticks at a site 3500 km distant from the region in which I. minor is known to occur in Tecopa Host Springs, Inyo County, eastern Mojave Desert, California. Voles were live-trapped, and ticks and blood samples queried by PCR and DNA sequencing for identification and determination of the presence of Borrelia spp. Between 2011-2013, we found 21 Ixodes minor ticks (prevalence 4-8%) on Amargosa voles and Reithrodontomys megalotis. DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA from ticks yielded 99% identity to I. minor. There was 92% identity with I. minor in the calreticulin gene fragment. Three ticks (23.1%), 15 (24%) voles, three (27%) house mice, and one (7%) harvest mice were PCR positive for Borrelia spp. Sequencing of the 5S-23S intergenic spacer region and flagellin gene assigned Amargosa vole Borrelia strains to B. carolinensis. Ixodes minor, first described in 1902 from a single Guatemalan record, reportedly occurs only in the southeast American on small mammals and birds. The source of this tick in the Mojave Desert and time scale for introduction is not known but likely via migratory birds. Borrelia strains in the Amargosa ecosystem most closely resemble B. carolinensis. B. carolinensis occurs in a rodent-I. minor enzootic cycle in the southeast U.S. although its epidemiological significance for people or rodents is unknown. The presence of a tick and Borrelia spp. only known from southeast U.S. in this extremely isolated habitat on the other side of the continent is of serious concern because it suggests that the animals in the ecosystem

  17. Borrelia garinii in Seabird Ticks (Ixodes uriae), Atlantic Coast, North America

    PubMed Central

    Muzaffar, Sabir Bin; Lavers, Jennifer; Lacombe, Eleanor H.; Cahill, Bruce K.; Lubelczyk, Charles B.; Kinsler, Allen; Mathers, Amy J.; Rand, Peter W.

    2006-01-01

    Borrelia garinii is the most neurotropic of the genospecies of B. burgdorferi sensu lato that cause Lyme disease in Europe, where it is transmitted to avian and mammalian reservoir hosts and to humans by Ixodes ricinus. B. garinii is also maintained in an enzootic cycle in seabirds by I. uriae, a tick found at high latitudes in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. To determine whether B. garinii is present in seabird ticks on the Atlantic Coast of North America, we examined 261 I. uriae ticks by polyclonal antiborrelial fluorescent antibody. Ten of 61 ticks from Gull Island, Newfoundland, were positive for borreliae by this screen. Amplicons of DNA obtained by PCR that targeted the B. garinii rrs-rrla intergenic spacer were sequenced and matched to GenBank sequences for B. garinii. The potential for introduction of this agent into the North American Lyme disease enzootic is unknown. PMID:17326943

  18. Immunochemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide-like component extracted from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Schwarzová, K; Ciznár, I

    2004-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis and its modifications were applied to analysis of a lipopolysaccharide-like component (LPS-LC) extracted from Borrelia garinii strains K24 and K48 isolated from Ixodes ricinus and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31. A modification of the hot phenol-water method was used for isolation of LPS. Immunoelectrophoresis (IE) and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) of LPS-LC with polyclonal rabbit antisera revealed a pattern and properties partially similar to LPS from other Gram-negative bacteria. B. garinii LPS-LC formed in CIE a diffuse band extending from the start to the anode. Similarly, the shape and position of the band in IE did not show major differences from LPS of other Gram-negative bacteria. The LPS-LC extracted from the three genomic groups of B. burgdorferi sensu lato were found to have similar immunochemical properties irrespective of their genotype origin.

  19. First isolation of the relapsing fever spirochete, Borrelia hermsii, from a domestic dog

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ashley L.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Fischer, Robert J.; Bellinghausen, Michael; Stevenson, Connie; Schwan, Tom G.

    2014-01-01

    In North America, tick-borne relapsing fever of humans is most frequently caused by infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. Prior to our investigation, this spirochete was not known to infect dogs although another species, Borrelia turicatae, has been isolated from domestic canids in Florida and Texas. A clinically ill dog in Washington, USA, was spirochetemic upon examination. Spirochetes were isolated from the dog’s serum and examined by PCR and multi-locus sequence typing. DNA sequences for 7 loci all typed the spirochete as B. hermsii and a member of genomic group II of this species. Therefore, companion dogs that reside in rustic cabins in higher elevation forests are at risk of infection with B. hermsii. PMID:24252262

  20. A novel EID family member, EID-3, inhibits differentiation and forms a homodimer or heterodimer with EID-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sasajima, Yuka; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Satoshi; Yuasa, Yasuhito . E-mail: yuasa.monc@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    The EID family members, i.e., E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation-1 (EID-1) and EID-1-like inhibitor of differentiation-2 (EID-2), were identified as negative regulators of cellular differentiation. EID-1 seems to inhibit differentiation by blocking histone acetyltransferase activity and EID-2 possibly inhibits differentiation through binding to class I histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we report a novel inhibitor of differentiation exhibiting homology with EID-2 termed EID-3 (EID-2-like inhibitor of differentiation-3). Like EID-2, EID-3 inhibited MyoD- and GR{alpha}-dependent transcription and blocked muscle differentiation in cultured cells by binding to class I HDACs. Unlike that of EID-2, the C-terminus, but not the N-terminus, of EID-3 was required for nuclear localization. EID-3 formed a homodimer or heterodimer with EID-2. These results suggest that EID-3 inhibits differentiation by blocking transcription as a complex in cells.

  1. Structure of the retinoid X receptor α-liver X receptor β (RXRα-LXRβ) heterodimer on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Xiaohua; Toresson, Gudrun; Benod, Cindy; Suh, Ji Ho; Philips, Kevin J; Webb, Paul; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2014-03-11

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are conditional transcription factors with common multidomain organization that bind diverse DNA elements. How DNA sequences influence NR conformation is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the human retinoid X receptor α–liver X receptor β (RXRα–LXRβ) heterodimer on its cognate element, an AGGTCA direct repeat spaced by 4 nt. The complex has an extended X-shaped arrangement, with DNA- and ligand-binding domains crossed, in contrast to the parallel domain arrangement of other NRs that bind an AGGTCA direct repeat spaced by 1 nt. The LXRβ core binds DNA via canonical contacts and auxiliary DNA contacts that enhance affinity for the response element. Comparisons of RXRα–LXRβs in the crystal asymmetric unit and with previous NR structures reveal flexibility in NR organization and suggest a role for RXRα in adaptation of heterodimeric complexes to DNA.

  2. Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) as hosts for Borrelia spp. in northern California.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert S; Mun, Jeomhee; Parker, John M; White, Marshall

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of infection of Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) with Borrelia spp. was evaluated in an area of northwestern California (USA) where Lyme disease is endemic and the relapsing-fever group spirochete Borrelia coriaceae is enzootic, and in a far-removed comparison area having a disparate climate and lower density of vector ticks. Blood samples collected from both deer herds in 1987, 1988, and from 2000-02 were assayed for borrelial infection with microscopic and molecular methods. Serum specimens from two (5%) of 39 deer from the Dye Creek Preserve in Tehama County versus 13 (20%) of 64 animals from the Hopland Research and Extension Center (HREC) in Mendocino County, California were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test positive for B. burgdorferi sensu lato. DNA sequencing analyses revealed that eight animals were infected with B. bissettii, six with three unclassified genotypes, and one with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. One serum sample (2%) from HREC was positive for a relapsing-fever group spirochete that had a 16S rRNA sequence homology of 99% with the C053 type strain of B. coriaceae. Spirochetes undetermined to geno-species were detected in thick-blood drops prepared from three (8%) of 36 deer from the HREC by direct immunofluorescence. Adults of the hippoboscid flies Lipoptena depressa (n=73) and Neolipoptena ferrisi (n=24), the Pacific Coast tick (Dermacentor occidentalis) (n=22), and the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus) (n=1) that had been removed from deer from both study areas in 2002 were PCR test negative for borreliae. The occurrence of diverse borreliae in deer from northern California confounds and, consequently, reduces the utility of borrelial serosurveys for detecting specific genospecies, unless they are complemented by more specific assays (e.g., immunoblotting, PCR/sequencing analysis). PMID:15827217

  3. High Prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi among Adult Blacklegged Ticks from White-Tailed Deer

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Graham J.; Tsao, Jean I.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi infection in questing and deer-associated adult Ixodes scapularis ticks in Wisconsin, USA. Prevalence among deer-associated ticks (4.5% overall, 7.1% in females) was significantly higher than among questing ticks (1.0% overall, 0.6% in females). Deer may be a sylvatic reservoir for this newly recognized zoonotic pathogen. PMID:26811985

  4. Collections of adult Ixodes dammini in Indiana, 1987-1990, and the isolation of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Pinger, R R; Holycross, J; Ryder, J; Mummert, M

    1991-09-01

    The collection records for Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin in Indiana are summarized for the period 1987-1990. In 1990, 13 of 729 deer examined were found to harbor adult I. dammini ticks. Eleven of these ticks were collected from 10 deer at a site in Newton County in northwestern Indiana. Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes were isolated from a single female I. dammini tick collected from this site.

  5. Suppression of Long-Lived Humoral Immunity Following Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Rebecca A.; Hastey, Christine J.; Olsen, Kimberly J.; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Lyme Disease caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is an emerging infectious disease and already by far the most common vector-borne disease in the U.S. Similar to many other infections, infection with B. burgdorferi results in strong antibody response induction, which can be used clinically as a diagnostic measure of prior exposure. However, clinical studies have shown a sometimes-precipitous decline of such antibodies shortly following antibiotic treatment, revealing a potential deficit in the host’s ability to induce and/or maintain long-term protective antibodies. This is further supported by reports of frequent repeat infections with B. burgdorferi in endemic areas. The mechanisms underlying such a lack of long-term humoral immunity, however, remain unknown. We show here that B. burgdorferi infected mice show a similar rapid disappearance of Borrelia-specific antibodies after infection and subsequent antibiotic treatment. This failure was associated with development of only short-lived germinal centers, micro-anatomical locations from which long-lived immunity originates. These showed structural abnormalities and failed to induce memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells for months after the infection, rendering the mice susceptible to reinfection with the same strain of B. burgdorferi. The inability to induce long-lived immune responses was not due to the particular nature of the immunogenic antigens of B. burgdorferi, as antibodies to both T-dependent and T-independent Borrelia antigens lacked longevity and B cell memory induction. Furthermore, influenza immunization administered at the time of Borrelia infection also failed to induce robust antibody responses, dramatically reducing the protective antiviral capacity of the humoral response. Collectively, these studies show that B. burgdorferi-infection results in targeted and temporary immunosuppression of the host and bring new insight into the mechanisms underlying the failure to develop long

  6. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice - A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 106, 1 x 104, 1 x 102 and 4 x 100 spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 106, 1 x 104 and 1 x 102 borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 104 and 1 x 102 borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species. PMID:26890814

  7. [The rate of infection of the taiga tick with Borrelia in the western Sayan].

    PubMed

    Naumov, R L; Gutova, V P; Ershova, A S; Papel'nitskaia, N P

    1994-01-01

    The paper provides microscopic findings of taiga ticks collected for the causative agent of Lyme's disease in May to July 1993 in the West Sayan . A total of 1,016 specimens were examined, among them 124 (12.2%) were found to have Borreliae. The areas were demonstrated to vary greatly with their epidemiological risk. The number of ticks and hence the epidemiological risk were the most in the low-mountain and chern taiga areas.

  8. Fibronectin-Binding Protein of Borrelia hermsii Expressed in the Blood of Mice with Relapsing Fever

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Eric R. G.; Marcsisin, Renee A.; Campeau Miller, Shelley A.; Hue, Fong; Phillips, April; AuCoin, David P.

    2014-01-01

    To identify and characterize surface proteins expressed by the relapsing fever (RF) agent Borrelia hermsii in the blood of infected mice, we used a cell-free filtrate of their blood to immunize congenic naive mice. The resultant antiserum was used for Western blotting of cell lysates, and gel slices corresponding to reactive bands were subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, followed by a search of the proteome database with the peptides. One of the immunogens was identified as the BHA007 protein, which is encoded by a 174-kb linear plasmid. BHA007 had sequence features of lipoproteins, was surface exposed by the criteria of in situ protease susceptibility and agglutination of Vtp− cells by anti-BHA007 antibodies, and was not essential for in vitro growth. BHA007 elicited antibodies during experimental infection of mice, but immunization with recombinant protein did not confer protection against needle-delivered infection. Open reading frames (ORFs) orthologous to BHA007 were found on large plasmids of other RF species, including the coding sequences for the CihC proteins of Borrelia duttonii and B. recurrentis, but not in Lyme disease Borrelia species. Recombinant BHA007 bound both human and bovine fibronectin with Kd (dissociation constant) values of 22 and 33 nM, respectively, and bound to C4-binding protein with less affinity. The distant homology of BHA007 and its orthologs to BBK32 proteins of Lyme disease species, as well as to previously described BBK32-like proteins in relapsing fever species, indicates that BHA007 is a member of a large family of multifunctional proteins in Borrelia species that bind to fibronectin as well as other host proteins. PMID:24686059

  9. Louse-borne relapsing fever (Borrelia recurrentis) in an Eritrean refugee arriving in Switzerland, August 2015.

    PubMed

    Goldenberger, D; Claas, G J; Bloch-Infanger, C; Breidthardt, T; Suter, B; Martínez, M; Neumayr, A; Blaich, A; Egli, A; Osthoff, M

    2015-08-13

    We report an imported case of louse-borne relapsing fever in a young adult Eritrean refugee who presented with fever shortly after arriving in Switzerland. Analysis of blood smears revealed spirochetes identified as Borrelia recurrentis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We believe that louse-borne relapsing fever may be seen more frequently in Europe as a consequence of a recent increase in refugees from East Africa travelling to Europe under poor hygienic conditions in confined spaces.

  10. Few vertebrate species dominate the Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeester, T. R.; Coipan, E. C.; van Wieren, S. E.; Prins, H. H. T.; Takken, W.; Sprong, H.

    2016-04-01

    Background. In the northern hemisphere, ticks of the Ixodidae family are vectors of diseases such as Lyme borreliosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tick-borne encephalitis. Most of these ticks are generalists and have a three-host life cycle for which they are dependent on three different hosts for their blood meal. Finding out which host species contribute most in maintaining ticks and the pathogens they transmit, is imperative in understanding the drivers behind the dynamics of a disease. Methods. We performed a systematic review to identify the most important vertebrate host species for Ixodes ricinus and Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. as a well-studied model system for tick-borne diseases. We analyzed data from 66 publications and quantified the relative contribution for 15 host species. Review results. We found a positive correlation between host body mass and tick burdens for the different stages of I. ricinus. We show that nymphal burdens of host species are positively correlated with infection prevalence with B. burgdorferi s.l., which is again positively correlated with the realized reservoir competence of a host species for B. burgdorferi s.l. Our quantification method suggests that only a few host species, which are amongst the most widespread species in the environment (rodents, thrushes and deer), feed the majority of I. ricinus individuals and that rodents infect the majority of I. ricinus larvae with B. burgdorferi s.l. Discussion. We argue that small mammal-transmitted Borrelia spp. are maintained due to the high density of their reservoir hosts, while bird-transmitted Borrelia spp. are maintained due to the high infection prevalence of their reservoir hosts. Our findings suggest that Ixodes ricinus and Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. populations are maintained by a few widespread host species. The increase in distribution and abundance of these species, could be the cause for the increase in Lyme borreliosis incidence in Europe in recent decades.

  11. Antibodies to Rickettsia spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi in Spanish Wild Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Lledó, Lourdes; Serrano, José Luis; Isabel Gegúndez, María; Giménez-Pardo, Consuelo; Saz, José Vicente

    2016-01-01

    We examined 314 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from the province of Soria, Spain, for Rickettsia typhi, Rickettsia slovaca, and Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Immunofluorescence assays showed 1.9% had antibodies to R. typhi, 6.7% had antibodies to R. slovaca, and 8.3% had antibodies to B. burgdorferi. Serostatus was not correlated with sex or age. Because red foxes can be infected by Rickettsiae and B. burgdorferi, presence of red foxes may be and indicator for the presence of these pathogens.

  12. Evidence of Borrelia lonestari DNA in Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) removed from humans.

    PubMed

    Stromdahl, Ellen Y; Williamson, Phillip C; Kollars, Thomas M; Evans, Sandra R; Barry, Ryan K; Vince, Mary A; Dobbs, Nicole A

    2003-12-01

    We used a nested PCR with Borrelia flagellin gene (flaB) primers and DNA sequencing to determine if Borrelia lonestari was present in Amblyomma americanum ticks removed from military personnel and sent to the Tick-Borne Disease Laboratory of the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine. In our preliminary investigation, we detected Borrelia sequences in 19 of 510 A. americanum adults and nymphs from Ft. A. P. Hill, Va. During the 2001 tick season, the flaB primers were used to test all A. americanum samples as they were received, and 29 of 2,358 A. americanum samples tested individually or in small pools were positive. PCRs with 2,146 A. americanum samples in 2002 yielded 26 more Borrelia-positive samples. The positive ticks in 2001 and 2002 were from Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The last positive sample of the 2001 season was a pool of larvae. To further investigate larval infection, we collected and tested questing A. americanum larvae from Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.; 4 of 33 pools (40 larvae per pool) were positive. Infection of unfed larvae provides evidence of the maintenance of B. lonestari by means of transovarial transmission. Sequence analysis revealed that the amplicons were identical to sequences of the B. lonestari flaB gene in GenBank. Despite the low prevalence of infection, the risk of B. lonestari transmission may be magnified because A. americanum is often abundant and aggressive, and many tick bite victims receive multiple bites.

  13. Evidence that Borrelia burgdorferi immunodominant proteins p100, p94 and p83 are identical.

    PubMed

    Ditton, H J; Neuss, M; Zöller, L

    1992-07-15

    Recently there have been reports on high-molecular mass components of Borrelia burgdorferi, namely the p100, p94 and p83, which claimed these proteins to be specific marker antigens for the serodiagnosis of late Lyme borreliosis. The nucleotide sequences of the p100 and p83 have been published. The alignment of the deduced N-terminal amino acid sequences with the N-terminal sequence of the p94 now provides evidence that all three proteins are identical.

  14. Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) as hosts for Borrelia spp. in northern California.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert S; Mun, Jeomhee; Parker, John M; White, Marshall

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of infection of Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) with Borrelia spp. was evaluated in an area of northwestern California (USA) where Lyme disease is endemic and the relapsing-fever group spirochete Borrelia coriaceae is enzootic, and in a far-removed comparison area having a disparate climate and lower density of vector ticks. Blood samples collected from both deer herds in 1987, 1988, and from 2000-02 were assayed for borrelial infection with microscopic and molecular methods. Serum specimens from two (5%) of 39 deer from the Dye Creek Preserve in Tehama County versus 13 (20%) of 64 animals from the Hopland Research and Extension Center (HREC) in Mendocino County, California were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test positive for B. burgdorferi sensu lato. DNA sequencing analyses revealed that eight animals were infected with B. bissettii, six with three unclassified genotypes, and one with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. One serum sample (2%) from HREC was positive for a relapsing-fever group spirochete that had a 16S rRNA sequence homology of 99% with the C053 type strain of B. coriaceae. Spirochetes undetermined to geno-species were detected in thick-blood drops prepared from three (8%) of 36 deer from the HREC by direct immunofluorescence. Adults of the hippoboscid flies Lipoptena depressa (n=73) and Neolipoptena ferrisi (n=24), the Pacific Coast tick (Dermacentor occidentalis) (n=22), and the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus) (n=1) that had been removed from deer from both study areas in 2002 were PCR test negative for borreliae. The occurrence of diverse borreliae in deer from northern California confounds and, consequently, reduces the utility of borrelial serosurveys for detecting specific genospecies, unless they are complemented by more specific assays (e.g., immunoblotting, PCR/sequencing analysis).

  15. Analysis and comparison of plasmid profiles of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato strains.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Johnson, R C

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between plasmid profiles and genospecies of the Lyme disease borreliae was investigated by using 40 strains from diverse biological and geographical sources. The genospecies of the strains were determined by examination of rRNA gene restriction patterns with cDNA probes complementary to the 16S and 23S rRNAs of Escherichia coli. Plasmid profiles were obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The number of plasmids per strain and the size of these plasmids ranged from 4 to 10 and from 13.3 to 57.7 kb, respectively. The strains all contained a single large plasmid of 50 to 57.7 kb, with the exception of two Borrelia garinii strains that contained two or three of the large plasmids. The large plasmids of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strains ranged in size from 51.4 to 52.7 kb and were consistently smaller than the 54.0- to 57.7-kb plasmids present in B. garinii and Borrelia afzelii. The exceptions of this observation were the two B. garinii strains with multiple large plasmids; in this case the large plasmids were 50.6 to 53 kb. Although a large degree of heterogeneity in the sizes and frequencies of occurrence of smaller plasmids was observed, there were some differences among the three genospecies. The differences in plasmids were further studied by using two BamHI DNA fragments from a 28.7-kb plasmid of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto 297 as probes. Both probes hybridized with the 27- to 29-kb plasmids of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strains. In contrast, two patterns of hybridization were observed with B. garinii and B. afzelii.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567905

  16. High Prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi among Adult Blacklegged Ticks from White-Tailed Deer.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungeun; Hickling, Graham J; Tsao, Jean I

    2016-02-01

    We compared the prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi infection in questing and deer-associated adult Ixodes scapularis ticks in Wisconsin, USA. Prevalence among deer-associated ticks (4.5% overall, 7.1% in females) was significantly higher than among questing ticks (1.0% overall, 0.6% in females). Deer may be a sylvatic reservoir for this newly recognized zoonotic pathogen. PMID:26811985

  17. DNA binding of Jun and Fos bZip domains: homodimers and heterodimers induce a DNA conformational change in solution.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Leppik, R; Busch, S J; Granger-Schnarr, M; Schnarr, M

    1996-01-01

    We constructed plasmids encoding the sequences for the bZip modules of c-Jun and c-Fos which could then be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified bZip modules were tested for their binding capacities of synthetic oligonucleotides containing either TRE or CRE recognition sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and circular dichroism (CD). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that bZip Jun homodimers and bZip Jun/Fos heterodimers bind a collagenase-like TRE (CTGACTCAT) with dissociation constants of respectively 1.4 x 10(-7) M and 5 x 10(-8) M. As reported earlier [Patel et al. (1990) Nature 347, 572-575], DNA binding induces a marked change of the protein structure. However, we found that the DNA also undergoes a conformational change. This is most clearly seen with small oligonucleotides of 13 or 14 bp harboring respectively a TRE (TGACTCA) or a CRE (TGACGTCA) sequence. In this case, the positive DNA CD signal at 280 nm increases almost two-fold with a concomitant blue-shift of 3-4 nm. Within experimental error the same spectral changes are observed for TRE and CRE containing DNA fragments. The spectral changes observed with a non-specific DNA fragment are weaker and the signal of free DNA is recovered upon addition of much smaller salt concentrations than required for a specific DNA fragment. Surprisingly the spectral changes induced by Jun/Jun homodimers are not identical to those induced by Jun/Fos heterodimers. However, in both cases the increase of the positive CD band and the concomitant blue shift would be compatible with a B to A-transition of part of the binding site or a DNA conformation intermediate between the canonical A and B structures. PMID:8948639

  18. Spectroscopy of homo- and heterodimers of silver and gold nanocubes as a function of separation: a DDA simulation.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Nasrin; O'Neil, Daniel; Asiri, Abdullah M; El-Sayed, Mostafa

    2014-09-18

    The plasmonic fields of silver and gold nanocubes are known to be among the strongest of any plasmonic metallic nanoparticles. Aggregation dominates their use in imaging and sensing applications due to the resulting enhancement of the plasmonic field in between the nanoparticles (hot spots). The first step in the aggregation process is dimerization. In the present work, we used the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) to calculate the interdimer separation dependence of the absorption and scattering components of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) extinction of homo and heterodimers of Ag and Au nanocubes when excited parallel to their interparticle axis. We also examined the changes in the nanocube surface plasmonic field distributions as the dimer separation was varied. The results from the homodimers were as expected: as the cubes were brought together, there was a red shift in the primary plasmon band in accordance with the universal scaling law. Additionally, as the particles moved together, scattering contributed more to the overall extinction. By examining the E-field distributions, we found that the hot spot geometry changes abruptly at small separations. At very short distances, the hot spot is located between the adjacent faces and away from the corners of these faces. At larger separations it moves toward the adjacent corners. We observed apparently anomalous behavior for the heterodimer. First, the E-field resulting from excitation of the Ag dominated plasmon resonance was significantly weaker than expected. Second, the red shift of the gold dominated plasmon resonance did not follow the universal scaling law. The most likely explanation for these observations is that the silver plasmon mixes strongly with the energetically resonant, but nonplasmonic, gold interband transition to form a hybrid resonance that produces weaker overall field intensity on the two nanocubes at short separation.

  19. Functional independence of monomeric CHIP28 water channels revealed by expression of wild-type mutant heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Shi, L B; Skach, W R; Verkman, A S

    1994-04-01

    CHIP28 is a major water transporting protein in erythrocytes and kidney which forms tetramers in membranes (Verbavatz, J. M., Brown, D., Sabolic, I., Valenti, G., Ausiello, D. A., Van Hoek, A. N., Ma, T., and Verkman, A. S. (1993) J. Cell Biol. 123, 605-618). To determine whether CHIP28 monomers function independently, chimeric cDNA dimers were constructed which contained wild-type CHIP28 in series with either wild-type CHIP28, a non-water transporting CHIP28 mutant (C189W), or a functional but mercurial-insensitive CHIP28 mutant (C189S). Transcribed cRNAs were injected in Xenopus oocytes and plasma membrane expression was assayed by quantitative immunofluorescence. Water channel function was measured by osmotically induced swelling. CHIP28 homo- and heterodimers were targeted to the oocyte plasma membrane and functioned as water channels. Relative osmotic water permeability (Pf) values (normalized for plasma membrane expression of monomeric subunits) were: 1.0 (CHIP28 monomer), 0.0 (C189W), 1.07 (C189S), 1.10 (CHIP28-CHIP28 dimer) and 0.52 (CHIP28-C189W). The increase in oocyte Pf was linearly related to plasma membrane expression of wild-type CHIP28 and C189S subunits. HgCl2 (0.3 mM) inhibited channel-mediated Pf in oocytes expressing wild-type CHIP28 monomers and dimers by 85-90%, but did not inhibit Pf in oocytes expressing C189S. HgCl2 inhibited Pf in oocytes expressing CHIP28-C189S dimers by 44 +/- 7%, consistent with one mercurial-sensitive and one insensitive subunit in the heterodimer. These results indicate that despite their assembly in tetramers, monomeric CHIP28 subunits function independently as water channels. PMID:7511600

  20. Low prevalence of Borrelia bavariensis in Ixodes ricinus ticks in southeastern Austria.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Martin; Muellegger, Robert R; Hizo-Teufel, Cecilia; Fingerle, Volker

    2014-10-01

    Borrelia bavariensis was recently described as a distinct genospecies among the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex. The prevalence of B. bavariensis in Austria, a highly endemic area for tick-transmitted pathogens, is scarcely characterized. To investigate the prevalence of B. bavariensis in Ixodes ricinus ticks we reevaluated the results of a study conducted in 518 ticks from southeastern Austria collected in 2002 and 2003. The presence of B. burgdorferi s.l.-specific DNA in ticks was analyzed by a PCR for the outer surface protein A (ospA) gene. Borrelia species were differentiated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and samples positive for B. bavariensis were further analyzed by multilocus sequence analysis. Two of 133 (1.5%) B. burgdorferi s.l.-positive I. ricinus ticks were infected with B. bavariensis. Both specimens were coinfected with the OspA serotype 5 of B. garinii. Borrelia bavariensis is present; however, seem to be rare in I. ricinus ticks in southeastern Austria.

  1. Why are there several species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato detected in dogs and humans?

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, Bogumiła

    2014-04-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is a group of spirochete bacteria species some of which cause borreliosis in humans and dogs. Humans and dogs are susceptible to illness from many of the same tick-borne pathogens, including B. burgdorferi s.l. (Bbsl). Little is known about the pathogenic role of the species of Bbsl in canines. The molecular methods which detect and amplify the DNA of borreliae and allow differentiating borreliae species or strains have not been used in canine diagnostics yet. Until now, it has been believed that in European dogs, like in humans, at least three pathogenic species occur but the most frequently described symptoms may be associated with the infection caused by B. burgdorferi sensu stricto species. A dog as well as a human is a host for many species of Bbsl, because borreliacidal ability of serum of dogs and humans is evident only in certain genospecies of Bbsl. Therefore both a dog and a human harbor more species than in case of some wild animal species which create older phylogenetic Bbsl species-host systems and these animals may act even as a non-competent reservoir host. Apart from many genospecies of Bbsl, a dog harbors other tick-borne agents and dual or triple infections may occur.

  2. Detection of Borreliae in Archived Sera from Patients with Clinically Suspect Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William; Shearer, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnoses of Lyme disease based on clinical manifestations, serological findings and detection of infectious agents often contradict each other. We tested 52 blind-coded serum samples, including 20 pre-treatment and 12 post-treatment sera from clinically suspect Lyme disease patients, for the presence of residual Lyme disease infectious agents, using nested PCR amplification of a signature segment of the borrelial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for detection and direct DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicon for molecular validation. These archived sera were split from the samples drawn for the 2-tier serology tests performed by a CDC-approved laboratory, and are used as reference materials for evaluating new diagnostic reagents. Of the 12 post-treatment serum samples, we found DNA evidence of a novel borrelia of uncertain significance in one, which was also positive for the 2-tier serology test. The rest of the post-treatment sera and all 20 control sera were PCR-negative. Of the 20 pre-treatment sera from clinically suspect early Lyme disease patients, we found Borrelia miyamotoi in one which was 2-tier serology-negative, and a Borrelia burgdorferi in two—one negative and one positive for 2-tier serology. We conclude that a sensitive and reliable DNA-based test is needed to support the diagnosis of Lyme disease and Lyme disease-like borreliosis. PMID:24619223

  3. Morphoea and Borrelia burgdorferi: results from the Scottish Highlands in the context of the world literature

    PubMed Central

    Goodlad, J R; Davidson, M M; Gordon, P; Billington, R; Ho-Yen, D O

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Previous studies investigating the link between infection with Borrelia burgdorferi and morphoea have produced conflicting results. Often, these studies have been undertaken in patients from different regions or countries, and using methods of varying sensitivity for detecting Borrelia burgdorferi infection. This study aimed to establish whether a relation could be demonstrated in the Highlands of Scotland, an area with endemic Lyme disease, with the use of a sensitive method for detecting the organism. Methods: The study was performed on biopsies of lesional skin taken from 16 patients from the Highlands of Scotland with typical clinical features of morphoea. After histological confirmation of the diagnosis, a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers to a unique conserved region of the Borrelia burgdorferi flagellin gene was performed on DNA extracts from each biopsy. A literature search was also performed for comparable studies. Results: None of the 16 patients had documented clinical evidence of previous infection with B burgdorferi. DNA was successfully extracted from 14 of the 16 cases but all of these were negative using PCR for B burgdorferi specific DNA, despite successful amplification of appropriate positive controls in every test. The results were compared with those of other documented studies. Conclusions: Examination of the literature suggests that there is a strong geographical relation between B burgdorferi and morphoea. These results, in which no such association was found, indicate that morphoea may not be associated with the subspecies of B burgdorferi found in the Highlands of Scotland. PMID:12456775

  4. Antigenically variable Borrelia burgdorferi isolated from cottontail rabbits and Ixodes dentatus in rural and urban areas.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J F; Magnarelli, L A; LeFebvre, R B; Andreadis, T G; McAninch, J B; Perng, G C; Johnson, R C

    1989-01-01

    Spirochetes were isolated from 71 subadult Ixodes dentatus removed from cottontail rabbits captured in Millbrook, N.Y., and in New York, N.Y. Spirochetes were also cultured from kidney tissues of six rabbits. While all isolates reacted with monoclonal antibody H9724, which identifies the spirochetes as borreliae, more than half did not bind with antibody H5332 and even fewer reacted with H3TS, both of which were produced to outer surface protein A of Borrelia burgdorferi. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles of three isolates differed from one another and from all previously characterized B. burgdorferi strains from humans, ticks, and wildlife in North America. The 12 periplasmic flagella that originated subterminally from each pointed end of a rabbit Borellia isolate contrasted with the 11 or fewer flagella for B. burgdorferi reported previously from North America. Although DNA homology and restriction endonuclease analysis also revealed differences among a rabbit kidney isolate, an I. dentatus isolate, and B. burgdorferi B31, similarities were sufficient to lead us to conclude that the borreliae in rabbits and I. dentatus are B. burgdorferi. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers of sera from humans with diagnosed Lyme disease to rabbit tick B. burgdorferi were often similar to one another and to those recorded for a reference B. burgdorferi strain. Images PMID:2913024

  5. Detection of borreliae in archived sera from patients with clinically suspect Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S; Vigliotti, Veronica S; Jones, William; Shearer, David M

    2014-03-11

    The diagnoses of Lyme disease based on clinical manifestations, serological findings and detection of infectious agents often contradict each other. We tested 52 blind-coded serum samples, including 20 pre-treatment and 12 post-treatment sera from clinically suspect Lyme disease patients, for the presence of residual Lyme disease infectious agents, using nested PCR amplification of a signature segment of the borrelial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for detection and direct DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicon for molecular validation. These archived sera were split from the samples drawn for the 2-tier serology tests performed by a CDC-approved laboratory, and are used as reference materials for evaluating new diagnostic reagents. Of the 12 post-treatment serum samples, we found DNA evidence of a novel borrelia of uncertain significance in one, which was also positive for the 2-tier serology test. The rest of the post-treatment sera and all 20 control sera were PCR-negative. Of the 20 pre-treatment sera from clinically suspect early Lyme disease patients, we found Borrelia miyamotoi in one which was 2-tier serology-negative, and a Borrelia burgdorferi in two-one negative and one positive for 2-tier serology. We conclude that a sensitive and reliable DNA-based test is needed to support the diagnosis of Lyme disease and Lyme disease-like borreliosis.

  6. Co-infection of Borrelia afzelii and Bartonella spp. in bank voles from a suburban forest.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Jean-Philippe; Marsot, Maud; Vaumourin, Elise; Gasqui, Patrick; Masséglia, Sébastien; Marcheteau, Elie; Huet, Dominique; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; Ferquel, Elisabeth; Halos, Lénaïg; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel

    2012-12-01

    We report the molecular detection of Borrelia afzelii (11%) and Bartonella spp. (56%) in 447 bank voles trapped in a suburban forest in France. Adult voles were infected by significantly more Borrelia afzelii than juveniles (p<0.001), whereas no significant difference was detected in the prevalence of Bartonella spp. between young and adult individuals (p=0.914). Six percent of the animals were co-infected by both bacteria. Analysis of the bank vole carrier status for either pathogen indicated that co-infections occur randomly (p=0.94, CI(95)=[0.53; 1.47]). Sequence analysis revealed that bank voles were infected by a single genotype of Borrelia afzelii and by 32 different Bartonella spp. genotypes, related to three known species specific to rodents (B. taylorii, B. grahamii and B. doshiae) and also two as yet unidentified Bartonella species. Our findings confirm that rodents harbor high levels of potential human pathogens; therefore, widespread surveillance should be undertaken in areas where humans may encounter rodents.

  7. Improved serodiagnosis of early Lyme borreliosis: immunoblot with local Borrelia afzelii strain.

    PubMed

    Jovicić, Vilma Lj; Grego, Edita M; Lako, Branislav L; Ristović, Blagoje M; Lepsanović, Zorica A; Stajković, Novica T

    2003-11-01

    To improve the serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis (LB) the performances of four tests were evaluated. An indirect immunofluorescent assay based on Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on local isolates of Borrelia afzelii and B. burgdorferi s.s., and immunoblot (IB) of B. afzelii were prepared. The serum panels contained 214 serum samples: control group (n=120) and patients at different stages of LB (n=94). The specificity of IB was 96%, of in-house ELISA 93%, and of IFA 89%. In early LB the sensitivity of IFA was 36%, ELISA 67%, and IB 93%. In late-stage LB the sensitivity was: 72% for IFA, 80% for ELISA, and 94% for IB. Comparison of in-house and Behring ELISA showed that the sensitivity of the serological assay could be increased when the test was based on local Borrelia strains. IgM and IgG antibodies from sera of patients with early and late LB most frequently demonstrated reactivity to OspC. The other significant proteins in early LB were: p39, p41 in IgM IB, and p83/100, p39, Osp17 in IgG IB; in late LB: p39, p41 in IgM IB, and p83/100, Osp17, p21 and p43 in IgG IB. Using IB based on local B. afzelii isolates improves the serodiagnosis of early LB in our geographical region.

  8. CD4+ cell-derived interleukin-17 in a model of dysregulated, Borrelia-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Emily S; Johnson, Megan E; Schell, Ronald F; Nardelli, Dean T

    2016-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis, which is caused in the United States by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, may manifest as different arrays of signs, symptoms and severities between infected individuals. Recent studies have indicated that particularly severe forms of Lyme borreliosis in humans are associated with an increased Th17 response. Here, we hypothesized that a murine model combining the dysregulated immune response of an environment lacking interleukin-10 (IL-10) with a robust T-cell-driven inflammatory response would reflect arthritis associated with the production of IL-17 by CD4+ cells. We demonstrate that IL-10 regulates the production of IL-17 by Borrelia-primed CD4+ cells early after interaction with Lyme spirochetes in vitro and that infection of Borrelia-primed mice with B. burgdorferi leads to significant production of IL-17 that contributes to the development of severe arthritis. These results extend our previous findings by demonstrating that a dysregulated adaptive immune response to Lyme spirochetes can contribute to severe, Th17-associated arthritis. These findings may lead to therapeutic measures for individuals with particularly severe symptoms of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:27549424

  9. Insights into the biology of Borrelia burgdorferi gained through the application of molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Groshong, Ashley M; Blevins, Jon S

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the vector-borne bacterium that causes Lyme disease, was first identified in 1982. It is known that much of the pathology associated with Lyme borreliosis is due to the spirochete's ability to infect, colonize, disseminate, and survive within the vertebrate host. Early studies aimed at defining the biological contributions of individual genes during infection and transmission were hindered by the lack of adequate tools and techniques for molecular genetic analysis of the spirochete. The development of genetic manipulation techniques, paired with elucidation and annotation of the B. burgdorferi genome sequence, has led to major advancements in our understanding of the virulence factors and the molecular events associated with Lyme disease. Since the dawn of this genetic era of Lyme research, genes required for vector or host adaptation have garnered significant attention and highlighted the central role that these components play in the enzootic cycle of this pathogen. This chapter covers the progress made in the Borrelia field since the application of mutagenesis techniques and how they have allowed researchers to begin ascribing roles to individual genes. Understanding the complex process of adaptation and survival as the spirochete cycles between the tick vector and vertebrate host will lead to the development of more effective diagnostic tools as well as identification of novel therapeutic and vaccine targets. In this chapter, the Borrelia genes are presented in the context of their general biological roles in global gene regulation, motility, cell processes, immune evasion, and colonization/dissemination.

  10. Ligand-dependent activation of transcription in vitro by retinoic acid receptor α/retinoid X receptor α heterodimers that mimics transactivation by retinoids in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, F. Jeffrey; Fromental-Ramain, Catherine; Remboutsika, Eumorphia; Benecke, Arndt; Chambon, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    All-trans and 9-cis retinoic acids (RA) signals are transduced by retinoic acid receptor/retinoid X receptor (RAR/RXR) heterodimers that act as functional units controlling the transcription of RA-responsive genes. With the aim of elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms, we have developed an in vitro transcription system using a chromatin template made up of a minimal promoter and a direct repeat with 5-spacing-based RA response element. RARα and RXRα were expressed in and purified from baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells, and transcription was carried out by using naked DNA or chromatin templates. Transcription from naked templates was not affected by the presence of RA and/or RAR/RXR heterodimers. In contrast, very little transcription occurred from chromatin templates in the absence of RA or RAR/RXR heterodimers whereas their addition resulted in a dosage-dependent stimulation of transcription that never exceeded that occurring on naked DNA templates. Most importantly, the addition of synthetic agonistic or antagonistic retinoids to the chromatin transcription system mimicked their stimulatory or inhibitory action in vivo, and activation by a RXR-specific retinoid was subordinated to the binding of an agonist ligand to the RAR partner. Moreover, the addition of the p300 coactivator generated a synergistic enhancement of transcription. Thus, the dissection of this transcription system ultimately should lead to the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which RAR/RXR heterodimers control transcription in a ligand-dependent manner. PMID:10051583

  11. Borrelia chilensis, a new member of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex that extends the range of this genospecies in the Southern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Larisa B.; Tomova, Alexandra; González-Acuña, Daniel; Murúa, Roberto; Moreno, Claudia X.; Hernández, Claudio; Cabello, Javier; Cabello, Carlos; Daniels, Thomas J.; Godfrey, Henry P.; Cabello, Felipe C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), transmitted by Ixodes spp. ticks, is the causative agent of Lyme disease. Although Ixodes spp. ticks are distributed in both Northern and Southern Hemispheres, evidence for the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. in South America apart from Uruguay is lacking. We now report the presence of culturable spirochetes with flat-wave morphology and borrelial DNA in endemic Ixodes stilesi ticks collected in Chile from environmental vegetation and long-tailed rice rats (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus). Cultured spirochetes and borrelial DNA in ticks were characterized by multilocus sequence typing and by sequencing five other loci (16S and 23S ribosomal genes, 5S-23S intergenic spacer, flaB, ospC). Phylogenetic analysis placed this spirochete as a new genospecies within the Lyme borreliosis group. Its plasmid profile determined by PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis differed from that of B. burgdorferi B31A3. We propose naming this new South American member of the Lyme borreliosis group Borrelia chilensis VA1, in honor of its country of origin. PMID:24148079

  12. Further Characterization of Complement Regulator-Acquiring Surface Proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Kraiczy, Peter; Skerka, Christine; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2001-01-01

    The three genospecies Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii, all causative agents of Lyme disease, differ in their susceptibilities to human complement-mediated lysis. We recently reported that serum resistance of borrelias correlates largely with their ability to bind the human complement regulators FHL-1/reconectin and factor H. To date, two complement regulator-acquiring-proteins (CRASP-1 and CRASP-2) have been identified in serum-resistant B. afzelii isolates (P. Kraiczy, C. Skerka, M. Kirschfink, V. Brade, and P. F. Zipfel, Eur. J. Immunol. 31:1674–1684, 2001). Here, we present a comprehensive study of the CRASPs detectable in both serum-resistant and intermediate serum-sensitive B. afzelii and B. burgdorferi isolates. These CRASPs were designated according to the genospecies either as BaCRASPs, when derived from B. afzelii, or as BbCRASPs, for proteins identified in B. burgdorferi isolates. Each borrelial isolate expresses distinct CRASPs that can be differentiated by their mobility and binding phenotypes. A detailed comparison reveals overlapping and even identical binding profiles for BaCRASP-1 (27.5 kDa), BbCRASP-1 (25.9 kDa), and BbCRASP-2 (23.2 kDa), which bind FHL-1/reconectin strongly and interact weakly with factor H. In contrast, two B. afzelii proteins (BaCRASP-4 [19.2 kDa] and BaCRASP-5 [22.5 kDa]) and three B. burgdorferi proteins (BbCRASP-3 [19.8 kDa], BbCRASP-4 [18.5 kDa], and BbCRASP-5 [17.7 kDa]) bind factor H but not FHL-1/reconectin. Most CRASPs bind both human immune regulators at their C-terminal ends. Temperature-dependent up-regulation of CRASPs (BaCRASP-1, BaCRASP-2, and BaCRASP-5) is detected in low-passage borrelias cultured at 33 or 37°C compared with those cultured at 20°C. The characterization of the individual CRASPs on the molecular level is expected to identify new virulence factors and potential vaccine candidates. PMID:11705962

  13. Isolation of Lyme disease Borrelia from puffins (Fratercula arctica) and seabird ticks (Ixodes uriae) on the Faeroe Islands.

    PubMed

    Gylfe; Olsen, B; Strasevicius, D; Marti Ras, N; Weihe, P; Noppa, L; Ostberg, Y; Baranton, G; Bergström, S

    1999-04-01

    This is the first report on the isolation of Lyme disease Borrelia from seabirds on the Faeroe Islands and the characteristics of its enzootic cycle. The major components of the Borrelia cycle include the puffin (Fratercula arctica) as the reservoir and Ixodes uriae as the vector. The importance of this cycle and its impact on the spread of human Lyme borreliosis have not yet been established. Borrelia spirochetes isolated from 2 of 102 sampled puffins were compared to the borreliae previously obtained from seabird ticks, I. uriae. The rrf-rrl intergenic spacer and the rrs and the ospC genes were sequenced and a series of phylogenetic trees were constructed. Sequence data and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis grouped the strains together with Borrelia garinii. In a seroepidemiological survey performed with residents involved in puffin hunting on the Faeroe Islands, 3 of 81 serum samples were found to be positive by two commonly used clinical tests: a flagellin-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. These three positive serum samples also had high optical density values in a whole-cell ELISA. The finding of seropositive Faeroe Islanders who are regularly exposed to I. uriae indicate that there may be a transfer of B. garinii by this tick species to humans. PMID:10074497

  14. Patterns of tick infestation and their Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. infection in wild birds in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Norte, A C; da Silva, L P; Tenreiro, P J Q; Felgueiras, M S; Araújo, P M; Lopes, P B; Matos, C; Rosa, A; Ferreira, P J S G; Encarnação, P; Rocha, A; Escudero, R; Anda, P; Núncio, M S; Lopes de Carvalho, I

    2015-09-01

    Wild birds may act as reservoirs for zoonotic pathogens and may be mechanical carriers of pathogen infected vector ticks through long distances during migration. The aim of this study was to assess tick infestation patterns in birds in Portugal and the prevalence of tick infection by Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. using PCR techniques. Seven tick species were collected from birds including Haemaphysalis punctata, Hyalomma spp., Ixodes acuminatus, Ixodes arboricola, Ixodes frontalis, Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes ventalloi. We found that I. frontalis and Hyalomma spp. were the most common ticks infesting birds of several species and that they were widespread in Portugal. Turdus merula was the bird species that presented the highest diversity of infesting ticks and had one of the highest infestation intensities. B. burgdorferi s.l. was detected in 7.3% (37/505) of Ixodidae ticks derived from birds. The most common genospecies was Borrelia turdi (6.9%), detected in ticks collected from Parus major, T. merula and Turdus philomelos, but Borrelia valaisiana (0.2%) and one Borrelia sp. (0.2%) similar to Borrelia bissettii (96% of similarity of the flaB gene in Blastn) were also detected. This study contributed to a better knowledge of the Ixodidae tick fauna parasitizing birds in Western Europe and to the assessment of the prevalence of B. burgdorferi s.l. associated with birds and their ticks.

  15. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA) binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Liu, Song; Kim, Kwang-Min; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn) for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA), a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 μg/mL (250 μM). Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia. PMID:25709405

  16. In Vivo Imaging Demonstrates That Borrelia burgdorferi ospC Is Uniquely Expressed Temporally and Spatially throughout Experimental Infection.

    PubMed

    Skare, Jonathan T; Shaw, Dana K; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Hyde, Jenny A

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochetal bacterium transmitted by the Ixodes tick that causes Lyme disease in humans due to its ability to evade the host immune response and disseminate to multiple immunoprotective tissues. The pathogen undergoes dynamic genetic alterations important for adaptation from the tick vector to the mammalian host, but little is known regarding the changes at the transcriptional level within the distal tissues they colonize. In this study, B. burgdorferi infection and gene expression of the essential virulence determinant ospC was quantitatively monitored in a spatial and temporal manner utilizing reporter bioluminescent borrelial strains with in vivo and ex vivo imaging. Although expressed from a shuttle vector, the PospC-luc construct exhibited a similar expression pattern relative to native ospC. Bacterial burden in skin, inguinal lymph node, heart, bladder and tibiotarsal joint varied between tissues and fluctuated over the course of infection possibly in response to unique cues of each microenvironment. Expression of ospC, when normalized for changes in bacterial load, presented unique profiles in murine tissues at different time points. The inguinal lymph node was infected with a significant B. burgdorferi burden, but showed minimal ospC expression. B. burgdorferi infected skin and heart induced expression of ospC early during infection while the bladder and tibiotarsal joint continued to display PospC driven luminescence throughout the 21 day time course. Localized skin borrelial burden increased dramatically in the first 96 hours following inoculation, which was not paralleled with an increase in ospC expression, despite the requirement of ospC for dermal colonization. Quantitation of bioluminescence representing ospC expression in individual tissues was validated by qRT-PCR of the native ospC transcript. Taken together, the temporal regulation of ospC expression in distal tissues suggests a role for this virulence determinant beyond

  17. In Vivo Imaging Demonstrates That Borrelia burgdorferi ospC Is Uniquely Expressed Temporally and Spatially throughout Experimental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Skare, Jonathan T.; Shaw, Dana K.; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochetal bacterium transmitted by the Ixodes tick that causes Lyme disease in humans due to its ability to evade the host immune response and disseminate to multiple immunoprotective tissues. The pathogen undergoes dynamic genetic alterations important for adaptation from the tick vector to the mammalian host, but little is known regarding the changes at the transcriptional level within the distal tissues they colonize. In this study, B. burgdorferi infection and gene expression of the essential virulence determinant ospC was quantitatively monitored in a spatial and temporal manner utilizing reporter bioluminescent borrelial strains with in vivo and ex vivo imaging. Although expressed from a shuttle vector, the PospC-luc construct exhibited a similar expression pattern relative to native ospC. Bacterial burden in skin, inguinal lymph node, heart, bladder and tibiotarsal joint varied between tissues and fluctuated over the course of infection possibly in response to unique cues of each microenvironment. Expression of ospC, when normalized for changes in bacterial load, presented unique profiles in murine tissues at different time points. The inguinal lymph node was infected with a significant B. burgdorferi burden, but showed minimal ospC expression. B. burgdorferi infected skin and heart induced expression of ospC early during infection while the bladder and tibiotarsal joint continued to display PospC driven luminescence throughout the 21 day time course. Localized skin borrelial burden increased dramatically in the first 96 hours following inoculation, which was not paralleled with an increase in ospC expression, despite the requirement of ospC for dermal colonization. Quantitation of bioluminescence representing ospC expression in individual tissues was validated by qRT-PCR of the native ospC transcript. Taken together, the temporal regulation of ospC expression in distal tissues suggests a role for this virulence determinant beyond

  18. Detection of a Borrelia miyamotoi sensu lato relapsing-fever group spirochete from Ixodes pacificus in California.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jeomhee; Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Lane, Robert S

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether host-seeking nymphs and adults of the western blacklegged tick, Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls, the primary vector of Lyme disease spirochetes in far-western North America, are infected naturally with relapsing-fever group spirochetes in Mendocino County, California. Relapsing-fever group borreliae were detected in four (1.7%) of 234 nymphal and two (0.7%) of 282 adult host-seeking I. pacificus ticks by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and flagellin genes, respectively, exhibiting 99 and 98.5% sequence homology to Borrelia miyamotoi Fukunaga. Phylogenetic analysis based on these two genes revealed that the borreliae detected in these ticks belong to the relapsing-fever group and that these are closely related to, if not identical with, B. miyamotoi. PMID:16506458

  19. Culturing Borrelia burgdorferi from spleen and kidney tissues of wild-caught white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J F; Johnson, R C; Magnarelli, L A; Hyde, F W

    1986-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi was isolated most frequently from tissue of spleen (n = 13) and kidney (n = 10) and less often from blood (n = 5) of wild-caught Peromyscus leucopus. Prevalence of infection tended to be highest at sites where Lyme disease was most common (e.g., 5 of 6 mice were positive in East Haddam, Connecticut). Spirochetes were not isolated in Danbury or New Hartford, areas where this malady is rare. However, in Fairfield, where the disease is also uncommon, 4 of 9 mice were infected. Larval and nymphal I. dammini, containing borreliae, parasitized P. leucopus at all sites where B. burgdorferi was cultured from mice. Borreliae were also detected in D. variabilis feeding on hosts at two of the sites. P. leucopus appears to be an excellent animal to identify focal areas of B. burgdorferi.

  20. TLR3 drives IRF6-dependent IL-23p19 expression and p19/EBI3 heterodimer formation in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramnath, Divya; Tunny, Kathryn; Hohenhaus, Daniel M; Pitts, Claire M; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Hogarth, P Mark; Hamilton, John A; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sturm, Richard A; Scholz, Glen M; Sweet, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members impart cell-type specificity to toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling, and we recently identified a role for IRF6 in TLR2 signalling in epithelial cells. TLR3 has a well-characterized role in wound healing in the skin, and here, we examined TLR3-dependent IRF6 functions in human keratinocytes. Primary keratinocytes responded robustly to the TLR3 agonist poly(IC) with upregulation of mRNAs for interferon-β (IFN-β), the interleukin-12 (IL-12) family member IL-23p19 and the chemokines IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5). Silencing of IRF6 expression enhanced poly(IC)-inducible IFN-β mRNA levels and inhibited poly(IC)-inducible IL-23p19 mRNA expression in primary keratinocytes. Consistent with these data, co-transfection of IRF6 increased poly(IC)-inducible IL-23p19 promoter activity, but inhibited poly(IC)-inducible IFN-β promoter activity in reporter assays. Surprisingly, poly(IC) did not regulate IL-12p40 expression in keratinocytes, suggesting that TLR3-inducible IL-23p19 may have an IL-23-independent function in these cells. The only other IL-12 family member that was strongly poly(IC) inducible was EBI3, which has not been shown to heterodimerize with IL-23p19. Both co-immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays revealed that IL-23p19 and EBI3 interact in cells. Co-expression of IL-23p19 and EBI3, as compared with IL-23p19 alone, resulted in increased levels of secreted IL-23p19, implying a functional role for this heterodimer. In summary, we report that IRF6 regulates a subset of TLR3 responses in human keratinocytes, including the production of a novel IL-12 family heterodimer (p19/EBI3). We propose that the TLR3-IRF6-p19/EBI3 axis may regulate keratinocyte and/or immune cell functions in the context of cell damage and wound healing in the skin. PMID:26303210

  1. Interaction of mumps virus V protein variants with STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer: experimental and theoretical studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mumps virus V protein has the ability to inhibit the interferon-mediated antiviral response by inducing degradation of STAT proteins. Two virus variants purified from Urabe AM9 mumps virus vaccine differ in their replication and transcription efficiency in cells primed with interferon. Virus susceptibility to IFN was associated with insertion of a non-coded glycine at position 156 in the V protein (VGly) of one virus variant, whereas resistance to IFN was associated with preservation of wild-type phenotype in the V protein (VWT) of the other variant. Results VWT and VGly variants of mumps virus were cloned and sequenced from Urabe AM9 vaccine strain. VGly differs from VWT protein because it possesses an amino acid change Gln103Pro (Pro103) and the Gly156 insertion. The effect of V protein variants on components of the interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), STAT1 and STAT2 proteins were experimentally tested in cervical carcinoma cell lines. Expression of VWT protein decreased STAT1 phosphorylation, whereas VGly had no inhibitory effect on either STAT1 or STAT2 phosphorylation. For theoretical analysis of the interaction between V proteins and STAT proteins, 3D structural models of VWT and VGly were predicted by comparing with simian virus 5 (SV5) V protein structure in complex with STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer. In silico analysis showed that VWT-STAT1-STAT2 complex occurs through the V protein Trp-motif (W174, W178, W189) and Glu95 residue close to the Arg409 and Lys415 of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of STAT2, leaving exposed STAT1 Lys residues (K85, K87, K296, K413, K525, K679, K685), which are susceptible to proteasome degradation. In contrast, the interaction between VGly and STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer occurs in a region far from the NLS of STAT2 without blocking of Lys residues in both STAT1 and STAT2. Conclusions Our results suggest that VWT protein of Urabe AM9 strain of mumps virus may be more efficient than VGly to inactivate both the IFN

  2. Direct inhibition of c-Myc-Max heterodimers by celastrol and celastrol-inspired triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabo; Teriete, Peter; Hu, Angela; Raveendra-Panickar, Dhanya; Pendelton, Kelsey; Lazo, John S; Eiseman, Julie; Holien, Toril; Misund, Kristine; Oliynyk, Ganna; Arsenian-Henriksson, Marie; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Sundan, Anders; Prochownik, Edward V

    2015-10-20

    Many oncogenic signals originate from abnormal protein-protein interactions that are potential targets for small molecule inhibitors. However, the therapeutic disruption of these interactions has proved elusive. We report here that the naturally-occurring triterpenoid celastrol is an inhibitor of the c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein, which is over-expressed in many human cancers. Most Myc inhibitors prevent the association between Myc and its obligate heterodimerization partner Max via their respective bHLH-ZIP domains. In contrast, we show that celastrol binds to and alters the quaternary structure of the pre-formed dimer and abrogates its DNA binding. Celastrol contains a reactive quinone methide group that promiscuously forms Michael adducts with numerous target proteins and other free sulfhydryl-containing molecules. Interestingly, triterpenoid derivatives lacking the quinone methide showed enhanced specificity and potency against Myc. As with other Myc inhibitors, these analogs rapidly reduced the abundance of Myc protein and provoked a global energy crisis marked by ATP depletion, neutral lipid accumulation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also inhibited the proliferation of numerous established human cancer cell lines as well as primary myeloma explants that were otherwise resistant to JQ1, a potent indirect Myc inhibitor. N-Myc amplified neuroblastoma cells showed similar responses and, in additional, underwent neuronal differentiation. These studies indicate that certain pharmacologically undesirable properties of celastrol such as Michael adduct formation can be eliminated while increasing selectivity and potency toward Myc and N-Myc. This, together with their low in vivo toxicity, provides a strong rationale for pursuing the development of additional Myc-specific triterpenoid derivatives.

  3. TASK-1 and TASK-3 may form heterodimers in human atrial cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rinné, Susanne; Kiper, Aytug K; Schlichthörl, Günter; Dittmann, Sven; Netter, Michael F; Limberg, Sven H; Silbernagel, Nicole; Zuzarte, Marylou; Moosdorf, Rainer; Wulf, Hinnerk; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Rolfes, Caroline; Decher, Niels

    2015-04-01

    TASK-1 channels have emerged as promising drug targets against atrial fibrillation, the most common arrhythmia in the elderly. While TASK-3, the closest relative of TASK-1, was previously not described in cardiac tissue, we found a very prominent expression of TASK-3 in right human auricles. Immunocytochemistry experiments of human right auricular cardiomyocytes showed that TASK-3 is primarily localized at the plasma membrane. Single-channel recordings of right human auricles in the cell-attached mode, using divalent-cation-free solutions, revealed a TASK-1-like channel with a single-channel conductance of about 30pS. While homomeric TASK-3 channels were not found, we observed an intermediate single-channel conductance of about 55pS, possibly reflecting the heteromeric channel formed by TASK-1 and TASK-3. Subsequent experiments with TASK-1/TASK-3 tandem channels or with co-expressed TASK-1 and TASK-3 channels in HEK293 cells or Xenopus oocytes, supported that the 55pS channels observed in right auricles have electrophysiological characteristics of TASK-1/TASK-3 heteromers. In addition, co-expression experiments and single-channel recordings suggest that heteromeric TASK-1/TASK-3 channels have a predominant surface expression and a reduced affinity for TASK-1 blockers. In summary, the evidence for heteromeric TASK-1/TASK-3 channel complexes together with an altered pharmacologic response to TASK-1 blockers in vitro is likely to have further impact for studies isolating ITASK-1 from cardiomyocytes and for the development of drugs specifically targeting TASK-1 in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  4. Direct inhibition of c-Myc-Max heterodimers by celastrol and celastrol-inspired triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabo; Teriete, Peter; Hu, Angela; Raveendra-Panickar, Dhanya; Pendelton, Kelsey; Lazo, John S; Eiseman, Julie; Holien, Toril; Misund, Kristine; Oliynyk, Ganna; Arsenian-Henriksson, Marie; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Sundan, Anders; Prochownik, Edward V

    2015-10-20

    Many oncogenic signals originate from abnormal protein-protein interactions that are potential targets for small molecule inhibitors. However, the therapeutic disruption of these interactions has proved elusive. We report here that the naturally-occurring triterpenoid celastrol is an inhibitor of the c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein, which is over-expressed in many human cancers. Most Myc inhibitors prevent the association between Myc and its obligate heterodimerization partner Max via their respective bHLH-ZIP domains. In contrast, we show that celastrol binds to and alters the quaternary structure of the pre-formed dimer and abrogates its DNA binding. Celastrol contains a reactive quinone methide group that promiscuously forms Michael adducts with numerous target proteins and other free sulfhydryl-containing molecules. Interestingly, triterpenoid derivatives lacking the quinone methide showed enhanced specificity and potency against Myc. As with other Myc inhibitors, these analogs rapidly reduced the abundance of Myc protein and provoked a global energy crisis marked by ATP depletion, neutral lipid accumulation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also inhibited the proliferation of numerous established human cancer cell lines as well as primary myeloma explants that were otherwise resistant to JQ1, a potent indirect Myc inhibitor. N-Myc amplified neuroblastoma cells showed similar responses and, in additional, underwent neuronal differentiation. These studies indicate that certain pharmacologically undesirable properties of celastrol such as Michael adduct formation can be eliminated while increasing selectivity and potency toward Myc and N-Myc. This, together with their low in vivo toxicity, provides a strong rationale for pursuing the development of additional Myc-specific triterpenoid derivatives. PMID:26474287

  5. Expression and characterization of a heterodimer of Streptomyces chromofuscus phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongying; Roberts, Mary F

    2004-12-01

    Streptomyces chromofuscus phospholipase D (PLD) is secreted by the bacterium and proteolytically cleaved to a more active form (PLD(37/18)) where the two parts of the molecule are still tightly associated. Based on previous sequencing results of authentic PLD(37/18), we have constructed a vector consisting of separate ORFs for the N-terminal and C-terminal portions of S. chromofuscus PLD and overexpressed active heterodimeric PLD. Neither fragment cloned separately folded properly. The identity of each peptide was confirmed by peptide-mass fingerprinting with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The recombinant complex had a specific activity about six times higher than that of the recombinant intact PLD enzyme and was no longer activated by phosphatidic acid (PA). Phosphotransferase activity, binding affinity to phospholipid vesicles, loss of product activation, pH profile and pH-related Ca(2+) activation and inhibition were comparable to authentic PLD(37/18) purified from S. chromofuscus growth medium. PLD(37) alone could also be isolated; the enzyme was active but not as stable as PLD(37/18). These experimental results strongly support the hypothesis that the C-terminal peptide is necessary for correct folding and insertion of catalytic metal ions. However, they suggest the ligands involved in Fe(3+) coordination must be altered upon cleavage of the protein. Asp389, in the C-terminal fragment, whose replacement impairs Fe(3+) binding to the protein, must be replaced by another ligand, since the N-terminal fragment, once folded, is active. In the process of cloning the two peptides, the complete signal sequence for this protein was also determined. The signal peptide of S. chromofuscus PLD enzyme contained a twin arginine motif suggesting that S. chromofuscus PLD, like Bacillus subtilis phoD, is most likely secreted by the TAT translocation pathway under the transcriptional control of the pho regulon.

  6. Direct inhibition of c-Myc-Max heterodimers by celastrol and celastrol-inspired triterpenoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huabo; Teriete, Peter; Hu, Angela; Raveendra-Panickar, Dhanya; Pendelton, Kelsey; Lazo, John S.; Eiseman, Julie; Holien, Toril; Misund, Kristine; Oliynyk, Ganna; Arsenian-Henriksson, Marie; Cosford, Nicholas D. P; Sundan, Anders; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    Many oncogenic signals originate from abnormal protein-protein interactions that are potential targets for small molecule inhibitors. However, the therapeutic disruption of these interactions has proved elusive. We report here that the naturally-occurring triterpenoid celastrol is an inhibitor of the c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein, which is over-expressed in many human cancers. Most Myc inhibitors prevent the association between Myc and its obligate heterodimerization partner Max via their respective bHLH-ZIP domains. In contrast, we show that celastrol binds to and alters the quaternary structure of the pre-formed dimer and abrogates its DNA binding. Celastrol contains a reactive quinone methide group that promiscuously forms Michael adducts with numerous target proteins and other free sulfhydryl-containing molecules. Interestingly, triterpenoid derivatives lacking the quinone methide showed enhanced specificity and potency against Myc. As with other Myc inhibitors, these analogs rapidly reduced the abundance of Myc protein and provoked a global energy crisis marked by ATP depletion, neutral lipid accumulation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also inhibited the proliferation of numerous established human cancer cell lines as well as primary myeloma explants that were otherwise resistant to JQ1, a potent indirect Myc inhibitor. N-Myc amplified neuroblastoma cells showed similar responses and, in additional, underwent neuronal differentiation. These studies indicate that certain pharmacologically undesirable properties of celastrol such as Michael adduct formation can be eliminated while increasing selectivity and potency toward Myc and N-Myc. This, together with their low in vivo toxicity, provides a strong rationale for pursuing the development of additional Myc-specific triterpenoid derivatives. PMID:26474287

  7. [An experimental study of the capacity of the rat mite Ornithonyssus bacoti (Hirst, 1913) to ingest, maintain and transmit Borrelia].

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Iu V; Vasil'eva, I S; Gutova, V P; Ershova, A S; Burakova, O V; Naumov, R L; Petrova, A D

    1999-01-01

    For the first time a possibility of the gamasina mites' O. bacoti participation in Lyme disease spirochetes' circulation has been demonstrated. It has been experimentally shown that Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. are received by O. bacoti, survive in them for at least 21 days and are transmitted to white mice through mites' bites. Mice's infestation has occurred in 23% of cases. It is suggested that other bloodsucking gamasina mites inhabiting the Lyme borreliosis reservoir rodents nests may be capable of participating in borrelia circulation in the Lyme disease endemic areas. PMID:10703202

  8. Comparison of detection of Borrelia burgdorferi DNA and anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in patients with erythema migrans in north-eastern Poland

    PubMed Central

    Dunaj, Justyna; Zajkowska, Joanna; Czupryna, Piotr; Świerzbińska, Renata; Guziejko, Katarzyna; Aleksiejczuk, Piotr; Barry, Gerald; Kondrusik, Maciej; Pancewicz, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diagnostic methods in erythema migrans are still not standardized. Aim To evaluate the frequency of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. DNA presence in patients with erythema migrans (EM); to assess the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure for detecting B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA in patients with the skin form of Lyme borreliosis; and to compare the results of the PCR-based method with the traditional ELISA method. Material and methods Skin biopsy and blood samples from 93 patients with EM were examined for B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA detection (PCR). Seventy-one of these patients were examined for the presence of anti-B. burgdorferi s.l. antibodies (ELISA). Results Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. DNA was detected in 48% of the skin biopsy specimens and in 2% of blood samples. Only 1 patient was PCR positive in both blood and skin samples. Seventy percent of patients whose PCR results were positive were bitten by a tick less than 14 days before. IgM anti-B. burgdorferi s.l – specific antibodies were present in the serum of 35% of patients and IgG antibodies – in 30% of patients. Seventeen percent were positive in both IgM and IgG. Conclusions Polymerase chain reaction of skin biopsy specimens seems to be currently the most sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of patients with EM, especially in patients with a short duration of the disease (< 14 days) but still its effectiveness is much lower than expected. Polymerase chain reaction of blood samples cannot be recommended at the present time for the routine diagnostic of patients with EM. PMID:25821421

  9. Investigations on the mode and dynamics of transmission and infectivity of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia afzelii in Ixodes ricinus ticks.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Mara; Rais, Olivier; Gern, Lise

    2002-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (sl), the agent of Lyme disease, is transmitted to the host during the blood meal of Ixodes ticks. In most unfed ticks, spirochetes are present in the midgut and migrate during blood feeding to the salivary glands, from which they are transmitted to the host via saliva. In the present study, the efficiency of Ixodes ricinus ticks to transmit B. afzelii and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (ss) and their infectivity for mice were examined in relation to the duration of the blood meal. In addition, we investigated whether these two Borrelia species can penetrate intact skin. Three modes of infection of mice were studied: tick-bite infection, inoculation of tick homogenates, and transcutaneous infection by topical application of tick homogenates on mouse skin. Transmission of B. burgdorferi sl from I. ricinus nymphs to mouse increased with duration of tick attachment. B. afzelii-infected ticks start to transmit infection earlier (< or = 48 h) than B. burgdorferi ss-infected ticks. As previously shown for B. burgdorferi ss in Ixodes scapularis, B. burgdorferi ss and B. afzelii in unfed I. ricinus were noninfectious for mice when tick homogenates were inoculated. However, the inoculation of homogenates of ticks fed for 24 h readily produced infection in mice. Therefore, B. burgdorferi ss and B. afzelii spirochetes are potentially infectious in the tick before natural transmission can occur. None of the mice (n = 33) became infected by transcutaneous transmission when tick homogenates were applied on mouse skin, showing that B. burgdorferi ss and B. afzelii are unable to penetrate intact skin, in contrast to relapsing fever spirochetes. This study also shows that B. afzelii is transmitted by I. ricinus to the host earlier than B. burgdorferi ss and that I. ricinus seems to be a more efficient vector of B. afzelii than B. burgdorferi ss.

  10. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  11. Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner inhibits angiotensin II- stimulated PAI-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Seo, Hye-Young; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Min, Ae-Kyung; Ryu, Seong-Yeol; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Park, Young Joo; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, Ki-Up; Park, Wan-Ju; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2010-01-31

    Angiotensin II is a major effector molecule in the development of cardiovascular disease. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), angiotensin II promotes cellular proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation through the upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression. Previously, we demonstrated that small heterodimer partner (SHP) represses PAI-1 expression in the liver through the inhibition of TGF-beta signaling pathways. Here, we investigated whether SHP inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated PAI-1 expression in VSMCs. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of SHP (Ad- SHP) in VSMCs inhibited angiotensin II- and TGF-beta-stimulated PAI-1 expression. Ad-SHP also inhibited angiotensin II-, TGF-beta- and Smad3-stimulated PAI-1 promoter activity, and angiotensin II-stimulated AP-1 activity. The level of PAI-1 expression was significantly higher in VSMCs of SHP(-/-) mice than wild type mice. Moreover, loss of SHP increased PAI-1 mRNA expression after angiotensin II treatment. These results suggest that SHP inhibits PAI-1 expression in VSMCs through the suppression of TGF-beta/Smad3 and AP-1 activity. Thus, agents that target the induction of SHP expression in VSMCs might help prevent the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  12. Phosphorylation of Ku70 subunit by cell cycle kinases modulates the replication related function of Ku heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumita; Chakraborty, Prabal; Saha, Partha

    2016-09-19

    The Ku protein, a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, binds to chromosomal replication origins maximally at G1-phase and plays an essential role in assembly of origin recognition complex. However, the mechanism regulating such a critical periodic activity of Ku remained unknown. Here, we establish human Ku70 as a novel target of cyclin B1-Cdk1, which phosphorylates it in a Cy-motif dependent manner. Interestingly, cyclin E1- and A2-Cdk2 also phosphorylate Ku70, and as a result, the protein remains in a phosphorylated state during S-M phases of cell cycle. Intriguingly, the phosphorylation of Ku70 by cyclin-Cdks abolishes the interaction of Ku protein with replication origin due to disruption of the dimer. Furthermore, Ku70 is dephosphorylated in G1-phase, when Ku interacts with replication origin maximally. Strikingly, the over-expression of Ku70 with non-phosphorylable Cdk targets enhances the episomal replication of Ors8 origin and induces rereplication in HeLa cells, substantiating a preventive role of Ku phosphorylation in premature and untimely licensing of replication origin. Therefore, periodic phosphorylation of Ku70 by cyclin-Cdks prevents the interaction of Ku with replication origin after initiation events in S-phase and the dephosphorylation at the end of mitosis facilitates its participation in pre-replication complex formation. PMID:27402161

  13. Structure of the Human Atg13-Atg101 HORMA Heterodimer: an Interaction Hub within the ULK1 Complex.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shiqian; Kim, Do Jin; Stjepanovic, Goran; Hurley, James H

    2015-10-01

    The ULK1 complex, consisting of the ULK1 protein kinase itself, FIP200, Atg13, and Atg101, controls the initiation of autophagy in animals. We determined the structure of the complex of the human Atg13 HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, Mad2) domain in complex with the full-length HORMA domain-only protein Atg101. The two HORMA domains assemble with an architecture conserved in the Mad2 conformational heterodimer and the S. pombe Atg13-Atg101 HORMA complex. The WF finger motif that is essential for function in human Atg101 is sequestered in a hydrophobic pocket, suggesting that the exposure of this motif is regulated. Benzamidine molecules from the crystallization solution mark two hydrophobic pockets that are conserved in, and unique to, animals, and are suggestive of sites that could interact with other proteins. These features suggest that the activity of the animal Atg13-Atg101 subcomplex is regulated and that it is an interaction hub for multiple partners.

  14. Effects of coating molecules on the magnetic heating properties of Au-Fe3O4 heterodimer nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Ogasawara, J.; Himukai, H.; Itoh, T.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report the heating properties of gold-magnetite (Au-Fe3O4) heterodimer nanoparticles (NPs) subjected to an alternating magnetic field. The Au-Fe3O4 NPs coated with oleic acid and oleylamine (OA) were synthesized through a method that combines seed mediation and high-temperature decomposition. The coating was replaced with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) by the ligand-exchange method. The specific absorption rates (SARs) for the OA- and DMSA-coated Au-Fe3O4 NPs coated with OA and DMSA at room temperature were determined through the calorimetric and magnetometric methods. SAR depended on the square of the magnetic field H up to an H value of 4 kA/m. The absolute value of the SAR for DMSA-coated NPs is about fivefold higher than that of the OA-coated NPs. The AC magnetic hysteresis measurements showed the recovery of the magnetic volume and the decrease in the magnetic anisotropy of the DMSA-coated NPs relative to those of the OA-coated NPs. These results suggest that the protective agent influences the magnetic properties of magnetite NPs via gold NPs.

  15. Phosphorylation of Ku70 subunit by cell cycle kinases modulates the replication related function of Ku heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Soumita; Chakraborty, Prabal; Saha, Partha

    2016-01-01

    The Ku protein, a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, binds to chromosomal replication origins maximally at G1-phase and plays an essential role in assembly of origin recognition complex. However, the mechanism regulating such a critical periodic activity of Ku remained unknown. Here, we establish human Ku70 as a novel target of cyclin B1-Cdk1, which phosphorylates it in a Cy-motif dependent manner. Interestingly, cyclin E1- and A2-Cdk2 also phosphorylate Ku70, and as a result, the protein remains in a phosphorylated state during S-M phases of cell cycle. Intriguingly, the phosphorylation of Ku70 by cyclin-Cdks abolishes the interaction of Ku protein with replication origin due to disruption of the dimer. Furthermore, Ku70 is dephosphorylated in G1-phase, when Ku interacts with replication origin maximally. Strikingly, the over-expression of Ku70 with non-phosphorylable Cdk targets enhances the episomal replication of Ors8 origin and induces rereplication in HeLa cells, substantiating a preventive role of Ku phosphorylation in premature and untimely licensing of replication origin. Therefore, periodic phosphorylation of Ku70 by cyclin-Cdks prevents the interaction of Ku with replication origin after initiation events in S-phase and the dephosphorylation at the end of mitosis facilitates its participation in pre-replication complex formation. PMID:27402161

  16. Borrelia garinii Induces CXCL13 Production in Human Monocytes through Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Tobias A.; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Popp, Bernadette; Kastenbauer, Stefan; Fingerle, Volker; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Koedel, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested an important role for the B-cell-attracting chemokine CXCL13 in the B-cell-dominated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infiltrate in patients with neuroborreliosis (NB). High levels of CXCL13 were present in the CSF of NB patients. It has not been clear, however, whether high CSF CXCL13 titers are specific for NB or are a characteristic of other spirochetal diseases as well. Furthermore, the mechanisms leading to the observed CXCL13 expression have not been identified yet. Here we describe similarly elevated CSF CXCL13 levels in patients with neurosyphilis, while pneumococcal meningitis patient CSF do not have high CXCL13 levels. In parallel, challenge of human monocytes in vitro with two of the spirochetal causative organisms, Borrelia garinii (the Borrelia species most frequently found in NB patients) and Treponema pallidum, but not challenge with pneumococci, induced CXCL13 release. This finding implies that a common spirochetal motif is a CXCL13 inducer. Accordingly, we found that the lipid moiety N-palmitoyl-S-(bis[palmitoyloxy]propyl)cystein (Pam3C) (three palmitoyl residues bound to N-terminal cysteine) of the spirochetal lipoproteins is critical for the CXCL13 induction in monocytes. As the Pam3C motif is known to signal via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and an anti-TLR2 monoclonal antibody blocked CXCL13 production of human monocytes incubated with B. garinii, this suggests that TLR2 is a major mediator of Borrelia-induced secretion of CXCL13 from human monocytes. PMID:17562761

  17. "Candidatus Borrelia kalaharica" Detected from a Febrile Traveller Returning to Germany from Vacation in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wächtler, Martin; Margos, Gabriele; Ruske, Sabine; Jung, Jette; Löscher, Thomas; Wendtner, Clemens; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A 26 year-old female patient presented to the Tropical Medicine outpatient unit of the Ludwig Maximilians-University in Munich with febrile illness after returning from Southern Africa, where she contracted a bite by a large mite-like arthropod, most likely a soft-tick. Spirochetes were detected in Giemsa stained blood smears and treatment was started with doxycycline for suspected tick-borne relapsing fever. The patient eventually recovered after developing a slight Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction during therapy. PCR reactions performed from EDTA-blood revealed a 16S rRNA sequence with 99.4% similarity to both, Borrelia duttonii, and B. parkeri. Further sequences obtained from the flagellin gene (flaB) demonstrated genetic distances of 0.066 and 0.097 to B. parkeri and B. duttonii, respectively. Fragments of the uvrA gene revealed genetic distance of 0.086 to B. hermsii in genetic analysis and only distant relations with classic Old World relapsing fever species. This revealed the presence of a novel species of tick-borne relapsing fever spirochetes that we propose to name “Candidatus Borrelia kalaharica”, as it was contracted from an arthropod bite in the Kalahari Desert belonging to both, Botswana and Namibia, a region where to our knowledge no relapsing fever has been described so far. Interestingly, the novel species shows more homology to New World relapsing fever Borrelia such as B. parkeri or B. hermsii than to known Old World species such as B. duttonii or B. crocidurae. PMID:27031729

  18. Evidence that two ATP-dependent (Lon) proteases in Borrelia burgdorferi serve different functions.

    PubMed

    Coleman, James L; Katona, Laura I; Kuhlow, Christopher; Toledo, Alvaro; Okan, Nihal A; Tokarz, Rafal; Benach, Jorge L

    2009-11-01

    The canonical ATP-dependent protease Lon participates in an assortment of biological processes in bacteria, including the catalysis of damaged or senescent proteins and short-lived regulatory proteins. Borrelia spirochetes are unusual in that they code for two putative ATP-dependent Lon homologs, Lon-1 and Lon-2. Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is transmitted through the blood feeding of Ixodes ticks. Previous work in our laboratory reported that B. burgdorferi lon-1 is upregulated transcriptionally by exposure to blood in vitro, while lon-2 is not. Because blood induction of Lon-1 may be of importance in the regulation of virulence factors critical for spirochete transmission, the clarification of functional roles for these two proteases in B. burgdorferi was the object of this study. On the chromosome, lon-2 is immediately downstream of ATP-dependent proteases clpP and clpX, an arrangement identical to that of lon of Escherichia coli. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Lon-1 and Lon-2 cluster separately due to differences in the NH(2)-terminal substrate binding domains that may reflect differences in substrate specificity. Recombinant Lon-1 manifested properties of an ATP-dependent chaperone-protease in vitro but did not complement an E. coli Lon mutant, while Lon-2 corrected two characteristic Lon-mutant phenotypes. We conclude that B. burgdorferi Lons -1 and -2 have distinct functional roles. Lon-2 functions in a manner consistent with canonical Lon, engaged in cellular homeostasis. Lon-1, by virtue of its blood induction, and as a unique feature of the Borreliae, may be important in host adaptation from the arthropod to a warm-blooded host.

  19. Novel methods for surveying reservoir hosts and vectors of Borrelia burgdorferi in Northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Veronica Aili

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in North America and presents challenges to clinicians, researchers and the public in diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, which is a zoonotic pathogen obligate upon hematophagous arthropod vectors and propagates in small mammal reservoir hosts. Identifying factors governing zoonotic diseases within regions of high-risk provides local health and agricultural agencies with necessary information to formulate public policy and implement treatment protocols to abate the rise and expansion of infectious disease outbreaks. In the United States, the documented primary reservoir host of Lyme disease is the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus, and the arthropod vector is the deer tick, Ixodes scapularis. Reducing the impact of Lyme disease will need novel methods for identifying both the reservoir host and the tick vector. The reservoir host, Peromyscus leucopus is difficult to distinguish from the virtually identical Peromyscus maniculatus that also is present in Northern Minnesota, a region where Lyme disease is endemic. Collection of the Ixodes tick, the Lyme disease vector, is difficult as this is season dependent and differs from year to year. This study develops new strategies to assess the extent of Borrelia burgdorferi in the local environment of Northern Minnesota. A selective and precise method to identify Peromyscus species was developed. This assay provides a reliable and definitive method to identify the reservoir host, Peromyscus leucopus from a physically identical and sympatric Peromyscus species, Peromyscus maniculatus. A new strategy to collect ticks for measuring the disbursement of Borrelia was employed. Students from local high schools were recruited to collect ticks. This strategy increased the available manpower to cover greater terrain, provided students with valuable experience in research methodology, and highlighted the

  20. Phylogeny of a relapsing fever Borrelia species transmitted by the hard tick Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of Borrelia species that were related to the agents of relapsing fever but were transmitted by hard ticks rather than soft ticks challenged previous taxonomies based largely on microbe-host specificities and geographic considerations. One of these newly-identified organisms is the Borrelia miyamotoi sensu lato strain LB-2001 from North America and transmitted by Ixodes scapularis. This or related strains have been identified as the cause of human disease, but comparatively little is known about their biology or genetics. Using recently acquired chromosome sequence of LB-2001 together with database sequences and additional sequences determined here, I carried out comparisons of the several species of Borrelia, including those in the two major clades: the relapsing fever group of species and the Lyme disease group of species. Phylogenetic inference at the species level was based on four data sets: whole chromosomes of ~1 Mb each, and concatenated sequences of 19 ribosomal protein genes, 3 conserved nucleic acid enzymes (rpoC, recC, and dnaE), and 4 contiguous genes for nucleotide salvage on a large plasmid. Analyses using neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods were largely concordant for each of the trees. They showed that LB-2001 and related hard tick-associated organisms, like B. lonestari, are deeply positioned within the RF group of species and that these organisms did not, as some earlier estimations had suggested, constitute a paraphyletic group. The analyses also provided further evidence that major changes in host ranges and life cycles, such as hard to soft ticks or vice versa, may not correlate well with overall sequence differences. The genetic differences between LB-2001 and B. miyamotoi sensu stricto justify provisional use of the “sensu lato” designation for LB-2001. PMID:24813576

  1. Borrelia burgdorferi Not Confirmed in Human-Biting Amblyomma americanum Ticks from the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Nadolny, Robyn M.; Gibbons, Jennifer A.; Auckland, Lisa D.; Vince, Mary A.; Elkins, Chad E.; Murphy, Michael P.; Hickling, Graham J.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Carolan, Heather E.; Crowder, Chris D.; Pilgard, Mark A.; Hamer, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    The predominant human-biting tick throughout the southeastern United States is Amblyomma americanum. Its ability to transmit pathogens causing Lyme disease-like illnesses is a subject of ongoing controversy. Results of previous testing by the Department of Defense Human Tick Test Kit Program and other laboratories indicated that it is highly unlikely that A. americanum transmits any pathogen that causes Lyme disease. In contrast, a recent publication by Clark and colleagues (K. L. Clark, B. Leydet, and S. Hartman, Int. J. Med. Sci. 10:915–931, 2013) reported detection of Lyme group Borrelia in A. americanum using a nested-flagellin-gene PCR. We evaluated this assay by using it and other assays to test 1,097 A. americanum ticks collected from humans. Using the Clark assay, in most samples we observed nonspecific amplification and nonrepeatability of results on subsequent testing of samples. Lack of reaction specificity and repeatability is consistent with mispriming, likely due to high primer concentrations and low annealing temperatures in this protocol. In six suspect-positive samples, Borrelia lonestari was identified by sequencing of an independent gene region; this is not a Lyme group spirochete and is not considered zoonotic. B. burgdorferi was weakly amplified from one pool using some assays, but not others, and attempts to sequence the amplicon of this pool failed, as did attempts to amplify and sequence B. burgdorferi from the five individual samples comprising this pool. Therefore, B. burgdorferi was not confirmed in any sample. Our results do not support the hypothesis that A. americanum ticks are a vector for Lyme group Borrelia infections. PMID:25788545

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Borrelia afzelii K78 and Comparative Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Wolfgang; Bunikis, Ignas; Weber-Lehman, Jacqueline; Comstedt, Pär; Kutschan-Bunikis, Sabrina; Stanek, Gerold; Huber, Jutta; Meinke, Andreas; Bergström, Sven; Lundberg, Urban

    2015-01-01

    The main Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe and Asia are Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi and B. bavariensis. This is in contrast to the United States, where infections are exclusively caused by B. burgdorferi. Until to date the genome sequences of four B. afzelii strains, of which only two include the numerous plasmids, are available. In order to further assess the genetic diversity of B. afzelii, the most common species in Europe, responsible for the large variety of clinical manifestations of Lyme borreliosis, we have determined the full genome sequence of the B. afzelii strain K78, a clinical isolate from Austria. The K78 genome contains a linear chromosome (905,949 bp) and 13 plasmids (8 linear and 5 circular) together presenting 1,309 open reading frames of which 496 are located on plasmids. With the exception of lp28-8, all linear replicons in their full length including their telomeres have been sequenced. The comparison with the genomes of the four other B. afzelii strains, ACA-1, PKo, HLJ01 and Tom3107, as well as the one of B. burgdorferi strain B31, confirmed a high degree of conservation within the linear chromosome of B. afzelii, whereas plasmid encoded genes showed a much larger diversity. Since some plasmids present in B. burgdorferi are missing in the B. afzelii genomes, the corresponding virulence factors of B. burgdorferi are found in B. afzelii on other unrelated plasmids. In addition, we have identified a species specific region in the circular plasmid, cp26, which could be used for species determination. Different non-coding RNAs have been located on the B. afzelii K78 genome, which have not previously been annotated in any of the published Borrelia genomes. PMID:25798594

  3. High-throughput plasmid content analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi B31 by using Luminex multiplex technology.

    PubMed

    Norris, Steven J; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Odeh, Evelyn A; Lin, Tao; Gao, Lihui; Edmondson, Diane G

    2011-02-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease in North America, is an invasive pathogen that causes persistent multiorgan manifestations in humans and other mammals. Genetic studies of this bacterium are complicated by the presence of multiple plasmid replicons, many of which are readily lost during in vitro culture. The analysis of B. burgdorferi plasmid content by plasmid-specific PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis or other existing techniques is informative, but these techniques are cumbersome and challenging to perform in a high-throughput manner. In this study, a PCR-based Luminex assay was developed for determination of the plasmid content of the strain B. burgdorferi B31. This multiplex, high-throughput method allows simultaneous detection of the plasmid contents of many B. burgdorferi strains in a 96-well format. The procedure was used to evaluate the occurrence of plasmid loss in 44 low-passage B. burgdorferi B31 clones and in a library of over 4,000 signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) transposon mutant clones. This analysis indicated that only 40% of the clones contained all plasmids, with (in order of decreasing frequency) lp5, lp56, lp28-1, lp25, cp9, lp28-4, lp28-2, and lp21 being the most commonly missing plasmids. These results further emphasize the need for careful plasmid analysis in Lyme disease Borrelia studies. Adaptations of this approach may also be useful in the evaluation of plasmid content and chromosomal gene variations in additional Lyme disease Borrelia strains and other organisms with variable genomes and in the correlation of these genetic differences with pathogenesis and other biological properties.

  4. Molecular characterization of the p100 gene of Borrelia burgdorferi strain PKo.

    PubMed

    Jauris-Heipke, S; Fuchs, R; Hofmann, A; Lottspeich, F; Preac-Mursic, V; Soutschek, E; Will, G; Wilske, B

    1993-12-01

    The p100 gene coding for the p100 protein of Borrelia burgdorferi strain PKo has been cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. An open reading frame including upstream and downstream sequences with potential translation and transcription signals could be identified. The reading frame consists of 1989 nucleotides corresponding to a protein of 663 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 75.8 kDa. The protein has a leader peptide and is processed without modification at the N-terminus. A high percentage of amino acid sequence identity could be found to the high-molecular mass protein p83/p93 of B. burgdorferi strain B31.

  5. Geographic uniformity of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) and its shared history with tick vector (Ixodes scapularis) in the Northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei-Gang; Dykhuizen, Daniel E; Acosta, Michael S; Luft, Benjamin J

    2002-03-01

    Over 80% of reported cases of Lyme disease in the United States occur in coastal regions of northeastern and mid-Atlantic states. The genetic structure of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) and its main tick vector (Ixodes scapularis) was studied concurrently and comparatively by sampling natural populations of I. scapularis ticks along the East Coast from 1996 to 1998. Borrelia is genetically highly diverse at the outer surface protein ospC. Since Borrelia is highly clonal, the ospC alleles can be used to define clones. A newly designed reverse line blotting (RLB) assay shows that up to 10 Borrelia clones can infect a single tick. The clone frequencies in Borrelia populations are the same across the Northeast. On the other hand, I. scapularis populations show strong regional divergence (among northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and southern states) as well as local differentiation. The high genetic diversity within Borrelia populations and the disparity in the genetic structure between Borrelia and its tick vector are likely consequences of strong balancing selection on local Borrelia clones. Demographically, both Borrelia and I. scapularis populations in the Northeast show the characteristics of a species that has recently expanded from a population bottleneck. Major geological and ecological events, such as the last glacial maximum (18,000 years ago) and the modern-day expansion of tick habitats, are likely causes of the observed "founder effects" for the two organisms in the Northeast. We therefore conclude that the genetic structure of B. burgdorferi has been intimately shaped by the natural history of its main vector, the northern lineage of I. scapularis ticks. PMID:11901105

  6. Serum antibodies against Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and the 41-kiloDalton flagellin in patients from a Lyme borreliosis endemic area: analysis by EIA and immunoblot.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, I; von Rosen, I A

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the possible importance of antigenic heterogeneity in the serological diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis a study was performed using antigens from various Lyme Borrelia strains. Serum samples from 102 patients with clinical signs of the infection, all living in an endemic area in southern Sweden, were evaluated by four enzyme immuno assays (EIA). The sera were initially tested for the immunoglobulin G response to antigens from a local Borrelia afzelii strain (ACA1). Serum samples from healthy blood donors residing in the same region were used to define seropositivity in the ACAI-EIA. Immunoblotting was performed with the ACAI antigen and the reactive bands were analysed. A serum was defined as positive when at least four of the Borrelia specific polypeptides (OspC, OspA, OspB, p39, p41 [flagellin], p83, p94, 110kDa) were stained. The same sera were then analysed in three other IgG enzyme immunoassays, one based on antigens from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto B31, and another on pooled protein fractions from strains B31 and ACAI. In the third EIA, sera were analysed for antiflagellin reactivity (B, afzelii strain DK-1). An inconstant immune response was demonstrated in the EIAs and the seropositivity varied between 30-47% when low positive values were excluded, and between 38-73% if all values were included. Fifty sera (50/102) met the criteria for a positive immunoblot, but positive immunoblots were detected with both low positive and negative sera independent of antigen used in the EIAs. Antigens of the local B. afzelii strain were found to detect a higher number of seropositive individuals, which suggests that the antibody reactivity to Lyme Borrelia increases when antigens from a strain endemic in a particular geographical region are used. Data from this study suggest that EIA alone seems insufficient for the serodiagnosis, and antigenic heterogeneity of Lyme Borrelia spp. influences the performance of serum antibody tests. The reliability of

  7. Novel relapsing fever Borrelia detected in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus) admitted to two rehabilitation centers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Yabsley, Michael J; Parsons, Nola J; Horne, Elizabeth C; Shock, Barbara C; Purdee, Michaelle

    2012-03-01

    The African penguin, Spheniscus demersus, the only penguin species that breeds in Africa, is endangered, and several diseases including avian malaria, babesiosis, and aspergillosis are common in some populations. From 2002 to 2010, spirochetes morphologically consistent with Borrelia were observed on thin blood smears from 115 of 8,343 (1.4%) African penguins admitted to rehabilitation centers in the Western Cape and Eastern Cape provinces of South Africa. Prevalence rates were significantly higher among chicks and juveniles compared with adults and for birds sampled during the summer months of October to February compared with winter months. The majority of infected birds were ultimately released, despite lack of antibiotic treatment; however, at least one bird is believed to have died of borreliosis based on characteristic gross and microscopic lesions. Analysis of partial flaB gene sequences indicated this was a relapsing fever Borrelia most similar to a Borrelia sp. detected in soft ticks from a seabird colony in Japan. This represents the fourth report of a relapsing fever Borrelia sp. in an avian species and highlights the need for additional studies of potentially pathogenic organisms infecting the African penguin in South Africa. PMID:21870246

  8. Neutrophil extracellular traps entrap and kill Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto spirochetes and are not affected by Ixodes ricinus tick saliva.

    PubMed

    Menten-Dedoyart, Catherine; Faccinetto, Céline; Golovchenko, Maryna; Dupiereux, Ingrid; Van Lerberghe, Pierre-Bernard; Dubois, Sophie; Desmet, Christophe; Elmoualij, Benaissa; Baron, Frédéric; Rudenko, Nataliia; Oury, Cécile; Heinen, Ernst; Couvreur, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Lyme disease is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. They are transmitted mainly by Ixodes ricinus ticks. After a few hours of infestation, neutrophils massively infiltrate the bite site. They can kill Borrelia via phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and hydrolytic enzymes. However, factors in tick saliva promote propagation of the bacteria in the host even in the presence of a large number of neutrophils. The neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) consists in the extrusion of the neutrophil's own DNA, forming traps that can retain and kill bacteria. The production of reactive oxygen species is apparently associated with the onset of NETs (NETosis). In this article, we describe NET formation at the tick bite site in vivo in mice. We show that Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto spirochetes become trapped and killed by NETs in humans and that the bacteria do not seem to release significant nucleases to evade this process. Saliva from I. ricinus did not affect NET formation by human neutrophils or its stability. However, it greatly decreased neutrophil reactive oxygen species production, suggesting that a strong decrease of hydrogen peroxide does not affect NET formation. Finally, round bodies trapped in NETs were observed, some of them staining as live bacteria. This observation could help contribute to a better understanding of the early steps of Borrelia invasion and erythema migrans formation after tick bite. PMID:23109724

  9. [Study on the infection of taiga ticks with Borrelia in the territory of Novosibirsk Scientific Center SB PAS].

    PubMed

    Borgoiakov, V Iu; Fomenko, N V; Panov, V V; Chikova, E D

    2010-01-01

    In our study, Borrelia were revealed in the taiga ticks Ixodes persulcatus collected on vegetation by flagging, as well as in the ticks removed from the people who asked for help in the vaccination center located in the Novosibirsk Scientific Center of the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science (NS SB RAS). By the isolation of Borrelia on BSK-H medum, the occurrence of B. garinii, B. afzelii, and B. miyamotoi was established in the territory of NSC. B. miyamotoi isolates were unstable and lost their ability to growth in later passages. DNA of the same three species of Borrelia was detected by PCR in the samples of ticks, both collected on vegetation by flagging and removed from humans. DNA of B. garinii was recorded most often; DNA of B. afzelii was less frequent; and the least number of positive samples was shown for B. miyamotoi. In the ticks collected on vegetation by flagging, DNA of B. garinii was found in 38.6%, B. afzelii in 9.9%, and B. miyamoboi in 3.9% of samples. In the ticks removed from people, number of positive samples was lesser; so, DNA of B. garinii was detected in 24.2%, B. afzelii in 6.9%, and B. miyamotoi in 5.6% of samples. Mixed infection with two Borrelia species was recorded, and DNA of B. mivamnotoi more often detected simultaneously with DNA of B. garinii.

  10. Novel relapsing fever Borrelia detected in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus) admitted to two rehabilitation centers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Yabsley, Michael J; Parsons, Nola J; Horne, Elizabeth C; Shock, Barbara C; Purdee, Michaelle

    2012-03-01

    The African penguin, Spheniscus demersus, the only penguin species that breeds in Africa, is endangered, and several diseases including avian malaria, babesiosis, and aspergillosis are common in some populations. From 2002 to 2010, spirochetes morphologically consistent with Borrelia were observed on thin blood smears from 115 of 8,343 (1.4%) African penguins admitted to rehabilitation centers in the Western Cape and Eastern Cape provinces of South Africa. Prevalence rates were significantly higher among chicks and juveniles compared with adults and for birds sampled during the summer months of October to February compared with winter months. The majority of infected birds were ultimately released, despite lack of antibiotic treatment; however, at least one bird is believed to have died of borreliosis based on characteristic gross and microscopic lesions. Analysis of partial flaB gene sequences indicated this was a relapsing fever Borrelia most similar to a Borrelia sp. detected in soft ticks from a seabird colony in Japan. This represents the fourth report of a relapsing fever Borrelia sp. in an avian species and highlights the need for additional studies of potentially pathogenic organisms infecting the African penguin in South Africa.

  11. Evaluation of the importance of VlsE antigenic variation for the enzootic cycle of borrelia burgdorferi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient acquisition and transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi by the tick vector, and the ability to persistently infect both vector and host, are important elements for the life cycle of the Lyme disease pathogen. Previous work has provided strong evidence implicating the significance of the vls l...

  12. Detection of Invasive Borrelia burgdorferi Strains in North-Eastern Piedmont, Italy.

    PubMed

    Pintore, M D; Ceballos, L; Iulini, B; Tomassone, L; Pautasso, A; Corbellini, D; Rizzo, F; Mandola, M L; Bardelli, M; Peletto, S; Acutis, P L; Mannelli, A; Casalone, C

    2015-08-01

    Following reports of human cases of Lyme borreliosis from the Ossola Valley, a mountainous area of Piemonte, north-western Italy, the abundance and altitudinal distribution of ticks, and infection of these vectors with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato were evaluated. A total of 1662 host-seeking Ixodes ricinus were collected by dragging from April to September 2011 at locations between 400 and 1450 m above sea level. Additional 104 I. ricinus were collected from 35 hunted wild animals (4 chamois, 8 roe deer, 23 red deer). Tick density, expressed as the number of ticks per 100 m(2), resulted highly variable among different areas, ranging from 0 to 105 larvae and from 0 to 22 nymphs. A sample of 352 ticks (327 from dragging and 25 from wild animals) was screened by a PCR assay targeting a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene of B. burgdorferi s.l. Positive samples were confirmed with a PCR assay specific for the 5S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and sequenced. Four genospecies were found: B. afzelii (prevalence 4.0%), B. lusitaniae (4.0%), B. garinii (1.5%) and B. valaisiana (0.3%). Phylogenetic analysis based on the ospC gene showed that most of the Borrelia strains from pathogenic genospecies had the potential for human infection and for invasion of secondary body sites. PMID:25220838

  13. Geographic distribution of white-tailed deer with ticks and antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Magnarelli, L A; Anderson, J F; Cartter, M L

    1993-01-01

    Ticks and blood specimens were collected from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Connecticut and analyzed to identify foci for Lyme borreliosis. Males and females of Ixodes scapularis, the chief vector of Borrelia burgdorferi, were collected from deer in five of eight counties during 1989-1991. Analysis by indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) staining of midgut tissues showed that prevalence of infection was highest (9.5% of 367 ticks) in south central and southeastern Connecticut. Infected I. scapularis also were collected from southwestern regions of the state (12.1% of 99 ticks), but prevalence of infection in northern counties was considerably lower (0.8% of 124 ticks). Deer sera, obtained in 1980 and 1989-1991, were analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or by IFA staining methods. Antibodies to B. burgdorferi were detected in sera collected from all eight counties in Connecticut. Deer had been infected by this spirochete in at least 50 towns, 17 (34%) of which are in south central and southeastern parts of the state. Borrelia burgdorferi is widely distributed in I. scapularis populations in Connecticut. PMID:8256460

  14. Lone Star Tick-Infecting Borreliae Are Most Closely Related to the Agent of Bovine Borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Stephen M.; Armstrong, Philip M.; Smith, Ronald D.; Telford, Sam R.

    2001-01-01

    Although Borrelia theileri, the agent of bovine borreliosis, was described at the turn of the century (in 1903), its relationship with borreliae causing Lyme disease or relapsing fever remains undescribed. We tested the previously published hypothesis that spirochetes infecting Lone Star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) may comprise B. theileri by analyzing the 16S ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and flagellin genes of these spirochetes. B. theileri, the Amblyomma agent, and B. miyamotoi formed a natural group or clade distinct from but most closely related to that of the relapsing fever spirochetes. B. theileri and the Amblyomma agent were 97 and 98% similar at the nucleotide level within the analyzed portions of the 16S rDNA and the flagellin gene respectively, suggesting a recent divergence. The agent of bovine borreliosis might be explored as a surrogate antigen for the as-yet-uncultivatable Amblyomma agent in studies designed to explore the etiology of a Lyme disease-like infection associated with Lone Star ticks. PMID:11158095

  15. First detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNA in king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus halli).

    PubMed

    Schramm, Frédéric; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Fournier, Jean-Charles; McCoy, Karen D; Barthel, Cathy; Postic, Danièle; Handrich, Yves; Le Maho, Yvon; Jaulhac, Benoît

    2014-10-01

    The hard tick Ixodes uriae parasitises a wide range of seabird species in the circumpolar areas of both Northern and Southern hemispheres and has been shown to be infected with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the bacterial agents of Lyme borreliosis. Although it is assumed that seabirds represent viable reservoir hosts, direct demonstrations of infection are limited to a single study from the Northern hemisphere. Here, the blood of 50 tick-infested adult king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus halli) breeding in the Crozet Archipelago (Southern Indian Ocean) was examined for B. burgdorferi sl exposure by serology and for spirochetemia by in vitro DNA amplification. Four birds were found positive by serology, whereas B. burgdorferi sl DNA was detected in two other birds. Our data therefore provide the first direct proof of Borrelia burgdorferi sl spirochetes in seabirds of the Southern hemisphere and indicate a possible reservoir role for king penguins in the natural maintenance of this bacterium. Although the bacterial genetic diversity present in these hosts and the infectious period for tick vectors remain to be elucidated, our results add to a growing body of knowledge on the contribution of seabirds to the complex epizootiology of Lyme disease and the global dissemination of B. burgdorferi sl spirochetes. PMID:25150726

  16. Refractoriness of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) to the Lyme disease group spirochete Borrelia bissettii.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Mun, J; Eisen, L; Eisen, R J

    2006-08-01

    The western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, is refractory to experimental infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, one of several Lyme disease spirochetes pathogenic for humans. Another member of the Lyme disease spirochete complex, Borrelia bissettii, is distributed widely throughout North America and a similar, if not identical, spirochete has been implicated as a human pathogen in southern Europe. To determine the susceptibility of S. occidentalis to B. bissettii, 6 naïve lizards were exposed to the feeding activities of Ixodes pacificus nymphs experimentally infected with this spirochete. None of the lizards developed spirochetemias detectable by polymerase chain reaction for up to 8 wk post-tick feeding, infected nymphs apparently lost their B. bissettii infections within 1-2 wk after engorgement, and xenodiagnostic L. pacificus larvae that co-fed alongside infected nymphs did not acquire and maintain spirochetes. In contrast, 3 of 4 naïve deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) exposed similarly to feeding by 1 or more B. bissettii-infected nymphs developed patent infections within 4 wk. These and previous findings suggest that the complement system of S. occidentalis typically destroys B. burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes present in tissues of attached and feeding I. pacificus nymphs, thereby potentially reducing the probability of transmission of these bacteria to humans or other animals by the resultant adult ticks. PMID:16995383

  17. [Study of the anti Borrelia burgdorferi antibody of hunters in Hokkaido].

    PubMed

    Kubo, N; Arashima, Y; Kawabata, M; Kawano, K; Nakao, M; Miyamoto, K

    1992-01-01

    We examined the sera of 587 hunters in Hokkaido (Japan's northernmost island) for the antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi) by enzyme immunoassay, clarified the conditions related to antibody positivity in these subjects according to region, and studied the effects of factors such as age and lifestyle on the antibody titer. In contrast with an anti-B. burgdorferi antibody positive rate of 7.1% in control sera, that in the hunters' sera was 16.0%. Among those positive for the anti-B. burgdorferi antibody, the antibody positive rate in sera excluding those testing positive in the serological test for syphilis was 5.5% in the controls, and 15.4% in the hunters, the latter rate being significantly higher (p less than 0.05). In both hunters and control groups, the antibody-positive rate tended to be higher in older subjects, but the antibody titer showed no correlation with their age, or the duration of their hunting experience. Examination of the hunters' occupations revealed a tendency toward high titers in those engaged in dairy farming. The antibody positivity of those who went gathering edible wild plants was significantly higher than those did not (p less than 0.05). These observations suggested that the high antibody-positive rate in hunters may have been due largely to the effect of activities other than hunting as sources of infection by Borrelia.

  18. Fatal spirochetosis due to a relapsing fever-like Borrelia sp. in a northern spotted owl.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nancy J; Bunikis, Jonas; Barbour, Alan G; Wolcott, Mark J

    2002-01-01

    Acute septicemic spirochetosis was diagnosed in an adult male northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) found dead in Kittitas County, Washington, USA. Gross necropsy findings included marked enlargement of the liver and spleen and serofibrinous deposits on the serous membranes lining the body cavities and the pericardial and perihepatic sacs. Microscopic observations included macrophage infiltration in the liver and spleen with mild thrombosis and multifocal necrosis, as well as hemorrhage and acute inflammation in the choroid plexus of the brain. No viruses or pathogenic bacteria were isolated from brain, liver, or spleen, and no parasites were found in blood smears or impression smears of the liver. Chlamydial culture attempts were unsuccessful and no chlamydial antibodies were detected in serum. In silver-stained microscopic sections and by transmission electron microscopy of liver, numerous long, thin, spiral-shaped bacteria were seen in the liver, spleen, cerebral ventricles, and within blood vessels in many organs. The organism was identified as a member of the Borrelia genus by sequence analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. The most closely related species is B. hermsii, an agent of relapsing fever in humans in the western United States. This is the first report of a relapsing fever-related Borrelia in a wild bird. PMID:11838214

  19. Seroprevalence of Leptospira spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Italian horses.

    PubMed

    Ebani, Valentina V; Bertelloni, Fabrizio; Pinzauti, Paolo; Cerri, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the seroprevalence of Leptospira spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in healthy horses living in 7 provinces of central Italy. In the period 2007-2009, sera from 386 horses were tested by microagglutination test (MAT) to detect antibodies to Leptospira spp., employing the following serovars as antigens: Bratislava, Ballum, Canicola, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Grippotyphosa, Hardjo, Pomona, Tarassovi. 3 animals were positive for the serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae, 2 to Bratislava, and 1 to Pomona, for a total 1.5% seroprevalence. All sera were examined by immunofluorence antibody test (IFAT) to reveal anti-B. burgdorferi s.l. antibodies. 94 (24.3%) horses were positive with antibody titres ranging from 1:64 to 1:1,024. The seroprevalence was significantly higher in >10 year-old horses compared to younger subjects. No significant differences in the mean seroprevalence were observed in the respective years. The total mean seroprevalence were strictly related to the environmental conditions of the areas in which the horses lived. No cross-reactions between Leptospira and Borrelia were observed. This is the first serological survey on antibodies to B. burgdorferi s.l. in Italian horses. PMID:22742794

  20. Peaceful coexistence amongst Borrelia plasmids: getting by with a little help from their friends?

    PubMed

    Chaconas, George; Norris, Steven J

    2013-09-01

    Borrelia species comprise a unique genus of bacterial pathogens. These organisms contain a segmented genome with up to two dozen plasmids ranging in size from 5 kb up to about 200 kb. The plasmids have also been referred to as mini-chromosomes or essential genetic elements, as some of them carry information important for infection of vertebrates or for survival in the tick vector. Most of the plasmids are linear with covalently closed hairpin telomeres and these linear plasmids are in a constant state of genetic rearrangement. The mechanisms of plasmid replication, maintenance and partitioning remain largely obscure and are complicated by a long doubling time, the requirement for expensive media and inefficient genetic manipulation. A set of five parologous protein families (PFs) are believed to confer the ability for autonomous replication and plasmid maintenance. The number of plasmids also complicates analyses because of the possibility that PFs from one plasmid may sometimes function in trans on other plasmids. Two papers in the last year have moved the field forward and their combined data suggest that trans complementation amongst Borrelia plasmids may sometimes occur.

  1. CspA from Borrelia burgdorferi Inhibits the Terminal Complement Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hallström, Teresia; Siegel, Corinna; Mörgelin, Matthias; Kraiczy, Peter; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host, Borrelia burgdorferi controls the human immune attack and blocks the damaging effects of the activated complement system. These Gram-negative spirochetes use CspA (CRASP-1) and four additional immune evasion proteins to bind combinations of human plasma regulators, including factor H, factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), complement factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1), CFHR2, CFHR5, and plasminogen. As many microbial immune evasion proteins have multiple functions, we hypothesized that CspA has additional roles in complement or immune control. Here, we identify CspA as a terminal complement inhibitor. Borrelial CspA binds the human terminal complement components C7 and C9 and blocks assembly and membrane insertion of the terminal complement complex (TCC). CspA inhibits TCC assembly at the level of C7, as revealed by hemolytic assays, and inhibits polymerization of C9. CspA, when ectopically expressed on the surface of serum-sensitive Borrelia garinii, blocks TCC assembly on the level of C7 and induces serum resistance in the transformed bacteria. This CspA-mediated serum resistance and terminal complement pathway inhibition allow B. burgdorferi to survive in the hostile environment of human plasma. PMID:23943762

  2. Identification of conserved antigens for early serodiagnosis of relapsing fever Borrelia

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Job E.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Hammer, Carl H.; Zhao, Ming; Robinson, Mary Ann; Schwan, Tom G.

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia hermsii is a blood-borne pathogen transmitted by the argasid tick Ornithodoros hermsi. Since spirochaete clearance in mice is associated with an IgM-mediated response, an immunoproteomic analysis was used to identify proteins reactive with IgM. We report that IgM from both mice and human patients infected with B. hermsii not only reacted with the previously identified variable membrane proteins but also identified candidate antigens including heat-shock proteins, an adhesin protein, ABC transporter proteins, flagellar proteins, housekeeping proteins, an immune evasion protein, and proteins with unknown function. Furthermore, IgM reactivity to recombinant glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase was detected during early spirochaete infection and prior to a detectable IgG response. Lastly, a conserved hypothetical protein was produced in Escherichia coli and tested with immune serum against B. hermsii and Borrelia recurrentis. These results identify a much larger set of immunoreactive proteins, and could help in the early serodiagnosis of this tick-borne infection. PMID:19443544

  3. Crystal Structure of Neurotropism-Associated Variable Surface Protein 1 (VSP1) of Borrelia Turicatae

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson,C.; Yung, B.; Barbour, A.; Zuckert, W.

    2006-01-01

    Vsp surface lipoproteins are serotype-defining antigens of relapsing fever spirochetes that undergo multiphasic antigenic variation to allow bacterial persistence in spite of an immune response. Two isogenic serotypes of Borrelia turicatae strain Oz1 differ in their Vsp sequences and in disease manifestations in infected mice: Vsp1 is associated with the selection of a neurological niche, while Vsp2 is associated with blood and skin infection. We report here crystal structures of the Vsp1 dimer at 2.7 and 2.2 Angstroms. The structures confirm that relapsing fever Vsp proteins share a common helical fold with OspCs of Lyme disease-causing Borrelia. The fold features an inner stem formed by highly conserved N and C termini and an outer 'dome' formed by the variable central residues. Both Vsp1 and OspC structures possess small water-filled cavities, or pockets, that are lined largely by variable residues and are thus highly variable in shape. These features appear to signify tolerance of the Vsp-OspC fold for imperfect packing of residues at its antigenic surface. Structural comparison of Vsp1 with a homology model for Vsp2 suggests that observed differences in disease manifestation may arise in part from distinct differences in electrostatic surface properties; additional predicted positively charged surface patches on Vsp2 compared to Vsp1 may be sufficient to explain the relative propensity of Vsp2 to bind to acidic glycosaminoglycans.

  4. Dynamics of connective-tissue localization during chronic Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

    PubMed

    Imai, Denise M; Feng, Sunlian; Hodzic, Emir; Barthold, Stephen W

    2013-08-01

    The etiologic agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, localizes preferentially in the extracellular matrix during persistence. In chronically infected laboratory mice, there is a direct association between B. burgdorferi and the proteoglycan decorin, which suggests that decorin has a role in defining protective niches for persistent spirochetes. In this study, the tissue colocalization of B. burgdorferi with decorin and the dynamics of borrelial decorin tropism were evaluated during chronic infection. Spirochetes were found to colocalize absolutely with decorin, but not collagen I in chronically infected immunocompetent C3H mice. Passive immunization of infected C3H-scid mice with B. burgdorferi-specific immune serum resulted in the localization of spirochetes in decorin-rich microenvironments, with clearance of spirochetes from decorin-poor microenvironments. In passively immunized C3H-scid mice, tissue spirochete burdens were initially reduced, but increased over time as the B. burgdorferi-specific antibody levels waned. Concurrent repopulation of the previously cleared decorin-poor microenvironments was observed with the rising tissue spirochete burden and declining antibody titer. These findings indicate that the specificity of B. burgdorferi tissue localization during chronic infection is determined by decorin, driven by the borrelia-specific antibody response, and fluctuates with the antibody response. PMID:23797360

  5. Fluorescent membrane markers elucidate the association of Borrelia burgdorferi with tick cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, R.C.; Baêta, B.A.; Ferreira, J.S.; Medeiros, R.C.; Maya-Monteiro, C.M.; Lara, F.A.; Bell-Sakyi, L.; Fonseca, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the association of Borrelia burgdorferi s.s. with ixodid tick cell lines by flow cytometry and fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Spirochetes were stained with a fluorescent membrane marker (PKH67 or PKH26), inoculated into 8 different tick cell lines and incubated at 30°C for 24 h. PKH efficiently stained B. burgdorferi without affecting bacterial viability or motility. Among the tick cell lines tested, the Rhipicephalus appendiculatus cell line RA243 achieved the highest percentage of association/internalization, with both high (90%) and low (10%) concentrations of BSK-H medium in tick cell culture medium. Treatment with cytochalasin D dramatically reduced the average percentage of cells with internalized spirochetes, which passed through a dramatic morphological change during their internalization by the host cell as observed in time-lapse photography. Almost all of the fluorescent bacteria were seen to be inside the tick cells. PKH labeling of borreliae proved to be a reliable and valuable tool to analyze the association of spirochetes with host cells by flow cytometry, confocal and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27332772

  6. Strain-specific antibodies reduce co-feeding transmission of the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia afzelii.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Maxime; Durand, Jonas; Rais, Olivier; Voordouw, Maarten J

    2016-03-01

    Vector-borne pathogens use a diversity of strategies to evade the vertebrate immune system. Co-feeding transmission is a potential immune evasion strategy because the vector-borne pathogen minimizes the time spent in the vertebrate host. We tested whether the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia afzelii, can use co-feeding transmission to escape the acquired immune response in the vertebrate host. We induced a strain-specific, protective antibody response by immunizing mice with one of two variants of OspC (A3 and A10), the highly variable outer surface protein C of Borrelia pathogens. Immunized mice were challenged via tick bite with B. afzelii strains A3 or A10 and infested with larval ticks at days 2 and 34 post-infection to measure co-feeding and systemic transmission respectively. Antibodies against a particular OspC variant significantly reduced co-feeding transmission of the targeted (homologous) strain but not the non-targeted (heterologous) strain. Cross-immunity between OspC antigens had no effect in co-feeding ticks but reduced the spirochaete load twofold in ticks infected via systemic transmission. In summary, OspC-specific antibodies reduced co-feeding transmission of a homologous but not a heterologous strain of B. afzelii. Co-feeding transmission allowed B. afzelii to evade the negative consequences of cross-immunity on the tick spirochaete load.

  7. Fatal spirochetosis due to a relapsing fever-like Borrelia sp. in northern spotted owl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.J.; Bunikis, J.; Barbour, A.G.; Wolcott, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septicemic spirochetosis was diagnosed in an adult male northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) found dead in Kittitas County, Washington, USA. Gross necropsy findings included marked enlargement of the liver and spleen and serofibrinous deposits on the serous membranes lining the body cavities and the pericardial and perihepatic sacs. Microscopic observations included macrophage infiltration in the liver and spleen with mild thrombosis and multifocal necrosis, as well as hemorrhage and acute inflammation in the choroid plexus of the brain. No viruses or pathogenic bacteria were isolated from brain, liver, or spleen, and no parasites were found in blood smears or impression smears of the liver. Chlamydial culture attempts were unsuccessful and no chlamydial antibodies were detected in serum. In silver-stained microscopic sections and by transmission electron microscopy of liver, numerous long, thin, spiral-shaped bacteria were seen in the liver, spleen, cerebral ventricles, and within blood vessels in many organs. The organism was identified as a member of the Borrelia genus by sequence analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. The most closely related species is B. hermsii, an agent of relapsing fever in humans in the western United States. This is the first report of a relapsing fever-related Borrelia in a wild bird.

  8. Myc-Max heterodimers activate a DEAD box gene and interact with multiple E box-related sites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grandori, C; Mac, J; Siëbelt, F; Ayer, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1996-08-15

    The c-Myc protein is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis though heterodimerization with Max to form a transcriptionally active sequence-specific DNA binding complex. By means of sequential immunoprecipitation of chromatin using anti-Max and anti-Myc antibodies, we have identified a Myc-regulated gene and genomic sites occupied by Myc-Max in vivo. Four of 27 sites recovered by this procedure corresponded to the highest affinity 'canonical' CACGTG sequence. However, the most common in vivo binding sites belonged to the group of 'non-canonical' E box-related binding sites previously identified by in vitro selection. Several of the genomic fragments isolated contained transcribed sequences, including one, MrDb, encoding an evolutionarily conserved RNA helicase of the DEAD box family. The corresponding mRNA was induced following activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein (Myc-ER) in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor, consistent with this helicase gene being a direct target of Myc-Max. In addition, as for c-Myc, the expression of MrDb is induced upon proliferative stimulation of primary human fibroblasts as well as B cells and down-regulated during terminal differentiation of HL60 leukemia cells. Our results indicate that Myc-Max heterodimers interact in vivo with a specific set of E box-related DNA sequences and that Myc is likely to activate multiple target genes including a highly conserved DEAD box protein. Therefore, Myc may exert its effects on cell behavior through proteins that affect RNA structure and metabolism.

  9. Repression of the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner by steatotic drugs and in advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Benet, Marta; Guzmán, Carla; Pisonero-Vaquero, Sandra; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Martínez-Chantar, M Luz; Donato, M Teresa; Castell, José Vicente; Jover, Ramiro

    2015-04-01

    The small heterodimer partner (SHP) (NR0B2) is an atypical nuclear receptor that lacks a DNA-binding domain. It interacts with and inhibits many transcription factors, affecting key metabolic processes, including bile acid, cholesterol, fatty acid, and drug metabolism. Our aim was to determine the influence of steatotic drugs and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) on SHP expression and investigate the potential mechanisms. SHP was found to be repressed by steatotic drugs (valproate, doxycycline, tetracycline, and cyclosporin A) in cultured hepatic cells and the livers of different animal models of NAFLD: iatrogenic (tetracycline-treated rats), genetic (glycine N-methyltransferase-deficient mice), and nutritional (mice fed a methionine- and choline-deficient diet). Among the different transcription factors investigated, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) showed the strongest dominant-repressive effect on SHP expression in HepG2 and human hepatocytes. Reporter assays revealed that the inhibitory effect of C/EBPα and steatotic drugs colocalize between -340 and -509 base pair of the SHP promoter, and mutation of a predicted C/EBPα response element at -473 base pair abolished SHP repression by both C/EBPα and drugs. Moreover, inhibition of major stress signaling pathways demonstrated that the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 pathway activates, while the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase pathway represses SHP in a C/EBP-dependent manner. We conclude that SHP is downregulated by several steatotic drugs and in advanced NAFLD. These conditions can activate signals that target C/EBPα and consequently repress SHP, thus favoring the progression and severity of NAFLD. PMID:25576488

  10. Crystal structure of the disintegrin heterodimer from saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) at 1.9 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Bilgrami, Sameeta; Yadav, Savita; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Singh, Tej P

    2005-08-23

    Disintegrins constitute a family of potent polypeptide inhibitors of integrins. Integrins are transmembrane heterodimeric molecules involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. They are involved in many diseases such as cancer and thrombosis. Thus, disintegrins have a great potential as anticancer and antithrombotic agents. A novel heterodimeric disintegrin was isolated from the venom of saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) and was crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 1.9 A resolution and belonged to space group P4(3)2(1)2. The data indicated the presence of a pseudosymmetry. The structure was solved by applying origin shifts to the disintegrin homodimer schistatin solved in space group I4(1)22 with similar cell dimensions. The structure refined to the final R(cryst)/R(free) factors of 0.213/0.253. The notable differences are observed between the loops, (Gln39-Asp48) containing the important Arg42-Gly43-Asp44, of the present heterodimer and schistatin. These differences are presumably due to the presence of two glycines at positions 43 and 46 that allow the molecule to adopt variable conformations. A comparative analysis of the surface-charge distributions of various disintegrins showed that the charge distribution on monomeric disintegrins occurred uniformly over the whole surface of the molecule, while in the dimeric disintegrins, the charge is distributed only on one face. Such a feature may be important in the binding of two integrins to a single dimeric disintegrin. The phylogenetic analysis developed on the basis of amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structures indicates that the protein diversification and evolution presumably took place from the medium disintegrins and both the dimeric and short disintegrins evolved from them. PMID:16101289

  11. The Heterogeneity, Distribution, and Environmental Associations of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato, the Agent of Lyme Borreliosis, in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    James, Marianne C.; Gilbert, Lucy; Bowman, Alan S.; Forbes, Ken J.

    2014-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an emerging infectious human disease caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex of bacteria with reported cases increasing in many areas of Europe and North America. To understand the drivers of disease risk and the distribution of symptoms, which may improve mitigation and diagnostics, here we characterize the genetics, distribution, and environmental associations of B. burgdorferi s.l. genospecies across Scotland. In Scotland, reported Lyme borreliosis cases have increased almost 10-fold since 2000 but the distribution of B. burgdorferi s.l. is so far unstudied. Using a large survey of over 2200 Ixodes ricinus tick samples collected from birds, mammals, and vegetation across 25 sites we identified four genospecies: Borrelia afzelii (48%), Borrelia garinii (36%), Borrelia valaisiana (8%), and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (7%), and one mixed genospecies infection. Surprisingly, 90% of the sequence types were novel and, importantly, up to 14% of samples were mixed intra-genospecies co-infections, suggesting tick co-feeding, feeding on multiple hosts, or multiple infections in hosts. B. garinii (hosted by birds) was considerably more genetically diverse than B. afzelii (hosted by small mammals), as predicted since there are more species of birds than small mammals and birds can import strains from mainland Europe. Higher proportions of samples contained B. garinii and B. valaisiana in the west, while B. afzelii and B. garinii were significantly more associated with mixed/deciduous than with coniferous woodlands. This may relate to the abundance of transmission hosts in different regions and habitats. These data on the genetic heterogeneity within and between Borrelia genospecies are a first step to understand pathogen spread and could help explain the distribution of patient symptoms, which may aid local diagnosis. Understanding the environmental associations of the pathogens is critical for rational policy making for disease risk

  12. Differential associations of Borrelia species with European badgers (Meles meles) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in western Poland.

    PubMed

    Wodecka, Beata; Michalik, Jerzy; Lane, Robert S; Nowak-Chmura, Magdalena; Wierzbicka, Anna

    2016-07-01

    European badgers and raccoon dogs and their associated ticks and lice were assayed for the presence of Lyme borreliosis and relapsing fever-group spirochete DNA in western Poland. Analyses of blood, ear-biopsy and liver samples revealed that 25% of 28 raccoon dogs and 12% of 34 badgers were PCR positive for borreliae. Borrelia garinii was the dominant species in raccoon dogs (62.5%), followed by B. afzelii (25%) and B. valaisiana (12.5%). PCR-positive badgers were infected only with B. afzelii. A total of 351 attached ticks was recovered from 23 (82%) of the raccoon dogs and 13 (38%) of the badgers. Using a nested PCR targeting the ITS2 fragments of Ixodes DNA, four Ixodes species were identified: I. ricinus, I. canisuga, I. hexagonus, and one provisionally named I. cf. kaiseri. Ixodes canisuga and I. ricinus prevailed on both host species. The highest infection prevalence was detected in I. ricinus, followed by I. canisuga and I. cf. kaiseri. Borrelia garinii and B. afzelii accounted for 61.6% and 30.1% of the infections detected in all PCR-positive ticks, respectively. Four other Borrelia species (B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. valaisiana, B. lusitaniae and B. miyamotoi) were detected only in I. ricinus from raccoon dogs. Moreover, Borrelia DNA, mostly B. garinii, was detected in 57 (81.4%) of 70 Trichodectes melis lice derived from 12 badgers. The detection of B. afzelii in one-half of PCR-positive biopsies reconfirms previous associations of this species with mammalian hosts, whereas the high prevalence of B. garinii in feeding lice and I. ricinus ticks (including larvae) demonstrates that both carnivores serve as hosts for B. garinii. The lack of B. garinii DNA in the tissues of badgers versus its prevalence in raccoon-dog biopsies, however, incriminates only the latter carnivore as a potential reservoir host. PMID:27263838

  13. Correlation of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato prevalence in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks with specific abiotic traits in the western palearctic.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Ortega, Carmelo; Sánchez, Nely; Desimone, Lorenzo; Sudre, Bertrand; Suk, Jonathan E; Semenza, Jan C

    2011-06-01

    This meta-analysis of reports examining ticks throughout the Western Palearctic region indicates a distinct geographic pattern for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato prevalence in questing nymphal Ixodes ricinus ticks. The greatest prevalence was reported between the 5°E and 25°E longitudes based on an analysis of 123 collection points with 37,940 nymphal tick specimens (87.43% of total nymphs; 56.35% of total ticks in the set of reports over the target area). Climatic traits, such as temperature and vegetation stress, and their seasonality correlated with Borrelia prevalence in questing ticks. The greatest prevalence was associated with mild winter, high summer, and low seasonal amplitude of temperatures within the range of the tick vector, higher vegetation indices in the May-June period, and well-connected vegetation patches below a threshold at which rates suddenly drop. Classification of the target territory using a qualitative risk index derived from the abiotic variables produced an indicator of the probability of finding infected ticks in the Western Palearctic region. No specific temporal trends were detected in the reported prevalence. The ranges of the different B. burgdorferi sensu lato genospecies showed a pattern of high biodiversity between 4°W and 20°E, partially overlapping the area of highest prevalence in ticks. Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii are the dominant species in central Europe (east of ∼25°E), but B. garinii may appear alone at southern latitudes and Borrelia lusitaniae is the main indicator species for meridional territories. PMID:21498767

  14. Differential associations of Borrelia species with European badgers (Meles meles) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in western Poland.

    PubMed

    Wodecka, Beata; Michalik, Jerzy; Lane, Robert S; Nowak-Chmura, Magdalena; Wierzbicka, Anna

    2016-07-01

    European badgers and raccoon dogs and their associated ticks and lice were assayed for the presence of Lyme borreliosis and relapsing fever-group spirochete DNA in western Poland. Analyses of blood, ear-biopsy and liver samples revealed that 25% of 28 raccoon dogs and 12% of 34 badgers were PCR positive for borreliae. Borrelia garinii was the dominant species in raccoon dogs (62.5%), followed by B. afzelii (25%) and B. valaisiana (12.5%). PCR-positive badgers were infected only with B. afzelii. A total of 351 attached ticks was recovered from 23 (82%) of the raccoon dogs and 13 (38%) of the badgers. Using a nested PCR targeting the ITS2 fragments of Ixodes DNA, four Ixodes species were identified: I. ricinus, I. canisuga, I. hexagonus, and one provisionally named I. cf. kaiseri. Ixodes canisuga and I. ricinus prevailed on both host species. The highest infection prevalence was detected in I. ricinus, followed by I. canisuga and I. cf. kaiseri. Borrelia garinii and B. afzelii accounted for 61.6% and 30.1% of the infections detected in all PCR-positive ticks, respectively. Four other Borrelia species (B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. valaisiana, B. lusitaniae and B. miyamotoi) were detected only in I. ricinus from raccoon dogs. Moreover, Borrelia DNA, mostly B. garinii, was detected in 57 (81.4%) of 70 Trichodectes melis lice derived from 12 badgers. The detection of B. afzelii in one-half of PCR-positive biopsies reconfirms previous associations of this species with mammalian hosts, whereas the high prevalence of B. garinii in feeding lice and I. ricinus ticks (including larvae) demonstrates that both carnivores serve as hosts for B. garinii. The lack of B. garinii DNA in the tissues of badgers versus its prevalence in raccoon-dog biopsies, however, incriminates only the latter carnivore as a potential reservoir host.

  15. Interaction of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with Brain Parenchyma Elicits Inflammatory Mediators from Glial Cells as Well as Glial and Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Geeta; Borda, Juan T.; Dufour, Jason; Kaushal, Deepak; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Lackner, Andrew A.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, often manifests by causing neurocognitive deficits. As a possible mechanism for Lyme neuroborreliosis, we hypothesized that B. burgdorferi induces the production of inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system with concomitant neuronal and/or glial apoptosis. To test our hypothesis, we constructed an ex vivo model that consisted of freshly collected slices from brain cortex of a rhesus macaque and allowed live B. burgdorferi to penetrate the tissue. Numerous transcripts of genes that regulate inflammation as well as oligodendrocyte and neuronal apoptosis were significantly altered as assessed by DNA microarray analysis. Transcription level increases of 7.43-fold (P = 0.005) for the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α and 2.31-fold (P = 0.016) for the chemokine interleukin (IL)-8 were also detected by real-time-polymerase chain reaction array analysis. The immune mediators IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, COX-2, and CXCL13 were visualized in glial cells in situ by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Concomitantly, significant proportions of both oligodendrocytes and neurons undergoing apoptosis were present in spirochete-stimulated tissues. IL-6 production by astrocytes in addition to oligodendrocyte apoptosis were also detected, albeit at lower levels, in rhesus macaques that had received in vivo intraparenchymal stereotaxic inoculations of live B. burgdorferi. These results provide proof of concept for our hypothesis that B. burgdorferi produces inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system, accompanied by glial and neuronal apoptosis. PMID:18832582

  16. Interaction of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with brain parenchyma elicits inflammatory mediators from glial cells as well as glial and neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Geeta; Borda, Juan T; Dufour, Jason; Kaushal, Deepak; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Lackner, Andrew A; Philipp, Mario T

    2008-11-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, often manifests by causing neurocognitive deficits. As a possible mechanism for Lyme neuroborreliosis, we hypothesized that B. burgdorferi induces the production of inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system with concomitant neuronal and/or glial apoptosis. To test our hypothesis, we constructed an ex vivo model that consisted of freshly collected slices from brain cortex of a rhesus macaque and allowed live B. burgdorferi to penetrate the tissue. Numerous transcripts of genes that regulate inflammation as well as oligodendrocyte and neuronal apoptosis were significantly altered as assessed by DNA microarray analysis. Transcription level increases of 7.43-fold (P = 0.005) for the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha and 2.31-fold (P = 0.016) for the chemokine interleukin (IL)-8 were also detected by real-time-polymerase chain reaction array analysis. The immune mediators IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta, COX-2, and CXCL13 were visualized in glial cells in situ by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Concomitantly, significant proportions of both oligodendrocytes and neurons undergoing apoptosis were present in spirochete-stimulated tissues. IL-6 production by astrocytes in addition to oligodendrocyte apoptosis were also detected, albeit at lower levels, in rhesus macaques that had received in vivo intraparenchymal stereotaxic inoculations of live B. burgdorferi. These results provide proof of concept for our hypothesis that B. burgdorferi produces inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system, accompanied by glial and neuronal apoptosis. PMID:18832582

  17. Establishment of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using purified recombinant 83-kilodalton antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia afzelii for serodiagnosis of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Rauer, S; Kayser, M; Neubert, U; Rasiah, C; Vogt, A

    1995-10-01

    The 83-kDa antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi was expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (p83-ELISA). Antibodies to the 83-kDa antigen of both the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM isotypes could be detected in all stages of Lyme disease. Sensitivity varied, depending on the clinical stage of illness. In early stages, as defined for 118 patients with erythema migrans, it was found to be 20% (24 of 118 patients: 7 with IgM, 16 with IgG, and 1 with IgM and IgG). Of the patients with late-stage Lyme arthritis and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, 94% (16 of 17:2 with IgM and IgG and 14 with IgG) and 86% (36 of 42:2 with IgG and IgM and 34 with IgG) revealed positive results in the p83-ELISA, respectively. p83 displays sequence heterogeneity according to the genomospecies, but when the reactions of serum specimens from acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans patients and arthritis patients with p83 derived from representative strains of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia afzelii in ELISAs were compared, no differences in specificity and sensitivity were seen. When 82 serum specimens from healthy controls were tested, none had IgG and only 3 (4%) had IgM antibodies, indicating a high specificity. Positive reactions with antibodies against Treponema pallidum (1 of 37 patients; IgG) and Epstein-Barr virus (1 of 44 patients; IgM) and with autoantibodies of various specificities (1 of 53 patients; IgG) were seen with < 3% of the serum samples te11111111111111111111 high speficicity for B. burgdorferi.2+ 13% for IgM antibodies, the IgM p83-ELISA provided little diagnostic information for Lyme disease, whereas the IgG p83-ELISA appears to be a suita ;e test for serodiagnosis of advanced-stage Lyme disease.

  18. Absence of sodA Increases the Levels of Oxidation of Key Metabolic Determinants of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria D.; Smith, Trever C.; Small, Christina M.; Thomas, Derek P.; Seshu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, alters its gene expression in response to environmental signals unique to its tick vector or vertebrate hosts. B. burgdorferi carries one superoxide dismutase gene (sodA) capable of controlling intracellular superoxide levels. Previously, sodA was shown to be essential for infection of B. burgdorferi in the C3H/HeN model of Lyme disease. We employed two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and immunoblot analysis with antibodies specific to carbonylated proteins to identify targets that were differentially oxidized in the soluble fractions of the sodA mutant compared to its isogenic parental control strain following treatment with an endogenous superoxide generator, methyl viologen (MV, paraquat). HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of oxidized proteins revealed that several proteins of the glycolytic pathway (BB0057, BB0020, BB0348) exhibited increased carbonylation in the sodA mutant treated with MV. Levels of ATP and NAD/NADH were reduced in the sodA mutant compared with the parental strain following treatment with MV and could be attributed to increased levels of oxidation of proteins of the glycolytic pathway. In addition, a chaperone, HtpG (BB0560), and outer surface protein A (OspA, BBA15) were also observed to be oxidized in the sodA mutant. Immunoblot analysis revealed reduced levels of Outer surface protein C (OspC), Decorin binding protein A (DbpA), fibronectin binding protein (BBK32), RpoS and BosR in the sodA mutant compared to the control strains. Viable sodA mutant spirochetes could not be recovered from both gp91/phox−⁄− and iNOS deficient mice while borrelial DNA was detected in multiple tissues samples from infected mice at significantly lower levels compared to the parental strain. Taken together, these observations indicate that the increased oxidation of select borrelial determinants and reduced levels of critical pathogenesis-associated lipoproteins contribute to the in vivo deficit of the sod

  19. Absence of sodA Increases the Levels of Oxidation of Key Metabolic Determinants of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria D; Smith, Trever C; Small, Christina M; Thomas, Derek P; Seshu, J

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, alters its gene expression in response to environmental signals unique to its tick vector or vertebrate hosts. B. burgdorferi carries one superoxide dismutase gene (sodA) capable of controlling intracellular superoxide levels. Previously, sodA was shown to be essential for infection of B. burgdorferi in the C3H/HeN model of Lyme disease. We employed two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and immunoblot analysis with antibodies specific to carbonylated proteins to identify targets that were differentially oxidized in the soluble fractions of the sodA mutant compared to its isogenic parental control strain following treatment with an endogenous superoxide generator, methyl viologen (MV, paraquat). HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of oxidized proteins revealed that several proteins of the glycolytic pathway (BB0057, BB0020, BB0348) exhibited increased carbonylation in the sodA mutant treated with MV. Levels of ATP and NAD/NADH were reduced in the sodA mutant compared with the parental strain following treatment with MV and could be attributed to increased levels of oxidation of proteins of the glycolytic pathway. In addition, a chaperone, HtpG (BB0560), and outer surface protein A (OspA, BBA15) were also observed to be oxidized in the sodA mutant. Immunoblot analysis revealed reduced levels of Outer surface protein C (OspC), Decorin binding protein A (DbpA), fibronectin binding protein (BBK32), RpoS and BosR in the sodA mutant compared to the control strains. Viable sodA mutant spirochetes could not be recovered from both gp91/phox-⁄- and iNOS deficient mice while borrelial DNA was detected in multiple tissues samples from infected mice at significantly lower levels compared to the parental strain. Taken together, these observations indicate that the increased oxidation of select borrelial determinants and reduced levels of critical pathogenesis-associated lipoproteins contribute to the in vivo deficit of the sod

  20. Absence of sodA Increases the Levels of Oxidation of Key Metabolic Determinants of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria D; Smith, Trever C; Small, Christina M; Thomas, Derek P; Seshu, J

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, alters its gene expression in response to environmental signals unique to its tick vector or vertebrate hosts. B. burgdorferi carries one superoxide dismutase gene (sodA) capable of controlling intracellular superoxide levels. Previously, sodA was shown to be essential for infection of B. burgdorferi in the C3H/HeN model of Lyme disease. We employed two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and immunoblot analysis with antibodies specific to carbonylated proteins to identify targets that were differentially oxidized in the soluble fractions of the sodA mutant compared to its isogenic parental control strain following treatment with an endogenous superoxide generator, methyl viologen (MV, paraquat). HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of oxidized proteins revealed that several proteins of the glycolytic pathway (BB0057, BB0020, BB0348) exhibited increased carbonylation in the sodA mutant treated with MV. Levels of ATP and NAD/NADH were reduced in the sodA mutant compared with the parental strain following treatment with MV and could be attributed to increased levels of oxidation of proteins of the glycolytic pathway. In addition, a chaperone, HtpG (BB0560), and outer surface protein A (OspA, BBA15) were also observed to be oxidized in the sodA mutant. Immunoblot analysis revealed reduced levels of Outer surface protein C (OspC), Decorin binding protein A (DbpA), fibronectin binding protein (BBK32), RpoS and BosR in the sodA mutant compared to the control strains. Viable sodA mutant spirochetes could not be recovered from both gp91/phox-⁄- and iNOS deficient mice while borrelial DNA was detected in multiple tissues samples from infected mice at significantly lower levels compared to the parental strain. Taken together, these observations indicate that the increased oxidation of select borrelial determinants and reduced levels of critical pathogenesis-associated lipoproteins contribute to the in vivo deficit of the sod

  1. flaB Gene as a Molecular Marker for Distinct Identification of Borrelia Species in Environmental Samples by the PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Method ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wodecka, Beata

    2011-01-01

    A new protocol employing nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) based on the flaB gene and two restriction enzymes was worked out. This protocol allows the identification of all Borrelia species transmitted by Ixodes ricinus in Europe, including Borrelia miyamotoi and 3 genetic variants of B. garinii. A dendrogram of flaB sequence similarity was in accordance with RFLP variants. PMID:21841027

  2. Western gray squirrel (Rodentia: Sciuridae): a primary reservoir host of Borrelia burgdorferi in Californian oak woodlands?

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert S; Mun, Jeomhee; Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars

    2005-05-01

    In California, dense woodlands have been recognized as important biotopes where humans are exposed to the nymphal stage of the western blacklegged tick, Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), in the far-western United States. To identify the principal reservoir host(s) of this spirochete, and of closely related spirochetes in the B. burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) complex, in dense woodlands in Mendocino County, California, approximately 50 species of birds and mammals, including wood rats and kangaroo rats, were evaluated as potential hosts for vector ticks and borreliae in 2002 and 2003. Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analyses revealed that many vertebrate species had been exposed to one or more members of the B. burgdorferi s.l. spirochetal complex, only the western gray squirrel, Sciurus griseus, fulfilled the major criteria for a reservoir host of B. burgdorferi s.s. Ear-punch biopsies from eight of 10 squirrels collected from five separate woodlands were PCR-positive for B. burgdorferi s.s., 47% of I. pacificus larvae (n = 64) and 31% of nymphs (n = 49) removed from squirrels contained B. burgdorferi s.l., and the engorgement status of I. pacificus larvae was associated positively with acquisition of spirochetes. Overall, 83 and 100% of the amplicons sequenced from PCR-positive I. pacificus larvae and nymphs, respectively, were identified as B. burgdorferi s.s, Among the five remaining positive I. pacificus larvae, three contained B. bissettii and two had uncharacterized B. burgdorferi s.l. Borrelia burgdorferi s.s. was detected in one of five larvae and zero of two nymphs of the Pacific Coast tick, Dermacentor occidentalis Marx, that likewise had been removed from squirrels. The rickettsial agent of human anaplasmosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, was detected in the blood or ear biopsies of two squirrels and in one (1.6%) of 64 I. pacificus larvae and

  3. Plaques of Alzheimer's disease originate from cysts of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Here is hypothesized a truly revolutionary notion that rounded cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi are the root cause of the rounded structures called plaques in the Alzheimer brain. Rounded "plaques' in high density in brain tissue are emblematic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plaques may be conceptualized as rounded "pock mark-like" areas of brain tissue injury. In this century, in brain tissue of AD, plaques are Amyloid Plaques according to the most up to date textbooks. In the last century, however, Dr. Alois Alzheimer did not require amyloid as the pathogenesis for either the disease or for the origin of its plaques. Surely, amyloid is an event in AD, but it may not be the primal cause of AD. Indeed in plaques, amyloid is regularly represented by the "congophilic core" structure which is so named because the waxy amyloid material binds the congo red stain and is congophilic. However an accepted subset of plaques in AD is devoid of a congophilic amyloid core region (these plaques "cotton wool" type plaques, lack a central congophilic core structure). Furthermore, there is "plaque diversity" in Alzheimer's; small, medium and large plaques parallel variable cystic diameters for Borrelia burgdorferi. Perturbations of AD plaque structure (i.e. young plaques devoid of a central core and older plaques with or without a central core structure) offer room for an alternate pathway for explanation of ontogeny of the plaque structures. If amyloid is not required to initiate all of the possible plaques in Alzheimer's, is it possible that amyloid just a by product of a more fundamental primal path to dementia? If a byproduct status is assigned to amyloid in the realm of plaque formation, then is amyloid also an epiphenomenon rather than a primary pathogenesis for Alzheimer's disease. In the "anatomy is destiny" model, cysts of borrelia are always round. Why then not accept roundness as a fundamental "structure determines function" argument for the answer to the mystery of

  4. Interpretation criteria for standardized Western blots for three European species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Hauser, U; Lehnert, G; Lobentanzer, R; Wilske, B

    1997-06-01

    Western blots (WBs; immunoblots) are a widely used tool for the serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, but so far, no defined criteria for performance, analysis, and interpretation have been established in Europe. For the current study WBs were produced with strains PKa2 (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto), PKo (Borrelia afzelii), and PBi (Borrelia garinii). To improve resolution we used gels of 17 cm in length. In a first step, 13 immunodominant proteins were identified with monoclonal antibodies. Then, the apparent molecular masses of all visually distinguishable bands were determined densitometrically. Approximately 40 bands of between 14 and 100 kDa were differentiated for each strain. From a study with 330 serum samples (from 189 patients with Lyme borreliosis and 141 controls), all observed bands were documented. To establish criteria for a positive WB result, the discriminating ability of a series of band combinations (interpretation rules) were evaluated separately for each strain (for immunoglobulin G [IgG] WB, > 40 combinations; for IgM WB, > 15 combinations). The following interpretation criteria resulting in specificities of greater than 96% were recommended: for IgG WB, at least one band of p83/100, p58, p56, OspC, p21, and p17a for PKa2; at least two bands of p83/100, p58, p43, p39, p30, OspC, p21, p17, and p14 for PKo; and at least one band of p83/100, p39, OspC, p21, and p17b for PBi; for IgM WB, at least one band of p39, OspC, and p17a or a strong p41 band for PKa2; at least one band of p39, OspC, and p17 or a strong p41 band for PKo; and at least one band of p39 and OspC or a strong p41 band for PBi. The overall sensitivity was the highest for PKo WB, followed by PBi and PKa2 WB, in decreasing order. Standardization of WB assays is necessary for comparison of results from different laboratories.

  5. Human seroprevalence against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in two comparable regions of the eastern Alps is not correlated to vector infection rates.

    PubMed

    Sonnleitner, S T; Margos, G; Wex, F; Simeoni, J; Zelger, R; Schmutzhard, E; Lass-Flörl, C; Walder, G

    2015-04-01

    Seroprevalences were determined by testing sera of 1607 blood donors from North, East, and South Tyrol. In the Tyrols, the continental divide delimitates areas with high seroprevalences of IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in the North (7.2%) from areas with low seroprevalences in the South (1.5%). To determine Borrelia prevalences in unfed Ixodes ricinus ticks, 755 questing ticks were tested by PCR. Prevalences in nymphal and adult ticks were found to be 19.7% (n=132) and 21.5% (n=205) in North Tyrol and 23% (n=43) and 23.7% (n=376) in South Tyrol, respectively. Sequencing of 46 Borrelia-positive ticks yielded 74% Borrelia (B.) afzelii, 11% B. garinii, 7% B. lusitaniae, 7% B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, and 2% B. valaisiana infections. Distinct genetic clusters could not be delimitated on either side of the continental divide. This study describes occurrence and geographic dispersion of Borrelia spp. in the Tyrols, discusses possible reasons for significant differences in human seroprevalence, and indicates that prevalence of Borrelia in vector ticks is not a direct predictive factor for the local seroprevalence in humans. PMID:25661649

  6. GDF-15 inhibits integrin activation and mouse neutrophil recruitment through the ALK-5/TGF-βRII heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Artz, Annette; Butz, Stefan; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2016-07-28

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is the first cytokine known to counteract chemokine-induced activation of leukocyte integrins. We showed recently that this activity dampens neutrophil recruitment into inflamed tissue and is required for survival of myocardial infarction in mice. The receptor responsible for this GDF-15-triggered anti-inflammatory mechanism on myeloid cells is not known. Here, we identify this receptor as transforming growth factor β receptor I (TGF-βRI) (activin receptor-like kinase 5 [ALK-5]) and TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII). We show that interference with these receptors by small-molecule inhibitors, antibodies, or small interfering RNA, blocked the GDF-15 effect on leukocyte integrin activation. Likewise, gene inactivation of each of the 2 receptors in neutrophils isolated from conditional gene-deficient mice abolished the inhibitory effect of GDF-15 on CXCL1-induced β2-integrin activation and neutrophil diapedesis. Rapid neutrophil arrest induced by CXCL1 in vivo was inhibited by GDF-15 in an ALK-5 and TGF-βRII dependent way. As for GDF-15 gene-deficient mice, we found that extravasation of neutrophils deficient for ALK-5 or TGF-βRII was strongly increased in the interleukin-1β inflamed cremaster. The inhibitory effects of GDF-15 on neutrophil integrin activation and in vivo neutrophil arrest were also found for TGF-β1. Mechanistically, GDF-15 and TGF-β1 interfered with integrin activation by inhibiting the activation of Ras-related protein 1 (Rap-1), an effect that depended on CalDAG- guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1) and cell division control protein 42 homolog. We conclude that both GDF-15 and TGF-β1 counteract chemokine-induced integrin activation on neutrophils via the ALK-5/TGF-βRII heterodimer. This represents a novel, rapid anti-inflammatory activity of the 2 TGF-β receptors and of TGF-β1. PMID:27235139

  7. Structure of FitAB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae bound to DNA reveals a tetramer of toxin-antitoxin heterodimers containing pin domains and ribbon-helix-helix motifs.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Kirsten; Wilbur, J Scott; So, Magdalene; Brennan, Richard G

    2006-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a sexually transmitted pathogen that initiates infections in humans by adhering to the mucosal epithelium of the urogenital tract. The bacterium then enters the apical region of the cell and traffics across the cell to exit into the subepithelial matrix. Mutations in the fast intracellular trafficking (fitAB) locus cause the bacteria to transit a polarized epithelial monolayer more quickly than the wild-type parent and to replicate within cells at an accelerated rate. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the toxin-antitoxin heterodimer, FitAB, bound to a high affinity 36-bp DNA fragment from the fitAB promoter. FitA, the antitoxin, binds DNA through its ribbon-helix-helix motif and is tethered to FitB, the toxin, to form a heterodimer by the insertion of a four turn alpha-helix into an extensive FitB hydrophobic pocket. FitB is composed of a PIN (PilT N terminus) domain, with a central, twisted, 5-stranded parallel beta-sheet that is open on one side and flanked by five alpha-helices. FitB in the context of the FitAB complex does not display nuclease activity against tested PIN substrates. The FitAB complex points to the mechanism by which antitoxins with RHH motifs can block the activity of toxins with PIN domains. Interactions between two FitB molecules result in the formation of a tetramer of FitAB heterodimers, which binds to the 36-bp DNA fragment and provides an explanation for how FitB enhances the DNA binding affinity of FitA. PMID:16982615

  8. Cryoelectron tomography reveals the sequential assembly of bacterial flagella in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Kai; Boquoi, Tristan; Hu, Bo; Motaleb, M A; Miller, Kelly A; James, Milinda E; Charon, Nyles W; Manson, Michael D; Norris, Steven J; Li, Chunhao; Liu, Jun

    2013-08-27

    Periplasmic flagella are essential for the distinctive morphology, motility, and infectious life cycle of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. In this study, we genetically trapped intermediates in flagellar assembly and determined the 3D structures of the intermediates to 4-nm resolution by cryoelectron tomography. We provide structural evidence that secretion of rod substrates triggers remodeling of the central channel in the flagellar secretion apparatus from a closed to an open conformation. This open channel then serves as both a gateway and a template for flagellar rod assembly. The individual proteins assemble sequentially to form a modular rod. The hook cap initiates hook assembly on completion of the rod, and the filament cap facilitates filament assembly after formation of the mature hook. Cryoelectron tomography and mutational analysis thus combine synergistically to provide a unique structural blueprint of the assembly process of this intricate molecular machine in intact cells. PMID:23940315

  9. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  10. Seroepidemiology of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in wild mice captured in northern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Güner, E S; Watanabe, M; Kadosaka, T; Polat, E; Gargili, A; Gulanber, A; Ohashi, N; Kaneda, K; Imai, Y; Masuzawa, T

    2005-04-01

    An expedition across the Asian part of the Black Sea coast and national parks of Northern Turkey was organized in the summer of 2001 to investigate the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), Lyme borreliosis agent, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, agent, in wild mice. A total of 65 Apodemus flavicollis, Apodemus sylvaticus, Microtus epiroticus, Crocidura suaveolens and Mus macedonicus, were captured. Two out of 22 Apodemus sylvaticus specimens were seropositive for B. afzelii by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as confirmed by Western blotting, however cultures of skin and bladder samples from all small mammals in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly's medium-II remained negative for B. burgdorferi s.l. All sera tested were negative for Anaplasma phagocytophilum by indirect immunofluorescent assay. The prevalence of B. burgdorferi s.l. and Anaplasma phagocytophilum is low in wild mice of the Asian part of Northern Turkey.

  11. Surveillance for Borrelia burgdorferi in Ixodes Ticks and Small Rodents in British Columbia*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Kuang; Man, Stephanie; Fernando, Keerthi; Wong, Quantine; Hojgaard, Andrias; Tang, Patrick; Mak, Sunny; Henry, Bonnie; Patrick, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi in British Columbian ticks, fieldwork was conducted over a 2-year period. In all, 893 ticks (Ixodes pacificus, I. angustus, I. soricis, Ixodes spp., and Dermacentor andersoni) of different life stages were retrieved from 483 small rodents (Peromyscus maniculatus, Perognathus parvus, and Reithrodontomys megalotis). B. burgdorferi DNA was detected in 5 out of 359 tick pools, and 41 out of 483 mice were serologically confirmed to have antibodies against B. burgdorferi. These results were consistent with previous studies, data from passive surveillance in British Columbia, and data from neighboring states in the Pacific Northwest, suggesting a continually low prevalence of B. burgdorferi in British Columbia ticks. PMID:26502354

  12. A MODEST MODEL EXPLAINS THE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF BORRELIA BURGDORFERI STRAINS

    PubMed Central

    BRISSON, DUSTIN; DYKHUIZEN, DANIEL E.

    2006-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of Borrelia burgdorferi, including human Lyme disease strains, is a function of its interactions with vertebrate species. We present a mathematical model describing important ecologic interactions affecting the distribution and abundance of B. burgdorferi strains, marked by the allele at the outer surface protein C locus, in Ixodes scapularis ticks, the principal vector. The frequency of each strain in ticks can be explained by the vertebrate species composition, the density of each vertebrate species, the number of ticks that feed on individuals of each species, and the rate at which those ticks acquire different strain. The model results are consistent with empirical data collected in a major Lyme disease focus in New England. An applicable extension of these results would be to predict the proportion of ticks carrying human infectious strains of B. burgdorferi from disease host densities and thus predict the local risk of contracting Lyme disease. PMID:16606995

  13. Spotted fever group rickettsiae or Borrelia burgdorferi in Ixodes cookei (Ixodidae) in Connecticut.

    PubMed Central

    Magnarelli, L A; Swihart, R K

    1991-01-01

    Immatures and females of Ixodes cookei, a hard-bodied tick, were collected from woodchucks and other mammals in the northeastern United States and examined for spotted fever group rickettsiae and Borrelia burgdorferi. Of the 93 nymphs analyzed by a hemolymph test, 4 (4.3%) harbored rickettsiae. Six (15%) of 40 females were also infected. All infected ticks were collected from woodchucks in Connecticut. Indirect fluorescent antibody staining of midgut tissues from 128 nymphs revealed B. burgdorferi in two (1.6%) ticks, whereas larval and female ticks were negative. Further consideration should be given to I. cookei as a possible vector of spotted fever group rickettsiae or spirochetes that cause Lyme borreliosis. PMID:1885748

  14. Human Risk of Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme Disease Agent, in Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Cislo, Paul; Brinkerhoff, Robert; Hamer, Sarah A.; Rowland, Michelle; Cortinas, Roberto; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Melton, Forrest; Hickling, Graham J.; Tsao, Jean I.; Bunikis, Jonas; Barbour, Alan G.; Kitron, Uriel; Piesman, Joseph; Fish, Durland

    2012-01-01

    The geographic pattern of human risk for infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the tick-borne pathogen that causes Lyme disease, was mapped for the eastern United States. The map is based on standardized field sampling in 304 sites of the density of Ixodes scapularis host-seeking nymphs infected with B. burgdorferi, which is closely associated with human infection risk. Risk factors for the presence and density of infected nymphs were used to model a continuous 8 km×8 km resolution predictive surface of human risk, including confidence intervals for each pixel. Discontinuous Lyme disease risk foci were identified in the Northeast and upper Midwest, with a transitional zone including sites with uninfected I. scapularis populations. Given frequent under- and over-diagnoses of Lyme disease, this map could act as a tool to guide surveillance, control, and prevention efforts and act as a baseline for studies tracking the spread of infection. PMID:22302869

  15. Patient isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato with genotypic and phenotypic similarities of strain 25015.

    PubMed

    Picken, R N; Cheng, Y; Strle, F; Picken, M M

    1996-11-01

    Strain 25015 is an atypical tick isolate that belongs to a distinct genomic group (DN127) within the general taxon Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Similarities between this strain and a white-footed mouse isolate from Illinois, strain CT39, have been reported. In the course of isolating B. burgdorferi sensu lato in culture from Slovenian patients, 9 isolates were identified with the same genetic profiles as strains 25015 and CT39, as evidenced by restriction enzyme MluI digestion patterns of genomic DNA. The aim of the present study was to molecularly characterize all 11 isolates to examine the extent of their genotypic and phenotypic similarity. The results of molecular studies suggest a close relationship between the patient isolates and strains 25015 and CT39. However, CT39 and several patient isolates possessed unique characteristics that reflect their discrete ontogeny. PMID:8896519

  16. Repeat or persistent Lyme disease: persistence, recrudescence or reinfection with Borrelia Burgdorferi?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not Borrelia burgdorferi can persist after conventional treatment with antimicrobials has been a very controversial issue. Two recent studies took different approaches to try to answer this question. In one, investigators showed that, in each of 22 instances in 17 patients with two consecutive episodes of culture-proved erythema migrans, the strains of B. burgdorferi were different based on their genotypes. This indicated that the repeat episodes were due to new infections rather than recrudescence of the original infection. In another study, in which persistence of B. burgdorferi was assessed by using xenodiagnosis, no viable B. burgdorferi were cultured from ticks fed on any of the patients. There continues to be no evidence that viable B. burgdorferi persist in humans after conventional treatment with antimicrobials. PMID:25705394

  17. Avidity determination of Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgG antibodies in Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Rauer, S; Beitlich, P; Neubert, U; Rasiah, C; Kaiser, R

    2001-01-01

    The avidity indices of Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgG antibodies were estimated using ELISA in sera from patients with different stages of Lyme disease. In addition, sera from healthy students with proof of borrelial-specific IgG antibodies from standard serology were tested. Low avidity indices were detected predominantly in sera from patients with early-stage Lyme disease [erythema migrans (EM); n = 25]. High avidity indices were found in healthy students (n = 72) and in most of the patients with neuroborreliosis (NB; n = 44) and chronic late-stage Lyme disease [acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA); n = 36]. In conclusion, early-stage Lyme disease (EM) could be differentiated from advanced and chronic stages (NB, ACA) and from "seropositive" healthy persons using avidity determination in the majority of patients in this study.

  18. Susceptibility of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) to the Lyme borreliosis spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi).

    PubMed

    Lane, R S

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to infect juvenile and adult western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) with the Lyme borreliosis spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) were largely unsuccessful. Spirochetes could not be isolated from the blood and various tissues of 14 lizards 21-32 days after they had been inoculated ip (n = 8) or sc (n = 6) with 10(6) or 10(8) B. burgdorferi representing 3 tick isolates, although 1 lizard apparently developed a transitory spirochetemia lasting 2 days. Similarly, spirochetes could not be detected in the blood or tissues of 5 lizards fed upon by 2- greater than 8 infected larvae or nymphs of the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus). Sixty-five blood samples from 59 lizards in an endemic area and various tissues from 20 of the same lizards were also assayed for B. burgdorferi with negative results. The implications of these findings for the maintenance of this spirochete in natural foci are discussed. PMID:2301709

  19. Serologic analyses of Peromyscus leucopus, a rodent reservoir for Borrelia burgdorferi, in northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Magnarelli, L A; Anderson, J F; Hyland, K E; Fish, D; Mcaninch, J B

    1988-06-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect fluorescent-antibody test were used to detect antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, in Peromyscus leucopus (white-footed mouse). Of the 661 mice captured in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New York during 1980 and 1983 to 1987, 166 (25.1%) had antibodies to B. burgdorferi by ELISA. Comparative analyses of 210 serum specimens, collected in areas where Lyme disease is endemic, revealed a threefold difference in sensitivity between the ELISA (38.1% positive) and the indirect fluorescent-antibody method (12.4%). Although prevalence of seropositive P. leucopus was highest during June, elevated amounts of antibody (1:1,280 to 1:2,560) were detected in mice that harbored spirochetes during all seasons. Being reservoirs for B. burgdorferi, these rodents are suitable for monitoring spirochete infections at foci and should be included in field evaluations of control programs aimed at suppressing Lyme disease.

  20. Genetic diversity among Borrelia burgdorferi isolates from wood rats and kangaroo rats in California.

    PubMed Central

    Zingg, B C; Brown, R N; Lane, R S; LeFebvre, R B

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-nine Borrelia burgdorferi isolates, obtained from dusky-footed wood rats (Neotoma fuscipes) and California kangaroo rats (Dipodomys californicus) in California, were analyzed genetically. Chromosomal DNA was examined by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and gene probe restriction fragment length polymorphism. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the plasmid profiles of the isolates. REA, the method with the greatest discrimination, disclosed 24 distinct restriction patterns among the 29 isolates. These restriction patterns were sorted into four restriction fragment length polymorphism groups on the basis of their gene hybridization patterns. Results of the REA and plasmid profile analysis supported this grouping. The degree of genetic diversity among Californian isolates demonstrated by our findings is greater than that previously reported among other groups of North American isolates and is similar or greater than the diversity reported among European isolates. Images PMID:7905880

  1. Susceptibility of Various Species of Rodents to the Relapsing Fever Spirochete, Borrelia hermsii.

    PubMed

    Burgdorfer, W; Mavros, A J

    1970-09-01

    In a study to determine susceptibility to Borrelia hermsii of various rodents commonly found in or near places where human cases of relapsing fever occurred, chipmunks (Eutamias amoenus), pine squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus richardsoni), flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus columbianus), golden-mantled ground squirrels (S. lateralis tescorum), wood rats (Neotoma cinerea cinerea), white-footed deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were exposed to spirochetes either by bites of infected Ornithodoros hermsi or by injection of infectious tick suspensions. Daily microscopic examination of blood samples revealed that pine squirrels, chipmunks, and meadow voles responded with spirochetemias of various degrees and length. Pine squirrels were most susceptible and experienced long-lasting and severe spirochetemias accompanied by typical signs of illness. Flying squirrels, Columbian ground squirrels, golden-mantled ground squirrels, wood rats, and white-footed deer mice did not develop demonstrable spirochetal infection. PMID:16557828

  2. Susceptibility of Various Species of Rodents to the Relapsing Fever Spirochete, Borrelia hermsii

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorfer, Willy; Mavros, Anthony J.

    1970-01-01

    In a study to determine susceptibility to Borrelia hermsii of various rodents commonly found in or near places where human cases of relapsing fever occurred, chipmunks (Eutamias amoenus), pine squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus richardsoni), flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus columbianus), golden-mantled ground squirrels (S. lateralis tescorum), wood rats (Neotoma cinerea cinerea), white-footed deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were exposed to spirochetes either by bites of infected Ornithodoros hermsi or by injection of infectious tick suspensions. Daily microscopic examination of blood samples revealed that pine squirrels, chipmunks, and meadow voles responded with spirochetemias of various degrees and length. Pine squirrels were most susceptible and experienced long-lasting and severe spirochetemias accompanied by typical signs of illness. Flying squirrels, Columbian ground squirrels, golden-mantled ground squirrels, wood rats, and white-footed deer mice did not develop demonstrable spirochetal infection. Images PMID:16557828

  3. Reservoir Targeted Vaccine Against Borrelia burgdorferi: A New Strategy to Prevent Lyme Disease Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Luciana Meirelles; Brisson, Dustin; Melo, Rita; Ostfeld, Richard S.; Zeidner, Nordin; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A high prevalence of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi in ixodid ticks is correlated with a high incidence of Lyme disease. The transmission of B. burgdorferi to humans can be disrupted by targeting 2 key elements in its enzootic cycle: the reservoir host and the tick vector. In a prospective 5-year field trial, we show that oral vaccination of wild white-footed mice resulted in outer surface protein A–specific seropositivity that led to reductions of 23% and 76% in the nymphal infection prevalence in a cumulative, time-dependent manner (2 and 5 years, respectively), whereas the proportion of infected ticks recovered from control plots varied randomly over time. Significant decreases in tick infection prevalence were observed within 3 years of vaccine deployment. Implementation of such a long-term public health measure could substantially reduce the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease. PMID:24523510

  4. Tick-borne Relapsing Fever and Borrelia hermsii, Los Angeles County, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Webster, Larry S.; Marques, Adriana R.; Spano, Robyn; Rood, Michael; Burns, Joe; Hu, Renjie

    2009-01-01

    The primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in western North America is Borrelia hermsii, a rodent-associated spirochete transmitted by the fast-feeding soft tick Ornithodoros hermsi. We describe a patient who had an illness consistent with relapsing fever after exposure in the mountains near Los Angeles, California, USA. The patient’s convalescent-phase serum was seropositive for B. hermsii but negative for several other vector-borne bacterial pathogens. Investigations at the exposure site showed the presence of O. hermsi ticks infected with B. hermsii and the presence of rodents that were seropositive for the spirochete. We determined that this tick-borne disease is endemic to the San Gabriel Mountains near the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area. PMID:19624916

  5. Reservoir targeted vaccine against Borrelia burgdorferi: a new strategy to prevent Lyme disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Richer, Luciana Meirelles; Brisson, Dustin; Melo, Rita; Ostfeld, Richard S; Zeidner, Nordin; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2014-06-15

    A high prevalence of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi in ixodid ticks is correlated with a high incidence of Lyme disease. The transmission of B. burgdorferi to humans can be disrupted by targeting 2 key elements in its enzootic cycle: the reservoir host and the tick vector. In a prospective 5-year field trial, we show that oral vaccination of wild white-footed mice resulted in outer surface protein A-specific seropositivity that led to reductions of 23% and 76% in the nymphal infection prevalence in a cumulative, time-dependent manner (2 and 5 years, respectively), whereas the proportion of infected ticks recovered from control plots varied randomly over time. Significant decreases in tick infection prevalence were observed within 3 years of vaccine deployment. Implementation of such a long-term public health measure could substantially reduce the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease.

  6. Reservoir competence of Microtus pennsylvanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markowski, D.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Hyland, K.E.; Hu, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reservoir competence of the meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus Ord, for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner was established on Patience Island, RI. Meadow voles were collected from 5 locations throughout Rhode Island. At 4 of the field sites, M. pennsylvanicus represented only 4.0% (n = 141) of the animals captured. However, on Patience Island, M. pennsylvanicus was the sole small mammal collected (n = 48). Of the larval Ixodes scapularis Say obtained from the meadow voles on Patience Island, 62% (n = 78) was infected with B. burgdorferi. Meadow voles from all 5 locations were successfully infected with B. burgdorferi in the laboratory and were capable of passing the infection to xenodiagnostic I. scapularis larvae for 9 wk. We concluded that M. pennsylvanicus was physiologically capable of maintaining B. burgdorferi infection. However, in locations where Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque) is abundant, the role of M. pennsylvanicus as a primary reservoir for B. burgdorferi was reduced.

  7. Prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi in Ixodes Ticks in Europe and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Chris D.; Carolan, Heather E.; Rounds, Megan A.; Honig, Vaclav; Mothes, Benedikt; Haag, Heike; Nolte, Oliver; Luft, Ben J.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Ecker, David J.; Schutzer, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, a relapsing fever-related spirochete transmitted by Ixodes ticks, has been recently shown to be a human pathogen. To characterize the prevalence of this organism in questing Ixodes ticks, we tested 2,754 ticks for a variety of tickborne pathogens by PCR and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry. Ticks were collected from California, New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Indiana in the United States and from Germany and the Czech Republic in Europe from 2008 through 2012. In addition, an isolate from Japan was characterized. We found 3 distinct genotypes, 1 for North America, 1 for Europe, and 1 for Japan. We found B. miyamotoi infection in ticks in 16 of the 26 sites surveyed, with infection prevalence as high as 15.4%. These results show the widespread distribution of the pathogen, indicating an exposure risk to humans in areas where Ixodes ticks reside. PMID:25280366

  8. Elimination of Borrelia burgdorferi from vector ticks feeding on OspA-immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Fikrig, E; Telford, S R; Barthold, S W; Kantor, F S; Spielman, A; Flavell, R A

    1992-06-15

    Although recombinant outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi protects mice against injected Lyme disease spirochetes, the mode of protection has not yet been explored. Indeed, the efficacy of vaccine-induced immunity against a realistic vector-mediated challenge remains unexplored. Accordingly, we determined whether this immunogen protects mice against spirochetes delivered by nymphal Ixodes dammini ticks. Following challenge by tick bite, no spirochetes could be cultured from immunized mice, and no characteristic histopathology was found. The spirochete was not detected in ticks that fed on immunized animals and was present in virtually all ticks that fed on nonimmunized mice. We conclude that OspA-immunized mice are protected from spirochetal infection, at least in part, because the spirochete is destroyed in the infecting tick.

  9. Human risk of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent, in eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Diuk-Wasser, Maria A; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Cislo, Paul; Brinkerhoff, Robert; Hamer, Sarah A; Rowland, Michelle; Cortinas, Roberto; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Melton, Forrest; Hickling, Graham J; Tsao, Jean I; Bunikis, Jonas; Barbour, Alan G; Kitron, Uriel; Piesman, Joseph; Fish, Durland

    2012-02-01

    The geographic pattern of human risk for infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the tick-borne pathogen that causes Lyme disease, was mapped for the eastern United States. The map is based on standardized field sampling in 304 sites of the density of Ixodes scapularis host-seeking nymphs infected with B. burgdorferi, which is closely associated with human infection risk. Risk factors for the presence and density of infected nymphs were used to model a continuous 8 km×8 km resolution predictive surface of human risk, including confidence intervals for each pixel. Discontinuous Lyme disease risk foci were identified in the Northeast and upper Midwest, with a transitional zone including sites with uninfected I. scapularis populations. Given frequent under- and over-diagnoses of Lyme disease, this map could act as a tool to guide surveillance, control, and prevention efforts and act as a baseline for studies tracking the spread of infection.

  10. Borrelia sp. in ticks recovered from white-tailed deer in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Luckhart, S; Mullen, G R; Durden, L A; Wright, J C

    1992-07-01

    Six hundred sixty-five hunter-killed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from 18 counties in Alabama (USA) were examined for ticks. Most of the collections were made at state-operated wildlife management areas. Four species of ticks (n = 4,527) were recovered: the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (n = 482); the Gulf Coast tick A. maculatum (n = 11); the winter tick Dermacentor albipictus (n = 1,242); and the black-legged tick Ixodes scapularis (n = 2,792). Fifty-six percent of the ticks (n = 2,555) were examined for Borrelia sp. spirochetes using an immunofluorescent, polyclonal antibody assay. Spirochetes were detected in I. scapularis (five females, seven males) from Barbour, Butler, Coosa, and Lee counties and A. americanum (four males, four nymphs) from Hale, Lee, and Wilcox counties. Area-specific prevalences in ticks were as high as 3.3% for I. scapularis and 3.8% for A. americanum.

  11. Reactivity of human Lyme borreliosis sera with a 39-kilodalton antigen specific to Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W J; Schrumpf, M E; Schwan, T G

    1990-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, a spirochetal illness with a variety of acute clinical manifestations that may lead to debilitating neurological and arthritic complications. Diagnosis is difficult because symptoms mimic a variety of unrelated clinical conditions, spirochetes cannot always be isolated from infected patients, and current serological tests are frequently inconclusive because of the presence of cross-reacting non-B. burgdorferi antibodies. To identify antigens specific to B. burgdorferi that could be used in the serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, we screened a Borrelia DNA expression library in Escherichia coli for antigens reactive with human Lyme borreliosis sera. One clone carried a 6.3-kilobase EcoRI chromosomal fragment (pSPR33), which encoded two species-specific antigens with molecular masses of 28 (P28) and 39 (P39) kilodaltons (kDa). These two antigens were immunologically distinct from OspA, OspB, and the 41-kDa flagellin. Ninety-four serum specimens from patients having Lyme borreliosis were tested for reactivity with P39. All of 33 the serum specimens with immunofluorescence assay titers of greater than or equal to 1:256, 13 of 17 serum specimens with titers of 1:128, and 14 of 44 serum specimens with titers of less than or equal to 1:64 reacted with P39. Notably, many sera reactive to P39 did not appear to react with the 41-kDa flagellin. Therefore, antibody to P39 could be mistaken for antibody to the 41-kDa flagellin in tests of human sera by Western blot (immunoblot). Twenty-five control serum specimens, which included sera from syphilitic, relapsing fever, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients as well as from 10 normal individuals, did not react to P39. Our data suggest that P39 may be a useful antigen for the serological confirmation of Lyme borreliosis. Images PMID:2380361

  12. Identification of novel activity against Borrelia burgdorferi persisters using an FDA approved drug library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Ting; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Although antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease is effective in the majority of cases, especially during the early phase of the disease, a minority of patients suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). It is unclear what mechanisms drive this problem, and although slow or ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi has been suggested as an explanation, there is a lack of evidence that viable organisms are present in PTLDS. Although not a clinical surrogate, insight may be gained by examining stationary-phase in vitro Borrelia burgdorferi persisters that survive treatment with the antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin. To identify drug candidates that can eliminate B. burgdorferi persisters more effectively, we screened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library consisting of 1524 compounds against stationary-phase B. burgdorferi by using a newly developed high throughput SYBR Green I/propidium iodide (PI) assay. We identified 165 agents approved for use in other disease conditions that had more activity than doxycycline and amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi persisters. The top 27 drug candidates from the 165 hits were confirmed to have higher anti-persister activity than the current frontline antibiotics. Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole), and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity. In addition, some drug candidates, such as daptomycin and clofazimine (which had the highest activity against non-growing persisters), had relatively poor activity or a high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against growing B. burgdorferi. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for Lyme disease and for the relief of long-term symptoms that afflict some Lyme disease patients. PMID:26038747

  13. Identification and characterization of a surface-exposed, 66-kilodalton protein from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Probert, W S; Allsup, K M; LeFebvre, R B

    1995-01-01

    The surface-exposed antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi represent important targets for the development of a protective immune response. We have identified a proteinase K-accessible, 66-kDa protein from B. burgdorferi and have demonstrated that at least a portion of this protein is surface exposed. The 66-kDa protein was purified by sequential extraction of spirochetes with butanol and Triton X-114 followed by preparative gel electrophoresis. Polyclonal antibodies developed against the purified 66-kDa protein were Borrelia spp. specific, whereas a monoclonal antibody, Route 66, displayed a genospecies-specific pattern of recognition for the 66-kDa protein. N-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained from an internal fragment, a truncated version, and the full-length form of the 66-kDa protein. A search of protein and gene databases for homologous sequences yielded a match with the predicted amino acid sequence from a segment of B. burgdorferi chromosomal DNA (P. A. Rosa, D. Hogan, and T. G. Schwan, J. Clin. Microbiol. 29:524-532, 1991). The construction of primers based on this DNA sequence and the N-terminal amino acid sequence allowed the amplification and cloning of the 66-kDa-protein gene. The identity of the cloned gene was verified by the recognition of the expressed gene product by Route 66. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot analysis were performed to confirm the chromosomal location of the 66-kDa-protein gene. This study describes the identification and cloning of the first chromosomally encoded, surface-exposed protein from B. burgdoferi. PMID:7729905

  14. Identification of novel activity against Borrelia burgdorferi persisters using an FDA approved drug library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Ting; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2014-07-01

    Although antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease is effective in the majority of cases, especially during the early phase of the disease, a minority of patients suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). It is unclear what mechanisms drive this problem, and although slow or ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi has been suggested as an explanation, there is a lack of evidence that viable organisms are present in PTLDS. Although not a clinical surrogate, insight may be gained by examining stationary-phase in vitro Borrelia burgdorferi persisters that survive treatment with the antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin. To identify drug candidates that can eliminate B. burgdorferi persisters more effectively, we screened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library consisting of 1524 compounds against stationary-phase B. burgdorferi by using a newly developed high throughput SYBR Green I/propidium iodide (PI) assay. We identified 165 agents approved for use in other disease conditions that had more activity than doxycycline and amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi persisters. The top 27 drug candidates from the 165 hits were confirmed to have higher anti-persister activity than the current frontline antibiotics. Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole), and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity. In addition, some drug candidates, such as daptomycin and clofazimine (which had the highest activity against non-growing persisters), had relatively poor activity or a high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against growing B. burgdorferi. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for Lyme disease and for the relief of long-term symptoms that afflict some Lyme disease patients.

  15. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

    2012-03-14

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

  16. Serodiagnosis of Louse-Borne Relapsing Fever with Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterase (GlpQ) from Borrelia recurrentis

    PubMed Central

    Porcella, Stephen F.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schriefer, Martin E.; Dennis, David T.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2000-01-01

    Human louse-borne relapsing fever occurs in sporadic outbreaks in central and eastern Africa that are characterized by significant morbidity and mortality. Isolates of the causative agent, Borrelia recurrentis, were obtained from the blood of four patients during a recent epidemic of the disease in southern Sudan. The glpQ gene, encoding glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase, from these isolates was sequenced and compared with the glpQ sequences obtained from other relapsing-fever spirochetes. Previously we showed that GlpQ of Borrelia hermsii is an immunogenic protein with utility as a serological test antigen for discriminating tick-borne relapsing fever from Lyme disease. In the present work, we cloned and expressed the glpQ gene from B. recurrentis and used recombinant GlpQ in serological tests. Acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples obtained from 42 patients with louse-borne relapsing fever were tested with an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that used whole cells of B. recurrentis and with immunoblotting to whole-cell lysates of the spirochete and Escherichia coli producing recombinant GlpQ. The geometric mean titers of the acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples measured by IFA were 1:83 and 1:575, respectively. The immunoblot analysis identified a high level of reactivity and seroconversion to GlpQ, and the assay was more sensitive than the whole-cell IFA and ELISA using purified, recombinant histidine-tagged GlpQ. Serum antibodies to GlpQ and other antigens persisted for 27 years in one patient. We conclude that assessment of anti-GlpQ antibodies will allow serological confirmation of louse-borne relapsing fever and determination of disease prevalence. PMID:11015364

  17. Linear chromosomal physical and genetic map of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent.

    PubMed

    Casjens, S; Huang, W M

    1993-05-01

    A physical map of the 952 kbp chromosome of Borrelia burgdorferi Sh-2-82 has been constructed. Eighty-three intervals on the chromosome, defined by the cleavage sites of 15 restriction enzymes, are delineated. The intervals vary in size from 96 kbp to a few hundred bp, with an average size of 11.5 kbp. A striking feature of the map is its linearity; no other bacterial groups are known to have linear chromosomes. The two ends of the chromosome do not hybridize with one another, indicating that there are no large common terminal regions. The chromosome of this strain was found to be stable in culture; passage 6, 165 and 320 cultures have identical chromosomal restriction maps. We have positioned all previously known Borrelia burgdorferi chromosomal genes and several newly identified ones on this map. These include the gyrA/gyrB/dnaA/dnaN gene cluster, the rRNA gene cluster, fla, flgE, groEL (hsp60), recA, the rho/hip cluster, the dnaK (hsp70)/dnaJ/grpE cluster, the pheT/pheS cluster, and the genes which encode the potent immunogen proteins p22A, p39 and p83. Our electrophoretic analysis detects five linear and at least two circular plasmids in B. burgdorferi Sh-2-82. We have constructed a physical map of the 53 kbp linear plasmid and located the operon that encodes the two major outer surface proteins ospA and ospB on this plasmid. Because of the absence of functional genetic tools for this organism, these maps will serve as a basis for future mapping, cloning and sequencing studies of B. burgdorferi.

  18. Invasion of the lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis: implications for Borrelia burgdorferi endemicity.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Sarah A; Tsao, Jean I; Walker, Edward D; Hickling, Graham J

    2010-08-01

    Lyme disease risk is increasing in the United States due in part to the spread of blacklegged ticks Ixodes scapularis, the principal vector of the spirochetal pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. A 5-year study was undertaken to investigate hypothesized coinvasion of I. scapularis and B. burgdorferi in Lower Michigan. We tracked the spatial and temporal dynamics of the tick and spirochete using mammal, bird, and vegetation drag sampling at eight field sites along coastal and inland transects originating in a zone of recent I. scapularis establishment. We document northward invasion of these ticks along Michigan's west coast during the study period; this pattern was most evident in ticks removed from rodents. B. burgdorferi infection prevalences in I. scapularis sampled from vegetation in the invasion zone were 9.3% and 36.6% in nymphs and adults, respectively, with the majority of infection (95.1%) found at the most endemic site. There was no evidence of I. scapularis invasion along the inland transect; however, low-prevalence B. burgdorferi infection was detected in other tick species and in wildlife at inland sites, and at northern coastal sites in years before the arrival of I. scapularis. These infections suggest that cryptic B. burgdorferi transmission by other vector-competent tick species is occurring in the absence of I. scapularis. Other Borrelia spirochetes, including those that group with B. miyamotoi and B. andersonii, were present at a low prevalence within invading ticks and local wildlife. Reports of Lyme disease have increased significantly in the invasion zone in recent years. This rapid blacklegged tick invasion--measurable within 5 years--in combination with cryptic pathogen maintenance suggests a complex ecology of Lyme disease emergence in which wildlife sentinels can provide an early warning of disease emergence.

  19. Extracellular secretion of the Borrelia burgdorferi Oms28 porin and Bgp, a glycosaminoglycan binding protein.

    PubMed

    Cluss, Robert G; Silverman, Damon A; Stafford, Thomas R

    2004-11-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease pathogen, cycles between its Ixodes tick vector and vertebrate hosts, adapting to vastly different biochemical environments. Spirochete gene expression as a function of temperature, pH, growth phase, and host milieu is well studied, and recent work suggests that regulatory networks are involved. Here, we examine the release of Borrelia burgdorferi strain B31 proteins into conditioned medium. Spirochetes intrinsically radiolabeled at concentrations ranging from 10(7) to 10(9) cells per ml secreted Oms28, a previously characterized outer membrane porin, into RPMI medium. As determined by immunoblotting, this secretion was not associated with outer membrane blebs or cytoplasmic contamination. A similar profile of secreted proteins was obtained for spirochetes radiolabeled in mixtures of RPMI medium and serum-free Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK II) medium. Proteomic liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of tryptic fragments derived from strain B31 culture supernatants confirmed the identity of the 28-kDa species as Oms28 and revealed a 26-kDa protein as 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (Pfs-2), previously described as Bgp, a glycosaminoglycan-binding protein. The release of Oms28 into the culture medium is more selective when the spirochetes are in logarithmic phase of growth compared to organisms obtained from stationary phase. As determined by immunoblotting, stationary-phase spirochetes released OspA, OspB, and flagellin. Oms28 secreted by strains B31, HB19, and N40 was also recovered by radioimmunoprecipitation. This is the first report of B. burgdorferi protein secretion into the extracellular environment. The possible roles of Oms28 and Bgp in the host-pathogen interaction are considered.

  20. Seroprevalence study of Tick-borne encephalitis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Dengue and Toscana virus in Turin Province.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Agostino; Beltramo, Tiziana; Torre, Donato

    2007-01-01

    Tick borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is present in some European countries and it is transmitted by a tick bite. Ixodes ricinus is the main vector of the infection in Italy, where fortunately clinical neurological manifestations, typical of the more serious phase of the disease, are very rarely observed. This behaviour is different from other endemic Euroasiatic areas where numerous cases of encephalitis are described. However TBE transmission has not been widely investigated in Italy and available epidemiological data have been obtained only by studies performed in Central and Northern Regions of the country. In addition seroepidemiological researches were made prevalently on subjects at high risk of tick bite, such as hunters or forest guards from Trentin and Central Italy. No precise information about TBE virus diffusion was available in the Piedmont before our investigations. We found that hunters and wild boar breeders seem to be particularly exposed to the risk of TBE virus infection in Turin Province and in particular in the Susa valley, although no neurological involvement was observed in our population. In particular a seroprevalence of about 5% was detected by the use of purified antigens ELISA test, amongst the subjects at high risk of tick bite. Moreover low risk individuals showed a seroprevalence of below 2%. In addition a parallel seroepidemiological study was performed in Turin Province for Borrelia burgdorferi, the aetiological agent of Lyme disease, also transmitted by tick bite (e.g. Ixodes ricinus), for Dengue and Toscana (TOS) arboviruses, respectively transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and phlebotomes. Data reported here demonstrate only a sporadic presence in our population of antibodies against Borrelia and Dengue infection. Moreover using an ELISA test performed with viral purified nucleoprotein, we reported a total percentage of about 3% of subjects positive for TOSV.

  1. A non-active-site SET domain surface crucial for the interaction of MLL1 and the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer within MLL family core complexes.

    PubMed

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Hu, Michael; Vought, Valarie E; Ng, Sarah B; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2014-06-12

    The mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) enzyme is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) monomethyltransferase and has served as a paradigm for understanding the mechanism of action of the human SET1 family of enzymes that include MLL1-MLL4 and SETd1a,b. Dimethylation of H3K4 requires a sub-complex including WRAD (WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30), which binds to each SET1 family member forming a minimal core complex that is required for multiple lysine methylation. We recently demonstrated that WRAD is a novel histone methyltransferase that preferentially catalyzes H3K4 dimethylation in a manner that is dependent on an unknown non-active-site surface from the MLL1 SET domain. Recent genome sequencing studies have identified a number of human disease-associated missense mutations that localize to the SET domains of several MLL family members. In this investigation, we mapped many of these mutations onto the three-dimensional structure of the SET domain and noticed that a subset of MLL2 (KMT2D, ALR, MLL4)-associated Kabuki syndrome missense mutations map to a common solvent-exposed surface that is not expected to alter enzymatic activity. We introduced these mutations into the MLL1 SET domain and observed that all are defective for H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex, which is associated with a loss of the ability of MLL1 to interact with WRAD or with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer. Our results suggest that amino acids from this surface, which we term the Kabuki interaction surface or KIS, are required for formation of a second active site within SET1 family core complexes. PMID:24680668

  2. Differences in Genotype, Clinical Features, and Inflammatory Potential of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto Strains from Europe and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cerar, Tjasa; Strle, Franc; Stupica, Dasa; Ruzic-Sabljic, Eva; McHugh, Gail; Steere, Allen C.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto isolates from patients with erythema migrans in Europe and the United States were compared by genotype, clinical features of infection, and inflammatory potential. Analysis of outer surface protein C and multilocus sequence typing showed that strains from these 2 regions represent distinct genotypes. Clinical features of infection with B. burgdorferi in Slovenia were similar to infection with B. afzelii or B. garinii, the other 2 Borrelia spp. that cause disease in Europe, whereas B. burgdorferi strains from the United States were associated with more severe disease. Moreover, B. burgdorferi strains from the United States induced peripheral blood mononuclear cells to secrete higher levels of cytokines and chemokines associated with innate and Th1-adaptive immune responses, whereas strains from Europe induced greater Th17-associated responses. Thus, strains of the same B. burgdorferi species from Europe and the United States represent distinct clonal lineages that vary in virulence and inflammatory potential. PMID:27088349

  3. Differences in Genotype, Clinical Features, and Inflammatory Potential of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto Strains from Europe and the United States.

    PubMed

    Cerar, Tjasa; Strle, Franc; Stupica, Dasa; Ruzic-Sabljic, Eva; McHugh, Gail; Steere, Allen C; Strle, Klemen

    2016-05-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto isolates from patients with erythema migrans in Europe and the United States were compared by genotype, clinical features of infection, and inflammatory potential. Analysis of outer surface protein C and multilocus sequence typing showed that strains from these 2 regions represent distinct genotypes. Clinical features of infection with B. burgdorferi in Slovenia were similar to infection with B. afzelii or B. garinii, the other 2 Borrelia spp. that cause disease in Europe, whereas B. burgdorferi strains from the United States were associated with more severe disease. Moreover, B. burgdorferi strains from the United States induced peripheral blood mononuclear cells to secrete higher levels of cytokines and chemokines associated with innate and Th1-adaptive immune responses, whereas strains from Europe induced greater Th17-associated responses. Thus, strains of the same B. burgdorferi species from Europe and the United States represent distinct clonal lineages that vary in virulence and inflammatory potential.

  4. Occurrence of Bartonella henselae and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato co-infections in ticks collected from humans in Germany.

    PubMed

    Mietze, A; Strube, C; Beyerbach, M; Schnieder, T; Goethe, R

    2011-06-01

    Bartonella (B.) henselae is the zoonotic agent of cat scratch disease. B. henselae has been associated with therapy-resistant Lyme disease in humans suggesting that B. henselae and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato might be transmitted concurrently by ticks. In the present study we found that 16 (6.9%) of 230 Ixodes ricinus collected from humans harboured DNA of Bartonella spp. Fifteen positive ticks were infected with B. henselae and one tick with B. clarridgeiae. Twenty-five percent of the 16 Bartonella positive ticks were co-infected with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Our data show that B. henselae is present in Ixodes ricinus and that ticks may serve as source of infection for humans.

  5. Kinetics of beta-tubulin exchange following translation. Evidence for a slow conformational change in beta-tubulin necessary for incorporation into heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, M B; Farr, G W; Sternlicht, H

    1989-11-15

    Cell-free translation of beta-tubulin mRNA generates full length beta-tubulin polypeptides distributed in three molecular forms: a high molecular weight lysate-associated form, the free beta-tubulin subunit, and the alpha beta-heterodimer (Yaffe, M.B., Farr, G. W., and Sternlicht, H. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 16023-16031). A quantitative assay system for these three forms was developed and used to measure the rates of incorporation/exchange of the newly synthesized free beta-subunit and the high molecular weight form into tubulin heterodimers following incubation of the 35S-translation products with unlabeled bovine tubulin dimer. This exchange process was found to be slow and strongly temperature-dependent. The half-lives for exchange ranged from 12.5 min at 37 degrees C to 17.5 h at 0 degree C with a measured activation energy of 22.5 kcal/mol. Microtubule-associated proteins appeared to play no role in the exchange process, since identical exchange rates were observed regardless of whether microtubule protein or phosphocellulose-purified tubulin was used as the source of tubulin dimer. Surprisingly, the exchange rates were found to be independent of dimer concentration. We interpret these results as evidence for a rate-limiting, slow conformational change that occurs within the newly synthesized beta-subunits prior to their association with alpha-tubulin to generate the alpha beta-hetero-dimer.

  6. Insights into Borrelia miyamotoi infection from an untreated case demonstrating relapsing fever, monocytosis and a positive C6 Lyme serology.

    PubMed

    Sudhindra, Praveen; Wang, Guiqing; Schriefer, Martin E; McKenna, Donna; Zhuge, Jian; Krause, Peter J; Marques, Adriana R; Wormser, Gary P

    2016-09-01

    We describe a patient from the United States with PCR- and serology-confirmed Borrelia miyamotoi infection who recovered without antibiotics. Our findings suggest that B. miyamotoi infection may cause relapsing fever, blood monocytosis and antibody reactivity to the C6 peptide. Further studies are required to better define the spectrum of clinical and laboratory findings for this emerging tick-transmitted infection. PMID:27412815

  7. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice--A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-02-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4), 1 x 10(2) and 4 x 10(0) spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species.

  8. Circumstantial evidence for an increase in the total number and activity of borrelia-infected ixodes ricinus in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Between 1994 and 2009, a threefold increase has been observed in consultations of general practitioners for tick bites and Lyme disease in The Netherlands. The objective of this study was to determine whether an increase in the number of questing ticks infected with B. burgdorferi sensu lato is a potential cause of the rise in Lyme disease incidence. Methods Historic data on land usage, temperature and wildlife populations were collected and analyzed together with data from two longitudinal field studies on density of questing ticks. Effective population sizes of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. were calculated. Results Long-term trend analyses indicated that the length of the annual tick questing season increased as well as the surface area of tick-suitable habitats in The Netherlands. The overall abundances of feeding and reproductive hosts also increased. Mathematical analysis of the data from the field studies demonstrated an increase in mean densities/activities of questing ticks, particularly of larvae between 2006 and 2009. No increase in infection rate of ticks with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was found. Population genetic analysis of the collected Borrelia species points to an increase in B. afzelii and B. garinii populations. Conclusions Together, these findings indicate an increase in the total number of Borrelia-infected ticks, providing circumstantial evidence for an increase in the risk of acquiring a bite of a tick infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. Due to the high spatiotemporal variation of tick densities/activities, long-term longitudinal studies on population dynamics of I. ricinus are necessary to observe significant trends. PMID:23244453

  9. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) in Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) adults in New Jersey, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Terry L; Jordan, Robert A; Hung, Robert W; Puelle, Rose S; Markowski, Daniel; Chomsky, Martin S

    2003-07-01

    Using polymerase chain reaction, we analyzed 529 Ixodes scapularis Say adults collected from 16 of New Jersey's 21 counties for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease. Overall, 261 (49.3%) were positive. B. burgdorferi was detected in ticks obtained from each county and from 53 of the 58 (93.1%) municipalities surveyed. The observed statewide prevalence in New Jersey is similar to those reported from other northeastern and mid-Atlantic states.

  10. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti in mice on islands inhabited by white-tailed deer.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J F; Johnson, R C; Magnarelli, L A; Hyde, F W; Myers, J E

    1987-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti were isolated from 35 of 51 white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) captured on two Narragansett Bay, R.I., islands inhabited by deer, the principal host for the adult stages of the vector tick, Ixodes dammini. Immature ticks parasitized mice from both islands. From 105 mice captured on four other islands not inhabited by deer neither pathogen was isolated, nor were I. dammini found. PMID:3555339

  11. [Effectiveness of sodium arsamilate and its effect on the immunity of hens experimentally infected with Borrelia anserina].

    PubMed

    Drumev, D; Stoianova, L

    1976-01-01

    The toxicity of sodium arsanilate for chickens was determined following a six-day oral application. Doses higher than 0.15/kg body weight led to symptoms of intoxication and death, especially when the intake of water was restricted. No spirochetemia, clinical signs of spirochetosis, and death cases were noted in birds infected subcutaneously with a lethal dose of Borrelia anserina simultaneously treated (orally) in the course of three days with sodium arsanilate either in solution or in tablets rated 0.05 -0.15/kg or in the drinking water at 0.4--0.5/1 for four days beginning one day prior to infection. Symptoms of the disease were observed in the birds of the control group only. On the second day after the infection the effectiveness of sodium arsanilate proved as high as 95 per cent, and on the third day--75 percent It was found that the agent had a relatively short-term prophylactic action. The chickens acquired immunity at the simultaneous application of sodium arsanilate and a culture of Borrelia anserina. Sodium arsanilate was shown not to affect the building of postvaccinal immunity in birds in the case of Borrelia anserina infection.

  12. Comparison of different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato used as antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed Central

    Magnarelli, L A; Anderson, J F; Johnson, R C; Nadelman, R B; Wormser, G P

    1994-01-01

    Eight strains of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato were tested with serum samples from persons who had Lyme borreliosis or syphilis in class-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Antigens of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, of Borrelia garinii, and of Borrelia spirochetes in group VS461 were prepared from cultured bacteria isolated from ticks, a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), or human tissues in North America, the former Soviet Union, and Japan. Nearly all of the serum specimens that contained immunoglobulins to strain 2591, a Connecticut isolate, were also positive in antibody tests with the other seven strains. In general, all eight strains reacted similarly and were suitable as coating antigens in class-specific ELISAs. Assay sensitivities ranged from 82.6 to 100% in analyses for immunoglobulin M and G antibodies. Compared with reference antigen strain 2591, strains 231 (a tick isolate from Canada) and NCH-1 (a human skin isolate from Wisconsin) resulted in higher antibody titers in an ELISA. Syphilitic sera cross-reacted in all tests regardless of the antigen used. Key immunodominant proteins are shared among the closely related strains of B. burgdorferi sensu lato tested, but it is suspected that variations in antigen compositions among these spirochetes may sometimes affect assay performance for detecting serum antibodies. PMID:8051239

  13. Isolation and characterization of Borrelia burgdorferi from blood of a bird captured in the Saint Croix River Valley.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, R G; Ubico, S R; Hughes, C A; Engstrom, S M; Johnson, R C

    1993-01-01

    Field investigations were conducted to further evaluate the role of birds in the maintenance and dissemination of Borrelia burgdorferi. Blood specimens were taken from 39 passerine birds of 17 species captured during June 1991 at the Saint Croix National Riverway in Wisconsin, and one isolate, WI91-23, was cultured from an adult song sparrow (Melospiza melodia). This isolate was shown to be infectious for Peromyscus leucopus and Mesocricetus auratus (golden hamster). Isolate WI91-23 was confirmed as B. burgdorferi by immunofluorescence assay by using species-specific anti-OspA monoclonal antibodies H3TS and H5332 and anti-OspB antibody H5TS. Isolate WI91-23 was compared with Borrelia anserina Es, Borrelia hermsii MAN-1, and other B. burgdorferi strains (ATCC 53210, CT-1, and Catharus fuscescens [veery] liver 10293). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of in situ-lysed spirochetes revealed that the DNA plasmid profile of WI91-23 was most similar to those of plasmids from B. burgdorferi and most different from those of plasmids from B. anserina and B. hermsii. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that the protein profile of WI91-23 was like that of other B. burgdorferi strains studied, with dominant proteins corresponding to OspA and OspB, and that it differed from the protein profiles of B. anserina and B. hermsii. These findings indicate that passerine birds may serve as reservoirs for B. burgdorferi. Images PMID:8370728

  14. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence.

    PubMed

    James, Allison E; Rogovskyy, Artem S; Crowley, Michael A; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence. PMID:27195796

  15. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    James, Allison E.; Rogovskyy, Artem S.; Crowley, Michael A.; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence. PMID:27195796

  16. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Ixodes cf. neuquenensis and Ixodes sigelos ticks from the Patagonian region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Patrick S; Bottero, Maria Noelia Saracho; Carvalho, Luis; Mackenstedt, Ute; Lareschi, Marcela; Venzal, José M; Nava, Santiago

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to detect Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection in ixodid ticks from the Patagonia region in the south of Argentina. Therefore, ticks were collected on rodents in the provinces of Chubut, Río Negro and Santa Cruz. These ticks were identified as nymphs of Ixodes cf. neuquenensis and Ixodes sigelos. The B. burgdorferi s.l. infection was tested by a battery of PCR methods targeting the gene flagellin (fla) and the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer region (IGS). Three pools of I. sigelos nymphs from Chubut and Santa Cruz provinces as well as one pool of I. cf. neuquenensis nymphs from Río Negro province were tested positive in the fla-PCR. The samples of I. sigelos were also positive for the IGS-PCR. Phylogenetically, the haplotypes found in the positive ticks belong to the B. burgdorferi s.l. complex, and they were closely related to Borrelia chilensis, a genospecies isolated from Ixodes stilesi in Chile. The pathogenic relevance of the Borrelia genospecies detected in both I. neuquenensis and I. sigelos is unknown. PMID:27372197

  17. A tick gut protein with fibronectin III domains aids Borrelia burgdorferi congregation to the gut during transmission.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Sukanya; Coumou, Jeroen; Schuijt, Tim J; Boder, Eric; Hovius, Joppe W; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the vertebrate host commences with growth of the spirochete in the tick gut and migration from the gut to the salivary glands. This complex process, involving intimate interactions of the spirochete with the gut epithelium, is pivotal to transmission. We utilized a yeast surface display library of tick gut proteins to perform a global screen for tick gut proteins that might interact with Borrelia membrane proteins. A putative fibronectin type III domain-containing tick gut protein (Ixofin3D) was most frequently identified from this screen and prioritized for further analysis. Immunization against Ixofin3D and RNA interference-mediated reduction in expression of Ixofin3D resulted in decreased spirochete burden in tick salivary glands and in the murine host. Microscopic examination showed decreased aggregation of spirochetes on the gut epithelium concomitant with reduced expression of Ixofin3D. Our observations suggest that the interaction between Borrelia and Ixofin3D facilitates spirochete congregation to the gut during transmission, and provides a "molecular exit" direction for spirochete egress from the gut.

  18. A Tick Gut Protein with Fibronectin III Domains Aids Borrelia burgdorferi Congregation to the Gut during Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Schuijt, Tim J.; Boder, Eric; Hovius, Joppe W.; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the vertebrate host commences with growth of the spirochete in the tick gut and migration from the gut to the salivary glands. This complex process, involving intimate interactions of the spirochete with the gut epithelium, is pivotal to transmission. We utilized a yeast surface display library of tick gut proteins to perform a global screen for tick gut proteins that might interact with Borrelia membrane proteins. A putative fibronectin type III domain-containing tick gut protein (Ixofin3D) was most frequently identified from this screen and prioritized for further analysis. Immunization against Ixofin3D and RNA interference-mediated reduction in expression of Ixofin3D resulted in decreased spirochete burden in tick salivary glands and in the murine host. Microscopic examination showed decreased aggregation of spirochetes on the gut epithelium concomitant with reduced expression of Ixofin3D. Our observations suggest that the interaction between Borrelia and Ixofin3D facilitates spirochete congregation to the gut during transmission, and provides a “molecular exit” direction for spirochete egress from the gut. PMID:25102051

  19. Cloning and expression of soluble truncated variants of Borrelia OspA, OspB and Vmp7

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Barbour, Alan G.

    1996-11-05

    A method is provided herein for preparing soluble recombinant variations of Borrelia lipoproteins such as Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA) and outer surface protein B (OspB), and B. hermsii variable major protein 7 (Vmp7). The method includes synthesizing a set of oligonucleotide primers, amplifying the template DNA utilizing the PCR, purifying the amplification products, cloning the amplification products into a suitable expression vector, transforming a suitable host utilizing the cloned expression vector, cultivating the transformed host for protein production and subsequently isolating and purifying the resulting protein. Also provided are soluble, recombinant variations of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA), outer surface protein B (OspB), and B. hermsii variable major protein 7 (Vmp7). The expression vectors harboring DNA encoding the recombinant variations, pET9-OspA, pET9-OspB and pET9-Vmp7, as well as the E. coli host BL21(DE3)/pLysS transformed with each of these vectors, are also disclosed.

  20. Cloning and expression of soluble truncated variants of Borrelia OspA, OspB and Vmp7

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.J.; Barbour, A.G.

    1996-11-05

    A method is provided for preparing soluble recombinant variations of Borrelia lipoproteins such as Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA) and outer surface protein B (OspB), and B. hermsii variable major protein 7 (Vmp7). The method includes synthesizing a set of oligonucleotide primers, amplifying the template DNA utilizing the PCR, purifying the amplification products, cloning the amplification products into a suitable expression vector, transforming a suitable host utilizing the cloned expression vector, cultivating the transformed host for protein production and subsequently isolating and purifying the resulting protein. Also provided are soluble, recombinant variations of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA), outer surface protein B (OspB), and B. hermsii variable major protein 7 (Vmp7). The expression vectors harboring DNA encoding the recombinant variations, pET9-OspA, pET9-OspB and pET9-Vmp7, as well as the E. coli host BL21(DE3)/pLysS transformed with each of these vectors, are also disclosed. 38 figs.

  1. Acute parvovirus B19 infection causes nonspecificity frequently in Borrelia and less often in Salmonella and Campylobacter serology, posing a problem in diagnosis of infectious arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Tuuminen, Tamara; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Seppälä, Ilkka

    2011-01-01

    Several infectious agents may cause arthritis or arthropathy. For example, infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, may in the late phase manifest as arthropathy. Infections with Campylobacter, Salmonella, or Yersinia may result in a postinfectious reactive arthritis. Acute infection with parvovirus B19 (B19V) may likewise initiate transient or chronic arthropathy. All these conditions may be clinically indistinguishable from rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we present evidence that acute B19V infection may elicit IgM antibodies that are polyspecific or cross-reactive with a variety of bacterial antigens. Their presence may lead to misdiagnosis and improper clinical management, exemplified here by two case descriptions. Further, among 33 subjects with proven recent B19V infection we found IgM enzyme immunoassay (EIA) positivity for Borrelia only; for Borrelia and Salmonella; for Borrelia and Campylobacter; and for Borrelia, Campylobacter, and Salmonella in 26 (78.7%), 1 (3%), 2 (6%), and 1 (3%), respectively; however, when examined by Borrelia LineBlot, all samples were negative. These antibodies persisted over 3 months in 4/13 (38%) patients tested. Likewise, in a retrospective comparison of the results of a diagnostic laboratory, 9/11 (82%) patients with confirmed acute B19V infection showed IgM antibody to Borrelia. However, none of 12 patients with confirmed borreliosis showed any serological evidence of acute B19V infection. Our study demonstrates that recent B19V infection can be misinterpreted as secondary borreliosis or enteropathogen-induced reactive arthritis. To obtain the correct diagnosis, we emphasize caution in interpretation of polyreactive IgM and exclusion of recent B19V infection in patients examined for infectious arthritis or arthropathy.

  2. Life history of Ixodes (Ixodes) jellisoni (Acari: Ixodidae) and its vector competence for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Peavey, C A; Padgett, K A; Hendson, M

    1999-05-01

    Ixodes (Ixodes) jellisoni Cooley & Kohls, a nonhuman biting and little known tick, is one of 4 members of the I. ricinus complex in the United States. A localized population of I. jellisoni inhabiting a grassland biotope in Mendocino County, CA, was studied from 1993 to 1997. Rodent trapping in all seasons revealed that the only host of both immature and adult I. jellisoni was the heteromyid rodent Dipodomys californicus Merriam. Field investigations suggested that I. jellisoni is nidicolous in habit, and laboratory findings demonstrated that it reproduces parthenogenetically. Known parthenogenetic females (n = 4) produced an average of 530 eggs of which 74% hatched, which was comparable to the fecundity and fertility of wild-caught females (n = 8). After the transstadial molt, 57 F1 or F2 nymphs derived from 2 wild-caught or 4 laboratory-reared, unmated females produced only females. Ixodes jellisoni males were not found on 112 wild-caught D. californicus individuals that were captured an average of 2 times. Collectively, these findings suggest that I. jellisoni may be obligatorily parthenogenetic. Borrelial isolates were obtained from 85% of 58 D. californicus and 33% of 21 I. jellisoni females removed from this rodent. None of the 7 infected female ticks passed borreliae ovarially to its F1 larval progeny. Eight D. californicus and 5 I. jellisoni-derived isolates that were genetically characterized belonged to 2 restriction pattern groups of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. Neither restriction pattern group has been assigned to a particular genospecies yet. After placement on naturally infected D. californicus, noninfected larval ticks acquired and transstadially passed spirochetes as efficiently as (group 1 borreliae) or 6 times more efficiently (group 2 borreliae) than Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls. As few as 1-4 infected I. jellisoni nymphs were capable of transmitting group 1 or group 2 borreliae to naive D. californicus. We conclude that I. jellisoni is a

  3. Abundance of Ixodes ricinus and prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. in the nature reserve Siebengebirge, Germany, in comparison to three former studies from 1978 onwards

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the last decades, population densities of Ixodes ricinus and prevalences of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. have increased in different regions in Europe. In the present study, we determined tick abundance and the prevalence of different Borrelia genospecies in ticks from three sites in the Siebengebirge, Germany, which were already examined in the years 1987, 1989, 2001 and 2003. Data from all investigations were compared. Methods In 2007 and 2008, host-seeking I. ricinus were collected by monthly blanket dragging at three distinct vegetation sites in the Siebengebirge, a nature reserve and a well visited local recreation area near Bonn, Germany. In both years, 702 ticks were tested for B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA by nested PCR, and 249 tick samples positive for Borrelia were further genotyped by reverse line blotting. Results A total of 1046 and 1591 I. ricinus were collected in 2007 and 2008, respectively. In comparison to previous studies at these sites, the densities at all sites increased from 1987/89 and/or from 2003 until 2008. Tick densities and Borrelia prevalences in 2007 and 2008, respectively, were not correlated for all sites and both years. Overall, Borrelia prevalence of all ticks decreased significantly from 2007 (19.5%) to 2008 (16.5%), thus reaching the same level as in 2001 two times higher than in 1987/89 (7.6%). Since 2001, single infections with a Borrelia genospecies predominated in all collections, but the number of multiple infections increased, and in 2007, for the first time, triple Borrelia infections occurred. Prevalences of Borrelia genospecies differed considerably between the three sites, but B. garinii or B. afzelii were always the most dominant genospecies. B. lusitaniae was detected for the first time in the Siebengebirge, also in co-infections with B. garinii or B. valaisiana. Conclusions Over the last two centuries tick densities have changed in the Siebengebirge at sites that remained unchanged by human activity since

  4. Selective association of outer surface lipoproteins with the lipid rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T; Coleman, James L; LaRocca, Timothy J; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L

    2014-03-11

    Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ospA, ospB, and ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism's adaptation to changing environments. IMPORTANCE Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich clusters within the membranes of cells. Lipid rafts contain proteins that have functions in sensing the cell environment and transmitting signals. Although selective proteins are present in

  5. Identification of host blood-meal sources and Borrelia in field-collected Ixodes ricinus ticks in north-western Poland.

    PubMed

    Wodecka, Beata; Skotarczak, Bogumila

    2016-01-01

    Forest animals play fundamental roles in the maintenance of Ixodes ricinus and Borrelia species in the forest biotope. To identify the forest vertebrate species that are host for I. ricinus and for the recognition of the reservoirs of Borrelia species, the blood-meal of 325 I. ricinus ticks collected at two forest sites in north-western Poland were analysed. Nested PCR was used to detect polymorphisms in a fragment of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene for the identification of the hosts species. The products were digested with the restriction enzymes, a combination that allows the identification of 60 vertebrate species, comprising 17 bird, 4 reptile and 39 mammalian species. Host DNA was detected in 244 (75%) I. ricinus individuals, with the species being detected and classified for 210 (86%) samples. The restriction patterns resulted in the identification of 14 vertebrate species, including 2 species of birds, lizard, badger, rabbit, deer; most of the samples contained DNA from wild boar (Sus scrofa), red fox (Vulpes vulpes), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). Identification of Borrelia species was based on the flaB gene using nested PCR coupled to RFLP. This method allows the identification of all Borrelia species transmitted by I. ricinus in Europe, including B. miyamotoi and 3 genetic variants of B. garinii. In the studied isolates, 2 species belonging to B. burgdorferi sensu lato were identified--B. garinii and B. afzelii, and B. miyamotoi, which are related to relapsing fever borreliae. PMID:27007518

  6. Homogeneous Inflammatory Gene Profiles Induced in Human Dermal Fibroblasts in Response to the Three Main Species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato

    PubMed Central

    Meddeb, Mariam; Carpentier, Wassila; Cagnard, Nicolas; Nadaud, Sophie; Grillon, Antoine; Barthel, Cathy; De Martino, Sylvie Josiane; Jaulhac, Benoît; Boulanger, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In Lyme borreliosis, the skin is the key site for bacterial inoculation by the infected tick and for cutaneous manifestations. We previously showed that different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto isolated from tick and from different clinical stages of the Lyme borreliosis (erythema migrans, and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans) elicited a very similar transcriptional response in normal human dermal fibroblasts. In this study, using whole transcriptome microarray chips, we aimed to compare the transcriptional response of normal human dermal fibroblasts stimulated by 3 Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato strains belonging to 3 main pathogenic species (B. afzelii, B. garinii and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto) in order to determine whether “species-related” inflammatory pathways could be identified. The three Borrelia strains tested exhibited similar transcriptional profiles, and no species-specific fingerprint of transcriptional changes in fibroblasts was observed. Conversely, a common core of chemokines/cytokines (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL6, CXCL10, IL-6, IL-8) and interferon-related genes was stimulated by all the 3 strains. Dermal fibroblasts appear to play a key role in the cutaneous infection with Borrelia, inducing a homogeneous inflammatory response, whichever Borrelia species was involved. PMID:27706261

  7. Mutations in Human Tubulin Proximal to the Kinesin-Binding Site Alter Dynamic Instability at Microtubule Plus- and Minus-Ends.

    PubMed

    Ti, Shih-Chieh; Pamula, Melissa C; Howes, Stuart C; Duellberg, Christian; Cade, Nicholas I; Kleiner, Ralph E; Forth, Scott; Surrey, Thomas; Nogales, Eva; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2016-04-01

    The assembly of microtubule-based cellular structures depends on regulated tubulin polymerization and directional transport. Here, we purify and characterize tubulin heterodimers that have human β-tubulin isotype III (TUBB3), as well as heterodimers with one of two β-tubulin mutations (D417H or R262H). Both point mutations are proximal to the kinesin-binding site and have been linked to an ocular motility disorder in humans. Compared to wild-type, microtubules with these mutations have decreased catastrophe frequencies and increased average lifetimes of plus- and minus-end-stabilizing caps. Importantly, the D417H mutation does not alter microtubule lattice structure or Mal3 binding to growing filaments. Instead, this mutation reduces the affinity of tubulin for TOG domains and colchicine, suggesting that the distribution of tubulin heterodimer conformations is changed. Together, our findings reveal how residues on the surface of microtubules, distal from the GTP-hydrolysis site and inter-subunit contacts, can alter polymerization dynamics at the plus- and minus-ends of microtubules.

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces the Production and Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Canine Synovial Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Straubinger, Alix F.; Summers, Brian A.; Erb, Hollis N.; Härter, Luc; Appel, Max J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Canine synovial membrane explants were exposed to high- or low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Spirochetes received no treatment, were UV light irradiated for 16 h, or were sonicated prior to addition to synovial explant cultures. In explant tissues, mRNA levels for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, and IL-8 were surveyed semiquantitatively by reverse transcription-PCR. Culture supernatants were examined for numbers of total and motile (i.e., viable) spirochetes, TNF-like and IL-1-like activities, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis-inducing activities, and IL-8. During exposure to synovial explant tissues, the total number of spirochetes in the supernatants decreased gradually by ∼30%, and the viability also declined. mRNAs for TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 were up-regulated in synovial explant tissues within 3 h after infection with untreated or UV light-irradiated B. burgdorferi, and mRNA levels corresponded to the results obtained with bioassays. During 24 h of coincubation, cultures challenged with untreated or UV light-irradiated spirochetes produced similar levels of TNF-like and IL-1-like activities. In contrast, explant tissues exposed to untreated B. burgdorferi generated significantly higher levels of chemotactic factors after 24 h of incubation than did explant tissues exposed to UV light-treated spirochetes. In identical samples, a specific signal for IL-8 was identified by Western blot analysis. High- and low-passage borreliae did not differ in their abilities to induce proinflammatory cytokines. No difference in cytokine induction between untreated and sonicated high-passage spirochetes was observed, suggesting that fractions of the organism can trigger the production and release of inflammatory mediators. The titration of spirochetes revealed a dose-independent cytokine response, where 103 to 107 B. burgdorferi organisms induced similar TNF

  9. A monoclonal antibody to OspA inhibits association of Borrelia burgdorferi with human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, L E; Fikrig, E; Shoberg, R J; Flavell, R A; Thomas, D D

    1993-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that polyclonal antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and some monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to borrelia major surface proteins caused inhibition of adherence of the bacteria to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells. In this study, fragment antigen binding (Fab) molecules generated from the immunoglobulin G fraction of rabbit anti-recombinant OspA serum were found to inhibit the adherence of B. burgdorferi to HUVE cells by 73%. Subsequently, MAbs were generated for use in determining whether or how B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins (Osps) A and/or B are involved in mediating attachment to, and/or invasion of, HUVE cells by B. burgdorferi. Twenty-two MAbs were generated to borrelial proteins with apparent molecular masses (determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of 19, 31 (OspA), 34 (OspB), and 35 kDa. Fab molecules from one anti-OspA MAb, 9B3D, demonstrated an inhibitory effect on bacterial association with HUVE cells. None of the other MAbs, including the other anti-OspA MAbs, showed an inhibitory effect on cell association of greater than 5%. This effect of Fab 9B3D was concentration dependent and plateaued at approximately 6 micrograms of Fab per ml (nearly 80% inhibition of the bacterial association with the monolayer). Penetration assays and cell association experiments performed by using immunofluorescence also suggested that the inhibitory action of 9B3D occurs at the level of adherence. MAb 9B3D recognized the OspA of every North American strain tested (n = 19) but only 3 [corrected] of 20 strains from western Europe, Russia, and Japan, suggesting that the North American strains and strains from other parts of the world may use different molecules and/or different OspA epitopes to interact with endothelial cells. Immunoblots of Escherichia coli expressing different OspA fusion peptides suggested that the 9B3D epitope resides in the carboxy-terminal half of OspA. MAb 9B3D

  10. Sequence analysis and characterization of a 40-kilodalton Borrelia hermsii glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Shang, E S; Skare, J T; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Blanco, D R; Tempst, P; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1997-01-01

    We report the purification, molecular cloning, and characterization of a 40-kDa glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase homolog from Borrelia hermsii. The 40-kDa protein was solubilized from whole organisms with 0.1% Triton X-100, phase partitioned into the Triton X-114 detergent phase, and purified by fast-performance liquid chromatography (FPLC). The gene encoding the 40-kDa protein was cloned from a B. hermsii chromosomal DNA lambda EXlox expression library and identified by using affinity antibodies generated against the purified native protein. The deduced amino acid sequence included a 20-amino-acid signal peptide encoding a putative leader peptidase II cleavage site, indicating that the 40-kDa protein was a lipoprotein. Based on significant homology (31 to 52% identity) of the 40-kDa protein to glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases of Escherichia coli (GlpQ), Bacillus subtilis (GlpQ), and Haemophilus influenzae (Hpd; protein D), we have designated this B. hermsii 40-kDa lipoprotein a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (Gpd) homolog, the first B. hermsii lipoprotein to have a putative functional assignment. A nonlipidated form of the Gpd homolog was overproduced as a fusion protein in E. coli BL21(DE3)(pLysE) and was used to immunize rabbits to generate specific antiserum. Immunoblot analysis with anti-Gpd serum recognized recombinant H. influenzae protein D, and conversely, antiserum to H. influenzae protein D recognized recombinant B. hermsii Gpd (rGpd), indicating antigenic conservation between these proteins. Antiserum to rGpd also identified native Gpd as a constituent of purified outer membrane vesicles prepared from B. hermsii. Screening of other pathogenic spirochetes with anti-rGpd serum revealed the presence of antigenically related proteins in Borrelia burgdorferi, Treponema pallidum, and Leptospira kirschneri. Further sequence analysis both upstream and downstream of the Gpd homolog showed additional homologs of glycerol metabolism

  11. Hypothetical Protein BB0569 Is Essential for Chemotaxis of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Jun; Charon, Nyles W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has five putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs). In this report, we provide evidence that a hypothetical protein, BB0569, is essential for the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi. While BB0569 lacks significant homology to the canonical MCPs, it contains a conserved domain (spanning residues 110 to 170) that is often evident in membrane-bound MCPs such as Tar and Tsr of Escherichia coli. Unlike Tar and Tsr, BB0569 lacks transmembrane regions and recognizable HAMP and methylation domains and is similar to TlpC, a cytoplasmic chemoreceptor of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. An isogenic mutant of BB0569 constantly runs in one direction and fails to respond to attractants, indicating that BB0569 is essential for chemotaxis. Immunofluorescence, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, and cryo-electron tomography analyses demonstrate that BB0569 localizes at the cell poles and is required for chemoreceptor clustering at the cell poles. Protein cross-linking studies reveal that BB0569 forms large protein complexes with MCP3, indicative of its interactions with other MCPs. Interestingly, analysis of B. burgdorferi mcp mutants shows that inactivation of either mcp2 or mcp3 reduces the level of BB0569 substantially and that such a reduction is caused by protein turnover. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the domain composition and function of BB0569 are similar in some respects to those of TlpC but that these proteins are different in their cellular locations, further highlighting that the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi is unique and different from the Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica paradigm. IMPORTANCE Spirochete chemotaxis differs substantially from the Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica paradigm, and the basis for controlling the rotation of the bundles of periplasmic flagella at each end of the cell is unknown. In recent years, Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, has

  12. β2-Adrenergic Receptors Chaperone Trapped Bitter Taste Receptor 14 to the Cell Surface as a Heterodimer and Exert Unidirectional Desensitization of Taste Receptor Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghwa; Pauer, Susan H; Yong, Hwan M; An, Steven S; Liggett, Stephen B

    2016-08-19

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are G-protein-coupled receptors now recognized to be expressed on extraoral cells, including airway smooth muscle (ASM) where they evoke relaxation. TAS2Rs are difficult to express in heterologous systems, with most receptors being trapped intracellularly. We find, however, that co-expression of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) in HEK-293T routes TAS2R14 to the cell surface by forming receptor heterodimers. Cell surface TAS2R14 expression was increased by ∼5-fold when β2AR was co-expressed. Heterodimer formation was shown by co-immunoprecipitation with tagged receptors, biomolecular fluorescence complementation, and merged confocal images. The dynamic nature of this interaction was shown by: a gene-dose relationship between transfected β2AR and TAS2R14 expression, enhanced (up to 3-fold) TAS2R14 agonist stimulation of [Ca(2+)]i with β2AR co-transfection, ∼53% decrease in [Ca(2+)]i signaling with shRNA knockdown of β2AR in H292 cells, and ∼60% loss of [Ca(2+)]i responsiveness in βAR knock-out mouse ASM. Once expressed on the surface, we detected unidirectional, conformation-dependent, interaction within the heterodimer, with β2AR activation rapidly uncoupling TAS2R14 function (∼65% desensitization). Cross-talk was independent of β2AR internalization and cAMP/PKA, and not accompanied by TAS2R14 internalization. With prolonged β-agonist exposure, TAS2R14 internalized, consistent with slow recycling of naked TAS2R14 in the absence of the heterodimeric milieu. In studies of ASM mechanics, rapid cross-talk was confirmed at the physiologic level, where relaxation from TAS2R14 agonist was decreased by ∼50% with β-agonist co-treatment. Thus the β2AR acts as a double-edged sword: increasing TAS2R14 cell surface expression, but when activated by β-agonist, partially offsetting the expression phenotype by direct receptor:receptor desensitization of TAS2R14 function. PMID:27342779

  13. β2-Adrenergic Receptors Chaperone Trapped Bitter Taste Receptor 14 to the Cell Surface as a Heterodimer and Exert Unidirectional Desensitization of Taste Receptor Function*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghwa; Pauer, Susan H.; Yong, Hwan M.; An, Steven S.; Liggett, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are G-protein-coupled receptors now recognized to be expressed on extraoral cells, including airway smooth muscle (ASM) where they evoke relaxation. TAS2Rs are difficult to express in heterologous systems, with most receptors being trapped intracellularly. We find, however, that co-expression of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) in HEK-293T routes TAS2R14 to the cell surface by forming receptor heterodimers. Cell surface TAS2R14 expression was increased by ∼5-fold when β2AR was co-expressed. Heterodimer formation was shown by co-immunoprecipitation with tagged receptors, biomolecular fluorescence complementation, and merged confocal images. The dynamic nature of this interaction was shown by: a gene-dose relationship between transfected β2AR and TAS2R14 expression, enhanced (up to 3-fold) TAS2R14 agonist stimulation of [Ca2+]i with β2AR co-transfection, ∼53% decrease in [Ca2+]i signaling with shRNA knockdown of β2AR in H292 cells, and ∼60% loss of [Ca2+]i responsiveness in βAR knock-out mouse ASM. Once expressed on the surface, we detected unidirectional, conformation-dependent, interaction within the heterodimer, with β2AR activation rapidly uncoupling TAS2R14 function (∼65% desensitization). Cross-talk was independent of β2AR internalization and cAMP/PKA, and not accompanied by TAS2R14 internalization. With prolonged β-agonist exposure, TAS2R14 internalized, consistent with slow recycling of naked TAS2R14 in the absence of the heterodimeric milieu. In studies of ASM mechanics, rapid cross-talk was confirmed at the physiologic level, where relaxation from TAS2R14 agonist was decreased by ∼50% with β-agonist co-treatment. Thus the β2AR acts as a double-edged sword: increasing TAS2R14 cell surface expression, but when activated by β-agonist, partially offsetting the expression phenotype by direct receptor:receptor desensitization of TAS2R14 function. PMID:27342779

  14. Diagnostic value of proteins of three Borrelia species (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato) and implications for development and use of recombinant antigens for serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hauser, U; Lehnert, G; Wilske, B

    1998-07-01

    More and more assays for the serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis (LB) are based on recombinant antigens. However, so far, there is no consensus as to which are the most specific and sensitive proteins and how they should be used in combination to obtain tests with the best discrimination abilities. The present study was preceded by a detailed analysis of Western blots (WB) using whole-cell lysates of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain PKa2, B. afzelii PKo, and B. garinii PBi (U. Hauser, G. Lehnert, R. Lobentanzer, and B. Wilske, J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:1433-1444, 1997). For the present work, the data bank from that study, containing information about the reactivities of 330 sera (from patients at different stages of LB [n = 189]; control group, n = 141), was reused. The specificities and sensitivities of various combinations of proteins from different strains were calculated for different interpretation criteria. For immunoglobulin G (IgG) WB, the recommended combination of antigens available to date as recombinant proteins included p83/100 of PKa2, p83/100 of PKo, p39 of PKo, p39 of PBi, and OspC of PBi (interpretation criterion, at least one reactive band required for a positive WB; specificity, 96.5%; sensitivity, 56.1%). The further addition of p58 of PKo, p17 of PKo, or p14 of PKo was most favorable in terms of both a considerable gain of sensitivity and little loss of specificity. IgG Western blotting with a whole-cell lysate of strain PKo might be improved by the addition of OspC of PBi. For IgG WB, the best combination, out of all bands, was p83/100, p58, p39, p30, and p21 of all three strains and OspC of PBi, p17b of PBi, p56 of PKa2, p43 of PKo, p17 of PKo, and p14 of PKo (interpretation criterion, at least two reactive bands required for a positive WB; specificity, 97.2%; sensitivity, 61.4%). An interpretation criterion of at least two reactive bands is more reliable than one of only one reactive band. For IgM WB, the best combination was OspC of PKo

  15. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of some [Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor]-C5'-linker-[Integrase Inhibitor] heterodimers as inhibitors of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Sugeac, Elena; Fossey, Christine; Ladurée, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Selected for their expected ability to inhibit HIV replication, a series of eight heterodimers containing a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NRTI) and an Integrase Inhibitor (INI), bound by a linker, were designed and synthesized. For the NRTIs, d4U, d2U and d4T were chosen. For the INIs, 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (6) and 4-(3,5-dibenzyloxyphenyl)-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (9) (belonging to the beta-diketo acids class) were chosen. The conjugation of the two different inhibitors (NRTI and INI) was performed using an amino acid (glycine or beta-alanine) as a cleavable linker.

  16. Retinoic acid activates human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene through binding of RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer to a novel retinoic acid response element in the promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Fang; Liu Yan; Liu Li; Wu Kailang; Wei Wei; Zhu Ying . E-mail: yingzhu@whu.edu.cn; Wu Jianguo . E-mail: wu9988@vip.sina.com

    2007-04-06

    Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) catalyzes nitric oxide (NO) which has a significant effect on tumor suppression and cancer therapy. Here we revealed the detailed molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of hiNOS expression induced by retinoic acid (RA). We showed that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer was important in hiNOS promoter activation, hiNOS protein expression, and NO production. Serial deletion and site-directed mutation analysis revealed two half-sites of retinoic acid response element (RARE) spaced by 5 bp located at -172 to -156 in the hiNOS promoter. EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} directly bound to this RARE of hiNOS promoter. Our results suggested the identification of a novel RARE in the hiNOS promoter and the roles of the nuclear receptors (RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha}) in the induction of hiNOS by RA.

  17. Motility is crucial for the infectious life cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Syed Z; Manne, Akarsh; Stewart, Philip E; Bestor, Aaron; Rosa, Patricia A; Charon, Nyles W; Motaleb, M A

    2013-06-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, exists in a zoonotic cycle involving an arthropod tick and mammalian host. Dissemination of the organism within and between these hosts depends upon the spirochete's ability to traverse through complex tissues. Additionally, the spirochete outruns the host immune cells while migrating through the dermis, suggesting the importance of B. burgdorferi motility in evading host clearance. B. burgdorferi's periplasmic flagellar filaments are composed primarily of a major protein, FlaB, and minor protein, FlaA. By constructing a flaB mutant that is nonmotile, we investigated for the first time the absolute requirement for motility in the mouse-tick life cycle of B. burgdorferi. We found that whereas wild-type cells are motile and have a flat-wave morphology, mutant cells were nonmotile and rod shaped. These mutants were unable to establish infection in C3H/HeN mice via either needle injection or tick bite. In addition, these mutants had decreased viability in fed ticks. Our studies provide substantial evidence that the periplasmic flagella, and consequently motility, are critical not only for optimal survival in ticks but also for infection of the mammalian host by the arthropod tick vector. PMID:23529620

  18. Evidence of Borrelia autoimmunity-induced component of Lyme carditis and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Raveche, Elizabeth S; Schutzer, Steven E; Fernandes, Helen; Bateman, Helen; McCarthy, Brian A; Nickell, Steven P; Cunningham, Madeleine W

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the possibility that manifestations of Lyme disease in certain hosts, such as arthritis and carditis, may be autoimmunity mediated due to molecular mimicry between the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and self-components. We first compared amino acid sequences of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein, a known inducer of antibodies that are cross-reactive with myosin, and B. burgdorferi and found significant homologies with OspA protein. We found that S. pyogenes M5-specific antibodies and sera from B. burgdorferi-infected mice reacted with both myosin and B. burgdorferi proteins by Western blots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To investigate the relationship between self-reactivity and the response to B. burgdorferi, NZB mice, models of autoimmunity, were infected. NZB mice infected with B. burgdorferi developed higher degrees of joint swelling and higher anti-B. burgdorferi immunoglobulin M cross-reactive responses than other strains with identical major histocompatibility complex (DBA/2 and BALB/c). These studies reveal immunological cross-reactivity and suggest that B. burgdorferi may share common epitopes which mimic self-proteins. These implications could be important for certain autoimmunity-susceptible individuals or animals who become infected with B. burgdorferi.

  19. Evidence of Borrelia Autoimmunity-Induced Component of Lyme Carditis and Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raveche, Elizabeth S.; Schutzer, Steven E.; Fernandes, Helen; Bateman, Helen; McCarthy, Brian A.; Nickell, Steven P.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the possibility that manifestations of Lyme disease in certain hosts, such as arthritis and carditis, may be autoimmunity mediated due to molecular mimicry between the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and self-components. We first compared amino acid sequences of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein, a known inducer of antibodies that are cross-reactive with myosin, and B. burgdorferi and found significant homologies with OspA protein. We found that S. pyogenes M5-specific antibodies and sera from B. burgdorferi-infected mice reacted with both myosin and B. burgdorferi proteins by Western blots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To investigate the relationship between self-reactivity and the response to B. burgdorferi, NZB mice, models of autoimmunity, were infected. NZB mice infected with B. burgdorferi developed higher degrees of joint swelling and higher anti-B. burgdorferi immunoglobulin M cross-reactive responses than other strains with identical major histocompatibility complex (DBA/2 and BALB/c). These studies reveal immunological cross-reactivity and suggest that B. burgdorferi may share common epitopes which mimic self-proteins. These implications could be important for certain autoimmunity-susceptible individuals or animals who become infected with B. burgdorferi. PMID:15695691

  20. Biodiversity of Borrelia burgdorferi strains in tissues of Lyme disease patients.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Dustin; Baxamusa, Nilofer; Schwartz, Ira; Wormser, Gary P

    2011-01-01

    Plant and animal biodiversity are essential to ecosystem health and can provide benefits to humans ranging from aesthetics to maintaining air quality. Although the importance of biodiversity to ecology and conservation biology is obvious, such measures have not been applied to strains of an invasive bacterium found in human tissues during infection. In this study, we compared the strain biodiversity of Borrelia burgdorferi found in tick populations with that found in skin, blood, synovial fluid or cerebrospinal fluid of Lyme disease patients. The biodiversity of B. burgdorferi strains is significantly greater in tick populations than in the skin of patients with erythema migrans. In turn, strains from skin are significantly more diverse than strains at any of the disseminated sites. The cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurologic Lyme disease harbored the least pathogen biodiversity. These results suggest that human tissues act as niches that can allow entry to or maintain only a subset of the total pathogen population. These data help to explain prior clinical observations on the natural history of B. burgdorferi infection and raise several questions that may help to direct future research to better understand the pathogenesis of this infection.

  1. The salt-sensitive structure and zinc inhibition of Borrelia burgdorferi protease BbHtrA.

    PubMed

    Russell, Theresa M; Tang, Xiaoling; Goldstein, Jason M; Bagarozzi, Dennis; Johnson, Barbara J B

    2016-02-01

    HtrA serine proteases are highly conserved and essential ATP-independent proteases with chaperone activity. Bacteria express a variable number of HtrA homologues that contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of bacterial pathogens. Lyme disease spirochetes possess a single HtrA protease homologue, Borrelia burgdorferi HtrA (BbHtrA). Previous studies established that, like the human orthologue HtrA1, BbHtrA is proteolytically active against numerous extracellular proteins in vitro. In this study, we utilized size exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) to demonstrate BbHtrA oligomeric structures that were substrate independent and salt sensitive. Examination of the influence of transition metals on the activity of BbHtrA revealed that this protease is inhibited by Zn(2+) > Cu(2+) > Mn(2+). Extending this analysis to two other HtrA proteases, E. coli DegP and HtrA1, revealed that all three HtrA proteases were reversibly inhibited by ZnCl2 at all micro molar concentrations examined. Commercial inhibitors for HtrA proteases are not available and physiologic HtrA inhibitors are unknown. Our observation of conserved zinc inhibition of HtrA proteases will facilitate structural and functional studies of additional members of this important class of proteases. PMID:26480895

  2. The Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Protects Borrelia burgdorferi from Nitrosative Stress in Ixodes scapularis Ticks.

    PubMed

    Bourret, Travis J; Lawrence, Kevin A; Shaw, Jeff A; Lin, Tao; Norris, Steven J; Gherardini, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi encounters a wide range of environmental conditions as it cycles between ticks of the genus Ixodes and its various mammalian hosts. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are potent antimicrobial molecules generated during the innate immune response to infection, however, it is unclear whether ROS and RNS pose a significant challenge to B. burgdorferi in vivo. In this study, we screened a library of B. burgdorferi strains with mutations in DNA repair genes for increased susceptibility to ROS or RNS in vitro. Strains with mutations in the methyl-directed mismatch repair gene mutS1 are hypersensitive to killing by ROS, while strains lacking the nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene uvrB show increased susceptibility to both ROS and RNS. Therefore, mutS1-deficient and uvrB-deficient strains were compared for their ability to complete their infectious cycle in Swiss Webster mice and I. scapularis ticks to help identify sites of oxidative and nitrosative stresses encountered by B. burgdorferi in vivo. Both mutS1 and uvrB were dispensable for infection of mice, while uvrB promoted the survival of spirochetes in I. scapularis ticks. The decreased survival of uvrB-deficient B. burgdorferi was associated with the generation of RNS in I. scapularis midguts and salivary glands during feeding. Collectively, these data suggest that B. burgdorferi must withstand cytotoxic levels of RNS produced during infection of I. scapularis ticks. PMID:27656169

  3. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi and granulocytic and monocytic ehrlichiae in Ixodes ricinus ticks from southern Germany.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, B U; Röllinghoff, M; Bogdan, C

    1999-11-01

    A total of 287 adult Ixodes ricinus ticks, collected in two regions of southern Germany (Frankonia and Baden-Württemberg) where Borrelia burgdorferi infections are known to be endemic, were examined for the presence of 16S ribosomal DNA specific for the Ehrlichia phagocytophila genogroup, E. chaffeensis, E. canis, and B. burgdorferi by nested PCR. Totals of 2.2% (6 of 275) and 21.8% (65 of 275) of the ticks were positive for the E. phagocytophila genogroup and B. burgdorferi, respectively. Two ticks (0.7%) were coinfected with both bacteria. Of 12 engorged I. ricinus ticks collected from two deer, 8 (67%) were positive for the E. phagocytophila genogroup and one (8%) was positive for B. burgdorferi. There was no evidence of infection with E. canis or E. chaffeensis in the investigated tick population. The nucleotide sequences of the 546-bp Ehrlichia PCR products differed at one or two positions from the original sequence of the human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) agent (S.-M. Chen, J. S. Dumler, J. S. Bakken, and D. H. Walker, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:589-595, 1994). Three groups of sequence variants were detected; two of these were known to occur in other areas in Europe or the United States, whereas one has not been reported before. Thus, in the German I. ricinus tick population closely related granulocytic ehrlichiae are prevalent, which might represent variants of E. phagocytophila or the HGE agent. PMID:10523532

  4. Increasing density and Borrelia burgdorferi infection of deer-infesting Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) in Maryland.

    PubMed

    Amerasinghe, F P; Breisch, N L; Neidhardt, K; Pagac, B; Scott, T W

    1993-09-01

    A statewide survey of Ixodes dammini Spielman was done in November 1991 as a follow-up to a study in 1989. In total, 3,434 adult ticks were collected from 922 hunter-killed white-tailed deer processed at 22 check stations (1 per county in 22 of 23 counties in the state). Significantly more male than female ticks were collected. Tick infestation was significantly heavier on male than female deer. The pattern of tick distribution was similar to that in 1989, with low prevalence (percentage tick-infested deer) and abundance (mean ticks per deer) in the Appalachian region, moderate values in the Piedmont, and high values in the western and eastern Coastal Plains regions. The pattern of tick infection with Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes (determined by polyclonal immunofluorescence assay) was similar to the tick distributional pattern. Overall, tick prevalence and abundance were higher in 1991 than in 1989, as was the spirochete infection rate in ticks. Multiple regression analysis of tick prevalence against six selected physical and biotic parameters (elevation, rainfall, summer and winter temperature, percentage of forest land, deer density) showed a significant relationship with rainfall and elevation in 1989 and elevation alone in 1991. A more extensive study in Caroline and Dorchester counties in the eastern Coastal Plains region (which showed exceptionally low tick density indices in a generally tick-abundant region in 1989) demonstrated that I. dammini was well established in Caroline but not in Dorchester County. PMID:8254631

  5. Survey for Ixodes spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi in southeastern Wisconsin and northeastern Illinois.

    PubMed

    Callister, S M; Nelson, J A; Schell, R F; Jobe, D A; Bautz, R; Agger, W A; Coggins, J

    1991-02-01

    Forested areas adjacent to Milwaukee, Wis., and Chicago, Ill., were investigated for rodents and ticks infected with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus or Peromyscus maniculatus), meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), and eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) were captured; and specimens from these animals were cultured for B. burgdorferi to define whether the midwestern Lyme disease area currently encompasses these large metropolitan centers. During 1988, B. burgdorferi was successfully cultured from the tissues of two M. pennyslvanicus voles captured from the Chicago area. However, no Ixodes spp. ticks were captured. None of 274 animals captured from sites I3 and 12 additional sites in Wisconsin and Illinois during the summer of 1989 were infected with B. burgdorferi or Ixodes spp. In addition, no ticks were recovered when the underbrush in 11 contiguous areas was flagged. Apparently, B. burgdorferi is rarely found in these areas because of the absence of the appropriate tick vectors. Further studies are needed to monitor the dispersal of B. burgdorferi-infected Ixodes dammini into this heavily populated midwestern region. PMID:2007650

  6. Inability of Ixodes cookei and Amblyomma americanum nymphs (Acari: Ixodidae) to transmit Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Ryder, J W; Pinger, R R; Glancy, T

    1992-05-01

    The vector competency of Ixodes cookei Packard and Amblyomma americanum (L.) for Borrelia burgdorferi was studied using Syrian hamsters. Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin were used as controls. Darkfield and immunofluorescent examinations of midgut diverticula revealed B. burgdorferi spirochetes in 32 of 36 (88.9%) I. dammini larvae, 5 of 36 (13.9%) I. cookei larvae, and 7 of 36 (19.4%) A. americanum larvae within 48 h after feeding on infected Syrian hamsters. B. burgdorferi were also observed in the midguts of 94 of 107 (87.8%) I. dammini nymphs that developed from the fed larvae. However, none of 30 I. cookei nymphs was positive for spirochetes and only 1 of 60 (1.7%) A. americanum nymphs was found positive for B. burgdorferi. Nymphs of each tick species, reared from larvae that had fed on infected hamsters, were allowed to feed on uninfected hamsters to determine their ability to transmit B. burgdorferi. Transmission was demonstrated only by I. dammini nymphs.

  7. Microarray-Based Comparative Genomic and Transcriptome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Radha; Schwartz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, is maintained in nature in a cycle involving a tick vector and a mammalian host. Adaptation to the diverse conditions of temperature, pH, oxygen tension and nutrient availability in these two environments requires the precise orchestration of gene expression. Over 25 microarray analyses relating to B. burgdorferi genomics and transcriptomics have been published. The majority of these studies has explored the global transcriptome under a variety of conditions and has contributed substantially to the current understanding of B. burgdorferi transcriptional regulation. In this review, we present a summary of these studies with particular focus on those that helped define the roles of transcriptional regulators in modulating gene expression in the tick and mammalian milieus. By performing comparative analysis of results derived from the published microarray expression profiling studies, we identified composite gene lists comprising differentially expressed genes in these two environments. Further, we explored the overlap between the regulatory circuits that function during the tick and mammalian phases of the enzootic cycle. Taken together, the data indicate that there is interplay among the distinct signaling pathways that function in feeding ticks and during adaptation to growth in the mammal. PMID:27600075

  8. Evidence for Host-Genotype Associations of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto

    PubMed Central

    Mechai, Samir; Margos, Gabriele; Feil, Edward J.; Barairo, Nicole; Lindsay, L. Robbin; Michel, Pascal; Ogden, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    Different genotypes of the agent of Lyme disease in North America, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, show varying degrees of pathogenicity in humans. This variation in pathogenicity correlates with phylogeny and we have hypothesized that the different phylogenetic lineages in North America reflect adaptation to different host species. In this study, evidence for host species associations of B. burgdorferi genotypes was investigated using 41 B. burgdorferi-positive samples from five mammal species and 50 samples from host-seeking ticks collected during the course of field studies in four regions of Canada: Manitoba, northwestern Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The B. burgdorferi genotypes in the samples were characterized using three established molecular markers (multi-locus sequence typing [MLST], 16S-23S rrs-rrlA intergenic spacer, and outer surface protein C sequence [ospC] major groups). Correspondence analysis and generalized linear mixed effect models revealed significant associations between B. burgdorferi genotypes and host species (in particular chipmunks, and white-footed mice and deer mice), supporting the hypotheses that host adaptation contributes to the phylogenetic structure and possibly the observed variation in pathogenicity in humans. PMID:26901761

  9. Live Attenuated Borrelia burgdorferi Targeted Mutants in an Infectious Strain Background Protect Mice from Challenge Infection.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Beth L; Padmore, Lavinia J; Ristow, Laura C; Curtis, Michael W; Coburn, Jenifer

    2016-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, B. garinii, and B. afzelii are all agents of Lyme disease in different geographic locations. If left untreated, Lyme disease can cause significant and long-term morbidity, which may continue after appropriate antibiotic therapy has been administered and live bacteria are no longer detectable. The increasing incidence and geographic spread of Lyme disease are renewing interest in the vaccination of at-risk populations. We took the approach of vaccinating mice with two targeted mutant strains of B. burgdorferi that, unlike the parental strain, are avirulent in mice. Mice vaccinated with both strains were protected against a challenge with the parental strain and a heterologous B. burgdorferi strain by either needle inoculation or tick bite. In ticks, the homologous strain was eliminated but the heterologous strain was not, suggesting that the vaccines generated a response to antigens that are produced by the bacteria both early in mammalian infection and in the tick. Partial protection against B. garinii infection was also conferred. Protection was antibody mediated, and reactivity to a variety of proteins was observed. These experiments suggest that live attenuated B. burgdorferi strains may be informative regarding the identification of protective antigens produced by the bacteria and recognized by the mouse immune system in vivo Further work may illuminate new candidates that are effective and safe for the development of Lyme disease vaccines. PMID:27335385

  10. In vitro susceptibilities of Leptospira spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi isolates to amoxicillin, tilmicosin, and enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo; Kordick, Dorsey; Divers, Thomas; Chang, Yung Fu

    2006-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted with 6 different spirochetal strains (4 strains of Leptospira spp. and 2 strains of Borrelia burgdorferi) against 3 antimicrobial agents, commonly used in equine and bovine practice. The ranges of MIC and MBC of amoxicillin against Leptospira spp. were 0.05 - 6.25 microgram/ml and 6.25 - 25.0 microgram/ml, respectively. And the ranges of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi were 0.05 - 0.39 microgram/ml and 0.20 - 0.78 microgram/ml, respectively. The ranges of MIC and MBC of enrofloxacin against Leptospira spp. were 0.05 - 0.39 microgram/ml and 0.05 - 0.39 microgram/ml, respectively. Two strains of B. burgdorferi were resistant to enrofloxacin at the highest concentration tested for MBC (>or=100 microgram/ml). Therefore, the potential role of tilmicosin in the treatment of leptospirosis and borreliosis should be further evaluated in animal models to understand whether the in vivo studies will confirm in vitro results. All spirochetal isolates were inhibited (MIC) and were killed (MBC) by tilmicosin at concentrations below the limit of testing (

  11. In vitro susceptibilities of Leptospira spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi isolates to amoxicillin, tilmicosin, and enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doo; Kordick, Dorsey; Divers, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted with 6 different spirochetal strains (4 strains of Leptospira spp. and 2 strains of Borrelia burgdorferi) against 3 antimicrobial agents, commonly used in equine and bovine practice. The ranges of MIC and MBC of amoxicillin against Leptospira spp. were 0.05-6.25 µg/ml and 6.25-25.0 µg/ml, respectively. And the ranges of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi were 0.05-0.39 µg/ml and 0.20-0.78 µg/ml, respectively. The ranges of MIC and MBC of enrofloxacin against Leptospira spp. were 0.05-0.39 µg/ml and 0.05-0.39 µg/ml, respectively. Two strains of B. burgdorferi were resistant to enrofloxacin at the highest concentration tested for MBC (≥100 µg/ml). Therefore, the potential role of tilmicosin in the treatment of leptospirosis and borreliosis should be further evaluated in animal models to understand whether the in vivo studies will confirm in vitro results. All spirochetal isolates were inhibited (MIC) and were killed (MBC) by tilmicosin at concentrations below the limit of testing (≤0.01 µg/ml). PMID:17106227

  12. Borrelia burgdorferi infection regulates CD1 expression in human cells and tissues via IL1-β

    PubMed Central

    Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Roura-Mir, Carme; Magalhaes, Kelly Grace; De Jong, Annemieke; Kasmar, Anne G.; Granter, Scott R.; Budd, Ralph; Steere, Allen; Pena-Cruz, Victor; Kirschning, Carsten; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Moody, D. Branch

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of newly translated group 1 CD1 proteins (CD1a, CD1b, CD1c) on maturing myeloid DC to effective lipid antigen presenting cells. Here we show that Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, triggers appearance of group 1 CD1 proteins at high density on the surface of human myeloid DC during infection. Within human skin, CD1b and CD1c expression was low or absent prior to infection, but increased significantly after experimental infections and in erythema migrans lesions from Lyme Disease patients. The induction of CD1 was initiated by borrelial lipids acting through TLR-2 within minutes, but required 3 days for maximum effect. The delay in CD1 protein appearance involved a multi-step process whereby TLR-2 stimulated cells release soluble factors, which are sufficient to transfer the CD1-inducing effect in trans to other cells. Analysis of these soluble factors identified IL-1β as a previously unknown pathway leading to group 1 CD1 protein function. These studies establish that upregulation of group 1 CD1 proteins is an early event in B. burgdorferi infection and suggest a stepwise mechanism whereby bacterial cell walls, TLR activation and cytokine release cause DC precursors to express group 1 CD1 proteins. PMID:21246541

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi infection regulates CD1 expression in human cells and tissues via IL1-β.

    PubMed

    Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Roura-Mir, Carme; Magalhaes, Kelly G; de Jong, Annemieke; Kasmar, Anne G; Granter, Scott R; Budd, Ralph; Steere, Allen; Pena-Cruz, Victor; Kirschning, Carsten; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Moody, D Branch

    2011-03-01

    The appearance of group 1 CD1 proteins (CD1a, CD1b and CD1c) on maturing myeloid DC is a key event that converts myeloid DC to effective lipid APC. Here, we show that Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, triggers appearance of group 1 CD1 proteins at high density on the surface of human myeloid DC during infection. Within human skin, CD1b and CD1c expression was low or absent prior to infection, but increased significantly after experimental infections and in erythema migrans lesions from Lyme disease patients. The induction of CD1 was initiated by borrelial lipids acting through TLR-2 within minutes, but required 3 days for maximum effect. The delay in CD1 protein appearance involved a multi-step process whereby TLR-2 stimulated cells release soluble factors, which are sufficient to transfer the CD1-inducing effect in trans to other cells. Analysis of these soluble factors identified IL-1β as a previously unknown pathway leading to group 1 CD1 protein function. This study establishes that upregulation of group 1 CD1 proteins is an early event in B. burgdorferi infection and suggests a stepwise mechanism whereby bacterial cell walls, TLR activation and cytokine release cause DC precursors to express group 1 CD1 proteins.

  14. Confirmation of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Ixodes scapularis, Southwestern Virginia.

    PubMed

    Herrin, Brian H; Zajac, Anne M; Little, Susan E

    2014-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in a newly established population of Ixodes scapularis in the mountainous region of southwestern Virginia, questing adult ticks were collected and the identity and infection status of each tick was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. A total of 364 adult ticks were tested from three field sites. B. burgdorferi sensu stricto was identified in a total of 32/101 (32%) ticks from site A, 49/154 (32%) ticks from site B, and 36/101 (36%) ticks from site C, for a total prevalence rate of 33% (117/356). In addition, A. phagocytophilum was detected in 3/364 (0.8%) ticks, one from site A and two from site B. The prevalence of both pathogens in ticks at these sites is similar to that reported from established endemic areas. These data document the presence of I. scapularis and the agent of Lyme disease in a newly established area of the Appalachian region, providing further evidence of range expansion of both the tick and public and veterinary health risk it creates.

  15. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi in urine of Peromyscus leucopus by inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Magnarelli, L A; Anderson, J F; Stafford, K C

    1994-03-01

    An inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to detect Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme borreliosis, in urine from white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Of the 87 urine specimens tested from 87 mice collected in widely separated tick-infested sites in Connecticut, 57 (65.5%) contained detectable concentrations of spirochetal antigens. Forty-seven (62.7%) of 75 serum samples analyzed contained antibodies to B. burgdorferi. In culture work with tissues from bladders, kidneys, spleens, or ears, 50 of 87 mice (57.5%) were infected with B. burgdorferi. Thirty-eight (76%) of 50 infected mice had antigens of this spirochete in urine, while 36 (72%) individuals had infected bladders. Of those with infected bladders, 24 (66.7%) mice excreted subunits or whole cells of B. burgdorferi into urine. Successful culturing of B. burgdorferi from mouse tissues, the presence of serum antibodies to this bacterium, and detection of antigens to this spirochete in urine provide further evidence that multiple assays can be performed to verify the presence of B. burgdorferi in P. leucopus.

  16. Human Coinfection with Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Kristen L.; Rice, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, and Babesia microti, a causative agent of babesiosis, are increasingly implicated in the growing tick-borne disease burden in the northeastern United States. These pathogens are transmitted via the bite of an infected tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, which is capable of harboring and inoculating a host with multiple pathogens simultaneously. Clinical presentation of the diseases is heterogeneous and ranges from mild flu-like symptoms to near-fatal cardiac arrhythmias. While the reason for the variability is not known, the possibility exists that concomitant infection with both B. burgdorferi and B. microti may synergistically increase disease severity. In an effort to clarify the current state of understanding regarding coinfection with B. burgdorferi and B. microti, in this review, we discuss the geographical distribution and pathogenesis of Lyme disease and babesiosis in the United States, the immunological response of humans to B. burgdorferi or B. microti infection, the existing knowledge regarding coinfection disease pathology, and critical factors that have led to ambiguity in the literature regarding coinfection, in order to eliminate confusion in future experimental design and investigation. PMID:26697208

  17. Reservoir competence of native North American birds for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.S.; Buckley, P.A.; Balmforth, M.G.; Zhioua, E.; Mitra, Siddhartha; Buckley, F.G.

    2005-01-01

    Reservoir competence of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was tested for six species of native North American birds: American Robin, Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, Eastern Towhee, Song Sparrow, and Northern Cardinal. Wild birds collected by mistnetting on Fire Island, NY, were held in a field lab in cages over water, and locally collected larval ticks were placed on the birds, harvested from the water after engorgement, and tested for infection by DFA after molting to the nymphal stage. American Robins were competent reservoirs, infecting 16.1% of larvae applied to wild-caught birds, compared to 0% of control ticks placed on uninfected lab mice. Robins that were previously infected in the lab by nymphal feeding infected 81.8% of applied larvae. Wild-caught Song Sparrows infected 4.8% of applied larvae, and 21.1% when infected by nymphal feeding. Results suggest moderate levels of reservoir competence for Northern Cardinals, lower levels for Gray Catbirds, and little evidence of reservoir competence for Eastern Towhees or Brown Thrashers. Lower infection rates in larvae applied to wild-caught birds compared to birds infected in the lab suggest that infected birds display temporal variability in infectiousness to larval ticks. Engorged larvae drop from birds abundantly during daylight hours, so the abundance of these bird species in the peridomestic environment suggests that they might contribute infected ticks to lawns and gardens.

  18. Genetic structure of marine Borrelia garinii and population admixture with the terrestrial cycle of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Boulinier, Thierry; Sertour, Natacha; Cornet, Muriel; Ferquel, Elisabeth; McCoy, Karen D

    2011-09-01

    Despite the importance of population structure for the epidemiology of pathogenic bacteria, the spatial and ecological heterogeneity of these populations is often poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of the Lyme borreliosis (LB) spirochaete Borrelia garinii in its marine cycle involving colonial seabirds and different host races of the seabird tick Ixodes uriae. Multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) on eight chromosomal and two plasmid loci (ospA and ospC) indicate that B. garinii circulating in the marine system is highly diverse. Microevolution in marine B. garinii seems to be mainly clonal, but recombination and selection do occur. Sequence types were not evenly distributed among geographic regions, with substantial population subdivision between Atlantic and Pacific Ocean basins. However, no geographic structuring was evident within regions. Results of selection analyses and phylogenetic discordance between chromosomal and plasmid loci indicate adaptive evolution is likely occurring in this system, but no pattern of host or vector-associated divergence was found. Recombination analyses showed evidence for population admixture between terrestrial and marine strains, suggesting that LB spirochaetes are exchanged between these enzootic cycles. Importantly, our results highlight the need to explicitly consider the marine system for a complete understanding of the evolutionary ecology and global epidemiology of Lyme borreliosis.

  19. Blocking pathogen transmission at the source: reservoir targeted OspA-based vaccines against Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Control strategies are especially challenging for microbial diseases caused by pathogens that persist in wildlife reservoirs and use arthropod vectors to cycle amongst those species. One of the most relevant illnesses that pose a direct human health risk is Lyme disease; in the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently revised the probable number of cases by 10-fold, to 300,000 cases per year. Caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, Lyme disease can affect the nervous system, joints and heart. No human vaccine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. In addition to novel human vaccines, new strategies for prevention of Lyme disease consist of pest management interventions, vector-targeted vaccines and reservoir-targeted vaccines. However, even human vaccines can not prevent Lyme disease expansion into other geographical areas. The other strategies aim at reducing tick density and at disrupting the transmission of B. burgdorferi by targeting one or more key elements that maintain the enzootic cycle: the reservoir host and/or the tick vector. Here, I provide a brief overview of the application of an OspA-based wildlife reservoir targeted vaccine aimed at reducing transmission of B. burgdorferi and present it as a strategy for reducing Lyme disease risk to humans. PMID:25309883

  20. Cell-density-dependent expression of Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Indest, K J; Ramamoorthy, R; Solé, M; Gilmore, R D; Johnson, B J; Philipp, M T

    1997-01-01

    Previously, we had identified non-OspA-OspB surface proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi that are targeted by the antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing mechanism. Here we demonstrate by Western blotting that one of these proteins, P35, is upregulated at the onset of stationary phase in vitro. Northern analysis revealed that the upregulation of P35 is at the level of transcription. In addition, the expression of an open reading frame (ORF) located downstream of the p35 gene was found to be regulated in the same fashion as that of P35. This ORF encodes a 7.5-kDa lipoprotein. The transcriptional start sites for both of these genes were determined, to aid in the identification of the putative promoter regions. Additional sequencing of the 5' flanking region of the p35 gene revealed a region of dyad symmetry 52 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Southern analysis demonstrated that the expression of these genes was not due to a cell-density-dependent rearrangement in the genome of B. burgdorferi. These findings provide an in vitro model for studying mechanisms of gene regulation in B. burgdorferi. PMID:9119447

  1. Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins Whose Expression Is Similarly Affected by Culture Temperature and pH

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Scholl-Meeker, Dorothy

    2001-01-01

    Previously, we had demonstrated the upregulation in the expression of several proteins, including the lipoproteins OspC and P35, of Borrelia burgdorferi in the stationary growth phase. Since the expression of OspC is also known to be affected by culture temperature and pH, we examined the effects of both variables on the expression of the remaining stationary-phase-upregulated proteins. Our study revealed that the expression of each of the remaining stationary-phase-upregulated proteins, P35 included, was also influenced by culture temperature; these proteins were selectively expressed at 34°C but not at 24°C. Significantly, the expression of a majority of these proteins was also affected by culture pH, since they were abundantly expressed at pH 7.0 (resembling the tick midgut pH of 6.8 during feeding) but only sparsely at pH 8.0 (a condition closer to that of the unfed tick midgut pH of 7.4). We propose that this group of B. burgdorferi proteins, which in culture is selectively expressed under conditions of 34°C and pH 7.0, may be induced in the tick midgut during the feeding event. Furthermore, the differential and coordinate expression of these proteins under different environmental conditions suggests that the encoding genes may be coregulated. PMID:11254645

  2. Variable major proteins of Borrelia hermsii. Epitope mapping and partial sequence analysis of CNBr peptides

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The variable major proteins (VMP) of serotypes 7 and 21 of the relapsing fever agent Borrelia hermsii were isolated by detergent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. Cyanogen bromide (CNBr) digestion of the isolated VMP yielded two peptides of apparent molecular weights 20,000 (20 K) and 16 K from VMP7, and three peptides of 14.5, 14, and 7 K mol wt from VMP21. Serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies bound in Western blots to one of each of the two or three CNBr fragments from the homologous VMP. A single monoclonal antibody bound to the whole cells, the isolated VMP, and a CNBr fragment of both serotype 7 and serotype 21. (This crossreactive antibody did not, however, bind to any of four other serotypes examined.) Regional conservation of structure between VMP7 and VMP21 was also shown by amino acid sequence analysis of the N-termini of the five CNBr fragments. One pair of aligned fragments from VMP7 and VMP21 had 80% amino acid homology in sequence; a second pair had 40% homology. The partial amino acid homologies between two VMP suggest that these proteins are products of members of a polygene family. PMID:2409197

  3. Evidence for Host-Genotype Associations of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto.

    PubMed

    Mechai, Samir; Margos, Gabriele; Feil, Edward J; Barairo, Nicole; Lindsay, L Robbin; Michel, Pascal; Ogden, Nicholas H

    2016-01-01

    Different genotypes of the agent of Lyme disease in North America, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, show varying degrees of pathogenicity in humans. This variation in pathogenicity correlates with phylogeny and we have hypothesized that the different phylogenetic lineages in North America reflect adaptation to different host species. In this study, evidence for host species associations of B. burgdorferi genotypes was investigated using 41 B. burgdorferi-positive samples from five mammal species and 50 samples from host-seeking ticks collected during the course of field studies in four regions of Canada: Manitoba, northwestern Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The B. burgdorferi genotypes in the samples were characterized using three established molecular markers (multi-locus sequence typing [MLST], 16S-23S rrs-rrlA intergenic spacer, and outer surface protein C sequence [ospC] major groups). Correspondence analysis and generalized linear mixed effect models revealed significant associations between B. burgdorferi genotypes and host species (in particular chipmunks, and white-footed mice and deer mice), supporting the hypotheses that host adaptation contributes to the phylogenetic structure and possibly the observed variation in pathogenicity in humans. PMID:26901761

  4. Prevalence of Anaplasma, Bartonella and Borrelia Species in Haemaphysalis longicornis collected from goats in North Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Gu; Ko, Sungjin; Smith, W Barney; Kim, Heung-Chul; Lee, In-Yong; Chae, Joon-Seok

    2016-06-30

    North Korea is located on the northern part of the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. While tick-borne pathogens of medical and veterinary importance have been reported from China and South Korea, they have not been reported from North Korea. To screen for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens in North Korea, ticks were collected from domestic goats. A total of 292 (27 nymph, 26 male, 239 female) Haemaphysalis (H.) longicornis were collected and assayed individually for selected tick-borne pathogens. A total of 77 (26.4%) were positive for Anaplasma bovis, followed by Bartonella (B.) grahamii (15, 5.1%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (12, 4.1%), Bartonella henselae (10, 3.4%), and Borrelia spp. (3, 1.0%) based on 16S ribosomal RNA and ITS species-specific nested polymerase chain reaction. Using the groEL-based nested PCR, a total of 6 and 1 H. longicornis were positive for B. grahamii and B. henselae, respectively. All products were sequenced and demonstrated 100% identity and homology with previously reported sequences from other countries in GenBank. This is the first report of the detection of tick-borne pathogens in the North Korea and suggests that farm animals may act as reservoirs for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens.

  5. Borrelia burgdorferi erp genes are expressed at different levels within tissues of chronically infected mammalian hosts.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer C; Stevenson, Brian

    2006-05-01

    The spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease and is transmitted to humans and other vertebrate hosts through the bites of ixodid ticks. B. burgdorferi Erp (OspE-F related lipoprotein) family members are encoded on members of the 32 kb circular plasmid-like prophage family (cp32s). Many Erp proteins serve as receptors for the complement inhibitory factor H molecules of numerous vertebrate hosts, providing one mechanism by which the bacteria potentially evade the innate immune system. Indirect immunofluorescence analyses (IFA) have demonstrated that Erp expression is temporally regulated throughout the mammal-tick infectious cycle, indicating that Erp proteins perform an important role (or even roles) during mammalian infection. However, it was not previously known whether Erp proteins are continually produced by B. burgdorferi throughout the course of mammalian infection. To address this issue, quantitative RT-PCR (q-RT-PCR) was utilized to assess erp transcription levels by bacteria within numerous different tissues of both mice and non-human primates (NHPs) chronically infected with B. burgdorferi. Q-RT-PCR results obtained using both animal models indicated that while the majority of erp genes were detectably transcribed during chronic infection, differences in expression levels were noted. These data strongly suggest that Erp proteins contribute to B. burgdorferi persistence within chronically infected host tissues, perhaps by protecting the bacteria from complement-mediated killing. PMID:16530008

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi BmpA Is a Laminin-Binding Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ashutosh; Brissette, Catherine A.; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The Borrelia burgdorferi BmpA outer surface protein plays a significant role in mammalian infection by the Lyme disease spirochete and is an important antigen for the serodiagnosis of human infection. B. burgdorferi adheres to host extracellular matrix components, including laminin. The results of our studies indicate that BmpA and its three paralogous proteins, BmpB, BmpC, and BmpD, all bind to mammalian laminin. BmpA did not bind mammalian type I or type IV collagens or fibronectin. BmpA-directed antibodies significantly inhibited the adherence of live B. burgdorferi to laminin. The laminin-binding domain of BmpA was mapped to the carboxy-terminal 80 amino acids. Solubilized collagen inhibited BmpA-laminin binding, suggesting interactions through the collagen-binding domains of laminin. These results, together with previous data, indicate that BmpA and its paralogs are targets for the development of preventative and curative therapies for Lyme disease. PMID:19703983

  7. In vitro and in vivo induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha by Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Defosse, D L; Johnson, R C

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is an immunoregulatory cytokine with many biological activities including the mediation of inflammation. We examined sera and synovial fluids from patients seropositive for infection with Borrelia burgdorferi using a radioimmunoassay specific for TNF-alpha. Significant elevation of TNF-alpha was found in the sera and synovial fluids of patients examined, while controls showed no elevation. Sera of mice infected with B. burgdorferi contained elevated levels of TNF-alpha which varied during the course of a 24-day infection. To determine whether B. burgdorferi is capable of inducing TNF-alpha production, spirochetes were added to adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or mouse peritoneal exudate cells and 24 h later supernatants were assayed. TNF-alpha induction occurred in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum stimulation occurred when a ratio of 1 to 10 spirochetes per mononuclear cell was used. At optimal concentrations, induction was not diminished by inactivation of spirochetes or pretreatment with polymyxin B. These results suggest that an increase in TNF-alpha production may occur as a result of infection with B. burgdorferi. PMID:1541526

  8. The Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Protects Borrelia burgdorferi from Nitrosative Stress in Ixodes scapularis Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Bourret, Travis J.; Lawrence, Kevin A.; Shaw, Jeff A.; Lin, Tao; Norris, Steven J.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi encounters a wide range of environmental conditions as it cycles between ticks of the genus Ixodes and its various mammalian hosts. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are potent antimicrobial molecules generated during the innate immune response to infection, however, it is unclear whether ROS and RNS pose a significant challenge to B. burgdorferi in vivo. In this study, we screened a library of B. burgdorferi strains with mutations in DNA repair genes for increased susceptibility to ROS or RNS in vitro. Strains with mutations in the methyl-directed mismatch repair gene mutS1 are hypersensitive to killing by ROS, while strains lacking the nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene uvrB show increased susceptibility to both ROS and RNS. Therefore, mutS1-deficient and uvrB-deficient strains were compared for their ability to complete their infectious cycle in Swiss Webster mice and I. scapularis ticks to help identify sites of oxidative and nitrosative stresses encountered by B. burgdorferi in vivo. Both mutS1 and uvrB were dispensable for infection of mice, while uvrB promoted the survival of spirochetes in I. scapularis ticks. The decreased survival of uvrB-deficient B. burgdorferi was associated with the generation of RNS in I. scapularis midguts and salivary glands during feeding. Collectively, these data suggest that B. burgdorferi must withstand cytotoxic levels of RNS produced during infection of I. scapularis ticks.

  9. Live imaging reveals a biphasic mode of dissemination of Borrelia burgdorferi within ticks

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Ems, Star M.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Pal, Utpal; Wolgemuth, Charles W.; Eggers, Christian H.; Balic, Anamaria; Radolf, Justin D.

    2009-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by transmission of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi from ticks to humans. Although much is known about B. burgdorferi replication, the routes and mechanisms by which it disseminates within the tick remain unclear. To better understand this process, we imaged live, infectious B. burgdorferi expressing a stably integrated, constitutively expressed GFP reporter. Using isolated tick midguts and salivary glands, we observed B. burgdorferi progress through the feeding tick via what we believe to be a novel, biphasic mode of dissemination. In the first phase, replicating spirochetes, positioned at varying depths throughout the midgut at the onset of feeding, formed networks of nonmotile organisms that advanced toward the basolateral surface of the epithelium while adhering to differentiating, hypertrophying, and detaching epithelial cells. In the second phase of dissemination, the nonmotile spirochetes transitioned into motile organisms that penetrated the basement membrane and entered the hemocoel, then migrated to and entered the salivary glands. We designated the first phase of dissemination “adherence-mediated migration” and provided evidence that it involves the inhibition of spirochete motility by one or more diffusible factors elaborated by the feeding tick midgut. Our studies, which we believe are the first to relate the transmission dynamics of spirochetes to the complex morphological and developmental changes that the midgut and salivary glands undergo during engorgement, challenge the conventional viewpoint that dissemination of Lyme disease–causing spirochetes within ticks is exclusively motility driven. PMID:19920352

  10. Substrate prediction of Ixodes ricinus salivary lipocalins differentially expressed during Borrelia afzelii infection

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, James J.; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Sima, Radek; Butterill, Philip T.; Růžek, Daniel; Nuttall, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution has provided ticks with an arsenal of bioactive saliva molecules that counteract host defense mechanisms. This salivary pharmacopoeia enables blood-feeding while enabling pathogen transmission. High-throughput sequencing of tick salivary glands has thus become a major focus, revealing large expansion within protein encoding gene families. Among these are lipocalins, ubiquitous barrel-shaped proteins that sequester small, typically hydrophobic molecules. This study was initiated by mining the Ixodes ricinus salivary gland transcriptome for specific, uncharacterized lipocalins: three were identified. Differential expression of these I. ricinus lipocalins during feeding at distinct developmental stages and in response to Borrelia afzelii infection suggests a role in transmission of this Lyme disease spirochete. A phylogenetic analysis using 803 sequences places the three I. ricinus lipocalins with tick lipocalins that sequester monoamines, leukotrienes and fatty acids. Both structural analysis and biophysical simulations generated robust predictions showing these I. ricinus lipocalins have the potential to bind monoamines similar to other tick species previously reported. The multidisciplinary approach employed in this study characterized unique lipocalins that play a role in tick blood-feeding and transmission of the most important tick-borne pathogen in North America and Eurasia. PMID:27584086

  11. Mechanisms generating long range correlation in nucleotide composition of the Borrelia Burgdorferi genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackiewicz, P.; Gierlik, A.; Kowalczuk, M.; Szczepanik, D.; Dudek, M. R.; Cebrat, S.

    1999-12-01

    We have analysed protein coding and intergenic sequences in the Borrelia burgdorferi (the Lyme disease bacterium) genome using different kinds of DNA walks. Genes occupying the leading strand of DNA have significantly different nucleotide composition from genes occupying the lagging strand. Nucleotide compositional bias of the two DNA strands reflects the aminoacid composition of proteins. 96% of genes coding for ribosomal proteins lie on the leading DNA strand, which suggests that the positions of these as well as other genes are non-random. In the B. burgdorferi genome, the asymmetry in intergenic DNA sequences is lower than the asymmetry in the third positions in codons. All these characters of the B. burgdorferi genome suggest that both replication-associated mutational pressure and recombination mechanisms have established the specific structure of the genome and now any recombination leading to inversion of a gene in respect to the direction of replication is forbidden. This property of the genome allows us to assume that it is in a steady state, which enables us to fix some parameters for simulations of DNA evolution.

  12. The Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Protects Borrelia burgdorferi from Nitrosative Stress in Ixodes scapularis Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Bourret, Travis J.; Lawrence, Kevin A.; Shaw, Jeff A.; Lin, Tao; Norris, Steven J.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi encounters a wide range of environmental conditions as it cycles between ticks of the genus Ixodes and its various mammalian hosts. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are potent antimicrobial molecules generated during the innate immune response to infection, however, it is unclear whether ROS and RNS pose a significant challenge to B. burgdorferi in vivo. In this study, we screened a library of B. burgdorferi strains with mutations in DNA repair genes for increased susceptibility to ROS or RNS in vitro. Strains with mutations in the methyl-directed mismatch repair gene mutS1 are hypersensitive to killing by ROS, while strains lacking the nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene uvrB show increased susceptibility to both ROS and RNS. Therefore, mutS1-deficient and uvrB-deficient strains were compared for their ability to complete their infectious cycle in Swiss Webster mice and I. scapularis ticks to help identify sites of oxidative and nitrosative stresses encountered by B. burgdorferi in vivo. Both mutS1 and uvrB were dispensable for infection of mice, while uvrB promoted the survival of spirochetes in I. scapularis ticks. The decreased survival of uvrB-deficient B. burgdorferi was associated with the generation of RNS in I. scapularis midguts and salivary glands during feeding. Collectively, these data suggest that B. burgdorferi must withstand cytotoxic levels of RNS produced during infection of I. scapularis ticks. PMID:27656169

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi: Carbon Metabolism and the Tick-Mammal Enzootic Cycle.

    PubMed

    Corona, Arianna; Schwartz, Ira

    2015-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, is a zoonotic pathogen that is maintained in a natural cycle that typically involves mammalian reservoir hosts and a tick vector of the Ixodes species. During each stage of the enzootic cycle, B. burgdorferi is exposed to environments that differ in temperature, pH, small molecules, and most important, nutrient sources. B. burgdorferi has a highly restricted metabolic capacity because it does not contain a tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, or any pathways for de novo biosynthesis of carbohydrates, amino acids, or lipids. Thus, B. burgdorferi relies solely on glycolysis for ATP production and is completely dependent on the transport of nutrients and cofactors from extracellular sources. Herein, pathways for carbohydrate uptake and utilization in B. burgdorferi are described. Regulation of these pathways during the different phases of the enzootic cycle is discussed. In addition, a model for differential control of nutrient flux through the glycolytic pathway as the spirochete transits through the enzootic cycle is presented.

  14. [Identification of the immunogenic outer membrane proteins of relapsing fever Borrelia].

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Norihiko; Murakami, Noritaka; Fukunaga, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia duttonii, a causative agent of relapsing fever, is transmitted between the distinct microenvironments of the vector tick, Ornithodoros moubata, and a mammalian host. We identified the total and membrane fraction proteins of B. duttonii strain Ly isolated from a patient in Tanzania by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The analyses of the total and membrane fractions from bacterial cultures incubated at 37°C identified 68 and 15 proteins, respectively. Since spirochaete clearance in mice is associated with an immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3)-mediated response, immunoblot analyses were used to identify the proteins reactive with IgM and IgG3 of gerbil serum against B. duttonii strain Ly. The outcome showed that six proteins (antigen p83/100, membrane-associated protein P66 (P66), flagellar filament outer layer protein, hypothetical protein BDU_412, vlp protein gamma subfamily (γ-Vlp) and flagellin (FlaB)) were identified against IgM, and four (antigen p83/100, P66, γ-Vlp and FlaB) of the six proteins also reacted with IgG3. It is believed that these proteins are immunodominant antigens for the host immune response. Some of these immunogenic proteins might be used as molecular diagnostic tools in the study of relapsing fever in Tanzania.

  15. Vectors as Epidemiological Sentinels: Patterns of Within-Tick Borrelia burgdorferi Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Katharine S.; Carpi, Giovanna; Evans, Benjamin R.; Caccone, Adalgisa; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Hosts including humans, other vertebrates, and arthropods, are frequently infected with heterogeneous populations of pathogens. Within-host pathogen diversity has major implications for human health, epidemiology, and pathogen evolution. However, pathogen diversity within-hosts is difficult to characterize and little is known about the levels and sources of within-host diversity maintained in natural populations of disease vectors. Here, we examine genomic variation of the Lyme disease bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), in 98 individual field-collected tick vectors as a model for study of within-host processes. Deep population sequencing reveals extensive and previously undocumented levels of Bb variation: the majority (~70%) of ticks harbor mixed strain infections, which we define as levels Bb diversity pre-existing in a diverse inoculum. Within-tick diversity is thus a sample of the variation present within vertebrate hosts. Within individual ticks, we detect signatures of positive selection. Genes most commonly under positive selection across ticks include those involved in dissemination in vertebrate hosts and evasion of the vertebrate immune complement. By focusing on tick-borne Bb, we show that vectors can serve as epidemiological and evolutionary sentinels: within-vector pathogen diversity can be a useful and unbiased way to survey circulating pathogen diversity and identify evolutionary processes occurring in natural transmission cycles. PMID:27414806

  16. A Novel Isothermal Assay of Borrelia burgdorferi by Recombinase Polymerase Amplification with Lateral Flow Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Hui-Xin; Zhang, Lin; Hou, Xue-Xia; Wan, Kang-Lin; Hao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A novel isothermal detection for recombinase polymerase amplification with lateral flow (LF-RPA) was established for Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi) detection in this study. This assay with high sensitivity and specificity can get a visible result without any additional equipment in 30 min. We designed a pair of primers according to recA gene of B. burgdorferi strains and a methodology evaluation was performed. The results showed that the RPA assay based on the recA gene was successfully applied in B. burgdorferi detection, and its specific amplification was only achieved from the genomic DNA of B. burgdorferi. The detection limit of the new assay was about 25 copies of the B. burgdorferi genomic DNA. Twenty Lyme borreliosis patients’ serum samples were detected by LF-RPA assay, real-time qPCR and nested-PCR. Results showed the LF-RPA assay is more effective than nested-PCR for its shorter reaction time and considerably higher detection rate. This method is of great value in clinical rapid detection for Lyme borreliosis. Using the RPA assay might be a megatrend for DNA detection in clinics and endemic regions. PMID:27527151

  17. Prevalence of Anaplasma, Bartonella and Borrelia Species in Haemaphysalis longicornis collected from goats in North Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun-Gu; Ko, Sungjin; Smith, W. Barney; Kim, Heung-Chul; Lee, In-Yong

    2016-01-01

    North Korea is located on the northern part of the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. While tick-borne pathogens of medical and veterinary importance have been reported from China and South Korea, they have not been reported from North Korea. To screen for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens in North Korea, ticks were collected from domestic goats. A total of 292 (27 nymph, 26 male, 239 female) Haemaphysalis (H.) longicornis were collected and assayed individually for selected tick-borne pathogens. A total of 77 (26.4%) were positive for Anaplasma bovis, followed by Bartonella (B.) grahamii (15, 5.1%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (12, 4.1%), Bartonella henselae (10, 3.4%), and Borrelia spp. (3, 1.0%) based on 16S ribosomal RNA and ITS species-specific nested polymerase chain reaction. Using the groEL-based nested PCR, a total of 6 and 1 H. longicornis were positive for B. grahamii and B. henselae, respectively. All products were sequenced and demonstrated 100% identity and homology with previously reported sequences from other countries in GenBank. This is the first report of the detection of tick-borne pathogens in the North Korea and suggests that farm animals may act as reservoirs for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens. PMID:26645342

  18. Blocking pathogen transmission at the source: reservoir targeted OspA-based vaccines against Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Control strategies are especially challenging for microbial diseases caused by pathogens that persist in wildlife reservoirs and use arthropod vectors to cycle amongst those species. One of the most relevant illnesses that pose a direct human health risk is Lyme disease; in the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently revised the probable number of cases by 10-fold, to 300,000 cases per year. Caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, Lyme disease can affect the nervous system, joints and heart. No human vaccine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. In addition to novel human vaccines, new strategies for prevention of Lyme disease consist of pest management interventions, vector-targeted vaccines and reservoir-targeted vaccines. However, even human vaccines can not prevent Lyme disease expansion into other geographical areas. The other strategies aim at reducing tick density and at disrupting the transmission of B. burgdorferi by targeting one or more key elements that maintain the enzootic cycle: the reservoir host and/or the tick vector. Here, I provide a brief overview of the application of an OspA-based wildlife reservoir targeted vaccine aimed at reducing transmission of B. burgdorferi and present it as a strategy for reducing Lyme disease risk to humans.

  19. Borrelia burgdorferi BBA52 is a potential target for transmission blocking Lyme disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Kaur, Simarjot; Kariu, Toru; Yang, Xiuli; Bossis, Ioannis; Anderson, John F; Pal, Utpal

    2011-11-01

    The surface-exposed antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi represent important targets for induction of protective host immune responses. BBA52 is preferentially expressed by B. burgdorferi in the feeding tick, and a targeted deletion of bba52 interferes with vector-host transitions in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that BBA52 is an outer membrane surface-exposed protein and that disulfide bridges take part in the homo-oligomeric assembly of native protein. BBA52 antibodies lack detectable borreliacidal activities in vitro. However, active immunization studies demonstrated that BBA52 vaccinated mice were significantly less susceptible to subsequent tick-borne challenge infection. Similarly, passive transfer of BBA52 antibodies in ticks completely blocked B. burgdorferi transmission from feeding ticks to naïve mice. Taken together, these studies highlight the role of BBA52 in spirochete dissemination from ticks to mice and demonstrate the potential of BBA52 antibody-mediated strategy to complement the ongoing efforts to develop vaccines for blocking the transmission of B. burgdorferi.

  20. The cyclic-di-GMP signaling pathway in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Novak, Elizabeth A; Sultan, Syed Z; Motaleb, Md A

    2014-01-01

    In nature, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi cycles between the unrelated environments of the Ixodes tick vector and mammalian host. In order to survive transmission between hosts, B. burgdorferi must be able to not only detect changes in its environment, but also rapidly and appropriately respond to these changes. One manner in which this obligate parasite regulates and adapts to its changing environment is through cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. c-di-GMP has been shown to be instrumental in orchestrating the adaptation of B. burgdorferi to the tick environment. B. burgdorferi possesses only one set of c-di-GMP-metabolizing genes (one diguanylate cyclase and two distinct phosphodiesterases) and one c-di-GMP-binding PilZ-domain protein designated as PlzA. While studies in the realm of c-di-GMP signaling in B. burgdorferi have exploded in the last few years, there are still many more questions than answers. Elucidation of the importance of c-di-GMP signaling to B. burgdorferi may lead to the identification of mechanisms that are critical for the survival of B. burgdorferi in the tick phase of the enzootic cycle as well as potentially delineate a role (if any) c-di-GMP may play in the transmission and virulence of B. burgdorferi during the enzootic cycle, thereby enabling the development of effective drugs for the prevention and/or treatment of Lyme disease.

  1. In vitro susceptibilities of Leptospira spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi isolates to amoxicillin, tilmicosin, and enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo; Kordick, Dorsey; Divers, Thomas; Chang, Yung Fu

    2006-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted with 6 different spirochetal strains (4 strains of Leptospira spp. and 2 strains of Borrelia burgdorferi) against 3 antimicrobial agents, commonly used in equine and bovine practice. The ranges of MIC and MBC of amoxicillin against Leptospira spp. were 0.05 - 6.25 microgram/ml and 6.25 - 25.0 microgram/ml, respectively. And the ranges of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi were 0.05 - 0.39 microgram/ml and 0.20 - 0.78 microgram/ml, respectively. The ranges of MIC and MBC of enrofloxacin against Leptospira spp. were 0.05 - 0.39 microgram/ml and 0.05 - 0.39 microgram/ml, respectively. Two strains of B. burgdorferi were resistant to enrofloxacin at the highest concentration tested for MBC (>or=100 microgram/ml). Therefore, the potential role of tilmicosin in the treatment of leptospirosis and borreliosis should be further evaluated in animal models to understand whether the in vivo studies will confirm in vitro results. All spirochetal isolates were inhibited (MIC) and were killed (MBC) by tilmicosin at concentrations below the limit of testing (

  2. GENETIC AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EVIDENCES OF BORRELIA BURGDORFERI IN DOG IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Sthitmatee, Nattawooti; Jinawan, Wanna; Jaisan, Nawaporn; Tangjitjaroen, Weerapongse; Chailangkarn, Sasisophin; Sodarat, Chollada; Ekgatat, Monaya; Padungtod, Pawin

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne zoonotic disease caused by spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. It is transmitted from animals to humans by the bite of infected ticks of the genus Ixodes. Although Lyme disease has been reported in China and Japan, the disease has never been reported in Thailand. Blood samples and ticks were collected from 402 dogs from 7 and 3 animal clinics in Chiang Mai and Phuket Provinces, Thailand, respectively. Blood samples were tested for antibodies against B. burgdorferi, Anaplasma spp, Ehrlichia spp and Dirofilaria immitis using a commercial kit, and positive blood samples were subjected to nested PCR assay for B. burgdorferi fla, ospA and ospC, amplicons of which also were sequenced. Only one dog (from Chiang Mai) was positive for B. burgdorferi, with 97% to 100% genetic identity, depending on the sequences used for comparison, with strains from United State of America. All 376 ticks collected were Rhipicephalus sanguineus, but no tick was found on the infected dog. Further investigations of the infection source and vector are needed to understand potential risks of Lyme disease to dogs and humans in Thailand.

  3. A Novel Isothermal Assay of Borrelia burgdorferi by Recombinase Polymerase Amplification with Lateral Flow Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Hui-Xin; Zhang, Lin; Hou, Xue-Xia; Wan, Kang-Lin; Hao, Qin

    2016-08-03

    A novel isothermal detection for recombinase polymerase amplification with lateral flow (LF-RPA) was established for Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi) detection in this study. This assay with high sensitivity and specificity can get a visible result without any additional equipment in 30 min. We designed a pair of primers according to recA gene of B. burgdorferi strains and a methodology evaluation was performed. The results showed that the RPA assay based on the recA gene was successfully applied in B. burgdorferi detection, and its specific amplification was only achieved from the genomic DNA of B. burgdorferi. The detection limit of the new assay was about 25 copies of the B. burgdorferi genomic DNA. Twenty Lyme borreliosis patients' serum samples were detected by LF-RPA assay, real-time qPCR and nested-PCR. Results showed the LF-RPA assay is more effective than nested-PCR for its shorter reaction time and considerably higher detection rate. This method is of great value in clinical rapid detection for Lyme borreliosis. Using the RPA assay might be a megatrend for DNA detection in clinics and endemic regions.

  4. Structure of decorin binding protein B from Borrelia burgdorferi and its interactions with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Wang, Xu

    2015-12-01

    Decorin-binding proteins (DBPs), DBPA and DBPB, are surface lipoproteins on Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPs bind to the connective tissue proteoglycan decorin and facilitate tissue colonization by the bacterium. Although structural and biochemical properties of DBPA are well understood, little is known about DBPB. In current work, we determined the solution structure of DBPB from strain B31 of B. burgdorferi and characterized its interactions with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Our structure shows that DBPB adopts the same topology as DBPA, but possesses a much shorter terminal helix, resulting in a longer unstructured C-terminal tail, which is also rich in basic amino acids. Characterization of DBPB-GAG interactions reveals that, despite similar GAG affinities of DBPA and DBPB, the primary GAG-binding sites in DBPB are different from DBPA. In particular, our results indicate that lysines in the C-terminus of DBPB are vital to DBPB's ability to bind GAGs whereas C-terminal tail for DBPA from strain B31 only plays a minor role in facilitating GAG bindings. Furthermore, the traditional GAG-binding pocket important to DBPA-GAG interactions is only secondary to DBPB's GAG-binding ability.

  5. A Novel Isothermal Assay of Borrelia burgdorferi by Recombinase Polymerase Amplification with Lateral Flow Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Hui-Xin; Zhang, Lin; Hou, Xue-Xia; Wan, Kang-Lin; Hao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A novel isothermal detection for recombinase polymerase amplification with lateral flow (LF-RPA) was established for Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi) detection in this study. This assay with high sensitivity and specificity can get a visible result without any additional equipment in 30 min. We designed a pair of primers according to recA gene of B. burgdorferi strains and a methodology evaluation was performed. The results showed that the RPA assay based on the recA gene was successfully applied in B. burgdorferi detection, and its specific amplification was only achieved from the genomic DNA of B. burgdorferi. The detection limit of the new assay was about 25 copies of the B. burgdorferi genomic DNA. Twenty Lyme borreliosis patients' serum samples were detected by LF-RPA assay, real-time qPCR and nested-PCR. Results showed the LF-RPA assay is more effective than nested-PCR for its shorter reaction time and considerably higher detection rate. This method is of great value in clinical rapid detection for Lyme borreliosis. Using the RPA assay might be a megatrend for DNA detection in clinics and endemic regions. PMID:27527151

  6. Vectors as Epidemiological Sentinels: Patterns of Within-Tick Borrelia burgdorferi Diversity.

    PubMed

    Walter, Katharine S; Carpi, Giovanna; Evans, Benjamin R; Caccone, Adalgisa; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A

    2016-07-01

    Hosts including humans, other vertebrates, and arthropods, are frequently infected with heterogeneous populations of pathogens. Within-host pathogen diversity has major implications for human health, epidemiology, and pathogen evolution. However, pathogen diversity within-hosts is difficult to characterize and little is known about the levels and sources of within-host diversity maintained in natural populations of disease vectors. Here, we examine genomic variation of the Lyme disease bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), in 98 individual field-collected tick vectors as a model for study of within-host processes. Deep population sequencing reveals extensive and previously undocumented levels of Bb variation: the majority (~70%) of ticks harbor mixed strain infections, which we define as levels Bb diversity pre-existing in a diverse inoculum. Within-tick diversity is thus a sample of the variation present within vertebrate hosts. Within individual ticks, we detect signatures of positive selection. Genes most commonly under positive selection across ticks include those involved in dissemination in vertebrate hosts and evasion of the vertebrate immune complement. By focusing on tick-borne Bb, we show that vectors can serve as epidemiological and evolutionary sentinels: within-vector pathogen diversity can be a useful and unbiased way to survey circulating pathogen diversity and identify evolutionary processes occurring in natural transmission cycles. PMID:27414806

  7. Microarray-Based Comparative Genomic and Transcriptome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Radha; Schwartz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, is maintained in nature in a cycle involving a tick vector and a mammalian host. Adaptation to the diverse conditions of temperature, pH, oxygen tension and nutrient availability in these two environments requires the precise orchestration of gene expression. Over 25 microarray analyses relating to B. burgdorferi genomics and transcriptomics have been published. The majority of these studies has explored the global transcriptome under a variety of conditions and has contributed substantially to the current understanding of B. burgdorferi transcriptional regulation. In this review, we present a summary of these studies with particular focus on those that helped define the roles of transcriptional regulators in modulating gene expression in the tick and mammalian milieus. By performing comparative analysis of results derived from the published microarray expression profiling studies, we identified composite gene lists comprising differentially expressed genes in these two environments. Further, we explored the overlap between the regulatory circuits that function during the tick and mammalian phases of the enzootic cycle. Taken together, the data indicate that there is interplay among the distinct signaling pathways that function in feeding ticks and during adaptation to growth in the mammal. PMID:27600075

  8. Serologic Evidence for Borrelia hermsii Infection in Rodents on Federally Owned Recreational Areas in California

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Jessica R.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is endemic in mountainous regions of the western United States. In California, the principal agent is the spirochete Borrelia hermsii, which is transmitted by the argasid tick Ornithodoros hermsi. Humans are at risk of TBRF when infected ticks leave an abandoned rodent nest in quest of a blood meal. Rodents are the primary vertebrate hosts for B. hermsii. Sciurid rodents were collected from 23 sites in California between August, 2006, and September, 2008, and tested for serum antibodies to B. hermsii by immunoblot using a whole-cell sonicate and a specific antigen, glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GlpQ). Antibodies were detected in 20% of rodents; seroprevalence was highest (36%) in chipmunks (Tamias spp). Seroprevalence in chipmunks was highest in the Sierra Nevada (41%) and Mono (43%) ecoregions and between 1900 and 2300 meters elevation (43%). The serological studies described here are effective in implicating the primary vertebrate hosts involved in the maintenance of the ticks and spirochetes in regions endemic for TBRF. PMID:23488454

  9. Substrate prediction of Ixodes ricinus salivary lipocalins differentially expressed during Borrelia afzelii infection.

    PubMed

    Valdés, James J; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Sima, Radek; Butterill, Philip T; Růžek, Daniel; Nuttall, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Evolution has provided ticks with an arsenal of bioactive saliva molecules that counteract host defense mechanisms. This salivary pharmacopoeia enables blood-feeding while enabling pathogen transmission. High-throughput sequencing of tick salivary glands has thus become a major focus, revealing large expansion within protein encoding gene families. Among these are lipocalins, ubiquitous barrel-shaped proteins that sequester small, typically hydrophobic molecules. This study was initiated by mining the Ixodes ricinus salivary gland transcriptome for specific, uncharacterized lipocalins: three were identified. Differential expression of these I. ricinus lipocalins during feeding at distinct developmental stages and in response to Borrelia afzelii infection suggests a role in transmission of this Lyme disease spirochete. A phylogenetic analysis using 803 sequences places the three I. ricinus lipocalins with tick lipocalins that sequester monoamines, leukotrienes and fatty acids. Both structural analysis and biophysical simulations generated robust predictions showing these I. ricinus lipocalins have the potential to bind monoamines similar to other tick species previously reported. The multidisciplinary approach employed in this study characterized unique lipocalins that play a role in tick blood-feeding and transmission of the most important tick-borne pathogen in North America and Eurasia. PMID:27584086

  10. BB0238, a presumed tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein, is required during Borrelia burgdorferi mammalian infection.

    PubMed

    Groshong, Ashley M; Fortune, Danielle E; Moore, Brendan P; Spencer, Horace J; Skinner, Robert A; Bellamy, William T; Blevins, Jon S

    2014-10-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, occupies both a tick vector and mammalian host in nature. Considering the unique enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi, it is not surprising that a large proportion of its genome is composed of hypothetical proteins not found in other bacterial pathogens. bb0238 encodes a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function that is predicted to contain a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain, a structural motif responsible for mediating protein-protein interactions. To evaluate the role of bb0238 during mammalian infection, a bb0238-deficient mutant was constructed. The bb0238 mutant was attenuated in mice infected via needle inoculation, and complementation of bb0238 expression restored infectivity to wild-type levels. bb0238 expression does not change in response to varying culture conditions, and thus, it appears to be constitutively expressed under in vitro conditions. bb0238 is expressed in murine tissues during infection, though there was no significant change in expression levels among different tissue types. Localization studies indicate that BB0238 is associated with the inner membrane of the spirochete and is therefore unlikely to promote interaction with host ligands during infection. B. burgdorferi clones containing point mutations in conserved residues of the putative TPR motif of BB0238 demonstrated attenuation in mice that was comparable to that in the bb0238 deletion mutant, suggesting that BB0238 may contain a functional TPR domain.

  11. Destruction of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi round-body propagules (RBs) by the antibiotic Tigecycline

    PubMed Central

    Brorson, Øystein; Brorson, Sverre-Henning; Scythes, John; MacAllister, James; Wier, Andrew; Margulis, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Persistence of tissue spirochetes of Borrelia burgdorferi as helices and round bodies (RBs) explains many erythema-Lyme disease symptoms. Spirochete RBs (reproductive propagules also called coccoid bodies, globular bodies, spherical bodies, granules, cysts, L-forms, sphaeroplasts, or vesicles) are induced by environmental conditions unfavorable for growth. Viable, they grow, move and reversibly convert into motile helices. Reversible pleiomorphy was recorded in at least six spirochete genera (>12 species). Penicillin solution is one unfavorable condition that induces RBs. This antibiotic that inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis cures neither the second “Great Imitator” (Lyme borreliosis) nor the first: syphilis. Molecular-microscopic techniques, in principle, can detect in animals (insects, ticks, and mammals, including patients) helices and RBs of live spirochetes. Genome sequences of B. burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum spirochetes show absence of >75% of genes in comparison with their free-living relatives. Irreversible integration of spirochetes at behavioral, metabolic, gene product and genetic levels into animal tissue has been documented. Irreversible integration of spirochetes may severely impair immunological response such that they persist undetected in tissue. We report in vitro inhibition and destruction of B. burgdorferi (helices, RBs = “cysts”) by the antibiotic Tigecycline (TG; Wyeth), a glycylcycline protein-synthesis inhibitor (of both 30S and 70S ribosome subunits). Studies of the pleiomorphic life history stages in response to TG of both B. burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum in vivo and in vitro are strongly encouraged. PMID:19843691

  12. Spirochetemia caused by Borrelia turicatae infection in 3 dogs in Texas.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Marlyn S; Schwan, Tom G; Sultemeier, Katherine B; McDonald, Polly S; Brillhart, Martin N

    2007-06-01

    Spirochetemia was diagnosed in 2 Siberian Huskies and a Rottweiler from the northwestern region of Texas between June 1999 and October 2001. Clinical findings were nonspecific; tick exposure was documented in 2 of the dogs. Hematologic abnormalities included anemia (n=2), neutrophilia (n=2, including 1 with a left shift), lymphopenia (n=3), eosinopenia (n=3), and thrombocytopenia (n=2). One anemic dog had a positive Coombs' test. In 1 dog, Western blot analysis of serum yielded multiple positive bands with B turicatae lysate, indicating the spirochetemia most likely was due to B turicatae infection. In 2 dogs, spirochetes were cultured from the blood and identified using DNA analysis as Borrelia turicatae; 1 of these dogs also was seropositive for Ehrlichia canis and B burgdorferi. In 2 cases, spirochetemia was more prominent in blood smears prepared immediately after sample collection than in smears prepared from EDTA blood. Two dogs recovered with doxycycline treatment; 1 dog declined clinically despite treatment and was euthanized. B turicatae is the agent of tick-borne (endemic) relapsing fever in humans and is distinct from B burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease; however, serologic cross-reactivity may occur. B turicatae is transmitted by the soft tick, Ornithodoros turicata, and infection should be considered in dogs with spirochetemia and possible exposure to the tick vector.

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi strain-specific Osp C-mediated immunity in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bockenstedt, L K; Hodzic, E; Feng, S; Bourrel, K W; de Silva, A; Montgomery, R R; Fikrig, E; Radolf, J D; Barthold, S W

    1997-01-01

    Antibodies to the outer surface proteins (Osps) A, B, and C of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi can prevent infection in animal models of Lyme borreliosis. We have previously demonstrated that immune serum from mice infected with B. burgdorferi N40 can also prevent challenge infection and induce disease regression in infected mice. The antigens targeted by protective and disease-modulating antibodies are presently unknown, but they do not include Osp A or Osp B. Because Osp C antibodies are present in immune mouse serum, we investigated the ability of hyperimmune serum to recombinant Osp C (N40) to protect mice against challenge infection with N40 spirochetes. In both active and passive immunization studies, Osp C (N40) antiserum failed to protect mice from challenge infection with cultured organisms. Mice actively immunized with recombinant Osp C (N40) were susceptible to tick-borne challenge infection, and nymphal ticks remained infected after feeding on Osp C-hyperimmunized mice. In contrast, similar immunization studies performed with Osp C (PKo) antiserum prevented challenge infection of mice with a clone of PKo spirochetes pathogenic for mice. Both Osp C (N40) and Osp C (PKo) antisera showed minimal in vitro borreliacidal activity, and immunofluorescence studies localized Osp C beneath the outer membrane of both N40 and PKo spirochetes. We conclude that Osp C antibody-mediated immunity is strain specific and propose that differences in Osp C surface expression by spirochetes in vivo may account for strain-specific immunity. PMID:9353047

  14. Analysis of promoters in Borrelia burgdorferi by use of a transiently expressed reporter gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sohaskey, C D; Arnold, C; Barbour, A G

    1997-01-01

    A transient chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression system was developed for Borrelia burgdorferi. An Escherichia coli vector containing a promoterless Streptococcus agalactiae cat gene was constructed. Promoters for ospA, ospC, and flaB were placed upstream of this cat gene, and CAT assays were performed in E. coli from these stably maintained plasmids. The plasmids with putative promoters ospA and flaB were found to be approximately 20-fold more active than were the plasmids with ospC or no promoter. The level of activity correlated well with the resistance to chloramphenicol that each plasmid provided. Next, the nonreplicative plasmid constructs were transformed by electroporation into B. burgdorferi. CAT assays were performed by both thin-layer chromatography and the fluor diffusion method. Measurement of CAT activity demonstrated that the ospA promoter was again about 20-fold more active than the promoterless cat gene. The flaB and ospC promoters increased the activity seven- and threefold, respectively, over that with the promoterless construct. This simple transient-expression assay was shown to be an effective method to study promoter function in B. burgdorferi in the absence of a well-developed genetic system. PMID:9352937

  15. Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in white-tailed deer from Texas.

    PubMed

    Adetunji, Shakirat A; Krecek, Rosina C; Castellanos, Gabrielle; Morrill, John C; Blue-McLendon, Alice; Cook, Walt E; Esteve-Gassent, Maria D

    2016-08-01

    Lyme Disease is caused by the bacterial pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi, and is transmitted by the tick-vector Ixodes scapularis. It is the most prevalent arthropod-borne disease in the United States. To determine the seroprevalence of B. burgdorferi antibodies in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Texas, we analyzed serum samples (n = 1493) collected during the 2001-2015 hunting seasons, using indirect ELISA. Samples with higher sero-reactivity (0.803 and above) than the negative control group (0.662) were further tested using a more specific standardized western immunoblot assay to rule out false positives. Using ELISA, 4.7% of the samples were sero-reactive against B. burgdorferi, and these originated in two eco-regions in Texas (Edwards Plateau and South Texas Plains). However, only 0.5% of the total samples were sero-reactive by standardized western immunoblot assay. Additionally, both ELISA and standardized western immunoblot assay results correlated with an increased incidence in human Lyme Disease cases reported in Texas. This is the first longitudinal study to demonstrate fluctuation in sero-reactivity of white-tailed deer to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto antigens in southern United States. Future ecological and geographical studies are needed to assess the environmental factors governing the prevalence of Lyme Disease in non-endemic areas of the southern United States. PMID:27366674

  16. Simple one-pot synthesis of Rh-Fe3O4 heterodimer nanocrystals and their applications to a magnetically recyclable catalyst for efficient and selective reduction of nitroarenes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Youngjin; Kim, Seyoung; Jun, Samuel Woojoo; Kim, Byung Hyo; Hwang, Sunhwan; Song, In Kyu; Kim, B Moon; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2011-03-28

    A simple synthesis of Rh-Fe(3)O(4) heterodimer nanocrystals was achieved by controlled one-pot thermolysis. The nanocrystals exhibited excellent activities for the selective reduction of nitroarenes and alkenes. Furthermore the nanocrystal catalyst could be easily separated by a magnet, and recycled eight times without losing the catalytic activity.

  17. Distribution of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in Naturally and Experimentally Infected Western Gray Squirrels (Sciurus griseus)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kelly; Salkeld, Daniel J.; Lane, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The dynamics of Borrelia burgdorferi infections within its natural hosts are poorly understood. We necropsied four wild-caught western gray squirrels (Sciurus griseus) that were acquired during a previous study that evaluated the reservoir competence of this rodent for the Lyme disease spirochete. One animal was infected experimentally, whereas the others were infected in the wild before capture. To investigate dissemination of B. burgdorferi and concurrent histopathologic lesions in different tissues, blood specimens, synovial and cerebrospinal fluid, ear-punch biopsies, and diverse tissue samples from skin and various organs were taken and examined by culture, polymerase chain reaction, and histology. Borrelia-positive cultures were obtained from three of the squirrels, that is, from skin biopsies (7 of 20 samples), ear-punch biopsies (2 of 8), and one (1 of 5) lymph node. Sequencing of amplicons confirmed B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) infection in 9 of 10 culture-positive samples and in DNA extracted from all 10 positive cultures. The experimentally infected squirrel yielded most of the positive samples. In contrast, bodily fluids, all other organ specimens from these animals, and all samples from one naturally infected squirrel were negative for Borrelia for both assays. None of the necropsied squirrels exhibited specific clinical signs associated with B. burgdorferi. Similarly, necropsy and histological examination of tissues indicated the presence of underlying infectious processes, none of which could be ascribed conclusively to B. burgdorferi infection. Based on these results, obtained from a small number of animals investigated at a single time point, we suggest that B. burgdorferi s.s. infection in S. griseus may result in rather localized dissemination of spirochetes, and that mild or nonclinical disease might be more common after several months of infection duration. Since spirochetes could be detected in squirrels 7–21 months

  18. Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Spirochetes in Wild Birds in Northwestern California: Associations with Ecological Factors, Bird Behavior and Tick Infestation

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Erica A.; Eisen, Lars; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Fedorova, Natalia; Hasty, Jeomhee M.; Vaughn, Charles; Lane, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Although Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) are found in a great diversity of vertebrates, most studies in North America have focused on the role of mammals as spirochete reservoir hosts. We investigated the roles of birds as hosts for subadult Ixodes pacificus ticks and potential reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) in northw