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Sample records for heterogeneous medium calculated

  1. Towards diffuse optical tomography of arbitrarily heterogeneous turbid medium using GPU-accelerated Monte-Carlo forward calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xi; Chen, Weiting; Wu, Linhui; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jiao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2013-03-01

    At present, the most widely accepted forward model in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is the diffusion equation, which is derived from the radiative transfer equation by employing the P1 approximation. However, due to its validity restricted to highly scattering regions, this model has several limitations for the whole-body imaging of small-animals, where some cavity and low scattering areas exist. To overcome the difficulty, we presented a Graphic-Processing- Unit(GPU) implementation of Monte-Carlo (MC) modeling for photon migration in arbitrarily heterogeneous turbid medium, and, based on this GPU-accelerated MC forward calculation, developed a fast, universal DOT image reconstruction algorithm. We experimentally validated the proposed method using a continuous-wave DOT system in the photon-counting mode and a cylindrical phantom with a cavity inclusion.

  2. A Heterogeneous Medium Analytical Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1999-09-27

    A benchmark, called benchmark BLUE, has been developed for one-group neutral particle (neutron or photon) transport in a one-dimensional sub-critical heterogeneous plane parallel medium with surface illumination. General anisotropic scattering is accommodated through the Green's Function Method (GFM). Numerical Fourier transform inversion is used to generate the required Green's functions which are kernels to coupled integral equations that give the exiting angular fluxes. The interior scalar flux is then obtained through quadrature. A compound iterative procedure for quadrature order and slab surface source convergence provides highly accurate benchmark qualities (4- to 5- places of accuracy) results.

  3. On fluid flow in a heterogeneous medium under nonisothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    D.W., Vasco

    2010-11-01

    An asymptotic technique, valid in the presence of smoothly-varying heterogeneity, provides explicit expressions for the velocity of a propagating pressure and temperature disturbance. The governing equations contain nonlinear terms due to the presence of temperature-dependent coefficients and due to the advection of fluids with differing temperatures. Two cases give well-defined expressions in terms of the parameters of the porous medium: the uncoupled propagation of a pressure disturbance and the propagation of a fully coupled temperature and pressure disturbance. The velocity of the coupled disturbance or front, depends upon the medium parameters and upon the change in temperature and pressure across the front. For uncoupled flow, the semi-analytic expression for the front velocity reduces to that associated with a linear diffusion equation. A comparison of the asymptotic travel time estimates with calculations from a numerical simulator indicates reasonably good agreement for both uncoupled and coupled disturbances.

  4. Towards the exact calculation of medium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gandolfi, Stefano; Carlson, Joseph Allen; Lonardoni, Diego; Wang, Xiaobao

    2016-12-19

    The prediction of the structure of light and medium nuclei is crucial to test our knowledge of nuclear interactions. The calculation of the nuclei from two- and three-nucleon interactions obtained from rst principle is, however, one of the most challenging problems for many-body nuclear physics.

  5. Scale dependent solute dispersion with linear isotherm in heterogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mritunjay Kumar; Das, Pintu

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an analytical solution for one-dimensional scale dependent solute dispersion with linear isotherm in semi-infinite heterogeneous medium. The governing advection-dispersion equation includes the terms such as advection, dispersion, zero order production and linear adsorption with respect to the liquid and solid phases. Initially, the medium is assumed to be polluted as the linear combination of source concentration and zero order production term with distance. Time dependent exponentially decreasing input source is assumed at one end of the domain in which initial source concentration is also included i.e., at the origin. The concentration gradient at the other end of the aquifer is assumed zero as there is no mass flux exists at that end. The analytical solution is derived by using the Laplace integral transform technique. Special cases are presented with respect to the different forms of velocity expression which are very much relevant in solute transport analysis. Result shows an excellent agreement between the analytical solutions with the different geological formations and velocity patterns. The impacts of non-dimensional parameters such as Peclet and Courant numbers have also been discussed. The results of analytical solution are compared with numerical solution obtained by explicit finite difference method. The stability condition has also been discussed. The accuracy of the result has been verified with root mean square error analysis. The CPU time has also been calculated for execution of Matlab program.

  6. Modeling flow in a pressure-sensitive, heterogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, Donald W.; Minkoff, Susan E.

    2009-06-01

    Using an asymptotic methodology, including an expansion in inverse powers of {radical}{omega}, where {omega} is the frequency, we derive a solution for flow in a medium with pressure dependent properties. The solution is valid for a heterogeneous medium with smoothly varying properties. That is, the scale length of the heterogeneity must be significantly larger then the scale length over which the pressure increases from it initial value to its peak value. The resulting asymptotic expression is similar in form to the solution for pressure in a medium in which the flow properties are not functions of pressure. Both the expression for pseudo-phase, which is related to the 'travel time' of the transient pressure disturbance, and the expression for pressure amplitude contain modifications due to the pressure dependence of the medium. We apply the method to synthetic and observed pressure variations in a deforming medium. In the synthetic test we model one-dimensional propagation in a pressure-dependent medium. Comparisons with both an analytic self-similar solution and the results of a numerical simulation indicate general agreement. Furthermore, we are able to match pressure variations observed during a pulse test at the Coaraze Laboratory site in France.

  7. Tracer experiments in periodical heterogeneous model porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdalani, Samer; Delenne, Carole; Guinot, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    It is established that solute transport in homogenous porous media follows a classical 'S' shape breakthrough curve that can easily be modelled by a convection dispersion equation. In this study, we designed a Model Heterogeneous Porous Medium (MHPM) with a high degree of heterogeneity, in which the breakthrough curve does not follow the classical 'S' shape. The contrast in porosity is obtained by placing a cylindrical cavity (100% porosity) inside a 40% porosity medium composed with 1mm glass beads. Step tracing experiments are done by injecting salty water in the study column initially containing deionised water, until the outlet concentration stabilises to the input one. Several replicates of the experiment were conducted for n = 1 to 6 MHPM placed in series. The total of 116 experiments gives a high-quality database allowing the assessment of experimental uncertainty. The experimental results show that the breakthrough curve is very different from the `S' shape for small values of n, but the more n increases, the more the classical shape is recovered.

  8. Parallelization of heterogeneous reactor calculations on a graphics processing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malofeev, V. M.; Pal'shin, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    Parallelization is applied to the neutron calculations performed by the heterogeneous method on a graphics processing unit. The parallel algorithm of the modified TREC code is described. The efficiency of the parallel algorithm is evaluated.

  9. Parallelization of heterogeneous reactor calculations on a graphics processing unit

    SciTech Connect

    Malofeev, V. M. Pal’shin, V. A.

    2016-12-15

    Parallelization is applied to the neutron calculations performed by the heterogeneous method on a graphics processing unit. The parallel algorithm of the modified TREC code is described. The efficiency of the parallel algorithm is evaluated.

  10. Formation of induced surface heterogeneity in a rarefied gas medium

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, S.F.; Kochnev, A.A.; Kulev, A.N.; Shestakov, A.M.; Shveikin, G.P.

    1987-11-01

    Induced surface heterogeneity caused by gas adsorption exerts a substantial effect on the surface properties of a solid. In this work, in order to study the dynamics of metal surface coverage in vacuum caused by adsorption of components of the residual gas medium, an experimental approach has been realized that is based on a combination of the spark method with Auger electron spectroscopy of the surface. The choice of thin tungsten filament as the object of investigation was due to the wide use of similar samples in thermal experiments, particularly in measuring the accomodation coefficient of the energy of gaseous molecules. Preliminary thermal desorption experiments at approx. 300/sup 0/K established that mainly H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ were adsorbed on the surface. Adsorption of H/sub 2/O, CH/sub 4/, CO/sub 2/, and D/sub 2/ constituted a substantially smaller fraction.

  11. An effective medium theory for three-dimensional elastic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    A second-order Born approximation is used to formulate a self-consistent theory for the effective elastic parameters of stochastic media with ellipsoidal distributions of small-scale heterogeneity. The covariance of the stiffness tensor is represented as the product of a one-point tensor variance and a two-point scalar correlation function with ellipsoidal symmetry, which separates the statistical properties of the local anisotropy from those of the geometric anisotropy. The spatial variations can then be rescaled to an isotropic distribution by a simple metric transformation; the spherical average of the strain Green's function in the transformed space reduces to a constant Kneer tensor, and the second-order corrections to the effective elastic parameters are given by the contraction of the rescaled Kneer tensor against the single-point variance of the stiffness tensor. Explicit results are derived for stochastic models in which the heterogeneity is transversely isotropic and its second moments are characterized by a horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio η. If medium is locally isotropic, the expressions for the anisotropic effective moduli reduce in the limit η → ∞ to Backus's second-order expressions for a 1-D stochastic laminate. Comparisons with the exact Backus theory show that the second-order approximation predicts the effective anisotropy for non-Gaussian media fairly well for relative rms fluctuations in the moduli smaller than about 30 per cent. A locally anisotropic model is formulated in which the local elastic properties have hexagonal symmetry, guided by a Gaussian random vector field that is transversely isotropic and specified by a horizontal-to-vertical orientation ratio ξ. The self-consistent theory provides closed-form expressions for the dependence of the effective moduli on 0 < ξ < ∞ and 0 < η < ∞. The effective-medium parametrizations described here appear to be suitable for incorporation into tomographic modelling.

  12. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  13. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  14. Wave propagation in a strongly heterogeneous elastic porous medium: Homogenization of Biot medium with double porosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohan, Eduard; Naili, Salah; Nguyen, Vu-Hieu

    2016-08-01

    We study wave propagation in an elastic porous medium saturated with a compressible Newtonian fluid. The porous network is interconnected whereby the pores are characterized by two very different characteristic sizes. At the mesoscopic scale, the medium is described using the Biot model, characterized by a high contrast in the hydraulic permeability and anisotropic elasticity, whereas the contrast in the Biot coupling coefficient is only moderate. Fluid motion is governed by the Darcy flow model extended by inertia terms and by the mass conservation equation. The homogenization method based on the asymptotic analysis is used to obtain a macroscopic model. To respect the high contrast in the material properties, they are scaled by the small parameter, which is involved in the asymptotic analysis and characterized by the size of the heterogeneities. Using the estimates of wavelengths in the double-porosity networks, it is shown that the macroscopic descriptions depend on the contrast in the static permeability associated with pores and micropores and on the frequency. Moreover, the microflow in the double porosity is responsible for fading memory effects via the macroscopic poroviscoelastic constitutive law. xml:lang="fr"

  15. 3D model for laser heating of a heterogeneous turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossacci, Michael J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Lindberg, Scott C.; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1997-05-01

    In order to better understand the interaction of laser light with biological tissue, a light-transport model is integrated with a heat-transport model. The outputs include temperature as a function of position and time, given the illumination conditions and the optical and thermal properties of the tissue. The optical portion of the algorithm is based on the theory of radiative transfer through a turbid medium. Our computer program models multiple scattering in three dimensions using seven discrete irradiances which approximate the radiative transport equation. The distribution of absorbed light in the tissue is calculated and used as the source term in a discrete approximation to the thermal diffusion equation. Recently, we have been using the model to better understand the laser-heating of heterogeneous tissue. Rather than modeling a homogeneous mixture having properties given by weighted averages of those of tissue and blood, we model this medium as an array of blood vessels in a bloodless dermis background. We are currently analyzing temporal and spatial variations of temperature in homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue having identical blood concentrations. A particular application of the model is to the study of laser coagulation tonsillectomy.

  16. Calculations of a wideband metamaterial absorber using equivalent medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaojun; Yang, Helin; Wang, Danqi; Yu, Shengqing; Lou, Yanchao; Guo, Ling

    2016-08-01

    Metamaterial absorbers (MMAs) have drawn increasing attention in many areas due to the fact that they can achieve electromagnetic (EM) waves with unity absorptivity. We demonstrate the design, simulation, experiment and calculation of a wideband MMA based on a loaded double-square-loop (DSL) array of chip resisters. For a normal incidence EM wave, the simulated results show that the absorption of the full width at half maximum is about 9.1 GHz, and the relative bandwidth is 87.1%. Experimental results are in agreement with the simulations. More importantly, equivalent medium theory (EMT) is utilized to calculate the absorptions of the DSL MMA, and the calculated absorptions based on EMT agree with the simulated and measured results. The method based on EMT provides a new way to analysis the mechanism of MMAs.

  17. Applicability of the Effective-Medium Approximation to Heterogeneous Aerosol Particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The effective-medium approximation (EMA) is based on the assumption that a heterogeneous particle can have a homogeneous counterpart possessing similar scattering and absorption properties. We analyze the numerical accuracy of the EMA by comparing superposition T-matrix computations for spherical aerosol particles filled with numerous randomly distributed small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie computations based on the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule. We verify numerically that the EMA can indeed be realized for inclusion size parameters smaller than a threshold value. The threshold size parameter depends on the refractive-index contrast between the host and inclusion materials and quite often does not exceed several tenths, especially in calculations of the scattering matrix and the absorption cross section. As the inclusion size parameter approaches the threshold value, the scattering-matrix errors of the EMA start to grow with increasing the host size parameter and or the number of inclusions. We confirm, in particular, the existence of the effective-medium regime in the important case of dust aerosols with hematite or air-bubble inclusions, but then the large refractive-index contrast necessitates inclusion size parameters of the order of a few tenths. Irrespective of the highly restricted conditions of applicability of the EMA, our results provide further evidence that the effective-medium regime must be a direct corollary of the macroscopic Maxwell equations under specific assumptions.

  18. Applicability of the effective-medium approximation to heterogeneous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The effective-medium approximation (EMA) is based on the assumption that a heterogeneous particle can have a homogeneous counterpart possessing similar scattering and absorption properties. We analyze the numerical accuracy of the EMA by comparing superposition T-matrix computations for spherical aerosol particles filled with numerous randomly distributed small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie computations based on the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule. We verify numerically that the EMA can indeed be realized for inclusion size parameters smaller than a threshold value. The threshold size parameter depends on the refractive-index contrast between the host and inclusion materials and quite often does not exceed several tenths, especially in calculations of the scattering matrix and the absorption cross section. As the inclusion size parameter approaches the threshold value, the scattering-matrix errors of the EMA start to grow with increasing the host size parameter and/or the number of inclusions. We confirm, in particular, the existence of the effective-medium regime in the important case of dust aerosols with hematite or air-bubble inclusions, but then the large refractive-index contrast necessitates inclusion size parameters of the order of a few tenths. Irrespective of the highly restricted conditions of applicability of the EMA, our results provide further evidence that the effective-medium regime must be a direct corollary of the macroscopic Maxwell equations under specific assumptions.

  19. Optical reflection spectra of the structures with surface plasmons excited at the metal-amplifying heterogeneous medium boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A.; Nazvanov, V.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper the results of computer simulations of the optical reflection spectra of the structures with surface plasmons excited at the interface between metal and dielectric with optical amplification are presented. To calculate the reflectance the method of scattering matrices was used. It is shown that the enhanced reflectance from an amplifying heterogeneous metal-dielectric medium with simultaneous surface plasmon excitation is possible.

  20. Wave propagation in elastic medium with heterogeneous quadratic nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Guangxin; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Qu Jianmin

    2011-06-23

    This paper studies the one-dimensional wave propagation in an elastic medium with spatially non-uniform quadratic nonlinearity. Two problems are solved analytically. One is for a time-harmonic wave propagating in a half-space where the displacement is prescribed on the surface of the half-space. It is found that spatial non-uniformity of the material nonlinearity causes backscattering of the second order harmonic, which when combined with the forward propagating waves generates a standing wave in steady-state wave motion. The second problem solved is the reflection from and transmission through a layer of finite thickness embedded in an otherwise linearly elastic medium of infinite extent, where it is assumed that the layer has a spatially non-uniform quadratic nonlinearity. The results show that the transmission coefficient for the second order harmonic is proportional to the spatial average of the nonlinearity across the thickness of the layer, independent of the spatial distribution of the nonlinearity. On the other hand, the coefficient of reflection is proportional to a weighted average of the nonlinearity across the layer thickness. The weight function in this weighted average is related to the propagating phase, thus making the coefficient of reflection dependent on the spatial distribution of the nonlinearity. Finally, the paper concludes with some discussions on how to use the reflected and transmitted second harmonic waves to evaluate the variance and autocorrelation length of nonlinear parameter {beta} when the nonlinearity distribution in the layer is a stochastic process.

  1. Velocities of guided ultrasonic waves in heterogeneous medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touratier, M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical examinations were performed of the longitudinal velocity characteristics of waves in trilaminar and encapsulated waveguides. The study was confined to waveguides with core material that featured transverse wave velocities much worse than the longitudinal wave velocities. The velocities were obtained using a dispersion equation, with consideration given to both the core and encapsulant. Asymptotic velocities were also calculated for bending and twisting in trilaminar waveguides. Trials were run with bimetallic waveguides for comparison with the theoretical predictions. Good agreement was found between the predicted velocity of the propagation of the fundamental mode and the measured velocities. The method was calculated valid for modes above four, confirming that the data were contained in either the core or outer layer, and were unsensitive to the encapsulant.

  2. Dense, viscous brine behavior in heterogeneous porous medium systems.

    PubMed

    Wright, D Johnson; Pedit, J A; Gasda, S E; Farthing, M W; Murphy, L L; Knight, S R; Brubaker, G R; Miller, C T

    2010-06-25

    The behavior of dense, viscous calcium bromide brine solutions used to remediate systems contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) is considered in laboratory and field porous medium systems. The density and viscosity of brine solutions are experimentally investigated and functional forms fit over a wide range of mass fractions. A density of 1.7 times, and a corresponding viscosity of 6.3 times, that of water is obtained at a calcium bromide mass fraction of 0.53. A three-dimensional laboratory cell is used to investigate the establishment, persistence, and rate of removal of a stratified dense brine layer in a controlled system. Results from a field-scale experiment performed at the Dover National Test Site are used to investigate the ability to establish and maintain a dense brine layer as a component of a DNAPL recovery strategy, and to recover the brine at sufficiently high mass fractions to support the economical reuse of the brine. The results of both laboratory and field experiments show that a dense brine layer can be established, maintained, and recovered to a significant extent. Regions of unstable density profiles are shown to develop and persist in the field-scale experiment, which we attribute to regions of low hydraulic conductivity. The saturated-unsaturated, variable-density groundwater flow simulation code SUTRA is modified to describe the system of interest, and used to compare simulations to experimental observations and to investigate certain unobserved aspects of these complex systems. The model results show that the standard model formulation is not appropriate for capturing the behavior of sharp density gradients observed during the dense brine experiments. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dense, Viscous Brine Behavior in Heterogeneous Porous Medium Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. Johnson; Pedit, J.A.; Gasda, S.E.; Farthing, M.W.; Murphy, L.L.; Knight, S.R.; Brubaker, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of dense, viscous calcium bromide brine solutions used to remediate systems contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) is considered in laboratory and field porous medium systems. The density and viscosity of brine solutions are experimentally investigated and functional forms fit over a wide range of mass fractions. A density of 1.7 times, and a corresponding viscosity of 6.3 times, that of water is obtained at a calcium bromide mass fraction of 0.53. A three-dimensional laboratory cell is used to investigate the establishment, persistence, and rate of removal of a stratified dense brine layer in a controlled system. Results from a field-scale experiment performed at the Dover National Test Site are used to investigate the ability to establish and maintain a dense brine layer as a component of a DNAPL recovery strategy, and to recover the brine at sufficiently high mass fractions to support the economical reuse of the brine. The results of both laboratory and field experiments show that a dense brine layer can be established, maintained, and recovered to a significant extent. Regions of unstable density profiles are shown to develop and persist in the field-scale experiment, which we attribute to regions of low hydraulic conductivity. The saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow simulation code SUTRA is modified to describe the system of interest, and used to compare simulations to experimental observations and to investigate certain unobserved aspects of these complex systems. The model results show that the standard model formulation is not appropriate for capturing the behavior of sharp density gradients observed during the dense brine experiments. PMID:20444520

  4. Quasi-statically Self-chosen Faulting Path Modeling in Heterogeneous Medium: FEM-beta Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kame, N.; Oguni, K.

    2005-12-01

    We apply FEM-β, a newly proposed Finite Element Method (Hori, Oguni and Sakaguchi, JMPS, 2005), to quasi-statically self-chosen faulting path modeling. The method, FEM-β, is based on particle discretization of a displacement field with non-overlapping shape function and it provides an easy way to express displacement discontinuities between any two adjacent nodes: This is an advantage of FEM-β for self-chosen failure path modeling. FEM-β, originally developed for the analysis on tensile failure within a structural material containing local imperfection, is here tested for earthquake shear faulting in strongly heterogeneous medium. In order to investigate the effect of elastic heterogeneity in the crust on the formation of geometrically complex fault traces, we first analyze the static stress field in a heterogeneous medium containing a shear crack and then simulate the quasi-static crack growth for which rupture path is self-chosen.

  5. TH-A-19A-01: An Open Source Software for Proton Treatment Planning in Heterogeneous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Desplanques, M; Baroni, G; Wang, K; Phillips, J; Gueorguiev, G; Sharp, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Due to its success in Radiation Oncology during the last decade, interest in proton therapy is on the rise. Unfortunately, despite the global enthusiasm in the field, there is presently no free, multiplatform and customizable Treatment Planning System (TPS) providing proton dose distributions in heterogenous medium. This restricts substantially the progress of clinical research for groups without access to a commercial Proton TPS. The latest implementation of our pencil beam dose calculation algorithm for proton beams within the 3D Slicer open-source environment fulfills all the conditions described above. Methods: The core dose calculation algorithm is based on the Hong algorithm (1), which was upgraded with the Kanematsu theory describing the evolution of the lateral scattering of proton beamlets in heterogeneous medium. This algorithm deals with both mono-energetic beams and Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). In order to be user-friendly, we provide a graphical user interface implemented with the Qt libraries, and visualization with the 3D Slicer medical image analysis software. Two different pencil beam algorithms were developed, and the clinical proton beam line at our facility was modeled. Results: The dose distributions provided by our algorithms were compared to dose distributions coming from both commercialized XiO TPS and literature (dose measurements, GEANT4 and MCNPx) and turned out to be in a good agreement, with maximum dose discrepancies of 5% in homogeneous phantoms and 10% in heterogeneous phantoms. The algorithm of SOBP creation from an optimized weigthing of mono-energetic beams results in flat SOBP. Conclusion: We hope that our efforts in implementing this new, open-source proton TPS will help the research groups to have a free access to a useful, reliable proton dose calculation software.(1) L. Hong et al., A pencil beam algorithm for proton dose calculations, Phys. Med. Biol. 41 (1996) 1305–1330. This project is paid for by NCI

  6. The crust as a heterogeneous ``optical'' medium, or ``crocodiles in the mist''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Hobbs, R. W.; Smith, S. K.; England, R. W.; Snyder, D. B.; Holliger, K.

    1994-04-01

    Based on petrophysical data, geologic maps, and a well log, we present statistical descriptions of likely upper-, middle-, and lower-crustal rocks to characterize the fine-scale heterogeneity observed in crustal exposures and inferred from deep-crustal seismic data. The statistical models, developed for granitic and metamorphic upper crust, and for an extended metamorphic lower crust, are used to construct whole-crustal models of seismic velocity heterogenity. We present finite-difference synthetic CMP data from several models which compare favorably with field data. The statistical models also permit classification of the seismic reflection experiment and the crustal heterogeneity according to scattering regime. The "optical", or scattering properties of importance for classification are the velocity fluctuation intensity, the horizontal and vertical correlation lengths of the medium, the correlation function of the medium, and the velocity population function. For the crustal properties we measured, the bandwidth of a typical deep crustal experiment overlaps from the weak to the strong scattering regime, with implications for crustal seismic data processing and imaging. Notably, deep-crustal signals are likely to have experienced multiple scattering, making common seismic imaging techniques of questionable value. Moreover, the details of the unmigrated CMP stacked section bears little resemblance to the underlying medium.

  7. Emergent dynamics of spatio-temporal chaos in a heterogeneous excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittihn, Philip; Berg, Sebastian; Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Self-organized activation patterns in excitable media such as spiral waves and spatio-temporal chaos underlie dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. While the interaction of single spiral waves with different types of heterogeneity has been studied extensively, the effect of heterogeneity on fully developed spatio-temporal chaos remains poorly understood. We investigate how the complexity and stability properties of spatio-temporal chaos in the Bär-Eiswirth model of excitable media depend on the heterogeneity of the underlying medium. We employ different measures characterizing the chaoticity of the system and find that the spatial arrangement of multiple discrete lower excitability regions has a strong impact on the complexity of the dynamics. Varying the number, shape, and spatial arrangement of the heterogeneities, we observe strong emergent effects ranging from increases in chaoticity to the complete cessation of chaos, contrasting the expectation from the homogeneous behavior. The implications of our findings for the development and treatment of arrhythmias in the heterogeneous cardiac muscle are discussed.

  8. Rotationally induced fingering patterns in a two-dimensional heterogeneous porous medium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Lin, Ting-Shiang; Miranda, José A

    2016-11-01

    Rotating fluid flows under two-dimensional homogeneous porous media conditions (or in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell) reveal the development of complex interfacial fingering patterns. These pattern-forming structures are characterized by the occurrence of finger competition events, finger pinch-off episodes, as well as by the production of satellite droplets. In this work, we use intensive numerical simulations to investigate how these fully nonlinear pattern growth phenomena are altered by the presence of permeability heterogeneities in the rotating porous medium. This is done by employing a diffuse-interface Darcy-Cahn-Hilliard description of the problem and considering a permeability field presenting a log-Gaussian distribution, characterized by a variance s and a correlation length l. We study how the heterogeneity measures s and l couple to the governing hydrodynamic dimensionless parameters of the problem and introduce important changes on the pattern formation dynamics of the system.

  9. Rotationally induced fingering patterns in a two-dimensional heterogeneous porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Lin, Ting-Shiang; Miranda, José A.

    2016-11-01

    Rotating fluid flows under two-dimensional homogeneous porous media conditions (or in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell) reveal the development of complex interfacial fingering patterns. These pattern-forming structures are characterized by the occurrence of finger competition events, finger pinch-off episodes, as well as by the production of satellite droplets. In this work, we use intensive numerical simulations to investigate how these fully nonlinear pattern growth phenomena are altered by the presence of permeability heterogeneities in the rotating porous medium. This is done by employing a diffuse-interface Darcy-Cahn-Hilliard description of the problem and considering a permeability field presenting a log-Gaussian distribution, characterized by a variance s and a correlation length l . We study how the heterogeneity measures s and l couple to the governing hydrodynamic dimensionless parameters of the problem and introduce important changes on the pattern formation dynamics of the system.

  10. Benchmarking analytical calculations of proton doses in heterogeneous matter.

    PubMed

    Ciangaru, George; Polf, Jerimy C; Bues, Martin; Smith, Alfred R

    2005-12-01

    A proton dose computational algorithm, performing an analytical superposition of infinitely narrow proton beamlets (ASPB) is introduced. The algorithm uses the standard pencil beam technique of laterally distributing the central axis broad beam doses according to the Moliere scattering theory extended to slablike varying density media. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of our computational tool by comparing it with experimental and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation data as benchmarks. In the tests, parallel wide beams of protons were scattered in water phantoms containing embedded air and bone materials with simple geometrical forms and spatial dimensions of a few centimeters. For homogeneous water and bone phantoms, the proton doses we calculated with the ASPB algorithm were found very comparable to experimental and MC data. For layered bone slab inhomogeneity in water, the comparison between our analytical calculation and the MC simulation showed reasonable agreement, even when the inhomogeneity was placed at the Bragg peak depth. There also was reasonable agreement for the parallelepiped bone block inhomogeneity placed at various depths, except for cases in which the bone was located in the region of the Bragg peak, when discrepancies were as large as more than 10%. When the inhomogeneity was in the form of abutting air-bone slabs, discrepancies of as much as 8% occurred in the lateral dose profiles on the air cavity side of the phantom. Additionally, the analytical depth-dose calculations disagreed with the MC calculations within 3% of the Bragg peak dose, at the entry and midway depths in the phantom. The distal depth-dose 20%-80% fall-off widths and ranges calculated with our algorithm and the MC simulation were generally within 0.1 cm of agreement. The analytical lateral-dose profile calculations showed smaller (by less than 0.1 cm) 20%-80% penumbra widths and shorter fall-off tails than did those calculated by the MC simulations. Overall

  11. Application of Effective Medium Theory to the Three-Dimensional Heterogeneity of Mantle Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    A self-consistent theory for the effective elastic parameters of stochastic media with small-scale 3D heterogeneities has been developed using a 2nd-order Born approximation to the scattered wavefield (T. H. Jordan, GJI, in press). Here we apply the theory to assess how small-scale variations in the local anisotropy of the upper mantle affect seismic wave propagation. We formulate a anisotropic model in which the local elastic properties are specified by a constant stiffness tensor with hexagonal symmetry of arbitrary orientation. This orientation is guided by a Gaussian random vector field with transversely isotropic (TI) statistics. If the outer scale of the statistical variability is small compared to a wavelength, then the effective seismic velocities are TI and depend on two parameters, a horizontal-to-vertical orientation ratio ξ and a horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio, η. If ξ = 1, the symmetry axis is isotropically distributed; if ξ < 1, it is vertical biased (bipolar distribution), and if ξ > 1, it is horizontally biased (girdle distribution). If η = 1, the heterogeneity is geometrically isotropic; as η à∞, the medium becomes a horizontal stochastic laminate; as η à0, the medium becomes a vertical stochastic bundle. Using stiffness tensors constrained by laboratory measurements of mantle xenoliths, we explore the dependence of the effective P and S velocities on ξ and η. The effective velocities are strongly controlled by the orientation ratio ξ; e.g., if the hexagonal symmetry axis of the local anisotropy is the fast direction of propagation, then vPH > vPV and vSH > vSV for ξ > 1. A more surprising result is the 2nd-order insensitivity of the velocities to the heterogeneity aspect ratio η. Consequently, the geometrical anisotropy of upper-mantle heterogeneity significantly enhances seismic-wave anisotropy only through local variations in the Voigt-averaged velocities, which depend primarily on rock composition and not deformation

  12. Dopamine presynaptically and heterogeneously modulates nucleus accumbens medium-spiny neuron GABA synapses in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Geldwert, Daron; Norris, J Madison; Feldman, Igor G; Schulman, Joshua J; Joyce, Myra P; Rayport, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Background The striatal complex is the major target of dopamine action in the CNS. There, medium-spiny GABAergic neurons, which constitute about 95% of the neurons in the area, form a mutually inhibitory synaptic network that is modulated by dopamine. When put in culture, the neurons reestablish this network. In particular, they make autaptic connections that provide access to single, identified medium-spiny to medium-spiny neuron synaptic connections. Results We examined medium-spiny neuron autaptic connections in postnatal cultures from the nucleus accumbens, the ventral part of the striatal complex. These connections were subject to presynaptic dopamine modulation. D1-like receptors mediated either inhibition or facilitation, while D2-like receptors predominantly mediated inhibition. Many connections showed both D1 and D2 modulation, consistent with a significant functional colocalization of D1 and D2-like receptors at presynaptic sites. These same connections were subject to GABAA, GABAB, norepinephrine and serotonin modulation, revealing a multiplicity of modulatory autoreceptors and heteroreceptors on individual varicosities. In some instances, autaptic connections had two components that were differentially modulated by dopamine agonists, suggesting that dopamine receptors could be distributed heterogeneously on the presynaptic varicosities making up a single synaptic (i.e. autaptic) connection. Conclusion Differential trafficking of dopamine receptors to different presynaptic varicosities could explain the many controversial studies reporting widely varying degrees of dopamine receptor colocalization in medium-spiny neurons, as well as more generally the diversity of dopamine actions in target areas. Longer-term changes in the modulatory actions of dopamine in the striatal complex could be due to plasticity in the presynaptic distribution of dopamine receptors on medium-spiny neuron varicosities. PMID:16813648

  13. Adaptations in Electronic Structure Calculations in Heterogeneous Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Talamudupula, Sai

    2011-01-01

    Modern quantum chemistry deals with electronic structure calculations of unprecedented complexity and accuracy. They demand full power of high-performance computing and must be in tune with the given architecture for superior e ciency. To make such applications resourceaware, it is desirable to enable their static and dynamic adaptations using some external software (middleware), which may monitor both system availability and application needs, rather than mix science with system-related calls inside the application. The present work investigates scienti c application interlinking with middleware based on the example of the computational chemistry package GAMESS and middleware NICAN. The existing synchronous model is limited by the possible delays due to the middleware processing time under the sustainable runtime system conditions. Proposed asynchronous and hybrid models aim at overcoming this limitation. When linked with NICAN, the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method is capable of adapting statically and dynamically its fragment scheduling policy based on the computing platform conditions. Signi cant execution time and throughput gains have been obtained due to such static adaptations when the compute nodes have very di erent core counts. Dynamic adaptations are based on the main memory availability at run time. NICAN prompts FMO to postpone scheduling certain fragments, if there is not enough memory for their immediate execution. Hence, FMO may be able to complete the calculations whereas without such adaptations it aborts.

  14. Decomposition of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) by heterogeneous photocatalysis in acidic aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Shaik, Khaja Lateef; Lin, Cheng-Fang

    2009-09-01

    Decomposition of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is of prime importance since they are recognized as persistent organic pollutants and are widespread in the environment. PFCAs with longer carbon chain length are particularly of interest because of their noted recalcitrance, toxicity, and bioaccumulation. Here in this study, we demonstrate efficient decomposition of three important PFCAs such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) by heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO(2) as a photocatalyst in acidic aqueous solutions. The PFCAs were decomposed into shorter carbon chain length PFCAs and fluoride ions. Photoholes of excited TiO(2) generated upon UV-irradiation are found to be the oxidation sites for PFCAs. Therefore, creation and sustenance of these photoholes in the acidic aqueous medium has enhanced the decomposition of PFCAs. Heterogeneous photocatalytic treatment achieved more than 99% decomposition and 38% complete mineralization of PFOA in 7h. The decomposition of other PFCAs was as high as 99% with a defluorination efficiency of 38% for PFDA and 54% for PFNA. The presence of perchloric acid was found to enhance the decomposition by facilitating the ionization of PFCAs. The oxygen present in the medium served both as an oxidant and an electron acceptor. The mechanistic details of PFCA decomposition and their corresponding mineralization are elaborated.

  15. Effects of Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous porous medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated porous media. The permeability ratios of porous medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the porous media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.

  16. Analytical solution of advection-diffusion equation in heterogeneous infinite medium using Green's function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanskrityayn, Abhishek; Kumar, Naveen

    2016-12-01

    Some analytical solutions of one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation (ADE) with variable dispersion coefficient and velocity are obtained using Green's function method (GFM). The variability attributes to the heterogeneity of hydro-geological media like river bed or aquifer in more general ways than that in the previous works. Dispersion coefficient is considered temporally dependent, while velocity is considered spatially and temporally dependent. The spatial dependence is considered to be linear and temporal dependence is considered to be of linear, exponential and asymptotic. The spatio-temporal dependence of velocity is considered in three ways. Results of previous works are also derived validating the results of the present work. To use GFM, a moving coordinate transformation is developed through which this ADE is reduced into a form, whose analytical solution is already known. Analytical solutions are obtained for the pollutant's mass dispersion from an instantaneous point source as well as from a continuous point source in a heterogeneous medium. The effect of such dependence on the mass transport is explained through the illustrations of the analytical solutions.

  17. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-21

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  18. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  19. Oxygen Transfer in a Fluctuating Capillary Fringe: Impact of Porous Medium Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberer, C.; Rolle, M.; Cirpka, O. A.; Grathwohl, P.

    2013-12-01

    Mass transfer of oxygen from the atmosphere, across the capillary fringe, to anoxic groundwater is of primary importance for many biogeochemical processes affecting groundwater quality. The controlling mechanisms for oxygen transfer across the capillary fringe are the diffusive/dispersive transport as well as mass exchange between entrapped air and groundwater. In addition, the presence of physical heterogeneity in the porous medium may strongly affect the oxygen fluxes. We performed quasi two-dimensional flow-through experiments at the laboratory bench-scale to study the effect of a coarse-material inclusion, located in proximity of the water table, on flow and oxygen transfer in the capillary fringe. Flow and transport were monitored under both steady-state and transient flow conditions, the latter obtained by fluctuating the water table. We visually inspected the complex flow field using a dye tracer solution, measured vertical oxygen profiles across the capillary fringe at high spatial resolution, and determined oxygen fluxes in the effluent of the flow-through chamber. Our results show that the coarse-material inclusion significantly affected oxygen transfer during the different phases of the experiments. At steady state, the oxygen flux across the unsaturated/saturated interface was considerably enhanced due to flow focusing in the fully water-saturated coarse lens. During drainage, the capillary barrier effect prevented water to drain from the fine material overlying the coarse lens. The entrapped oxygen-rich aqueous phase contributed to the total amount of oxygen supplied to the system when the water table was raised back to its initial level. In case of imbibition, also pronounced entrapment of air occurred in the coarse lens, causing oxygen to partition between the aqueous and gaseous phases. Thus, we found that oxygen transfer across the capillary fringe was significantly enhanced by the coarse-material inclusion due to flow focusing, the capillary

  20. An analytical approach to estimating the first order x-ray scatter in heterogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weiguang; Leszczynski, Konrad W

    2009-07-01

    X-ray scatter estimation in heterogeneous medium is a challenge in improving the quality of diagnostic projection images and volumetric image reconstruction. For Compton scatter, the statistical behavior of the first order scatter can be accurately described by using the Klein-Nishina expression for Compton scattering cross section provided that the exact information of the medium including the geometry and the attenuation, which in fact is unknown, is known. The authors present an approach to approximately separate the unknowns from the Klein-Nishina formula and express the unknown part by the primary x-ray intensity at the detector. The approximation is fitted to the exact solution of the Klein-Nishina formulas by introducing one parameter, whose value is shown to be not sensitive to the linear attenuation coefficient and thickness of the scatterer. The performance of the approach is evaluated by comparing the result with those from the Klein-Nishina formula and Monte Carlo simulations. The approximation is close to the exact solution and the Monte Carlo simulation result for parallel and cone beam imaging systems with various field sizes, air gaps, and mono- and polyenergy of primary photons and for nonhomogeneous scatterer with various geometries of slabs and cylinders. For a wide range of x-ray energy including those often used in kilo- and megavoltage cone beam computed tomographies, the first order scatter fluence at the detector is mainly from Compton scatter. Thus, the approximate relation between the first order scatter and primary fluences at the detector is useful for scatter estimation in physical phantom projections.

  1. Mean and variance of DNAPL ringer development in a saturated, randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, A. M.; Neuman, S. P.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorinated organic solvents such as TCE and PCE are among the most ubiquitous and problematic groundwater contaminants at many sites. They usually enter the subsurface in the form of organic liquids which exhibit low miscibility with water and thus form a separate dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Here we analyze the movement of DNAPL in a three-dimensional randomly heterogeneous porous medium saturated with water. We consider the fluid interface between DNAPL and water to form a sharp boundary at which the capillary pressure head, assumed equal to the entry pressure head of DNAPL, is prescribed either deterministically or randomly. We treat log hydraulic conductivity as a statistically homogeneous random field with given mean, variance and covariance, This allows us to cast the corresponding boundary-value problem in the form of an integro-differential equation, in which the parameters and domain of integration are random. Expanding this equation in a Taylor series about the mean position of the front, and averaging in probability space, yields leading-order ensemble I moment equations for the mean and variance of front evolution with time. Previously we solved these moment equations analytically in one-dimension with gravity, to first order in the variance of log conductivity, and compared our solution with the results of Monte Carlo sjmulations. Here we solve the same moment equations numerically in two-spatial dimensions without gravity.

  2. Trajectory-based modeling of fluid transport in a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity

    DOE PAGES

    Vasco, D. W.; Pride, Steven R.; Commer, Michael

    2016-03-04

    Using an asymptotic methodology, valid in the presence of smoothly varying heterogeneity and prescribed boundaries, we derive a trajectory-based solution for tracer transport. The analysis produces a Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential equation for the phase of the propagating tracer front. The trajectories follow from the characteristic equations that are equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The paths are determined by the fluid velocity field, the total porosity, and the dispersion tensor. Due to their dependence upon the local hydrodynamic dispersion, they differ from conventional streamlines. This difference is borne out in numerical calculations for both uniform and dipole flow fields. In anmore » application to the computational X-ray imaging of a saline tracer test, we illustrate that the trajectories may serve as the basis for a form of tracer tomography. In particular, we use the onset time of a change in attenuation for each volume element of the X-ray image as a measure of the arrival time of the saline tracer. In conclusion, the arrival times are used to image the spatial variation of the effective hydraulic conductivity within the laboratory sample.« less

  3. Trajectory-based modeling of fluid transport in a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasco, D. W.; Pride, Steven R.; Commer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Using an asymptotic methodology, valid in the presence of smoothly varying heterogeneity and prescribed boundaries, we derive a trajectory-based solution for tracer transport. The analysis produces a Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential equation for the phase of the propagating tracer front. The trajectories follow from the characteristic equations that are equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The paths are determined by the fluid velocity field, the total porosity, and the dispersion tensor. Due to their dependence upon the local hydrodynamic dispersion, they differ from conventional streamlines. This difference is borne out in numerical calculations for both uniform and dipole flow fields. In an application to the computational X-ray imaging of a saline tracer test, we illustrate that the trajectories may serve as the basis for a form of tracer tomography. In particular, we use the onset time of a change in attenuation for each volume element of the X-ray image as a measure of the arrival time of the saline tracer. The arrival times are used to image the spatial variation of the effective hydraulic conductivity within the laboratory sample.

  4. Trajectory-based modeling of fluid transport in a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D. W.; Pride, Steven R.; Commer, Michael

    2016-03-04

    Using an asymptotic methodology, valid in the presence of smoothly varying heterogeneity and prescribed boundaries, we derive a trajectory-based solution for tracer transport. The analysis produces a Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential equation for the phase of the propagating tracer front. The trajectories follow from the characteristic equations that are equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The paths are determined by the fluid velocity field, the total porosity, and the dispersion tensor. Due to their dependence upon the local hydrodynamic dispersion, they differ from conventional streamlines. This difference is borne out in numerical calculations for both uniform and dipole flow fields. In an application to the computational X-ray imaging of a saline tracer test, we illustrate that the trajectories may serve as the basis for a form of tracer tomography. In particular, we use the onset time of a change in attenuation for each volume element of the X-ray image as a measure of the arrival time of the saline tracer. In conclusion, the arrival times are used to image the spatial variation of the effective hydraulic conductivity within the laboratory sample.

  5. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Westerly, David C.; Mo Xiaohu; DeLuca, Paul M. Jr.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke ['Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media,' Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313-3330 (2002)] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Methods: Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Moliere scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Results: Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as much as 1.4 mm (21%) at the depth

  6. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries.

    PubMed

    Westerly, David C; Mo, Xiaohu; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Mackie, Thomas R; DeLuca, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke ["Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media," Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313-3330 (2002)] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Molière scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as much as 1.4 mm (21%) at the depth of the Bragg peak for a

  7. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries

    PubMed Central

    Westerly, David C.; Mo, Xiaohu; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Mackie, Thomas R.; DeLuca, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke [“Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media,” Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313–3330 (2002)10.1088/0031-9155/47/18/304] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Methods: Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Molière scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Results: Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as

  8. Methods for calculating X-ray diffuse scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punegov, V. I.; Sivkov, D. V.

    2015-03-01

    Two independent approaches to calculate the angular distribution of X-ray diffusion scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots (QDs) have been proposed. The first method is based on the analytical solution involving the multipole expansion of elastic strain fields beyond QDs. The second approach is based on calculations of atomic displacements near QDs by the Green's function method. An analysis of the diffuse scattering intensity distribution in the reciprocal space within these two approaches shows that both methods yield similar results for the chosen models of QD spatial distribution.

  9. Effects of heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and biomass on biodegradation rate calculations - Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations were used to examine the effects of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and intrinsic biodegradation rate on the accuracy of contaminant plume-scale biodegradation rates obtained from field data. The simulations were based on a steady-state BTEX contaminant plume-scale biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions, with the electron acceptor in excess. Biomass was either uniform or correlated with K to model spatially variable intrinsic biodegradation rates. A hydraulic conductivity data set from an alluvial aquifer was used to generate three sets of 10 realizations with different degrees of heterogeneity, and contaminant transport with biodegradation was simulated with BIOMOC. Biodegradation rates were calculated from the steady-state contaminant plumes using decreases in concentration with distance downgradient and a single flow velocity estimate, as is commonly done in site characterization to support the interpretation of natural attenuation. The observed rates were found to underestimate the actual rate specified in the heterogeneous model in all cases. The discrepancy between the observed rate and the 'true' rate depended on the ground water flow velocity estimate, and increased with increasing heterogeneity in the aquifer. For a lognormal K distribution with variance of 0.46, the estimate was no more than a factor of 1.4 slower than the true rate. For aquifer with 20% silt/clay lenses, the rate estimate was as much as nine times slower than the true rate. Homogeneous-permeability, uniform-degradation rate simulations were used to generate predictions of remediation time with the rates estimated from heterogeneous models. The homogeneous models were generally overestimated the extent of remediation or underestimated remediation time, due to delayed degradation of contaminants in the low-K areas. Results suggest that aquifer characterization for natural attenuation at contaminated sites should include assessment of the presence

  10. Measurement and calculation of the two-dimensional backscattering Mueller matrix of a turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Cameron, B D; Rakovic, M J; Mehrübeoglu, M; Kattawar, G W; Rastegar, S; Wang, L V; Coté, G L

    1998-04-01

    We present both experimental and Monte Carlo-based simulation results for the diffusely backscattered intensity patterns that arise from illumination of a turbid medium with a polarized laser beam. A numerical method that allows the calculation of all 16 elements of the two-dimensional Muller matrix is used; moreover, it is shown that only seven matrix elements are independent. To validate our method, we compared our simulations with experimental measurements, using a turbid medium consisting of 2.02-microm -diameter polystyrene spheres suspended in deionized water. By varying the incident polarization and the analyzer optics for the experimental measurements, we obtained the diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix elements. The experimental and the numerical results are in good agreement.

  11. Systematic improvements of ab-initio in-medium similarity renormalization group calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Titus Dan

    The In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group (IM-SRG) is an ab initio many-body method that has enjoyed increasing prominence in nuclear theory, due to its soft polynomial scaling with system size, and the flexibility to target ground and excited states of both closed- and open-shell systems. Despite many successful applications of the IM-SRG to microscopic calculations of medium-mass nuclei in recent years, the conventional formulation of the method suffers a number of limitations. Key amongst these are i) large memory demands that limit calculations in heavier systems and render the calculation of observables besides energy spectra extremely difficult, and ii) the lack of a computationally feasible sequence of improved approximations that converge to the exact solution in the appropriate limit, thereby verifying that the IM-SRG is systematically improvable. In this thesis, I present a novel formulation of the IM-SRG based on the Magnus expansion. I will show that this improved formulation, guided by intuition gleaned from a diagrammatic analysis of the perturbative content of different truncations and parallels with coupled-cluster theory, allows one to bypass the computational limitations of traditional implementations, and provides computationally viable approximations that go beyond the truncations used to date. The effectiveness of the new Magnus formulation is illustrated for several many-nucleon and many-electron systems.

  12. Calculation of Physicochemical Properties for Short- and Medium-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glüge, Juliane; Bogdal, Christian; Scheringer, Martin; Buser, Andreas M.; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2013-06-01

    Short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins are potential PBT chemicals (persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic) and short-chain chlorinated paraffins are under review for inclusion in the UNEP Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. Despite their high production volume of more than one million metric tonnes per year, only few data on their physicochemical properties are available. We calculated subcooled-liquid vapor pressure, subcooled-liquid solubility in water and octanol, Henry's law constant for water and octanol, as well as the octanol-water partition coefficient with the property calculation methods COSMOtherm, SPARC, and EPI Suite™, and compared the results to experimental data from the literature. For all properties, good or very good agreement between calculated and measured data was obtained for COSMOtherm; results from SPARC were in good agreement with the measured data except for subcooled-liquid water solubility, whereas EPI Suite™ showed the largest discrepancies for all properties. After critical evaluation of the three property calculation methods, a final set of recommended property data for short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins was derived. The calculated property data show interesting relationships with chlorine content and carbon chain length. Increasing chlorine content does not cause pronounced changes in water solubility and octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW) as long as it is below 55%. Increasing carbon chain length leads to strong increases in KOW and corresponding decreases in subcooled-liquid water solubility. The present data set can be used in further studies to assess the environmental fate and human exposure of this relevant compound class.

  13. An orthorhombic representation of a heterogeneous medium for the finite-difference modelling of seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristek, Jozef; Moczo, Peter; Chaljub, Emmanuel; Kristekova, Miriam

    2017-02-01

    The possibility of applying one explicit finite-difference (FD) scheme to all interior grid points (points not lying on a grid border) no matter what their positions are with respect to the material interface is one of the key factors of the computational efficiency of the FD modelling. Smooth or discontinuous heterogeneity of the medium is accounted for only by values of the effective grid moduli and densities. Accuracy of modelling thus very much depends on how these effective grid parameters are evaluated. We present an orthorhombic representation of a heterogeneous medium for the FD modelling. We numerically demonstrate its superior accuracy. Compared to the harmonic-averaging representation the orthorhombic representation is more accurate mainly in the case of strong surface waves that are especially important in local surface sedimentary basins. The orthorhombic representation is applicable to modelling seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion in isotropic models with material interfaces and smooth heterogeneities using velocity-stress, displacement-stress and displacement FD schemes on staggered, partly staggered, Lebedev and collocated grids.

  14. Analytical method for calculating neutron bulk shielding in a medium-energy accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    This investigation aims at an analytical method for calculating neutron bulk shielding in a medium-energy accelerator facility on the basis of the modified Moyer model. Shielding parameters for the analytical formula are obtained using the ANISN one-dimensional discrete ordinate code and the MCNP three-dimensional Monte Carlo code. The dose attenuation length of a concrete shield, which is the most important parameter, is obtained as a function of neutron energies from 0.2 MeV to 400 MeV and of shield thickness from 1 m to 7 m. The equation is also applicable to the estimation of neutron oblique penetration through a concrete shield, so the correction factor for oblique penetration is introduced into the analytical formula. It is expressed as the ratio of dose equivalent as calculated with MCNP for penetration through a relatively thin (1 or 2 m thick) concrete slab shield to that with the analytical equation developed in this work.

  15. A Monte Carlo calculation model of electronic portal imaging device for transit dosimetry through heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on its effective atomic number modeling in the XVMC code. Methods: A previously developed EPID model, based on the XVMC code by density scaling of EPID structures, was modified by additionally considering effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of each structure and adopting a phase space file from the EGSnrc code. The model was tested under various homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms and field sizes by comparing the calculations in the model with measurements in EPID. In order to better evaluate the model, the performance of the XVMC code was separately tested by comparing calculated dose to water with ion chamber (IC) array measurement in the plane of EPID. Results: In the EPID plane, calculated dose to water by the code showed agreement with IC measurements within 1.8%. The difference was averaged across the in-field regions of the acquired profiles for all field sizes and phantoms. The maximum point difference was 2.8%, affected by proximity of the maximum points to penumbra and MC noise. The EPID model showed agreement with measured EPID images within 1.3%. The maximum point difference was 1.9%. The difference dropped from the higher value of the code by employing the calibration that is dependent on field sizes and thicknesses for the conversion of calculated images to measured images. Thanks to the Z{sub eff} correction, the EPID model showed a linear trend of the calibration factors unlike those of the density-only-scaled model. The phase space file from the EGSnrc code sharpened penumbra profiles significantly, improving agreement of calculated profiles with measured profiles. Conclusions: Demonstrating high accuracy, the EPID model with the associated calibration system may be used for in vivo dosimetry of radiation therapy. Through this study, a MC model of EPID has been developed, and their performance has been rigorously

  16. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms in slab phantoms with cortical bone equivalent heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, P.; Jornet, N.; Duch, M. A.; Panettieri, V.; Weber, L.; Eudaldo, T.; Ginjaume, M.; Ribas, M.

    2007-08-15

    To evaluate the dose values predicted by several calculation algorithms in two treatment planning systems, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and measurements by means of various detectors were performed in heterogeneous layer phantoms with water- and bone-equivalent materials. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), plane parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers, and beam profiles with films. The MC code used for the simulations was the PENELOPE code. Three different field sizes (10x10, 5x5, and 2x2 cm{sup 2}) were studied in two phantom configurations and a bone equivalent material. These two phantom configurations contained heterogeneities of 5 and 2 cm of bone, respectively. We analyzed the performance of four correction-based algorithms and one based on convolution superposition. The correction-based algorithms were the Batho, the Modified Batho, the Equivalent TAR implemented in the Cadplan (Varian) treatment planning system (TPS), and the Helax-TMS Pencil Beam from the Helax-TMS (Nucletron) TPS. The convolution-superposition algorithm was the Collapsed Cone implemented in the Helax-TMS. All the correction-based calculation algorithms underestimated the dose inside the bone-equivalent material for 18 MV compared to MC simulations. The maximum underestimation, in terms of root-mean-square (RMS), was about 15% for the Helax-TMS Pencil Beam (Helax-TMS PB) for a 2x2 cm{sup 2} field inside the bone-equivalent material. In contrast, the Collapsed Cone algorithm yielded values around 3%. A more complex behavior was found for 6 MV where the Collapsed Cone performed less well, overestimating the dose inside the heterogeneity in 3%-5%. The rebuildup in the interface bone-water and the penumbra shrinking in high-density media were not predicted by any of the calculation algorithms except the Collapsed Cone, and only the MC simulations matched the experimental values

  17. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms in slab phantoms with cortical bone equivalent heterogeneities.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, P; Jornet, N; Duch, M A; Panettieri, V; Weber, L; Eudaldo, T; Ginjaume, M; Ribas, M

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate the dose values predicted by several calculation algorithms in two treatment planning systems, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and measurements by means of various detectors were performed in heterogeneous layer phantoms with water- and bone-equivalent materials. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), plane parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers, and beam profiles with films. The MC code used for the simulations was the PENELOPE code. Three different field sizes (10 x 10, 5 x 5, and 2 x 2 cm2) were studied in two phantom configurations and a bone equivalent material. These two phantom configurations contained heterogeneities of 5 and 2 cm of bone, respectively. We analyzed the performance of four correction-based algorithms and one based on convolution superposition. The correction-based algorithms were the Batho, the Modified Batho, the Equivalent TAR implemented in the Cadplan (Varian) treatment planning system (TPS), and the Helax-TMS Pencil Beam from the Helax-TMS (Nucletron) TPS. The convolution-superposition algorithm was the Collapsed Cone implemented in the Helax-TMS. All the correction-based calculation algorithms underestimated the dose inside the bone-equivalent material for 18 MV compared to MC simulations. The maximum underestimation, in terms of root-mean-square (RMS), was about 15% for the Helax-TMS Pencil Beam (Helax-TMS PB) for a 2 x 2 cm2 field inside the bone-equivalent material. In contrast, the Collapsed Cone algorithm yielded values around 3%. A more complex behavior was found for 6 MV where the Collapsed Cone performed less well, overestimating the dose inside the heterogeneity in 3%-5%. The rebuildup in the interface bone-water and the penumbra shrinking in high-density media were not predicted by any of the calculation algorithms except the Collapsed Cone, and only the MC simulations matched the experimental values

  18. Migration and Entrapment of DNAPLs in Heterogeneous Systems: Impact of Waste and Porous Medium Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Linda M. Abriola; Avery H. Demond

    2005-01-10

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) pose a significant threat to soil and groundwater at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Evidence suggests that subsurface wettability variations are present at many of these sites as a result of spatical and temporal variations in aqueous phase chemistry, contaminant aging, mineralogy and organic matter. The presence of such heterogeneity may significantly influence DNAPL migration and entrapment in the saturated zone.

  19. Dose calculation algorithm of fast fine-heterogeneity correction for heavy charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-04-01

    This work addresses computing techniques for dose calculations in treatment planning with proton and ion beams, based on an efficient kernel-convolution method referred to as grid-dose spreading (GDS) and accurate heterogeneity-correction method referred to as Gaussian beam splitting. The original GDS algorithm suffered from distortion of dose distribution for beams tilted with respect to the dose-grid axes. Use of intermediate grids normal to the beam field has solved the beam-tilting distortion. Interplay of arrangement between beams and grids was found as another intrinsic source of artifact. Inclusion of rectangular-kernel convolution in beam transport, to share the beam contribution among the nearest grids in a regulatory manner, has solved the interplay problem. This algorithmic framework was applied to a tilted proton pencil beam and a broad carbon-ion beam. In these cases, while the elementary pencil beams individually split into several tens, the calculation time increased only by several times with the GDS algorithm. The GDS and beam-splitting methods will complementarily enable accurate and efficient dose calculations for radiotherapy with protons and ions. Copyright © 2010 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Necessity of using heterogeneous ellipsoidal Earth model with terrain to calculate co-seismic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huihong; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Huai; Huang, Luyuan; Qu, Wulin; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-04-01

    Co-seismic deformation and stress changes, which reflect the elasticity of the earth, are very important in the earthquake dynamics, and also to other issues, such as the evaluation of the seismic risk, fracture process and triggering of earthquake. Lots of scholars have researched the dislocation theory and co-seismic deformation and obtained the half-space homogeneous model, half-space stratified model, spherical stratified model, and so on. Especially, models of Okada (1992) and Wang (2003, 2006) are widely applied in the research of calculating co-seismic and post-seismic effects. However, since both semi-infinite space model and layered model do not take the role of the earth curvature or heterogeneity or topography into consideration, there are large errors in calculating the co-seismic displacement of a great earthquake in its impacted area. Meanwhile, the computational methods of calculating the co-seismic strain and stress are different between spherical model and plane model. Here, we adopted the finite element method which could well deal with the complex characteristics (such as anisotropy, discontinuities) of rock and different conditions. We use the mash adaptive technique to automatically encrypt the mesh at the fault and adopt the equivalent volume force replace the dislocation source, which can avoid the difficulty in handling discontinuity surface with conventional (Zhang et al., 2015). We constructed an earth model that included earth's layered structure and curvature, the upper boundary was set as a free surface and the core-mantle boundary was set under buoyancy forces. Firstly, based on the precision requirement, we take a testing model - - a strike-slip fault (the length of fault is 500km and the width is 50km, and the slippage is 10m) for example. Because of the curvature of the Earth, some errors certainly occur in plane coordinates just as previous studies (Dong et al., 2014; Sun et al., 2012). However, we also found that: 1) the co

  1. Calculation of two-particle quantities in the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Yang, S. X.; Tam, K.-M.; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.; Jarrell, M.

    2017-04-01

    The mean-field theory for disordered electron systems without interaction is widely and successfully used to describe equilibrium properties of materials over the whole range of disorder strengths. However, it fails to take into account the effects of quantum coherence and information of localization. Vertex corrections due to multiple backscatterings may drive the electrical conductivity to zero and make expansions around the mean field in strong disorder problematic. Here, we present a method for the calculation of two-particle quantities which enables us to characterize the metal-insulator transitions in disordered electron systems by using the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation. We show how to include vertex corrections and information about the mobility edge in the typical mean-field theory. We successfully demonstrate the application of the developed method by showing that the conductivity formulated in this way properly characterizes the metal-insulator transition in disordered systems.

  2. Random choice method for calculating fluid displacement in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, N.; Anderson, C.; Concus, P.

    1980-06-01

    Multiphase fluid displacement in a porous medium gives rise naturally to the occurrence of steep fronts, for example between different fluids or between regions of differing chemical concentrations. Such fronts pose substantial difficulty for most numerical methods. However, the recently developed random choice numerical method has been found capable of following effectively even perfectly sharp fronts. An application to the calculation of immiscible displacement in a petroleum reservoir is discussed, including the effects of capillary pressure and gravity. Previous work with W. Proskurowski has considered the limiting hyperbolic case of zero capillary pressure with gravity neglected. Numerical results of our current work for solving a model problem of two-phase displacement in two dimensions indicate that the effects of the additional possible interactions of shock and expansion waves permitted by the inclusion of gravity can be handled efficiently within the framework of the random choice method.

  3. SU-E-J-60: Efficient Monte Carlo Dose Calculation On CPU-GPU Heterogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, K; Chen, D. Z; Hu, X. S; Zhou, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well-known that the performance of GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation implementations is bounded by memory bandwidth. One major cause of this bottleneck is the random memory writing patterns in dose deposition, which leads to several memory efficiency issues on GPU such as un-coalesced writing and atomic operations. We propose a new method to alleviate such issues on CPU-GPU heterogeneous systems, which achieves overall performance improvement for Monte Carlo dose calculation. Methods: Dose deposition is to accumulate dose into the voxels of a dose volume along the trajectories of radiation rays. Our idea is to partition this procedure into the following three steps, which are fine-tuned for CPU or GPU: (1) each GPU thread writes dose results with location information to a buffer on GPU memory, which achieves fully-coalesced and atomic-free memory transactions; (2) the dose results in the buffer are transferred to CPU memory; (3) the dose volume is constructed from the dose buffer on CPU. We organize the processing of all radiation rays into streams. Since the steps within a stream use different hardware resources (i.e., GPU, DMA, CPU), we can overlap the execution of these steps for different streams by pipelining. Results: We evaluated our method using a Monte Carlo Convolution Superposition (MCCS) program and tested our implementation for various clinical cases on a heterogeneous system containing an Intel i7 quad-core CPU and an NVIDIA TITAN GPU. Comparing with a straightforward MCCS implementation on the same system (using both CPU and GPU for radiation ray tracing), our method gained 2-5X speedup without losing dose calculation accuracy. Conclusion: The results show that our new method improves the effective memory bandwidth and overall performance for MCCS on the CPU-GPU systems. Our proposed method can also be applied to accelerate other Monte Carlo dose calculation approaches. This research was supported in part by NSF under Grants CCF

  4. Coherent light scattering of heterogeneous randomly rough films and effective medium in the theory of electromagnetic wave multiple scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berginc, G.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a general formalism based on Green's functions to calculate the coherent electromagnetic field scattered by a random medium with rough boundaries. The approximate expression derived makes it possible to determine the effective permittivity, which is generalised for a layer of an inhomogeneous random medium with different types of particles and bounded with randomly rough interfaces. This effective permittivity describes the coherent propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a random medium with randomly rough boundaries. We have obtained an expression, which contains the Maxwell - Garnett formula at the low-frequency limit, and the Keller formula; the latter has been proved to be in good agreement with experiments for particles whose dimensions are larger than a wavelength.

  5. Coherent light scattering of heterogeneous randomly rough films and effective medium in the theory of electromagnetic wave multiple scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berginc, G

    2013-11-30

    We have developed a general formalism based on Green's functions to calculate the coherent electromagnetic field scattered by a random medium with rough boundaries. The approximate expression derived makes it possible to determine the effective permittivity, which is generalised for a layer of an inhomogeneous random medium with different types of particles and bounded with randomly rough interfaces. This effective permittivity describes the coherent propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a random medium with randomly rough boundaries. We have obtained an expression, which contains the Maxwell – Garnett formula at the low-frequency limit, and the Keller formula; the latter has been proved to be in good agreement with experiments for particles whose dimensions are larger than a wavelength. (coherent light scattering)

  6. Field-scale experiments of unsaturated flow and solute transport in a heterogeneous porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Craig; Smith, Leslie; Beckie, Roger

    2005-05-01

    A multiyear flow and conservative tracer test has been carried out in unsaturated mine waste rock to examine the physical mechanisms by which water moves through this coarse, heterogeneous, granular material. The experimental system has a footprint of 8 m × 8 m, is 5 m high, and is built on a contiguous grid of 16 zero-tension lysimeters. A chloride tracer was applied during a single rainfall event. Subsequently, the system has been subject to both natural and applied rainfall events in which no further tracer was added. Water flow and tracer transport is monitored using in situ measurements of moisture content, matric suction, and soil water solution samplers. Results demonstrate for transient infiltration conditions the influence and interaction of matrix flow in a heterogeneous granular matrix, preferential flow in macropores, and noncapillary pathways. Tracer migration through preferential flow paths dominates the initial and peak breakthrough concentrations. Point measurements of tracer concentration from in situ solution samplers yield a relatively poor indication of the flux-averaged transport of mass that is recorded at the base of the experiment, in addition to overestimating the stored mass and underestimating residence time.

  7. Design principle and calculations of a Scheffler fixed focus concentrator for medium temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Munir, A.; Hensel, O.; Scheffler, W.

    2010-08-15

    Scheffler fixed focus concentrators are successfully used for medium temperature applications in different parts of the world. These concentrators are taken as lateral sections of paraboloids and provide fixed focus away from the path of incident beam radiations throughout the year. The paper presents a complete description about the design principle and construction details of an 8 m{sup 2} surface area Scheffler concentrator. The first part of the paper presents the mathematical calculations to design the reflector parabola curve and reflector elliptical frame with respect to equinox (solar declination = 0) by selecting a specific lateral part of a paraboloid. Crossbar equations and their ellipses, arc lengths and their radii are also calculated to form the required lateral section of the paraboloid. Thereafter, the seasonal parabola equations are calculated for two extreme positions of summer and winter in the northern hemisphere (standing reflectors). The slopes of the parabola equations for equinox (solar declination = 0), summer (solar declination = +23.5) and winter (solar declination = -23.5) for the Scheffler reflector (8 m{sup 2} surface area) are calculated to be 0.17, 0.28, and 0.13 respectively. The y-intercepts of the parabola equations for equinox, summer and winter are calculated as 0, 0.54, and -0.53 respectively. By comparing with the equinox parabola curve, the summer parabola is found to be smaller in size and uses the top part of the parabola curve while the winter parabola is bigger in size and uses the lower part of the parabola curve to give the fixed focus. For this purpose, the reflector assembly is composed of flexible crossbars and a frame to induce the required change of the parabola curves with the changing solar declination. The paper also presents the calculation procedure of seasonal parabola equations for standing reflectors in the southern hemisphere as well as for laying reflectors in the northern and southern hemispheres. Highly

  8. Calculation of a mirror asymmetric effect in electron scattering from chiral targets. [in optically active medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, A.; Van House, J.; Hegstrom, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A dynamical calculation is presented of the helicity induced in an initially unpolarized electron beam after elastic scattering from an optically active medium, a process analogous to the circular polarization induced in unpolarized light following Rayleigh scattering from chiral targets. The calculation is based on the bound helical electron model of a chiral molecule, according to which the major contribution to the helicity is provided by the perturbation of the electron bound state by the spin-orbit interaction of the bound electrons moving in the electric field of the molecular core. The net helicity acquired is found to depend directly on a molecular asymmetry factor and the square of the atomic number of the heaviest atom in an asymmetric environment. For the case of carbon, the induced helicity is on the order of 0.00001, which would account for its lack of observation in a recent experiment. Results may have implications for the origin of optical activity in biological molecules by the differential ionization of D and L isomers by beta-decay electrons.

  9. Study of the Surface Heterogeneity of icy dwarf?planets and other medium size Kuiper Belt objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Emery, Josh P.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a comprehensive analysis of the surface heterogeneity of a selected sample of dwarf-planets and candidates to be considered as dwarf-planets. The sample has been carefully selected to reach the scientific goals with a relative low cost in observing time. The research proposed here will be based on the analysis of the light-curve of these objects obtained using IRAC/Spitzer photometry. KBOs likely retain some of the most primitive material in the Solar System. Models of the retention of volatiles by small-bodies in the Solar System show that dwarf-planets can retain most of the original inventory of volatiles. A good example is Pluto. The surface of this body is formed by patches of CH4, N2 and CO and exhibits a large degree of surface heterogeneity. Our preliminary results of the IRAC/Spitzer light curves of Pluto, obtained by this group in 2004 and 2014, show the potential of these data to map the surface distribution of the different species of ices on the surface of KBOs. For this project we have selected six objects (out of a list of 15) that are ideal for this study using Spitzer photometry. Our sample covers two classes of bodies: Eris, Makemake and Haumea, all large enough to retain volatiles and so how signs of sublimation and condensation cycles on their surfaces; and Quaoar, Varuna and Ixion (D<1000 km) that may not have retained volatiles. If signs of heterogeneity are detected on IRAC data from these medium bodies (as suggested by previous studies) this could be due to a combination of collisions and irradiation. By addressing the compositional heterogeneity of this sample of KBOs the proposed work will address gaps in the scientific knowledge of the chemical and dynamical history of the outer Solar System as well as other planetary systems.}

  10. Driven flow and pinning of molecular aggregates in a heterogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Grace M.; Pandey, R. B.

    2000-06-01

    Aggregation and flow of polymer chains (each of length Lc) on a heterogeneous surface are studied in presence of a field E using a hybrid simulation. Effects of field, heterogeneity (i.e., the barrier concentration pb), and temperature T on aggregation and desegregation of chains with low molecular weight is found to be different from that with high molecular weight. For low Lc, at low T=0.2, the impurity barriers act as seeds for pinning the growth of molecular aggregates that lead to larger aggregates at lower pb. At high temperature (T=1.0), in contrast, larger aggregates appear at higher pb where pinning of aggregates is augmented by cluster of clustering. For large Lc, orientational ordering with a molecular bridging occurs at low pb, while a nearly isotropic network of chains anchored by the barriers emerges at higher pb. The rms displacement of chain ranges from drift-like for short chains at low barrier concentration to strongly subdiffusive for long chains at high fields. A linear response of the flow rate density j to field j˜E is observed over low to moderate fields (E⩽1.0), high temperature (T⩾1), and low barrier concentrations (pb⩽0.1). The variation of the effective linear permeability φm of polymer with the field is nonmonotonic over the range 0.0

  11. Analytic Coarse-Mesh Finite-Difference Method Generalized for Heterogeneous Multidimensional Two-Group Diffusion Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Cabellos, Oscar; Aragones, Jose M.; Ahnert, Carol

    2003-05-15

    In order to take into account in a more effective and accurate way the intranodal heterogeneities in coarse-mesh finite-difference (CMFD) methods, a new equivalent parameter generation methodology has been developed and tested. This methodology accounts for the dependence of the nodal homogeneized two-group cross sections and nodal coupling factors, with interface flux discontinuity (IFD) factors that account for heterogeneities on the flux-spectrum and burnup intranodal distributions as well as on neighbor effects.The methodology has been implemented in an analytic CMFD method, rigorously obtained for homogeneous nodes with transverse leakage and generalized now for heterogeneous nodes by including IFD heterogeneity factors. When intranodal mesh node heterogeneity vanishes, the heterogeneous solution tends to the analytic homogeneous nodal solution. On the other hand, when intranodal heterogeneity increases, a high accuracy is maintained since the linear and nonlinear feedbacks on equivalent parameters have been shown to be as a very effective way of accounting for heterogeneity effects in two-group multidimensional coarse-mesh diffusion calculations.

  12. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    SciTech Connect

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-28

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  13. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  14. SU-F-19A-01: APBI Brachytherapy Treatment Planning: The Impact of Heterogeneous Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Loupot, S; Han, T; Salehpour, M; Gifford, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the difference in dose to PTV-EVAL and OARs (skin and rib) as calculated by (TG43) and heterogeneous calculations (CCC). Methods: 25 patient plans (5 Contura and 20 SAVI) were selected for analysis. Clinical dose distributions were computed with a commercially available treatment planning algorithm (TG43-D-(w,w)) and then recomputed with a pre-clinical collapsed cone convolution algorithm (CCCD-( m,m)). PTV-EVAL coverage (V90%, V95%), and rib and skin maximum dose were compared via percent difference. Differences in dose to normal tissue (V150cc, V200cc of PTV-EVAL) were also compared. Changes in coverage and maximum dose to organs at risk are reported in percent change, (100*(TG43 − CCC) / TG43)), and changes in maximum dose to normal tissue are absolute change in cc (TG43 − CCC). Results: Mean differences in V90, V95, V150, and V200 for the SAVI cases were −0.2%, −0.4%, −0.03cc, and −0.14cc, respectively, with maximum differences of −0.78%, −1.7%, 1.28cc, and 1.01cc, respectively. Mean differences in the 0.1cc dose to the rib and skin were −1.4% and −0.22%, respectively, with maximum differences of −4.5% and 16%, respectively. Mean differences in V90, V95, V150, and V200 for the Contura cases were −1.2%, −2.1%, −1.8cc, and −0.59cc, respectively, with maximum differences of −2.0%, −3.16%, −2.9cc, and −0.76cc, respectively. Mean differences in the 0.1cc dose to the rib and skin were −2.6% and −3.9%, respectively, with maximum differences of −3.2% and −5.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The effects of translating clinical knowledge based on D-(w,w) to plans reported in D-(m,m) are minimal (2% or less) on average, but vary based on the type and placement of the device, source, and heterogeneity information.

  15. Non local Lotka-Volterra system with cross-diffusion in an heterogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Fontbona, Joaquin; Méléard, Sylvie

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a stochastic individual model for the spatial behavior of an animal population of dispersive and competitive species, considering various kinds of biological effects, such as heterogeneity of environmental conditions, mutual attractive or repulsive interactions between individuals or competition between them for resources. As a consequence of the study of the large population limit, global existence of a nonnegative weak solution to a multidimensional parabolic strongly coupled model of competing species is proved. The main new feature of the corresponding integro-differential equation is the nonlocal nonlinearity appearing in the diffusion terms, which may depend on the spatial densities of all population types. Moreover, the diffusion matrix is generally not strictly positive definite and the cross-diffusion effect allows for influences growing linearly with the subpopulations' sizes. We prove uniqueness of the finite measure-valued solution and give conditions under which the solution takes values in a functional space. We then make the competition kernels converge to a Dirac measure and obtain the existence of a solution to a locally competitive version of the previous equation. The techniques are essentially based on the underlying stochastic flow related to the dispersive part of the dynamics, and the use of suitable dual distances in the space of finite measures.

  16. Monte Carlo calculations of the modulation transfer function of an optical system operating in a turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Bruscaglioni, P; Donelli, P; Ismaelli, A; Zaccanti, G

    1993-05-20

    Using a Monte Carlo method, we investigate the effect of a turbid medium on image transmission by means of the modulation transfer function approach. We present results that refer to a medium that consists of a random distribution of water spherical particles in air. We analyze the effect of geometric conditions (medium width and position) and source characteristics (Lambertian, beam emission). We present results for small spheres (Rayleigh scattering) and spheres (1.0-microm diameter) that are not small in comparison with the wavelength lambda = 0.6328 microm. Numerical data show a large modulation transfer function dependence on the source emission aperture and a substantial independence of the medium width for a fixed value of the optical depth. In accordance with reciprocity principles, we test an inverse scheme of Monte Carlo calculation, the advantage of this scheme being a substantial reduction in calculation time.

  17. A new method for calculating single-point productivity equation coefficient α in heterogeneous gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, He; Yifei, Lan; Yingzhong, Yuan; Shan, Xie; Liangrong, You; Qinglin, Ai

    2017-04-01

    Single-point test is mainly based on quantitative statistics of productivity well testing data to obtain average α value of gas fields or blocks, then corresponding single-point productivity equation can be obtained. However, for heterogeneous gas reservoir in Ordos Basin, because of the influences of reservoir physical property and test data, there are relatively big error between calculated average α value of gas field and actual α value of single gas well, which results in application of single-point empirical formula is limited. Through derivation of binomial productivity equation in this paper, it is found that there are good linear relationship between α and reciprocal of the square of pressure 1/pR 2. Combined with actual test data of Jingbian gas field, the empirical formula between α and 1/pR 2 for 20 gas wells is got through regression analysis. The results indicate that new method greatly improves computational accuracy for absolute open flow of gas wells, which has good application prospect in similar gas field.

  18. Comparison of theory and experiment for solute transport in highly heterogeneous porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfier, Fabrice; Quintard, Michel; Cherblanc, Fabien; Zinn, Brendan A.; Wood, Brian D.

    2007-11-01

    In this work we compare the recently developed two-region mass transfer theory reported by Ahmadi et al. [A. Ahmadi, M. Quintard, S. Whitaker (1998), Transport in chemically and mechanically heterogeneous porous media, V, two-equation model for solute transport with adsorption, Adv. Water Resour. 1998;22:59-86] with experimental results reported by Zinn et al. [Zinn, B., L. C. Meigs, C. F. Harvey, R. Haggerty, W. J. Peplinski, C. F. Von Schwerin. Experimental visualization of solute transport and mass transfer processes in two-dimensional conductivity fields with connected regions of high conductivity. Environ Sci Technol 2004;38:3916-3926]. We find that the constant mass transfer coefficient predicted by the steady-state closure to the theory, when used with the macroscale transport equation, provides a reasonable prediction of the observed breakthrough curve. However, the use of a constant mass transfer coefficient does not allow good representation of the tailing that is observed in the data. We show that the mass transfer coefficient can be represented in terms of the eigenvalue expansion of a Green's function. For a steady solution to the closure problem, this expansion leads to the effective mass transfer coefficient being defined in terms of the harmonic average of the eigenvalues of the expansion; this is consistent with previous work on this topic. To further investigate the influence of using a single, constant value for the mass transfer coefficient, we examine the solution to the mass transfer problem in terms of a mixed model, where the eigenvalues of one region (the inclusions) are kept, while the second region (the matrix) is treated as a homogenized material. The results from this comparison indicate that the mass transfer coefficient predicted via volume averaging using a quasi-steady closure could potentially be improved upon by development of new methods that retain more of the eigenvalues of the system.

  19. Experimental verification of the Acuros XB and AAA dose calculation adjacent to heterogeneous media for IMRT and RapidArc of nasopharygeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Monica W. K.; Leung, Lucullus H. T.; So, Ronald W. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the doses calculated by the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm and analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) with experimentally measured data adjacent to and within heterogeneous medium using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} (RA) volumetric arc therapy plans for nasopharygeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Two-dimensional dose distribution immediately adjacent to both air and bone inserts of a rectangular tissue equivalent phantom irradiated using IMRT and RA plans for NPC cases were measured with GafChromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT3 films. Doses near and within the nasopharygeal (NP) region of an anthropomorphic phantom containing heterogeneous medium were also measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and EBT3 films. The measured data were then compared with the data calculated by AAA and AXB. For AXB, dose calculations were performed using both dose-to-medium (AXB{sub Dm}) and dose-to-water (AXB{sub Dw}) options. Furthermore, target dose differences between AAA and AXB were analyzed for the corresponding real patients. The comparison of real patient plans was performed by stratifying the targets into components of different densities, including tissue, bone, and air. Results: For the verification of planar dose distribution adjacent to air and bone using the rectangular phantom, the percentages of pixels that passed the gamma analysis with the {+-} 3%/3mm criteria were 98.7%, 99.5%, and 97.7% on the axial plane for AAA, AXB{sub Dm}, and AXB{sub Dw}, respectively, averaged over all IMRT and RA plans, while they were 97.6%, 98.2%, and 97.7%, respectively, on the coronal plane. For the verification of planar dose distribution within the NP region of the anthropomorphic phantom, the percentages of pixels that passed the gamma analysis with the {+-} 3%/3mm criteria were 95.1%, 91.3%, and 99.0% for AAA, AXB{sub Dm}, and AXB{sub Dw}, respectively, averaged over all IMRT and RA plans. Within the NP region where

  20. Developing a phenomenological model of the proton trajectory within a heterogeneous medium required for proton imaging.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Charles-Antoine Collins; Doolan, Paul; Dias, Marta F; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao

    2015-07-07

    To develop an accurate phenomenological model of the cubic spline path estimate of the proton path, accounting for the initial proton energy and water equivalent thickness (WET) traversed. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the path of protons crossing various WET (10-30 cm) of different material (LN300, water and CB2-50% CaCO3) for a range of initial energies (180-330 MeV). For each MC trajectory, cubic spline trajectories (CST) were constructed based on the entrance and exit information of the protons and compared with the MC using the root mean square (RMS) metric. The CST path is dependent on the direction vector magnitudes (|P0,1|). First, |P0,1| is set to the proton path length (with factor Λ(Norm)(0,1) = 1.0). Then, two optimal factor Λ(0,1) are introduced in |P0,1|. The factors are varied to minimize the RMS difference with MC paths for every configuration. A set of Λ(opt)(0,1) factors, function of WET/water equivalent path length (WEPL), that minimizes the RMS are presented. MTF analysis is then performed on proton radiographs of a line-pair phantom reconstructed using the CST trajectories. Λ(opt)(0,1) was fitted to the WET/WEPL ratio using a quadratic function (Y = A + BX(2) where A = 1.01,0.99, B = 0.43,-  0.46 respectively for Λ(opt)(0), Λ(opt)(1)). The RMS deviation calculated along the path, between the CST and the MC, increases with the WET. The increase is larger when using Λ(Norm)(0,1) than Λ(opt)(0,1) (difference of 5.0% with WET/WEPL = 0.66). For 230/330 MeV protons, the MTF10% was found to increase by 40/16% respectively for a thin phantom (15 cm) when using the Λ(opt)(0,1) model compared to the Λ(Norm)(0,1) model. Calculation times for Λ(opt)(0,1) are scaled down compared to MLP and RMS deviation are similar within standard deviation.B ased on the results of this study, using CST with the Λ(opt)(0,1) factors reduces the RMS deviation and increases the spatial resolution when reconstructing proton

  1. Developing a phenomenological model of the proton trajectory within a heterogeneous medium required for proton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Doolan, Paul; Dias, Marta F.; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao

    2015-07-01

    To develop an accurate phenomenological model of the cubic spline path estimate of the proton path, accounting for the initial proton energy and water equivalent thickness (WET) traversed. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the path of protons crossing various WET (10-30 cm) of different material (LN300, water and CB2-50% CaCO3) for a range of initial energies (180-330 MeV). For each MC trajectory, cubic spline trajectories (CST) were constructed based on the entrance and exit information of the protons and compared with the MC using the root mean square (RMS) metric. The CST path is dependent on the direction vector magnitudes (|P0,1|). First, |P0,1| is set to the proton path length (with factor Λ0,1\\text{Norm} = 1.0). Then, two optimal factor Λ0,1{} are introduced in |P0,1|. The factors are varied to minimize the RMS difference with MC paths for every configuration. A set of Λ0,1\\text{opt} factors, function of WET/water equivalent path length (WEPL), that minimizes the RMS are presented. MTF analysis is then performed on proton radiographs of a line-pair phantom reconstructed using the CST trajectories. Λ0,1\\text{opt} was fitted to the WET/WEPL ratio using a quadratic function (Y = A + BX2 where A = 1.01,0.99, B = 0.43,-  0.46 respectively for Λ0\\text{opt} , Λ1\\text{opt} ). The RMS deviation calculated along the path, between the CST and the MC, increases with the WET. The increase is larger when using Λ0,1\\text{Norm} than Λ0,1\\text{opt} (difference of 5.0% with WET/WEPL = 0.66). For 230/330 MeV protons, the MTF10% was found to increase by 40/16% respectively for a thin phantom (15 cm) when using the Λ0,1\\text{opt} model compared to the Λ0,1\\text{Norm} model. Calculation times for Λ0,1\\text{opt} are scaled down compared to MLP and RMS deviation are similar within standard deviation. Based on the results of this study, using CST with the Λ0,1\\text{opt} factors reduces the RMS deviation and increases the spatial

  2. Phase-field simulation of counter-current spontaneous imbibition in a fractured heterogeneous porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhforouz, M. R.; Akhlaghi Amiri, H. A.

    2017-06-01

    Spontaneous imbibition is well-known to be one of the most effective processes of oil recovery in fractured reservoirs. However, the detailed pore-scale mechanisms of the counter-current imbibition process and the effects of different fluid/rock parameters on this phenomenon have not yet been deeply addressed. This work presents the results of a new pore-level numerical study of counter-current spontaneous imbibition, using coupled Cahn-Hilliard phase field and Navier-Stokes equations, solved by a finite element method. A 2D fractured medium was constructed consisting of a nonhomogeneous porous matrix, in which the grains were represented by an equilateral triangular array of circles with different sizes and initially saturated with oil, and a fracture, adjacent to the matrix, initially saturated with water and supported by low rate water inflow. Through invasion of water into the matrix, oil drops were expelled one by one from the matrix to the fracture, and in the matrix, water progressed by forming capillary fingerings, with characteristics corresponding to the experimental observations. The effects of wettability, viscosity ratio, and interfacial tension were investigated. In strongly water-wet matrix, with grain contact angles of θ < π/8, different micro-scale mechanisms were successfully captured, including oil film thinning and rupture, fluids' contact line movement, water bridging, and oil drop detachment. It was notified that there was a specific grain contact angle for this simulated model, θ = π/4, above it, matrix oil recovery was negligible by imbibition, while below it, the imbibition rate and oil recovery were significantly increased by decreasing the contact angle. In simulated mixed wet models, water, coming from the fracture, just invaded the neighboring water-wet grains; the water front was stopped moving as it met the oil-wet grains or wide pores/throats. Increasing water-oil interfacial tension, in the range of 0.005-0.05 N/m, resulted in

  3. Substitution Structures of Large Molecules and Medium Range Correlations in Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Pate, Brooks

    2017-06-01

    A study of the minimally exciting topic of agreement between experimental and measured rotational constants of molecules was performed on a set of large molecules with 16-18 heavy atoms (carbon and oxygen). The molecules are: nootkatone (C_{15}H_{22}O), cedrol (C_{15}H_{26}O), ambroxide (C_{16}H_{28}O), sclareolide (C_{16}H_{22}O_{2}), and dihydroartemisinic acid (C_{15}H_{24}O_{2}). For this set of molecules we obtained 13C-subsitution structures for six molecules (this includes two conformers of nootkatone). A comparison of theoretical structures and experimental substitution structures was performed in the spirit of the recent work of Grimme and Steinmetz.[1] Our analysis focused the center-of-mass distance of the carbon atoms in the molecules. Four different computational methods were studied: standard DFT (B3LYP), dispersion corrected DFT (B3LYP-D3BJ), hybrid DFT with dispersion correction (B2PLYP-D3), and MP2. A significant difference in these theories is how they handle medium range correlation of electrons that produce dispersion forces. For larger molecules, these dispersion forces produce an overall contraction of the molecule around the center-of-mass. DFT poorly treats this effect and produces structures that are too expanded. MP2 calculations overestimate the correction and produce structures that are too compact. Both dispersion corrected DFT methods produce structures in excellent agreement with experiment. The analysis shows that the difference in computational methods can be described by a linear error in the center-of-mass distance. This makes it possible to correct poorer performing calculations with a single scale factor. We also reexamine the issue of the "Costain error" in substitution structures and show that it is significantly larger in these systems than in the smaller molecules used by Costain to establish the error limits. [1] Stefan Grimme and Marc Steinmetz, "Effects of London dispersion correction in density functional theory on

  4. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Henry; Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. We calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid. Funded by National Science Foundation award CBET-1252182.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Fu, Henry Chien

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. Here, we calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid.

  6. Capturing medium scale heterogeneity in surface water-groundwater interactions: challenges and advantages of high resolution temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanafield, M.; Cook, P. G.; McCallum, J.; Noorduijn, S.

    2013-12-01

    capturing and quantifying streambed heterogeneity at a medium scale.

  7. Developing the Noncentrality Parameter for Calculating Group Sample Sizes in Heterogeneous Analysis of Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luh, Wei-Ming; Guo, Jiin-Huarng

    2011-01-01

    Sample size determination is an important issue in planning research. In the context of one-way fixed-effect analysis of variance, the conventional sample size formula cannot be applied for the heterogeneous variance cases. This study discusses the sample size requirement for the Welch test in the one-way fixed-effect analysis of variance with…

  8. Developing the Noncentrality Parameter for Calculating Group Sample Sizes in Heterogeneous Analysis of Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luh, Wei-Ming; Guo, Jiin-Huarng

    2011-01-01

    Sample size determination is an important issue in planning research. In the context of one-way fixed-effect analysis of variance, the conventional sample size formula cannot be applied for the heterogeneous variance cases. This study discusses the sample size requirement for the Welch test in the one-way fixed-effect analysis of variance with…

  9. A simple derivation of the formula to calculate synthetic long-period seismograms in a heterogeneous earth by normal mode summation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, T.

    1984-01-01

    A simple modification of Gilbert's formula to account for slight lateral heterogeneity of the earth leads to a convenient formula to calculate synthetic long period seismograms. Partial derivatives are easily calculated, thus the formula is suitable for direct inversion of seismograms for lateral heterogeneity of the earth. Previously announced in STAR as N83-29893

  10. A simple derivation of the formula to calculated synthetic long-period seismograms in a heterogeneous Earth by normal mode summation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, T.

    1983-01-01

    A simple modification of Gilbert's formula to account for slight lateral heterogeneity of the Earth leads to a convenient formula to calculate synthetic long period seismograms. Partial derivatives are easily calculated, thus the formula is suitable for direct inversion of seismograms for lateral heterogeneity of the Earth.

  11. Calculation of effective slip on rough chemically heterogeneous surfaces using a homogenization approach.

    PubMed

    Lund, Nat J; Zhang, Xingyou Philip; Mahelona, Keoni; Hendy, Shaun C

    2012-10-01

    We present an expression for the effective slip length of a nanoscale rough chemically heterogeneous surface. A heterogeneous surface may be regarded as having an effective slip length generated by extrapolating the uniform velocity profile found in the far field. We consider two-dimensional steady-state Stokes flow over a surface that has periodic roughness and an intrinsic slip length varying over the same period. Using weak convergence methods for partial differential equations, we derive an expression for the effective slip length in terms of the intrinsic slip length and contact area of the surface. The result predicts that roughness causes a significant reduction in effective slip and that slip effects are dominated by the minimum intrinsic slip length of the system.

  12. Modeling and Calculation of Optical Amplification in One Dimensional Case of Laser Medium Using Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryana, Okky Fajar Tri; Hidayat, Rahmat

    2016-08-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method has been much employed for studying light propagation in various structures, from simple one-dimensional structures up to three-dimensional complex structures. One of challenging problems is to implement this method for the case of light propagation in amplifying medium or structures, such as optical amplifier and lasers. The implementation is hindered by the fact that the dielectric constant becomes a complex number when optical gain parameter is involved in the calculation. In general, complex dielectric constant is related to complex susceptibility, in which the imaginary part is related to optical gain. Here, we then modify the formulation for updating electric field in the calculation algorithm. Using this approach, we then finally can calculate light amplification in laser active medium of Nd3+ ion doped glass. The calculation result shows an agreement with the result from the calculation using differential equation for intensity. Although this method is more time consuming, the method seem promising for optical complex micro- and nano-structures, such quantum dot lasers, micro-ring lasers, etc.

  13. The present and future of withdrawal period calculations for milk in the European Union: focus on heterogeneous, nonmonotonic data.

    PubMed

    Chevance, A; Jacques, A-M; Laurentie, M; Sanders, P; Henri, J

    2016-09-07

    Harmonization of the method for calculating the withdrawal period for milk dates from the 1990s. European harmonization has led to guidance with three accepted methods for determining the withdrawal period for milk that are currently applicable. These three methods can be used by marketing authorization holders, but, in some cases, their diversity can lead to very different withdrawal periods. This is particularly the case when concentrations in milk are nonmonotonic and heterogeneous, meaning that concentrations strictly increase and then strictly decrease with significant interindividual variability in the time to reach the maximal concentration. Here, we first describe the concepts associated with the different methods used in the harmonized approach currently applicable for the determination of milk withdrawal periods, and then, we propose the application of a modern pharmacometric tool. Finally, with a nonmonotonic heterogeneous dataset, we illustrate the usefulness of this tool in comparison with the three currently applicable methods and discuss the limitations and advantages of each method.

  14. Heterogeneous processes involving nitrogenous compounds and Saharan dust inferred from measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy-Lacaux, C.; Carmichael, G. R.; Song, C. H.; Lacaux, J. P.; Al Ourabi, H.; Modi, A. I.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data on aerosol chemical composition and gaseous concentrations in various African ecosystems have been obtained under the IGAC DEBITS AFRICA (IDAF) program. In this paper, data covering a complete wet and dry season (1996 and 1998) in the semiarid savanna of the Sahelian region of Niger are presented. The analysis of the aerosol chemical composition and the gas phase concentrations at the Banizoumbou station indicates two strong signatures: a nitrogenous component composed of nitric acid, ammonia, particulate ammonium, and nitrates; and a terrigenous component originating from semiarid and desert soils (calcium, carbonates, magnesium, potassium, sulfate). To further investigate the interactions between gas and particles and to help interpret the IDAF experimental data, these data are analyzed using a gas aerosol equilibrium model (Simulating Composition of Atmospheric Particles at Equilibrium (SCAPE)). The model is found to accurately represent the mean aerosol composition for the dry and the wet season of the studied region. It is found that heterogeneous processes involving terrigenous compounds are important and play a major role in partitioning semivolatile species, such as nitric acid, between the gas and aerosol phases. The important role of these heterogeneous processes in the atmospheric chemistry in the Sahelian region is discussed. To compare results obtained in the semiarid savanna of Niger and other African ecosystems, SCAPE model is also applied to humid savanna and forest using IDAF and Experiment for Regional Sources and Sinks of Oxidants (EXPRESSO) measurements.

  15. Statistical calculation of complete events in medium-energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.

    1983-04-01

    This lecture presents the essential tools for formulating a statistical model for the nuclear disassembly process. We consider the quick disassembly (explosion) of a hot nuclear system, a so-called source, into multifragment final states, which compete according to their statistical weight. First some useful notation is introduced. The expressions for exclusive and inclusive distributions are given and the factorization of an exclusive distribution into inclusive ones is carried out. In turn, the grand canonical approximation for one-fragment inclusive distributions is introduced. Finally, it is outlined how to generate a statistical sample of complete final states. On this basis, a model for statistical simulation of complete events in medium-energy nuclear collisions has been developed.

  16. Water adsorption in SAPO-34: elucidating the role of local heterogeneities and defects using dispersion-corrected DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael

    2015-10-14

    The chabazite-type silicoaluminophosphate SAPO-34 is a promising adsorbent for applications in thermal energy storage using water adsorption-desorption cycles. In order to develop a microscopic understanding of the impact of local heterogeneities and defects on the water adsorption properties, the interaction of different models of SAPO-34 with water was studied using dispersion-corrected density-functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. In addition to SAPO-34 with isolated silicon atoms, the calculations considered models incorporating two types of heterogeneities (silicon islands, aluminosilicate domains), and two defect-containing (partially and fully desilicated) systems. DFT-D optimisations were performed for systems with small amounts of adsorbed water, in which all H2O molecules can interact with framework protons, and systems with large amounts of adsorbed water (30 H2O molecules per unit cell). At low loadings, the host-guest interaction energy calculated for SAPO-34 with isolated Si atoms amounts to approximately -90 kJ mol(-1). While the presence of local heterogeneities leads to the creation of some adsorption sites that are energetically slightly more favourable, the interaction strength is drastically reduced in systems with defects. At high water loadings, energies in the range of -70 kJ mol(-1) are obtained for all models. The DFT-D interaction energies are in good agreement with experimentally measured heats of water adsorption. A detailed analysis of the equilibrium structures was used to gain insights into the binding modes at low coverages, and to assess the extent of framework deprotonation and changes in the coordination environment of aluminium atoms at high water loadings.

  17. Impact of Heterogeneity-Based Dose Calculation Using a Deterministic Grid-Based Boltzmann Equation Solver for Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikell, Justin K.; Klopp, Ann H.; Gonzalez, Graciela M.N.; Kisling, Kelly D.; Price, Michael J.; Berner, Paula A.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Mourtada, Firas

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of the heterogeneity dose calculation Acuros (Transpire Inc., Gig Harbor, WA), a grid-based Boltzmann equation solver (GBBS), for brachytherapy in a cohort of cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The impact of heterogeneities was retrospectively assessed in treatment plans for 26 patients who had previously received {sup 192}Ir intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer with computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance-compatible tandems and unshielded colpostats. The GBBS models sources, patient boundaries, applicators, and tissue heterogeneities. Multiple GBBS calculations were performed with and without solid model applicator, with and without overriding the patient contour to 1 g/cm{sup 3} muscle, and with and without overriding contrast materials to muscle or 2.25 g/cm{sup 3} bone. Impact of source and boundary modeling, applicator, tissue heterogeneities, and sensitivity of CT-to-material mapping of contrast were derived from the multiple calculations. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 (TG-43) guidelines and the GBBS were compared for the following clinical dosimetric parameters: Manchester points A and B, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) report 38 rectal and bladder points, three and nine o'clock, and {sub D2cm3} to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. Results: Points A and B, D{sub 2} cm{sup 3} bladder, ICRU bladder, and three and nine o'clock were within 5% of TG-43 for all GBBS calculations. The source and boundary and applicator account for most of the differences between the GBBS and TG-43 guidelines. The D{sub 2cm3} rectum (n = 3), D{sub 2cm3} sigmoid (n = 1), and ICRU rectum (n = 6) had differences of >5% from TG-43 for the worst case incorrect mapping of contrast to bone. Clinical dosimetric parameters were within 5% of TG-43 when rectal and balloon contrast were mapped to bone and radiopaque packing was not overridden. Conclusions

  18. Numerical Laplace transform density of states calculation for medium and large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanini, D.; Lehmann, K. K.

    1993-04-01

    A novel implementation of the Laplace transform method for the calculation of the density of states of molecules, for which the partition function can be explicitly given is described. It consists of doing the inverse Laplace transform numerically after multiplying the integrand by a smoothing factor. This evaluation is more accurate than the method of steepest descent, and the computation can still be done on a PC in a few minutes. By first order expansion of the partition function in the anharmonic parameters we have been able to calculate the density of states for a model molecule composed by anharmonically coupled anharmonic oscillators, which cannot be treated by the well known Beyer-Swinehart algorithm.

  19. Calculation of pressure and temperature in medium-voltage electrical installations due to fault arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhang, J.; Gockenbach, E.

    2008-05-01

    In order to determine the pressure rise due to arc faults in electrical installations, the portion of energy heating the surrounding gas of fault arcs has to be known. The ratio of the portion of energy to the electric energy, the thermal transfer coefficient, is adopted as the kp factor. This paper presents a theoretical approach for the determination of the thermal transfer coefficient and the pressure rise in electrical installations. It is based on the fundamental hydro- and thermodynamic conservation equations and the equation of gas state taking into account melting and evaporation of metals as well as chemical reactions with the surrounding gas. In order to consider the dependence of the arc energy on the gas density, the radiative effect of fault arcs on the energy balance is introduced into the arc model by using the net emission coefficient as a function of gas density, arc temperature and arc radius. The results for a test container show that factors such as the kinds of insulating gases and of electrode materials, the size of test vessels and the gas density considerably influence the thermal transfer coefficient and thus the pressure rise. Furthermore, it is demonstrated, for an example of the arc fault in a compact medium-voltage station with pressure relief openings and a pressure relief channel, that the arc energy and the arc temperature can be simulated based on the changing gas density.

  20. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Perez, Michel; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland

    2014-07-21

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  1. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  2. Collapsed cone convolution of radiant energy for photon dose calculation in heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Ahnesjö, A

    1989-01-01

    A method for photon beam dose calculations is described. The primary photon beam is raytraced through the patient, and the distribution of total radiant energy released into the patient is calculated. Polyenergetic energy deposition kernels are calculated from the spectrum of the beam, using a database of monoenergetic kernels. It is shown that the polyenergetic kernels can be analytically described with high precision by (A exp( -ar) + B exp( -br)/r2, where A, a, B, and b depend on the angle with respect to the impinging photons and the accelerating potential, and r is the radial distance. Numerical values of A, a, B, and b are derived and used to convolve energy deposition kernels with the total energy released per unit mass (TERMA) to yield dose distributions. The convolution is facilitated by the introduction of the collapsed cone approximation. In this approximation, all energy released into coaxial cones of equal solid angle, from volume elements on the cone axis, is rectilinearly transported, attenuated, and deposited in elements on the axis. Scaling of the kernels is implicitly done during the convolution procedure to fully account for inhomogeneities present in the irradiated volume. The number of computational operations needed to compute the dose with the method is proportional to the number of calculation points. The method is tested for five accelerating potentials; 4, 6, 10, 15, and 24 MV, and applied to two geometries; one is a stack of slabs of tissue media, and the other is a mediastinum-like phantom of cork and water. In these geometries, the EGS4 Monte Carlo system has been used to generate reference dose distributions with which the dose computed with the collapsed cone convolution method is compared. Generally, the agreement between the methods is excellent. Deviations are observed in situations of lateral charged particle disequilibrium in low density media, however, but the result is superior compared to that of the generalized Batho method.

  3. Calculation of Iron Loss of Medium-sized High Voltage Motor which Have Axial Ventilation Holes in Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Da-wei; Li, Jin-xiao

    2017-05-01

    When optimizing the ventilation and cooling system of medium-sized high power density asynchronous motor, it is found that the temperature rise of the motor can be greatly reduced after punching the axial ventilation holes in the rotor yoke, but the traditional method based on the magnetic circuit method cannot accurately calculate the motor iron loss of this new structure. In this paper combined with the finite element field-circuit-motion coupled analysis method, taking YXKK355-4, 355kW and YKK400-4, 400kW medium-sized high voltage asynchronous motor for example, a two-dimensional geometric model and mathematical model of the motor are established, then the iron loss calculation method is improved. Using this method not only the iron loss value of the whole motor can be obtained, but also the specific distribution of iron loss in different areas of the motor can be known, and the correctness of the simulation results is proved by experiments.

  4. Influences of Flow Transients and Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Colloid-Associated Contaminants Transport in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Saiers, James E.; Ryan, Joseph

    2003-06-15

    During the past year (June 2003 to June 2004), work at Yale has centered on investigating the influences of porewater pH, flow transients, and the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the deposition and mobilization of clay colloids (kaolinite and illite) within columns packed with unsaturated porous media. The experiments on pH and flow-transient effects were described in our First-Term Progress Report (which covered the initial 18 months of the study) and will not be repeated here. More recent experiments on the role of NOM in colloid transport proved equally as interesting. Even at porewater concentrations as low as 0.2 mg/L, soil-humic acid substantially lowered clay-colloid deposition rates compared to the case in which soil-humic acid was absent from the porewater. We attribute this to adsorption of the humic acid to the positively charged edge sites of the clay colloids, which effectively reduced the colloid affinity for negatively charged air- and solid-water interfaces. Comparison of the results of the column experiments to calculations of a new mathematical model has sharpened our inferences regarding mechanisms that govern the rate-limited deposition and mobilization of colloids. We are testing these inferences by carrying out flow-and-transport visualization experiments. We have constructed a semi-transparent representation of a porous medium, consisting of a rectangular parallel-plate chamber that encloses 3-5 layers of uniformly sized sand grains. Ceramic plates fused to the ends of the chamber maintain the capillary tension and syringe pumps (located at the inlet and outlet ends) regulate the flow of water and colloids through the partially saturated sand. By placing the chamber beneath a microscope, we can examine the distribution of colloids between air-water and solid-water interfaces, directly measure the kinetics of deposition onto these interfaces, and observe the mechanisms that contribute to the release of immobile colloids. To date

  5. First Kinetic Reactive-Flow and Melting Calculations for Entropy Budget and Major Elements in Heterogeneous Mantle Lithologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.

    2009-12-01

    The consequences of source heterogeneity and reactive flow during melt transport in the mantle can be classified by scale. At the smallest spatial and longest temporal scales, we can assume complete equilibrium and use batch melting of homogenized sources or equilibrium porous flow treatments. At large enough spatial scale or short enough temporal scale to prevent any thermal or chemical interaction between heterogeneities or between melt and matrix, we can assume perfectly fractional melting and transport and apply simple melt-mixing calculations. At a somewhat smaller spatial or longer temporal scale, thermal but not chemical interactions are significant and various lithologies and channel/matrix systems must follow common pressure-temperature paths, with energy flows between them. All these cases are tractable to model with current tools, whether we are interested in the energy budget, major elements, trace elements, or isotopes. There remains, however, the very important range of scales where none of these simple theories applies because of partial chemical interaction among lithologies or along the flow path. Such disequilibrium or kinetic cases have only been modeled, in the case of mantle minerals and melts, for trace elements and isotopes, with fixed melting rates instead of complete energy budgets. In order to interpret volumes of magma production and major element basalt and residue compositions that might emerge from a heterogeneous mantle in this last range of scales, we must develop tools that can combine a kinetic formulation with a major element and energy-constrained thermodynamic calculation. The kinetics can be handled either with a chemical kinetic approach with rate constants for various net transfer and exchange reactions, or with a physical diffusion-limited approach. A physical diffusion-limited approach can be built with the following elements. At grain scale, spherical grains of an arbitrary number of solid phases can evolve zoning profiles

  6. Evaluation of Resveratrol, Green Tea Extract, Curcumin, Oxaloacetic Acid, and Medium-Chain Triglyceride Oil on Life Span of Genetically Heterogeneous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Richard A.; Astle, Clinton M.; Baur, Joseph A.; de Cabo, Rafael; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Guo, Wen; Javors, Martin; Kirkland, James L.; Nelson, James F.; Sinclair, David A.; Teter, Bruce; Williams, David; Zaveri, Nurulain; Nadon, Nancy L.; Harrison, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program (ITP) was established to evaluate agents that are hypothesized to increase life span and/or health span in genetically heterogeneous mice. Each compound is tested in parallel at three test sites. It is the goal of the ITP to publish all results, negative or positive. We report here on the results of lifelong treatment of mice, beginning at 4 months of age, with each of five agents, that is, green tea extract (GTE), curcumin, oxaloacetic acid, medium-chain triglyceride oil, and resveratrol, on the life span of genetically heterogeneous mice. Each agent was administered beginning at 4 months of age. None of these five agents had a statistically significant effect on life span of male or female mice, by log-rank test, at the concentrations tested, although a secondary analysis suggested that GTE might diminish the risk of midlife deaths in females only. PMID:22451473

  7. Experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations: Construction of a heterogeneous phantom based on human organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauridsen, Bente; Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1987-03-01

    The basic dosimetric quantity in ICRP-publication no. 30 is the aborbed fraction AF( T←S). This parameter is the fraction of energy absorbed in a target organ T per emission of radiation from activity deposited in the source organ S. Based upon this fraction it is possible to calculate the Specific Effective Energy SEE( T← S). From this, the committed effective dose equivalent from an intake of radioactive material can be found, and thus the annual limit of intake for given radionuclides can be determined. A male phantom has been constructed with the aim of measuring the Specific Effective Energy SEE(T←S) in various target organs. Impressions-of real human organs have been used to produce vacuum forms. Tissue equivalent plastic sheets were sucked into the vacuum forms producing a shell with a shape identical to the original organ. Each organ has been made of two shells. The same procedure has been used for the body. Thin tubes through the organs make it possible to place TL dose meters in a matrix so the dose distribution can be measured. The phantom has been supplied with lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen, stomach, bladder, pancreas, and thyroid gland. To select a suitable body liquid for the phantom, laboratory experiments have been made with different liquids and different radionuclides. In these experiments the change in dose rate due to changes in density and composition of the liquid was determined. Preliminary results of the experiments are presented.

  8. Efficient heterogeneous execution of Monte Carlo shielding calculations on a Beowulf cluster.

    PubMed

    Dewar, David; Hulse, Paul; Cooper, Andrew; Smith, Nigel

    2005-01-01

    Recent work has been done in using a high-performance 'Beowulf' cluster computer system for the efficient distribution of Monte Carlo shielding calculations. This has enabled the rapid solution of complex shielding problems at low cost and with greater modularity and scalability than traditional platforms. The work has shown that a simple approach to distributing the workload is as efficient as using more traditional techniques such as PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine). In addition, when used in an operational setting this technique is fairer with the use of resources than traditional methods, in that it does not tie up a single computing resource but instead shares the capacity with other tasks. These developments in computing technology have enabled shielding problems to be solved that would have taken an unacceptably long time to run on traditional platforms. This paper discusses the BNFL Beowulf cluster and a number of tests that have recently been run to demonstrate the efficiency of the asynchronous technique in running the MCBEND program. The BNFL Beowulf currently consists of 84 standard PCs running RedHat Linux. Current performance of the machine has been estimated to be between 40 and 100 Gflop s(-1). When the whole system is employed on one problem up to four million particles can be tracked per second. There are plans to review its size in line with future business needs.

  9. Performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing unit and many integrated core for hartree potential calculations on a numerical grid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-09-15

    We investigated the performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing units (GPUs) and many integrated core (MIC) with 20 CPU cores (20×CPU). As a practical example toward large scale electronic structure calculations using grid-based methods, we evaluated the Hartree potentials of silver nanoparticles with various sizes (3.1, 3.7, 4.9, 6.1, and 6.9 nm) via a direct integral method supported by the sinc basis set. The so-called work stealing scheduler was used for efficient heterogeneous computing via the balanced dynamic distribution of workloads between all processors on a given architecture without any prior information on their individual performances. 20×CPU + 1GPU was up to ∼1.5 and ∼3.1 times faster than 1GPU and 20×CPU, respectively. 20×CPU + 2GPU was ∼4.3 times faster than 20×CPU. The performance enhancement by CPU + MIC was considerably lower than expected because of the large initialization overhead of MIC, although its theoretical performance is similar with that of CPU + GPU. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Predictive modeling of flow and transport in a two-dimensional intermediate-scale, heterogeneous porous medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, G.R.; Hill, M.C.; Illangasekare, T.H.; Rajaram, H.

    2001-01-01

    As a first step toward understanding the role of sedimentary structures in flow and transport through porous media, this work deterministically examines how small-scale laboratory-measured values of hydraulic conductivity relate to in situ values of simple, artificial structures in an intermediate-scale (10 m long), two-dimensional, heterogeneous, laboratory experiment. Results were judged based on how well simulations using measured values of hydraulic conductivities matched measured hydraulic heads, net flow, and transport through the tank. Discrepancies were investigated using sensitivity analysis and nonlinear regression estimates of the in situ hydraulic conductivity that produce the best fit to measured hydraulic heads and net flow. Permeameter and column experiments produced laboratory measurements of hydraulic conductivity for each of the sands used in the intermediate-scale experiments. Despite explicit numerical representation of the heterogeneity the laboratory-measured values underestimated net flow by 12-14% and were distinctly smaller than the regression-estimated values. The significance of differences in measured hydraulic conductivity values was investigated by comparing variability of transport predictions using the different measurement methods to that produced by different realizations of the heterogeneous distribution. Results indicate that the variations in measured hydraulic conductivity were more important to transport than variations between realizations of the heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity.

  11. On the propagation of a quasi-static disturbance in a heterogeneous, deformable, and porous medium with pressure-dependent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    2011-10-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid when the medium properties are smoothly-varying, I derive a semi-analytic expression for the propagation velocity of a quasi-static disturbance traveling within a nonlinear-elastic porous medium. The phase, a function related to the propagation time, depends upon the properties of the medium, including the pressure-sensitivities of the medium parameters, and on pressure and displacement amplitude changes. Thus, the propagation velocity of a disturbance depends upon its amplitude, as might be expected for a nonlinear process. As a check, the expression for the phase function is evaluated for a poroelastic medium, when the material properties do not depend upon the fluid pressure. In that case, the travel time estimates agree with conventional analytic estimates, and with values calculated using a numerical simulator. For a medium with pressure-dependent permeability I find general agreement between the semi-analytic estimates and estimates from a numerical simulation. In this case the pressure amplitude changes are obtained from the numerical simulator.

  12. Matrix impedance in the problem of the calculation of synthetic seismograms for a layered-homogeneous isotropic elastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. M.

    2009-10-01

    A new method is proposed for calculating synthetic seismograms caused by a force in a plane-parallel medium consisting of homogeneous elastic isotropic layers. The matrix impedance, i.e., the matrix function of depth, by which motion vector must be multiplied in order to obtain the stress vector, is introduced for solving a system of ordinary differential equations with respect to the motion-stress vector, which appears during the separation of variables. An independent nonlinear equation is obtained for the impedance. The propagator for the motion vector is constructed with the aid of the impedance. The closed analytical formulas, which do not contain any exponents with positive indices, are obtained both for the impedance and for the motionvector propagator. The algorithm for the calculation of seismograms, free of limitations on the number and thickness of layers, as well as on the frequency range of interest, is constructed on the basis of these formulas. The algorithm is tested with the aid of an analytical solution.

  13. Solute transport with time-variable flow paths during upward and downward flux in a heterogeneous unsaturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa; Bechtold, Michel; Vanderborght, Jan

    2014-05-01

    To acquire knowledge of solute transport through the unsaturated zone in the shallow subsurface is decisive to assess groundwater quality, nutrient cycling or to plan remediation strategies. The shallow subsurface is characterized by structural heterogeneity and strongly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This leads to changing flow directions, strong temporal changes in saturation and heterogeneous water fluxes during infiltration and evaporation events. Recent studies (e.g. Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al.,2011) demonstrated the importance of lateral flow and solute transport during evaporation conditions (upward flux). The heterogeneous structure in these studies was constructed using two types of sand with strong material contrasts and arranged in parallel with a vertical orientation. Lateral transport and redistribution of solute from coarse to fine media was observed deeper in the soil column and from fine to coarse close to the soil surface. However, if boundary conditions are reversed due to precipitation, the flow field is not necessarily reversed in the same manner, resulting in entirely different transport patterns for downward and upward flow. Therefore, considering net-flow rates alone is misleading when describing transport under those conditions. In this contribution we analyze transport of a solute in the shallow subsurface to assess effects resulting from the temporal change of heterogeneous soil structures due to dynamic flow conditions. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of unsaturated flow and transport are conducted using a coupled finite volume and random walk particle tracking algorithm to quantify solute transport and leaching rates. Following previous studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011), the chosen domain is composed of two materials, coarse and fine sand, arranged in parallel with a vertical orientation. Hence, one sharp interface of strong material heterogeneity is induced. During evaporation both sands are

  14. A complete assignment of the vibrational spectra of sucrose in aqueous medium based on the SQM methodology and SCRF calculations.

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Alicia Beatriz; Castillo, María Victoria; Raschi, Ana Beatriz; Davies, Lilian; Romano, Elida; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2014-03-31

    In the present study, a complete assignment of the vibrational spectra of sucrose in aqueous medium was performed combining Pulay's Scaled Quantum Mechanics Force Field (SQMFF) methodology with self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations. Aqueous saturated solutions of sucrose and solutions at different molar concentrations of sucrose in water were completely characterized by infrared, HATR, and Raman spectroscopies. In accordance with reported data of the literature for sucrose, the theoretical structures of sucrose penta and sucrose dihydrate were also optimized in gas and aqueous solution phases by using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The solvent effects for the three studied species were analyzed using the solvation PCM/SMD model and, then, their corresponding solvation energies were predicted. The presence of pure water, sucrose penta-hydrate, and sucrose dihydrate was confirmed by using theoretical calculations based on the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G(∗) method and the experimental vibrational spectra. The existence of both sucrose hydrate complexes in aqueous solution is evidenced in the IR and HATR spectra by means of the characteristic bands at 3388, 3337, 3132, 1648, 1375, 1241, 1163, 1141, 1001, 870, 851, 732, and 668cm(-1) while in the Raman spectrum, the groups of bands in the regions 3159-3053cm(-1), 2980, 2954, and 1749-1496cm(-1) characterize the vibration modes of those complexes. The inter and intra-molecular H bond formations in aqueous solution were studied by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Atoms in Molecules theory (AIM) investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Heterogeneous areas-identification of outliers and calculation of soil sampling uncertainty using the modified RANOVA method.

    PubMed

    Dołęgowska, Sabina; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Migaszewski, Zdzisław M

    2016-10-01

    We modified the robust analysis of variance (RANOVA) method to calculate sampling uncertainty of selected trace elements determined in soil samples from two heterogeneous remote historic metal ore mining areas. Classical RANOVA is down-weighting the outlying values by replacing them during the calculation process with mean ± c·σ r . Because the arithmetic mean is greatly influenced by outliers, it cannot represent a robust statistic. The main novel contribution of this work is use of median value that is independent on outliers and replace all extreme values during the calculation process with median ± 2·σ r . In our work, 18 duplicate, composite soil samples were collected, digested with aqua regia in a closed microwave system, and analyzed twice for selected trace elements. To extract homogenous groups within sampling areas and make the results more accessible for interpretation, a cluster analysis was done. Subsequently, histograms of each element were prepared and statistical tests were applied to determine the normal distribution of datasets. For abnormally distributed elements, the outlying values were identified by four different methods: boxplot, mean ± c·σ r , mean ± c·σ, and median ± 2·σ r . For five elements, the amount of outliers identified by the median ± 2·σ r procedure was less than 10 %, and for these elements, the sampling uncertainty was computed using a modified RANOVA method. The sampling uncertainty computed with this method was 28.9 % for Cd, 15.2 % for Co, 14.5 % for Mn, 12.7 % for Ni, and 16.3 % for Zn, whereas that computed with a traditional model was 16.7 % for Cd, 9.2 % for Co, 20.5 % for Mn, 17.9 % for Ni, and 16.3 % for Zn.

  16. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms in phantoms with lung equivalent heterogeneities under conditions of lateral electronic disequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, P.; Jornet, N.; Duch, M.A.; Weber, L.; Ginjaume, M.; Eudaldo, T.; Jurado, D.; Ruiz, A.; Ribas, M.

    2004-10-01

    An extensive set of benchmark measurement of PDDs and beam profiles was performed in a heterogeneous layer phantom, including a lung equivalent heterogeneity, by means of several detectors and compared against the predicted dose values by different calculation algorithms in two treatment planning systems. PDDs were measured with TLDs, plane parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers and beam profiles with films. Additionally, Monte Carlo simulations by meansof the PENELOPE code were performed. Four different field sizes (10x10, 5x5, 2x2, and1x1 cm{sup 2}) and two lung equivalent materials (CIRS, {rho}{sub e}{sup w}=0.195 and St. Bartholomew Hospital, London, {rho}{sub e}{sup w}=0.244-0.322) were studied. The performance of four correction-based algorithms and one based on convolution-superposition was analyzed. The correction-based algorithms were the Batho, the Modified Batho, and the Equivalent TAR implemented in the Cadplan (Varian) treatment planning system and the TMS Pencil Beam from the Helax-TMS (Nucletron) treatment planning system. The convolution-superposition algorithm was the Collapsed Cone implemented in the Helax-TMS. The only studied calculation methods that correlated successfully with the measured values with a 2% average inside all media were the Collapsed Cone and the Monte Carlo simulation. The biggest difference between the predicted and the delivered dose in the beam axis was found for the EqTAR algorithm inside the CIRS lung equivalent material in a 2x2 cm{sup 2} 18 MV x-ray beam. In these conditions, average and maximum difference against the TLD measurements were 32% and 39%, respectively. In the water equivalent part of the phantom every algorithm correctly predicted the dose (within 2%) everywhere except very close to the interfaces where differences up to 24% were found for 2x2 cm{sup 2} 18 MV photon beams. Consistent values were found between the reference detector (ionization chamber in water and TLD in lung) and Monte Carlo

  17. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms in phantoms with lung equivalent heterogeneities under conditions of lateral electronic disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, P; Jornet, N; Duch, M A; Weber, L; Ginjaume, M; Eudaldo, T; Jurado, D; Ruiz, A; Ribas, M

    2004-10-01

    An extensive set of benchmark measurement of PDDs and beam profiles was performed in a heterogeneous layer phantom, including a lung equivalent heterogeneity, by means of several detectors and compared against the predicted dose values by different calculation algorithms in two treatment planning systems. PDDs were measured with TLDs, plane parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers and beam profiles with films. Additionally, Monte Carlo simulations by means of the PENELOPE code were performed. Four different field sizes (10 x 10, 5 x 5, 2 x 2, and 1 x 1 cm2) and two lung equivalent materials (CIRS, p(w)e=0.195 and St. Bartholomew Hospital, London, p(w)e=0.244-0.322) were studied. The performance of four correction-based algorithms and one based on convolution-superposition was analyzed. The correction-based algorithms were the Batho, the Modified Batho, and the Equivalent TAR implemented in the Cadplan (Varian) treatment planning system and the TMS Pencil Beam from the Helax-TMS (Nucletron) treatment planning system. The convolution-superposition algorithm was the Collapsed Cone implemented in the Helax-TMS. The only studied calculation methods that correlated successfully with the measured values with a 2% average inside all media were the Collapsed Cone and the Monte Carlo simulation. The biggest difference between the predicted and the delivered dose in the beam axis was found for the EqTAR algorithm inside the CIRS lung equivalent material in a 2 x 2 cm2 18 MV x-ray beam. In these conditions, average and maximum difference against the TLD measurements were 32% and 39%, respectively. In the water equivalent part of the phantom every algorithm correctly predicted the dose (within 2%) everywhere except very close to the interfaces where differences up to 24% were found for 2 x 2 cm2 18 MV photon beams. Consistent values were found between the reference detector (ionization chamber in water and TLD in lung) and Monte Carlo simulations, yielding minimal

  18. Percentage depth dose calculation accuracy of model based algorithms in high energy photon small fields through heterogeneous media and comparison with plastic scintillator dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Alagar, Ananda Giri Babu; Kadirampatti Mani, Ganesh; Karunakaran, Kaviarasu

    2016-01-08

    Small fields smaller than 4 × 4 cm2 are used in stereotactic and conformal treatments where heterogeneity is normally present. Since dose calculation accuracy in both small fields and heterogeneity often involves more discrepancy, algorithms used by treatment planning systems (TPS) should be evaluated for achieving better treatment results. This report aims at evaluating accuracy of four model-based algorithms, X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) from Monaco, Superposition (SP) from CMS-Xio, AcurosXB (AXB) and analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) from Eclipse are tested against the measurement. Measurements are done using Exradin W1 plastic scintillator in Solid Water phantom with heterogeneities like air, lung, bone, and aluminum, irradiated with 6 and 15 MV photons of square field size ranging from 1 to 4 cm2. Each heterogeneity is introduced individually at two different depths from depth-of-dose maximum (Dmax), one setup being nearer and another farther from the Dmax. The central axis percentage depth-dose (CADD) curve for each setup is measured separately and compared with the TPS algorithm calculated for the same setup. The percentage normalized root mean squared deviation (%NRMSD) is calculated, which represents the whole CADD curve's deviation against the measured. It is found that for air and lung heterogeneity, for both 6 and 15 MV, all algorithms show maximum deviation for field size 1 × 1 cm2 and gradually reduce when field size increases, except for AAA. For aluminum and bone, all algorithms' deviations are less for 15 MV irrespective of setup. In all heterogeneity setups, 1 × 1 cm2 field showed maximum deviation, except in 6MV bone setup. All algorithms in the study, irrespective of energy and field size, when any heterogeneity is nearer to Dmax, the dose deviation is higher compared to the same heterogeneity far from the Dmax. Also, all algorithms show maximum deviation in lower-density materials compared to high-density materials.

  19. Impact of heterogeneity-corrected dose calculation using a grid-based Boltzmann solver on breast and cervix cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Julia; Kirisits, Christian; Resch, Alexandra; Xu, Yingjie; Sturdza, Alina; Pötter, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the impact of heterogeneity-corrected dose calculation on dosimetric quality parameters in gynecological and breast brachytherapy using Acuros, a grid-based Boltzmann equation solver (GBBS), and to evaluate the shielding effects of different cervix brachytherapy applicators. Material and methods Calculations with TG-43 and Acuros were based on computed tomography (CT) retrospectively, for 10 cases of accelerated partial breast irradiation and 9 cervix cancer cases treated with tandem-ring applicators. Phantom CT-scans of different applicators (plastic and titanium) were acquired. For breast cases the V20Gyαβ3 to lung, the D0.1cm3, D1cm3, D2cm3 to rib, the D0.1cm3, D1cm3, D10cm3 to skin, and Dmax for all structures were reported. For cervix cases, the D0.1cm3, D2cm3 to bladder, rectum and sigmoid, and the D50, D90, D98, V100 for the CTVHR were reported. For the phantom study, surrogates for target and organ at risk were created for a similar dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Absorbed dose and equivalent dose to 2 Gy fractionation (EQD2) were used for comparison. Results Calculations with TG-43 overestimated the dose for all dosimetric indices investigated. For breast, a decrease of ~8% was found for D10cm3 to the skin and 5% for D2cm3 to rib, resulting in a difference ~ –1.5 Gy EQD2 for overall treatment. Smaller effects were found for cervix cases with the plastic applicator, with up to –2% (–0.2 Gy EQD2) per fraction for organs at risk and –0.5% (–0.3 Gy EQD2) per fraction for CTVHR. The shielding effect of the titanium applicator resulted in a decrease of 2% for D2cm3 to the organ at risk versus 0.7% for plastic. Conclusions Lower doses were reported when calculating with Acuros compared to TG-43. Differences in dose parameters were larger in breast cases. A lower impact on clinical dose parameters was found for the cervix cases. Applicator material causes systematic shielding effects that can be taken into account. PMID

  20. Radiative transfer calculations of ultra-relativistic shock breakout in circumstellar medium: Dependence on the central engine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Yukari; Suzuki, Akihiro; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2015-08-01

    Core collapse supernovae radiate bright X-ray or UV flashes imediately after their explosion, because shock waves emerge on the surfaces of the progenitors. Due to their short duration, a very small number of such events (so called shock breakouts) have been observed, and the maximum shock velocities are likely to be significantly smaller than the speed of light. In principle, we can consider the shocks with ultra-relativistic velocities breakout stellar surfaces and generate gamma-ray photons. A recently popular theory of gamma-ray bursts argues that the thermal radiation produced in the jet may play important roles in the prompt emission. Therefore, for understanding of the relation between jets and the central engine, studying properties of breakouts in the relativistic limit will be interesting. To obtain some information concerning the temporal evolution of the photospheric emission from jets, we make a radiative transfer calculation of ultra-relativistic shock breakout in circumstellar medium by using a Monte Carlo method. We use a self-similar solution constructed by Blandford & McKee (1976), in which the shock Lorentz factor is assumed to follow a simple power law relation determined by the central engine activity. By comparing the calculation results of the accelerating shock and the decelerating shock, we find that influence of the beaming effect and the scattering angular distribution cause two apparent differences in light curves and temporal spectral evolution. One is that the ratio of the time between the onset and the peak to the duration is much smaller in light curves of decelerating shocks. The other one is that the spectral shape does not significantly change with time if the shock accelerates, otherwise the first half of the emerging photons contains much more high energy photons (above 1 MeV) than the second half.

  1. A parallel code to calculate rate-state seismicity evolution induced by time dependent, heterogeneous Coulomb stress changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattania, C.; Khalid, F.

    2016-09-01

    The estimation of space and time-dependent earthquake probabilities, including aftershock sequences, has received increased attention in recent years, and Operational Earthquake Forecasting systems are currently being implemented in various countries. Physics based earthquake forecasting models compute time dependent earthquake rates based on Coulomb stress changes, coupled with seismicity evolution laws derived from rate-state friction. While early implementations of such models typically performed poorly compared to statistical models, recent studies indicate that significant performance improvements can be achieved by considering the spatial heterogeneity of the stress field and secondary sources of stress. However, the major drawback of these methods is a rapid increase in computational costs. Here we present a code to calculate seismicity induced by time dependent stress changes. An important feature of the code is the possibility to include aleatoric uncertainties due to the existence of multiple receiver faults and to the finite grid size, as well as epistemic uncertainties due to the choice of input slip model. To compensate for the growth in computational requirements, we have parallelized the code for shared memory systems (using OpenMP) and distributed memory systems (using MPI). Performance tests indicate that these parallelization strategies lead to a significant speedup for problems with different degrees of complexity, ranging from those which can be solved on standard multicore desktop computers, to those requiring a small cluster, to a large simulation that can be run using up to 1500 cores.

  2. Final technical report: The effect of physical and chemical heterogeneities in a porous medium on the transport of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hornberger, George M.; Mills, Aaron L.; Herman, Janet S.

    2001-04-01

    Among the demonstrated processes influencing the transport of bacteria through aquifers, the deposition of cells on mineral surfaces is one of the most important. Heterogeneous distribution of aquifer properties such as mineral-grain oxide coatings and preferred flow paths can control the numbers of microbes arriving a point down gradient from their injection, and these properties can also affect the distribution of the organisms remaining in the sedimentary matrix. The distribution of metal oxide coatings affects the final location of retained cells within the matrix but had no effect on total breakthrough of applied bacteria. We were able to demonstrate transverse mixing of both conservative tracers and bacteria between regions of differing hydraulic conductivity; the conservative tracer could be used to model the transverse mixing of the bacteria. We were able to show that the presence of metal oxide coatings on aquifer surfaces retarded a reactive tracer (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that simulated bacterial retardation in the laboratory. When metal oxide coatings were absent (due to bacterial establishment of a reducing environment) the tracer and bacteria were not retarded. The effect was reproduced in a tracer experiment done in the field. The results suggest that bacterial transport in the subsurface is controlled by a number of interrelated and confounding factors that prevent accurate prediction of transport given the present state of knowledge.

  3. Velocity and thermal slip effects on MHD third order blood flow in an irregular channel though a porous medium with homogeneous/ heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnaneswara Reddy, M.

    2017-09-01

    This communication presents the transportation of third order hydromagnetic fluid with thermal radiation by peristalsis through an irregular channel configuration filled a porous medium under the low Reynolds number and large wavelength approximations. Joule heating, Hall current and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions effects are considered in the energy and species equations. The Second-order velocity and energy slip restrictions are invoked. Final dimensionless governing transport equations along the boundary restrictions are resolved numerically with the help of NDsolve in Mathematica package. Impact of involved sundry parameters on the non-dimensional axial velocity, fluid temperature and concentration characteristics have been analyzed via plots and tables. It is manifest that an increasing porosity parameter leads to maximum velocity in the core part of the channel. Fluid velocity boosts near the walls of the channel where as the reverse effect in the central part of the channel for higher values of first order slip. Larger values of thermal radiation parameter R reduce the fluid temperature field. Also, an increase in heterogeneous reaction parameter Ks magnifies the concentration profile. The present study has the crucial application of thermal therapy in biomedical engineering.

  4. SU-E-T-626: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms in MultiPlan Treatment Planning System in Presence of Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Moignier, C; Huet, C; Barraux, V; Loiseau, C; Sebe-Mercier, K; Batalla, A; Makovicka, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Advanced stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) treatments require accurate dose calculation for treatment planning especially for treatment sites involving heterogeneous patient anatomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation algorithms, Raytracing and Monte Carlo (MC), implemented in the MultiPlan treatment planning system (TPS) in presence of heterogeneities. Methods: First, the LINAC of a CyberKnife radiotherapy facility was modeled with the PENELOPE MC code. A protocol for the measurement of dose distributions with EBT3 films was established and validated thanks to comparison between experimental dose distributions and calculated dose distributions obtained with MultiPlan Raytracing and MC algorithms as well as with the PENELOPE MC model for treatments planned with the homogenous Easycube phantom. Finally, bones and lungs inserts were used to set up a heterogeneous Easycube phantom. Treatment plans with the 10, 7.5 or the 5 mm field sizes were generated in Multiplan TPS with different tumor localizations (in the lung and at the lung/bone/soft tissue interface). Experimental dose distributions were compared to the PENELOPE MC and Multiplan calculations using the gamma index method. Results: Regarding the experiment in the homogenous phantom, 100% of the points passed for the 3%/3mm tolerance criteria. These criteria include the global error of the method (CT-scan resolution, EBT3 dosimetry, LINAC positionning …), and were used afterwards to estimate the accuracy of the MultiPlan algorithms in heterogeneous media. Comparison of the dose distributions obtained in the heterogeneous phantom is in progress. Conclusion: This work has led to the development of numerical and experimental dosimetric tools for small beam dosimetry. Raytracing and MC algorithms implemented in MultiPlan TPS were evaluated in heterogeneous media.

  5. Dyson equation for electromagnetic scattering of heterogeneous media with spatially disordered particles: properties of the effective medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berginc, G.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the coherent component of the electromagnetic wave field inside random media. The subject of our interest concerns a random medium, consisting of a statistical ensemble of different scattering species and artificial material structures developed on base of dielectric or metallic resonant or non-resonant particles. The starting point of our theory is the multiple scattering theory, the averaged electric field satisfies a Dyson equation with a mass operator related to the effective dielectric permittivity of the homogenized structure. Quantum multiple scattering theory has been transposed into this electromagnetic case. We give a formal solution for the mass operator by introducing the T-matrix formalism. We show that the T-matrix satisfies a Lippman-Schwinger equation. Then, we introduce the Quasi-Crystalline Coherent Potential Approximation (QC-CPA), which takes into account the correlation between the particles with a pair-distribution function. The mass operator includes geometric effects, caused by resonant behavior due to the shape and size of particles, cluster effects because of correlations between particles. Significant modifications of particle scattering properties can be observed.

  6. Calculation of natural oscillations of a resonator with a doppler-broadened active medium linear with respect to the field

    SciTech Connect

    Glushchenko, Y.V.; Radina, T.V.; Radin, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    A linear self-consistent model of laser generation in an anisotropic active medium is constructed. The nonreciprocal character of field distributions of waves circulating in a ring resonator in counter directions, which is caused by an active medium, is found and analyzed. Corrections to mode frequencies and threshold gain are determined. 3 refs.

  7. A new approach to account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage x-rays.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jason M; Ding, George X

    2011-07-07

    This study presents a new approach to accurately account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage (kV) x-rays. This approach is based on the hypothesis that the correction factors needed to convert dose from model-based dose calculations to absorbed dose-to-medium depend on both the attenuation characteristics of the absorbing media and the changes to the energy spectrum of the incident x-rays as they traverse media with an effective atomic number different than that of water. Using Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we obtained empirical medium-dependent correction factors that take both effects into account. We found that the correction factors can be expressed as a function of a single quantity, called the effective bone depth, which is a measure of the amount of bone that an x-ray beam must penetrate to reach a voxel. Since the effective bone depth can be calculated from volumetric patient CT images, the medium-dependent correction factors can be obtained for model-based dose calculations based on patient CT images. We tested the accuracy of this new approach on 14 patients for the case of calculating imaging dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography used for patient setup in radiotherapy, and compared it with the Monte Carlo method, which is regarded as the 'gold standard'. For all patients studied, the new approach resulted in mean dose errors of less than 3%. This is in contrast to current available inhomogeneity corrected methods, which have been shown to result in mean errors of up to -103% for bone and 8% for soft tissue. Since there is a huge gain in the calculation speed relative to the Monte Carlo method (∼two orders of magnitude) with an acceptable loss of accuracy, this approach provides an alternative accurate dose calculation method for kV x-rays.

  8. A new approach to account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Ding, George X.

    2011-07-01

    This study presents a new approach to accurately account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage (kV) x-rays. This approach is based on the hypothesis that the correction factors needed to convert dose from model-based dose calculations to absorbed dose-to-medium depend on both the attenuation characteristics of the absorbing media and the changes to the energy spectrum of the incident x-rays as they traverse media with an effective atomic number different than that of water. Using Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we obtained empirical medium-dependent correction factors that take both effects into account. We found that the correction factors can be expressed as a function of a single quantity, called the effective bone depth, which is a measure of the amount of bone that an x-ray beam must penetrate to reach a voxel. Since the effective bone depth can be calculated from volumetric patient CT images, the medium-dependent correction factors can be obtained for model-based dose calculations based on patient CT images. We tested the accuracy of this new approach on 14 patients for the case of calculating imaging dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography used for patient setup in radiotherapy, and compared it with the Monte Carlo method, which is regarded as the 'gold standard'. For all patients studied, the new approach resulted in mean dose errors of less than 3%. This is in contrast to current available inhomogeneity corrected methods, which have been shown to result in mean errors of up to -103% for bone and 8% for soft tissue. Since there is a huge gain in the calculation speed relative to the Monte Carlo method (~two orders of magnitude) with an acceptable loss of accuracy, this approach provides an alternative accurate dose calculation method for kV x-rays.

  9. Algorithms used in heterogeneous dose calculations show systematic differences as measured with the Radiological Physics Center’s anthropomorphic thorax phantom used for RTOG credentialing

    PubMed Central

    Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Molineu, Andrea; Amador, Carrie; Galvin, James; Followill, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of treatment planning algorithm on the accuracy of heterogeneous dose calculations in the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) thorax phantom. Methods and Materials We retrospectively analyzed the results of 304 irradiations of the RPC thorax phantom at 221 different institutions as part of credentialing for RTOG clinical trials; the irradiations were all done using 6-MV beams. Treatment plans included those for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as well as 3D conformal therapy (3D CRT). Heterogeneous plans were developed using Monte Carlo (MC), convolution/superposition (CS) and the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), as well as pencil beam (PB) algorithms. For each plan and delivery, the absolute dose measured in the center of a lung target was compared to the calculated dose, as was the planar dose in 3 orthogonal planes. The difference between measured and calculated dose was examined as a function of planning algorithm as well as use of IMRT. Results PB algorithms overestimated the dose delivered to the center of the target by 4.9% on average. Surprisingly, CS algorithms and AAA also showed a systematic overestimation of the dose to the center of the target, by 3.7% on average. In contrast, the MC algorithm dose calculations agreed with measurement within 0.6% on average. There was no difference observed between IMRT and 3D CRT calculation accuracy. Conclusion Unexpectedly, advanced treatment planning systems (those using CS and AAA algorithms) overestimated the dose that was delivered to the lung target. This issue requires attention in terms of heterogeneity calculations and potentially in terms of clinical practice. PMID:23237006

  10. Accuracy of dose measurements and calculations within and beyond heterogeneous tissues for 6 MV photon fields smaller than 4 cm produced by Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Ellen E.; Daskalov, George M.

    2008-06-15

    For the small radiation field sizes used in stereotactic radiosurgery, lateral electronic disequilibrium and steep dose gradients exist in a large portion of these fields, requiring the use of high-resolution measurement techniques. These relatively large areas of electronic disequilibrium make accurate dosimetry as well as dose calculation more difficult, and this is exacerbated in regions of tissue heterogeneity. Tissue heterogeneity was considered insignificant in the brain where stereotactic radiosurgery was first used. However, as this technique is expanded to the head and neck and other body sites, dose calculations need to account for dose perturbations in and beyond air cavities, lung, and bone. In a previous study we have evaluated EBT Gafchromic film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) for dosimetry and characterization of the Cyberknife radiation beams and found that it was comparable to other common detectors used for small photon beams in solid water equivalent phantoms. In the present work EBT film is used to measure dose in heterogeneous slab phantoms containing lung and bone equivalent materials for the 6 MV radiation beams of diameter 7.5 to 40 mm produced by the Cyberknife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). These measurements are compared to calculations done with both the clinically utilized Raytrace algorithm as well as the newly developed Monte Carlo based algorithm available on the Cyberknife treatment planning system. Within the low density material both the measurements and Monte Carlo calculations correctly model the decrease in dose produced by a loss of electronic equilibrium, whereas the Raytrace algorithm incorrectly predicts an enhancement of dose in this region. Beyond the low density material an enhancement of dose is correctly calculated by both algorithms. Within the high density bone heterogeneity the EBT film measurements represent dose to unit density tissue in bone and agree with the Monte Carlo results when corrected to dose

  11. Calculation of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent induced by medium energy neutrons and protons and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Bishop, B. L.

    1972-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to determine the absorbed dose and dose equivalent for 592-MeV protons incident on a cylindrical phantom and for neutrons from 580-MeV proton-Be collisions incident on a semi-infinite phantom. For both configurations, the calculated depth dependence of the absorbed dose is in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure, and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants for understanding and predicting their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the analytical solutions of random distributions of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and is suitable for ecological models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change.

  13. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2014-07-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate the solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in order to understand and predict their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming that crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the results of random distribution of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and can be included in vegetation models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change. The code and a user's manual are provided as Supplement of the paper.

  14. Calculating infinite-medium α-eigenvalue spectra with Monte Carlo using a transition rate matrix method

    DOE PAGES

    Betzler, Benjamin R.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Brown, Forrest B.; ...

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent behavior of the energy spectrum in neutron transport was investigated with a formulation, based on continuous-time Markov processes, for computing α eigenvalues and eigenvectors in an infinite medium. In this study, a research Monte Carlo code called “TORTE” (To Obtain Real Time Eigenvalues) was created and used to estimate elements of a transition rate matrix. TORTE is capable of using both multigroup and continuous-energy nuclear data, and verification was performed. Eigenvalue spectra for infinite homogeneous mixtures were obtained, and an eigenfunction expansion was used to investigate transient behavior of the neutron energy spectrum.

  15. Calculating infinite-medium α-eigenvalue spectra with Monte Carlo using a transition rate matrix method

    SciTech Connect

    Betzler, Benjamin R.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent behavior of the energy spectrum in neutron transport was investigated with a formulation, based on continuous-time Markov processes, for computing α eigenvalues and eigenvectors in an infinite medium. In this study, a research Monte Carlo code called “TORTE” (To Obtain Real Time Eigenvalues) was created and used to estimate elements of a transition rate matrix. TORTE is capable of using both multigroup and continuous-energy nuclear data, and verification was performed. Eigenvalue spectra for infinite homogeneous mixtures were obtained, and an eigenfunction expansion was used to investigate transient behavior of the neutron energy spectrum.

  16. Calculation of angular distribution of 662 keV gamma rays by Monte Carlo method in copper medium.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, A; Ozmutlu, E N; Gurler, O; Yalcin, S; Kaynak, G; Gundogdu, O

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents results on the angular distribution of Compton scattering of 662 keV gamma photons in both forward and backward hemispheres in copper medium. The number of scattered events graph has been determined for scattered gamma photons in both the forward and backward hemispheres and theoretical saturation thicknesses have been obtained using these results. Furthermore, response function of a 51 x 51 mm NaI(Tl) detector at 60 degrees angle with incoming photons scattered from a 10mm thick copper layer has been determined using Monte Carlo method.

  17. A new experimental and theoretical investigation on the structures of aminoethyl phosphonic acid in aqueous medium based on the vibrational spectra and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, María L.; Ledesma, Ana E.; Raschi, Ana B.; Castillo, María V.; Romano, Elida; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2013-06-01

    A new study on the structural and vibrational properties of the aminoethylphosphonic acid was performed in aqueous solution phase by using the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method. We have studied and characterized it by infrared and Raman spectroscopies in solid and aqueous solution phases. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) method with Pople's basis set show that three stable zwitterions for the title molecule have been theoretically determined in aqueous solution and that probably they are present in it medium. Here, the solvent effects were studied by means of the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method with the polarized continuum model (PCM). The harmonic vibrational frequencies for the optimized geometries of the three zwitterions were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G∗ level of the theory. A complete assignment of the IR and Raman spectra of the compound in aqueous solution was performed combining the DFT calculations with Pulay's Scaled Quantum Mechanics Force Field (SQMFF) methodology in order to fit the theoretical frequency values to the experimental ones. Moreover, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and topological properties calculations were performed to analyze the energies and geometrical parameters of its three zwitterions in aqueous medium as well as the magnitude of the intramolecular interactions. The bond orders, atomic charges, solvation energies, dipole moments, molecular electrostatic potentials and force constants parameters calculated for zwitterions in aqueous solution, may be used to gain chemical and vibrational insights into related compounds.

  18. SU-E-T-513: Investigating Dose of Internal Target Volume After Correcting for Tissue Heterogeneity in SBRT Lung Plans with Homogeneity Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, P; Zhuang, T; Magnelli, A; Djemil, T; Shang, Q; Balik, S; Andrews, M; Stephans, K; Videtic, G; Xia, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose It was recommended to use the prescription of 54 Gy/3 with heterogeneity corrections for previously established dose scheme of 60 Gy/3 with homogeneity calculation. This study is to investigate dose coverage for the internal target volume (ITV) with and without heterogeneity correction. Methods Thirty patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to a dose of 60 Gy in 3 fractions with homogeneous planning for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were selected. ITV was created either from 4DCT scans or a fusion of multi-phase respiratory scans. Planning target volume (PTV) was a 5 mm expansion of the ITV. For this study, we recalculated homogeneous clinical plans using heterogeneity corrections with monitor units set as clinically delivered. All plans were calculated with 3 mm dose grids and collapsed cone convolution algorithm. To account for uncertainties from tumor delineation and image-guided radiotherapy, a structure ITV2mm was created by expanding ITV with 2 mm margins. Dose coverage to the PTV, ITV and ITV2mm were compared with a student paired t-test. Results With heterogeneity corrections, the PTV V60Gy decreased by 10.1% ± 18.4% (p<0.01) while the maximum dose to the PTV increased by 3.7 ± 4.3% (p<0.01). With and without corrections, D99% was 65.8 ± 4.0 Gy and 66.7 ± 4.8 Gy (p=0.15) for the ITV, and 63.9 ± 3.4 Gy and 62.9 ± 4.6 Gy for the ITV2mm (p=0.22), respectively. The mean dose to the ITV and ITV2mm increased 3.6% ± 4.7% (p<0.01) and 2.3% ± 5.2% (p=0.01) with heterogeneity corrections. Conclusion After heterogeneity correction, the peripheral coverage of the PTV decreased to approximately 54 Gy, but D99% of the ITV and ITV2mm was unchanged and the mean dose to the ITV and ITV2mm was increased. Clinical implication of these results requires more investigation.

  19. Ab initio calculation of infrared intensities for the linear isoelectronic series HCN, HNC, CO, HCO/+/, and HOC/+/. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ab initio infrared intensities and dipole moment derivatives expressed in atomic polar tensor form are calculated using the 4-31 and 6-31G(double asterisk) basis sets for the isoelectronic HCN, HNC, CO, HCO(+), and HOC(+) series of molecules. The calculated atomic polar tensors are analyzed in terms of the charge-charge flux-overlap model, which is found to be useful in explaining some of the trends observed in the dipole moment derivatives for this series of molecules. A detailed examination of the dipole moment derivatives for the structural isomers indicates some of the ways in which experimental atomic polar tensors for one isomer should be modified to predict infrared intensities for the other isomer. The absolute intensities calculated for the HCO(+) and HOC(+) ions are believed to be accurate to within a factor of 2 and thus should be useful in astrophysical applications.

  20. Modelling of hydrothermal fluid circulation in a heterogeneous medium: Application to the Rainbow Vent site (Mid-Atlantic-Ridge, 36°14N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Mügler, C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Charlou, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity at the axis of mid-ocean ridges is a key driver for energy and matter transfer from the interior of the Earth to the ocean floor. At mid-ocean ridges, seawater penetrates through the permeable young crust, warms at depth and exchanges chemicals with the surrounding rocks. This hot fluid focuses and flows upwards, then is expelled from the crust at hydrothermal vent sites in the form of black or white smokers completed by diffusive emissions. We developed a new numerical tool in the Cast3M software framework to model such hydrothermal circulations. Thermodynamic properties of one-phase pure water were calculated from the IAPWS formulation. This new numerical tool was validated on several test cases of convection in closed-top and open-top boxes. Simulations of hydrothermal circulation in a homogeneous-permeability porous medium also gave results in good agreement with already published simulations. We used this new numerical tool to construct a geometric and physical model configuration of the Rainbow Vent site at 36°14'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In this presentation, several configurations will be discussed, showing that high temperatures and high mass fluxes measured at the Rainbow site cannot be modelled with hydrothermal circulation in a homogeneous-permeability porous medium. We will show that these high values require the presence of a fault or a preferential pathway right below the venting site. We will propose and discuss a 2-D one-path model that allows us to simulate both high temperatures and high mass fluxes. This modelling of the hydrothermal circulation at the Rainbow site constitutes a first but necessary step to understand the origin of high concentrations of hydrogen issued from this ultramafic-hosted vent field.

  1. A comparison of measured HONO uptake and release with calculated source strengths in a heterogeneous forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sörgel, M.; Trebs, I.; Wu, D.; Held, A.

    2015-08-01

    Vertical mixing ratio profiles of nitrous acid (HONO) were measured in a clearing and on the forest floor in a rural forest environment. For the forest floor, HONO was found to predominantly deposit, whereas for the clearing, net deposition dominated only during nighttime and net emissions were observed during daytime. For selected days, net fluxes of HONO were calculated from the measured profiles using the aerodynamic gradient method. The emission fluxes were in the range of 0.02 to 0.07 nmol m-2 s-1 and thus were in the lower range of previous observations. These fluxes were compared to the strengths of postulated HONO sources. Laboratory measurements of different soil samples from both sites revealed an upper limit for soil biogenic HONO emission fluxes of 0.025 nmol m-2 s-1. HONO formation by light-induced NO2 conversion was calculated to be below 0.03 nmol m-2 s-1 for the investigated days, which is comparable to the potential soil fluxes. Due to light saturation at low irradiance, this reaction pathway was largely found to be independent of light intensity, i.e. it was only dependent on ambient NO2. We used three different approaches based on measured leaf nitrate loadings for calculating HONO formation from HNO3 photolysis. While the first two approaches based on empirical HONO formation rates yielded values in the same order of magnitude as the estimated fluxes, the third approach based on available kinetic data of the postulated pathway failed to produce noticeable amounts of HONO. Estimates based on reported cross sections of adsorbed HNO3 indicate that the lifetime of adsorbed HNO3 was only about 15 min, which would imply a substantial renoxification. Although the photolysis of HNO3 was significantly enhanced at the surface, the subsequent light-induced conversion of the photolysis product NO2 did not produce considerable amounts of HONO. Consequently, this reaction might occur via an alternative mechanism. By explicitly calculating HONO formation based

  2. New Physical Ideas and Method of Description and Calculation of Resistance to Motion of Small Particles in a Gaseous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Bubenchikov, A. M.; Bubenchikov, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    New ideas and a new approach to the motion of small-including nanosized-particles are presented, resting on basic concepts of the molecular kinetic theory of gases, statistical physics, and classical mechanics. Two new concepts are introduced: the λ-layer and "counter-moving" pairs of molecules. The first makes it possible to limit the number of molecules under consideration and ignore their collisions with each other. The second makes it possible to exclude Brownian motion of the molecules. It is established that the action of potential van der Waals forces is localized in the vicinity of the small particle in such a way that it is possible in the statistical calculations to assume that the trajectories of the molecules consist of line segments and that impact of a molecule is perfectly elastic and equivalent to impact on an "effective particle" with linear dimension 40% higher than the actual diameter of the particle. Good agreement is obtained with the experimental Cunningham-Millikan-Davies (CMD) approximation, and also with extrapolated values of this approximation.

  3. A comparison of measured HONO uptake and release with calculated source strengths in a heterogeneous forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sörgel, Matthias; Trebs, Ivonne; Wu, Dianming; Held, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Vertical mixing ratio profiles of nitrous acid (HONO) were measured in a clearing and on the forest floor in a rural forest environment (in the south-east of Germany) by applying a lift system to move the sampling unit of the LOng Path Absorption Photometer (LOPAP) up and down. For the forest floor, HONO was found to be predominantly deposited, whereas net deposition was dominating in the clearing only during nighttime and net emissions were observed during daytime. For selected days, net fluxes of HONO were calculated from the measured profiles using the aerodynamic gradient method. The emission fluxes were in the range of 0.02 to 0.07 nmol m-2 s-1, and, thus were in the lower range of previous observations. These fluxes were compared to the strengths of postulated HONO sources and to the amount of HONO needed to sustain photolysis in the boundary layer. Laboratory measurements of different soil samples from both sites revealed an upper limit for soil biogenic HONO emission fluxes of 0.025 nmol m-2 s-1. HONO formation by light induced NO2 conversion was calculated to be below 0.03 nmol m-2 s-1 for the investigated days, which is comparable to the potential soil fluxes. Due to light saturation at low irradiance, this reaction pathway was largely found to be independent of light intensity, i.e. it was only dependent on ambient NO2. We used three different approaches based on measured leaf nitrate loadings for calculating HONO formation from HNO3 photolysis. While the first two approaches based on empirical HONO formation rates yielded values in the same order of magnitude as the estimated fluxes, the third approach based on available kinetic data of the postulated pathway failed to produce noticeable amounts of HONO. Estimates based on reported cross sections of adsorbed HNO3 indicate that the lifetime of adsorbed HNO3 was only about 15 min, which would imply a substantial renoxification. Although the photolysis of HNO3 was significantly enhanced at the surface, the

  4. Correction factors for the NMi free-air ionization chamber for medium-energy x-rays calculated with the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Grimbergen, T W; van Dijk, E; de Vries, W

    1998-11-01

    A new method is described for the determination of x-ray quality dependent correction factors for free-air ionization chambers. The method is based on weighting correction factors for mono-energetic photons, which are calculated using the Monte Carlo method, with measured air kerma spectra. With this method, correction factors for electron loss, scatter inside the chamber and transmission through the diaphragm and front wall have been calculated for the NMi free-air chamber for medium-energy x-rays for a wide range of x-ray qualities in use at NMi. The newly obtained correction factors were compared with the values in use at present, which are based on interpolation of experimental data for a specific set of x-ray qualities. For x-ray qualities which are similar to this specific set, the agreement between the correction factors determined with the new method and those based on the experimental data is better than 0.1%, except for heavily filtered x-rays generated at 250 kV. For x-ray qualities dissimilar to the specific set, differences up to 0.4% exist, which can be explained by uncertainties in the interpolation procedure of the experimental data. Since the new method does not depend on experimental data for a specific set of x-ray qualities, the new method allows for a more flexible use of the free-air chamber as a primary standard for air kerma for any x-ray quality in the medium-energy x-ray range.

  5. Experimental Determination of Conditions for the Explosive Fragmentation of a Heterogeneous Water Droplet in Heating in a High-Temperature Gas Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, G. V.; Piskunov, M. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-05-01

    An experimental study has been made of the processes of warming up, evaporation, and boiling of a heterogeneous (with a solid graphite particle) droplet of water in a flow of high-temperature (500-800 K) combustion products. The mechanism of explosive fragmentation (breakup) of the heterogeneous droplet with enhancement of vaporization on internal interfaces (during the nucleation of vapour bubbles at the graphite-particle surface) has been established. The characteristic times of heating of the heterogeneous droplet (2.5-4 mm in size) with an inclusion (in the shape of a cylindrical disk of diameter and height 2 mm) to explosive-fragmentation conditions have been determined. The times of complete evaporation of a liquid film from the inclusion during the implementation of the process of vaporization from the free exterior surface of the droplet have also been given. A significant difference of the conditions and characteristics of the investigated processes from the "graphite substrate-water droplet" system has been shown. Conditions under which the controlling share of heat to internal interfaces of the heterogeneous droplet is supplied through the liquid film or the inclusion have been determined.

  6. The structure of SrTiO3(001)-2 × 1 surface analyzed by high-resolution medium energy ion scattering coupled with ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Taishi; Yoshida, Yuki; Mitsuhara, Kei; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) spectrometry coupled with photoelectron spectroscopy revealed unambiguously that the initial SrTiO3(001) surface chemically etched in a buffered NH4F-HF solution was perfectly terminated with a single-layer (SL) of TiO2(001) and annealing the surface at 600-800 °C in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) led to a (2 × 1)-reconstructed surface terminated with a double-layer (DL) of TiO2(001). After annealing in UHV, rock-salt SrO(001) clusters with two atomic layer height grew epitaxially on the DL-TiO2(001)-2 × 1 surface with a coverage of 20%-30%. High-resolution MEIS in connection with ab initio calculations demonstrated the structure of the DL-TiO2(001)-2 × 1 surface close to that proposed by Erdman et al. [Nature (London) 419, 55 (2002)], 10.1038/nature01010 rather than that predicted by Herger et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 076102 (2007)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.076102. Based on the MEIS analysis combined with the ab initio calculations, we propose the most probable (2 × 1) surface structure.

  7. Introduction on background medium theory about celestial body motion orbit and foundation of fractional-dimension calculus about self-similar fractal measure calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Kun

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, by discussing the basic hypotheses about the continuous orbit and discrete orbit in two research directions of the background medium theory for celestial body motion, the concrete equation forms and their summary of the theoretic frame of celestial body motion are introduced. Future more, by discussing the general form of Binet's equation of celestial body motion orbit and it's solution of the advance of the perihelion of planets, the relations and differences between the continuous orbit theory and Newton's gravitation theory and Einstein's general relativity are given. And by discussing the fractional-dimension expanded equation for the celestial body motion orbits, the concrete equations and the prophesy data of discrete orbit or stable orbits of celestial bodies which included the planets in the Solar system, satellites in the Uranian system, satellites in the Earth system and satellites obtaining the Moon obtaining from discrete orbit theory are given too. Especially, as the preliminary exploration and inference to the gravitation curve of celestial bodies in broadly range, the concept for the ideal black hole with trend to infinite in mass density difficult to be formed by gravitation only is explored. By discussing the position hypothesis of fractional-dimension derivative about general function and the formula form the hypothesis of fractional-dimension derivative about power function, the concrete equation formulas of fractional-dimension derivative, differential and integral are described distinctly further, and the difference between the fractional-dimension derivative and the fractional-order derivative are given too. Subsequently, the concrete forms of measure calculation equations of self-similar fractal obtaining by based on the definition of form in fractional-dimension calculus about general fractal measure are discussed again, and the differences with Hausdorff measure method or the covering method at present are given. By applying

  8. Comparison between In-house developed and Diamond commercial software for patient specific independent monitor unit calculation and verification with heterogeneity corrections.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Nagarajan, Vivekanandan; Jeevanandam, Prakash; Murugan, Lavanya

    2016-02-01

    The study was aimed to compare two different monitor unit (MU) or dose verification software in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using modified Clarkson's integration technique for 6 MV photons beams. In-house Excel Spreadsheet based monitor unit verification calculation (MUVC) program and PTW's DIAMOND secondary check software (SCS), version-6 were used as a secondary check to verify the monitor unit (MU) or dose calculated by treatment planning system (TPS). In this study 180 patients were grouped into 61 head and neck, 39 thorax and 80 pelvic sites. Verification plans are created using PTW OCTAVIUS-4D phantom and also measured using 729 detector chamber and array with isocentre as the suitable point of measurement for each field. In the analysis of 154 clinically approved VMAT plans with isocentre at a region above -350 HU, using heterogeneity corrections, In-house Spreadsheet based MUVC program and Diamond SCS showed good agreement TPS. The overall percentage average deviations for all sites were (-0.93% + 1.59%) and (1.37% + 2.72%) for In-house Excel Spreadsheet based MUVC program and Diamond SCS respectively. For 26 clinically approved VMAT plans with isocentre at a region below -350 HU showed higher variations for both In-house Spreadsheet based MUVC program and Diamond SCS. It can be concluded that for patient specific quality assurance (QA), the In-house Excel Spreadsheet based MUVC program and Diamond SCS can be used as a simple and fast accompanying to measurement based verification for plans with isocentre at a region above -350 HU. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling Gas-Grain Chemistry with Quantum Chemical Cluster Calculations. I. Heterogeneous Hydrogenation of CO and H2CO on Icy Grain Mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woon, David E.

    2002-04-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) and methanol (CH3OH) are thought to be produced in the interstellar medium by the successive hydrogenation of carbon monoxide (CO) on grain surfaces. In the gas phase, the steps in which H adds to CO and H2CO possess modest barriers and are too inefficient to account for the observed abundances. Recent laboratory work has confirmed that formaldehyde and methanol are formed when H atoms are deposited on CO ice at 12 K. The present study employs ab initio quantum chemical calculations to investigate the impact of water ice on the sequential hydrogenation of CO. The most favorable pathway is CO-->HCO (formyl radical)-->H2CO-->CH3O (methoxy radical)-->CH3OH. There is sufficient reaction energy in the final step to fragment CH3OH into methyl and hydroxyl radicals, which can be hydrogenated to yield methane and water, as observed in the experimental work. The emphasis here was on the two steps with barriers, H+CO and H+H2CO, with both addition and abstraction considered for the latter. Calculations with up to four explicit water molecules were performed, as well as further modeling to incorporate bulk effects. While ice was found to have a nearly negligible impact on H+CO-->HCO, it modestly enhances the addition reaction H+H2CO-->CH3O and hinders the abstraction reaction H+H2CO-->H2+HCO. The deuterium-substituted reactions D+CO-->DCO and D+H2CO-->CDH2O were found to be slightly favored over the corresponding H reactions, particularly in the latter case. Overall, the energetics are not favorable: water ice is evidently not a good catalytic substrate for H+CO or H+H2CO addition reactions at very cold temperatures.

  10. Experimental and numerical study of heterogeneous pressure-temperature-induced lethal and sublethal injury of Lactococcus lactis in a medium scale high-pressure autoclave.

    PubMed

    Kilimann, K V; Kitsubun, P; Delgado, A; Gänzle, M G; Chapleau, N; Le Bail, A; Hartmann, C

    2006-07-05

    The present contribution is dedicated to experimental and theoretical assessment of microbiological process heterogeneities of the high-pressure (HP) inactivation of Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris MG 1363. The inactivation kinetics are determined in dependence of pressure, process time, temperature and absence or presence of co-solutes in the buffer system namely 4 M sodium chloride and 1.5 M sucrose. The kinetic analysis is carried out in a 0.1-L autoclave in order to minimise thermal and convective effects. Upon these data, a deterministic inactivation model is formulated with the logistic equation. Its independent variables represent the counts of viable cells (viable but injured) and of the stress-resistant cells (viable and not injured). This model is then coupled to a thermo-fluiddynamical simulation method, high-pressure computer fluid dynamics technique (HP-CFD), which yields spatiotemporal temperature and flow fields occurring during the HP application inside any considered autoclave. Besides the thermo-fluiddynamic quantities, the coupled model predicts also the spatiotemporal distribution of both viable (VC) and stress-resistant cell counts (SRC). In order to assess the process non-uniformity of the microbial inactivation in a 3.3-L autoclave experimentally, microbial samples are placed at two distinct locations and are exposed to various process conditions. It can be shown with both, experimental and theoretical models that thermal heterogeneities induce process non-uniformities of more than one decimal power in the counts of the viable cells at the end of the treatment. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Source inversion analysis of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using Green's functions calculated from a 3-D heterogeneous structure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, W.; Aoi, S.; Maeda, T.; Sekiguchi, H.; Kunugi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Source inversion analysis using near-source strong-motion records with an assumption of 1-D underground structure models has revealed the overall characteristics of the rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki mega-thrust earthquake. This assumption for the structure model is acceptable because the seismic waves radiated during the Tohoku-Oki event were rich in the very-low-frequency contents lower than 0.05 Hz, which are less affected by the small-scale heterogeneous structure. The analysis using more reliable Green's functions even in the higher-frequency range considering complex structure of the subduction zone will illuminate more detailed rupture process in space and time and the transition of the frequency dependence of the wave radiation for the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. In this study, we calculate the near-source Green's functions using a 3-D underground structure model and perform the source inversion analysis using them. The 3-D underground structure model used in this study is the Japan Integrated Velocity Structure Model (Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, 2012). A curved fault model on the Pacific plate interface is discretized into 287 subfaults at ~20 km interval. The Green's functions are calculated using GMS (Aoi et al., 2004), which is a simulation program package for the seismic wave field by the finite difference method using discontinuous grids (Aoi and Fujiwara, 1999). Computational region is 136-146.2E in longitude, 34-41.6N in latitude, and 0-100 km in depth. The horizontal and vertical grid intervals are 200 m and 100 m, respectively, for the shallower region and those for the deeper region are tripled. The number of the total grids is 2.1 billion. We derive 300-s records by calculating 36,000 steps with a time interval of 0.0083 second (120 Hz sampling). It takes nearly one hour to compute one case using 48 Graphics Processing Units (GPU) on TSUBAME2.0 supercomputer owned by Tokyo Institute of Technology. In total, 574 cases are

  12. Deformed shell model calculations of half lives for β+/EC decay and 2ν β+β+/β+EC/ECEC decay in medium-heavy N~Z nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Shukla, A.; Sahu, R.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2008-08-01

    The β+/EC half-lives of medium heavy N~Z nuclei with mass number A~64-80 are calculated within the deformed shell model (DSM) based on Hartree-Fock states by employing a modified Kuo interaction in (2p3/2,1f5/2,2p1/2,1g9/2) space. The DSM model has been quite successful in predicting many spectroscopic properties of N~Z medium heavy nuclei with A~64-80. The calculated β+/EC half-lives, for prolate and oblate shapes, compare well with the predictions of the calculations with Skyrme force by Sarriguren Going further, following recent searches, half-lives for 2ν β+β+/β+EC/ECEC decay for the nucleus Kr78 are calculated using DSM and the results compare well with QRPA predictions.

  13. POTENTIAL OF MEAN FORCE CALCULATION FOR THE PROTON AND HYDRIDE TRANSFER REACTIONS CATALYZED BY MEDIUM CHAIN ACYL-COA DEHYDROGENASE: THE EFFECT OF MUTATIONS ON ENZYME CATALYSISa

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sudeep; Ma, Shuhua; Stankovich, Marian T.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gao, Jiali

    2008-01-01

    Potential of mean force calculations have been performed on the wild-type medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) and two of its mutant forms. Initial simulation and analysis of the active site of the enzyme reveals that an arginine residue (Arg256), conserved in the substrate binding domain of this group of enzymes, exists in two alternate conformations, only one of which makes the enzyme active. This active conformation was used in subsequent computations of the enzymatic reactions. It is known that the catalytic α,β-dehydrogenation of fatty acyl-CoAs consists of two C-H bond dissociation processes: a proton abstraction and a hydride transfer. Energy profiles of the two reaction steps in the wild-type MCAD demonstrate that the reaction proceeds by a stepwise mechanism with a transient species. The activation barriers of the two steps differ by only ∼2 kcal/mol, indicating that both may contribute to the rate-limiting process. Thus this may be a stepwise dissociation mechanism whose relative barriers can be tuned by suitable alterations of the substrate and/or enzyme. Analysis of the structures along the reaction path reveals that Arg256 plays a key role in maintaining the reaction-center hydrogen-bonding network involving the thioester carbonyl group, which stabilizes transition states as well as the intervening transient species. Mutation of this arginine residue to glutamine increases the activation barrier of the hydride transfer reaction by ∼5 kcal/mol, and the present simulations predict a substantial loss of catalytic activity for this mutant. Structural analysis of this mutant reveals that the orientation of the thioester moiety of the substrate has been changed significantly as compared to that in the wild-type enzyme. In contrast, simulation of the active site of the Thr168Ala mutant shows no significant change in the relative orientation of the substrate and the cofactor in the active site; as a result, this mutation has very little effect on

  14. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Developing a Phenomenological Model of the Proton Trajectory Within a Heterogeneous Medium Required for Proton Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Collins-Fekete, CA; Doolan, P; Dias, M; Beaulieu, L; Seco, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an accurate phenomenological model of the cubic spline trajectory (CST) estimate of the proton path, accounting for the initial proton energy and water equivalent thickness (WET) traversed. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the path of protons crossing various slabs (5–30 cm WET) of different material (LN300, water and CB2–50% CaCO3) for a range of initial energies (150–330MeV). For each MC trajectory, CST was constructed based on the proton entrance and exit information and compared with the MC using the root mean square (RMS) metric. The CST path is dependent on the direction vector magnitudes (|P0,1|). First, |P0,1| is set to the proton path length. Then, a factor Λ is introduced to modify |P0,1|. The factor is varied to minimize the RMS with MC paths for every configuration. Finally, a set of Λopt factors that minimizes the RMS is presented. These are dependent on the ratio between WET and water equivalent path length (WEPL). The resolution along the path is investigated with a set of slabs. MTF analysis is performed on proton radiographs of a line-pair phantom reconstructed using the CST trajectories (Λopt and Λ1). Results: Λopt was fitted to the ratio of WET/WEPL using a power function (Y=1-AXB where A=0.36, B=4.07). The RMS deviation calculated along the path, between the CST and the MC path, increases with the WET. The increase is larger when using Λ1 than Λopt (difference of 5.0% with WET/WEPL=0.86). For 230(330) MeV protons, the MTF10% was found to increase by 40%(6%) respectively for a thick phantom (30cm) and by 25%(1%) for thinner phantom (25cm) when using the Λopt model compared to the Λ1 model. Conclusion: Based on these results, using CST with the Λopt factor reduces the RMS deviation and increases the spatial resolution when reconstructing proton trajectories.

  15. Power and Sample Size Calculations for Testing Linear Combinations of Group Means under Variance Heterogeneity with Applications to Meta and Moderation Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Gwowen; Jan, Show-Li

    2015-01-01

    The general formulation of a linear combination of population means permits a wide range of research questions to be tested within the context of ANOVA. However, it has been stressed in many research areas that the homogeneous variances assumption is frequently violated. To accommodate the heterogeneity of variance structure, the…

  16. A dosimetric study of a heterogeneous phantom for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy comparing Monte Carlo and pencil beam calculations to dose distributions measured with a 2-D diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curley, Casey Michael

    Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) calculations are compared to their measured planar dose distributions using a 2-D diode array for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). The planar dose distributions were studied for two different phantom types: an in-house heterogeneous phantom and a homogeneous phantom. The motivation is to mimic the human anatomy during a lung SBRT treatment and incorporate heterogeneities into the pre-treatment Quality Assurance process, where measured and calculated planar dose distributions are compared before the radiation treatment. Individual and combined field dosimetry has been performed for both fixed gantry angle (anterior to posterior) and planned gantry angle delivery. A gamma analysis has been performed for all beam arrangements. The measurements were obtained using the 2-D diode array MapCHECK 2(TM). MC and PB calculations were performed using the BrainLAB iPlan RTRTM Dose software. The results suggest that with the heterogeneous phantom as a quality assurance device, the MC calculations result in closer agreements to the measured values, when using the planned gantry angle delivery method for composite beams. For the homogeneous phantom, the results suggest that the preferred delivery method is at the fixed anterior to posterior gantry angle. Furthermore, the MC and PB calculations do not show significant differences for dose difference and distance to agreement criteria 3%/3mm. However, PB calculations are in better agreement with the measured values for more stringent gamma criteria when considering individual beam whereas MC agreements are closer for composite beam measurements.

  17. Anisotropic and heterogeneous mechanical properties of a stratified shale/limestone sequence at Nash Point, South Wales: A case study for hydraulic fracture propagation through a layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes Inskip, Nathaniel; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    While considerable effort has been expended on the study of fracture propagation in rocks in recent years, our understanding of how fractures propagate through layered sedimentary rocks with different mechanical and elastic properties remains poorly constrained. Yet this is a key issue controlling the propagation of both natural and anthropogenic hydraulic fractures in layered sequences. Here we report measurements of the contrasting mechanical and elastic properties of the Lower Lias at Nash Point, South Wales, which comprises an interbedded sequence of shale and limestone layers, and how those properties may influence fracture propagation. Elastic properties of both materials have been characterised via ultrasonic wave velocity measurements as a function of azimuth on samples cored both normal and parallel to bedding. The shale is highly anisotropic, with P-wave velocities varying from 2231 to 3890 m s-1, giving an anisotropy of ~55%. By contrast, the limestone is essentially isotropic, with a mean P-wave velocity of 5828 m s-1 and an anisotropy of ~2%. The dynamic Young's modulus of the shale, calculated from P- and S-wave velocity data, is also anisotropic with a value of 36 GPa parallel to bedding and 12 GPa normal to bedding. The modulus of the limestone is again isotropic with a value of 80 GPa. It follows that for a vertical fracture propagating (i.e. normal to bedding) the modulus contrast is 6.6. This is important because the contrast in elastic properties is a key factor in controlling whether fractures arrest, deflect, or propagate across interfaces between layers in a sequence. There are three principal mechanisms by which a fracture may deflect across or along an interface, namely: Cook-Gordon debonding, stress barrier, and elastic mismatch. Preliminary numerical modelling results (using a Finite Element Modelling software) of induced fractures at Nash Point suggest that all three are important. The results demonstrate a rotation of the maximum

  18. The Green`s function method for critical heterogeneous slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, D.E.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, the Green`s Function Method (GFM) has been employed to obtain benchmark-quality results for nuclear engineering and radiative transfer calculations. This was possible because of fast and accurate calculations of the Green`s function and the associated Fourier and Laplace transform inversions. Calculations have been provided in one-dimensional slab geometries for both homogeneous and heterogeneous media. A heterogeneous medium is analyzed as a series of homogeneous slabs, and Placzek`s lemma is used to extend each slab to infinity. This allows use of the infinite medium Green`s function (the anisotropic plane source in an infinite homogeneous medium) in the solution. To this point, a drawback of the GFM has been the limitation to media with c < 1, where c is the number of secondary particles produced in a collision. Clearly, no physical steady-state solution exists for an infinite medium that contains an infinite source and is described by c >1; however, mathematical solutions exist which result in oscillating Green`s functions. Such calculations are briefly discussing. The limitation to media with c < 1 has been relaxed so that the Green`s function may also be calculated for media with c {ge} 1. Thus, materials that contain fissionable isotopes may be modeled.

  19. SU-F-SPS-02: Accuracy of the Small Field Dosimetry Using the Monte Carlo and Sequential Dose Calculation Algorithms of Multiplan Treatment Planning System Within and Beyond Heterogeneous Media for Cyberknife M6 Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Serin, E.; Codel, G.; Mabhouti, H.; Cebe, M.; Sanli, E.; Pacaci, P.; Kucuk, N.; Kucukmorkoc, E.; Doyuran, M.; Canoglu, D.; Altinok, A.; Acar, H.; Caglar Ozkok, H.

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In small field geometries, the electronic equilibrium can be lost, making it challenging for the dose-calculation algorithm to accurately predict the dose, especially in the presence of tissue heterogeneities. In this study, dosimetric accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) advanced dose calculation and sequential algorithms of Multiplan treatment planning system were investigated for small radiation fields incident on homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. Methods: Small open fields of fixed cones of Cyberknife M6 unit 100 to 500 mm2 were used for this study. The fields were incident on in house phantom containing lung, air, and bone inhomogeneities and also homogeneous phantom. Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using CK with the 60 mm fixed cone by delivering 0- 800 cGy. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson 1000XL flatbed scanner. The dosimetric accuracy of MC and sequential algorithms in the presence of the inhomogeneities was compared against EBT3 film dosimetry Results: Open field tests in a homogeneous phantom showed good agreement between two algorithms and film measurement For MC algorithm, the minimum gamma analysis passing rates between measured and calculated dose distributions were 99.7% and 98.3% for homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields in the case of lung and bone respectively. For sequential algorithm, the minimum gamma analysis passing rates were 98.9% and 92.5% for for homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields respectively for used all cone sizes. In the case of the air heterogeneity, the differences were larger for both calculation algorithms. Overall, when compared to measurement, the MC had better agreement than sequential algorithm. Conclusion: The Monte Carlo calculation algorithm in the Multiplan treatment planning system is an improvement over the existing sequential algorithm. Dose discrepancies were observed for in the presence of air inhomogeneities.

  20. Comparison between measured and calculated contributions of multiply scattered radiation to the transmittance of a light beam through a turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruscaglioni, P.; Zaccanti, G.; Ismaelli, A.; Pili, P.

    1987-11-01

    Results are presented of measurements pertaining to multiple scattering effects on the propagation of a HeNe laser beam through suspensions of latex spheres in water. Both spheres with a large radius in comparison with the radiation wavelength and spheres with a small radius were used. The data are compared with numerical results obtained by means of a Monte Carlo method employing scaling relations. The effect of varying the distance between the diffusing medium and the receiver was examined.

  1. Thermal properties of heterogeneous grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Cometary dust is not spherical nor homogeneous, yet these are the assumptions used to model its thermal, optical, and dynamical properties. To better understand the effects of heterogeneity on the thermal and optical properties of dust grains, the effective dielectric constant for an admixture of magnetite and a silicate were calculated using two different effective medium theories: the Maxwell-Garnett theory and the Bruggeman theory. In concept, the MG theory describes the effective dielectric constant of a matrix material into which is embedded a large number of very small inclusions of a second material. The Bruggeman theory describes the dielectric constant of a well mixed aggregate of two or more types of materials. Both theories assume that the individual particles are much smaller than the wavelength of the incident radiation. The refractivity for a heterogeneous grain using the MG theory is very similar to the refractivity of the matrix material, even for large volume fractions of the inclusion. The equilibrium grain temperature for spherical particles sized from .001 to 100 microns in radius at 1 astronomical unit from the sun was calculated. Further explanation is given.

  2. Estimating flow heterogeneity in natural fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckenby, Robert J.; Sanderson, David J.; Lonergan, Lidia

    2005-10-01

    Examples of small to medium scale fault systems have been mapped in Jurassic sedimentary rocks in north Somerset, England. These examples include contractional and dilational strike-slip oversteps as well as normal faults. These maps form the basis of calculations performed to investigate heterogeneity in natural fracture systems with the aim of predicting fluid flow localisation in different fault styles. As there is no way to measure fracture aperture directly, we use vein thickness to represent an integrated flow path or 'palaeo-aperture' from which we derive a representation of the flow distribution. Three different methods are used to estimate flow heterogeneity based on: (1) fracture density (the ratio of fracture length to area), (2) fracture aperture (fracture porosity) and (3) hydraulic conductance (fracture permeability normalised to the pressure gradient and fluid properties). Our results show that fracture density and hydraulic conductance are poorly correlated and that fracture density does not fully represent the natural heterogeneity of fracture systems. Fracture aperture and hydraulic conductance indicate stronger degrees of flow localisation. Different types of structures also seem to display characteristic and predictable patterns of heterogeneity. Normal fault systems show the highest magnitude of localisation along the faults rather than in the relay ramps, while contractional and dilational strike-slip systems show very strong localisation in the faults and oversteps, respectively. In all cases the amount of damage in the oversteps can modify such patterns of heterogeneity.

  3. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations of electric dipole n=2−n=3 transitions for medium-charge Li-like ions

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Banglin; Jiang, Gang; Zhang, Chuanyu

    2014-09-15

    In this work, the multi-configuration Dirac–Fock and relativistic configuration-interaction methods have been used to calculate the transition wavelengths, electric dipole transition probabilities, line strengths, and absorption oscillator strengths for the 2s–3p, 2p–3s, and 2p–3d transitions in Li-like ions with nuclear charge Z=7–30. Our calculated values are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results. We took the contributions from Breit interaction, finite nuclear mass corrections, and quantum electrodynamics corrections to the initial and final levels into account, and also found that the contributions from Breit interaction, self-energy, and vacuum polarization grow fast with increasing nuclear charge for a fixed configuration. The ratio of the velocity to length form of the transition rate (A{sub v}/A{sub l}) was used to estimate the accuracy of our calculations.

  4. Mathematical Model of Porous Medium Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerschuk, Peotr; Sapozhnikov, Anatoly

    1999-06-01

    Semiempirical model describing porous material strains under pulse mechanical and thermal loadings is proposed. Porous medium is considered as continuous one but with special form of pressure dependence upon strain. This model takes into account principal features of porous materials behavior which can be observed when the material is strained in dynamic and static experiments ( non-reversibility of large strains, nonconvexity of loading curve). Elastoplastic properties of porous medium, its damages when it is strained and dynamic fracture are also taken into account. Dispersion of unidirectional motion caused by medium heterogeneity (porousness) is taken into acount by introducing the physical viscosity depending upon pores size. It is supposed that at every moment of time pores are in equilibrium with pressure i.e. kinetic of pores collapse is not taken into account. The model is presented by the system of differential equations connecting pressure and energy of porous medium with its strain. These equations close system of equations of motion and continuity which then is integrated numerically. The proposed model has been tested on carbon materials and porous copper . Results of calculation of these materials shock compressing are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Results of calculation of thin plate with porous copper layer collision are given as an illustration.

  5. Accurately Modelling the Absorption of a Mixture of Gases at Low- to Medium-resolution in Exoplanetary and Brown Dwarf Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Ryan; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Exoplanetary and brown dwarf atmospheres are extremely diverse environments ranging over many different temperatures, pressures, and compositions. In order to model the spectra produced by the these objects, a commonplace approach in exoplanetary science is to use cross-sections of individual gases to quickly calculate the atmospheric opacities. However, when combining multiple gases with non-monochromatic absorption coefficients, the multiplication property of transmission does not hold. The resulting spectra are hence unreliable. Extensive work was carried out on Solar System radiative transfer models to find an efficient alternative to line-by-line calculations of opacity which was more accurate than combining cross-sections, resulting in many band models and the correlated-k method. Here we illustrate the effect of using cross-sections to model typical brown dwarf and exoplanetary atmospheres (e.g. HD189733b), and compare them to the spectra calculated using the correlated-k method. We verify our correlated-k method using a line-by-line model. For the same objects, we also present the effects of pressure broadening on the resulting spectra. Considering both the method of calculation (i.e. cross-section or correlated-k) and the treatment of pressure broadening, we show that the differences in the spectra are immediately obvious and hugely significant. Entire spectral features can appear or disappear, changing the morphology of the spectra. For the inspected brown dwarfs, these spectral features can vary by up to three orders of magnitude in luminosity. For our exoplanets, the transit depth can vary by up to 1%. We conclude that each effect would change the retrieved system parameters (i.e. temperature and abundances) considerably.

  6. Calculation of ultrasonic fields radiated in a ferromagnetic medium by an EMAT of arbitrary bias field driven by a current of arbitrary intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Rouge, C.; Lhémery, A.; Aristégui, C.; Walaszek, H.

    2014-02-18

    ElectroMagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) are contactless transducers generating ultrasonic waves in conductive media, notably shear horizontal and torsional waves (in plates and pipes, respectively), possibly in hostile environments. In a ferromagnetic part, the elastic strain and the magnetic field couple through magnetostriction phenomena, so that a magnetostriction and magnetization forces add up to the Lorentz force created in any conductive medium. Here, a model is proposed to predict these forces for an arbitrary bias field due to the EMAT permanent magnet and whatever the current intensity in its electric circuit, whereas the usual assumption of high bias field and low intensity current leads to important model simplifications. To handle the nonlinear behavior of all the three forces when the usual assumption cannot be made, forces are expressed in the time domain. In particular, magnetostriction force generates waves at several harmonic frequencies of the driving current frequency. Forces are then transformed into equivalent surface stresses readily usable as source terms in existing models of ultrasonic radiation, under the assumption that ultrasonic wavelengths are much longer than force penetration depths, (which is generally true in NDT applications of EMATs). Force spectra computed in various EMAT configurations are compared for illustration.

  7. Increasing the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene-Polyamide-6,6 Nanocomposites by Surface-Grafted Polymer Chains: Calculation with Molecular Dynamics and Effective-Medium Approximation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangyang; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2016-02-25

    By employing reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a full atomistic resolution, the effect of surface-grafted chains on the thermal conductivity of graphene-polyamide-6.6 (PA) nanocomposites has been investigated. The interfacial thermal conductivity perpendicular to the graphene plane is proportional to the grafting density, while it first increases and then saturates with the grafting length. Meanwhile, the intrinsic in-plane thermal conductivity of graphene drops sharply as the grafting density increases. The maximum overall thermal conductivity of nanocomposites appears at an intermediate grafting density because of these two competing effects. The thermal conductivity of the composite parallel to the graphene plane increases with the grafting density and grafting length which is attributed to better interfacial coupling between graphene and PA. There exists an optimal balance between grafting density and grafting length to obtain the highest interfacial and parallel thermal conductivity. Two empirical formulas are suggested, which quantitatively account for the effects of grafting length and density on the interfacial and parallel thermal conductivity. Combined with effective medium approximation, for ungrafted graphene in random orientation, the model overestimates the thermal conductivity at low graphene volume fraction (f < 10%) compared with experiments, while it underestimates it at high graphene volume fraction (f > 10%). For unoriented grafted graphene, the model matches the experimental results well. In short, this work provides some valuable guides to obtain the nanocomposites with high thermal conductivity by grafting chain on the surface of graphene.

  8. Optimization of permanent breast seed implant dosimetry incorporating tissue heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, Shahram

    Seed brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG43 formalism, which generates the dose in homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM task group no. 186 (TG186) emphasized the importance of accounting for heterogeneities. In this work we introduce an analytical dose calculation algorithm in heterogeneous media using CT images. The advantages over other methods are computational efficiency and the ease of integration into clinical use. An Inhomogeneity Correction Factor (ICF) is introduced as the ratio of absorbed dose in tissue to that in water medium. ICF is a function of tissue properties and independent of the source structure. The ICF is extracted using CT images and the absorbed dose in tissue can then be calculated by multiplying the dose as calculated by the TG43 formalism times ICF. To evaluate the methodology, we compared our results with Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in phantoms with known density and atomic compositions. The dose distributions obtained through applying ICF to TG43 protocol agreed very well with those of Monte Carlo simulations and experiments in all phantoms. In all cases, the mean relative error was reduced by at least a factor of two when ICF correction factor was applied to the TG43 protocol. In conclusion we have developed a new analytical dose calculation method, which enables personalized dose calculations in heterogeneous media using CT images. The methodology offers several advantages including the use of standard TG43 formalism, fast calculation time and extraction of the ICF parameters directly from Hounsfield Units. The methodology was implemented into our clinical treatment planning system where a cohort of 140 patients were processed to study the clinical benefits of a heterogeneity corrected dose.

  9. From computed microtomography images to resistivity index calculations of heterogeneous carbonates using a dual-porosity pore-network approach: influence of percolation on the electrical transport properties.

    PubMed

    Bauer, D; Youssef, S; Han, M; Bekri, S; Rosenberg, E; Fleury, M; Vizika, O

    2011-07-01

    Standard reservoir evaluations are based on Archie's law relating the average water saturation to the average electrical resistivity by R(ind) = S(w)(-2). However, especially in the case of complex heterogeneous carbonates, deviation from Archie's law is observed and generally attributed to factors affecting the percolation or disconnectedness of the different phases (wetting films, microporosity, macropores) assuring electrical conductance. Pore-network models (PNM's) in combination with high-resolution computed microtomography (μ-CT) constitute a very effective tool to investigate the influence of the geometry and topology of the porous media on the spatial distribution of the conductive phase, and therefore on the shape of the resistivity index curve. An extended version of the classical PNM applicable to dual-porosity systems is presented. It combines the classical pore-network modeling applied on the macroporous space with the macroscopic properties of the microporous phase, supposing that the two pore systems act in parallel. Three-dimensional images provide information on the connectedness of the microporous phase, which is then included in the simulations. Electrical behavior of sandstone and two carbonates presenting distinct resistivity index curves were simulated and compared to measurements. Both Archie and "non-Archie" behavior were correctly reproduced, and the curve shape was explained considering percolation of the different phases.

  10. Estimation of M 1 scissors mode strength for deformed nuclei in the medium- to heavy-mass region by statistical Hauser-Feshbach model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumpower, M. R.; Kawano, T.; Ullmann, J. L.; Krtička, M.; Sprouse, T. M.

    2017-08-01

    Radiative neutron capture is an important nuclear reaction whose accurate description is needed for many applications ranging from nuclear technology to nuclear astrophysics. The description of such a process relies on the Hauser-Feshbach theory which requires the nuclear optical potential, level density, and γ -strength function as model inputs. It has recently been suggested that the M 1 scissors mode may explain discrepancies between theoretical calculations and evaluated data. We explore statistical model calculations with the strength of the M 1 scissors mode estimated to be dependent on the nuclear deformation of the compound system. We show that the form of the M 1 scissors mode improves the theoretical description of evaluated data and the match to experiment in both the fission product and actinide regions. Since the scissors mode occurs in the range of a few keV to a few MeV, it may also impact the neutron capture cross sections of neutron-rich nuclei that participate in the rapid neutron capture process of nucleosynthesis. We comment on the possible impact to nucleosynthesis by evaluating neutron capture rates for neutron-rich nuclei with the M 1 scissors mode active.

  11. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.; Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  12. Some Phthalocyanine and Naphthalocyanine Derivatives as Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminium in Acidic Medium: Experimental, Quantum Chemical Calculations, QSAR Studies and Synergistic Effect of Iodide Ions.

    PubMed

    Dibetsoe, Masego; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Fayemi, Omolola E; Yesudass, Sasikumar; Ramaganthan, Baskar; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-08-28

    The effects of seven macrocyclic compounds comprising four phthalocyanines (Pcs) namely 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc1), 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc2), 2,9,16,23-tetra-tert-butyl-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc3) and 29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc4), and three naphthalocyanines namely 5,9,14,18,23,27,32,36-octabutoxy-2,3-naphthalocyanine (nPc1), 2,11,20,29-tetra-tert-butyl-2,3-naphthalocyanine (nPc2) and 2,3-naphthalocyanine (nP3) were investigated on the corrosion of aluminium (Al) in 1 M HCl using a gravimetric method, potentiodynamic polarization technique, quantum chemical calculations and quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR). Synergistic effects of KI on the corrosion inhibition properties of the compounds were also investigated. All the studied compounds showed appreciable inhibition efficiencies, which decrease with increasing temperature from 30 °C to 70 °C. At each concentration of the inhibitor, addition of 0.1% KI increased the inhibition efficiency compared to the absence of KI indicating the occurrence of synergistic interactions between the studied molecules and I(-) ions. From the potentiodynamic polarization studies, the studied Pcs and nPcs are mixed type corrosion inhibitors both without and with addition of KI. The adsorption of the studied molecules on Al surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, while the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters revealed that the adsorption of the studied compounds on Al surface is spontaneous and involves competitive physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. The experimental results revealed the aggregated interactions between the inhibitor molecules and the results further indicated that the peripheral groups on the compounds affect these interactions. The calculated quantum chemical parameters and the QSAR results revealed the possibility of strong interactions between the studied inhibitors and metal surface. QSAR analysis on the

  13. SU-F-SPS-01: Accuracy of the Small Field Dosimetry Using Acuros XB and AAA Dose Calculation Algorithms of Eclipse Treatment Planning System Within and Beyond Heterogeneous Media for Trubeam 2.0 Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Codel, G; Serin, E; Pacaci, P; Sanli, E; Cebe, M; Mabhouti, H; Doyuran, M; Kucukmorkoc, E; Kucuk, N; Altinok, A; Canoglu, D; Acar, H; Caglar Ozkok, H

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, the comparison of dosimetric accuracy of Acuros XB and AAA algorithms were investigated for small radiation fields incident on homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries Methods: Small open fields of Truebeam 2.0 unit (1×1, 2×2, 3×3, 4×4 fields) were used for this study. The fields were incident on homogeneous phantom and in house phantom containing lung, air, and bone inhomogeneities. Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtaine dusing Trubeam 2.0 for 6 MV, 6 FFF, 10 MV, 10 FFF, 15 MV energies by delivering 0- 800 cGy. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson 1000XL flatbed scanner. The dosimetric accuracy of Acuros XB and AAA algorithms in the presence of the inhomogeneities was compared against EBT3 film dosimetry Results: Open field tests in a homogeneous phantom showed good agreement betweent wo algorithms and measurement. For Acuros XB, minimum gamma analysis passin grates between measured and calculated dose distributions were 99.3% and 98.1% for homogeneousand inhomogeneous fields in thecase of lung and bone respectively. For AAA, minimum gamma analysis passingrates were 99.1% and 96.5% for homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields respectively for all used energies and field sizes.In the case of the air heterogeneity, the differences were larger for both calculations algorithms. Over all, when compared to measurement, theAcuros XB had beter agreement than AAA. Conclusion: The Acuros XB calculation algorithm in the TPS is an improvemen tover theexisting AAA algorithm. Dose discrepancies were observed for in the presence of air inhomogeneities.

  14. Validation of GEANT4 simulations for percentage depth dose calculations in heterogeneous media by using small photon beams from the 6-MV Cyberknife: Comparison with photon beam dosimetry with EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Shin, Jae Won; Hong, Seung-Woo; Suh, Tae Suk; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions in heterogeneous phantoms with lung and soft bone equivalent media are studied by using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. For lung equivalent media, Balsa wood is used, and for soft bone equivalent media, a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as a heterogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT2 film by using photon beams from the 6-MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5 to 10 to 30 mm. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT2 film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT2 film in and the dose beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, the discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT2 film and the dose without EBT2 film can be seen only in the region of the soft bone equivalent material. GEANT4 simulations are done with and without the EBT2 film to compare the simulation results with measurements. The GEANT4 simulations including EBT2 film are found to agree well with the measurements for all the cases within an error of 2.2%. The results of the present study show that GEANT4 gives reasonable results for the PDD calculations in heterogeneous media when using photon beams produced by the 6-MV CyberKnife

  15. Unconventional application of the two-flux approximation for the calculation of the Ambartsumyan-Chandrasekhar function and the angular spectrum of the backward-scattered radiation for a semi-infinite isotropically scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remizovich, V. S.

    2010-06-01

    It is commonly accepted that the Schwarzschild-Schuster two-flux approximation (1905, 1914) can be employed only for the calculation of the energy characteristics of the radiation field (energy density and energy flux density) and cannot be used to characterize the angular distribution of radiation field. However, such an inference is not valid. In several cases, one can calculate the radiation intensity inside matter and the reflected radiation with the aid of this simplest approximation in the transport theory. In this work, we use the results of the simplest one-parameter variant of the two-flux approximation to calculate the angular distribution (reflection function) of the radiation reflected by a semi-infinite isotropically scattering dissipative medium when a relatively broad beam is incident on the medium at an arbitrary angle relative to the surface. We do not employ the invariance principle and demonstrate that the reflection function exhibits the multiplicative property. It can be represented as a product of three functions: the reflection function corresponding to the single scattering and two identical h functions, which have the same physical meaning as the Ambartsumyan-Chandrasekhar function ( H) has. This circumstance allows a relatively easy derivation of simple analytical expressions for the H function, total reflectance, and reflection function. We can easily determine the relative contribution of the true single scattering in the photon backscattering at an arbitrary probability of photon survival Λ. We compare all of the parameters of the backscattered radiation with the data resulting from the calculations using the exact theory of Ambartsumyan, Chandrasekhar, et al., which was developed decades after the two-flux approximation. Thus, we avoid the application of fine mathematical methods (the Wiener-Hopf method, the Case method of singular functions, etc.) and obtain simple analytical expressions for the parameters of the scattered radiation

  16. Calculating core-level excitations and X-ray absorption spectra of medium-sized closed-shell molecules with the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme for the polarization propagator.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jan; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-10-05

    Core-level excitations are generated by absorption of high-energy radiation such as X-rays. To describe these energetically high-lying excited states theoretically, we have implemented a variant of the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme of second-order ADC(2) by applying the core-valence separation (CVS) approximation to the ADC(2) working equations. Besides excitation energies, the CVS-ADC(2) method also provides access to properties of core-excited states, thereby allowing for the calculation of X-ray absorption spectra. To demonstrate the potential of our implementation of CVS-ADC(2), we have chosen medium-sized molecules as examples that have either biological importance or find application in organic electronics. The calculated results of CVS-ADC(2) are compared with standard TD-DFT/B3LYP values and experimental data. In particular, the extended variant, CVS-ADC(2)-x, provides the most accurate results, and the agreement between the calculated values and experiment is remarkable.

  17. General eigenstates of Maxwell's equations in a two-constituent composite medium and their application to a calculation of the local electric field in a flat-slab microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhi, Asaf; Bergman, David J.

    2016-09-01

    An exact calculation of the local electric field E(r) is described for the case of an external current or plane wave source in a setup of an E1, μ1 slab in an E2, μ2 medium. For this purpose we first calculate all the general eigenstates of the full Maxwell equations. These eigenstates are then used to develop an exact expansion for the physical values of E(r) in the system characterized by physical values of E1, E2, μ1, and μ2. Results are compared with those of a previous calculation of the local field where μ = 1 everywhere. Numerical results are shown for the eigenvalues in practically important configurations where attaining an optical image with sub-wavelength resolution has practical significance. We show that the k >> k2 components are enhanced for the TM field when E1/E2 = -1 and for the TE field when μ1/μ2 = -1 where the enhancement of the evanescent waves starts from lower k values as we approach a setup with both E1/E2 = -1 and μ1/μ2 = -1. We also show that the eigenfunctions for the setup where μ = 1 everywhere correspond to configurations of 3D phased arrays.

  18. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  19. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  20. Heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Robert

    2015-03-09

    A heterogeneous catalyst is a functional material that continually creates active sites with its reactants under reaction conditions. These sites change the rates of chemical reactions of the reactants localized on them without changing the thermodynamic equilibrium between the materials.

  1. SU-E-T-519: Investigation of the CyberKnife MultiPlan Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using EBT3 Film Absolute Dosimetry for Delivery in a Heterogeneous Thorax Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberto, M; Chen, H; Huang, K; Mourtada, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To characterize the Cyberknife (CK) robotic system’s dosimetric accuracy of the delivery of MultiPlan’s Monte Carlo dose calculations using EBT3 radiochromic film inserted in a thorax phantom. Methods The CIRS XSight Lung Tracking (XLT) Phantom (model 10823) was used in this study with custom cut EBT3 film inserted in the horizontal (coronal) plane inside the lung tissue equivalent phantom. CK MultiPlan v3.5.3 with Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (1.5 mm grid size, 2% statistical uncertainty) was used to calculate a clinical plan for a 25-mm lung tumor lesion, as contoured by the physician, and then imported onto the XLT phantom CT. Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using CK with the 60 mm fixed cone by delivering 0– 800 cGy. The test films (n=3) were irradiated using 325 cGy to the prescription point. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson v700 scanner (48 bits color scan, extracted red channel only, 96 dpi). Percent absolute dose and relative isodose distribution difference relative to the planned dose were quantified using an in-house QA software program. Multiplan Monte Carlo dose calculation was validated using RCF dosimetry (EBT3) and gamma index criteria of 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm for absolute dose and relative isodose distribution measurement comparisons. Results EBT3 film measurements of the patient plans calculated with Monte Carlo in MultiPlan resulted in an absolute dose passing rate of 99.6±0.4% for the Gamma Index of 3%/3mm, 10% dose threshold, and 95.6±4.4% for 2%/2mm, 10% threshold criteria. The measured central axis absolute dose was within 1.2% (329.0±2.5 cGy) of the Monte Carlo planned dose (325.0±6.5 cGy) for that same point. Conclusion MultiPlan’s Monte Carlo dose calculation was validated using the EBT3 film absolute dosimetry for delivery in a heterogeneous thorax phantom.

  2. The imprint of crustal density heterogeneities on seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plonka, A.; Fichtner, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a set of numerical experiments designed to observe the imprint of three-dimensional density heterogeneities on a seismogram. To compute the full seismic wavefield in a three-dimensional heterogeneous medium, we use numerical wave propagation based on a spectral-element discretization of the seismic wave equation. We consider a 2000 by 1000 km wide and 500 km deep spherical section, with the one-dimensional Earth model PREM, altered so that the crust is 40 km thick and all the parameters in the crust are constant, as a background. Onto the uppermost 40 km of the underlying one-dimensional model we superimpose three-dimensional randomly generated velocity and density heterogeneities of various correlation lengths. We use different random realizations of heterogeneity distribution. We compare the synthetic seismograms for three-dimensional velocity and density structure with three-dimensional velocity structure and one-dimensional density kept as PREM, calculating relative amplitude differences and time shifts as functions of time and frequency. The misfits in time shift and amplitude for different frequency bands, epicentral distances and medium complexities are then stacked into histograms and statistically analysed. We observe strong dependency on frequency of density-related amplitude difference. We also conclude potential sensitivity to distant density structures, and that scattering is essential to observe significant density imprint on a seismogram. The possible density-related bias in velocity and attenuation for regional tomographic models is calculated using mean misfit values for given epicentral distances. Whereas the bias in velocity does not exceed 0.5% of the model value, the density-related change in attenuation may be as big as 71% of the model value for the mean amplitude difference in the highest frequency band. The results suggest that density imprint on a seismogram is not negligible and with further theoretical

  3. Stabilization of three-dimensional scroll waves and suppression of spatiotemporal chaos by heterogeneities.

    PubMed

    Spreckelsen, Florian; Hornung, Daniel; Steinbock, Oliver; Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Scroll waves in a three-dimensional medium with negative filament tension may break up and display spatiotemporal chaos. The presence of heterogeneities can influence the evolution of the medium, in particular scroll waves may pin to such heterogeneities. We show that as a result the medium may be stabilized by heterogeneities of a suitably chosen geometry. Thin rodlike heterogeneities suppress otherwise developing spatiotemporal chaos and additionally clear out already existing chaotic excitation patterns.

  4. Scales of mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Akber-Knutson, S.; Konter, J.; Kellogg, J.; Hart, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Romanowicz, B.

    2004-12-01

    A long-standing question in mantle dynamics concerns the scale of heterogeneity in the mantle. Mantle convection tends to both destroy (through stirring) and create (through melt extraction and subduction) heterogeneity in bulk and trace element composition. Over time, these competing processes create variations in geochemical composition along mid-oceanic ridges and among oceanic islands, spanning a range of scales from extremely long wavelength (for example, the DUPAL anomaly) to very small scale (for example, variations amongst melt inclusions). While geochemical data and seismic observations can be used to constrain the length scales of mantle heterogeneity, dynamical mixing calculations can illustrate the processes and timescales involved in stirring and mixing. At the Summer 2004 CIDER workshop on Relating Geochemical and Seismological Heterogeneity in the Earth's Mantle, an interdisciplinary group evaluated scales of heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using a combined analysis of geochemical data, seismological data and results of numerical models of mixing. We mined the PetDB database for isotopic data from glass and whole rock analyses for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR), projecting them along the ridge length. We examined Sr isotope variability along the East Pacific rise by looking at the difference in Sr ratio between adjacent samples as a function of distance between the samples. The East Pacific Rise exhibits an overall bowl shape of normal MORB characteristics, with higher values in the higher latitudes (there is, however, an unfortunate gap in sampling, roughly 2000 km long). These background characteristics are punctuated with spikes in values at various locations, some, but not all of which are associated with off-axis volcanism. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram for unevenly spaced data was utilized to construct a power spectrum of the scale lengths of heterogeneity along both ridges. Using the same isotopic systems (Sr, Nd

  5. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokajíček, T.; Kern, H.; Svitek, T.; Ivankina, T.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic measurements of the 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves were performed on a spherical sample of a biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole. Measurements were done at room temperature and pressures up to 400 and 70 MPa, respectively, in a pressure vessel with oil as a pressure medium. A modified transducer/sample assembly and the installation of a new mechanical system allowed simultaneous measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in 132 independent directions of the sphere on a net in steps of 15°. Proper signals for P- and S-waves could be recorded by coating the sample surface with a high-viscosity shear wave gel and by temporal point contacting of the transmitter and receiver transducers with the sample surface during the measurements. The 3D seismic measurements revealed a strong foliation-related directional dependence (anisotropy) of P- and S-wave velocities, which is confirmed by measurements in a multi-anvil apparatus on a cube-shaped specimen of the same rock. Both experimental approaches show a marked pressure sensitivity of P- and S-wave velocities and velocity anisotropies. With increasing pressure, P- and S-wave velocities increase non-linearly due to progressive closure of micro-cracks. The reverse is true for velocity anisotropy. 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction measurements of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of major minerals show that the intrinsic bulk anisotropy is basically caused by the CPO of biotite constituting about 23 vol.% of the rock. Including the shape of biotite grains and oriented low-aspect ratio microcracks into the modelling increases bulk anisotropy. An important finding from this study is that the measurements on the sample sphere and on the sample cube displayed distinct differences, particularly in shear wave velocities. It is assumed that the differences are due to the different geometries of the samples and the configuration of the transducer-sample assembly

  6. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  7. Dose prediction accuracy of anisotropic analytical algorithm and pencil beam convolution algorithm beyond high density heterogeneity interface

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Suresh B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that photon beam radiation therapy requires dose calculation algorithms. The objective of this study was to measure and assess the ability of pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) to predict doses beyond high density heterogeneity. Materials and Methods: An inhomogeneous phantom of five layers was created in Eclipse planning system (version 8.6.15). Each layer of phantom was assigned in terms of water (first or top), air (second), water (third), bone (fourth), and water (fifth or bottom) medium. Depth doses in water (bottom medium) were calculated for 100 monitor units (MUs) with 6 Megavoltage (MV) photon beam for different field sizes using AAA and PBC with heterogeneity correction. Combinations of solid water, Poly Vinyl Chloride (PVC), and Styrofoam were then manufactured to mimic phantoms and doses for 100 MUs were acquired with cylindrical ionization chamber at selected depths beyond high density heterogeneity interface. The measured and calculated depth doses were then compared. Results: AAA's values had better agreement with measurements at all measured depths. Dose overestimation by AAA (up to 5.3%) and by PBC (up to 6.7%) was found to be higher in proximity to the high-density heterogeneity interface, and the dose discrepancies were more pronounced for larger field sizes. The errors in dose estimation by AAA and PBC may be due to improper beam modeling of primary beam attenuation or lateral scatter contributions or combination of both in heterogeneous media that include low and high density materials. Conclusions: AAA is more accurate than PBC for dose calculations in treating deep-seated tumor beyond high-density heterogeneity interface. PMID:24455541

  8. Dose prediction accuracy of anisotropic analytical algorithm and pencil beam convolution algorithm beyond high density heterogeneity interface.

    PubMed

    Rana, Suresh B

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that photon beam radiation therapy requires dose calculation algorithms. The objective of this study was to measure and assess the ability of pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) to predict doses beyond high density heterogeneity. An inhomogeneous phantom of five layers was created in Eclipse planning system (version 8.6.15). Each layer of phantom was assigned in terms of water (first or top), air (second), water (third), bone (fourth), and water (fifth or bottom) medium. Depth doses in water (bottom medium) were calculated for 100 monitor units (MUs) with 6 Megavoltage (MV) photon beam for different field sizes using AAA and PBC with heterogeneity correction. Combinations of solid water, Poly Vinyl Chloride (PVC), and Styrofoam were then manufactured to mimic phantoms and doses for 100 MUs were acquired with cylindrical ionization chamber at selected depths beyond high density heterogeneity interface. The measured and calculated depth doses were then compared. AAA's values had better agreement with measurements at all measured depths. Dose overestimation by AAA (up to 5.3%) and by PBC (up to 6.7%) was found to be higher in proximity to the high-density heterogeneity interface, and the dose discrepancies were more pronounced for larger field sizes. The errors in dose estimation by AAA and PBC may be due to improper beam modeling of primary beam attenuation or lateral scatter contributions or combination of both in heterogeneous media that include low and high density materials. AAA is more accurate than PBC for dose calculations in treating deep-seated tumor beyond high-density heterogeneity interface.

  9. Dynamical quorum-sensing in oscillators coupled through an external medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David J.; Baetica, Ania; Mehta, Pankaj

    2012-11-01

    Many biological and physical systems exhibit population-density-dependent transitions to synchronized oscillations in a process often termed “dynamical quorum sensing”. Synchronization frequently arises through chemical communication via signaling molecules distributed through an external medium. We study a simple theoretical model for dynamical quorum sensing: a heterogenous population of limit-cycle oscillators diffusively coupled through a common medium. We show that this model exhibits a rich phase diagram with four qualitatively distinct physical mechanisms that can lead to a loss of coherent population-level oscillations, including a novel mechanism arising from effective time-delays introduced by the external medium. We derive a single pair of analytic equations that allow us to calculate phase boundaries as a function of population density and show that the model reproduces many of the qualitative features of recent experiments on Belousov-Zhabotinsky catalytic particles as well as synthetically engineered bacteria.

  10. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  11. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. For continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the, clinical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects. of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration.

  12. Heterogeneity, permeability patterns, and permeability upscaling: Physical characterization of a block of Massillon sandstone exhibiting nested scales of heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    TIDWELL,VINCENT C.; WILSON,JOHN L.

    2000-04-20

    Over 75,000 permeability measurements were collected from a meter-scale block of Massillon sandstone, characterized by conspicuous cross bedding that forms two distinct nested-scales of heterogeneity. With the aid of a gas minipermeameter, spatially exhaustive fields of permeability data were acquired at each of five different sample supports (i.e. sample volumes) from each block face. These data provide a unique opportunity to physically investigate the relationship between the multi-scale cross-stratified attributes of the sandstone and the corresponding statistical characteristics of the permeability. These data also provide quantitative physical information concerning the permeability upscaling of a complex heterogeneous medium. Here, a portion of the data taken from a single block face cut normal to stratification is analyzed. Results indicate a strong relationship between the calculated summary statistics and the cross-stratified structural features visible evident in the sandstone sample. Specifically, the permeability fields and semivariograms are characterized by two nested scales of heterogeneity, including a large-scale structure defined by the cross-stratified sets (delineated by distinct bounding surfaces) and a small-scale structure defined by the low-angle cross-stratification within each set. The permeability data also provide clear evidence of upscaling. That is, each calculated summary statistic exhibits distinct and consistent trends with increasing sample support. Among these trends are an increasing mean, decreasing variance, and an increasing semivariogram range. Results also clearly indicate that the different scales of heterogeneity upscale differently, with the small-scale structure being preferentially filtered from the data while the large-scale structure is preserved. Finally, the statistical and upscaling characteristics of individual cross-stratified sets were found to be very similar owing to their shared depositional environment

  13. Disordered hyperuniform heterogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-10-19

    Disordered hyperuniform many-body systems are distinguishable states of matter that lie between a crystal and liquid: they are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These systems play a vital role in a number of fundamental and applied problems: glass formation, jamming, rigidity, photonic and electronic band structure, localization of waves and excitations, self-organization, fluid dynamics, quantum systems, and pure mathematics. Much of what we know theoretically about disordered hyperuniform states of matter involves many-particle systems. In this paper, we derive new rigorous criteria that disordered hyperuniform two-phase heterogeneous materials must obey and explore their consequences. Two-phase heterogeneous media are ubiquitous; examples include composites and porous media, biological media, foams, polymer blends, granular media, cellular solids, and colloids. We begin by obtaining some results that apply to hyperuniform two-phase media in which one phase is a sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space [Formula: see text]. Among other results, we rigorously establish the requirements for packings of spheres of different sizes to be 'multihyperuniform'. We then consider hyperuniformity for general two-phase media in [Formula: see text]. Here we apply realizability conditions for an autocovariance function and its associated spectral density of a two-phase medium, and then incorporate hyperuniformity as a constraint in order to derive new conditions. We show that some functional forms can immediately be eliminated from consideration and identify other forms that are allowable. Specific examples and counterexamples are described. Contact is made with well-known microstructural models (e.g. overlapping spheres and checkerboards) as well as irregular phase-separation and Turing-type patterns. We also ascertain a family

  14. Disordered hyperuniform heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-10-01

    Disordered hyperuniform many-body systems are distinguishable states of matter that lie between a crystal and liquid: they are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These systems play a vital role in a number of fundamental and applied problems: glass formation, jamming, rigidity, photonic and electronic band structure, localization of waves and excitations, self-organization, fluid dynamics, quantum systems, and pure mathematics. Much of what we know theoretically about disordered hyperuniform states of matter involves many-particle systems. In this paper, we derive new rigorous criteria that disordered hyperuniform two-phase heterogeneous materials must obey and explore their consequences. Two-phase heterogeneous media are ubiquitous; examples include composites and porous media, biological media, foams, polymer blends, granular media, cellular solids, and colloids. We begin by obtaining some results that apply to hyperuniform two-phase media in which one phase is a sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Among other results, we rigorously establish the requirements for packings of spheres of different sizes to be ‘multihyperuniform’. We then consider hyperuniformity for general two-phase media in {{{R}}d} . Here we apply realizability conditions for an autocovariance function and its associated spectral density of a two-phase medium, and then incorporate hyperuniformity as a constraint in order to derive new conditions. We show that some functional forms can immediately be eliminated from consideration and identify other forms that are allowable. Specific examples and counterexamples are described. Contact is made with well-known microstructural models (e.g. overlapping spheres and checkerboards) as well as irregular phase-separation and Turing-type patterns. We also ascertain a family of

  15. Calculating and parametric analysis of the work of the air single-stage medium pressure reciprocating compressor of on the basis of the oil-free long-stroke slow-speed stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusha, V. L.; Busarov, S. S.; Vasil'ev, V. K.; Gromov, A. Yu.; Nedovenchanyj, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    The computational and parametric analysis of the of the operating process efficiency in an airless, slow-speed, long-stroke stage of a medium-pressure compressor unit was carried out. The influence on the discharge temperature, the indicator efficiency and the feed rate of the main structural and mode parameters of the stage are considered. It is shown that cycle time, cylinder diameter and stroke have significant influence on the economical efficiency of the operating process and the temperature mode of the stage and can be regarded as optimization parameters while developing a reciprocating stage of such type.

  16. Microswimmers in Complex Environments with Heterogeneous Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyon, Yunkyong; Fu, Henry

    2011-11-01

    We will discuss the swimming of microorganisms in complex and heterogeneous environments. Microswimmers in biological complex fluids, for instance, bacteria and sperm, are often greatly influenced by heterogeneous medium microstructure with length scales comparable to themselves. We characterize the interaction between the microswimmer and the medium microstructure using the model Golestanian three-sphere swimmer, treating the hydrodynamic interaction with the microstructure through the Oseen tensor. In this investigation, the microstructure of the heterogeneous environment is modeled by fixed spheres representing obstacles, or chains consisting of spheres connected with elastic springs. We find that the swimming speed of the swimmer depends on the force and deformation exerted on micro-structure. Furthermore, we find that while short freely suspended chains and short chains anchored at their ends interact with swimmer quite differently, long enough chains interact similarly, that is, a long mobile chain acts like a anchored chain. We discuss the implications for swimmer interactions with polymer solutions and compliant networks.

  17. Heterogeneities of flow in stochastically generated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Winter, C. Larrabee

    2012-11-01

    Heterogeneous flows are observed to result from variations in the geometry and topology of pore structures within stochastically generated three dimensional porous media. A stochastic procedure generates media comprising complex networks of connected pores. Inside each pore space, the Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated until steady state velocity and pressure fields are attained. The intricate pore structures exert spatially variable resistance on the fluid, and resulting velocity fields have a wide range of magnitudes and directions. Spatially nonuniform fluid fluxes are observed, resulting in principal pathways of flow through the media. In some realizations, up to 25% of the flux occurs in 5% of the pore space depending on porosity. The degree of heterogeneity in the flow is quantified over a range of porosities by tracking particle trajectories and calculating their attributes including tortuosity, length, and first passage time. A representative elementary volume is first computed so the dependence of particle based attributes on the size of the domain through which they are followed is minimal. High correlations between the dimensionless quantities of porosity and tortuosity are calculated and a logarithmic relationship is proposed. As the porosity of a medium increases the flow field becomes more uniform.

  18. The effect of material heterogeneities in long term multiscale seismic cycle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakopoulos, C.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Dieterich, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental part of the simulation of the earthquake cycles in large-scale multicycle earthquake simulators is the pre-computation of elastostatic Greens functions collected into the stiffness matrix (K). The stiffness matrices are typically based on the elastostatic solutions of Okada (1992), Gimbutas et al. (2012), or similar. While these analytic solutions are computationally very fast, they are limited to modeling a homogeneous isotropic half-space. It is thus unknown how such simulations may be affected by material heterogeneity characterizing the earth medium. We are currently working on the estimation of the effects of heterogeneous material properties in the earthquake simulator RSQSim (Richards-Dinger and Dieterich, 2012). In order to do that we are calculating elastostatic solutions in a heterogeneous medium using the Finite Element (FE) method instead of any of the analytical solutions. The investigated region is a 400 x 400 km area centered on the Anza zone in southern California. The fault system geometry is based on that of the UCERF3 deformation models in the area of interest, which we then implement in a finite element mesh using Trelis 15. The heterogeneous elastic structure is based on available tomographic data (seismic wavespeeds and density) for the region (SCEC CVM and Allam et al., 2014). For computation of the Greens functions we are using the open source FE code Defmod (https://bitbucket.org/stali/defmod/wiki/Home) to calculate the elastostatic solutions due to unit slip on each patch. Earthquake slip on the fault plane is implemented through linear constraint equations (Ali et al., 2014, Kyriakopoulos et al., 2013, Aagard et al, 2015) and more specifically with the use of Lagrange multipliers adjunction. The elementary responses are collected into the "heterogeneous" stiffness matrix Khet and used in RSQSim instead of the ones generated with Okada. Finally, we compare the RSQSim results based on the "heterogeneous" Khet with results from

  19. Law of mass action in the Arctic lower stratospheric polar vortex January-March 2000: ClO scaling and the calculation of ozone loss rates in a turbulent fractal medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, Adrian F.; Hovde, Susan J.; Gao, Ru-Shan; Richard, Erik C.

    2003-08-01

    We consider the effects of power law scaling in the 1999-2000 Arctic lower stratospheric vortex from the point of view of the law of mass action and its application to the chemical kinetics of ozone loss embedded in a turbulent, macroscopic, fractal medium. The ER-2 observations of ClO obey power law scaling; the exponent varies with time in a manner shown to be consistent with the scaling of NOy and O3, via the influences of polar stratospheric clouds and actinic solar radiation. While the microscopic rate coefficient for ClO three-body recombination to the dimer applies as measured to three-dimensional volumes in which the sole transport mechanism is molecular diffusion, this cannot be true in the 2.56-dimensional space in which macroscopically fluctuating ClO reacts in the lower stratosphere. We show that the rate of loss of ozone via the ClO dimer mechanism is proportional to [ClO]2.20 in late January/early February and to [ClO]2.55 in March. Chemical ozone loss had already occurred by the date of the first flight, 20000120.

  20. Medium-Assisted Vacuum Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaš, M. S.

    We discuss some implications of a very recently obtained result for the force on a slab in a planar cavity based on the calculation of the vacuum Lorentz force [C.Raabe and D.-G. Welsch, Phys. Rev. A 71 (2005) 013814]. We demonstrate that, according to this formula, the total force on the slab consists of a medium-screened Casimir force and, in addition to it, a medium-assisted force. The sign of of the medium-assisted force is determined solely by the properties of the cavity mirrors. In the Lifshitz configuration, this force is proportional to 1/d at small distances and is very small compared with the corresponding van der Waals force. At large distances, however, it is proportional to 1/d4 and comparable with the Casimir force, especially for denser media. The exponents in these power laws decrease by 1 in the case of a thin slab. The formula for the medium-assisted force also describes the force on a layer of the cavity medium, which has similar properties. For dilute media, it implies an atom-mirror interaction of the Coulomb type at small and of the Casimir-Polder type at large atom-mirror distances. For a perfectly reflecting mirror, the latter force is effectively only three-times smaller than the Casimir-Polder force.

  1. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Reniers, Brigitte; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (Dm,m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (Dw,m). The relation between Dm,m and Dw,m for 192Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of Dw,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: Dm,m, Dw,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. Dw,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between Dw,m (SCT) and Dw,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources.

  2. Calculation of the cross section and the transverse-longitudinal asymmetry of the process {sup 3}He(e,e{sup '}p)pn at medium energies within the unfactorized generalized Glauber approach

    SciTech Connect

    Alvioli, M.; Atti, C. Ciofi degli; Kaptari, L. P.

    2010-02-15

    The cross section and the transverse-longitudinal asymmetry A{sub TL} of the three-body breakup process {sup 3}He(e,e{sup '}p)pn have been calculated by a parameter-free approach based upon realistic few-body wave functions corresponding to the AV18 interaction, treating the rescattering of the struck nucleon within the unfactorized generalized eikonal approximation. The results of calculations exhibit a good agreement with recent JLab experimental data and show the dominant role played by the final state interaction, which, however, in the region of missing momentum, 300< or approx.p{sub m}< or approx.600 MeV/c, and removal energy corresponding to the two-body kinematic peak and higher, E{sub m}> or approx.p{sub m}{sup 2}/4m{sub N}, is dominated by single-nucleon rescattering, providing evidence that the final state interaction is mainly due to the one between the struck nucleon and a nearby correlated one.

  3. Upscaling unsaturated hydraulic parameters for flow through heterogeneous anisotropic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andy L.; Zhang, Z. Fred; Gee, Glendon W.

    2006-02-01

    We compare two methods for determining the upscaled water characteristics and saturation-dependent anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from a field-scale injection test. In both approaches an effective medium approximation is used to reduce a porous medium of M textures to an equivalent homogenous medium. The first approach is a phenomenological approach based on homogenization and assumes that moisture-based Richards' equation can be treated like the convective-dispersive equation (CDE). The gravity term, d Kz( θ)/d( θ), analogous to the vertical convective velocity in the CDE, is determined from the temporal evolution of the plume centroid along the vertical coordinate allowing calculation of an upscaled Kz( θ). As with the dispersion tensor in the CDE, the rate of change of the second spatial moment in 3D space is used to calculate the water diffusivity tensor, D( θ), from which an upscaled K( θ) is calculated. The second approach uses the combined parameter scale inverse technique (CPSIT). Parameter scaling is used first to reduce the number of parameters to be estimated by a factor M. Upscaled parameters are then optimized by inverse modeling to produce an upscaled K( θ) characterized by a pore tortuosity-connectivity tensor, L. Parameters for individual textures are finally determined from the optimized parameters by inverse scaling using scale factors determined a priori. Both methods produced upscaled K( θ) that showed evidence of saturation dependent anisotropy. Flow predictions with the STOMP simulator, parameterized with upscaled parameters, were compared with field observations. Predictions based on the homogenization method were able to capture the mean plume behavior but could not reproduce the asymmetry caused by heterogeneity and lateral spreading. The CPSIT method captured the effects of heterogeneity and anisotropy and reduced the mean squared residual by nearly 90% compared to local-scale and upscaled parameters from the

  4. Evaluating heterogeneity in cumulative meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Elmer V; Zavarsek, Silva

    2004-01-01

    Background Recently developed measures such as I2 and H allow the evaluation of the impact of heterogeneity in conventional meta-analyses. There has been no examination of the development of heterogeneity in the context of a cumulative meta-analysis. Methods Cumulative meta-analyses of five smoking cessation interventions (clonidine, nicotine replacement therapy using gum and patch, physician advice and acupuncture) were used to calculate I2 and H. These values were plotted by year of publication, control event rate and sample size to trace the development of heterogeneity over these covariates. Results The cumulative evaluation of heterogeneity varied according to the measure of heterogeneity used and the basis of cumulation. Plots produced from the calculations revealed areas of heterogeneity useful in the consideration of potential sources for further study. Conclusion The examination of heterogeneity in conjunction with summary effect estimates in a cumulative meta-analysis offered valuable insight into the evolution of variation. Such information is not available in the context of conventional meta-analysis and has the potential to lead to the development of a richer picture of the effectiveness of interventions. PMID:15251035

  5. Evaluating heterogeneity in cumulative meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Elmer V; Zavarsek, Silva

    2004-07-13

    Recently developed measures such as I2 and H allow the evaluation of the impact of heterogeneity in conventional meta-analyses. There has been no examination of the development of heterogeneity in the context of a cumulative meta-analysis. Cumulative meta-analyses of five smoking cessation interventions (clonidine, nicotine replacement therapy using gum and patch, physician advice and acupuncture) were used to calculate I2 and H. These values were plotted by year of publication, control event rate and sample size to trace the development of heterogeneity over these covariates. The cumulative evaluation of heterogeneity varied according to the measure of heterogeneity used and the basis of cumulation. Plots produced from the calculations revealed areas of heterogeneity useful in the consideration of potential sources for further study. The examination of heterogeneity in conjunction with summary effect estimates in a cumulative meta-analysis offered valuable insight into the evolution of variation. Such information is not available in the context of conventional meta-analysis and has the potential to lead to the development of a richer picture of the effectiveness of interventions.

  6. Modeling the detonation structure of heterogeneous explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, J. P.; Lee, J. H. S.

    1998-07-01

    A simplified ZND calculation for the one-dimensional detonation (infinite diameter) of heterogeneous explosives is proposed. The effects of thermal relaxation within the two-phase products is incorporated into a source term in the chemical rate law. The explosive is then approximated as a homogeneous mixture of two phases. The source term is based on the rate of heat transfer from the liquid explosive to the inert heterogeneities. The effect of the properties of the heterogeneities (size, heat capacity, density) on this additional term is discussed.

  7. SU-E-T-477: An Efficient Dose Correction Algorithm Accounting for Tissue Heterogeneities in LDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mashouf, S; Lai, P; Karotki, A; Keller, B; Beachey, D; Pignol, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Seed brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose surrounding the brachytherapy seeds is based on American Association of Physicist in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (TG-43 formalism) which generates the dose in homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM Task Group No. 186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. This can be done using Monte Carlo (MC) methods, but it requires knowing the source structure and tissue atomic composition accurately. In this work we describe an efficient analytical dose inhomogeneity correction algorithm implemented using MIM Symphony treatment planning platform to calculate dose distributions in heterogeneous media. Methods: An Inhomogeneity Correction Factor (ICF) is introduced as the ratio of absorbed dose in tissue to that in water medium. ICF is a function of tissue properties and independent of source structure. The ICF is extracted using CT images and the absorbed dose in tissue can then be calculated by multiplying the dose as calculated by the TG-43 formalism times ICF. To evaluate the methodology, we compared our results with Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in phantoms with known density and atomic compositions. Results: The dose distributions obtained through applying ICF to TG-43 protocol agreed very well with those of Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in all phantoms. In all cases, the mean relative error was reduced by at least 50% when ICF correction factor was applied to the TG-43 protocol. Conclusion: We have developed a new analytical dose calculation method which enables personalized dose calculations in heterogeneous media. The advantages over stochastic methods are computational efficiency and the ease of integration into clinical setting as detailed source structure and tissue segmentation are not needed. University of Toronto, Natural Sciences and

  8. Phenotypically heterogeneous populations in spatially heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Pintu; Klumpp, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    The spatial expansion of a population in a nonuniform environment may benefit from phenotypic heterogeneity with interconverting subpopulations using different survival strategies. We analyze the crossing of an antibiotic-containing environment by a bacterial population consisting of rapidly growing normal cells and slow-growing, but antibiotic-tolerant persister cells. The dynamics of crossing is characterized by mean first arrival times and is found to be surprisingly complex. It displays three distinct regimes with different scaling behavior that can be understood based on an analytical approximation. Our results suggest that a phenotypically heterogeneous population has a fitness advantage in nonuniform environments and can spread more rapidly than a homogeneous population.

  9. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  10. Computer simulation of microwave propagation in heterogeneous and fractal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korvin, Gabor; Khachaturov, Ruben V.; Oleschko, Klaudia; Ronquillo, Gerardo; Correa López, María de jesús; García, Juan-josé

    2017-03-01

    Maxwell's equations (MEs) are the starting point for all calculations involving surface or borehole electromagnetic (EM) methods in Petroleum Industry. In well-log analysis numerical modeling of resistivity and induction tool responses has became an indispensable step of interpretation. We developed a new method to numerically simulate electromagnetic wave propagation through heterogeneous and fractal slabs taking into account multiple scattering in the direction of normal incidence. In simulation, the gray-scale image of the porous medium is explored by monochromatic waves. The gray-tone of each pixel can be related to the dielectric permittivity of the medium at that point by two different equations (linear dependence, and fractal or power law dependence). The wave equation is solved in second order difference approximation, using a modified sweep technique. Examples will be shown for simulated EM waves in carbonate rocks imaged at different scales by electron microscopy and optical photography. The method has wide ranging applications in remote sensing, borehole scanning and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) exploration.

  11. Medium modifications with recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.F.J. van den; Ent, R.

    1994-04-01

    The authors show that the virtual Compton scattering process allows for a precise study of the off-shell electron-nucleon vertex. In a separable model, they show the sensitivity to new unconstrained structure functions of the nucleon, beyond the usual Dirac and Pauli form factors. In addition, they show the sensitivity to bound nucleon form factors using the reaction 4He({rvec e},e{prime},{rvec p}){sup 3}H. A nucleon embedded in a nucleus represents a complex system. Firstly, the bound nucleon is necessarily off-shell and in principle a complete understanding of the dynamical structure of the nucleon is required in order to calculate its off-shell electromagnetic interaction. Secondly, one faces the possibility of genuine medium effects, such as for example quark-exchange contributions. Furthermore, the electromagnetic coupling to the bound nucleon is dependent on the nuclear dynamics through the self-energy of the nucleon in the nuclear medium.

  12. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous LWR MOX fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, D.; Barker, M.

    2013-11-01

    the correlations of Fink [16] for the UO2 matrix, Duriez at low PuO2 contents (coating phase) and of Philipponneau at high PuO2 contents (agglomerates). For the first model, applying a correlation for non-stoichiometric UO2 would be relevant, but such a correlation does not exist for physical reasons in the hypostoichiometric domain. A correlation for homogeneous (U,Pu)O2+x has to be obtained in order to predict the thermal conductivity of heterogeneous MOX fuel, supposing that the effect of Pu can be neglected, i.e. supposing that the thermal conductivities of homogeneous (U,Pu)O2 and UO2 are equal both for stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric fuels. Such a correlation has to be obtained considering reliable data for stoichiometric UO2 and stoichiometry dependence. Different correlations for non-stoichiometric fuels were reviewed [2,8,12,13,15,35,36]. The correlation of Martin [36], available for hyperstoichiometric UO2, was evaluated in the hypostoichiometric domain and the predictions were found to give a stoichiometry dependence very similar to a correlation already proposed [15]. Investigations by Molecular Dynamics [37] have confirmed the almost symmetric effect of the hypo- and hyper-stoichiometry in UO2. We therefore use the correlation of Martin, with however a correction, as for stoichiometric fuels it over predicts the conductivity of stoichiometric UO2 at high temperatures, when compared to the recommendation of Fink [16] (Fig. 4). Analysis has shown that this over-prediction was due to the high temperature term in the correlation of Martin, and that, if this term is removed, the predictions of Martin and Fink were identical for stoichiometric fuels in the temperature range 500-1500 K. The correlation proposed for homogeneous MOX is therefore given by the following equation. k=(0.035 The series and parallel bounds (Eq. (2)) were calculated using the thermal conductivity values given by Eq. (5) for the heterogeneous MOX constituents and the maximum

  13. Consequences of dose heterogeneity on the biological efficiency of ¹⁰³Pd permanent breast seed implants.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Reniers, Brigitte; Landry, Guillaume; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-02-07

    Brachytherapy is associated with highly heterogeneous spatial dose distributions. This heterogeneity is usually ignored when estimating the biological effective dose (BED). In addition, the heterogeneities of the medium including the tissue heterogeneity (TH) and the interseed attenuation (ISA) are also contributing to the heterogeneity of the dose distribution, but they are both ignored in Task Group 43 (TG43)-based protocols. This study investigates the effect of dose heterogeneity, TH and ISA on metrics that are commonly used to quantify biological efficiency in brachytherapy. The special case of 29 breast cancer patients treated with permanent (103)Pd seed implant is considered here. BED is compared to equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) capable of considering the spatial heterogeneity of the dose distribution. The effects of TH and ISA on biological efficiency of treatments are taken into account by comparing TG43 with Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for each patient. The effect of clonogenic repopulation is also considered. The analysis is performed for different sets of (α/β, α) ratios of (2, 0.3), (4, 0.27) and (10, 0.3) [Gy, Gy(-1)] covering the whole range of reported α/β values in the literature. BED is sometimes larger and sometimes smaller than EUBED(TG43) indicating that the effect of the dose heterogeneity is not similar among patients. The effect of the dose heterogeneity can be characterized by using the D(99) dose metric. For each set of the radiobiological parameters considered, a D(99) threshold is found over which dose heterogeneity will cause an overestimation of the biological efficiencies while the inverse happens for smaller D(99) values. EUBED(MC) is always larger than EUBED(TG43) indicating that by neglecting TH and ISA in TG43-based dosimetry algorithms, the biological efficiencies may be underestimated by about 10 Gy. Overall, by going from BED to the more accurate EUBED(MC) there is a gain of about 9.6 to 13 Gy on the biological

  14. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  15. Stress relaxation in heterogeneous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.

    1992-05-01

    When heterogeneous polymers such as diblock copolymers form a microdomain phase, an imposed strain gives rise to stress from two sources, and several mechanisms of stress relaxation. The release of stress by disentanglement is strongly influenced by the effective confinement of the junction points to the domain boundaries and by the stretching of the chains. Using accepted notions of entangled chain kinetics, it is argued that the relaxation time for sliding stress is exponential in the chainlength to the 7/9 power. A method for calculating the frequency-dependent dynamic modulus is sketched. Despite the slow relaxation implied by these mechanisms, it appears possible to create domains of high energy.

  16. Calculator Cookery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Casey; And Others

    This valuable collection of materials was developed to incorporate the calculator as an instructional aid in ninth- and tenth-grade general and basic mathematics classes. The materials are also appropriate for grades 7 and 8. After an introductory section which teaches the use of the calculator, four games and activities are described. For these…

  17. CBI: Systems or Medium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higginbotham-Wheat, Nancy L.

    This paper addresses one area of conflict in decisionmaking in computer-based instruction (CBI) research: the relationship between the researcher's definition of CBI either as a medium or as an integrated system and the design of meaningful research questions. (A medium is defined here as a device for the delivery of instruction, while an…

  18. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  19. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  20. Estimation of Random Medium Parameters from 2D Post-Stack Seismic Data and Its Application in Seismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Small scale heterogeneities of subsurface medium can be characterized conveniently and effectively using a few simple random medium parameters (RMP), such as autocorrelation length, angle and roughness factor, etc. The estimation of these parameters is significant in both oil reservoir prediction and metallic mine exploration. Poor accuracy and low stability existed in current estimation approaches limit the application of random medium theory in seismic exploration. This study focuses on improving the accuracy and stability of RMP estimation from post-stacked seismic data and its application in the seismic inversion. Experiment and theory analysis indicate that, although the autocorrelation of random medium is related to those of corresponding post-stacked seismic data, the relationship is obviously affected by the seismic dominant frequency, the autocorrelation length, roughness factor and so on. Also the error of calculation of autocorrelation in the case of finite and discrete model decreases the accuracy. In order to improve the precision of estimation of RMP, we design two improved approaches. Firstly, we apply region growing algorithm, which often used in image processing, to reduce the influence of noise in the autocorrelation calculated by the power spectrum method. Secondly, the orientation of autocorrelation is used as a new constraint in the estimation algorithm. The numerical experiments proved that it is feasible. In addition, in post-stack seismic inversion of random medium, the estimated RMP may be used to constrain inverse procedure and to construct the initial model. The experiment results indicate that taking inversed model as random medium and using relatively accurate estimated RMP to construct initial model can get better inversion result, which contained more details conformed to the actual underground medium.

  1. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  2. Stochastic study of solute transport in a nonstationary medium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bill X

    2006-01-01

    A Lagrangian stochastic approach is applied to develop a method of moment for solute transport in a physically and chemically nonstationary medium. Stochastic governing equations for mean solute flux and solute covariance are analytically obtained in the first-order accuracy of log conductivity and/or chemical sorption variances and solved numerically using the finite-difference method. The developed method, the numerical method of moments (NMM), is used to predict radionuclide solute transport processes in the saturated zone below the Yucca Mountain project area. The mean, variance, and upper bound of the radionuclide mass flux through a control plane 5 km downstream of the footprint of the repository are calculated. According to their chemical sorption capacities, the various radionuclear chemicals are grouped as nonreactive, weakly sorbing, and strongly sorbing chemicals. The NMM method is used to study their transport processes and influence factors. To verify the method of moments, a Monte Carlo simulation is conducted for nonreactive chemical transport. Results indicate the results from the two methods are consistent, but the NMM method is computationally more efficient than the Monte Carlo method. This study adds to the ongoing debate in the literature on the effect of heterogeneity on solute transport prediction, especially on prediction uncertainty, by showing that the standard derivation of solute flux is larger than the mean solute flux even when the hydraulic conductivity within each geological layer is mild. This study provides a method that may become an efficient calculation tool for many environmental projects.

  3. The effective absorption cross-section of thermal neutrons in a medium containing strongly or weakly absorbing centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Gabańska, Barbara; Igielski, Andrzej; Krynicka, Ewa; Woźnicka, Urszula

    2003-06-01

    The structure of a heterogeneous system influences diffusion of thermal neutrons. The thermal-neutron absorption in grained media is considered in the paper. A simple theory is presented for a two-component medium treated as grains embedded in the matrix or as a system built of two types of grains (of strongly differing absorption cross-sections). A grain parameter is defined as the ratio of the effective macroscopic absorption cross-section of the heterogeneous medium to the absorption cross-section of the corresponding homogeneous medium (consisting of the same components in the same proportions). The grain parameter depends on the ratio of the absorption cross-sections and contributions of the components and on the size of grains. The theoretical approach has been verified in experiments on prepared dedicated models which have kept required geometrical and physical conditions (silver grains distributed regularly in Plexiglas). The effective absorption cross-sections have been measured and compared with the results of calculations. A very good agreement has been observed. In certain cases the differences between the absorption in the heterogeneous and homogeneous media are very significant. A validity of an extension of the theoretical model on natural, two-component, heterogeneous mixtures has been tested experimentally. Aqueous solutions of boric acid have been used as the strongly absorbing component. Fine- and coarse-grained pure silicon has been used as the second component with well-defined thermal-neutron parameters. Small and large grains of diabase have been used as the second natural component. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed in these experiments.

  4. Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schryer, David R.

    In the past few years it has become increasingly clear that heterogeneous, or multiphase, processes play an important role in the atmosphere. Unfortunately the literature on the subject, although now fairly extensive, is still rather dispersed. Furthermore, much of the expertise regarding heterogeneous processes lies in fields not directly related to atmospheric science. Therefore, it seemed desirable to bring together for an exchange of ideas, information, and methodologies the various atmospheric scientists who are actively studying heterogeneous processes as well as other researchers studying similar processes in the context of other fields.

  5. The validation of tomotherapy dose calculations in low-density lung media.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Summer R; Pechenaya, Olga L; Goddu, S Murty; Mutic, Sasa; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Low, Daniel

    2009-04-21

    The dose-calculation accuracy of the tomotherapy Hi-Art II(R) (Tomotherapy, Inc., Madison, WI) treatment planning system (TPS) in the presence of low-density lung media was investigated. In this evaluation, a custom-designed heterogeneous phantom mimicking the mediastinum geometry was used. Gammex LN300 and balsa wood were selected as two lung-equivalent materials with different densities. Film analysis and ionization chamber measurements were performed. Treatment plans for esophageal cancers were used in the evaluation. The agreement between the dose calculated by the TPS and the dose measured via ionization chambers was, in most cases, within 0.8%. Gamma analysis using 3% and 3 mm criteria for radiochromic film dosimetry showed that 98% and 95% of the measured dose distribution had passing gamma values < or =1 for LN300 and balsa wood, respectively. For a homogeneous water-equivalent phantom, 95% of the points passed the gamma test. It was found that for the interface between the low-density medium and water-equivalent medium, the TPS calculated the dose distribution within acceptable limits. The phantom developed for this work enabled detailed quality-assurance testing under realistic conditions with heterogeneous media.

  6. The validation of tomotherapy dose calculations in low-density lung media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Summer R.; Pechenaya, Olga L.; Goddu, S. Murty; Mutic, Sasa; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    The dose-calculation accuracy of the tomotherapy Hi-Art II® (Tomotherapy, Inc., Madison, WI) treatment planning system (TPS) in the presence of low-density lung media was investigated. In this evaluation, a custom-designed heterogeneous phantom mimicking the mediastinum geometry was used. Gammex LN300 and balsa wood were selected as two lung-equivalent materials with different densities. Film analysis and ionization chamber measurements were performed. Treatment plans for esophageal cancers were used in the evaluation. The agreement between the dose calculated by the TPS and the dose measured via ionization chambers was, in most cases, within 0.8%. Gamma analysis using 3% and 3 mm criteria for radiochromic film dosimetry showed that 98% and 95% of the measured dose distribution had passing gamma values <=1 for LN300 and balsa wood, respectively. For a homogeneous water-equivalent phantom, 95% of the points passed the gamma test. It was found that for the interface between the low-density medium and water-equivalent medium, the TPS calculated the dose distribution within acceptable limits. The phantom developed for this work enabled detailed quality-assurance testing under realistic conditions with heterogeneous media.

  7. Investigation on relationship between epicentral distance and growth curve of initial P-wave propagating in local heterogeneous media for earthquake early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kyosuke; Tsuno, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    In the earthquake early warning (EEW) system, the epicenter location and magnitude of earthquakes are estimated using the amplitude growth rate of initial P-waves. It has been empirically pointed out that the growth rate becomes smaller as epicentral distance becomes far regardless of the magnitude of earthquakes. So, the epicentral distance can be estimated from the growth rate using this empirical relationship. However, the growth rates calculated from different earthquakes at the same epicentral distance mark considerably different values from each other. Sometimes the growth rates of earthquakes having the same epicentral distance vary by 104 times. Qualitatively, it has been considered that the gap in the growth rates is due to differences in the local heterogeneities that the P-waves propagate through. In this study, we demonstrate theoretically how local heterogeneities in the subsurface disturb the relationship between the growth rate and the epicentral distance. Firstly, we calculate seismic scattered waves in a heterogeneous medium. First-ordered PP, PS, SP, and SS scatterings are considered. The correlation distance of the heterogeneities and fractional fluctuation of elastic parameters control the heterogeneous conditions for the calculation. From the synthesized waves, the growth rate of the initial P-wave is obtained. As a result, we find that a parameter (in this study, correlation distance) controlling heterogeneities plays a key role in the magnitude of the fluctuation of the growth rate. Then, we calculate the regional correlation distances in Japan that can account for the fluctuation of the growth rate of real earthquakes from 1997 to 2011 observed by K-NET and KiK-net. As a result, the spatial distribution of the correlation distance shows locality. So, it is revealed that the growth rates fluctuate according to the locality. When this local fluctuation is taken into account, the accuracy of the estimation of epicentral distances from initial P

  8. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  9. Stability of Heterogeneous Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Yan, Gang; Barabasi, Alber-Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    Stability of ecosystem measures the tendency of a community to return to equilibrium after environmental perturbation, which is severely constrained by the underlying network structure. Despite significant advances in uncovering the relationship between stability and network structure, little attention has been paid to the impact of the degree heterogeneity that exists in real ecosystems. Here we show that for networks with mixed interactions of competition and mutualism the degree heterogeneity always destabilizes the ecosystem. Surprisingly, for predator-prey interactions (e.g., food webs) high heterogeneity is destabilizing yet moderate heterogeneity is stabilizing. These findings deepen our understanding of the stability of real ecosystems and may also have implications in studying the stability of more general complex dynamical systems.

  10. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  11. Towards heterogeneous distributed debugging

    SciTech Connect

    Damodaran-Kamal, S.K.

    1995-04-01

    Several years of research and development in parallel debugger design have given up several techniques, though implemented in a wide range of tools for an equally wide range of systems. This paper is an evaluation of these myriad techniques as applied to the design of a heterogeneous distributed debugger. The evaluation is based on what features users perceive as useful, as well as the ease of implementation of the features using the available technology. A preliminary architecture for such a heterogeneous tool is proposed. Our effort in this paper is significantly different from the other efforts at creating portable and heterogeneous distributed debuggers in that we concentrate on support for all the important issues in parallel debugging, instead of simply concentrating on portability and heterogeneity.

  12. Dynamic splitting of Gaussian pencil beams in heterogeneity-correction algorithms for radiotherapy with heavy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Komori, Masataka; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ishizaki, Azusa

    2009-04-01

    The pencil-beam algorithm is valid only when elementary Gaussian beams are small enough compared to the lateral heterogeneity of a medium, which is not always true in actual radiotherapy with protons and ions. This work addresses a solution for the problem. We found approximate self-similarity of Gaussian distributions, with which Gaussian beams can split into narrower and deflecting daughter beams when their sizes have overreached lateral heterogeneity in the beam-transport calculation. The effectiveness was assessed in a carbon-ion beam experiment in the presence of steep range compensation, where the splitting calculation reproduced a detour effect amounting to about 10% in dose or as large as the lateral particle disequilibrium effect. The efficiency was analyzed in calculations for carbon-ion and proton radiations with a heterogeneous phantom model, where the beam splitting increased computing times by factors of 4.7 and 3.2. The present method generally improves the accuracy of the pencil-beam algorithm without severe inefficiency. It will therefore be useful for treatment planning and potentially other demanding applications.

  13. Heterogeneous basic catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Hideshi

    1995-05-01

    Heterogeneous acid catalysis attracted much attention primarily because heterogeneous acidic catalysts act as catalysts in petroleum refinery and are known as a main catalyst in the cracking process which is the largest process among the industrial chemical processes. In contrast to these extensive studies of heterogeneous acidic catalysts, fewer efforts have been given to the study of heterogeneous basic catalysts. The types of heterogeneous basic catalysts are listed in Table 1. Except for non-oxide catalysts, the basic sites are believed to be surface O atoms. The studies of heterogeneous catalysis have been continuous and progressed steadily. They have never been reviewed in the chemical Reviews before. It is more useful and informative to describe the studies of heterogeneous basic catalysis performed for a long period. In the present article, therefore, the cited papers are not restricted to those published recently, but include those published for the last 25 years. The paper first describes the generation of basic sites before describing methods used in the characterization of basic surfaces. These are indicator methods, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO{sub 2}, UV absorption and luminescence spectroscopies, TPD of H{sub 2}, XPS, IR of CO{sub 2}, IR of pyrrole, and oxygen exchange between CO{sub 2} and the surface. The paper then discusses studies on the catalysis by heterogeneous basic catalysts. Some of these reactions are dehydration, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, amination, alkylation, ring transformation, and reactions of organosilanes. Catalysts discussed are single component metal oxides, zeolites, non-oxide types, and superbasic catalysts. 141 refs.

  14. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  15. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, S; Lechtman, E; Lai, P; Keller, B M; Karotki, A; Beachey, D J; Pignol, J P

    2014-09-21

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 [Formula: see text] formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  16. Green's Function Retrieval and Marchenko Imaging in a Dissipative Acoustic Medium.

    PubMed

    Slob, Evert

    2016-04-22

    Single-sided Marchenko equations for Green's function construction and imaging relate the measured reflection response of a lossless heterogeneous medium to an acoustic wave field inside this medium. I derive two sets of single-sided Marchenko equations for the same purpose, each in a heterogeneous medium, with one medium being dissipative and the other a corresponding medium with negative dissipation. Double-sided scattering data of the dissipative medium are required as input to compute the surface reflection response in the corresponding medium with negative dissipation. I show that each set of single-sided Marchenko equations leads to Green's functions with a virtual receiver inside the medium: one exists inside the dissipative medium and one in the medium with negative dissipation. This forms the basis of imaging inside a dissipative heterogeneous medium. I relate the Green's functions to the reflection response inside each medium, from which the image can be constructed. I illustrate the method with a one-dimensional example that shows the image quality. The method has a potentially wide range of imaging applications where the material under test is accessible from two sides.

  17. Characterization of Paper Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Considine, John M.

    Paper and paperboard are the most widely-used green materials in the world because they are renewable, recyclable, reusable, and compostable. Continued and expanded use of these materials and their potential use in new products requires a comprehensive understanding of the variability of their mechanical properties. This work develops new methods to characterize the mechanical properties of heterogeneous materials through a combination of techniques in experimental mechanics, materials science and numerical analysis. Current methods to analyze heterogeneous materials focus on crystalline materials or polymer-crystalline composites, where material boundaries are usually distinct. This work creates a methodology to analyze small, continuously-varying stiffness gradients in 100% polymer systems and is especially relevant to paper materials where factors influencing heterogeneity include local mass, fiber orientation, individual pulp fiber properties, local density, and drying restraint. A unique approach was used to understand the effect of heterogeneity on paper tensile strength. Additional variation was intentionally introduced, in the form of different size holes, and their effect on strength was measured. By modifying two strength criteria, an estimate of strength in the absence of heterogeneity was determined. In order to characterize stiffness heterogeneity, a novel load fixture was developed to excite full-field normal and shear strains for anisotropic stiffness determination. Surface strains were measured with digital image correlation and were analyzed with the VFM (Virtual Fields Method). This approach led to VFM-identified stiffnesses that were similar to values determined by conventional tests. The load fixture and VFM analyses were used to measure local stiffness and local stiffness variation on heterogeneous anisotropic materials. The approach was validated on simulated heterogeneous materials and was applied experimentally to three different paperboards

  18. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-01: Acoustic Range Verification of Proton Beams: Simulation of Heterogeneity and Clinical Proton Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K; Sehgal, C; Avery, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Through simulation, to assess acoustic-based range verification of proton beams (protoacoustics) under clinical conditions. Methods: Pressure waves generated by the energy deposition of a 150 MeV, 8 mm FWHM pulsed pencil proton beam were numerically simulated through two Methods: 1) For a homogeneous water medium, an analytical wave-equation solution was used to calculate the time-dependent pressure measured at detector points surrounding the proton Bragg peak. 2) For heterogeneity studies, a CT tissue image was used to calculate the proton dose deposition and define the acoustic properties of the voxels through which numerical pressure wave propagation was simulated with the k-Wave matlab toolbox. The simulations were used to assess the dependence of the acoustic amplitude and range-verification accuracy on proton pulse rise time and tissue heterogeneity. Results: As the proton pulse rise time is increased from 1 to 40 µs, the amplitude of the expected acoustic emission decreases (a 60% drop distal to the Bragg peak), the central frequency of the expected signal decreases (from 45 to 6 kHz), and the accuracy of the range-verification decreases (from <1 mm to 16 mm at 5 cm distal to the Bragg peak). For a 300 nA pulse, the expected pressure range is on the order of 0.1 Pa, which is observable with commercial detectors. For the heterogeneous medium, our test case shows that pressure waves emitted by an anterior pencil beam directed into the abdomen and detected posteriorly can determine the Bragg peak range to an accuracy of <2mm for a 1 µs proton pulse. Conclusion: For proton pulses with fast rise-times, protoacoustics is a promising potential method for monitoring penetration depth through heterogeneous tissue. The loss of range-verification accuracy with increasing rise-times, however, suggests the need for comparisons to modeling to improve accuracy for slower cyclotron proton sources.

  19. Firewood calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Curtis, A.B.; Darwin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    Rotating cardboard discs are used to read off total tree or topwood firewood volume (tons or cords) that can be expected from trees of d.b.h. 6 to 24 inches and tree height 10 to 90 feet. One side of the calculator is used for broadleaved species with deliquescent crowns and the other side for braodleaves with excurrent crowns.

  20. Molecular modeling of heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason, Jason Joseph

    A novel method for modeling heterogeneous catalysis was developed to further facilitate the understanding of catalytic reactor mechanisms. The method employs molecular dynamics simulations, statistical mechanical, and Unity Bond Index - Quadratic Exponential Potential (UBI-QEP) calculations to calculate the rate constants for reactions on metal surfaces. The primary difficulty of molecular dynamics simulations on metal surfaces has been the lack of reliable reactive potential energy surfaces. We have overcome this through the development of the Normalized Bond Index - Reactive Potential Function (NBI-RPF), which can accurately describe the reaction of adsorbates on metal surfaces. The first calculations of rate constants for a reaction on a metal surface using molecular dynamics simulations are presented. This method is applied to the determination of the mechanism for selective hydrogenation of acetylene in an ethylene rich flow. It was determined that the selectivity for acetylene hydrogenation is attributable to the higher reactivity of acetylene versus ethylene with respect to hydrogenation by molecular hydrogen. It was shown that hydrogen transfer from the carbonaceous layer to acetylene or ethylene is insignificant in the hydrogenation process. Molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics calculations were used to determine the diffusion rate constants for dimethylnaphthalene isomers is mordenite. 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene were found to have similar diffusion rate constants. Grand canonical Monte Carlo calculations were performed on the competitive adsorption of 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene in type X zeolites exchanged individually with barium, calcium, potassium, and rubidium ions, calcium exchanged MCM-22, and hydrogen form mordenite (MOR), X zeolite, Y zeolite, hypBEB, ZSM- 12, and MCM-22. These calculations showed that barium exchanged X zeolite was the most selective toward 2

  1. The uncertainty research of visual positioning in different mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanzhu; Wang, Song; Ai, Xinbo; Meng, Zhen; Tian, Wenjia; Wang, Jiao; Hu, Yu

    2017-06-01

    In engineering application, there existed deviation when light spreads in different mediums. At the same time miscellaneous medium and random fluctuation may lead to inaccuracy of visual positioning. It explored visual positioning technology in condition of different mediums for binocular camera. Firstly focused on medium material and impurity in real environment, the refractive index formula is derived through binocular visual positioning principle. Then considering deviation when light spreads in different mediums, deductive process of vision positioning is realized according to calculated refractive index. Because cloud model can better describe randomness and fuzziness. It was introduced to deal with problems of random fluctuation in different mediums. Finally simulation was designed to prove the accuracy improvement in different mediums. The result showed that accuracy error had decreased by 66.7% after considering transparent organic mediums. Compared with not knowing refractive index, positioning error had decreased by 49.7%.

  2. Strip and microstrip line periodic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerer, A. M.; Lerer, B. M.; Ryazanov, V. D.; Sledkov, V. A.

    1985-04-01

    A quasistatic method is described for analyzing periodic heterogeneities in single and coupled strip lines and microstrip lines. An ALGOL program on a BESM-6 computer calculated the running inductance and capacitance, wave impedances and delay coefficients for single and coupled strip lines and microstrip lines with periodic heterogeneities of arbitrary form. The analyzed quantities are investigated as a function of distance (from side shield to the strip), number of terms in the series and number of approximated functions. The method demonstrates good convergence and requires little machine time and results were verified experimentally.

  3. Nucleon-nucleon scattering at medium energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afnan, I. R.

    1984-03-01

    A model of the N-N potential, at medium energies, in the frame work of the BB-πBB equations, is presented. The derivation is based on the Cloudy Bag Model Hamiltonian. Recent N-N calculations are reviewed in the frame work of the model. Theoretical methods for the analysis of dibaryon resonances are compared.

  4. Calculation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    MathSoft Plus 5.0 is a calculation software package for electrical engineers and computer scientists who need advanced math functionality. It incorporates SmartMath, an expert system that determines a strategy for solving difficult mathematical problems. SmartMath was the result of the integration into Mathcad of CLIPS, a NASA-developed shell for creating expert systems. By using CLIPS, MathSoft, Inc. was able to save the time and money involved in writing the original program.

  5. Impact of supersonic and subsonic aircraft on ozone: Including heterogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnison, Douglas E.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary calculations suggest that heterogeneous reactions are important in calculating the impact on ozone from emissions of trace gases from aircraft fleets. In this study, three heterogeneous chemical processes that occur on background sulfuric acid aerosols are included and their effects on O3, NO(x), Cl(x), HCl, N2O5, ClONO2 are calculated.

  6. Heterogeneity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Kornelia

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. There is a high degree of diversity between and within tumors as well as among cancer-bearing individuals, and all of these factors together determine the risk of disease progression and therapeutic resistance. Advances in technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and functional viability screens now allow us to analyze tumors at unprecedented depths. However, translating this increasing knowledge into clinical practice remains a challenge in part due to tumor evolution driven by the diversity of cancer cell populations and their microenvironment. The articles in this Review series discuss recent advances in our understanding of breast tumor heterogeneity, therapies tailored based on this knowledge, and future ways of assessing and treating heterogeneous tumors.

  7. Monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon; Taylor, Philip R

    2005-12-01

    Heterogeneity of the macrophage lineage has long been recognized and, in part, is a result of the specialization of tissue macrophages in particular microenvironments. Circulating monocytes give rise to mature macrophages and are also heterogeneous themselves, although the physiological relevance of this is not completely understood. However, as we discuss here, recent studies have shown that monocyte heterogeneity is conserved in humans and mice, allowing dissection of its functional relevance: the different monocyte subsets seem to reflect developmental stages with distinct physiological roles, such as recruitment to inflammatory lesions or entry to normal tissues. These advances in our understanding have implications for the development of therapeutic strategies that are targeted to modify particular subpopulations of monocytes.

  8. Spatial heterogeneity in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Morrissy, A Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M G; Remke, Marc; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Shih, David J H; Holgado, Borja L; Farooq, Hamza; Donovan, Laura K; Garzia, Livia; Agnihotri, Sameer; Kiehna, Erin N; Mercier, Eloi; Mayoh, Chelsea; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gayden, Tenzin; Torchia, Jonathon; Picard, Daniel; Merino, Diana M; Vladoiu, Maria; Luu, Betty; Wu, Xiaochong; Daniels, Craig; Horswell, Stuart; Thompson, Yuan Yao; Hovestadt, Volker; Northcott, Paul A; Jones, David T W; Peacock, John; Wang, Xin; Mack, Stephen C; Reimand, Jüri; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam M; Thiessen, Nina; Li, Yisu; Schein, Jacqueline E; Lee, Darlene; Carlsen, Rebecca; Mayo, Michael; Tse, Kane; Tam, Angela; Dhalla, Noreen; Ally, Adrian; Chuah, Eric; Cheng, Young; Plettner, Patrick; Li, Haiyan I; Corbett, Richard D; Wong, Tina; Long, William; Loukides, James; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Rood, Brian R; Myseros, John S; Packer, Roger J; Korshunov, Andrey; Lichter, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M; Schüller, Ulrich; Dirks, Peter; Huang, Annie; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Bader, Gary D; Swanton, Charles; Ma, Yusanne; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Majewski, Jacek; Jones, Steven J M; Das, Sunit; Malkin, David; Jabado, Nada; Marra, Marco A; Taylor, Michael D

    2017-04-10

    Spatial heterogeneity of transcriptional and genetic markers between physically isolated biopsies of a single tumor poses major barriers to the identification of biomarkers and the development of targeted therapies that will be effective against the entire tumor. We analyzed the spatial heterogeneity of multiregional biopsies from 35 patients, using a combination of transcriptomic and genomic profiles. Medulloblastomas (MBs), but not high-grade gliomas (HGGs), demonstrated spatially homogeneous transcriptomes, which allowed for accurate subgrouping of tumors from a single biopsy. Conversely, somatic mutations that affect genes suitable for targeted therapeutics demonstrated high levels of spatial heterogeneity in MB, malignant glioma, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Actionable targets found in a single MB biopsy were seldom clonal across the entire tumor, which brings the efficacy of monotherapies against a single target into question. Clinical trials of targeted therapies for MB should first ensure the spatially ubiquitous nature of the target mutation.

  9. Randomly-fluctuating heterogeneous continuum model of a ballasted railway track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu Corrêa, Lucio; Quezada, Juan Carlos; Cottereau, Régis; d'Aguiar, Sofia Costa; Voivret, Charles

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a description of a granular medium as a stochastic heterogeneous continuum medium. The heterogeneity of the material properties field recreates the heterogeneous stress field in a granular medium. The stochastic approach means that only statistical information, easily available, is required to construct the model. The heterogeneous continuum model is Calibrated with respect to discrete simulations of a set of railway ballast samples. As they are continuum-based, the equilibrium equations can be solved on a large scale using a parallel implementation of an explicit time discretization scheme for the Finite Element Method. Simulations representative of the influence on the environment of the passage of a train on a ballasted railway track clearly show the influence of the heterogeneity. These simulations seem to correlate well with previously unexplained overly damped measurements in the free field.

  10. Cancer heterogeneity and imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B

    2016-10-04

    There is interest in identifying and quantifying tumor heterogeneity at the genomic, tissue pathology and clinical imaging scales, as this may help better understand tumor biology and may yield useful biomarkers for guiding therapy-based decision making. This review focuses on the role and value of using x-ray, CT, MRI and PET based imaging methods that identify, measure and map tumor heterogeneity. In particular we highlight the potential value of these techniques and the key challenges required to validate and qualify these biomarkers for clinical use.

  11. Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2004-05-10

    The fundamental picture that shock initiation in heterogeneous explosives is caused by the linking of hot spots formed at inhomogeneities was put forward by several researchers in the 1950's and 1960's, and more recently. Our work uses the computer hardware and software developed in the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the U.S. Department of Energy to explicitly include heterogeneities at the scale of the explosive grains and to calculate the consequences of realistic although approximate models of explosive behavior. Our simulations are performed with ALE-3D, a three-dimensional, elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler finite-difference program, which includes chemical kinetics and heat transfer, and which is under development at this laboratory. We developed the parameter values for a reactive-flow model to describe the non-ideal detonation behavior of an HMX-based explosive from the results of grain-scale simulations. In doing so, we reduced the number of free parameters that are inferred from comparison with experiment to a single one - the characteristic defect dimension. We also performed simulations of the run to detonation in small volumes of explosive. These simulations illustrate the development of the reaction zone and the acceleration of the shock front as the flame fronts start from hot spots, grow, and interact behind the shock front. In this way, our grain-scale simulations can also connect to continuum experiments directly.

  12. Calculating Speed of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  13. WBGT Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Charles H.

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulate the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.

  14. Heterogeneous Catalytic Chemistry by Example of Industrial Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heveling, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 85% of all chemical products are manufactured with the help of catalysts. Virtually all transition metals of the periodic table are active as catalysts or catalyst promoters. Catalysts are divided into homogeneous catalysts, which are soluble in the reaction medium, and heterogeneous catalysts, which remain in the solid state.…

  15. Heterogeneous Catalytic Chemistry by Example of Industrial Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heveling, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 85% of all chemical products are manufactured with the help of catalysts. Virtually all transition metals of the periodic table are active as catalysts or catalyst promoters. Catalysts are divided into homogeneous catalysts, which are soluble in the reaction medium, and heterogeneous catalysts, which remain in the solid state.…

  16. Hypermedia as medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dede, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Claims and rebuttals that hypermedia (the associative, nonlinear interconnection of multimedia materials) is a fundamentally innovative means of thinking and communicating are described. This representational architecture has many advantages that make it a major advance over other media; however, it also has several intrinsic problems that severly limits its effectiveness as a medium. These advantages and limits in applications are discussed.

  17. Holographic recording medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, Robert Allen (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A holographic recording medium comprising a conductive substrate, a photoconductive layer and an electrically alterable layer of a linear, low molecular weight hydrocarbon polymer has improved fatigue resistance. An acrylic barrier layer can be interposed between the photoconductive and electrically alterable layers.

  18. Why does heterogeneity matter?

    Treesearch

    K.B. Pierce

    2007-01-01

    This is a review of the book "Ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes" published in 2005. The authors are G. Lovett, C. Jones, M.G. Turner, and K.C. Weathers. It was published by Springer, New York. The book is a synthesis of the 10th Gary conference held at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York, in 2003.

  19. Heterogeneous waste processing

    DOEpatents

    Vanderberg, Laura A.; Sauer, Nancy N.; Brainard, James R.; Foreman, Trudi M.; Hanners, John L.

    2000-01-01

    A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

  20. Heterogeneous Uncertainty Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-08

    probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about collections of moving objects. S...heterogeneous temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about...temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agent. HTP agents can build temporal probabilistic reasoning capabilities on top of multiple databases and software

  1. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  2. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S. Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  3. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  4. Hadrons in the Nuclear Medium

    SciTech Connect

    S. Strauch, S. Malace, M. Paolone

    2011-11-01

    Nucleon properties are modified in the nuclear medium. To understand these modifications and their origin is a central issue in nuclear physics. For example, a wide variety of QCD-based models, including quark-meson coupling and chiral-quark soliton models, predict that the nuclear constituents change properties with increasing density. These changes are predicted to lead to observable changes in the nucleon structure functions and electromagnetic form factors. We present results from a series of recent experiments at MAMI and Jefferson Lab, which measured the proton recoil polarization in the {sup 4}He({rvec e},e{prime}{rvec p}){sup 3}H reaction to test these predictions. These results, with the most precise data at Q{sup 2} = 0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} and at 1.3 (GeV/c){sup 2} from E03-104, put strong constraints on available model calculations, such that below Q{sup 2} = 1.3 (GeV/c){sup 2} the measured ratios of polarization-transfer are successfully described in a fully relativistic calculation when including a medium modification of the proton form factors or, alternatively, by strong charge-exchange final-state interactions. We also discuss possible extensions of these studies with measurements of the {sup 4}He({rvec e},e{prime}{rvec p}){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H({rvec e},e{prime}{rvec p})n reactions as well as with the neutron knockout in {sup 4}He({rvec e},e{prime}{rvec n}){sup 3}He.

  5. H2 molecules and the intercloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. K.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses expected column densities of H2 in the intercloud medium and the possible use of molecules as indicators of intercloud physical conditions. Molecule formation by the H(-) process and on graphite grains is treated, and it is shown that the Barlow-Silk hypothesis of a 1-eV semichemical hydrogen-graphite bond leads to a large enhancement of the intercloud molecule-formation rate. Rotational-excitation calculations are presented for both cloud and intercloud conditions which show, in agreement with Jura (1975), that the presently observed optically thin H2 absorption components are more likely to originate in cold clouds than in the intercloud medium.

  6. Fluid dynamics of active heterogeneities in a mantle plume conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, C. G.; Limare, A.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations indicate that the flow of a purely thermal plume preserves the azimuthal zonation of the source region, thus providing a framework to attribute a deep origin to the isotopic zonation of Hawaiian lavas. However, previous studies were limited to passive heterogeneities not affecting the flow. We go beyond this simplification by considering active heterogeneities which are compositionally denser, or more viscous, and we address the following questions: (1) How do active heterogeneities modify the axially symmetric velocity field of the plume conduit? (2) Under which conditions is the azimuthal zonation of the source region no longer preserved in the plume stem? (3) How do active heterogeneities deform during upwelling and what is their shape once at sublithospheric depths? We conducted both laboratory experiments, using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to calculate the velocity field, and high resolution three-dimensional simulations where millions of tracers keep track of the heterogeneous fluid. For compositionally denser heterogeneities we cover a range of buoyancy ratios 0heterogeneities, the range of viscosity ratios is 0<λ<20, where λ=ηheterogeneity/ηfluid and η is viscosity. The initial heterogeneity has the arbitrary shape of a sphere and we vary its volume and its distance from the plume axis. We find that by increasing λ, the shape of the heterogeneity changes from filament-like to blob-like characterized by internal rotation and little stretching. By increasing B the heterogeneity tends to spread at the base of the plume stem and to rise as a tendril close to the axis, so that the initial zonation may be poorly preserved. We also find that the plume velocity field can be profoundly modified by active heterogeneities, and we explore the relation between strain rates and the evolving shape of the upwelling heterogeneity.

  7. Evaluation of path-history-based fluorescence Monte Carlo method for photon migration in heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu; Deng, Yong; Luo, Zhaoyang; Wang, Kan; Lian, Lichao; Yang, Xiaoquan; Meglinski, Igor; Luo, Qingming

    2014-12-29

    The path-history-based fluorescence Monte Carlo method used for fluorescence tomography imaging reconstruction has attracted increasing attention. In this paper, we first validate the standard fluorescence Monte Carlo (sfMC) method by experimenting with a cylindrical phantom. Then, we describe a path-history-based decoupled fluorescence Monte Carlo (dfMC) method, analyze different perturbation fluorescence Monte Carlo (pfMC) methods, and compare the calculation accuracy and computational efficiency of the dfMC and pfMC methods using the sfMC method as a reference. The results show that the dfMC method is more accurate and efficient than the pfMC method in heterogeneous medium.

  8. Report of the Task Group 186 on model-based dose calculation methods in brachytherapy beyond the TG-43 formalism: Current status and recommendations for clinical implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, Luc; Carlsson Tedgren, Asa; Carrier, Jean-Francois; and others

    2012-10-15

    The charge of Task Group 186 (TG-186) is to provide guidance for early adopters of model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) for brachytherapy (BT) dose calculations to ensure practice uniformity. Contrary to external beam radiotherapy, heterogeneity correction algorithms have only recently been made available to the BT community. Yet, BT dose calculation accuracy is highly dependent on scatter conditions and photoelectric effect cross-sections relative to water. In specific situations, differences between the current water-based BT dose calculation formalism (TG-43) and MBDCAs can lead to differences in calculated doses exceeding a factor of 10. MBDCAs raise three major issues that are not addressed by current guidance documents: (1) MBDCA calculated doses are sensitive to the dose specification medium, resulting in energy-dependent differences between dose calculated to water in a homogeneous water geometry (TG-43), dose calculated to the local medium in the heterogeneous medium, and the intermediate scenario of dose calculated to a small volume of water in the heterogeneous medium. (2) MBDCA doses are sensitive to voxel-by-voxel interaction cross sections. Neither conventional single-energy CT nor ICRU/ICRP tissue composition compilations provide useful guidance for the task of assigning interaction cross sections to each voxel. (3) Since each patient-source-applicator combination is unique, having reference data for each possible combination to benchmark MBDCAs is an impractical strategy. Hence, a new commissioning process is required. TG-186 addresses in detail the above issues through the literature review and provides explicit recommendations based on the current state of knowledge. TG-43-based dose prescription and dose calculation remain in effect, with MBDCA dose reporting performed in parallel when available. In using MBDCAs, it is recommended that the radiation transport should be performed in the heterogeneous medium and, at minimum, the dose to

  9. Report of the Task Group 186 on model-based dose calculation methods in brachytherapy beyond the TG-43 formalism: current status and recommendations for clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Luc; Carlsson Tedgren, Asa; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Davis, Stephen D; Mourtada, Firas; Rivard, Mark J; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Wareing, Todd A; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2012-10-01

    The charge of Task Group 186 (TG-186) is to provide guidance for early adopters of model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) for brachytherapy (BT) dose calculations to ensure practice uniformity. Contrary to external beam radiotherapy, heterogeneity correction algorithms have only recently been made available to the BT community. Yet, BT dose calculation accuracy is highly dependent on scatter conditions and photoelectric effect cross-sections relative to water. In specific situations, differences between the current water-based BT dose calculation formalism (TG-43) and MBDCAs can lead to differences in calculated doses exceeding a factor of 10. MBDCAs raise three major issues that are not addressed by current guidance documents: (1) MBDCA calculated doses are sensitive to the dose specification medium, resulting in energy-dependent differences between dose calculated to water in a homogeneous water geometry (TG-43), dose calculated to the local medium in the heterogeneous medium, and the intermediate scenario of dose calculated to a small volume of water in the heterogeneous medium. (2) MBDCA doses are sensitive to voxel-by-voxel interaction cross sections. Neither conventional single-energy CT nor ICRU∕ICRP tissue composition compilations provide useful guidance for the task of assigning interaction cross sections to each voxel. (3) Since each patient-source-applicator combination is unique, having reference data for each possible combination to benchmark MBDCAs is an impractical strategy. Hence, a new commissioning process is required. TG-186 addresses in detail the above issues through the literature review and provides explicit recommendations based on the current state of knowledge. TG-43-based dose prescription and dose calculation remain in effect, with MBDCA dose reporting performed in parallel when available. In using MBDCAs, it is recommended that the radiation transport should be performed in the heterogeneous medium and, at minimum, the dose

  10. In-medium Properties of B and D Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundu, H.; Azizi, K.; Er, N.

    2014-11-01

    The shifts in the masses and decay constants of B and D mesons in nuclear medium are calculated in the frame work of QCD sum rules. The results obtained are compared with the existing theoretical predictions.

  11. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  12. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  13. Culture Medium for Enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Neidhardt, Frederick C.; Bloch, Philip L.; Smith, David F.

    1974-01-01

    A new minimal medium for enterobacteria has been developed. It supports growth of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium at rates comparable to those of any of the traditional media that have high phosphate concentrations, but each of the macronutrients (phosphate, sulfate, and nitrogen) is present at a sufficiently low level to permit isotopic labeling. Buffering capacity is provided by an organic dipolar ion, morpholinopropane sulfonate, which has a desirable pK (7.2) and no apparent inhibitory effect on growth. The medium has been developed with the objectives of (i) providing reproducibility of chemical composition, (ii) meeting the experimentally determined nutritional needs of the cell, (iii) avoiding an unnecessary excess of the major ionic species, (iv) facilitating the adjustment of the levels of individual ionic species, both for isotopic labeling and for nutritional studies, (v) supplying a complete array of micronutrients, (vi) setting a particular ion as the crop-limiting factor when the carbon and energy source is in excess, and (vii) providing maximal convenience in the manufacture and storage of the medium. PMID:4604283

  14. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  15. Heterogeneities in granular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, A.; Barker, G. C.; Luck, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The absence of Brownian motion in granular media is a source of much complexity, including the prevalence of heterogeneity, whether static or dynamic, within a given system. Such strong heterogeneities can exist as a function of depth in a box of grains; this is the system we study here. First, we present results from three-dimensional, cooperative and stochastic Monte Carlo shaking simulations of spheres on heterogeneous density fluctuations. Next, we juxtapose these with results obtained from a theoretical model of a column of grains under gravity; frustration via competing local fields is included in our model, whereas the effect of gravity is to slow down the dynamics of successively deeper layers. The combined conclusions suggest that the dynamics of a real granular column can be divided into different phases—ballistic, logarithmic, activated, and glassy—as a function of depth. The nature of the ground states and their retrieval (under zero-temperature dynamics) is analyzed; the glassy phase shows clear evidence of its intrinsic (“crystalline”) states, which lie below a band of approximately degenerate ground states. In the other three phases, by contrast, the system jams into a state chosen randomly from this upper band of metastable states. PMID:18541918

  16. Shock initiation in heterogeneous explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nunziato, J.W.; Kipp, M.E.; Setchell, R.E.; Walsh, E.K.

    1982-09-01

    It is generally accepted that the shock initiation of heterogeneous explosives begins with the formation of hot spots in the vicinity of microstructural defects such as voids, grain boundaries, and phase boundaries where there can be significant localized deformation as a result of material viscosity, plastic work, and intergranular friction. In this report, we describe this phenomenon in the context of a recently developed theory of chemically reacting, multiphase mixtures. In particular, we consider a granular explosive with an energetic binder (e.g. PBX-9404) and represent it as a three-phase, saturated mixture consisting of the granular reactant, the binder phase, and the product gases. Under dynamic loading, viscous dissipation results in high temperatures in the binder phase which subsequently thermally explodes to form product gases. Decomposition of the granular reactant is achieved by laminar grain burning. This model has been incorporated into a 1-D Lagrangian finite-difference code (WONDY) and the evolution of compressive shock and acceleration (ramp) waves have been calculated for PBX-9404. The calculated wave growth at the front, as well as the reaction-induced pressure wave behind the front, are shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  17. Spatial heterogeneity study of vegetation coverage at Heihe River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijuan; Zhong, Bo; Guo, Liyu; Zhao, Xiangwei

    2014-11-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of the animal-landscape system has three major components: heterogeneity of resource distributions in the physical environment, heterogeneity of plant tissue chemistry, heterogeneity of movement modes by the animal. Furthermore, all three different types of heterogeneity interact each other and can either reinforce or offset one another, thereby affecting system stability and dynamics. In previous studies, the study areas are investigated by field sampling, which costs a large amount of manpower. In addition, uncertain in sampling affects the quality of field data, which leads to unsatisfactory results during the entire study. In this study, remote sensing data is used to guide the sampling for research on heterogeneity of vegetation coverage to avoid errors caused by randomness of field sampling. Semi-variance and fractal dimension analysis are used to analyze the spatial heterogeneity of vegetation coverage at Heihe River Basin. The spherical model with nugget is used to fit the semivariogram of vegetation coverage. Based on the experiment above, it is found, (1)there is a strong correlation between vegetation coverage and distance of vegetation populations within the range of 0~28051.3188m at Heihe River Basin, but the correlation loses suddenly when the distance greater than 28051.3188m. (2)The degree of spatial heterogeneity of vegetation coverage at Heihe River Basin is medium. (3)Spatial distribution variability of vegetation occurs mainly on small scales. (4)The degree of spatial autocorrelation is 72.29% between 25% and 75%, which means that spatial correlation of vegetation coverage at Heihe River Basin is medium high.

  18. Groundwater flow in heterogeneous composite aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, C. L.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2002-08-01

    We introduce a stochastic model of flow through highly heterogeneous, composite porous media that greatly improves estimates of pressure head statistics. Composite porous media consist of disjoint blocks of permeable materials, each block comprising a single material type. Within a composite medium, hydraulic conductivity can be represented through a pair of random processes: (1) a boundary process that determines block arrangement and extent and (2) a stationary process that defines conductivity within a given block. We obtain second-order statistics for hydraulic conductivity in the composite model and then contrast them with statistics obtained from a standard univariate model that ignores the boundary process and treats a composite medium as if it were statistically homogeneous. Next, we develop perturbation expansions for the first two moments of head and contrast them with expansions based on the homogeneous approximation. In most cases the bivariate model leads to much sharper perturbation approximations than does the usual model of flow through an undifferentiated material when both are applied to highly heterogeneous media. We make this statement precise. We illustrate the composite model with examples of one-dimensional flows which are interesting in their own right and which allow us to compare the accuracy of perturbation approximations of head statistics to exact analytical solutions. We also show the boundary process of our bivariate model is equivalent to the indicator functions often used to represent composite media in Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Measuring habitat heterogeneity reveals new insights into bird community composition.

    PubMed

    Stirnemann, Ingrid A; Ikin, Karen; Gibbons, Philip; Blanchard, Wade; Lindenmayer, David B

    2015-03-01

    Fine-scale vegetation cover is a common variable used to explain animal occurrence, but we know less about the effects of fine-scale vegetation heterogeneity. Theoretically, fine-scale vegetation heterogeneity is an important driver of biodiversity because it captures the range of resources available in a given area. In this study we investigated how bird species richness and birds grouped by various ecological traits responded to vegetation cover and heterogeneity. We found that both fine-scale vegetation cover (of tall trees, medium-sized trees and shrubs) and heterogeneity (of tall trees, and shrubs) were important predictors of bird richness, but the direction of the response of bird richness to shrub heterogeneity differed between sites with different proportions of tall tree cover. For example, bird richness increased with shrub heterogeneity in sites with high levels of tall tree cover, but declined in sites with low levels of tall tree cover. Our findings indicated that an increase in vegetation heterogeneity will not always result in an increase in resources and niches, and associated higher species richness. We also found birds grouped by traits responded in a predictable way to vegetation heterogeneity. For example, we found small birds benefited from increased shrub heterogeneity supporting the textual discontinuity hypothesis and non-arboreal (ground or shrub) nesting species were associated with high vegetation cover (low heterogeneity). Our results indicated that focusing solely on increasing vegetation cover (e.g. through restoration) may be detrimental to particular animal groups. Findings from this investigation can help guide habitat management for different functional groups of birds.

  20. Root Foraging Increases Performance of the Clonal Plant Potentilla reptans in Heterogeneous Nutrient Environments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengwen; van Kleunen, Mark; During, Heinjo J.; Werger, Marinus J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Plastic root-foraging responses have been widely recognized as an important strategy for plants to explore heterogeneously distributed resources. However, the benefits and costs of root foraging have received little attention. Methodology/Principal Findings In a greenhouse experiment, we grew pairs of connected ramets of 22 genotypes of the stoloniferous plant Potentilla reptans in paired pots, between which the contrast in nutrient availability was set as null, medium and high, but with the total nutrient amount kept the same. We calculated root-foraging intensity of each individual ramet pair as the difference in root mass between paired ramets divided by the total root mass. For each genotype, we then calculated root-foraging ability as the slope of the regression of root-foraging intensity against patch contrast. For all genotypes, root-foraging intensity increased with patch contrast and the total biomass and number of offspring ramets were lowest at high patch contrast. Among genotypes, root-foraging intensity was positively related to production of offspring ramets and biomass in the high patch-contrast treatment, which indicates an evolutionary benefit of root foraging in heterogeneous environments. However, we found no significant evidence that the ability of plastic foraging imposes costs under homogeneous conditions (i.e. when foraging is not needed). Conclusions/Significance Our results show that plants of P. reptans adjust their root-foraging intensity according to patch contrast. Moreover, the results show that the root foraging has an evolutionary advantage in heterogeneous environments, while costs of having the ability of plastic root foraging were absent or very small. PMID:23472211

  1. Root foraging increases performance of the clonal plant Potentilla reptans in heterogeneous nutrient environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengwen; van Kleunen, Mark; During, Heinjo J; Werger, Marinus J A

    2013-01-01

    Plastic root-foraging responses have been widely recognized as an important strategy for plants to explore heterogeneously distributed resources. However, the benefits and costs of root foraging have received little attention. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew pairs of connected ramets of 22 genotypes of the stoloniferous plant Potentilla reptans in paired pots, between which the contrast in nutrient availability was set as null, medium and high, but with the total nutrient amount kept the same. We calculated root-foraging intensity of each individual ramet pair as the difference in root mass between paired ramets divided by the total root mass. For each genotype, we then calculated root-foraging ability as the slope of the regression of root-foraging intensity against patch contrast. For all genotypes, root-foraging intensity increased with patch contrast and the total biomass and number of offspring ramets were lowest at high patch contrast. Among genotypes, root-foraging intensity was positively related to production of offspring ramets and biomass in the high patch-contrast treatment, which indicates an evolutionary benefit of root foraging in heterogeneous environments. However, we found no significant evidence that the ability of plastic foraging imposes costs under homogeneous conditions (i.e. when foraging is not needed). Our results show that plants of P. reptans adjust their root-foraging intensity according to patch contrast. Moreover, the results show that the root foraging has an evolutionary advantage in heterogeneous environments, while costs of having the ability of plastic root foraging were absent or very small.

  2. Seismic waves in a three-dimensional block medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, N. I.

    2016-08-01

    We study numerically the propagation of seismic waves in a three-dimensional block medium. The medium is modelled by a spatial lattice of masses connected by elastic springs and viscous dampers. We study Lamb's problem under a surface point vertical load. The cases of both step and pulse load are considered. The displacements and velocities are calculated for surface masses. The influence of the viscosity of the dampers on the attenuation of perturbations is studied. We compare our numerical results for the block medium with known analytical solutions for the elastic medium.

  3. Mechanisms of anomalous dispersion in flow through heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukhova, Alina; Dentz, Marco; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Willmann, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the origins of anomalous dispersion in heterogeneous porous media in terms of the medium and flow properties. To identify and quantify the heterogeneity controls, we focus on porous media which are organized in assemblies of equally sized conductive inclusions embedded in a constant conductivity matrix. We study the behavior of particle arrival times for different conductivity distributions and link the statistical medium characteristics to large-scale transport using a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach. The CTRW models particle motion as a sequence of transitions in space and time. We derive an explicit map of the conductivity onto the transition time distribution. The derived CTRW model predicts solute transport based on the conductivity distribution and the characteristic heterogeneity length. In this way, heavy tails in solute arrival times and anomalous particle dispersion as measured by the centered mean square displacement are directly related to the medium properties. These findings shed light on the mechanisms of anomalous dispersion in heterogeneous porous media, and provide a basis for the predictive modeling of large-scale transport.

  4. Soft random solids and their heterogeneous elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoming; Goldbart, Paul M.; Xing, Xiangjun; Zippelius, Annette

    2009-09-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in the elastic properties of soft random solids is examined via vulcanization theory. The spatial heterogeneity in the structure of soft random solids is a result of the fluctuations locked-in at their synthesis, which also brings heterogeneity in their elastic properties. Vulcanization theory studies semimicroscopic models of random-solid-forming systems and applies replica field theory to deal with their quenched disorder and thermal fluctuations. The elastic deformations of soft random solids are argued to be described by the Goldstone sector of fluctuations contained in vulcanization theory, associated with a subtle form of spontaneous symmetry breaking that is associated with the liquid-to-random-solid transition. The resulting free energy of this Goldstone sector can be reinterpreted as arising from a phenomenological description of an elastic medium with quenched disorder. Through this comparison, we arrive at the statistics of the quenched disorder of the elasticity of soft random solids in terms of residual stress and Lamé-coefficient fields. In particular, there are large residual stresses in the equilibrium reference state, and the disorder correlators involving the residual stress are found to be long ranged and governed by a universal parameter that also gives the mean shear modulus.

  5. Soft random solids and their heterogeneous elasticity.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoming; Goldbart, Paul M; Xing, Xiangjun; Zippelius, Annette

    2009-09-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in the elastic properties of soft random solids is examined via vulcanization theory. The spatial heterogeneity in the structure of soft random solids is a result of the fluctuations locked-in at their synthesis, which also brings heterogeneity in their elastic properties. Vulcanization theory studies semimicroscopic models of random-solid-forming systems and applies replica field theory to deal with their quenched disorder and thermal fluctuations. The elastic deformations of soft random solids are argued to be described by the Goldstone sector of fluctuations contained in vulcanization theory, associated with a subtle form of spontaneous symmetry breaking that is associated with the liquid-to-random-solid transition. The resulting free energy of this Goldstone sector can be reinterpreted as arising from a phenomenological description of an elastic medium with quenched disorder. Through this comparison, we arrive at the statistics of the quenched disorder of the elasticity of soft random solids in terms of residual stress and Lamé-coefficient fields. In particular, there are large residual stresses in the equilibrium reference state, and the disorder correlators involving the residual stress are found to be long ranged and governed by a universal parameter that also gives the mean shear modulus.

  6. The Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger

    Substantial progress in the field of the Local Interstellar Medium has been largely due to recent launches of space missions, mostly in the UV and X-ray domains, but also to ground-based observations, mainly in high resolution spectroscopy. However, a clear gap seems to remain between the wealth of new data and the theoretical understanding. This paper gives an overview of some observational aspects, with no attempt of completeness or doing justice to all the people involved in the field. As progress rarely evolves in straight paths, we can expect that our present picture of the solar system surroundings is not definitive.

  7. Modeling Endovascular Coils as Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadollahi Farsani, H.; Herrmann, M.; Chong, B.; Frakes, D.

    2016-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgeries are the stat-of-the-art treatments for many pathologies. Treating brain aneurysms is no exception; invasive neurovascular clipping is no longer the only option and endovascular coiling has introduced itself as the most common treatment. Coiling isolates the aneurysm from blood circulation by promoting thrombosis within the aneurysm. One approach to studying intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics consists of virtually deploying finite element coil models and then performing computational fluid dynamics. However, this approach is often computationally expensive and requires extensive resources to perform. The porous medium approach has been considered as an alternative to the conventional coil modeling approach because it lessens the complexities of computational fluid dynamics simulations by reducing the number of mesh elements needed to discretize the domain. There have been a limited number of attempts at treating the endovascular coils as homogeneous porous media. However, the heterogeneity associated with coil configurations requires a more accurately defined porous medium in which the porosity and permeability change throughout the domain. We implemented this approach by introducing a lattice of sample volumes and utilizing techniques available in the field of interactive computer graphics. We observed that the introduction of the heterogeneity assumption was associated with significant changes in simulated aneurysmal flow velocities as compared to the homogeneous assumption case. Moreover, as the sample volume size was decreased, the flow velocities approached an asymptotical value, showing the importance of the sample volume size selection. These results demonstrate that the homogeneous assumption for porous media that are inherently heterogeneous can lead to considerable errors. Additionally, this modeling approach allowed us to simulate post-treatment flows without considering the explicit geometry of a deployed endovascular coil mass

  8. Soil particle heterogeneity affects the growth of a rhizomatous wetland plant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Xue, Wei; Peng, Yi-Ke; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Soil is commonly composed of particles of different sizes, and soil particle size may greatly affect the growth of plants because it affects soil physical and chemical properties. However, no study has tested the effects of soil particle heterogeneity on the growth of clonal plants. We conducted a greenhouse experiment in which individual ramets of the wetland plant Bolboschoenus planiculmis were grown in three homogeneous soil treatments with uniformly sized quartz particles (small: 0.75 mm, medium: 1.5 mm, or large: 3 mm), one homogeneous treatment with an even mixture of large and medium particles, and two heterogeneous treatments consisting of 16 or 4 patches of large and medium particles. Biomass, ramet number, rhizome length and spacer length were significantly greater in the treatment with only medium particles than in the one with only large particles. Biomass, ramet number, rhizome length and tuber number in the patchy treatments were greater in patches of medium than of large particles; this difference was more pronounced when patches were small than when they were large. Soil particle size and soil particle heterogeneity can greatly affect the growth of clonal plants. Thus, studies to test the effects of soil heterogeneity on clonal plants should distinguish the effects of nutrient heterogeneity from those of particle heterogeneity.

  9. Optical activity via Kerr nonlinearity in a spinning chiral medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Anwar Ali; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Khan, Rahmat Ali

    2016-11-01

    Optical activity is investigated in a chiral medium by employing the four level cascade atomic model, in which the optical responses of the atomic medium are studied with Kerr nonlinearity. Light entering into a chiral medium splits into circular birefringent beams. The angle of divergence between the circular birefringent beams and the polarization states of the two light beams is manipulated with Kerr nonlinearity. In the stationary chiral medium the angle of divergence between the circular birefringent beams is calculated to be 1.3 radian. Furthermore, circular birefringence is optically controlled in a spinning chiral medium, where the maximum rotary photon drag angle for left (right) circularly polarized beam is ±1.1 (±1.5) microradian. The change in the angle of divergence between circular birefringent beams by rotary photon drag is calculated to be 0.4 microradian. The numerical results may help to understand image designing, image coding, discovery of photonic crystals and optical sensing technology.

  10. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  11. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  12. [An improved differential medium, CA medium, for differentiating Shigella].

    PubMed

    Tokoro, M; Nagano, I; Goto, K; Nakamura, A

    1990-07-01

    We devised a Citrate-Acetate (CA) medium for rapidly differentiating Shigella. The medium consisted of 3.0 g of sodium citrate, 2.0 g of sodium acetate, 0.2 g of glucose, 1.0 g of dipotassium phosphate, 1.0 g of mono ammonium phosphate, 0.2 g of magnesium sulfate, 5.0 g of sodium chloride, 0.08 g of brom thymol blue, 15.0 g of agar, and 1000 ml of distilled water. An evaluation was made of the CA medium, for the rapid differentiation of 23 Shigella strains, 129 Escherichia coli strains and 130 isolates, that formed colourless colonies suspected to be Shigella on SS agar plate, from feces of healthy people. The results obtained were as follows 1) On the CA medium, all Shigella strains did not grow and there was no change in colour. 2) Positive growth rates of E. coli strains after incubation for 24 hr at 37 degrees C on CA medium, sodium acetate medium (Acet) and Christensen citrate medium (C-Cit) were 96.0%, 95.2% and 28.0%, respectively. Therefore, the positive growth rate of E. coli strains after incubation for 24 hr on CA medium was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) than that on C-Cit medium. 3) Positive growth rates of isolates after incubation for 24 hr at 37 degrees C on CA medium, Acet medium and C-Cit medium were 95.4%, 83.1% and 71.5%, respectively. Therefore, the positive growth rates of isolates after incubation for 24 hr on CA medium was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) than that on Acet medium and C-Cit medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Unravelling mononuclear phagocyte heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Frédéric; Gordon, Siamon; Hume, David A.; Mowat, Allan M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2011-01-01

    When Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn first described dendritic cells (DCs) in 1973 it took many years to convince the immunology community that these cells were truly distinct from macrophages. Almost four decades later, the DC is regarded as the key initiator of adaptive immune responses; however, distinguishing DCs from macrophages still leads to confusion and debate in the field. Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks five experts to discuss the issue of heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system and to give their opinion on the importance of defining these cells for future research. PMID:20467425

  14. Intratumor Heterogeneity in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beca, Francisco; Polyak, Kornelia

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity is the main obstacle to effective cancer treatment and personalized medicine. Both genetic and epigenetic sources of intratumor heterogeneity are well recognized and several technologies have been developed for their characterization. With the technological advances in recent years, investigators are now elucidating intratumor heterogeneity at the single cell level and in situ. However, translating the accumulated knowledge about intratumor heterogeneity to clinical practice has been slow. We are certain that better understanding of the composition and evolution of tumors during disease progression and treatment will improve cancer diagnosis and the design of therapies. Here we review some of the most important considerations related to intratumor heterogeneity. We discuss both genetic and epigenetic sources of intratumor heterogeneity and review experimental approaches that are commonly used to quantify it. We also discuss the impact of intratumor heterogeneity on cancer diagnosis and treatment and share our perspectives on the future of this field.

  15. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  16. The Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Interstellar Medium (ISM) forms an integral part of the lifecycle of stars and the galaxy. Stars are formed by gravitational contraction of interstellar clouds. Over their life, stars return much of their mass to the ISM through winds and supernova explosions, resulting in a slow enrichment in heavy elements. Understanding the origin and evolution of the ISM is a key problem within astrophysics. The KAO has made many important contributions to studies of the interstellar medium both on the macro and on the micro scale. In this overview, I will concentrate on two breakthroughs in the last decade in which KAO observations have played a major role: (1) the importance of large Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules for the ISM (section 3) and (2) the study of Photodissociation Regions (PDRs) as an analog for the diffuse ISM at large (section 4). Appropriately, the micro and macro problem are intricately interwoven in these problems. Finally, section 5 reviews the origin of the (CII) emission observed by COBE.

  17. Pore scale heterogeneity in the mineral distribution and surface area of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Peter; Moulton, Kevin; Krevor, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    There are long-standing challenges in characterizing reactive transport in porous media at scales larger than individual pores. This hampers the prediction of the field-scale impact of geochemical processes on fluid flow [1]. This is a source of uncertainty for carbon dioxide injection, which results in a reactive fluid-rock system, particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2,3]. The objective of this study was to quantify heterogeneity in reactive surface and observe the extent of its non-normal character. In this study we describe our work in using micron-scale x-ray imaging and other spectroscopic techniques for the purpose of describing the statistical distribution of reactive surface area within a porous medium, and identifying specific mineral phases and their distribution in 3-dimensions. Using in-house image processing techniques and auxilary charactersation with thin section, electron microscope and spectroscopic techniques we quantified the surface area of each mineral phase in the x-ray CT images. This quantification was validated against nitrogen BET surface area and backscattered electron imaging measurements of the CT-imaged samples. Distributions in reactive surface area for each mineral phase were constructed by calculating surface areas in thousands of randomly selected subvolume images of the total sample, each normalized to the pore volume in that image. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be

  18. Heterogeneity in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Anthony M; Fortune, Sarah M; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2017-07-24

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), results in a range of clinical presentations in humans. Most infections manifest as a clinically asymptomatic, contained state that is termed latent TB infection (LTBI); a smaller subset of infected individuals present with symptomatic, active TB. Within these two seemingly binary states, there is a spectrum of host outcomes that have varying symptoms, microbiologies, immune responses and pathologies. Recently, it has become apparent that there is diversity of infection even within a single individual. A good understanding of the heterogeneity that is intrinsic to TB - at both the population level and the individual level - is crucial to inform the development of intervention strategies that account for and target the unique, complex and independent nature of the local host-pathogen interactions that occur in this infection. In this Review, we draw on model systems and human data to discuss multiple facets of TB biology and their relationship to the overall heterogeneity observed in the human disease.

  19. Heterogeneity of reactive astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Ao, Yan; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes respond to injury and disease in the central nervous system (CNS) with a process referred to as reactive astrogliosis. Recent progress demonstrates that reactive astrogliosis is not a simple all-or-none phenomenon, but is a finely gradated continuum of changes that range from reversible alterations in gene expression and cell hypertrophy, to scar formation with permanent tissue rearrangement. There is now compelling evidence that reactive astrocytes exhibit a substantial potential for heterogeneity at multiple levels, including gene expression, cell morphology, topography (distance from lesions), CNS regions, local (among neighboring cells), cell signaling and cell function. Structural and functional changes are regulated in reactive astrocytes by many different potential signaling events that occur in a context dependent manner. It is noteworthy that different stimuli of astrocyte reactivity can lead to similar degrees of GFAP upregulation while causing substantially different changes in transcriptome profiles and cell function. Thus, it is not possible to equate simple and uniform measures such as cell hypertrophy and upregulation of GFAP expression with a single, uniform concept of astrocyte reactivity. Instead, it is necessary to recognize the considerable potential for heterogeneity and determine the functional implications of astrocyte reactivity in a context specific manner as regulated by specific signaling events. PMID:24361547

  20. Heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Alexander W.; Fish, Gregory; Hall, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) have been dichotomized into circuits with high passive content (silica and silicon PLCs) and high active content (InP tunable lasers and transceivers) due to the trade-off in material characteristics used within these two classes. This has led to restrictions in the adoption of PICs to systems in which only one of the two classes of circuits are required to be made on a singular chip. Much work has been done to create convergence in these two classes by either engineering the materials to achieve the functionality of both device types on a single platform, or in epitaxial growth techniques to transfer one material to the next, but have yet to demonstrate performance equal to that of components fabricated in their native substrates. Advances in waferbonding techniques have led to a new class of heterogeneously integrated photonic circuits that allow for the concurrent use of active and passive materials within a photonic circuit, realizing components on a transferred substrate that have equivalent performance as their native substrate. In this talk, we review and compare advances made in heterogeneous integration along with demonstrations of components and circuits enabled by this technology.

  1. SIMULATE-4 pin power calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadir, T.; Lindahl, S. Oe

    2006-07-01

    A new pin power reconstruction module has been implemented in Studsvik Scandpower's next generation nodal code, SIMULATE-4. Heterogeneous pin powers are calculated by modulating multi-group pin powers from the sub-mesh solver of SIMULATE-4 with pin form factors from single-assembly CASMO-5 lattice calculations. The multi-group pin power model captures instantaneous spectral effects, and actinide tracking on the assembly sub-mesh describes exposure-induced pin power variations. Model details and verification tests against high order multi-assembly transport methods are presented. The accuracy of the new methods is also demonstrated by comparing SIMULATE-4 calculations with measured critical experiment pin powers. (authors)

  2. Not only Gravitational Lensing, but in general Medium Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2013-05-01

    According to the General Theory of Relativity the gravity curves the spacetime and everything over there follows a curved path. The space being curved near massive cosmic bodies is just a metaphor, not a fact. We dough that gravity is only geometry. The deflection of light (Gravitational Lensing) near massive cosmic bodies is not due because of a ``curved space'', but because of the medium composition (medium that could be formed by waves, particles, plasma, dust, gaseous, fluids, solids, etc.), to the medium density, medium heterogeneity, and to the electromagnetic and gravitational fields contained in that medium that light passes through. This medium deviates the light direction, because of the interactions of photons with other particles. The space is not empty; it has various nebulae and fields and corpuscles, etc. Light bends not only because of the gravity but also because of the medium gradient and refraction index, similarly as light bends when it leaves or enters a liquid, a plastic, a glass, or a quartz. The inhomogeneous medium may act as an optical lens such that its refractive index varies in a fashion, alike the Gradient-Index Lens. We talk about a Medium Lensing, which means that photons interact with other particles in the medium. For example, the interaction between a photon of electromagnetic radiation with a charged particle (let's say with a free electron), which is known as Compton Effect, produces an increase in the photon's wavelength. In the Inverse Compton Effect the low-energy photons gain energy because they were scattered by much-higher energy free electrons.

  3. Adaptation Driven by Spatial Heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermsen, Rutger

    2011-03-01

    Biological evolution and ecology are intimately linked, because the reproductive success or ``fitness'' of an organism depends crucially on its ecosystem. Yet, most models of evolution (or population genetics) consider homogeneous, fixed-size populations subjected to a constant selection pressure. To move one step beyond such ``mean field'' descriptions, we discuss stochastic models of evolution driven by spatial heterogeneity. We imagine a population whose range is limited by a spatially varying environmental parameter, such as a temperature or the concentration of an antibiotic drug. Individuals in the population replicate, die and migrate stochastically. Also, by mutation, they can adapt to the environmental stress and expand their range. This way, adaptation and niche expansion go hand in hand. This mode of evolution is qualitatively different from the usual notion of a population climbing a fitness gradient. We analytically calculate the rate of adaptation by solving a first passage time problem. Interestingly, the joint effects of reproduction, death, mutation and migration result in two distinct parameter regimes depending on the relative time scales of mutation and migration. We argue that the proposed scenario may be relevant for the rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance. This work was supported by the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Grant PHY-0822283).

  4. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, Omar C-M Ma, Charlie

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  5. Modelling heterogeneous interfaces for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia

    2017-04-01

    The generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight offers a promising approach for producing scalable and sustainable carbon-free energy. The key of a successful solar-to-fuel technology is the design of efficient, long-lasting and low-cost photoelectrochemical cells, which are responsible for absorbing sunlight and driving water splitting reactions. To this end, a detailed understanding and control of heterogeneous interfaces between photoabsorbers, electrolytes and catalysts present in photoelectrochemical cells is essential. Here we review recent progress and open challenges in predicting physicochemical properties of heterogeneous interfaces for solar water splitting applications using first-principles-based approaches, and highlights the key role of these calculations in interpreting increasingly complex experiments.

  6. Simple model to study heterogeneous electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Junior, Edison; Lopes, Ana Carolina G.; Suffredini, Hugo B.; Homem-de-Mello, Paula

    2015-01-01

    New electrocatalyst materials have been proposed to increase the performance of fuel cells. Experimental studies show that Pt and Pb metallic and oxide materials are quite efficient in the oxidation of alcohols and small organic molecules such as formic acid in advanced fuel cells. This work proposes a model for studying morphologically heterogeneous catalysts through quantum chemistry methods such as density functional calculations. For testing the model, we have experimentally studied the adsorption of small organic molecules, namely formic acid and methanol, on Pt and Pb electrodes. All methodologies we have tested can be employed for this kind of study, but M06 functional results correlate best with previous simulations of homogeneous catalysts and with experimental data obtained for homogeneous and heterogeneous electrodes. Our model indicates that the presence of a Pt-Pb interface is responsible for higher adsorption energies of these molecules, most likely due to the orientation of the organic molecules that should facilitate the oxidation process.

  7. The lunar seismic tomography and internal heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, N.; Zhu, P.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    A seismic tomography is presented to show the internal lateral heterogeneities of moon. The lunar seismic tomography is made from the moonquake arrival-time data acquired by the Apollo program during 1971 to 1977. The seismic records obtained from the four seismic station of Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package on the moon. The research target covers the surround of Apollo-12, 14, 15 and 16 landing sites. A preliminary image of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structures of lunar interior have been calculated using hundreds of arrival-times of moonquake events from surface to deep mantle. These results show that some evidences of lateral heterogeneities in the lunar mantle and crust, which implies the existence of complex structure inside the moon.

  8. Partial stresses in heterogeneous media by a direct statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouanna, Paul; Pèdesseau, Laurent

    2004-04-01

    The total stress tensor in a structured or non-structured medium can be obtained by a direct statistical approach using the generalized virial theorem, without any reference to a potential function, as soon as positions, velocities and interactions of the particles are given by Molecular Dynamics. However, as shown here, it would be wrong to apply these results to a given class of particles in an heterogeneous medium without adding a cross internal virial tensor to the self internal virial tensor and the partial kinetic energy tensor relative to this class of particles. To cite this article: P. Jouanna, L. Pèdesseau, C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  9. Population heterogeneity and causal inference.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu

    2013-04-16

    Population heterogeneity is ubiquitous in social science. The very objective of social science research is not to discover abstract and universal laws but to understand population heterogeneity. Due to population heterogeneity, causal inference with observational data in social science is impossible without strong assumptions. Researchers have long been concerned with two potential sources of bias. The first is bias in unobserved pretreatment factors affecting the outcome even in the absence of treatment. The second is bias due to heterogeneity in treatment effects. In this article, I show how "composition bias" due to population heterogeneity evolves over time when treatment propensity is systematically associated with heterogeneous treatment effects. A form of selection bias, composition bias, arises dynamically at the aggregate level even when the classic assumption of ignorability holds true at the microlevel.

  10. Population heterogeneity and causal inference

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Population heterogeneity is ubiquitous in social science. The very objective of social science research is not to discover abstract and universal laws but to understand population heterogeneity. Due to population heterogeneity, causal inference with observational data in social science is impossible without strong assumptions. Researchers have long been concerned with two potential sources of bias. The first is bias in unobserved pretreatment factors affecting the outcome even in the absence of treatment. The second is bias due to heterogeneity in treatment effects. In this article, I show how “composition bias” due to population heterogeneity evolves over time when treatment propensity is systematically associated with heterogeneous treatment effects. A form of selection bias, composition bias, arises dynamically at the aggregate level even when the classic assumption of ignorability holds true at the microlevel. PMID:23530202

  11. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  12. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: LOD-score considerations for confirmation of linkage in a heterogeneous trait

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, M.P.; Kibar, Z.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system, defined by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. HSP may be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or an X-linked trait. AD HSP is genetically heterogeneous, and three loci have been identified so far: SPG3 maps to chromosome 14q, SPG4 to 2p, and SPG4a to 15q. We have undertaken linkage analysis with 21 uncomplicated AD families to the three AD HSP loci. We report significant linkage for three of our families to the SPG4 locus and exclude several families by multipoint linkage. We used linkage information from several different research teams to evaluate the statistical probability of linkage to the SPG4 locus for uncomplicated AD HSP families and established the critical LOD-score value necessary for confirmation of linkage to the SPG4 locus from Bayesian statistics. In addition, we calculated the empirical P-values for the LOD scores obtained with all families with computer simulation methods. Power to detect significant linkage, as well as type I error probabilities, were evaluated. This combined analytical approach permitted conclusive linkage analyses on small to medium-size families, under the restrictions of genetic heterogeneity. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: LOD-score considerations for confirmation of linkage in a heterogeneous trait.

    PubMed

    Dubé, M P; Mlodzienski, M A; Kibar, Z; Farlow, M R; Ebers, G; Harper, P; Kolodny, E H; Rouleau, G A; Figlewicz, D A

    1997-03-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system, defined by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. HSP may be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or an X-linked trait. AD HSP is genetically heterogeneous, and three loci have been identified so far: SPG3 maps to chromosome 14q, SPG4 to 2p, and SPG4a to 15q. We have undertaken linkage analysis with 21 uncomplicated AD families to the three AD HSP loci. We report significant linkage for three of our families to the SPG4 locus and exclude several families by multipoint linkage. We used linkage information from several different research teams to evaluate the statistical probability of linkage to the SPG4 locus for uncomplicated AD HSP families and established the critical LOD-score value necessary for confirmation of linkage to the SPG4 locus from Bayesian statistics. In addition, we calculated the empirical P-values for the LOD scores obtained with all families with computer simulation methods. Power to detect significant linkage, as well as type I error probabilities, were evaluated. This combined analytical approach permitted conclusive linkage analyses on small to medium-size families, under the restrictions of genetic heterogeneity.

  14. Ventilation heterogeneity in obesity.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Gobbi, Alessandro; Antonelli, Andrea; Torchio, Roberto; Gulotta, Carlo; Pellegrino, Giulia Michela; Dellacà, Raffaele; Hyatt, Robert E; Brusasco, Vito

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is associated with important decrements in lung volumes. Despite this, ventilation remains normally or near normally distributed at least for moderate decrements in functional residual capacity (FRC). We tested the hypothesis that this is because maximum flow increases presumably as a result of an increased lung elastic recoil. Forced expiratory flows corrected for thoracic gas compression volume, lung volumes, and forced oscillation technique at 5-11-19 Hz were measured in 133 healthy subjects with a body mass index (BMI) ranging from 18 to 50 kg/m(2). Short-term temporal variability of ventilation heterogeneity was estimated from the interquartile range of the frequency distribution of the difference in inspiratory resistance between 5 and 19 Hz (R5-19_IQR). FRC % predicted negatively correlated with BMI (r = -0.72, P < 0.001) and with an increase in slope of either maximal (r = -0.34, P < 0.01) or partial flow-volume curves (r = -0.30, P < 0.01). Together with a slight decrease in residual volume, this suggests an increased lung elastic recoil. Regression analysis of R5-19_IQR against FRC % predicted and expiratory reserve volume (ERV) yielded significantly higher correlation coefficients by nonlinear than linear fitting models (r(2) = 0.40 vs. 0.30 for FRC % predicted and r(2) = 0.28 vs. 0.19 for ERV). In conclusion, temporal variability of ventilation heterogeneities increases in obesity only when FRC falls approximately below 65% of predicted or ERV below 0.6 liters. Above these thresholds distribution is quite well preserved presumably as a result of an increase in lung recoil.

  15. Structures Formation In Slurry Flow In A Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilchherr, R.; Koenders, M. A.

    A finely-grained, densely packed material is mixed with a Newtonian fluid and made to flow upwards through a porous medium. The slurry percolates through the medium and, because slurries are inherently non-Newtonian, structures formation takes place (see Koenders 1998). To visualise the effect, the fluid is chosen to be Rizella oil, while the porous medium is constituted of very heterogeneous Pyrex elements. The latter have virtually the same refractive index as the oil, which enables the study of the distribution of the solid fraction of the slurry, as this is the only non-transparent phase in the system. Pictures of the experiments are presented; using various forms of image processing, it is demonstrated that predominantly horizontal structures are formed in the flow process. The multiphase flow in the heterogeneous matrix has also been described theoretically using granular temperature theory (McTigue and Jenkins 1992) and the structures formation has been obtained in this way too. References Koenders M.A. 1998, Effects of microstructure and non-linearity in heterogeneous materials. J. Appl Phys 31, 1875-1882 McTigue D. and Jenkins J.T. 1992, Channel flow of a concentrated suspensions. In: Advances in Micromechanics of Granular Materials, Shen H.H. et al. (Eds.), pp 381 - 390, Elsevier, Oxford.

  16. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  17. Stochasticity, heterogeneity, and variance in longevity in human populations.

    PubMed

    Hartemink, Nienke; Missov, Trifon I; Caswell, Hal

    2017-04-01

    Inter-individual variance in longevity (or any other demographic outcome) may arise from heterogeneity or from individual stochasticity. Heterogeneity refers to differences among individuals in the demographic rates experienced at a given age or stage. Stochasticity refers to variation due to the random outcome of demographic rates applied to individuals with the same properties. The variance due to individual stochasticity can be calculated from a Markov chain description of the life cycle. The variance due to heterogeneity can be calculated from a multistate model that incorporates the heterogeneity. We show how to use this approach to decompose the variance in longevity into contributions from stochasticity and heterogeneous frailty for male and female cohorts from Sweden (1751-1899), France (1816-1903), and Italy (1872-1899), and also for a selection of period data for the same countries. Heterogeneity in mortality is described by the gamma-Gompertz-Makeham model, in which a gamma distributed "frailty" modifies a baseline Gompertz-Makeham mortality schedule. Model parameters were estimated by maximum likelihood for a range of starting ages. The estimates were used to construct an age×frailty-classified matrix model, from which we compute the variance of longevity and its components due to heterogeneous frailty and to individual stochasticity. The estimated fraction of the variance in longevity due to heterogeneous frailty (averaged over time) is less than 10% for all countries and for both sexes. These results suggest that most of the variance in human longevity arises from stochasticity, rather than from heterogeneous frailty. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity) and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments). The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length) of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants.

  19. Nickel hydroxide deposited indium tin oxide electrodes as electrocatalysts for direct oxidation of carbohydrates in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, V.; Farzana, S.; Berchmans, Sheela

    In this work, the direct electrochemical oxidation of carbohydrates using nickel hydroxide modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes in alkaline medium is demonstrated; suggesting the feasibility of using carbohydrates as a novel fuel in alkaline fuel cells applications. The chosen monosaccharides are namely glucose and fructose; disaccharides such as sucrose and lactose; and sugar acid like ascorbic acid for this study. ITO electrodes are chemically modified using a hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase template electrodeposition of nickel. Structural morphology, growth, orientation and electrochemical behaviour of Ni deposits are characterized using SEM, XRD, XPS and cyclic voltammetry (CV), respectively. Further electrochemical potential cycling process in alkaline medium is employed to convert these Ni deposits into corresponding nickel hydroxide modified electrodes. These electrodes are used as novel platform to perform the electrocatalytic oxidation of various carbohydrates in alkaline medium. It was found that bare and Ni coated ITO electrodes are inactive towards carbohydrates oxidation. The heterogeneous rate constant values are determined and calculated to be two orders of magnitude higher in the case of template method when compared to non-template technique. The observed effect is attributed to the synergistic effect of higher surface area of these deposits and catalytic ability of Ni(II)/Ni(III) redox couple.

  20. Extended variational theory of complex rays in heterogeneous Helmholtz problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Ladeveze, Pierre; Riou, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    In the past years, a numerical technique method called Variational Theory of Complex Rays (VTCR) has been developed for vibration problems in medium frequency. It is a Trefftz Discontinuous Galerkin method which uses plane wave functions as shape functions. However this method is only well developed in homogeneous case. In this paper, VTCR is extended to the heterogeneous Helmholtz problem by creating a new base of shape functions. Numerical examples give a scope of the performances of such an extension of VTCR.

  1. Effect of geometry on concentration polarization in realistic heterogeneous permselective systems.

    PubMed

    Green, Yoav; Shloush, Shahar; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-04-01

    This study extends previous analytical solutions of concentration polarization occurring solely in the depleted region, to the more realistic geometry consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium connecting two opposite microchambers (i.e., a three-layer system). Under the local electroneutrality approximation, the separation of variable methods is used to derive an analytical solution of the electrodiffusive problem for the two opposing asymmetric microchambers. The assumption of an ideal permselective medium allows for the analytic calculation of the 3D concentration and electric potential distributions as well as a current-voltage relation. It is shown that any asymmetry in the microchamber geometries will result in current rectification. Moreover, it is demonstrated that for non-negligible microchamber resistances, the conductance does not exhibit the expected saturation at low concentrations but instead shows a continuous decrease. The results are intended to facilitate a more direct comparison between theory and experiments, as now the voltage drop is across a realistic 3D and three-layer system.

  2. Effect of geometry on concentration polarization in realistic heterogeneous permselective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Yoav; Shloush, Shahar; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-04-01

    This study extends previous analytical solutions of concentration polarization occurring solely in the depleted region, to the more realistic geometry consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium connecting two opposite microchambers (i.e., a three-layer system). Under the local electroneutrality approximation, the separation of variable methods is used to derive an analytical solution of the electrodiffusive problem for the two opposing asymmetric microchambers. The assumption of an ideal permselective medium allows for the analytic calculation of the 3D concentration and electric potential distributions as well as a current-voltage relation. It is shown that any asymmetry in the microchamber geometries will result in current rectification. Moreover, it is demonstrated that for non-negligible microchamber resistances, the conductance does not exhibit the expected saturation at low concentrations but instead shows a continuous decrease. The results are intended to facilitate a more direct comparison between theory and experiments, as now the voltage drop is across a realistic 3D and three-layer system.

  3. Etiologic heterogeneity in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, S B; Reich, T; Cloninger, C R

    1987-01-01

    Etiologic heterogeneity in alcohol abuse was evaluated in 195 extended pedigrees, comprising 288 nuclear families of 140 male and 55 female Caucasian American hospitalized alcoholics. Previous adoption studies in Sweden demonstrated differential heritability of two patterns of alcohol abuse in men: type-2 alcoholism exhibited early onset of abuse associated with criminal behavior, while type-1 abuse began at a later age, uncomplicated by antisocial traits. Alcohol abuse in female Swedish adoptees was relatively homogeneous and similar to the late-onset, type-1 abuse. The notion of etiologic heterogeneity, as suggested by the Stockholm Adoption Studies, was examined in the American pedigrees by contrasting the models of familial transmission of susceptibility to alcoholism obtained via segregation analyses of families of male versus female probands. Families of male probands demonstrated significant familial resemblance, accounted for by a multifactorial-polygenic background in addition to a major (gene) effect. In contrast, familial resemblance in the pedigrees of female probands was attributed solely to a multifactorial-polygenic effect. We considered whether some families of male alcoholics were similar to families of female probands, who expressed type-1 abuse predominantly. Pedigrees of male probands were separated in two groups: (1) "female-like" families had a better likelihood for the model obtained for families of female probands than the one for families of all male probands, (2) "male-like" families had a better likelihood for the model of familial transmission describing families of all male probands. A statistically significant difference in the pattern of familial transmission was observed between the "male-like" and "female-like" groups. Discriminant function analysis of alcohol-related symptoms showed that the familial subtypes differed in clinical features as well. Alcohol abuse by male relatives in "male-like" families was characterized by the

  4. SNS Medium Beta Cryomodule Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Isidoro Campisi; Edward Daly; G. Davis; Jean Delayen; Christiana Grenoble; John Hogan; Lawrence King; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; Mark Wiseman

    2003-09-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerating Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing 24 Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cryomodules for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cold linac. This includes one medium-beta (0.61) prototype, 11 medium-beta production, and 12 high-beta (0.81) production cryomodules. Each of the medium-beta cryomodules is scheduled to undergo complete operational performance testing at Jefferson Laboratory before shipment to ORNL. To date, the prototype and three production models of the medium beta cryomodule have been tested. The performance results of the tested cryomodules will be discussed.

  5. Massively Parallel Geostatistical Inversion of Coupled Processes in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, A.; Schwede, R. L.; Li, W.; Bastian, P.; Ippisch, O.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    The quasi-linear geostatistical approach is an inversion scheme that can be used to estimate the spatial distribution of a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. The estimated parameter field is considered to be a random variable that varies continuously in space, meets the measurements of dependent quantities (such as the hydraulic head, the concentration of a transported solute or its arrival time) and shows the required spatial correlation (described by certain variogram models). This is a method of conditioning a parameter field to observations. Upon discretization, this results in as many parameters as elements of the computational grid. For a full three dimensional representation of the heterogeneous subsurface it is hardly sufficient to work with resolutions (up to one million parameters) of the model domain that can be achieved on a serial computer. The forward problems to be solved within the inversion procedure consists of the elliptic steady-state groundwater flow equation and the formally elliptic but nearly hyperbolic steady-state advection-dominated solute transport equation in a heterogeneous porous medium. Both equations are discretized by Finite Element Methods (FEM) using fully scalable domain decomposition techniques. Whereas standard conforming FEM is sufficient for the flow equation, for the advection dominated transport equation, which rises well known numerical difficulties at sharp fronts or boundary layers, we use the streamline diffusion approach. The arising linear systems are solved using efficient iterative solvers with an AMG (algebraic multigrid) pre-conditioner. During each iteration step of the inversion scheme one needs to solve a multitude of forward and adjoint problems in order to calculate the sensitivities of each measurement and the related cross-covariance matrix of the unknown parameters and the observations. In order to reduce interprocess communications and to improve the scalability of the code on larger clusters

  6. Interference Management in Heterogeneous Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    INTERFERENCE MANAGEMENT IN HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND JUNE 2013 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2011 – FEB 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTERFERENCE MANAGEMENT IN HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...However, such deployments require efficient frequency allocation schemes for managing interference from the pico- and macro base stations that are

  7. Data manipulation in heterogeneous databases

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Segev, A.

    1991-10-01

    Many important information systems applications require access to data stored in multiple heterogeneous databases. This paper examines a problem in inter-database data manipulation within a heterogeneous environment, where conventional techniques are no longer useful. To solve the problem, a broader definition for join operator is proposed. Also, a method to probabilistically estimate the accuracy of the join is discussed.

  8. Heterogeneous Vapor Condensation in Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carpio, A.; Neu, J. C.

    2008-09-01

    We consider heterogeneous condensation of vapors mixed with a carrier gas in stagnation point boundary layer flow near a cold wall in the presence of solid particles much larger than the mean free path of vapor particles. The supersaturated vapor condenses on the particles by diffusion, particles and droplets are thermophoretically attracted to the wall. We sketch three asymptotic theories of the condensation process, calculate the flow-induced shift in the dew point interface, vapor density profile and deposition rates at the wall, and compare them to direct numerical simulation.

  9. Impact of supersonic and subsonic aircraft on ozone: Including heterogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1992-07-05

    Preliminary calculations suggest that heterogeneous reactions are important in calculating the impact on ozone from emissions of trace gases from aircraft fleets. In this study, three heterogeneous chemical processes that occur on background sulfuric acid aerosols are included and their effects on O{sub 3}, NO{sub x}, Cl{sub x}, HCl, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ClONO{sub 2} are calculated.

  10. Redshift and Blueshift are due to the Medium Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2017-01-01

    The redshift is the shift from shorter wavelengths towards longer wavelengths [or from higher wave frequency to lower wave frequency]. And, reciprocally, the blueshift is the shift from longer wavelengths towards shorter wavelengths [or from lower wave frequency towards higher wave frequency]. The General Theory of Relativity asserts that the redshift and blueshift are entirely due to the Doppler's Effect, which is caused by the motion of light source: if the source is moving away from the observer the frequency received is lower [redshift], but if the source is moving towards the observer the frequency received is higher [blueshift]. But Doppler's Effect itself is actually an appearance to a Subjective Observer, because the frequency is the same all over (if one considers the Absolute Observer). We believe that the redshift and blueshift are not entirely due to the Doppler's Effect, but also due (as in the light bending) to the medium composition (medium that could be formed by waves, particles, plasma, dust, gaseous, fluids, solids, etc.), to the medium density, to the medium heterogeneity, to the medium structure, and to the electromagnetic and gravitational fields contained in that medium that may interfere with the light that passes through.

  11. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  12. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  13. Heterogeneous recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, Vitaly I.

    1991-02-01

    The paper summarizes the results of investigations performed to obtain deep 3-D holograms with 102 i0 mkm physical thickness allowing the postexposure amplification and the a posteriori changing of the grating parameters. This aim has been achieved by developing heterogeneous systems on the basis of porous glass with light-sensitive compositions introduced into it. 1. INTRODUCTION. LIGHT-SENSITIVE MEDIA FOR 3-D HOLOGRAMS RECORDING. The 3-D holograms have many useful properties: very high diffraction efficiency angular and spectral selectivity but low level of noise. It shoud be noted that in this case deep 3-D holograms are dealt with whose physical thickness is as high as 102 -i mkm. Such hologram recording is usually done using homogeneous light-sensitive media for example dyed acid-halide and electrooptical crystals photochrome glass photostructurized polimer compositions and so on. The nature of photophisical and photochemical processes responsible for the light sensitivity of these materials exclude the possibility of post-exposure treatment. This does not allow to enhance the recorded holograms and considerably hampers their fixing or makes it practically impossible. The object of our work is to create the media which are quite suitable for two-stage processes of the deep hologram formation with post-exposure processing. Such material must satisfy the following requirements: a)they must have high permeability for the developing substances in order to make the development duration suitable for practical applications b)they must be shrinkproof to prevent deformation of the

  14. Reference Point Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income.

  15. Improving network utilization over heterogeneous airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Peter H.; Rickenbach, Brent L.; Rush, Jason A.

    2011-06-01

    Existing and future military networks vary widely in bandwidth and other network characteristics, potentially challenging deployment of services and applications across heterogeneous data links. To address this challenge, General Dynamics and Naval Research Laboratory created network services to allow applications to use wireless data links more efficiently. The basis for the network services are hooks into the data links and transport protocols providing status about the airborne networking environment. The network service can monitor heterogeneous data links on a platform and report on link availability and parameters such as latency and bandwidth. The network service then presents the network characteristics to other services and applications. These services and applications are then able to tune parameters and content based on network parameters. The technology has been demonstrated in several live-flight experiments sponsored by the United States Air Force and United States Navy. The technology was housed on several aircraft with a variety of data links ranging from directional, high-bandwidth systems to omnidirectional, medium-bandwidth systems to stable but low-bandwidth satellite systems. In each of these experiments, image and video data was successfully delivered over tactical data links that varied greatly in bandwidth and delay.

  16. Type-curve estimation of statistical heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Shlomo P.; Guadagnini, Alberto; Riva, Monica

    2004-04-01

    The analysis of pumping tests has traditionally relied on analytical solutions of groundwater flow equations in relatively simple domains, consisting of one or at most a few units having uniform hydraulic properties. Recently, attention has been shifting toward methods and solutions that would allow one to characterize subsurface heterogeneities in greater detail. On one hand, geostatistical inverse methods are being used to assess the spatial variability of parameters, such as permeability and porosity, on the basis of multiple cross-hole pressure interference tests. On the other hand, analytical solutions are being developed to describe the mean and variance (first and second statistical moments) of flow to a well in a randomly heterogeneous medium. We explore numerically the feasibility of using a simple graphical approach (without numerical inversion) to estimate the geometric mean, integral scale, and variance of local log transmissivity on the basis of quasi steady state head data when a randomly heterogeneous confined aquifer is pumped at a constant rate. By local log transmissivity we mean a function varying randomly over horizontal distances that are small in comparison with a characteristic spacing between pumping and observation wells during a test. Experimental evidence and hydrogeologic scaling theory suggest that such a function would tend to exhibit an integral scale well below the maximum well spacing. This is in contrast to equivalent transmissivities derived from pumping tests by treating the aquifer as being locally uniform (on the scale of each test), which tend to exhibit regional-scale spatial correlations. We show that whereas the mean and integral scale of local log transmissivity can be estimated reasonably well based on theoretical ensemble mean variations of head and drawdown with radial distance from a pumping well, estimating the log transmissivity variance is more difficult. We obtain reasonable estimates of the latter based on

  17. Energy and momentum deposited into a QCD medium by a jet shower.

    PubMed

    Qin, G-Y; Majumder, A; Song, H; Heinz, U

    2009-10-09

    For a hard parton moving through a dense QCD medium, we compute self-consistently the energy loss and the fraction deposited into the medium due to showering and rescattering of the shower, assuming weak coupling between probe and medium. The same transport coefficients thus determine both the energy loss and its deposition into the medium. This allows a parameter free calculation of the latter once the former are computed or measured. We compute them for a weakly interacting medium. Assuming a short thermalization time for the deposited energy, we determine the medium's hydrodynamical response and obtain a conical pattern that is strongly enhanced by showering.

  18. Heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation compared: rapid nucleation on microscopic impurities.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2006-03-16

    We use computer simulation to calculate the rates of both homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation on microscopic impurities. We do so in perhaps the simplest model of fluids and magnets: the two-dimensional Ising model. We expect our results to be qualitatively applicable to many simple and complex fluids. We find that heterogeneous nucleation on an impurity that is not only microscopic but also as small as possible, that is, a single fixed spin, is more than four orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous nucleation. The rate of heterogeneous nucleation then increases by a factor of approximately five for each additional fixed spin in the impurity. These results suggest that impurities as small as single molecules can result in homogeneous nucleation being irrelevant due to heterogeneous nucleation on these microscopic impurities being much faster.

  19. Evaluation of material heterogeneity dosimetric effects using radiochromic film for COMS eye plaques loaded with {sup 125}I seeds (model I25.S16)

    SciTech Connect

    Acar, Hilal; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Oezbay, Ismail; Kemikler, Goenuel; Tuncer, Samuray

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: (1) To measure absolute dose distributions in eye phantom for COMS eye plaques with {sup 125}I seeds (model I25.S16) using radiochromic EBT film dosimetry. (2) To determine the dose correction function for calculations involving the TG-43 formalism to account for the presence of the COMS eye plaque using Monte Carlo (MC) method specific to this seed model. (3) To test the heterogeneous dose calculation accuracy of the new version of Plaque Simulator (v5.3.9) against the EBT film data for this seed model. Methods: Using EBT film, absolute doses were measured for {sup 125}I seeds (model I25.S16) in COMS eye plaques (1) along the plaque's central axis for (a) uniformly loaded plaques (14-20 mm in diameter) and (b) a 20 mm plaque with single seed, and (2) in off-axis direction at depths of 5 and 12 mm for all four plaque sizes. The EBT film calibration was performed at {sup 125}I photon energy. MC calculations using MCNP5 code for a single seed at the center of a 20 mm plaque in homogeneous water and polystyrene medium were performed. The heterogeneity dose correction function was determined from the MC calculations. These function values at various depths were entered into PS software (v5.3.9) to calculate the heterogeneous dose distributions for the uniformly loaded plaques (of all four sizes). The dose distributions with homogeneous water assumptions were also calculated using PS for comparison. The EBT film measured absolute dose rate values (film) were compared with those calculated using PS with homogeneous assumption (PS Homo) and heterogeneity correction (PS Hetero). The values of dose ratio (film/PS Homo) and (film/PS Hetero) were obtained. Results: The central axis depth dose rate values for a single seed in 20 mm plaque measured using EBT film and calculated with MCNP5 code (both in ploystyrene phantom) were compared, and agreement within 9% was found. The dose ratio (film/PS Homo) values were substantially lower than unity (mostly between 0.8 and 0

  20. In-medium pion valence distributions in a light-front model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, J. P. B. C.; Tsushima, K.; Ahmed, I.

    2017-03-01

    Pion valence distributions in nuclear medium and vacuum are studied in a light-front constituent quark model. The in-medium input for studying the pion properties is calculated by the quark-meson coupling model. We find that the in-medium pion valence distribution, as well as the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  1. New medium licensed for campylobacter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A medium, “Campy-Cefex”, has been licensed by the ARS Office of Technology Transfer with Becton Dickinson (No. 1412-002) and Neogen (No. 1412-001) based on patent No. 5,891,709, “Campy-Cefex Selective and Differential Medium for Campylobacter” by Dr. Norman Stern of the Poultry Microbiological Safet...

  2. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  3. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  4. Node assignment in heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Som, Sukhamoy

    1993-01-01

    A number of node assignment schemes, both static and dynamic, are explored for the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM). The architecture under consideration consists of heterogeneous processors and implements dataflow models of real-time applications. Terminology is developed for heterogeneous computing. New definitions are added to the ATAMM for token and assignment classifications. It is proved that a periodic execution is possible for dataflow graphs. Assignment algorithms are developed and proved. A design procedure is described for satisfying an objective function in an heterogeneous architecture. Several examples are provided for illustration.

  5. Enhancements to commissioning techniques and quality assurance of brachytherapy treatment planning systems that use model-based dose calculation algorithmsa).

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Beaulieu, Luc; Mourtada, Firas

    2010-06-01

    The current standard for brachytherapy dose calculations is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism. Simplifications used in the TG-43 formalism have been challenged by many publications over the past decade. With the continuous increase in computing power, approaches based on fundamental physics processes or physics models such as the linear-Boltzmann transport equation are now applicable in a clinical setting. Thus, model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) have been introduced to address TG-43 limitations for brachytherapy. The MBDCA approach results in a paradigm shift, which will require a concerted effort to integrate them properly into the radiation therapy community. MBDCA will improve treatment planning relative to the implementation of the traditional TG-43 formalism by accounting for individualized, patient-specific radiation scatter conditions, and the radiological effect of material heterogeneities differing from water. A snapshot of the current status of MBDCA and AAPM Task Group reports related to the subject of QA recommendations for brachytherapy treatment planning is presented. Some simplified Monte Carlo simulation results are also presented to delineate the effects MBDCA are called to account for and facilitate the discussion on suggestions for (i) new QA standards to augment current societal recommendations, (ii) consideration of dose specification such as dose to medium in medium, collisional kerma to medium in medium, or collisional kerma to water in medium, and (iii) infrastructure needed to uniformly introduce these new algorithms. Suggestions in this Vision 20/20 article may serve as a basis for developing future standards to be recommended by professional societies such as the AAPM, ESTRO, and ABS toward providing consistent clinical implementation throughout the brachytherapy community and rigorous quality management of MBDCA-based treatment planning systems. © 2010 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Enhancements to commissioning techniques and quality assurance of brachytherapy treatment planning systems that use model-based dose calculation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Beaulieu, Luc; Mourtada, Firas

    2010-06-01

    The current standard for brachytherapy dose calculations is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism. Simplifications used in the TG-43 formalism have been challenged by many publications over the past decade. With the continuous increase in computing power, approaches based on fundamental physics processes or physics models such as the linear-Boltzmann transport equation are now applicable in a clinical setting. Thus, model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) have been introduced to address TG-43 limitations for brachytherapy. The MBDCA approach results in a paradigm shift, which will require a concerted effort to integrate them properly into the radiation therapy community. MBDCA will improve treatment planning relative to the implementation of the traditional TG-43 formalism by accounting for individualized, patient-specific radiation scatter conditions, and the radiological effect of material heterogeneities differing from water. A snapshot of the current status of MBDCA and AAPM Task Group reports related to the subject of QA recommendations for brachytherapy treatment planning is presented. Some simplified Monte Carlo simulation results are also presented to delineate the effects MBDCA are called to account for and facilitate the discussion on suggestions for (i) new QA standards to augment current societal recommendations, (ii) consideration of dose specification such as dose to medium in medium, collisional kerma to medium in medium, or collisional kerma to water in medium, and (iii) infrastructure needed to uniformly introduce these new algorithms. Suggestions in this Vision 20/20 article may serve as a basis for developing future standards to be recommended by professional societies such as the AAPM, ESTRO, and ABS toward providing consistent clinical implementation throughout the brachytherapy community and rigorous quality management of MBDCA-based treatment planning systems.

  7. Hyporheic zone as a bioreactor: sediment heterogeneity influencing biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perujo, Nuria; Romani, Anna M.; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean fluvial systems are characterized by frequent periods of low flow or even drought. During low flow periods, water from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is proportionally large in fluvial systems. River water might be vertically transported through the hyporheic zone, and then porous medium acts as a complementary treatment system since, as water infiltrates, a suite of biogeochemical processes occurs. Subsurface sediment heterogeneity plays an important role since it influences the interstitial fluxes of the medium and drives biomass growing, determining biogeochemical reactions. In this study, WWTP water was continuously infiltrated for 3 months through two porous medium tanks: one consisting of 40 cm of fine sediment (homogeneous); and another comprised of two layers of different grain size sediments (heterogeneous), 20 cm of coarse sediment in the upper part and 20 cm of fine one in the bottom. Several hydrological, physicochemical and biological parameters were measured periodically (weekly at the start of the experiment and biweekly at the end). Analysed parameters include dissolved nitrogen, phosphorus, organic carbon, and oxygen all measured at the surface, and at 5, 20 and 40 cm depth. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with time were evaluated. Sediment samples were also analysed at three depths (surface, 20 and 40 cm) to determine bacterial density, chlorophyll content, extracellular polymeric substances, and biofilm function (extracellular enzyme activities and carbon substrate utilization profiles). Preliminary results suggest hydraulic conductivity to be the main driver of the differences in the biogeochemical processes occurring in the subsurface. At the heterogeneous tank, a low nutrient reduction throughout the whole medium is measured. In this medium, high hydraulic conductivity allows for a large amount of infiltrating water, but with a small residence time. Since some biological processes are largely time-dependent, small water

  8. The Effect of Surface Heterogeneity on Cloud Absorption Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan C.; Marshak, Alexander; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a systematic and quantitative analysis of the effect of inhomogeneous surface albedo on shortwave cloud absorption estimates. We use 3D radiative transfer modeling with gradually complex clouds over a simplified surface to calculate cloud absorption. We find that averaging surface albedo always underestimates cloud absorption, and thus accounting for surface heterogeneity always enhances cloud absorption. However, the impact on cloud absorption estimates is not enough to explain the discrepancy between measured and model calculated shortwave cloud absorptions.

  9. PDF-based heterogeneous multiscale filtration model.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian; Rutland, Christopher J

    2015-04-21

    Motivated by modeling of gasoline particulate filters (GPFs), a probability density function (PDF) based heterogeneous multiscale filtration (HMF) model is developed to calculate filtration efficiency of clean particulate filters. A new methodology based on statistical theory and classic filtration theory is developed in the HMF model. Based on the analysis of experimental porosimetry data, a pore size probability density function is introduced to represent heterogeneity and multiscale characteristics of the porous wall. The filtration efficiency of a filter can be calculated as the sum of the contributions of individual collectors. The resulting HMF model overcomes the limitations of classic mean filtration models which rely on tuning of the mean collector size. Sensitivity analysis shows that the HMF model recovers the classical mean model when the pore size variance is very small. The HMF model is validated by fundamental filtration experimental data from different scales of filter samples. The model shows a good agreement with experimental data at various operating conditions. The effects of the microstructure of filters on filtration efficiency as well as the most penetrating particle size are correctly predicted by the model.

  10. Reformulation of Rothermel's wildland fire behaviour model for heterogeneous fuelbeds.

    Treesearch

    David V. Sandberg; Cynthia L. Riccardi; Mark D. Schaaf

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) includes equations that calculate energy release and one-dimensional spread rate in quasi-steady-state fires in heterogeneous but spatially uniform wildland fuelbeds, using a reformulation of the widely used Rothermel fire spread model. This reformulation provides an automated means to predict fire behavior...

  11. Colloid interaction energies for physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mean and variance of the colloid interaction energy (phi*) as a function of separation distance (h) were calculated on physically and/or chemically heterogeneous solid surfaces at the representative elementary area (REA) scale. Nanoscale roughness was demonstrated to have a significant influence...

  12. Colloid adhesive parameters for chemical heterogeneous porous media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A simple modeling approach was developed to calculate colloid adhesive parameters for chemically heterogeneous porous media. The area of the zone of electrostatic influence between a colloid and solid-water interface (Az) was discretized into a number of equally sized grid cells to capture chemical...

  13. Hydrodynamic controls on particle transport through heterogeneous porous media. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Silliman, S.E.; Babic, M.

    1993-09-28

    Sophisticated models of the movement of particles, particularly bacteria and viruses, through porous media have been developed, but have met with limited success when compared to field observations some argue that the poor predictive capabilities of the models are due in part to the fact that most of the sophisticated models are tied to an assumptions of homogeneity within the flow field. In previous work, the structure of random percolation fields has been investigated and suggests application of percolation theory to heterogeneous porous media. One conclusion from this study as applied to particle transport is that as the distribution of pore throat sizes takes on variation in the third dimension, the probability of finding a continuous flow path with large throat size increases. One interpretation of this work, within the current context, leads to an argument that a saturated medium will become more open to transport of particles as the medium takes on three dimensional structure. The central hypothesis of the current project is therefore be stated: Particles which are suspended within the pore fluids of media demonstrating three-dimensional heterogeneities will be transported at higher average velocities and with less trapping than particles which are suspended in the pore fluids of media demonstrating one- or two-dimensional heterogeneities. This dependence on dimension is a function of the dimensional character of the heterogeneity, the length scales of the heterogeneity, the size of the particles, the hydrodynamics of the flow field, the degree of saturation of the medium, and the medium/particle interaction.

  14. Coupled Continuous Time Random Walks for Anomalous Transport in Media Characterized by Heterogeneous Mass Transfer Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comolli, A.; Dentz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solute transport in geological media is in general non-Fickian as it cannot be explained in terms of equivalent homogeneous media. This anomalous character can be traced back to the existence of multiscale heterogeneity and strong correlations within the medium. Here we investigate the impact of fast heterogeneous mass transfer properties as represented by a spatially varying retardation coefficient (mass exchange between mobile and immobile regions, linear sorption-desorption reactions, variable porosity). In order to estimate the effects of spatial correlation, and disorder distribution on the average transport, we consider 2D media characterized by complex multiscale geometries and point distributions of retardation of increasing heterogeneity. Within a Lagrangian framework, we coarse-grain the Langevin equation for the transport of solute particles due to advection and diffusion in the heterogeneous medium. The large-scale transport properties are derived within a stochastic modeling approach by ensemble averaging of the coarse-grained Langevin equation . This approach shows that the effective particle motion can be described by a coupled CTRW that is fully parametrized by the distribution of the retardation coefficient and the spatial medium organization. This allows for the explicit relation of the heterogeneous medium properties to observed anomalous transport in terms of solute dispersion, breakthrough curves and spatial concentration profiles.

  15. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  16. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  17. HETEROGENIC SERUM, AGE, AND MULTIPLICATION OF FIBROBLASTS

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Alexis; Ebeling, Albert H.

    1922-01-01

    The presence in a culture medium of heterogenic serum of various concentrations exerts a definite influence on the rate of multiplication of fibroblasts. Dog serum does not inhibit the growth of See PDF for Structure chicken fibroblasts markedly until its concentration reaches 15 per cent. Beyond this figure, each increase of the concentration brings about a rapid decrease in the rate of cell multiplication. When the concentration reaches from 30 to 45 per cent, no growth takes place. The inhibiting action of cat serum begins to manifest itself at a concentration of 25 per cent and prevents cell proliferation completely at a concentration of 55 and 60 per cent. The ratio, See PDF for Equation can be taken as expressing the action of the serum on fibroblast multiplication; that is, as the growth index of the serum. See PDF for Structure The inhibiting influence of heterogenic serum was found to vary in direct ratio to the age of the animal from which it was obtained. The rate of proliferation of chicken fibroblasts was studied comparatively in media containing varied concentrations of serum from young and old animals. For each concentration of serum, the rate of growth in the serum of the old animal was expressed in relation to the rate of growth in the serum of the young animal. When cat serum was used, the curve obtained in plotting this ratio in ordinates and the serum concentration in abscissæ showed a rapid increase in the inhibiting action of the old serum as soon as the concentration reached 30 per cent. The same tests were repeated with the serum from young and old dogs. The general results were identical, although See PDF for Structure the quantitative inhibiting action of both sera was greater than that of cat serum. It may be concluded that under the conditions of the experiments: 1. Heterogenicsera inhibit and prevent the growth of chicken fibroblasts when their concentration is made to vary within certain limits. 2. A relation exists between the rate

  18. Random lasing in a nanocomposite medium

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Basiev, Tasoltan T

    2013-01-31

    The characteristics of a random laser based on a nanocomposite medium consisting of a transparent dielectric and scattering doped nanocrystals are calculated. It is proposed to use ytterbium laser media with a high concentration of active ions as nanocrystals and to use gases, liquids, or solid dielectrics with a refractive index lower than that of nanocrystals as dielectric matrices for nanocrystals. Based on the concept of nonresonant distributed feedback due to the Rayleigh scattering, an expression is obtained for the minimum length of a nanocomposite laser medium at which the random lasing threshold is overcome. Expressions are found for the critical (maximum) and the optimal size of nanocrystals, as well as for the optimal relative refractive index of nanocomposites that corresponds not only to the maximum gain but also to the minimum of the medium threshold length at the optimal size of nanocrystals. It is shown that the optimal relative refractive index of a nanocomposite increases with increasing pump level, but is independent of the other nanocomposite parameters. (nanocomposites)

  19. Heterogeneity in motor driven transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabei, Ali

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss quantitative analysis of particle tracking data for motor driven vesicles inside an insulin secreting cell. We use this method to study the dynamical and structural heterogeneity inside the cell. I will discuss our effort to explain the origin of observed heterogeneity in intracellular transport. Finally, I will explain how analyzing directional correlations in transport trajectories reveals self-similarity in the diffusion media.

  20. Heterogeneity in schistosomiasis transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mari, Lorenzo; Ciddio, Manuela; Casagrandi, Renato; Perez-Saez, Javier; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Rinaldo, Andrea; Sokolow, Susanne H; De Leo, Giulio A; Gatto, Marino

    2017-11-07

    Simple models of disease propagation often disregard the effects of transmission heterogeneity on the ecological and epidemiological dynamics associated with host-parasite interactions. However, for some diseases like schistosomiasis, a widespread parasitic infection caused by Schistosoma worms, accounting for heterogeneity is crucial to both characterize long-term dynamics and evaluate opportunities for disease control. Elaborating on the classic Macdonald model for macroparasite transmission, we analyze families of models including explicit descriptions of heterogeneity related to differential transmission risk within a community, water contact patterns, the distribution of the snail host population, human mobility, and the seasonal fluctuations of the environment. Through simple numerical examples, we show that heterogeneous multigroup communities may be more prone to schistosomiasis than homogeneous ones, that the availability of multiple water sources can hinder parasite transmission, and that both spatial and temporal heterogeneities may have nontrivial implications for disease endemicity. Finally, we discuss the implications of heterogeneity for disease control. Although focused on schistosomiasis, results from this study may apply as well to other parasitic infections with complex transmission cycles, such as cysticercosis, dracunculiasis and fasciolosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. PUNCH: Population Characterization of Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Tunc, Birkan; Ghanbari, Yasser; Smith, Alex R.; Pandey, Juhi; Browne, Aaron; Schultz, Robert T.; Verma, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are notoriously heterogeneous in their presentation, which precludes straightforward and objective description of the differences between affected and typical populations that therefore makes finding reliable biomarkers a challenge. This difficulty underlines the need for reliable methods to capture sample characteristics of heterogeneity using a single continuous measure, incorporating the multitude of scores used to describe different aspects of functioning. This study addresses this challenge by proposing a general method of identifying and quantifying the heterogeneity of any clinical population using a severity measure called the PUNCH (Population Characterization of Heterogeneity). PUNCH is a decision level fusion technique to incorporate decisions of various phenotypic scores, while providing interpretable weights for scores. We provide an application of our framework to a simulated dataset and to a large sample of youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Next we stratify PUNCH scores in our ASD sample and show how severity moderates findings of group differences in diffusion weighted brain imaging data; more severely affected subgroups of ASD show expanded differences compared to age and gender matched healthy controls. Results demonstrate the ability of our measure in quantifying the underlying heterogeneity of the clinical samples, and suggest its utility in providing researchers with reliable severity assessments incorporating population heterogeneity. PMID:24799135

  2. First-Principles Modeling Of Electromagnetic Scattering By Discrete and Discretely Heterogeneous Random Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Bi, Lei; Cairns, Brian; Liu, Li; Panetta, R. Lee; Travis, Larry D.; Yang, Ping; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2016-01-01

    A discrete random medium is an object in the form of a finite volume of a vacuum or a homogeneous material medium filled with quasi-randomly and quasi-uniformly distributed discrete macroscopic impurities called small particles. Such objects are ubiquitous in natural and artificial environments. They are often characterized by analyzing theoretically the results of laboratory, in situ, or remote-sensing measurements of the scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation. Electromagnetic scattering and absorption by particles can also affect the energy budget of a discrete random medium and hence various ambient physical and chemical processes. In either case electromagnetic scattering must be modeled in terms of appropriate optical observables, i.e., quadratic or bilinear forms in the field that quantify the reading of a relevant optical instrument or the electromagnetic energy budget. It is generally believed that time-harmonic Maxwell's equations can accurately describe elastic electromagnetic scattering by macroscopic particulate media that change in time much more slowly than the incident electromagnetic field. However, direct solutions of these equations for discrete random media had been impracticable until quite recently. This has led to a widespread use of various phenomenological approaches in situations when their very applicability can be questioned. Recently, however, a new branch of physical optics has emerged wherein electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media is modeled directly by using analytical or numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations. Therefore, the main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell- Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell-Lorentz equations, we trace the development of

  3. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Bi, Lei; Cairns, Brian; Liu, Li; Panetta, R. Lee; Travis, Larry D.; Yang, Ping; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2016-05-01

    A discrete random medium is an object in the form of a finite volume of a vacuum or a homogeneous material medium filled with quasi-randomly and quasi-uniformly distributed discrete macroscopic impurities called small particles. Such objects are ubiquitous in natural and artificial environments. They are often characterized by analyzing theoretically the results of laboratory, in situ, or remote-sensing measurements of the scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation. Electromagnetic scattering and absorption by particles can also affect the energy budget of a discrete random medium and hence various ambient physical and chemical processes. In either case electromagnetic scattering must be modeled in terms of appropriate optical observables, i.e., quadratic or bilinear forms in the field that quantify the reading of a relevant optical instrument or the electromagnetic energy budget. It is generally believed that time-harmonic Maxwell's equations can accurately describe elastic electromagnetic scattering by macroscopic particulate media that change in time much more slowly than the incident electromagnetic field. However, direct solutions of these equations for discrete random media had been impracticable until quite recently. This has led to a widespread use of various phenomenological approaches in situations when their very applicability can be questioned. Recently, however, a new branch of physical optics has emerged wherein electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media is modeled directly by using analytical or numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations. Therefore, the main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell-Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell-Lorentz equations, we trace the development of

  4. Discriminating cellular heterogeneity using microwell-based RNA cytometry.

    PubMed

    Dimov, Ivan K; Lu, Rong; Lee, Eric P; Seita, Jun; Sahoo, Debashis; Park, Seung-min; Weissman, Irving L; Lee, Luke P

    2014-03-25

    Discriminating cellular heterogeneity is important for understanding cellular physiology. However, it is limited by the technical difficulties of single-cell measurements. Here we develop a two-stage system to determine cellular heterogeneity. In the first stage, we perform multiplex single-cell RNA cytometry in a microwell array containing over 60,000 reaction chambers. In the second stage, we use the RNA cytometry data to determine cellular heterogeneity by providing a heterogeneity likelihood score (HLS). Moreover, we use Monte-Carlo simulation and RNA cytometry data to calculate the minimum number of cells required for detecting heterogeneity. We apply this system to characterize the RNA distributions of ageing-related genes in a highly purified mouse haematopoietic stem cell population. We identify genes that reveal novel heterogeneity of these cells. We also show that changes in expression of genes such as Birc6 during ageing can be attributed to the shift of relative portions of cells in the high-expressing subgroup versus low-expressing subgroup.

  5. Dosimetric verification of the anisotropic analytical algorithm in lung equivalent heterogeneities with and without bone equivalent heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kaoru; Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hirokawa, Yutaka

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors evaluated the accuracy of dose calculations performed by the convolution/superposition based anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) in lung equivalent heterogeneities with and without bone equivalent heterogeneities. Methods: Calculations of PDDs using the AAA and Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP4C) were compared to ionization chamber measurements with a heterogeneous phantom consisting of lung equivalent and bone equivalent materials. Both 6 and 10 MV photon beams of 4x4 and 10x10 cm{sup 2} field sizes were used for the simulations. Furthermore, changes of energy spectrum with depth for the heterogeneous phantom using MCNP were calculated. Results: The ionization chamber measurements and MCNP calculations in a lung equivalent phantom were in good agreement, having an average deviation of only 0.64{+-}0.45%. For both 6 and 10 MV beams, the average deviation was less than 2% for the 4x4 and 10x10 cm{sup 2} fields in the water-lung equivalent phantom and the 4x4 cm{sup 2} field in the water-lung-bone equivalent phantom. Maximum deviations for the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field in the lung equivalent phantom before and after the bone slab were 5.0% and 4.1%, respectively. The Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated an increase of the low-energy photon component in these regions, more for the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field compared to the 4x4 cm{sup 2} field. Conclusions: The low-energy photon by Monte Carlo simulation component increases sharply in larger fields when there is a significant presence of bone equivalent heterogeneities. This leads to great changes in the build-up and build-down at the interfaces of different density materials. The AAA calculation modeling of the effect is not deemed to be sufficiently accurate.

  6. Dealing with spatial heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsily, Gh.; Delay, F.; Gonçalvès, J.; Renard, Ph.; Teles, V.; Violette, S.

    2005-03-01

    Heterogeneity can be dealt with by defining homogeneous equivalent properties, known as averaging, or by trying to describe the spatial variability of the rock properties from geologic observations and local measurements. The techniques available for these descriptions are mostly continuous Geostatistical models, or discontinuous facies models such as the Boolean, Indicator or Gaussian-Threshold models and the Markov chain model. These facies models are better suited to treating issues of rock strata connectivity, e.g. buried high permeability channels or low permeability barriers, which greatly affect flow and, above all, transport in aquifers. Genetic models provide new ways to incorporate more geology into the facies description, an approach that has been well developed in the oil industry, but not enough in hydrogeology. The conclusion is that future work should be focused on improving the facies models, comparing them, and designing new in situ testing procedures (including geophysics) that would help identify the facies geometry and properties. A world-wide catalog of aquifer facies geometry and properties, which could combine site genesis and description with methods used to assess the system, would be of great value for practical applications. On peut aborder le problème de l'hétérogénéité en s'efforçant de définir une perméabilité équivalente homogène, par prise de moyenne, ou au contraire en décrivant la variation dans l'espace des propriétés des roches à partir des observations géologiques et des mesures locales. Les techniques disponibles pour une telle description sont soit continues, comme l'approche Géostatistique, soit discontinues, comme les modèles de faciès, Booléens, ou bien par Indicatrices ou Gaussiennes Seuillées, ou enfin Markoviens. Ces modèles de faciès sont mieux capables de prendre en compte la connectivité des strates géologiques, telles que les chenaux enfouis à forte perméabilité, ou au contraire les faci

  7. Medium for presumptive identification of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Weagant, S D

    1983-02-01

    A medium, lysine-arginine-iron agar, was developed for the presumptive identification of Yersinia enterocolitica isolates. This medium was a modification of lysine-iron agar and allowed for the testing of five biochemical characteristics in a single tube medium. The reactions of Y. enterocolitica on this medium were reliable and distinctive. The medium significantly simplified the identification of Y. enterocolitica isolates.

  8. Impact of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yuling; Nair, Udaysankar S.; Pielke, Roger A., Sr.; McNider, Richard T.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Anantharaj, Valentine G.

    2009-01-01

    Prior numerical modelling studies show that atmospheric dispersion is sensitive to surface heterogeneities, but past studies do not consider the impact of a realistic distribution of surface heterogeneities on mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. While these focussed on dispersion in the convective boundary layer, the present work also considers dispersion in the nocturnal boundary layer and above. Using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) coupled to the Eulerian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), the impact of topographic, vegetation, and soil moisture heterogeneities on daytime and nighttime atmospheric dispersion is examined. In addition, the sensitivity to the use of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived spatial distributions of vegetation characteristics on atmospheric dispersion is also studied. The impact of vegetation and terrain heterogeneities on atmospheric dispersion is strongly modulated by soil moisture, with the nature of dispersion switching from non-Gaussian to near- Gaussian behaviour for wetter soils (fraction of saturation soil moisture content exceeding 40%). For drier soil moisture conditions, vegetation heterogeneity produces differential heating and the formation of mesoscale circulation patterns that are primarily responsible for non-Gaussian dispersion patterns. Nighttime dispersion is very sensitive to topographic, vegetation, soil moisture, and soil type heterogeneity and is distinctly non-Gaussian for heterogeneous land-surface conditions. Sensitivity studies show that soil type and vegetation heterogeneities have the most dramatic impact on atmospheric dispersion. To provide more skillful dispersion calculations, we recommend the utilisation of satellite-derived vegetation characteristics coupled with data assimilation techniques that constrain soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models to generate realistic spatial distributions of surface energy fluxes.

  9. Study of heterogeneity loss in upscaling of geological maps by introducing a cluster-based heterogeneity number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjeh-Ghazvini, Mostafa; Masihi, Mohsen; Baghalha, Morteza

    2015-10-01

    The prediction of flow behavior in porous media can provide useful insights into the mechanisms involved in CO2 sequestration, petroleum engineering and hydrology. The multi-phase flow is usually simulated by solving the governing equations over an efficient model. The geostatistical (or fine grid) models are rarely used for simulation purposes because they have too many cells. A common approach is to coarsen a fine gird realization by an upscaling method. Although upscaling can speed up the flow simulation, it neglects the fine scale heterogeneity. The heterogeneity loss reduces the accuracy of simulation results. In this paper, the relation between heterogeneity loss during upscaling and accuracy of flow simulation is studied. A realization is divided into some clusters. Every cluster consists of a number of neighboring cells whose permeability values belong to a pre-known interval. The concept of coefficient of variation is applied to define the intra-cluster and inter-cluster heterogeneity numbers. These numbers are then calculated for some fine grid and corresponding upscaled models. The heterogeneous fine grid models are generated by the process of fractional Brownian motion. After simulating water-oil displacement in both fine and coarse models, the relation between flow performance error and heterogeneity loss is investigated. An upper limit for the degree of coarsening is also suggested according to this relation.

  10. On oscillating flows in randomly heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Trefry, M G; McLaughlin, D; Metcalfe, G; Lester, D; Ord, A; Regenauer-Lieb, K; Hobbs, B E

    2010-01-13

    The emergence of structure in reactive geofluid systems is of current interest. In geofluid systems, the fluids are supported by a porous medium whose physical and chemical properties may vary in space and time, sometimes sharply, and which may also evolve in reaction with the local fluids. Geofluids may also experience pressure and temperature conditions within the porous medium that drive their momentum relations beyond the normal Darcy regime. Furthermore, natural geofluid systems may experience forcings that are periodic in nature, or at least episodic. The combination of transient forcing, near-critical fluid dynamics and heterogeneous porous media yields a rich array of emergent geofluid phenomena that are only now beginning to be understood. One of the barriers to forward analysis in these geofluid systems is the problem of data scarcity. It is most often the case that fluid properties are reasonably well known, but that data on porous medium properties are measured with much less precision and spatial density. It is common to seek to perform an estimation of the porous medium properties by an inverse approach, that is, by expressing porous medium properties in terms of observed fluid characteristics. In this paper, we move toward such an inversion for the case of a generalized geofluid momentum equation in the context of time-periodic boundary conditions. We show that the generalized momentum equation results in frequency-domain responses that are governed by a second-order equation which is amenable to numerical solution. A stochastic perturbation approach demonstrates that frequency-domain responses of the fluids migrating in heterogeneous domains have spatial spectral densities that can be expressed in terms of the spectral densities of porous media properties. This journal is © 2010 The Royal Society

  11. Short characteristics method for two dimensional heterogeneous Cartesian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Masiello, E.; Zmijarevic, I.

    2006-07-01

    The short characteristics method for two-dimensional xy-geometry is extended to heterogeneous Cartesian cells. The new method is intended for realistic neutron transport calculation, as for pressurized water reactor assemblies and bundles, without pin cells homogenization. The pin cell is chosen as the basic element for geometrical mapping. Thus, the heterogeneous cells are modeled by a rectangular element with an arbitrary number of concentric rings. Test problems show that the use of this kind of cells allows a minimal geometrical modeling without a significant lost in precision. (authors)

  12. Monsoon circulations and tropical heterogeneous chlorine chemistry in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Doug; Garcia, Rolando R.; Bandoro, Justin; Mills, Michael; Wilka, Catherine; Neely, Ryan R.; Schmidt, Anja; Barnes, John E.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Höpfner, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Model simulations presented in this paper suggest that transport processes associated with the summer monsoons bring increased abundances of hydrochloric acid into contact with liquid sulfate aerosols in the cold tropical lowermost stratosphere, leading to heterogeneous chemical activation of chlorine species. The calculations indicate that the spatial and seasonal distributions of chlorine monoxide and chlorine nitrate near the monsoon regions of the northern hemisphere tropical and subtropical lowermost stratosphere could provide indicators of heterogeneous chlorine processing. In the model, these processes impact the local ozone budget and decrease ozone abundances, implying a chemical contribution to longer-term northern tropical ozone profile changes at 16-19 km.

  13. River Meandering in Heterogeneous Floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guneralp, I.; Rhoads, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Freely-meandering natural rivers typically evolve into complex planforms characterized by compound loops or multilobes or into irregular patterns. It is widely acknowledged that spatial heterogeneity in floodplain erodibility should affect the planform evolution of meandering rivers; however, past studies have not systematically explored the importance of this effect. In this study, we systematically analyze how the scale, magnitude, and stochasticity of floodplain erosional variability influence meander evolution and the emergence of bend complexity and planform irregularity. We employ a physically-based model of meander morphodynamics and stochastically-generated heterogeneous landscapes with a range of spatial scales that represent spatial heterogeneity (i.e., patchiness) in floodplain erosional resistance. The heterogeneous mosaics of differential resistance with different scales of patchiness are meant to represent spatial arrangements of factors influencing migration and varying with scale, such as sedimentological complexity, patches of floodplain vegetation, and human activities. We also evaluate the effects of stochasticity in bank erodibility on the spatial characteristics of planform evolution. The results show that both the spatial scale of heterogeneity and the magnitude of variability in erodibility have a strong influence on meander evolution. The planform morphologies generated by simulations with spatially-heterogeneous landscapes are remarkably similar, both visually and in their spectral signatures, to those of natural meandering rivers. Landscapes with patch sizes larger than the initial meander size promote the evolution of highly elongated, upstream-skewed meanders with high variability in amplitudes. As patch size becomes smaller than the initial meander size, bend complexity and planform irregularities increase, resulting in downstream-skewed bends and compound loops or multilobes. Fine-grained heterogeneity results in meanders similar to

  14. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Svetlana; Kirzhner, Valery; Korol, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS) analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers) in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM) allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  15. Heterogeneity of vertebrate brain tubulins.

    PubMed Central

    Field, D J; Collins, R A; Lee, J C

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the extent of brain tubulin heterogeneity in six vertebrate species commonly used in tubulin research (rat, calf, pig, chicken, human, and lamb) using isoelectric focusing, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and peptide mapping procedures that provide higher resolution than previously available. The extent of heterogeneity is extremely similar in all of these organisms, as judged by number, range of isoelectric points, and distribution of the isotubulins. A minimum of 6 alpha and 12 beta tubulins was resolved from all sources. Even the pattern of spots on two-dimensional peptide maps is remarkably similar. These similarities suggest that the populations of tubulin in all of these brains should have similar overall physical properties. It is particularly interesting that chicken, which has only four or five beta-tubulin genes, contains approximately 12 beta tubulins. Thus, post-translational modification must generate at least some of the tubulin heterogeneity. Mammalian species, which contain 15-20 tubulin DNA sequences, do not show any more tubulin protein heterogeneity than does chicken. This suggests that expression of only a small number of the mammalian genes may be required to generate the observed tubulin heterogeneity. Images PMID:6588378

  16. Phenotypic heterogeneity promotes adaptive evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Kalapis, Dorottya; Lázár, Viktória; Csörgő, Bálint; Nyerges, Ákos; Szamecz, Béla; Fekete, Gergely; Papp, Balázs; Araújo, Hugo; Oliveira, José L.; Moura, Gabriela; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Székely Jr, Tamás; Balázsi, Gábor

    2017-01-01

    Genetically identical cells frequently display substantial heterogeneity in gene expression, cellular morphology and physiology. It has been suggested that by rapidly generating a subpopulation with novel phenotypic traits, phenotypic heterogeneity (or plasticity) accelerates the rate of adaptive evolution in populations facing extreme environmental challenges. This issue is important as cell-to-cell phenotypic heterogeneity may initiate key steps in microbial evolution of drug resistance and cancer progression. Here, we study how stochastic transitions between cellular states influence evolutionary adaptation to a stressful environment in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed inducible synthetic gene circuits that generate varying degrees of expression stochasticity of an antifungal resistance gene. We initiated laboratory evolutionary experiments with genotypes carrying different versions of the genetic circuit by exposing the corresponding populations to gradually increasing antifungal stress. Phenotypic heterogeneity altered the evolutionary dynamics by transforming the adaptive landscape that relates genotype to fitness. Specifically, it enhanced the adaptive value of beneficial mutations through synergism between cell-to-cell variability and genetic variation. Our work demonstrates that phenotypic heterogeneity is an evolving trait when populations face a chronic selection pressure. It shapes evolutionary trajectories at the genomic level and facilitates evolutionary rescue from a deteriorating environmental stress. PMID:28486496

  17. Flow In Highly Heterogeneous Aquifers: Coping With Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, D. M.; Guadagnini, L.

    We discuss a random domain decomposition approach to analyze flow through highly heterogeneous, composite porous media that greatly improves estimates of pressure head statistics. Composite porous media consist of disjoint blocks of geologic ma- terials, each block comprising a single material type. Within a composite medium, hydraulic conductivity can be represented through a pair of random processes: (i) a boundary process that determines block arrangement and extent and (ii) a random process that defines conductivity within a given block. To demonstrate the advantages of this model, we analyze two-dimensional flow in a layered heterogeneous medium composed of two materials whose hydraulic properties and geometries are uncertain. For simplicity, hydraulic conductivities of both materials are treated as statistically ho- mogeneous log-normally distributed random fields. The location of the internal bound- ary between the two layers is treated as a normally distributed random variable. We consider two flow scenarios, (i) parallel and (ii) perpendicular to the layering. In both cases, the hydraulic head and flux statistics obtained from the moment equations for composite media model are virtually indistinguishable from those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. We conclude by contrasting our model with the existing determinis- tic trend models and with a statistically homogeneous model, which ignores composite nature of the medium.

  18. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  19. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  20. Quantum Heterogeneous Computing for Satellite Positioning Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, G.; Kumar, V.; Dulny, J., III

    2016-12-01

    Hard optimization problems occur in many fields of academic study and practical situations. We present results in which quantum heterogeneous computing is used to solve a real-world optimization problem: satellite positioning. Optimization problems like this can scale very rapidly with problem size, and become unsolvable with traditional brute-force methods. Typically, such problems have been approximately solved with heuristic approaches; however, these methods can take a long time to calculate and are not guaranteed to find optimal solutions. Quantum computing offers the possibility of producing significant speed-up and improved solution quality. There are now commercially available quantum annealing (QA) devices that are designed to solve difficult optimization problems. These devices have 1000+ quantum bits, but they have significant hardware size and connectivity limitations. We present a novel heterogeneous computing stack that combines QA and classical machine learning and allows the use of QA on problems larger than the quantum hardware could solve in isolation. We begin by analyzing the satellite positioning problem with a heuristic solver, the genetic algorithm. The classical computer's comparatively large available memory can explore the full problem space and converge to a solution relatively close to the true optimum. The QA device can then evolve directly to the optimal solution within this more limited space. Preliminary experiments, using the Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm to simulate QA hardware, have produced promising results. Working with problem instances with known global minima, we find a solution within 8% in a matter of seconds, and within 5% in a few minutes. Future studies include replacing QMC with commercially available quantum hardware and exploring more problem sets and model parameters. Our results have important implications for how heterogeneous quantum computing can be used to solve difficult optimization problems in any

  1. Hydrological heterogeneity in agricultural riparian buffer strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Larocque, Marie; Perron, Rachel; Wiseman, Natalie; Labrecque, Michel

    2017-03-01

    Riparian buffer strips (RBS) may protect surface water and groundwater in agricultural settings, although their effectiveness, observed in field-scale studies, may not extend to a watershed scale. Hydrologically-controlled leaching plots have often shown RBS to be effective at buffering nutrients and pesticides, but uncontrolled field studies have sometimes suggested limited effectiveness. The limited RBS effectiveness may be explained by the spatiotemporal hydrological heterogeneity near non-irrigated fields. This hypothesis was tested in conventional corn and soy fields in the St. Lawrence Lowlands of southern Quebec (Canada), where spring melt brings heavy and rapid runoff, while summer months are hot and dry. One field with a mineral soil (Saint-Roch-de-l'Achigan) and another with an organic-rich soil (Boisbriand) were equipped with passive runoff collectors, suction cup lysimeters, and piezometers placed before and after a 3 m-wide RBS, and monitored from 2011 to 2014. Soil topography of the RBS was mapped to a 1 cm vertical precision and a 50 cm sampling grid. On average, surface runoff intersects the RBS perpendicularly, but is subject to substantial local heterogeneity. Groundwater saturates the root zones, but flows little at the time of snowmelt. Groundwater flow is not consistently perpendicular to the RBS, and may reverse, flowing from stream to field under low water flow regimes with stream-aquifer connectivity, thus affecting RBS effectiveness calculations. Groundwater flow direction can be influenced by stratigraphy, local soil hydraulic properties, and historical modification of the agricultural stream beds. Understanding the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of surface and groundwater flows is essential to correctly assess the effectiveness of RBS in intercepting agro-chemical pollution. The implicit assumption that water flows across vegetated RBS, from the field to the stream, should always be verified.

  2. Static heterogeneities in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of water seems to be closely related to static heterogeneities. These static heterogeneities are related to the local structure of water molecules, and when properly characterized, may offer an economical explanation of thermodynamic data. The key feature of liquid water is not so much that the existence of hydrogen bonds, first pointed out by Linus Pauling, but rather the local geometry of the liquid molecules is not spherical or oblong but tetrahedral. In the consideration of static heterogeneities, this local geometry is critical. Recent experiments suggested more than one phase of amorphous solid water, while simulations suggest that one of these phases is metastable with respect to another, so that in fact there are only two stable phases.

  3. Resource heterogeneity can facilitate cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Kun, Ádám; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Although social structure is known to promote cooperation, by locally exposing selfish agents to their own deeds, studies to date assumed that all agents have access to the same level of resources. This is clearly unrealistic. Here we find that cooperation can be maintained when some agents have access to more resources than others. Cooperation can then emerge even in populations in which the temptation to defect is so strong that players would act fully selfishly if their resources were distributed uniformly. Resource heterogeneity can thus be crucial for the emergence and maintenance of cooperation. We also show that resource heterogeneity can hinder cooperation once the temptation to defect is significantly lowered. In all cases, the level of cooperation can be maximized by managing resource heterogeneity. PMID:24088665

  4. Quantifying tumour heterogeneity with CT

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity is a key feature of malignancy associated with adverse tumour biology. Quantifying heterogeneity could provide a useful non-invasive imaging biomarker. Heterogeneity on computed tomography (CT) can be quantified using texture analysis which extracts spatial information from CT images (unenhanced, contrast-enhanced and derived images such as CT perfusion) that may not be perceptible to the naked eye. The main components of texture analysis can be categorized into image transformation and quantification. Image transformation filters the conventional image into its basic components (spatial, frequency, etc.) to produce derived subimages. Texture quantification techniques include structural-, model- (fractal dimensions), statistical- and frequency-based methods. The underlying tumour biology that CT texture analysis may reflect includes (but is not limited to) tumour hypoxia and angiogenesis. Emerging studies show that CT texture analysis has the potential to be a useful adjunct in clinical oncologic imaging, providing important information about tumour characterization, prognosis and treatment prediction and response. PMID:23545171

  5. Simulator for heterogeneous dataflow architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    1993-01-01

    A new simulator is developed to simulate the execution of an algorithm graph in accordance with the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) rules. ATAMM is a Petri Net model which describes the periodic execution of large-grained, data-independent dataflow graphs and which provides predictable steady state time-optimized performance. This simulator extends the ATAMM simulation capability from a heterogenous set of resources, or functional units, to a more general heterogenous architecture. Simulation test cases show that the simulator accurately executes the ATAMM rules for both a heterogenous architecture and a homogenous architecture, which is the special case for only one processor type. The simulator forms one tool in an ATAMM Integrated Environment which contains other tools for graph entry, graph modification for performance optimization, and playback of simulations for analysis.

  6. Resource heterogeneity can facilitate cooperation.

    PubMed

    Kun, Ádám; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Although social structure is known to promote cooperation, by locally exposing selfish agents to their own deeds, studies to date assumed that all agents have access to the same level of resources. This is clearly unrealistic. Here we find that cooperation can be maintained when some agents have access to more resources than others. Cooperation can then emerge even in populations in which the temptation to defect is so strong that players would act fully selfishly if their resources were distributed uniformly. Resource heterogeneity can thus be crucial for the emergence and maintenance of cooperation. We also show that resource heterogeneity can hinder cooperation once the temptation to defect is significantly lowered. In all cases, the level of cooperation can be maximized by managing resource heterogeneity.

  7. Simulator for heterogeneous dataflow architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    1993-09-01

    A new simulator is developed to simulate the execution of an algorithm graph in accordance with the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) rules. ATAMM is a Petri Net model which describes the periodic execution of large-grained, data-independent dataflow graphs and which provides predictable steady state time-optimized performance. This simulator extends the ATAMM simulation capability from a heterogenous set of resources, or functional units, to a more general heterogenous architecture. Simulation test cases show that the simulator accurately executes the ATAMM rules for both a heterogenous architecture and a homogenous architecture, which is the special case for only one processor type. The simulator forms one tool in an ATAMM Integrated Environment which contains other tools for graph entry, graph modification for performance optimization, and playback of simulations for analysis.

  8. Regional seismic wavefield computation on a 3-D heterogeneous Earth model by means of coupled traveling wave synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2002-01-01

    I present a new algorithm for calculating seismic wave propagation through a three-dimensional heterogeneous medium using the framework of mode coupling theory originally developed to perform very low frequency (f < ???0.01-0.05 Hz) seismic wavefield computation. It is a Greens function approach for multiple scattering within a defined volume and employs a truncated traveling wave basis set using the locked mode approximation. Interactions between incident and scattered wavefields are prescribed by mode coupling theory and account for the coupling among surface waves, body waves, and evanescent waves. The described algorithm is, in principle, applicable to global and regional wave propagation problems, but I focus on higher frequency (typically f ??????0.25 Hz) applications at regional and local distances where the locked mode approximation is best utilized and which involve wavefields strongly shaped by propagation through a highly heterogeneous crust. Synthetic examples are shown for P-SV-wave propagation through a semi-ellipsoidal basin and SH-wave propagation through a fault zone.

  9. Modeling nonlinear ultrasound propagation in heterogeneous media with power law absorption using a k-space pseudospectral method.

    PubMed

    Treeby, Bradley E; Jaros, Jiri; Rendell, Alistair P; Cox, B T

    2012-06-01

    The simulation of nonlinear ultrasound propagation through tissue realistic media has a wide range of practical applications. However, this is a computationally difficult problem due to the large size of the computational domain compared to the acoustic wavelength. Here, the k-space pseudospectral method is used to reduce the number of grid points required per wavelength for accurate simulations. The model is based on coupled first-order acoustic equations valid for nonlinear wave propagation in heterogeneous media with power law absorption. These are derived from the equations of fluid mechanics and include a pressure-density relation that incorporates the effects of nonlinearity, power law absorption, and medium heterogeneities. The additional terms accounting for convective nonlinearity and power law absorption are expressed as spatial gradients making them efficient to numerically encode. The governing equations are then discretized using a k-space pseudospectral technique in which the spatial gradients are computed using the Fourier-collocation method. This increases the accuracy of the gradient calculation and thus relaxes the requirement for dense computational grids compared to conventional finite difference methods. The accuracy and utility of the developed model is demonstrated via several numerical experiments, including the 3D simulation of the beam pattern from a clinical ultrasound probe.

  10. Phase-field based Multiscale Modeling of Heterogeneous Solid Electrolytes: Applications to Nanoporous Li 3 PS 4

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Wang, Bo; Ji, Yanzhou; ...

    2017-09-07

    Modeling the effective ion conductivities of heterogeneous solid electrolytes typically involves the use of a computer-generated microstructure consisting of randomly or uniformly oriented fillers in a matrix. But, the structural features of the filler/matrix interface, which critically determine the interface ion conductivity and the microstructure morphology, have not been considered during the microstructure generation. In using nanoporous β-Li3PS4 electrolyte as an example, we develop a phase-field model that enables generating nanoporous microstructures of different porosities and connectivity patterns based on the depth and the energy of the surface (pore/electrolyte interface), both of which are predicted through density functional theory (DFT)more » calculations. Room-temperature effective ion conductivities of the generated microstructures are then calculated numerically, using DFT-estimated surface Li-ion conductivity (3.14×10-3 S/cm) and experimentally measured bulk Li-ion conductivity (8.93×10-7 S/cm) of β-Li3PS4 as the inputs. We also use the generated microstructures to inform effective medium theories to rapidly predict the effective ion conductivity via analytical calculations. Furthemore, when porosity approaches the percolation threshold, both the numerical and analytical methods predict a significantly enhanced Li-ion conductivity (1.74×10-4 S/cm) that is in good agreement with experimental data (1.64×10-4 S/cm). The present phase-field based multiscale model is generally applicable to predict both the microstructure patterns and the effective properties of heterogeneous solid electrolytes.« less

  11. Phase-Field Based Multiscale Modeling of Heterogeneous Solid Electrolytes: Applications to Nanoporous Li3PS4.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Wang, Bo; Ji, Yanzhou; Yang, Tiannan; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Wang, Yi; Chen, Long-Qing

    2017-09-27

    Modeling the effective ion conductivities of heterogeneous solid electrolytes typically involves the use of a computer-generated microstructure consisting of randomly or uniformly oriented fillers in a matrix. However, the structural features of the filler/matrix interface, which critically determine the interface ion conductivity and the microstructure morphology, have not been considered during the microstructure generation. Using nanoporous β-Li3PS4 electrolyte as an example, we develop a phase-field model that enables generating nanoporous microstructures of different porosities and connectivity patterns based on the depth and the energy of the surface (pore/electrolyte interface), both of which are predicted through density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Room-temperature effective ion conductivities of the generated microstructures are then calculated numerically, using DFT-estimated surface Li-ion conductivity (3.14 × 10(-3) S/cm) and experimentally measured bulk Li-ion conductivity (8.93 × 10(-7) S/cm) of β-Li3PS4 as the inputs. We also use the generated microstructures to inform effective medium theories to rapidly predict the effective ion conductivity via analytical calculations. When porosity approaches the percolation threshold, both the numerical and analytical methods predict a significantly enhanced Li-ion conductivity (1.74 × 10(-4) S/cm) that is in good agreement with experimental data (1.64 × 10(-4) S/cm). The present phase-field based multiscale model is generally applicable to predict both the microstructure patterns and the effective properties of heterogeneous solid electrolytes.

  12. Barometric pumping of a fractured porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Varloteaux, Clément; Mourzenko, Valeri; François Thovert, Jean; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuations in the ambient atmospheric pressure result in motion of air in porous and fractured media. This mechanism, known as barometric (or atmospheric) pumping, efficiently transports gaseous species through the vadose zone to the atmosphere. This is of interest in many environmental and engineering fields, such as transport of trace gases from soil to atmosphere, environmental remediation of contaminated sites, radon in buildings and last but not least detection of nuclear explosions or leakage from carbon sequestration sites. The physical situation has been addressed in the following way. The fractures are modeled as polygonal plane surfaces with a given transmissivity embedded in a porous medium with a given permeability. The fluid is slightly compressible and is assumed to obey Darcy's law in the fractures and the porous medium with exchanges between them. The solute obeys convection-diffusion equations in both media again with exchanges between them. The fractures and the porous medium located in between them are meshed by triangles and tetrahedra. The equations are discretized by the finite volume method. In order to improve numerical precision, a Flux Limiting Scheme is applied to the transport equations ; moreover, special care is devoted to the description of the solute transfer between the fractures and the porous medium. The resulting equations are solved by conjugate gradient algorithms. This model is applied to the Roselend Natural Laboratory. At a 55 m depth, a sealed cavity allows for gas release experiments across fractured porous rocks in the unsaturated zone. The fractures are hexagons with a radius of 5m; their density is larger than 2.4 10-3 m-3; the aperture is of the order of 0.5 mm. The pressure fluctuations are sinusoidal, of amplitude 0.01 bar and period 1 week. The solute concentration is supposed to be equal to 1 at the bottom of the site. Systematic results will be presented. First, the precision of the calculations is assessed

  13. Extending Theis' solution to incorporate heterogeneity into pumping test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Sebastian; Zech, Alraune; Heße, Falk; Attinger, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    A framework for interpreting transient pumping tests in heterogeneous transmissivity fields is developed to infer the overall geostatistical parameters of the medium without reconstructing the specific heterogeneous structure point wise. This method is applied to the field sites "Horkheimer Insel" and "Lauswiesen" (South-West Germany) to estimate the respective parameters of heterogeneity from pumping test data of each site. The methodology is based on the upscaling approach Radial Coarse Graining which is applied to deduce an effective radial description of multi-Gaussian transmissivity. It was used to derive an Effective Well Flow Solution for transient flow conditions including not only the storativity, but also the geometric mean, the variance, and the correlation length of log-transmissivity. This solution is shown to be appropriate to characterize the pumping test drawdown behavior in heterogeneous transmissivity fields making use of ensembles of simulated pumping tests with multiple combinations of statistical parameters. The whole procedure is described in detail in Zech et al. 2016 (doi: 10.1002/2015WR018509).

  14. Dynamic fracture of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G.; Liu, C.; Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.; Bennett, J.G.; Haberman, K.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to investigate the fundamental aspects of the process of dynamic fracture propagation in heterogeneous materials. The work focused on three important, but poorly understood, aspects of dynamic fracture for materials with a heterogeneous microstructure. These were: the appropriateness of using a single-parameter asymptotic analysis to describe dynamic crack-tip deformation fields, the temperature rises at the tip and on the flanks of a running crack, and the constitutive modeling of damage initiation and accumulation.

  15. Heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Alexander

    2011-11-18

    Sulfur aromatic compounds, such as mono-, di-, tri-, and tetraalkyl-substituted thiophene, benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, are the molecular components of many fossils (petroleum, oil shale, tar sands, bitumen). Structural units of natural, cross-linked heteroaromatic polymers present in brown coals, turf, and soil are similar to those of sulfur aromatic compounds. Many sulfur aromatic compounds are found in the streams of petroleum refining and upgrading (naphthas, gas oils) and in the consumer products (gasoline, diesel, jet fuels, heating fuels). Besides fossils, the structural fragments of sulfur aromatic compounds are present in molecules of certain organic semiconductors, pesticides, small molecule drugs, and in certain biomolecules present in human body (pheomelanin pigments). Photocatalysis is the frontier area of physical chemistry that studies chemical reactions initiated by absorption of photons by photocatalysts, that is, upon electronic rather than thermal activation, under "green" ambient conditions. This review provides systematization and critical review of the fundamental chemical and physicochemical information on heterogeneous photocatalysis of sulfur aromatic compounds accumulated in the last 20-30 years. Specifically, the following topics are covered: physicochemical properties of sulfur aromatic compounds, major classes of heterogeneous photocatalysts, mechanisms and reactive intermediates of photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds, and the selectivity of these reactions. Quantum chemical calculations of properties and structures of sulfur aromatic compounds, their reactive intermediates, and the structure of adsorption complexes formed on the surface of the photocatalysts are also discussed.

  16. Semiclassical approach to heterogeneous vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, Benjamín; Murphy, Christopher W.

    2015-12-01

    We derive the decay rate of an unstable phase of a quantum field theory in the presence of an impurity in the thin-wall approximation. This derivation is based on the how the impurity changes the (flat spacetime) geometry relative to case of pure false vacuum. Two examples are given that show how to estimate some of the additional parameters that enter into this heterogeneous decay rate. This formalism is then applied to the Higgs vacuum of the Standard Model (SM), where baryonic matter acts as an impurity in the electroweak Higgs vacuum. We find that the probability for heterogeneous vacuum decay to occur is suppressed with respect to the homogeneous case. That is to say, the conclusions drawn from the homogeneous case are not modified by the inclusion of baryonic matter in the calculation. On the other hand, we show that Beyond the Standard Model physics with a characteristic scale comparable to the scale that governs the homogeneous decay rate in the SM, can in principle lead to an enhanced decay rate.

  17. OH initiated heterogeneous degradation of organophosphorus compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Liu, Y.; Harner, T.; Jantunen, L.; Shoeib, M.; Li, S.

    2013-12-01

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) have been extensively used worldwide as flame retardants, plasticizers, antifoaming agents, and additives because of their favorable physicochemical characteristics. The global consumption of OPs is likely to greatly increase due to the phasing out of bromine-containing flame retardants (BFRs) with OPs identified as possible substitutes. In most applications, OPs easily leach out of the material into the environment via volatilization, abrasion, and dissolution and have been observed widely in atmospheric particles even in polar regions. However, little is known about their atmospheric fate. The Canadian Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) has targeted OP FRs for risk assessment, including assessing stability and atmospheric transport potential of OP FRs and other priority chemicals that are associated primarily with particles. In the current study, OH initiated heterogeneous reaction kinetics of tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris-2-ethylhexyl-phosphate (TEHP), tris-2-butoxyethyl-phosphate (TBEP), and tri-phenyl phosphate (TPhP) coated on (NH4)2SO4 were investigated using a photo-chemical flow tube which was coupled to an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). second-order rate constants (k2) for the heterogeneous loss of TPhP, TEHP and TDCPP were (2.07×0.19)×10-12, (2.69×0.63)×10-12 and (9.22×0.92)×10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively, from which approximate atmospheric lifetimes were estimated to be 5.6 (5.2-6.0), 4.3 (3.5-5.6), and 12.6 (11.4-14.0) days. These results represent the first reported estimates of heterogeneous rate constants for these species, and suggest that particle bound OPEs will be highly persistent in the atmosphere, supporting the assumption that OPEs can undergo medium or long-range transport, as proposed on the basis of field measurements.

  18. Different pressure grids for reservoir simulation in heterogeneous reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Guerillot, D.R.; Verdiere, S.

    1995-12-31

    Petroleum reservoirs are made of highly heterogeneous rocks. These reservoirs could be described by geostatistical models composed of millions of cells. Currently, fluid flow simulations performed within these media need upscaling (or averaging) techniques. Hence, their results are given by averaging on cells which are much larger than the geological model cells. To overcome this problem, the Dual Mesh Method is proposed here, whose purpose is to solve the pressure equation on a low resolution grid, and then to interpolate pressure over the fine mesh by taking into account small scale heterogeneities of the mediums. The aim of this paper is the interpolation step; its implementation is presented and illustrated in a five-spot pattern for three different rock characteristics.

  19. Programmable calculator stress analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gulick, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced programmable alphanumeric calculators are well suited for closed-form calculation of pressure-vessel stresses. They offer adequate computing power, portability, special programming features, and simple interactive execution procedures. Representative programs that demonstrate calculator capabilities are presented. Problems treated are stress and strength calculations in thick-walled pressure vessels and the computation of stresses near head/pressure-vessel junctures.

  20. Properties of the nuclear medium.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Burgio, G F

    2012-02-01

    We review our knowledge on the properties of the nuclear medium that have been studied, over many years, on the basis of many-body theory, laboratory experiments and astrophysical observations. Throughout the presentation particular emphasis is placed on the possible relationship and links between the nuclear medium and the structure of nuclei, including the limitations of such an approach. First we consider the realm of phenomenological laboratory data and astrophysical observations and the hints they can give on the characteristics that the nuclear medium should possess. The analysis is based on phenomenological models, that however have a strong basis on physical intuition and an impressive success. More microscopic models are also considered, and it is shown that they are able to give invaluable information on the nuclear medium, in particular on its equation of state. The interplay between laboratory experiments and astrophysical observations is particularly stressed, and it is shown how their complementarity enormously enriches our insights into the structure of the nuclear medium. We then introduce the nucleon-nucleon interaction and the microscopic many-body theory of nuclear matter, with a critical discussion about the different approaches and their results. The Landau-Fermi liquid theory is introduced and briefly discussed, and it is shown how fruitful it can be in discussing the macroscopic and low-energy properties of the nuclear medium. As an illustrative example, we discuss neutron matter at very low density, and it is shown how it can be treated within the many-body theory. The general bulk properties of the nuclear medium are reviewed to indicate at which stage of our knowledge we stand, taking into account the most recent developments both in theory and experiments. A section is dedicated to the pairing problem. The connection with nuclear structure is then discussed, on the basis of the energy density functional method. The possibility of linking

  1. A theoretical analysis of colloid attachment and straining in chemically heterogeneous porous media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A balance of applied hydrodynamic (TH) and resisting adhesive (TA) torques was conducted over a chemically heterogeneous porous medium that contained random roughness of height hr to determine the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to colloid immobilization (Sf*) under unfavorable a...

  2. Neutronic double heterogeneity effect in particle dispersed type inert matrix fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akie, H.; Takano, H.

    2006-06-01

    Rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel concept is studied in Japan for effective plutonium burning in light water reactors (LWRs). ROX is a heterogeneous fuel, where Pu containing yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) particles are dispersed in spinel matrix, and similar to the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) fuel. The effect of such a 'double' heterogeneity (fuel, structure and coolant heterogeneity in reactor core, plus fuel heterogeneity) on HTR neutronic characteristics is important, while the effect was not taken into account in the ROX fueled LWR neutronics calculations. Here, this double heterogeneity effect is estimated for ROX fueled LWR, and compared with the Pu containing YSZ particle fueled HTR. As a result, the heterogeneity effect was negligible in the ROX-LWR system, while it is notable in YSZ-HTR system. The volume fraction of YSZ particle in the fuel region is one of the important parameter to cause the difference.

  3. Heterogeneous Interactions of Acetaldehyde and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] by aqueous sulfuric acid has been studied via Knudsen cell experiments over ranges of temperature (210-250 K) and acid concentration (40-80 wt. %) representative of the upper troposphere. The Henry's law constants for acetaldehyde calculated from these data range from 6 x 10(exp 2) M/atm for 40 wt. % H2SO4 at 228 K to 2 x 10(exp 5) M/atm for 80 wt. % H2SO4 at 212 K. In some instances, acetaldehyde uptake exhibits apparent steady-state loss. The possible sources of this behavior, including polymerization, will be explored. Furthermore, the implications for heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in sulfate aerosols in the upper troposphere will be discussed.

  4. Calculation of Surface Waves and Body Waves from an Explosion in a Three-Dimensional Stress Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. L.; Thompson, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Although the effect of tectonic prestress on explosion-generated surface waves has been discussed since the 1960's, until recently it has not been possible to directly calculate the seismic waves from an explosion in a three-dimensional stress field. We developed a 3D nonlinear finite element code designed for calculation of explosions in 3D heterogeneous media and incorporated the capability to perform explosion calculations in a prestressed medium. During the calculations we save displacements and stresses on a monitoring surface in the elastic region outside the nonlinear region, and then use the representation theorem to propagate the solution to regional and teleseismic distances. We have run calculations with and without tectonic release so that we can compare them and isolate the effects of tectonic release. We model the explosion Shoal, a 12.5 kiloton explosion detonated at 390 meters depth near Fallon, Nevada. This event had strong heterogeneity in near-field waveforms and is in a region under primarily extensional tectonic stress. There were three near-field shot level recording stations located in three directions each at about 590 meters from the shot. Including prestress consistent with the regional stress field causes variations in the calculated near-field waveforms similar to those observed in the Shoal data. The calculation with tectonic release also generates Love waves and a Rayleigh wave radiation pattern similar to those observed. We calculate both far-field and regional body waves and find very little difference between the P-waves for the cases with and without tectonic release. The effect of tectonic release on the SV-waves from the explosion is also small. However the calculation with tectonic release does generate SH-waves not present in the calculation without tectonic release. An important conclusion from these calculations relevant to nuclear monitoring is that while tectonic release can be expected to substantially change surface wave

  5. Methodology for embedded transport core calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Boyan D.

    The progress in the Nuclear Engineering field leads to developing new generations of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) with complex rector core designs, such as cores loaded partially with mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, high burn-up loadings, and cores with advanced designs of fuel assemblies and control rods. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the diffusion theory that has been used for several decades for calculations of the current Pressurized Water Rector (PWR) cores. To address the difficulties the diffusion approximation encounters new core calculation methodologies need to be developed by improving accuracy, while preserving efficiency of the current reactor core calculations. In this thesis, an advanced core calculation methodology is introduced, based on embedded transport calculations. Two different approaches are investigated. The first approach is based on embedded finite element (FEM), simplified P3 approximation (SP3), fuel assembly (FA) homogenization calculation within the framework of the diffusion core calculation with NEM code (Nodal Expansion Method). The second approach involves embedded FA lattice physics eigenvalue calculation based on collision probability method (CPM) again within the framework of the NEM diffusion core calculation. The second approach is superior to the first because most of the uncertainties introduced by the off-line cross-section generation are eliminated.

  6. Upstream reciprocity in heterogeneous networks.

    PubMed

    Iwagami, Akio; Masuda, Naoki

    2010-08-07

    Many mechanisms for the emergence and maintenance of altruistic behavior in social dilemma situations have been proposed. Indirect reciprocity is one such mechanism, where other-regarding actions of a player are eventually rewarded by other players with whom the original player has not interacted. The upstream reciprocity (also called generalized indirect reciprocity) is a type of indirect reciprocity and represents the concept that those helped by somebody will help other unspecified players. In spite of the evidence for the enhancement of helping behavior by upstream reciprocity in rats and humans, theoretical support for this mechanism is not strong. In the present study, we numerically investigate upstream reciprocity in heterogeneous contact networks, in which the players generally have different number of neighbors. We show that heterogeneous networks considerably enhance cooperation in a game of upstream reciprocity. In heterogeneous networks, the most generous strategy, by which a player helps a neighbor on being helped and in addition initiates helping behavior, first occupies hubs in a network and then disseminates to other players. The scenario to achieve enhanced altruism resembles that seen in the case of the Prisoner's Dilemma game in heterogeneous networks. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Floodplain heterogeneity and meander migration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of horizontal heterogeneity of floodplain soils on rates and patterns of meander migration is analyzed with a Ikeda et al. (1981)-type model for hydrodynamics and bed morphodynamics, coupled with a physically-based bank erosion model according to the approach developed by Motta et al. (20...

  8. Modeling large heterogeneous RF structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Ko, Kwok; Srinivas, V.; Higo, Toshiyasu

    1996-11-01

    Large heterogeneous structures are difficult to model on a numerical grid because of the limitations on computing resources, so that alternate approaches such as equivalent circuits and mode-matching have been developed to treat this problem. This paper will describe the three methods and will analyze a structure representative of the SLAC and JLC detuned structures to compare the efficacy of each approach.

  9. Genetic heterogeneity in human disease.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Jon; King, Mary-Claire

    2010-04-16

    Strong evidence suggests that rare mutations of severe effect are responsible for a substantial portion of complex human disease. Evolutionary forces generate vast genetic heterogeneity in human illness by introducing many new variants in each generation. Current sequencing technologies offer the possibility of finding rare disease-causing mutations and the genes that harbor them. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Teaching about Heterogeneous Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals vary in their responses to incentives and opportunities. For example, additional education will affect one person differently than another. In recent years, econometricians have given increased attention to such heterogeneous responses and to the consequences of such responses for interpreting regression estimates, especially…

  11. Heterogeneous porous media in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababou, Rachid

    In natural geologic formations, flow and transport-related processes are perturbed by multidimensional and anisotropic material heterogeneities of diverse sizes, shapes, and origins (bedding, layering, inclusions, fractures, grains, for example). Heterogeneity tends to disperse and mix transported quantities and may initiate new transfer mechanisms not seen in ideally homogeneous porous media. Effective properties such as conductivity and dispersivity may not be simple averages of locally measured quantities.The special session, “Effective Constitutive Laws for Heterogeneous Porous Media,” convened at AGU's 1992 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, addressed these issue. Over forty-five contributions, both oral and poster, covering a broad range of physical phenomena were presented. The common theme was the macroscale characterization and modeling of flow and flow-related processes in geologic media that are heterogeneous at various scales (from grain size or fracture aperture, up to regional scales). The processes analyzed in the session included coupled hydro-mechanical processes; Darcy-type flow in the saturated, unsaturated, or two-phase regimes; tracer transport, dilution, and dispersion. These processes were studied for either continuous (porous) or discontinuous (fractured) media.

  12. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described.

  13. Heterogeneous catalytic alcoholysis of benzonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Kagarlitskii, A.D.; Dmumakaev, K.Kh.; Bekova, N.S.

    1986-04-01

    The authors investigate the possibility of the direct heterogeneous catalytic synthesis of ethylbenzoate from benzonitrile. The catalysts tested were oxides of aluminium, titanium, and vanadium. The main conversion product detected chromatographically was ethylbenzoate; benzaldehyde, benzamide, and benzanilide were also identified. Aluminium oxide was found to be the most effective catalyst.

  14. Social Capital and Community Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffe, Hilde

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that more pronounced community heterogeneity is associated with lower levels of social capital. These studies, however, concentrate on specific aspects in which people differ (such as income inequality or ethnic diversity). In the present paper, we introduce the number of parties in the local party system as a more…

  15. Surface science of heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    White, J M

    1982-10-29

    Some of the present and future directions for surface science as a growing and naturally interdisciplinary subject are reviewed. Particular attention is given to surface reaction chemistry as it is related to heterogenous catalysis, a subject area where there are abundant opportunities for detailed measurements of structure and dynamics at the molecular level.

  16. Social Capital and Community Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffe, Hilde

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that more pronounced community heterogeneity is associated with lower levels of social capital. These studies, however, concentrate on specific aspects in which people differ (such as income inequality or ethnic diversity). In the present paper, we introduce the number of parties in the local party system as a more…

  17. A theoretical analysis of colloid attachment and straining in chemically heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Shapiro, Alexander

    2013-06-11

    A balance of applied hydrodynamic (T(H)) and resisting adhesive (T(A)) torques was conducted over a chemically heterogeneous porous medium that contained random roughness of height h(r) to determine the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to colloid immobilization (S(f)*) under unfavorable attachment conditions. This model considers resistance due to deformation and the horizontal component of the adhesive force (F(AT)), spatial variations in the pore scale velocity distribution, and the influence of hr on lever arms for T(H) and T(A). Values of S(f)* were calculated for a wide range of physicochemical properties to gain insight into mechanisms and factors influencing colloid immobilization. Colloid attachment processes were demonstrated to depend on solution ionic strength (IS), the colloid radius (r(c)), the Young's modulus (K), the amount of chemical heterogeneity (P+), and the Darcy velocity (q). Colloid immobilization was also demonstrated to occur on a rough surface in the absence of attachment. In this case, S(f)* depended on IS, r(c), the roughness fraction (f0), h(r), and q. Roughness tended to enhance T(A) and diminish T(H). Consequently, the effect of IS on S(f)* was enhanced by h(r) relative to attachment. In contrast, the effects of r(c) and q on S(f)* were diminished by hr in comparison to attachment. Colloid immobilization adjacent to macroscopic roughness locations shares many similarities to grain-grain contact points and may be viewed as a type of straining process. In general, attachment was more important for higher IS and variance in the secondary minimum, and for smaller r(c), q, and K, but diffusion decreased these values. Conversely, straining was dominant for the opposite conditions. Discrepancies in the literature on mechanisms of colloid retention are likely due to a lack of consideration of all of these factors.

  18. Flammability of Heterogeneously Combusting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    Most engineering materials, including some metals, most notably aluminum, burn in homogeneous combustion. 'Homogeneous' refers to both the fuel and the oxidizer being in the same phase, which is usually gaseous. The fuel and oxidizer are well mixed in the combustion reaction zone, and heat is released according to some relation like q(sub c) = delta H(sub c)c[((rho/rho(sub 0))]exp a)(exp -E(sub c)/RT), Eq. (1) where the pressure exponent a is usually close to unity. As long as there is enough heat released, combustion is sustained. It is useful to conceive of a threshold pressure beyond which there is sufficient heat to keep the temperature high enough to sustain combustion, and beneath which the heat is so low that temperature drains away and the combustion is extinguished. Some materials burn in heterogeneous combustion, in which the fuel and oxidizer are in different phases. These include iron and nickel based alloys, which burn in the liquid phase with gaseous oxygen. Heterogeneous combustion takes place on the surface of the material (fuel). Products of combustion may appear as a solid slag (oxide) which progressively covers the fuel. Propagation of the combustion melts and exposes fresh fuel. Heterogeneous combustion heat release also follows the general form of Eq.(1), except that the pressure exponent a tends to be much less than 1. Therefore, the increase in heat release with increasing pressure is not as dramatic as it is in homogeneous combustion. Although the concept of a threshold pressure still holds in heterogeneous combustion, the threshold is more difficult to identify experimentally, and pressure itself becomes less important relative to the heat transfer paths extant in any specific application. However, the constants C, a, and E(sub c) may still be identified by suitable data reduction from heterogeneous combustion experiments, and may be applied in a heat transfer model to judge the flammability of a material in any particular actual

  19. A conceptual translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis: homogeneous-like heterogeneous gold nanoparticle catalyst induced by ceria supporter.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Xue, Wei; Guan, Bing-Tao; Shi, Fu-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-02-07

    Translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis is a promising solution to green and sustainable development in chemical industry. For this purpose, noble metal nanoparticles represent a new frontier in catalytic transformations. Many challenges remain for researchers to transform noble metal nanoparticles of heterogeneous catalytic active sites into ionic species of homogeneous catalytic active sites. We report here a successful design on translating homogeneous gold catalysis into a heterogeneous system with a clear understanding of the catalytic pathway. This study initiates a novel concept to immobilize a homogeneous catalyst based on electron transfer between supporting base and supported nanoparticles. Meanwhile, on the basis of theoretical calculation, it has deepened the understanding of the interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and the catalyst support.

  20. Review of hadrons in medium

    SciTech Connect

    Krein, Gastão

    2016-01-22

    I review the present status in the theoretical and phenomenological understanding of hadron properties in strongly interacting matter. The topics covered are the EMC effect, nucleon structure functions in cold nuclear matter, spectral properties of light vector mesons in hot and cold nuclear matter, and in-medium properties of heavy flavored hadrons.

  1. Heterogeneity in perinatal depression: how far have we come? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hudson; Tan, Xianming; Salomon, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Despite perinatal depression (PND) being a common mental disorder affecting pregnant women and new mothers, limited attention has been paid to the heterogeneous nature of this disorder. We examined heterogeneity in PND symptom profiles and symptom trajectories. Literature searches revealed 247 studies, 23 of which were included in the final review. The most common statistical approaches used to explore symptom and trajectory heterogeneity were latent class model and growth mixture model. All but one study examined PND symptom trajectories and provided collective evidence of at least three heterogeneous patterns: low, medium, or chronic-high symptom levels. Social and psychological risk factors were the most common group of predictors related to a higher burden (high sum of score) of depressive symptoms. These studies were consistent in reporting poorer health outcomes for children of mothers assigned to high burden symptom trajectories. Only one study explored heterogeneity in symptom profile and was the only one to describe the specific constellations of depressive symptoms related to the PND heterogeneous patterns identified. Therefore, there is limited evidence on the specific symptoms and symptom configurations that make up PND heterogeneity. We suggest directions for future research to further clarify the PND heterogeneity and its related mechanisms.

  2. Integrated Structural/Acoustic Modeling of Heterogeneous Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven, M.; Pennline, James, A.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the dynamic response of heterogeneous media is presented. A given medium is discretized into a number of subvolumes, each of which may contain an elastic anisotropic material, void, or fluid, and time-dependent boundary conditions are applied to simulate impact or incident pressure waves. The full time-dependent displacement and stress response throughout the medium is then determined via an explicit solution procedure. The model is applied to simulate the coupled structural/acoustic response of foam core sandwich panels as well as aluminum panels with foam inserts. Emphasis is placed on the acoustic absorption performance of the panels versus weight and the effects of the arrangement of the materials and incident wave frequency.

  3. Medium Increased Risk for Central Sleep Apnea but Not Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Long-Term Opioid Users: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Filiatrault, Marie-Lou; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Daoust, Raoul; Roy, Marie-Pier; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Opioids are associated with higher risk for ataxic breathing and sleep apnea. We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the influence of long-term opioid use on the apnea-hypopnea and central apnea indices (AHI and CAI, respectively). Methods: A systematic review protocol (Cochrane Handbook guidelines) was developed for the search and analysis. We searched Embase, Medline, ACP Journal Club, and Cochrane Database up to November 2014 for three topics: (1) narcotics, (2) sleep apnea, and (3) apnea-hypopnea index. The outcome of interest was the variation in AHI and CAI in opioid users versus non-users. Two reviewers performed the data search and extraction, and disagreements were resolved by discussion. Results were combined by standardized mean difference using a random effect model, and heterogeneity was tested by χ2 and presented as I2 statistics. Results: Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, for a total of 803 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We compared 2 outcomes: AHI (320 opioid users and 483 non-users) and 790 patients with CAI (315 opioid users and 475 non-users). The absolute effect size for opioid use was a small increased in apnea measured by AHI = 0.25 (95% CI: 0.02–0.49) and a medium for CAI = 0.45 (95% CI: 0.27–0.63). Effect consistency across studies was calculated, showing moderate heterogeneity at I2 = 59% and 29% for AHI and CAI, respectively. Conclusions: The meta-analysis results suggest that long-term opioid use in OSA patients has a medium effect on central sleep apnea. Citation: Filiatrault ML, Chauny JM, Daoust R, Roy MP, Denis R, Lavigne G. Medium increased risk for central sleep apnea but not obstructive sleep apnea in long-term opioid users: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):617–625. PMID:26943709

  4. Parallelizing N-Body Simulations on a Heterogeneous Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenborg, T. N.

    2009-10-01

    This thesis evaluates quantitatively the effectiveness of a new technique for parallelising direct gravitational N-body simulations on a heterogeneous computing cluster. In addition to being an investigation into how a specific computational physics task can be optimally load balanced across the heterogeneity factors of a distributed computing cluster, it is also, more generally, a case study in effective heterogeneous parallelisation of an all-pairs programming task. If high-performance computing clusters are not designed to be heterogeneous initially, they tend to become so over time as new nodes are added, or existing nodes are replaced or upgraded. As a result, effective techniques for application parallelisation on heterogeneous clusters are needed if maximum cluster utilisation is to be achieved and is an active area of research. A custom C/MPI parallel particle-particle N-body simulator was developed, validated and deployed for this evaluation. Simulation communication proceeds over cluster nodes arranged in a logical ring and employs nonblocking message passing to encourage overlap of communication with computation. Redundant calculations arising from force symmetry given by Newton's third law are removed by combining chordal data transfer of accumulated forces with ring passing data transfer. Heterogeneity in node computation speed is addressed by decomposing system data across nodes in proportion to node computation speed, in conjunction with use of evenly sized communication buffers. This scheme is shown experimentally to have some potential in improving simulation performance in comparison with an even decomposition of data across nodes. Techniques for further heterogeneous cluster load balancing are discussed and remain an opportunity for further work.

  5. Surface heterogeneity of small asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho

    A rubble pile model of asteroid origin would predict averaged rather homogeneous surface of an asteroid. Previous spacecraft observations (mostly S-type asteroids) did not show large color/albedo variation on the surface. Vesta would be exceptional since HST observation suggested that its surface should be heterogeneous due to the impact excavation of the interior. As for a young asteroid (832) Karin (age being 5Ma), Sasaki et al. (2004) detected variation of infrared spectra which could be explained by the difference of the space weathering degree. They discussed the possibility of the survival of the old surface. However, the variation was not confirmed by later observation (Chapman et al., 2007; Vernazza et al., 2007). Recent observation of a small (550m) asteroid Itokawa by Hayabusa spacecraft revealed that Itokawa is heterogeneous in color and albedo although the overall rocky structure is considered as a rubble pile (Saito et al., 2006). The color difference can be explained by the difference of weathering degree (Ishiguro et al., 2008). The heterogeneity could be explained by mass movement caused by rapid rotation from YORP effect (Scheeres et al., 2007) or seismic shaking (Sasaki, 2006). Probably small silicate asteroids without significant regolith could have heterogeneous in color and albedo. On large asteroids (˜ a few 10km), regolith reaccumulation should have covered the underlying heterogeneity. References: Chapman, C. R. et al (2007) Icarus, 191, 323-329 Ishiguro, M. et al. (2008) MAPS, in press. Saito, J. et al. (2006) Science, 312, 1341-1344 Sasaki, S. (2006) in Spacecraft Reconnaissance of Asteroid and Comet Interiors Sasaki, T. et al (2004) Astrophys. J. 615, L161-L164 Scheeres, D. J. (2007) Icarus 188, 425-429 Vernazza, P. et al. (2007) Icarus 191, 330-336.

  6. Experiment and theory for heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals in a porous medium

    PubMed Central

    Chayen, Naomi E.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Sear, Richard P.

    2006-01-01

    The determination of high-resolution structures of proteins requires crystals of suitable quality. Because of the new impetus given to structural biology by structural genomics/proteomics, the problem of crystallizing proteins is becoming increasingly acute. There is therefore an urgent requirement for the development of new efficient methods to aid crystal growth. Nucleation is the crucial step that determines the entire crystallization process. Hence, the holy grail is to design a “universal nucleant,” a substrate that induces the nucleation of crystals of any protein. We report a theory for nucleation on disordered porous media and its experimental testing and validation using a mesoporous bioactive gel-glass. This material induced the crystallization of the largest number of proteins ever crystallized using a single nucleant. The combination of the model and the experimental results opens up the scope for the rational design of nucleants, leading to alternative means of controlling crystallization. PMID:16407115

  7. Experiment and theory for heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Chayen, Naomi E; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Sear, Richard P

    2006-01-17

    The determination of high-resolution structures of proteins requires crystals of suitable quality. Because of the new impetus given to structural biology by structural genomics/proteomics, the problem of crystallizing proteins is becoming increasingly acute. There is therefore an urgent requirement for the development of new efficient methods to aid crystal growth. Nucleation is the crucial step that determines the entire crystallization process. Hence, the holy grail is to design a "universal nucleant," a substrate that induces the nucleation of crystals of any protein. We report a theory for nucleation on disordered porous media and its experimental testing and validation using a mesoporous bioactive gel-glass. This material induced the crystallization of the largest number of proteins ever crystallized using a single nucleant. The combination of the model and the experimental results opens up the scope for the rational design of nucleants, leading to alternative means of controlling crystallization.

  8. An analytical approach to estimating the first order scatter in heterogeneous medium. II. A practical application.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weiguang; Leszczynski, Konrad W

    2009-07-01

    Recently, the authors proposed an analytical scheme to estimate the first order x-ray scatter by approximating the Klein-Nishina formula so that the first order scatter fluence is expressed as a function of the primary photon fluence on the detector. In this work, the authors apply the scheme to experimentally obtained 6 MV cone beam CT projections in which the primary photon fluence is the unknown of interest. With the assumption that the higher-order scatter fluence is either constant or proportional to the first order scatter fluence, an iterative approach is proposed to estimate both primary and scatter fluences from projections by utilizing their relationship. The iterative approach is evaluated by comparisons with experimentally measured scatter-primary ratios of a Catphan phantom and with Monte Carlo simulations of virtual phantoms. The convergence of the iterations is fast and the accuracy of scatter correction is high. For a sufficiently long cylindrical water phantom with 10 cm of radius, the relative error of estimated primary photon fluence was within +/- 2% and +/- 4% when the phantom was projected with 6 MV and 120 kVp x-ray imaging systems, respectively. In addition, the iterative approach for scatter estimation is applied to 6 MV x-ray projections of a QUASAR and anthropomorphic phantoms (head and pelvis). The scatter correction is demonstrated to significantly improve the accuracy of the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficient and the contrast of the projections and reconstructed volumetric images generated with a linac 6 MV beam.

  9. Formation of Benzene in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Crim, F. Fleming (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block-the aromatic benzene molecule-has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3- butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 --> C6H6, + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadlene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium.

  10. Formation of benzene in the interstellar medium

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block—the aromatic benzene molecule—has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3-butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 → C6H6 + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadiene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium. PMID:21187430

  11. Accounting for aquifer heterogeneity from geological data to management tools.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Martin; Martel, Richard; Gloaguen, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    A nested workflow of multiple-point geostatistics (MPG) and sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS) was tested on a study area of 6 km(2) located about 20 km northwest of Quebec City, Canada. In order to assess its geological and hydrogeological parameter heterogeneity and to provide tools to evaluate uncertainties in aquifer management, direct and indirect field measurements are used as inputs in the geostatistical simulations to reproduce large and small-scale heterogeneities. To do so, the lithological information is first associated to equivalent hydrogeological facies (hydrofacies) according to hydraulic properties measured at several wells. Then, heterogeneous hydrofacies (HF) realizations are generated using a prior geological model as training image (TI) with the MPG algorithm. The hydraulic conductivity (K) heterogeneity modeling within each HF is finally computed using SGS algorithm. Different K models are integrated in a finite-element hydrogeological model to calculate multiple transport simulations. Different scenarios exhibit variations in mass transport path and dispersion associated with the large- and small-scale heterogeneity respectively. Three-dimensional maps showing the probability of overpassing different thresholds are presented as examples of management tools. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  12. Lizard locomotion in heterogeneous granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Goldman, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Locomotion strategies in heterogeneous granular environments (common substrates in deserts), are relatively unexplored. The zebra-tailed lizard (C. draconoides) is a useful model organism for such studies owing to its exceptional ability to navigate a variety of desert habitats at impressive speed (up to 50 body-lengths per second) using both quadrapedal and bidepal gaits. In laboratory experiments, we challenge the lizards to run across a field of boulders (2.54 cm diameter glass spheres or 3.8 cm 3D printed spheres) placed in a lattice pattern and embedded in a loosely packed granular medium of 0.3 mm diameter glass particles. Locomotion kinematics of the lizard are recorded using high speed cameras, with and without the scatterers. The data reveals that unlike the lizard's typical quadrupedal locomotion using a diagonal gait, when scatterers are present the lizard is most successful when using a bipedal gait, with a raised center of mass (CoM). We propose that the kinematics of bipedal running in conjunction with the lizard's long toes and compliant hind foot are the keys to this lizard's successful locomotion in the presence of such obstacles. NSF PoLS

  13. Nonlinear Poisson Equation for Heterogeneous Media

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Langhua; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The Poisson equation is a widely accepted model for electrostatic analysis. However, the Poisson equation is derived based on electric polarizations in a linear, isotropic, and homogeneous dielectric medium. This article introduces a nonlinear Poisson equation to take into consideration of hyperpolarization effects due to intensive charges and possible nonlinear, anisotropic, and heterogeneous media. Variational principle is utilized to derive the nonlinear Poisson model from an electrostatic energy functional. To apply the proposed nonlinear Poisson equation for the solvation analysis, we also construct a nonpolar solvation energy functional based on the nonlinear Poisson equation by using the geometric measure theory. At a fixed temperature, the proposed nonlinear Poisson theory is extensively validated by the electrostatic analysis of the Kirkwood model and a set of 20 proteins, and the solvation analysis of a set of 17 small molecules whose experimental measurements are also available for a comparison. Moreover, the nonlinear Poisson equation is further applied to the solvation analysis of 21 compounds at different temperatures. Numerical results are compared to theoretical prediction, experimental measurements, and those obtained from other theoretical methods in the literature. A good agreement between our results and experimental data as well as theoretical results suggests that the proposed nonlinear Poisson model is a potentially useful model for electrostatic analysis involving hyperpolarization effects. PMID:22947937

  14. Adaptive heterogeneous multi-robot teams

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control in robot missions involving loosely coupled, largely independent tasks. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, the author describes in detail the experimental results of an implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative box pushing demonstration. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes in the capabilities of the robot team.

  15. How snowpack heterogeneity affects diurnal streamflow timing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundquist, J.D.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Diurnal cycles of streamflow in snow-fed rivers can be used to infer the average time a water parcel spends in transit from the top of the snowpack to a stream gauge in the river channel. This travel time, which is measured as the difference between the hour of peak snowmelt in the afternoon and the hour of maximum discharge each day, ranges from a few hours to almost a full day later. Travel times increase with longer percolation times through deeper snowpacks, and prior studies of small basins have related the timing of a stream's diurnal peak to the amount of snow stored in a basin. However, in many larger basins the time of peak flow is nearly constant during the first half of the melt season, with little or no variation between years. This apparent self-organization at larger scales can be reproduced by employing heterogeneous observations of snow depths and melt rates in a model that couples porous medium flow through an evolving snowpack with free surface flow in a channel. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Nonlinear Poisson equation for heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Hu, Langhua; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-08-22

    The Poisson equation is a widely accepted model for electrostatic analysis. However, the Poisson equation is derived based on electric polarizations in a linear, isotropic, and homogeneous dielectric medium. This article introduces a nonlinear Poisson equation to take into consideration of hyperpolarization effects due to intensive charges and possible nonlinear, anisotropic, and heterogeneous media. Variational principle is utilized to derive the nonlinear Poisson model from an electrostatic energy functional. To apply the proposed nonlinear Poisson equation for the solvation analysis, we also construct a nonpolar solvation energy functional based on the nonlinear Poisson equation by using the geometric measure theory. At a fixed temperature, the proposed nonlinear Poisson theory is extensively validated by the electrostatic analysis of the Kirkwood model and a set of 20 proteins, and the solvation analysis of a set of 17 small molecules whose experimental measurements are also available for a comparison. Moreover, the nonlinear Poisson equation is further applied to the solvation analysis of 21 compounds at different temperatures. Numerical results are compared to theoretical prediction, experimental measurements, and those obtained from other theoretical methods in the literature. A good agreement between our results and experimental data as well as theoretical results suggests that the proposed nonlinear Poisson model is a potentially useful model for electrostatic analysis involving hyperpolarization effects.

  17. Effective medium theory of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. T.; Zhang, S.; Huang, Y. J.; Sridhar, S.

    2008-03-01

    We develop an effective medium theory for photonic crystals including negative index metamaterials. This theory is based on field summation within the unit cell. The unit cell is determined by the surface termination. The orientation of the surface breaks the field summation symmetry. This theory is self-consistent. The effective permittivity and permeability tensors will give the exact dispersion relation obtained from the band structure calculation. For waves incident into multilayered structures, our theory gives exact transmittance and reflectance for any wavelengths. For interface with periodic surface structures, our theory gives very accurate results for wavelength down to being comparable with the lattice spacing. By properly taking into account the multiple Bloch modes inside the photonic crystal, our theory can be made to give exact Bragg coefficients.

  18. Diffuse mass transport in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, F. G.

    1981-08-01

    Variational methods are used to investigate the problems of diffusive mass transport in a porous medium. Calculations of the effective diffusivities are performed for a model pore structure generated by randomly placed, freely overlapping solid spheres all of the same radius. Effects of the tortuosity of the diffusion paths are considered. Numerical evaluations are used to test some approximate engineering models. For gaseous transition region diffusion the mean free path kinetic theory is used to derive a variational upper bound on the effective transition region diffusivity. For the simultaneous liquid or gas phase Fickian bulk diffusion in the void and Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface, an analytical expression for effective diffusion coefficient is obtained and compared with the usual engineering model of parallel surface and void diffusion. The simultaneous gaseous transition region diffusion in the void and the Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface are examined numerically.

  19. The opacity of an expanding medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinnikov, S. I.

    1996-01-01

    Based on heuristic arguments, Karp et al. (1977) derived their well-known expression for the line opacity that allows for the effect of expansion. We use the general solution and Hilbert-type asymptotic expansions of the Boltzmann equation for photons to derive an expression for this "expansion opacity" rigorously. The difference between our result and the published results on this subject is discussed, as is the applicability of the expression for the expansion opacity to calculations of radiative transfer in a comoving frame in the moment approximation. For the zeroth moment (i.e., the energy equation), there is no need to take the expansion effect into account, and the absorption coefficient can be averaged just as in the case of a static medium. We also show how to properly average the expansion opacity in the flux equation.

  20. Pencil-beam redefinition algorithm dose calculations for electron therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert Arthur

    2001-08-01

    The electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) of Shiu and Hogstrom has been developed for use in radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). Earlier studies of Boyd and Hogstrom showed that the PBRA lacked an adequate incident beam model, that PBRA might require improved electron physics, and that no data existed which allowed adequate assessment of the PBRA-calculated dose accuracy in a heterogeneous medium such as one presented by patient anatomy. The hypothesis of this research was that by addressing the above issues the PBRA-calculated dose would be accurate to within 4% or 2 mm in regions of high dose gradients. A secondary electron source was added to the PBRA to account for collimation-scattered electrons in the incident beam. Parameters of the dual-source model were determined from a minimal data set to allow ease of beam commissioning. Comparisons with measured data showed 3% or better dose accuracy in water within the field for cases where 4% accuracy was not previously achievable. A measured data set was developed that allowed an evaluation of PBRA in regions distal to localized heterogeneities. Geometries in the data set included irregular surfaces and high- and low-density internal heterogeneities. The data was estimated to have 1% precision and 2% agreement with accurate, benchmarked Monte Carlo (MC) code. PBRA electron transport was enhanced by modeling local pencil beam divergence. This required fundamental changes to the mathematics of electron transport (divPBRA). Evaluation of divPBRA with the measured data set showed marginal improvement in dose accuracy when compared to PBRA; however, 4% or 2mm accuracy was not achieved by either PBRA version for all data points. Finally, PBRA was evaluated clinically by comparing PBRA- and MC-calculated dose distributions using site-specific patient RTP data. Results show PBRA did not agree with MC to within 4% or 2mm in a small fraction (<3%) of the irradiated volume. Although the hypothesis of the

  1. Modeling of diffuse reflectance of light in heterogeneous biological tissue to analysis of the effects of multiple scattering on reflectance pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Mohsen; Setayeshi, Saeed; Ardehali, Seyed Hossein; Arabalibeik, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Fingertip-type pulse oximeters are popular, but their inconvenience for long-term monitoring in daily life means that other types of wearable pulse oximeters, such as reflectance pulse oximeters, need to be developed. For the purpose of developing reflection pulse oximetry, we have analyzed the light propagation in tissue to calculate and estimate the measured intensities of reflected light using the analytical and numerical solutions of the diffusion approximation equation. The reflectance of light from the biological tissue is investigated from theoretical and experimental perspectives, for light in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. To establish the model, the calculated curves were compared with the analytical solution (AS) of the diffusion approximation equation in biological tissue. The results validated that the diffusion approximation equation could resolve the heterogeneous advanced tissue and the finite element method (FEM) could offer the simulation with higher efficiency and accuracy. Our aim has been to demonstrate the power of the FEM and AS in modeling of the steady-state diffusion approximation in a heterogeneous medium. Also, experimental data and the Monte Carlo model as a gold standard were used to verify the effectiveness of these methods.

  2. Effective-medium theory for anisotropic magnetic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Junfeng; Liu, Shiyang; Lin, Zhifang; Chui, S. T.

    2009-09-01

    We have developed an effective-medium theory within the coherent-potential approximation, which is especially suitable to retrieve the effective constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) of the anisotropic magnetic metamaterials consisting of the ferrite rods. The anisotropy originates from the gyromagnetic property of the ferrite material whose permeability is a tensor with nonzero off-diagonal components. To confirm the validity of our method the photonic band structures of the two-dimensional periodic magnetic metamaterials are calculated, which are in agreement with the effective-medium theory in the long wavelength limit, in addition, even when a/λ0˜0.4 the effective-medium theory can still be applied, where a and λ0 are the lattice constant and the vacuum wavelength, respectively. The simulations on the electric field patterns for a plane wave illuminated on the magnetic metamaterials and the equal-size effective scattering objects are performed, the results corroborate the effectiveness of the effective-medium theory once again. We also perform the simulation for the metamaterial composed of disordered ferrite rods, which is still in agreement with the effective-medium theory, suggesting the powerfulness of the effective-medium theory. Moreover, our results suggest that the anisotropy must be considered exactly in order to retrieve the effective constitutive parameters accurately.

  3. The strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks: A 2D approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Xu, Tao; Chen, Chong-feng; Tang, Chun'an

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic rocks typically contain heterogeneities in the form of crystals and pores. We investigate here the influence of such heterogeneity on the strength of volcanic rocks using an elastic damage mechanics model in which we numerically deform two-dimensional samples comprising low-strength elements representing crystals and zero-strength elements representing pores. These circular elements are stochastically generated so that there is no overlap in a medium representing the groundmass. Our modelling indicates that increasing the fraction of pores and/or crystals reduces the strength of volcanic rocks, and that increasing the pore fraction results in larger strength reductions than increasing the crystal fraction. The model also highlights an important weakening role for pore diameter, but finds that crystal diameter has a less significant influence for strength. To account for heterogeneity (pores and crystals), we propose an effective medium approach where we define an effective pore fraction ϕp‧ = Vp/(Vp + Vg) where Vp and Vg are the pore and groundmass fractions, respectively. Highly heterogeneous samples (containing high pore and/or crystal fractions) will therefore have high values of ϕp‧, and vice-versa. When we express our numerical samples (more than 200 simulations spanning a wide range of crystal and pore fractions) in terms of ϕp‧, we find that their strengths can be described by a single curve for a given pore diameter. To provide a predictive tool for the strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks, we propose a modified version of 2D solution for the Sammis and Ashby (1986) pore-emanating crack model, a micromechanical model designed to estimate strength using microstructural attributes such as porosity, pore radius, and fracture toughness. The model, reformulated to include ϕp‧ (and therefore crystal fraction), captures the strength curves for our numerical simulations over a sample heterogeneity range relevant to volcanic systems. We find

  4. The Distribution of Captured Non-Wetting Liquid Dispersed in Nanoporous Medium Recovery Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogorlov, A. A.; Borman, V. D.; Bortnikova, S. A.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper the recovery method of a distribution function of non-wetting liquid captured in porous medium presented. Computation algorithm described. The recovered distribution functions for the system nanoporous medium (Libersorb 23) - non-wetting liquid (water) at the temperature of experiments 6°C presented. The used for calculation experimental data obtained in the time relaxation of metastable states of the non-wetting liquid in a porous medium experiment [Borman et al. 2016 Phys Rev E 93 022142].

  5. Wave propagation through a random medium - The random slab problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquista, C.

    1978-01-01

    The first-order smoothing approximation yields integral equations for the mean and the two-point correlation function of a wave in a random medium. A method is presented for the approximate solution of these equations that combines features of the eiconal approximation and of the Born expansion. This method is applied to the problem of reflection and transmission of a plane wave by a slab of a random medium. Both the mean wave and the covariance are calculated to determine the reflected and transmitted amplitudes and intensities.

  6. Nucleon QCD sum rules in the instanton medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskin, M. G.; Drukarev, E. G. Sadovnikova, V. A.

    2015-09-15

    We try to find grounds for the standard nucleon QCD sum rules, based on a more detailed description of the QCD vacuum. We calculate the polarization operator of the nucleon current in the instanton medium. The medium (QCD vacuum) is assumed to be a composition of the small-size instantons and some long-wave gluon fluctuations. We solve the corresponding QCD sum rule equations and demonstrate that there is a solution with the value of the nucleon mass close to the physical one if the fraction of the small-size instantons contribution is w{sub s} ≈ 2/3.

  7. Enhancing the Flexibility of TCP in Heterogeneous Network

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Wang; Zhihui, Fan; Zheqing, Li; Xuhui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Due to a set of constant initial values, the performance of conventional TCP drops significantly encountering heterogeneous network, showing low throughput and unfairness. This paper firstly demonstrates the chaotic character of TCP congestion control in heterogeneous network, especially the sensitivity to initial value. Inspired by merit of nature-inspired algorithm, a novel structure of TCP congestion control (IPPM, Internet Prey-Predator Model) is proposed. Parameters such as available link capacity(C), congestion window (W) and queue length (Q) are collected by IPPM, which calculates the max value of C according to the interacting relationship existing in C, W and Q, and IPPM initiates the TCP ssthresh with the calculated value. Plenty of simulation results show that the modified TCP can effectively avoid network congestion and packet loss. Besides, it holds high resource utilization, convergence speeds, fairness and stability. PMID:27657890

  8. Enhancing the Flexibility of TCP in Heterogeneous Network.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wang; Peiyu, Li; Zhihui, Fan; Zheqing, Li; Xuhui, Wei

    Due to a set of constant initial values, the performance of conventional TCP drops significantly encountering heterogeneous network, showing low throughput and unfairness. This paper firstly demonstrates the chaotic character of TCP congestion control in heterogeneous network, especially the sensitivity to initial value. Inspired by merit of nature-inspired algorithm, a novel structure of TCP congestion control (IPPM, Internet Prey-Predator Model) is proposed. Parameters such as available link capacity(C), congestion window (W) and queue length (Q) are collected by IPPM, which calculates the max value of C according to the interacting relationship existing in C, W and Q, and IPPM initiates the TCP ssthresh with the calculated value. Plenty of simulation results show that the modified TCP can effectively avoid network congestion and packet loss. Besides, it holds high resource utilization, convergence speeds, fairness and stability.

  9. Sustained Reaction Waves Against Flow in Porous Medium: Frozen Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salin, Dominique; Atis, Severine; Auradou, Harold; Saha, Sandeep; Talon, Laurent

    2012-11-01

    Autocatalytic reactions lead to fronts propagating as solitary, self-sustained, waves with a constant velocity and an invariant, flat, concentration profile resulting from a balance between reaction and diffusion. In the presence of a hydrodynamic flow, such fronts, while propagating at a new constant velocity, adapt their shape in order to achieve a balance between reaction diffusion and flow advection all over the front. The issue addressed here is the behaviour of autocatalytic reaction fronts when the forced advection is a heterogeneous flow field. It has been recently observed that in inside a porous medium there exist static, frozen, fronts over a wide range of mean flow rates in the opposite direction of the chemical wave propagation. To account for this dynamical equilibrium where the front is pinned at different points, we use both designed experiments around different configurations of solid obstacles and lattice Boltzmann numerical simulations which allows a control of the flow field heterogeneities. These approach allows us to account for the dependence of the range of observation of frozen states with th control parameters. In the case of the porous medium flow field, the transition to this frozen state is understood in term of percolation like path.

  10. Personal Finance Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argo, Mark

    1982-01-01

    Contains explanations and examples of mathematical calculations for a secondary level course on personal finance. How to calculate total monetary cost of an item, monthly payments, different types of interest, annual percentage rates, and unit pricing is explained. (RM)

  11. Photodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides in honey medium.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhimin; Yao, Jun; Liu, Haijun; Han, Jun; Trebše, Polonca

    2014-10-01

    Honey can be polluted due to environmental pollution and misuse of beekeeping practices. In the present study, photodegradation experiments of organophosphorus pesticides (coumaphos, methyl parathion and fenitrothion) in honey medium were conducted using Atlas Suntest simulator CPS+ as a sunlight producer. Photodegradation experiments were conducted under three different intensities as 250W/m(2), 500W/m(2) and 750W/m(2) to evaluate the impact of sunlight intensity on removal of OPs in honey medium. Significant decreases of three OPs' concentrations were observed. Coumaphos showed the highest degradability, reaching a degradation percentage of 90 percent within 15min. After 1h irradiation, residual percentages of coumaphos were 6.62 percent for 250W/m(2), 3.48 percent for 500W/m(2) and 2.98 percent for 750W/m(2), respectively. Methyl parathion and fenitrothion also could be removed through photodegradation efficiently. After 1h irradiation, the residual percentages of methyl parathion and fenitrothion under 750W/m(2) sunlight irradiation were 26.89 percent and 16.70 percent, respectively. Intensity of sunlight showed a positive impact on removal of OPs in honey medium. The higher intensity, the lower residual percentage. Photodegradation of three OPs fitted well with pseudo-first order kinetics. Half-lives calculated from pseudo-first order kinetics were 17.61min (250W/m(2)), 16.67min (500W/m(2)) and 17.58min (750W/m(2)) for coumaphos, 57.62min (250W/m(2)), 34.13min (500W/m(2)) and 31.69min (750W/m(2)) for methyl parathion and 144.70min (250W/m(2)), 95.47min (500W/m(2)) and 22.57min (750W/m(2)) for fenitrothion, respectively. Most of the three OPs could dissipate in a short time under sunlight irradiation. Photodegradation could be accepted as an appropriate method for the removal of OPs in honey medium.

  12. Characterization of Bimolecular Reactive Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, B.; Edery, Y.; Porta, G.; Guadagnini, A.; Scher, H.

    2016-12-01

    We characterize the role of preferential pathways in controlling the dynamics of bimolecular reactive transport in a representative model of a heterogeneous porous medium. We examine a suite of numerical simulations that quantifies the irreversible bimolecular reaction A + B → C, in a two-dimensional heterogeneous domain (with log-conductivity, Y), wherein solute A is injected along an inlet boundary to displace the resident solute B under uniform (in the mean) flow conditions. We explore the feedback between the reactive process and (a) the degree of system heterogeneity, as quantified by the unconditional variance of Y, 1 ≤ σY2 ≤ 7, representing moderately to strongly heterogeneous media; and (b) the relative strengths of advective and diffusive mechanisms, as quantified by a grid Péclet number. Our analysis is based on identification of particle preferential pathways, focusing on particle residence time within cells employed to discretize the flow domain. These preferential pathways are formed mainly by high conductivity cells, and generally contain an important component of (sometimes isolated and a relatively small number of) lower conductivity values. A key finding of our analysis is that while the former dominate the behavior, the latter are shown to provide a non-negligible contribution to the global number of reactions taking place in the domain for strongly heterogeneous media, i.e., for the largest investigated values of σY2. Reactions are detected across the complete simulation time window (of about 5.5 pore volumes) for the strongly advective case. When diffusion plays an important role, the reactive process essentially stops after the injection of a limited amount ( 2.5) of pore volumes.

  13. Modeling dispersion in three-dimensional heterogeneous fractured media at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Sean A; Walker, Douglas D; Arnold, Bill

    2003-01-01

    Highly resolved numerical simulations are conducted to evaluate the longitudinal and transverse dispersivities proposed for use in the larger-scale Yucca Mountain saturated zone (SZ) site-scale model. Two different stochastic continuum models (SCM) that define the spatial variability of permeability are inferred from the observed fracture characteristics and the measured permeabilities. These models are created with a combination of indicator geostatistics and boolean simulation that allow for modeling different correlation lengths and anisotropy ratios at different permeability thresholds as well as the inclusion of large, high-permeability features. Longitudinal and transverse (horizontal and vertical) dispersion through the permeability realizations is evaluated for both distributed and focused source geometries using groundwater flow and streamline particle tracking. These numerical results are compared to behavior predicted by an analytical solution and to dispersivities estimated by an expert panel. Early time transport results are significantly non-Gaussian due to the strong heterogeneity of the fractured medium. At late times, travel distances of 23 correlation lengths, the longitudinal and transverse horizontal dispersivity results are well approximated by the analytical solution and the expert elicitation estimates. The calculated transverse vertical dispersivity values are smaller than those estimated from the analytical solution. Inclusion of high-permeability features of the same size as the model domain with a distributed planar source creates extreme values of the longitudinal and transverse horizontal dispersivity.

  14. Thermodynamic parameters of heterogeneous materials under shock-wave loading in presentation of equilibrium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maevskii, K. K.; Kinelovskii, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The results of numerical experiments on modeling of shock wave loading of solid and porous heterogeneous materials on the example of molybdenum and some alloys included molybdenum as a component are presented. A thermodynamically equilibrium model is applied to describe the behavior of solid and porous materials. This model ensures good compliance with the experiment in a wide range of pressures. The gas in pores, which is a component of the medium, is taken into account in this model. The equation of state of the Mie-Grüneisen type with allowance for the dependence of the Grüneisen coefficient on temperature is used for condensed phases. The applied model allows the behavior of the molybdenum with porosity from 1 to 3 to be calculated under shock-wave loading at pressures above 5 GPa in the one-velocity and one-temperature approximations, as well as on the assumption of equal pressures for all the phases. Computational results are compared with the well-known experimental results obtained by different authors. The model permits the shock-wave loading of solid and porous alloys with molybdenum in their composition to be described reliably solely by using species parameters.

  15. Upscaling for unsaturated flow for non-Gaussian heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuweiler, Insa; Vogel, Hans-JöRg

    2007-03-01

    Large-scale models of transient flow processes in the unsaturated zone require, in general, upscaling of the flow problem in order to capture the impact of heterogeneities on a small scale, which cannot be resolved by the model. Effective parameters for the upscaled models are often derived from second-order stochastic properties of the parameter fields. Such properties are good quantifications for parameter fields, which are multi-Gaussian. However, the structure of soil does rarely resemble these kinds of fields. The non-multi-Gaussian field properties can lead to strong discrepancies between predictions of upscaled models and the averaged real flow process. In particular, the connected paths of parameter ranges of the medium are important features, which are usually not taken into account in stochastic approaches. They are determined here by the Euler number of one-cut indicator fields. Methods to predict effective parameters are needed that incorporate this type of information. We discuss different simple and fast approaches for estimating the effective parameter for upscaled models of slow transient flow processes in the unsaturated zone, where connected paths of the material may be taken into account. Upscaled models are derived with the assumption of capillary equilibrium. The effective parameters are calculated using effective media approaches. We also discuss the limits of the applicability of these methods.

  16. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments: A Systematic Investigation of Different Quantum Chemical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Casper; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-09-08

    Theoretical prediction of transport and optical properties of protein-pigment complexes is of significant importance when aiming at understanding the structure-function relationship in such systems. Electronic energy transfer (EET) couplings represent a key property in this respect since such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photoactive pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding model has been suggested (Curutchet, C., et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2009, 5, 1838-1848). In this work, we further develop this computational model by extending it with an ab initio derived polarizable force field including higher-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made, for example, the explicit use of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings, and also when including the explicit environment contribution, can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions.

  17. Exact solution for the Casimir stress in a spherically symmetric medium

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Simpson, William M. R.

    2011-10-15

    We calculated the stress of the quantum vacuum, the Casimir stress, in a spherically symmetric medium, Maxwell's fish eye, surrounded by a perfect mirror and derived an exact analytic solution. Our solution questions the idea that the Casimir force of a spherical mirror is repulsive--we found an attractive stress in the medium that diverges at the mirror.

  18. Advanced fiber information systems seed coat neps baseline response from diverse mediums

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An extensive literature search has revealed that no papers have been published regarding selectivity calculation of the AFIS seed coat neps (SCN) determination over interfering material in cotton. A prerequisite to selectivity measurements is to identify suitable fiber medium(s) that give baseline ...

  19. Autistic Savant Calendar Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, Paul J.

    This study identified 10 savants with developmental disabilities and an exceptional ability to calculate calendar dates. These "calendar calculators" were asked to demonstrate their abilities, and their strategies were analyzed. The study found that the ability to calculate dates into the past or future varied widely among these…

  20. Flexible Mental Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, John

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that strategy choice is a misleading characterization of efficient mental calculation and that teaching mental calculation methods as a whole is not conducive to flexibility. Proposes an alternative in which calculation is thought of as an interaction between noticing and knowledge. Presents an associated teaching approach to promote…

  1. Calculator-Active Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.; Harris, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This journal contains brief descriptions of calculator-active materials that were found using Resource Finder, the searchable online catalog of curriculum resources from the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC). It features both the calculators themselves and the activity books that are used with them. Among the calculators included are those…

  2. Calculators, Computers, and Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Jon L.; Kirschner, Vicky

    Suggestions for using four-function calculators, programmable calculators, and microcomputers are considered in this collection of 36 articles. The first section contains articles considering general implications for mathematics curricula implied by the freedom calculators offer students from routine computation, enabling them to focus on results…

  3. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    PubMed

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  4. Modeling of hydrodynamics of water-methane heterogeneous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetova, Elena A.

    2015-11-01

    To study the behavior of heterogeneous methane-water system, a mathematical model describing the joint processes of hydrodynamics, transport, and transformation of methane in a deep freshwater body is used. There are three phases of methane in the system: solid (hydrate), gaseous (bubbles) and dissolved in water. We discuss the physical origin of phase transitions in the specific conditions of Lake Baikal and possible mathematical formulations of problems. Some preliminary results of calculations are presented.

  5. Heterogeneous reactions important in atmospheric ozone depletion: a theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Hynes, James T

    2006-02-01

    Theoretical studies of the mechanisms of several heterogeneous reactions involving ClONO(2), H(2)O, HCl, HBr, and H(2)SO(4) important in atmospheric ozone depletion are described, focused primarily on reactions on aqueous aerosol surfaces. Among the insights obtained is the active chemical participation of the surface water molecules in several of these reactions. The general methodology adopted allows reduction of these complex chemical problems to meaningful model systems amenable to quantum chemical calculations.

  6. Atom probe tomography investigation of assisted precipitation of secondary hardening carbides in a medium carbon martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Danoix, R; Akre, J; Grellier, A; Delagnes, D

    2011-12-01

    A medium carbon martensitic steel containing nanometer scale secondary hardening carbides and intermetallic particles is investigated by field ion microscopy and atom probe tomography. The interaction between the concomitant precipitations of both types of particles is investigated. It is shown that the presence of the intermetallic phase affects the nucleation mechanism and the spatial distribution of the secondary hardening carbides, which shifts from heterogeneous on dislocations to heterogeneous on the intermetallic particles.

  7. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  8. Biodiesel production using heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Surbhi; Arora, Ajay K; Badoni, Rajendra P; Tuli, Deepak K

    2011-02-01

    The production and use of biodiesel has seen a quantum jump in the recent past due to benefits associated with its ability to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG). There are large number of commercial plants producing biodiesel by transesterification of vegetable oils and fats based on base catalyzed (caustic) homogeneous transesterification of oils. However, homogeneous process needs steps of glycerol separation, washings, very stringent and extremely low limits of Na, K, glycerides and moisture limits in biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The present report is review of the progress made in development of heterogeneous catalysts suitable for biodiesel production. This review shall help in selection of suitable catalysts and the optimum conditions for biodiesel production.

  9. The heterogeneity statistic I(2) can be biased in small meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, Paul T

    2015-04-14

    Estimated effects vary across studies, partly because of random sampling error and partly because of heterogeneity. In meta-analysis, the fraction of variance that is due to heterogeneity is estimated by the statistic I(2). We calculate the bias of I(2), focusing on the situation where the number of studies in the meta-analysis is small. Small meta-analyses are common; in the Cochrane Library, the median number of studies per meta-analysis is 7 or fewer. We use Mathematica software to calculate the expectation and bias of I(2). I(2) has a substantial bias when the number of studies is small. The bias is positive when the true fraction of heterogeneity is small, but the bias is typically negative when the true fraction of heterogeneity is large. For example, with 7 studies and no true heterogeneity, I(2) will overestimate heterogeneity by an average of 12 percentage points, but with 7 studies and 80 percent true heterogeneity, I(2) can underestimate heterogeneity by an average of 28 percentage points. Biases of 12-28 percentage points are not trivial when one considers that, in the Cochrane Library, the median I(2) estimate is 21 percent. The point estimate I(2) should be interpreted cautiously when a meta-analysis has few studies. In small meta-analyses, confidence intervals should supplement or replace the biased point estimate I(2).

  10. How Do Calculators Calculate Trigonometric Functions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Jeremy M.; Edwards, Bruce H.

    How does your calculator quickly produce values of trigonometric functions? You might be surprised to learn that it does not use series or polynomial approximations, but rather the so-called CORDIC method. This paper will focus on the geometry of the CORDIC method, as originally developed by Volder in 1959. This algorithm is a wonderful…

  11. 40 CFR 86.244-94 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculations; exhaust emissions. 86.244-94 Section 86.244-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.244-94 Calculations;...

  12. Temperature chaos and quenched heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo; Parisi, Giorgio; Rizzo, Tommaso

    2014-03-01

    We present a treatable generalization of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model which introduces correlations in the elements of the coupling matrix through multiplicative disorder on the single variables and investigate the consequences on the phase diagram. We define a generalized qEA parameter and test the structural stability of the SK results in this correlated case evaluating the de Almeida-Thouless line of the model. As a main result we demonstrate the increase of temperature chaos effects due to heterogeneities.

  13. Composite catalyst surfaces: Effect of inert and active heterogeneities on pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.; Bangia, A.K.; Kevrekidis, I.G.; Haas, G.; Rotermund, H.H.; Ertl, G.

    1996-12-05

    Spatiotemporal dynamics in reaction-diffusion systems can be altered through the properties (reactivity, diffusivity) of the medium in which they occur. We construct active heterogeneous media (composite catalytic surfaces with inert as well as active illusions) using microelectronics fabrication techniques and study the spatiotemporal dynamics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions on these catalysts. In parallel, we perform simulations as well as numerical stability and bifurcation analysis of these patterns using mechanistic models. At the limit of large heterogeneity `grain size` (compared to the wavelength of spontaneously arising structures) the interaction patterns with inert or active boundaries dominates (e.g., pinning, transmission, and boundary breakup of spirals, interaction of pulses with corners, `pacemaker` effects). At the opposite limit of very small or very finely distributed heterogeneity, effective behavior is observed (slight modulation of pulses, nearly uniform oscillations, effective spirals). Some representative studies of transitions between the two limits are presented. 48 refs., 11 figs.

  14. Measuring heterogeneous remanence in paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Geneviciene, Ieva

    2007-06-01

    Remanence directions of from the same block-sample may be inconsistent or unrepresentative due to orientation and location heterogeneity of their remanence-bearing minerals (RBM). Magnetization-heterogeneity is usually undetectable at the specimen-level but we replicated its effects by measuring 8 small specimens with stable magnetizations (8 or 5.2 cm3). These were assembled into a single large multi-specimen inside 125 cm3 containers that were measured in a Molspin ``BigSpin'' magnetometer. Large-specimen remanence directions deflect towards the direction of any strongly magnetized sub-specimen. Differences between the large-specimen remanence and that for the group of individually measured sub-specimens worsened when one sub-specimen was mis-oriented. These discrepancies were cancelled or reduced using larger numbers of specimen orientations in the magnetometer. Conventional schemes with 4 or 6 different measurement-orientations may fail to suppress heterogeneity-effects whereas our 12-orientation protocol may succeed. For most specimens, acceptable remanence-homogeneity is present where similar remanence-directions are recorded from 4, 6, and 12 different spin-orientations.

  15. On comparing heterogeneity across biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Robert J; Rajaram, Satwik; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Microscopy reveals complex patterns of cellular heterogeneity that can be biologically informative. However, a limitation of microscopy is that only a small number of biomarkers can typically be monitored simultaneously. Thus, a natural question is whether additional biomarkers provide a deeper characterization of the distribution of cellular states in a population. How much information about a cell's phenotypic state in one biomarker is gained by knowing its state in another biomarker? Here, we describe a framework for comparing phenotypic states across biomarkers. Our approach overcomes the current limitation of microscopy by not requiring costaining biomarkers on the same cells; instead, we require staining of biomarkers (possibly separately) on a common collection of phenotypically diverse cell lines. We evaluate our approach on two image datasets: 33 oncogenically diverse lung cancer cell lines stained with 7 biomarkers, and 49 less diverse subclones of one lung cancer cell line stained with 12 biomarkers. We first validate our method by comparing it to the "gold standard" of costaining. We then apply our approach to all pairs of biomarkers and use it to identify biomarkers that yield similar patterns of heterogeneity. The results presented in this work suggest that many biomarkers provide redundant information about heterogeneity. Thus, our approach provides a practical guide for selecting independently informative biomarkers and, more generally, will yield insights into both the connectivity of biological networks and the complexity of the state space of biological systems.

  16. Soft Dielectrics: Heterogeneity and Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudykh, Stephan; Debotton, Gal; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    2012-02-01

    Dielectric Elastomers are capable of large deformations in response to electrical stimuli. Heterogeneous soft dielectrics with proper microstructures demonstrate much stronger electromechanical coupling than their homogeneous constituents. In turn, the heterogeneity is an origin for instability developments leading to drastic change in the composite microstructure. In this talk, the electromechanical instabilities are considered. Stability of anisotropic soft dielectrics is analyzed. Ways to achieve giant deformations and manipulating extreme material properties are discussed. 1. S. Rudykh and G. deBotton, ``Instabilities of Hyperelastic Fiber Composites: Micromechanical Versus Numerical Analyses.'' Journal of Elasticity, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/2010.1007/s10659-011-9313-x 2. S. Rudykh, K. Bhattacharya and G. deBotton, ``Snap-through actuation of thick-wall electroactive balloons.'' International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnonlinmec.2011.05.006 3. S. Rudykh and G. deBotton, ``Stability of Anisotropic Electroactive Polymers with Application to Layered Media.'' Zeitschrift f"ur angewandte Mathematik und Physik, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00033-011-0136-1 4. S. Rudykh, A. Lewinstein, G. Uner and G. deBotton, ``Giant Enhancement of the Electromechanical Coupling in Soft Heterogeneous Dielectrics.'' 2011 http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.4217v1

  17. Analyzing and modeling heterogeneous behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiting; Wu, Xiaoqing; He, Dongyue; Zhu, Qiang; Ni, Jixiang

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it was pointed out that the non-Poisson statistics with heavy tail existed in many scenarios of human behaviors. But most of these studies claimed that power-law characterized diverse aspects of human mobility patterns. In this paper, we suggest that human behavior may not be driven by identical mechanisms and can be modeled as a Semi-Markov Modulated Process. To verify our suggestion and model, we analyzed a total of 1,619,934 records of library visitations (including undergraduate and graduate students). It is found that the distribution of visitation intervals is well fitted with three sections of lines instead of the traditional power law distribution in log-log scale. The results confirm that some human behaviors cannot be simply expressed as power law or any other simple functions. At the same time, we divided the data into groups and extracted period bursty events. Through careful analysis in different groups, we drew a conclusion that aggregate behavior might be composed of heterogeneous behaviors, and even the behaviors of the same type tended to be different in different period. The aggregate behavior is supposed to be formed by "heterogeneous groups". We performed a series of experiments. Simulation results showed that we just needed to set up two states Semi-Markov Modulated Process to construct proper representation of heterogeneous behavior.

  18. Hot-spot initiation of heterogeneous explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, M.E.; Nonziato, J.W.; Setchell, R.E.; Walsh, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the shock initiation of heterogeneous explosives begins with the formation of hot spots in the vicinity of microstructural defects such as voids, grain boundaries, and phase boundaries where there can be significant localized deformation as a result of material viscosity, plastic work, and intergranular friction. This phenomenon is described in the context of a recently developed theory of chemically reacting, multiphase mixtures. In particular, we consider a granular explosive with an energetic binder (e.g. PBX-9404) and represent it as a three-phase, saturated mixture consisting of the granular reactant, the binder phase, and the product gases. Under dynamic loading, viscous dissipation results in high temperatures in the binder phase which subsequently thermally explodes to form product gases. Decomposition of the granular reactant is achieved by laminar grain burning. This model has been incorporated into a 1-D Lagrangian finite-difference code (WONDY) and the evolution of compressive shock and acceleration (ramp) waves have been calculated for PBX-9404. The calculated wave growth at the front, as well as the reaction-induced pressure wave behind the wave, are shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  19. Mechanistic insights into heterogeneous methane activation

    DOE PAGES

    Latimer, Allegra A.; Aljama, Hassan; Kakekhani, Arvin; ...

    2017-01-11

    While natural gas is an abundant chemical fuel, its low volumetric energy density has prompted a search for catalysts able to transform methane into more useful chemicals. This search has often been aided through the use of transition state (TS) scaling relationships, which estimate methane activation TS energies as a linear function of a more easily calculated descriptor, such as final state energy, thus avoiding tedious TS energy calculations. It has been shown that methane can be activated via a radical or surface-stabilized pathway, both of which possess a unique TS scaling relationship. Herein, we present a simple model tomore » aid in the prediction of methane activation barriers on heterogeneous catalysts. Analogous to the universal radical TS scaling relationship introduced in a previous publication, we show that a universal TS scaling relationship that transcends catalysts classes also seems to exist for surface-stabilized methane activation if the relevant final state energy is used. We demonstrate that this scaling relationship holds for several reducible and irreducible oxides, promoted metals, and sulfides. By combining the universal scaling relationships for both radical and surface-stabilized methane activation pathways, we show that catalyst reactivity must be considered in addition to catalyst geometry to obtain an accurate estimation for the TS energy. Here, this model can yield fast and accurate predictions of methane activation barriers on a wide range of catalysts, thus accelerating the discovery of more active catalysts for methane conversion.« less

  20. Feasibility of a Multigroup Deterministic Solution Method for 3D Radiotherapy Dose Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Wareing, Todd A.; Davis, Ian M.; McGhee, John; Barnett, Douglas; Horton, John L.; Gifford, Kent; Failla, Gregory; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of a novel deterministic solver, Attila, for external photon beam radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods and Materials Two hypothetical cases for prostate and head and neck cancer photon beam treatment plans were calculated using Attila and EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. Open beams were modeled as isotropic photon point sources collimated to specified field sizes (100 cm SSD). The sources had a realistic energy spectrum calculated by Monte Carlo for a Varian Clinac 2100 operated in a 6MV photon mode. The Attila computational grids consisted of 106,000 elements, or 424,000 spatial degrees of freedom, for the prostate case, and 123,000 tetrahedral elements, or 492,000 spatial degrees of freedom, for the head and neck cases. Results For both cases, results demonstrate excellent agreement between Attila and EGSnrc in all areas, including the build-up regions, near heterogeneities, and at the beam penumbra. Dose agreement for 99% of the voxels was within 3% (relative point-wise difference) or 3mm distance-to-agreement criterion. Localized differences between the Attila and EGSnrc results were observed at bone and soft tissue interfaces, and are attributable to the effect of voxel material homogenization in calculating dose-to-medium in EGSnrc. For both cases, Attila calculation times were under 20 CPU minutes on a single 2.2 GHz AMD Opteron processor. Conclusions The methods in Attila have the potential to be the basis for an efficient dose engine for patient specific treatment planning, providing accuracy similar to that obtained by Monte Carlo. PMID:18722273

  1. NASA GSFC Perspective on Heterogeneous Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Wesley A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of NASA GSFC, our onboard processing applications, the applicability heterogeneous processing to these applications, and necessary developments to enable heterogeneous processing to be infused into our missions.

  2. Nuclear data calculation methods for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shubin, Yu.N.; Lunev, V.P.; Masterov, V.S.; Kurenkov, N.V.; Kulikov, E.V.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron deficient radionuclides play an important role in medicine, where they are used for diagnostic with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET). Using some reactions connected with the producing most widely used radioisotopes {sup 123}I, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99}Tc as example we calculated reaction cross sections and discuss the possibilities of the models and codes and recent progress in the methods to predict nuclear data for medical and other applications in medium energy region.

  3. Reversed Cherenkov transition radiation of charge entering anisotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyamin, S. N.; Tyukhtin, A. V.

    2011-04-01

    The electromagnetic field of a charge crossing the interface between vacuum and an electrically anisotropic dispersive medium in which reversed Cherenkov transition radiation (RCTR) is generated has been theoretically studied. An algorithm for calculating the Fourier harmonics of the field based on exact formulas is developed and their asymptotics in the far field zone are determined. A special attention is devoted to the RCTR phenomenon, which was previously only studied for the so-called left-handed medium (LHM). Conditions for RCTR excitation are found and the effect of losses in the medium on the propagation of radiation is analyzed. The RCTR under the indicated conditions is compared to the analogous effect in LHM.

  4. Wave scattering in a multiscale random inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinin, Mikhail V.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, using the Fock method of the fifth parameter and weighted Fourier-transform with respect to the coordinates of the source and observer, an integral representation is obtained for the wave field in a randomly inhomogeneous medium without invoking the assumption about small-angle propagation. Random trajectory variations to a first approximation are taken into account in calculating the partial wave phase (the expression under the integral sign). The expressions for the field in a medium with different-scale irregularities and for the scintillation index, obtained using this integral representation, are compared with known results. The good agreement with results from the theory of single scattering in a medium with background irregularities, and with investigations of the scintillation index made in terms of Rytov's method and path integrals, indicates that it is possible to use the approach developed in this study to describe the effects of simultaneous influence of different-scale irregularities.

  5. Transport toward a well in highly heterogeneous aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dato, Mariaines; de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Bellin, Alberto; Fiori, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Solute transport toward a well is a challenging subject in subsurface hydrology since the complexity of the mathematical model is tremendously increased by the non-uniformity of the mean flow and heterogeneity of the formation. Up to date, analytical solutions for such flow configurations are limited to low heterogeneous conditions. On the other hand, numerical simulations in 3D highly heterogeneous formations are computationally expensive and plagued by numerical errors. In this work we propose an analytical solution for the Breakthrough Curve (BTC) at the well for an instantaneous linear injection across the aquifer's thickness for any degree of heterogeneity of the porous medium. Our solution makes use of the Multi Indicator Model-Self Consistent Approximation (MIMSCA), by which the aquifer is conceptualized as an ensemble of blocks of constant hydraulic conductivity K randomly drawn from a lognormal distribution. In order to apply MIMSCA, we assume the flow as locally uniform, given that K is uniform within the block. With this approximation, the travel time to the well is equal to the superposition of the time spent by the solute particle within each block. We emphasize that, despite the approximations introduced, the model is able to reproduce the laboratory experiment of [1] without the need to fit any transport parameters. In this work, we present results for two different injection modes: a resident injection (e.g., residual DNAPL) and a flux proportional injection (e.g., leakage from a passive well). The proposed methodology allows to quantify the BTC at the well as a function of few parameters such as the injection mode and the statistical structure of the aquifer (geometric mean, variance and integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity field). Results illustrate that the release condition has a strong impact on the shape of the BTC. Furthermore, the difference between different injection modes increases with the heterogeneity of the K-field. The

  6. Hard QCD processes in the nuclear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Adam

    The environment inside the atomic nucleus is one of the most fascinating arenas for the study of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The strongly-interacting nature of the nuclear medium a?ects the nature of both QCD processes and the quark-gluon structure of hadrons, allowing several unique aspects of the strong nuclear force to be investigated in reactions involving nuclear targets. The research presented in this dissertation explores two aspects of nuclear QCD: firstly, the partonic structure of the nucleus itself; and secondly, the use of the nucleus as a micro-laboratory in which QCD processes can be studied. The partonic structure of the nucleus is calculated in this work by deriving and utilizing a convolution formula. The hadronic structure of the nucleus and the quark-gluon structure of its constituent nucleons are taken together to determine the nuclear partonic structure. Light cone descriptions of short range correlations, in terms of both hadronic and partonic structure, are derived and taken into account. Medium modifications of the bound nucleons are accounted for using the color screening model, and QCD evolution is used to connect nuclear partonic structure at vastly di?erent energy scales. The formalism developed for calculating nuclear partonic structure is applied to inclusive dijet production from proton-nucleus collisions at LHC kinematics, and novel predictions are calculated and presented for the dijet cross section. The nucleus is investigated as a micro-laboratory in vector meson photoproduction reactions. In particular, the deuteron is studied in the break-up reaction gammad → Vpn, for both the φ(1020) and J/v vector mesons. The generalized eikonal approximation is utilized, allowing unambiguous separation of the impulse approximation and final state interactions (FSIs). Two peaks or valleys are seen in the angular distribution of the reaction cross section, each of which is due to an FSI between either the proton and neutron, or the

  7. Variance of Dispersion Coefficients in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; De Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2013-04-01

    We study the dispersion of a passive solute in heterogeneous porous media using a stochastic modeling approach. Heterogeneity on one hand leads to an increase of solute spreading, which is described by the well-known macrodispersion phenomenon. On the other hand, it induces uncertainty about the dispersion behavior, which is quantified by ensemble averages over suitably defined dispersion coefficients in single medium realizations. We focus here on the sample to sample fluctuations of dispersion coefficients about their ensemble mean values for solutes evolving from point-like and extended source distributions in d = 2 and d = 3 spatial dimensions. The definition of dispersion coefficients in single medium realizations for finite source sizes is not unique, unlike for point-like sources. Thus, we first discuss a series of dispersion measures, which describe the extension of the solute plume, as well as dispersion measures that quantify the solute dispersion relative to the injection point. The sample to sample fluctuations of these observables are quantified in terms of the variance with respect to their ensemble averages. We find that the ensemble averages of these dispersion measures may be identical, their fluctuation behavior, however, may be very different. This is quantified using perturbation expansions in the fluctuations of the random flow field. We derive explicit expressions for the time evolution of the variance of the dispersion coefficients. The characteristic time scale for the variance evolution is given by the typical dispersion time over the characteristic heterogeneity scale and the dimensions of the source. We find that the dispersion variances asymptotically decrease to zero in d = 3 dimensions, which means, the dispersion coefficients are self-averaging observables, at least for moderate heterogeneity. In d = 2 dimensions, the variance converges towards a finite asymptotic value that is independent of the source distribution. Dispersion is not

  8. Reflection of thermoelastic wave on the interface of isotropic half-space and tetragonal syngony anisotropic medium of classes 4, 4/m with thermomechanical effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurlybek, A. Ispulov; Abdul, Qadir; M, A. Shah; Ainur, K. Seythanova; Tanat, G. Kissikov; Erkin, Arinov

    2016-03-01

    The thermoelastic wave propagation in a tetragonal syngony anisotropic medium of classes 4, 4/m having heterogeneity along z axis has been investigated by employing matrizant method. This medium has an axis of second-order symmetry parallel to z axis. In the case of the fourth-order matrix coefficients, the problems of wave refraction and reflection on the interface of homogeneous anisotropic thermoelastic mediums are solved analytically.

  9. Radiotherapy dose calculations in the presence of hip prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, Paul J.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Jeraj, Robert; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-06-30

    The high density and atomic number of hip prostheses for patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy challenge our ability to accurately calculate dose. A new clinical dose calculation algorithm, Monte Carlo, will allow accurate calculation of the radiation transport both within and beyond hip prostheses. The aim of this research was to investigate, for both phantom and patient geometries, the capability of various dose calculation algorithms to yield accurate treatment plans. Dose distributions in phantom and patient geometries with high atomic number prostheses were calculated using Monte Carlo, superposition, pencil beam, and no-heterogeneity correction algorithms. The phantom dose distributions were analyzed by depth dose and dose profile curves. The patient dose distributions were analyzed by isodose curves, dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability (TCP/NTCP) calculations. Monte Carlo calculations predicted the dose enhancement and reduction at the proximal and distal prosthesis interfaces respectively, whereas superposition and pencil beam calculations did not. However, further from the prosthesis, the differences between the dose calculation algorithms diminished. Treatment plans calculated with superposition showed similar isodose curves, DVHs, and TCP/NTCP as the Monte Carlo plans, except in the bladder, where Monte Carlo predicted a slightly lower dose. Treatment plans calculated with either the pencil beam method or with no heterogeneity correction differed significantly from the Monte Carlo plans.

  10. Wheat Transpiration Response to Soil Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langensiepen, M.; Kupisch, M.; Cai, G.; Vanderborght, J.; Stadler, A.; Hüging, H.; Ewert, F.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring sap-flow in thin wheat tillers has been difficult so far due to technical difficulties associated with the application of the heat-balance method for this purpose. We developed a new method which solved this problem (Langensiepen et al. 2014) and applied it during four consecutive vegetation seasons for determining tiller transpiration rates in a wheat field with strong soil heterogeneity. The transpiration rates differed insignificantly between different field sections characterized by strong differences in physical soil conditions, regardless whether the crop was irrigated or supplied with variable rainwater. Tiller transpiration in a sheltered section was slightly reduced. Maximum leaf vapor conductance didn't differ among these different conditions, except under severe water stress conditions. Leaf water potential varied considerably during daily cycles under all circumstances. These responses are typical for plants with anisohydric behaviors which are characterized by small sensitivities of guard cells to critical leaf water potential thresholds and high photosynthetic productivity under absent or mild water stress. Recent studies conducted in Eucalyptus, tomato, and Arabidopsis plants have shown that the transition from mild to severe stress in anisohydric plants is marked by an increasing sensitivity of stomatal control to the transpiration rate. The results of this study demonstrate that this also seems to be the case for wheat. This practically implies that the parameterization of models calculating wheat canopy flux responses to soil heterogeneity patterns must not only account for the crop-type specific soil-vegetation pattern interaction under absent or mild stress, but also for additional mechanisms which kick in when water stress becomes severe. Langensiepen, M., Kupisch, M., Graf, A., Schmidt, M., Ewert, F. (2014) Improving the stem heat balance method for determining sap-flow in wheat. Agric. For. Met. 186: 34-42

  11. Impact of flow correlation and heterogeneity on transport in fractured media: field evidence and theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Le Borgne, T.; Dentz, M.; Bour, O.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative modeling of flow and transport through fractured geological media is challenging due to the inaccessibility of the underlying medium properties and the complex interplay between heterogeneity and small scale transport processes such as heterogeneous advection, matrix diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion and adsorption. This complex interplay leads to anomalous (non-Fickian) transport behavior, the origin of which remains a matter of debate: whether it arises from variability in fracture permeability (velocity heterogeneity), connectedness in the fracture network (velocity correlation), or interaction between fractures and matrix. Here we show that this uncertainty of heterogeneity- vs. correlation-controlled transport can be resolved by combining convergent and push-pull tracer tests because flow reversibility is strongly dependent on correlation, whereas late-time scaling of breakthrough curves is mainly controlled by heterogeneity. We build on this insight, and propose a Lagrangian statistical model that takes the form of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) with correlated particle velocities. In this framework, flow heterogeneity and flow correlation are quantified by a Markov process of particle transition times that is characterized by a distribution function and a transition probability. Our transport model captures the anomalous behavior in the breakthrough curves for both push-pull and convergent flow geometries, with the same set of parameters. We validate our model in the Ploemeur observatory in France. Thus, the proposed correlated CTRW modeling approach provides a simple yet powerful framework for characterizing the impact of flow correlation and heterogeneity on transport in fractured media.

  12. Programming strategy for efficient modeling of dynamics in a population of heterogeneous cells.

    PubMed

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Garkier Hendriksen, Morten; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2013-05-15

    Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly unpredictable. In heterogeneous populations, synchronization of events becomes a cardinal problem-particularly for phase coherence in oscillating systems. The present article presents a novel strategy for construction of large-scale simulation programs of heterogeneous biological entities. The strategy is designed to be tractable, to handle heterogeneity and to handle computational cost issues simultaneously, primarily by writing a generator of the 'model to be simulated'. We apply the strategy to model glycolytic oscillations among thousands of yeast cells coupled through the extracellular medium. The usefulness is illustrated through (i) benchmarking, showing an almost linear relationship between model size and run time, and (ii) analysis of the resulting simulations, showing that contrary to the experimental situation, synchronous oscillations are surprisingly hard to achieve, underpinning the need for tools to study heterogeneity. Thus, we present an efficient strategy to model the biological heterogeneity, neglected by ordinary mean-field models. This tool is well posed to facilitate the elucidation of the physiologically vital problem of synchronization. The complete python code is available as Supplementary Information. bjornhald@gmail.com or pgs@kiku.dk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Transient heterogeneity in extracellular protease production by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Veening, Jan-Willem; Igoshin, Oleg A; Eijlander, Robyn T; Nijland, Reindert; Hamoen, Leendert W; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2008-01-01

    The most sophisticated survival strategy Bacillus subtilis employs is the differentiation of a subpopulation of cells into highly resistant endospores. To examine the expression patterns of non-sporulating cells within heterogeneous populations, we used buoyant density centrifugation to separate vegetative cells from endospore-containing cells and compared the transcriptome profiles of both subpopulations. This demonstrated the differential expression of various regulons. Subsequent single-cell analyses using promoter-gfp fusions confirmed our microarray results. Surprisingly, only part of the vegetative subpopulation highly and transiently expresses genes encoding the extracellular proteases Bpr (bacillopeptidase) and AprE (subtilisin), both of which are under the control of the DegU transcriptional regulator. As these proteases and their degradation products freely diffuse within the liquid growth medium, all cells within the clonal population are expected to benefit from their activities, suggesting that B. subtilis employs cooperative or even altruistic behavior. To unravel the mechanisms by which protease production heterogeneity within the non-sporulating subpopulation is established, we performed a series of genetic experiments combined with mathematical modeling. Simulations with our model yield valuable insights into how population heterogeneity may arise by the relatively long and variable response times within the DegU autoactivating pathway.

  14. Transient heterogeneity in extracellular protease production by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Veening, Jan-Willem; Igoshin, Oleg A; Eijlander, Robyn T; Nijland, Reindert; Hamoen, Leendert W; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2008-01-01

    The most sophisticated survival strategy Bacillus subtilis employs is the differentiation of a subpopulation of cells into highly resistant endospores. To examine the expression patterns of non-sporulating cells within heterogeneous populations, we used buoyant density centrifugation to separate vegetative cells from endospore-containing cells and compared the transcriptome profiles of both subpopulations. This demonstrated the differential expression of various regulons. Subsequent single-cell analyses using promoter-gfp fusions confirmed our microarray results. Surprisingly, only part of the vegetative subpopulation highly and transiently expresses genes encoding the extracellular proteases Bpr (bacillopeptidase) and AprE (subtilisin), both of which are under the control of the DegU transcriptional regulator. As these proteases and their degradation products freely diffuse within the liquid growth medium, all cells within the clonal population are expected to benefit from their activities, suggesting that B. subtilis employs cooperative or even altruistic behavior. To unravel the mechanisms by which protease production heterogeneity within the non-sporulating subpopulation is established, we performed a series of genetic experiments combined with mathematical modeling. Simulations with our model yield valuable insights into how population heterogeneity may arise by the relatively long and variable response times within the DegU autoactivating pathway. PMID:18414485

  15. Slip-behavior transitions of a heterogeneous linear fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Ide, S.

    2016-12-01

    Shear-slip behavior on the fault has diversity, such as ordinary earthquakes, afterslips, and shallow and deep slow earthquakes. Although the cause of this diversity is a hot topic in seismology, one possibility is the friction varying with tectonic environments (e.g., Blanpied et al., 1991). It is often explained that negative, neutral, and positive a-b of rate and state friction law corresponds to seismogenic zone, slow earthquake, and creeps in subduction zones, respectively. However, the frictional heterogeneity is expected to exist on the fault because of the fractal irregular fault surface in a wide scale range (Candela et al., 2012), which fluctuate rupture propagations. To understand the slip behavior of