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Sample records for heterozygous truncating mutation

  1. The Characteristics of Heterozygous Protein Truncating Variants in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, Paul J.; Mohammadi, Pejman; Tardaguila, Manuel; Chaturvedi, Nimisha; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing projects have identified large numbers of rare stop-gain and frameshift variants in the human genome. As most of these are observed in the heterozygous state, they test a gene’s tolerance to haploinsufficiency and dominant loss of function. We analyzed the distribution of truncating variants across 16,260 autosomal protein coding genes in 11,546 individuals. We observed 39,893 truncating variants affecting 12,062 genes, which significantly differed from an expectation of 12,916 genes under a model of neutral de novo mutation (p<10−4). Extrapolating this to increasing numbers of sequenced individuals, we estimate that 10.8% of human genes do not tolerate heterozygous truncating variants. An additional 10 to 15% of truncated genes may be rescued by incomplete penetrance or compensatory mutations, or because the truncating variants are of limited functional impact. The study of protein truncating variants delineates the essential genome and, more generally, identifies rare heterozygous variants as an unexplored source of diversity of phenotypic traits and diseases. PMID:26642228

  2. Recessive truncating titin gene, TTN, mutations presenting as centronuclear myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Agrawal, Pankaj B.; Hidalgo, Carlos; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Soemedi, Rachel; Vasli, Nasim; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Shieh, Perry B.; Shur, Natasha; Dennison, Jane M.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Markianos, Kyriacos; Fairbrother, William G.; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify causative genes for centronuclear myopathies (CNM), a heterogeneous group of rare inherited muscle disorders that often present in infancy or early life with weakness and hypotonia, using next-generation sequencing of whole exomes and genomes. Methods: Whole-exome or -genome sequencing was performed in a cohort of 29 unrelated patients with clinicopathologic diagnoses of CNM or related myopathy depleted for cases with mutations of MTM1, DNM2, and BIN1. Immunofluorescence analyses on muscle biopsies, splicing assays, and gel electrophoresis of patient muscle proteins were performed to determine the molecular consequences of mutations of interest. Results: Autosomal recessive compound heterozygous truncating mutations of the titin gene, TTN, were identified in 5 individuals. Biochemical analyses demonstrated increased titin degradation and truncated titin proteins in patient muscles, establishing the impact of the mutations. Conclusions: Our study identifies truncating TTN mutations as a cause of congenital myopathy that is reported as CNM. Unlike the classic CNM genes that are all involved in excitation-contraction coupling at the triad, TTN encodes the giant sarcomeric protein titin, which forms a myofibrillar backbone for the components of the contractile machinery. This study expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with TTN mutations and indicates that TTN mutation analysis should be considered in cases of possible CNM without mutations in the classic CNM genes. PMID:23975875

  3. DNA repair capacity is impaired in healthy BRCA1 heterozygous mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Vaclová, Tereza; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Setién, Fernando; Bueno, José María García; Macías, José Antonio; Barroso, Alicia; Urioste, Miguel; Esteller, Manel; Benítez, Javier; Osorio, Ana

    2015-07-01

    BRCA1 germline mutations increase the lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. However, taking into account the differences in disease manifestation among mutation carriers, it is probable that different BRCA1 mutations have distinct haploinsufficiency effects and lead to the formation of different phenotypes. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from heterozygous BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers, we investigated the haploinsufficiency effects of various mutation types using qPCR, immunofluorescence, and microarray technology. Lymphoblastoid cell lines carrying a truncating mutation showed significantly lower BRCA1 mRNA and protein levels and higher levels of gamma-H2AX than control cells or those harboring a missense mutation, indicating greater spontaneous DNA damage. Cells carrying either BRCA1 mutation type showed impaired RAD51 foci formation, suggesting defective repair in mutated cells. Moreover, compared to controls, cell lines carrying missense mutations displayed a more distinct expression profile than cells with truncating mutations, which is consistent with different mutations giving rise to distinct phenotypes. Alterations in the immune response pathway in cells harboring missense mutations point to possible mechanisms of breast cancer initiation in carriers of these mutations. Our findings offer insight into how various heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 could lead to impairment of BRCA1 function and provide strong evidence of haploinsufficiency in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

  4. Recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to compound heterozygous mitofusin 2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Polke, J.M.; Laurá, M.; Pareyson, D.; Taroni, F.; Milani, M.; Bergamin, G.; Gibbons, V.S.; Houlden, H.; Chamley, S.C.; Blake, J.; DeVile, C.; Sandford, R.; Sweeney, M.G.; Davis, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in mitofusin 2 (MFN2) are the most common cause of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2). Over 50 mutations have been reported, mainly causing autosomal dominant disease, though families with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations have been described. We present 3 families with early-onset CMT2 associated with compound heterozygous MFN2 mutations. Transcriptional analysis was performed to investigate the effects of the mutations. Methods: Patients were examined clinically and electrophysiologically; parents were also examined where available. Genetic investigations included MFN2 DNA sequencing and dosage analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. MFN2 mRNA transcripts from blood lymphocytes were analyzed in 2 families. Results: Compound heterozygosity for MFN2 mutations was associated with early-onset CMT2 of varying severity between pedigrees. Parents, where examined, were unaffected and were heterozygous for the expected mutations. Four novel mutations were detected (one missense, one nonsense, an intragenic deletion of exons 7 + 8, and a 3–base pair deletion), as well as 2 previously reported missense mutations. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated aberrant splicing of the exonic deletion and indicated nonsense-mediated decay of mutant alleles with premature truncating mutations. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that MFN2 mutations can cause early-onset CMT2 with apparent recessive inheritance. Novel genetic findings include an intragenic MFN2 deletion and nonsense-mediated decay. Carrier parents were asymptomatic, suggesting that MFN2 null alleles can be nonpathogenic unless coinherited with another mutation. PMID:21715711

  5. Skeletal characteristics associated with homozygous and heterozygous WNT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Telma; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Moffatt, Pierre; Glorieux, Francis H; Lentle, Brian; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Rauch, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Recent reports have shown that homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in WNT1 can give rise to severe bone fragility resembling osteogenesis imperfecta, whereas heterozygous WNT1 mutations have been found in adults with dominant early-onset osteoporosis. Here we assessed the effects of WNT1 mutations in four children with recessive severe bone fragility and in heterozygous family members. In vitro studies using the Topflash luciferase reporter system showed that two WNT1 missense mutations that were observed in these families, p.Cys143Phe and p.Val355Phe, decreased the ability of WNT1 to stimulate WNT signaling by >90%. Analyses of iliac bone samples revealed no major abnormalities in bone mineralization density distribution, an indicator of material bone properties, whereas a shift towards higher bone mineralization density is characteristic of classical osteogenesis imperfecta caused by mutations in COL1A1/COL1A2. Intravenous bisphosphonate treatment of four children with homozygous or compound heterozygous WNT1 mutations was associated with increasing lumbar spine areal bone mineral density z-scores, as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, but the effect was smaller than what had previously been reported for children with classical osteogenesis imperfecta. Family members with heterozygous WNT1 mutation tended to have low bone mass. Three of these heterozygous individuals had radiographic signs of vertebral fractures. These observations suggest that more effective treatment approaches are needed for children with recessive WNT1-related bone fragility and that a systematic work-up for osteoporosis is warranted for WNT1 mutation carriers in these families.

  6. Heterozygous FA2H mutations in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Widespread abnormalities in white matter development are frequently reported in cases of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and could be involved in the disconnectivity suggested in these disorders. Homozygous mutations in the gene coding for fatty-acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H), an enzyme involved in myelin synthesis, are associated with complex leukodystrophies, but little is known about the functional impact of heterozygous FA2H mutations. We hypothesized that rare deleterious heterozygous mutations of FA2H might constitute risk factors for ASD. Methods We searched deleterious mutations affecting FA2H, by genotyping 1256 independent patients with ASD genotyped using Genome Wide SNP arrays, and also by sequencing in independent set of 186 subjects with ASD and 353 controls. We then explored the impact of the identified mutations by measuring FA2H enzymatic activity and expression, in transfected COS7 cells. Results One heterozygous deletion within 16q22.3-q23.1 including FA2H was observed in two siblings who share symptoms of autism and severe cognitive impairment, axial T2-FLAIR weighted MRI posterior periventricular white matter lesions. Also, two rare non-synonymous mutations (R113W and R113Q) were reported. Although predictive models suggested that R113W should be a deleterious, we did not find that FA2H activity was affected by expression of the R113W mutation in cultured COS cells. Conclusions While our results do not support a major role for FA2H coding variants in ASD, a screening of other genes related to myelin synthesis would allow us to better understand the role of non-neuronal elements in ASD susceptibility. PMID:24299421

  7. Homozygous and compound heterozygous MMP20 mutations in amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Gasse, B; Karayigit, E; Mathieu, E; Jung, S; Garret, A; Huckert, M; Morkmued, S; Schneider, C; Vidal, L; Hemmerlé, J; Sire, J-Y; Bloch-Zupan, A

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we focus on hypomaturation autosomal-recessive-type amelogenesis imperfecta (type IIA2) and describe 2 new causal Matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) mutations validated in two unrelated families: a missense mutation p.T130I at the expected homozygous state, and a compound heterozygous mutation having the same mutation combined with a nucleotide deletion, leading to a premature stop codon (p.N120fz*2). We characterized the enamel structure of the latter case using scanning electron microscopy analysis and microanalysis (Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, EDX) and confirmed the hypomaturation-type amelogenesis imperfecta as identified in the clinical diagnosis. The mineralized content was slightly decreased, with magnesium substituting for calcium in the crystal structure. The anomalies affected enamel with minimal inter-rod enamel present and apatite crystals perpendicular to the enamel prisms, suggesting a possible new role for MMP20 in enamel formation.

  8. Heterozygous mutations of OTX2 cause severe ocular malformations.

    PubMed

    Ragge, Nicola K; Brown, Alison G; Poloschek, Charlotte M; Lorenz, Birgit; Henderson, R Alex; Clarke, Michael P; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Fielder, Alistair; Gerrelli, Dianne; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Ruddle, Piers; Hurst, Jane; Collin, J Richard O; Salt, Alison; Cooper, Simon T; Thompson, Pamela J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Williamson, Kathleen A; Fitzpatrick, David R; van Heyningen, Veronica; Hanson, Isabel M

    2005-06-01

    Major malformations of the human eye, including microphthalmia and anophthalmia, are examples of phenotypes that recur in families yet often show no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern. Defining loci by mapping is therefore rarely feasible. Using a candidate-gene approach, we have identified heterozygous coding-region changes in the homeobox gene OTX2 in eight families with ocular malformations. The expression pattern of OTX2 in human embryos is consistent with the eye phenotypes observed in the patients, which range from bilateral anophthalmia to retinal defects resembling Leber congenital amaurosis and pigmentary retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed defects of the optic nerve, optic chiasm, and, in some cases, brain. In two families, the mutations appear to have occurred de novo in severely affected offspring, and, in two other families, the mutations have been inherited from a gonosomal mosaic parent. Data from these four families support a simple model in which OTX2 heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause ocular malformations. Four additional families display complex inheritance patterns, suggesting that OTX2 mutations alone may not lead to consistent phenotypes. The high incidence of mosaicism and the reduced penetrance have implications for genetic counseling.

  9. Clinical and functional characterization of a patient carrying a compound heterozygous pericentrin mutation and a heterozygous IGF1 receptor mutation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Eva; Dunstheimer, Desiree; Klammt, Jürgen; Friebe, Daniela; Kiess, Wieland; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Kruis, Tassilo; Laue, Sandy; Pfäffle, Roland; Wallborn, Tillmann; Heidemann, Peter H

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine and postnatal longitudinal growth is controlled by a strong genetic component that regulates a complex network of endocrine factors integrating them with cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic processes in target tissues, particularly the growth centers of the long bones. Here we report on a patient born small for gestational age (SGA) with severe, proportionate postnatal growth retardation, discreet signs of skeletal dysplasia, microcephaly and moyamoya disease. Initial genetic evaluation revealed a novel heterozygous IGF1R p.Leu1361Arg mutation affecting a highly conserved residue with the insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor suggestive for a disturbance within the somatotropic axis. However, because the mutation did not co-segregate with the phenotype and functional characterization did not reveal an obvious impairment of the ligand depending major IGF1R signaling capabilities a second-site mutation was assumed. Mutational screening of components of the somatotropic axis, constituents of the IGF signaling system and factors involved in cellular proliferation, which are described or suggested to provoke syndromic dwarfism phenotypes, was performed. Two compound heterozygous PCNT mutations (p.[Arg585X];[Glu1774X]) were identified leading to the specification of the diagnosis to MOPD II. These investigations underline the need for careful assessment of all available information to derive a firm diagnosis from a sequence aberration.

  10. Clinical and Functional Characterization of a Patient Carrying a Compound Heterozygous Pericentrin Mutation and a Heterozygous IGF1 Receptor Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Klammt, Jürgen; Friebe, Daniela; Kiess, Wieland; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Kruis, Tassilo; Laue, Sandy; Pfäffle, Roland; Wallborn, Tillmann; Heidemann, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine and postnatal longitudinal growth is controlled by a strong genetic component that regulates a complex network of endocrine factors integrating them with cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic processes in target tissues, particularly the growth centers of the long bones. Here we report on a patient born small for gestational age (SGA) with severe, proportionate postnatal growth retardation, discreet signs of skeletal dysplasia, microcephaly and moyamoya disease. Initial genetic evaluation revealed a novel heterozygous IGF1R p.Leu1361Arg mutation affecting a highly conserved residue with the insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor suggestive for a disturbance within the somatotropic axis. However, because the mutation did not co-segregate with the phenotype and functional characterization did not reveal an obvious impairment of the ligand depending major IGF1R signaling capabilities a second-site mutation was assumed. Mutational screening of components of the somatotropic axis, constituents of the IGF signaling system and factors involved in cellular proliferation, which are described or suggested to provoke syndromic dwarfism phenotypes, was performed. Two compound heterozygous PCNT mutations (p.[Arg585X];[Glu1774X]) were identified leading to the specification of the diagnosis to MOPD II. These investigations underline the need for careful assessment of all available information to derive a firm diagnosis from a sequence aberration. PMID:22693602

  11. Enhanced Tumor Formation in Mice Heterozygous for Blm Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Risinger, Mary A.; Kordich, Jennifer J.; Sanz, Maureen M.; Straughen, Joel E.; Slovek, Lisa E.; Capobianco, Anthony J.; German, James; Boivin, Gregory P.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-09-01

    Persons with the autosomal recessive disorder Bloom syndrome are predisposed to cancers of many types due to loss-of-function mutations in the BLM gene, which encodes a recQ-like helicase. Here we show that mice heterozygous for a targeted null mutation of Blm, the murine homolog of BLM, develop lymphoma earlier than wild-type littermates in response to challenge with murine leukemia virus and develop twice the number of intestinal tumors when crossed with mice carrying a mutation in the Apctumor suppressor. These observations indicate that Blm is a modifier of tumor formation in the mouse and that Blm haploinsufficiency is associated with tumor predisposition, a finding with important implications for cancer risk in humans.

  12. Heterozygous Reelin Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Lateral Temporal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  13. Heterozygous reelin mutations cause autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  14. Idiopathic Short Stature due to Novel Heterozygous Mutation of the Aggrecan Gene

    PubMed Central

    Quintos, Jose Bernardo; Guo, Michael H.; Dauber, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, whole exome sequencing identified heterozygous defects in the Aggrecan gene (ACAN) in three families with short stature and advanced bone age. Objective We report a novel frameshift mutation in ACAN in a family with dominantly inherited short stature, advanced bone age, and premature growth cessation. This is the first case of targeted sequencing of ACAN in this phenotype and confirms that ACAN sequencing is warranted in patients with this rare constellation of findings. Results We present a 5 1/2 year old male with a family history of short stature in 3 generations. The maternal grandfather stands 144.5 cm (Ht SDS -4.7), mother 147.7 cm (Ht SDS -2.6), and index case 99.2 cm (Ht SDS -2.7). Our prepubertal patient has significant bone age advancement (bone age 8 years at chronologic age 5 1/2 years) resulting in a poor predicted adult height of 142 cm (Ht SDS -5.1). DNA sequencing identified a novel heterozygous variant in ACAN, which encodes aggrecan, a proteoglycan in the extracellular matrix of growth plate and other cartilaginous tissues. The mutation (p.Gly1797Glyfs*52) results in premature truncation and presumed loss of protein function. Conclusion Mutations in aggrecan gene should be included in the differential diagnosis of the child with idiopathic short stature or familial short stature and bone age advancement. PMID:25741789

  15. Atypical Progeroid Syndrome due to Heterozygous Missense LMNA Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Subramanyam, Lalitha; Agarwal, Anil K.; Simha, Vinaya; Levine, Benjamin; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Novelli, Giuseppe; Crow, Yanick

    2009-01-01

    Context: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and mandibuloacral dysplasia are well-recognized allelic autosomal dominant and recessive progeroid disorders, respectively, due to mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA) gene. Heterozygous LMNA mutations have also been reported in a small number of patients with a less well-characterized atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the phenotype of patients presenting with APS. Results: We report 11 patients with APS from nine families, many with novel heterozygous missense LMNA mutations, such as, P4R, E111K, D136H, E159K, and C588R. These and previously reported patients now reveal a spectrum of clinical features including progeroid manifestations such as short stature, beaked nose, premature graying, partial alopecia, high-pitched voice, skin atrophy over the hands and feet, partial and generalized lipodystrophy with metabolic complications, and skeletal anomalies such as mandibular hypoplasia and mild acroosteolysis. Skin fibroblasts from these patients when assessed for lamin A/C expression using epifluorescence microscopy revealed variable nuclear morphological abnormalities similar to those observed in patients with HGPS. However, these nuclear abnormalities in APS patients could not be rescued with 48 h treatment with farnesyl transferase inhibitors, geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors or trichostatin-A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Immunoblots of cell lysates from fibroblasts did not reveal prelamin A accumulation in any of these patients. Conclusions: APS patients have a few overlapping but some distinct clinical features as compared with HGPS and mandibuloacral dysplasia. The pathogenesis of clinical manifestations in APS patients seems not to be related to accumulation of mutant farnesylated prelamin A. PMID:19875478

  16. Dental Abnormalities Caused by Novel Compound Heterozygous CTSK Mutations.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y; Wang, L; Xia, D; Li, Q; Gao, S; Dong, M; Cai, T; Shi, S; He, L; Hu, K; Mao, T; Duan, X

    2015-05-01

    Cathepsin K (CTSK) is an important protease responsible for degrading type I collagen, osteopontin, and other bone matrix proteins. The mutations in the CTSK gene can cause pycnodysostosis (OMIM 265800), a rare autosomal recessive bone dysplasia. Patients with pycnodysostosis have been reported to present specific dental abnormalities; however, whether these dental abnormalities are related to dysfunctional CTSK has never been reported. Here we investigated the histologic changes of cementum and alveolar bone in a pycnodysostosis patient, caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in the CTSK gene (c.87 G>A p.W29X and c.848 A>G p.Y283C). The most impressive manifestations in tooth were extensive periradicular high-density clumps with unclear periodontal space by orthopantomography examination and micro-computed tomography scanning analysis. Hematoxylin/eosin and toluidine blue staining and atomic force microscopy analysis showed that the cementum became significantly thickened, softened, and full of cementocytes. The disorganized bone structure was the main character of alveolar bone. The p.W29X mutation may represent the loss-of-function allele with an earlier termination codon in the precursor CTSK polypeptide. Residue Y283 is highly conserved among papain-like cysteine proteases. Three-dimensional structure modeling analysis found that the loss of the hydroxybenzene residue in the Y283C mutation would interrupt the hydrogen network and possibly affect the self-cleavage of the CTSK enzyme. Furthermore, p.Y283C mutation did not affect the mRNA and protein levels of overexpressed CTSK in COS-7 system but did reduce CTSK enzyme activity. In conclusion, the histologic and ultrastructural changes of cementum and alveolar bone might be affected by CTSK mutation via reduction of its enzyme activity (clinical trial registration: ChiCTR-TNC-10000876).

  17. Detection of heterozygous nonsense mutations in genes of interest using an Escherichia coli-based stop codon assay.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Joon; Kang, Yoonsung; Choi, Jee-Hye; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2007-02-01

    Since nonsense mutations are closely associated with severe conditions of genetic disorders, including familial cancers, rapid and precise detection of those mutations is very important for research purposes and molecular diagnosis. Currently, screening methods such as the FASAY (functional analysis of separated alleles in yeast) and the Y-SC (stop codon assay in yeast) are used for functional detection of nonsense mutations in genes of interest. But these yeast-based approaches are time-consuming, expensive and complicated. In order to circumvent these problems, we, in the present study, devised a novel Escherichia coli-based screening method, the E-SC (E. coli stop codon assay) for the detection of heterozygous nonsense mutations in genes of interest. Our strategy was based on the fact that the plasmid replicating with a low copy number in E. coli allows an effective separation of normal and mutant alleles. Moreover, it relies on the expression vector, resulting in the formation of white and blue colonies for mutant and normal alleles through the expression of PCR-amplified fragment/lacZ fusion protein respectively. To evaluate the applicability of the E-SC method for the detection of the heterozygous truncating mutation, PCR-amplified exon 7 of the StAR [steroidogenic acute regulatory protein; causative gene of the CAH (congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia)] and RT (reverse transcription)-PCR-amplified full-length cDNA of MeCP2 (methyl-CpG-binding protein 2; causative gene of Rett syndrome) were used. The E-SC showed an almost 1:1 ratio of blue/white colonies in all patients examined, whereas the control samples produced blue colonies only. These results demonstrate that the E-SC system is useful for rapid and precise detection of known and unknown heterozygous truncation mutations in genes that cause genetic disorders and familial cancers.

  18. Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Chan, Szeman Ruby; Griffith, Malachi; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Hundal, Jasreet; Allen, Julie A; Arthur, Cora D; Runci, Daniele; Bugatti, Mattia; Miceli, Alexander P; Schmidt, Heather; Trani, Lee; Kanchi, Krishna-Latha; Miller, Christopher A; Larson, David E; Fulton, Robert S; Vermi, William; Wilson, Richard K; Schreiber, Robert D; Mardis, Elaine R

    2016-09-27

    Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+) luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1(-/-) mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1(-/-) primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR) in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation. PMID:27681435

  19. Novel heterozygous mutation in the extracellular domain of FGFR1 associated with Hartsfield syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Masaki; Miyoshi, Tatsuya; Nagashima, Yuka; Shibata, Nao; Yagi, Hiroko; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous kinase domain mutations or homozygous extracellular domain mutations in FGFR1 have been reported to cause Hartsfield syndrome (HS), which is characterized by the triad of holoprosencephaly, ectrodactyly and cleft lip/palate. To date, more than 200 mutations in FGFR1 have been described; however, only 10 HS-associated mutations have been reported thus far. We describe a case of typical HS with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) harboring a novel heterozygous mutation, p.His253Pro, in the extracellular domain of FGFR1. This is the first report of an HS-associated heterozygous mutation located in the extracellular domain of FGFR1, thus expanding our understanding of the phenotypic features and further developmental course associated with FGFR1 mutations. PMID:27790375

  20. Abnormal corneal epithelial maintenance in mice heterozygous for the micropinna microphthalmia mutation Mp.

    PubMed

    Douvaras, Panagiotis; Dorà, Natalie J; Mort, Richard L; Lodge, Emily J; Hill, Robert E; West, John D

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the corneal morphology of adult Mp/+ mice, which are heterozygous for the micropinna microphthalmia mutation, and identified several abnormalities, which implied that corneal epithelial maintenance was abnormal. The Mp/+ corneal epithelium was thin, loosely packed and contained goblet cells in older mice. Evidence also suggested that the barrier function was compromised. However, there was no major effect on corneal epithelial cell turnover and mosaic patterns of radial stripes indicated that radial cell movement was normal. Limbal blood vessels formed an abnormally wide limbal vasculature ring, K19-positive cells were distributed more widely than normal and K12 was weakly expressed in the peripheral cornea. This raises the possibilities that the limbal-corneal boundary was poorly defined or the limbus was wider than normal. BrdU label-retaining cell numbers and quantitative clonal analysis suggested that limbal epithelial stem cell numbers were not depleted and might be higher than normal. However, as corneal epithelial homeostasis was abnormal, it is possible that Mp/+ stem cell function was impaired. It has been shown recently that the Mp mutation involves a chromosome 18 inversion that disrupts the Fbn2 and Isoc1 genes and produces an abnormal, truncated fibrillin-2(MP) protein. This abnormal protein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells that normally express Fbn2 and causes ER stress. It was also shown that Fbn2 is expressed in the corneal stroma but not the corneal epithelium, suggesting that the presence of truncated fibrillin-2(MP) protein in the corneal stroma disrupts corneal epithelial homeostasis in Mp/+ mice. PMID:27235794

  1. Behavioral and metabolic characterization of heterozygous and homozygous POLG mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Kiselak, Tomas; Clark, Joanne; Clore, Elizabeth; Zheng, Kangni; Cheng, Allen; Kujoth, Gregory C; Prolla, Tomas A; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Simon, David K

    2013-07-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (POLG) mutator mice provide the first experimental evidence that high levels of somatic mtDNA mutations can be functionally significant. Here we report that older homozygous, but not heterozygous, POLG mice show significant reductions in striatal dopaminergic terminals as well as deficits in motor function. However, resting oxygen consumption, heat production, mtDNA content and mitochondrial electron transport chain activities are significantly decreased at older ages in both homozygous and heterozygous mice. These results indicate that high levels of somatic mtDNA mutations can contribute to dopaminergic dysfunction and to behavioral and metabolic deficits.

  2. Behavioral and metabolic characterization of heterozygous and homozygous POLG mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ying; Kiselak, Tomas; Clark, Joanne; Clore, Elizabeth; Zheng, Kangni; Cheng, Allen; Kujoth, Gregory C.; Prolla, Tomas A.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Simon, David K.

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (POLG) mutator mice provide the first experimental evidence that high levels of somatic mtDNA mutations can be functionally significant. Here we report that older homozygous, but not heterozygous, POLG mice show significant reductions in striatal dopaminergic terminals as well as deficits in motor function. However, resting oxygen consumption, heat production, mtDNA content and mitochondrial electron transport chain activities are significantly decreased at older ages in both homozygous and heterozygous mice. These results indicate that high levels of somatic mtDNA mutations can contribute to dopaminergic dysfunction and to behavioral and metabolic deficits. PMID:23542163

  3. Truncating and missense mutations in IGHMBP2 cause Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 2.

    PubMed

    Cottenie, Ellen; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Bansagi, Boglarka; Zimon, Magdalena; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Saveri, Paola; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Baets, Jonathan; Bartsakoulia, Marina; Ploski, Rafal; Teterycz, Pawel; Nikolic, Milos; Quinlivan, Ros; Laura, Matilde; Sweeney, Mary G; Taroni, Franco; Lunn, Michael P; Moroni, Isabella; Gonzalez, Michael; Hanna, Michael G; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chabrol, Elodie; Franke, Andre; von Au, Katja; Schilhabel, Markus; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Brandner, Sebastian; Lim, Siew Choo; Song, Haiwei; Choi, Byung-Ok; Horvath, Rita; Chung, Ki-Wha; Zuchner, Stephan; Pareyson, Davide; Harms, Matthew; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2014-11-01

    Using a combination of exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we investigated an English family with two affected siblings in their 40s with recessive Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Compound heterozygous mutations in the immunoglobulin-helicase-μ-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2) gene were identified. Further sequencing revealed a total of 11 CMT2 families with recessively inherited IGHMBP2 gene mutations. IGHMBP2 mutations usually lead to spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), where most infants die before 1 year of age. The individuals with CMT2 described here, have slowly progressive weakness, wasting and sensory loss, with an axonal neuropathy typical of CMT2, but no significant respiratory compromise. Segregating IGHMBP2 mutations in CMT2 were mainly loss-of-function nonsense in the 5' region of the gene in combination with a truncating frameshift, missense, or homozygous frameshift mutations in the last exon. Mutations in CMT2 were predicted to be less aggressive as compared to those in SMARD1, and fibroblast and lymphoblast studies indicate that the IGHMBP2 protein levels are significantly higher in CMT2 than SMARD1, but lower than controls, suggesting that the clinical phenotype differences are related to the IGHMBP2 protein levels.

  4. Truncating and Missense Mutations in IGHMBP2 Cause Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Cottenie, Ellen; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Bansagi, Boglarka; Zimon, Magdalena; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Saveri, Paola; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Baets, Jonathan; Bartsakoulia, Marina; Ploski, Rafal; Teterycz, Pawel; Nikolic, Milos; Quinlivan, Ros; Laura, Matilde; Sweeney, Mary G.; Taroni, Franco; Lunn, Michael P.; Moroni, Isabella; Gonzalez, Michael; Hanna, Michael G.; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chabrol, Elodie; Franke, Andre; von Au, Katja; Schilhabel, Markus; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Brandner, Sebastian; Lim, Siew Choo; Song, Haiwei; Choi, Byung-Ok; Horvath, Rita; Chung, Ki-Wha; Zuchner, Stephan; Pareyson, Davide; Harms, Matthew; Reilly, Mary M.; Houlden, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we investigated an English family with two affected siblings in their 40s with recessive Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Compound heterozygous mutations in the immunoglobulin-helicase-μ-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2) gene were identified. Further sequencing revealed a total of 11 CMT2 families with recessively inherited IGHMBP2 gene mutations. IGHMBP2 mutations usually lead to spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), where most infants die before 1 year of age. The individuals with CMT2 described here, have slowly progressive weakness, wasting and sensory loss, with an axonal neuropathy typical of CMT2, but no significant respiratory compromise. Segregating IGHMBP2 mutations in CMT2 were mainly loss-of-function nonsense in the 5′ region of the gene in combination with a truncating frameshift, missense, or homozygous frameshift mutations in the last exon. Mutations in CMT2 were predicted to be less aggressive as compared to those in SMARD1, and fibroblast and lymphoblast studies indicate that the IGHMBP2 protein levels are significantly higher in CMT2 than SMARD1, but lower than controls, suggesting that the clinical phenotype differences are related to the IGHMBP2 protein levels. PMID:25439726

  5. Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism in a Patient with Heterozygous Factor V Leiden Mutation

    PubMed Central

    White, C. Whitney; Prince, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To report a patient case identifying risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation. Case Summary: A 54-year-old Caucasian male was diagnosed with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation in 2008 after experiencing a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and bilateral pulmonary embolism. The patient was treated appropriately and started on anticoagulation therapy with warfarin through an anticoagulation management clinic. After approximately 17 months of warfarin therapy without incident, warfarin was discontinued. Within 2 months after discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy, the patient experienced his second DVT and left pulmonary artery embolus. Discussion: The risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation is documented as an approximate 1.4-fold increase compared to patients without thrombophilia. However, the risk increases dramatically when nonreversible (age) or reversible risk factors (obesity, smoking, and long air flights) are present in this population. Conclusion: Based on recent literature, heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation exponentially increases the risk of recurrent VTE, especially in the presence of other risk factors. Health care providers should complete a comprehensive review of the patients’ other risk factors when deciding on duration of anticoagulation therapy for patients with positive heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation. PMID:25477600

  6. Transient congenital hypothyroidism caused by compound heterozygous mutations affecting the NADPH-oxidase domain of DUOX2.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa-Ogasawara, Atsuko; Abe, Kiyomi; Ogikubo, Sayaka; Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Satoh, Mari

    2016-03-01

    Here, we describe three cases of loss-of-function mutations in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase (NOX) domain of dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) occurring along with concurrent missense mutations in thyroid peroxidase (TPO), leading to transient congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Three Japanese boys with nonconsanguineous parents were diagnosed with CH during their neonatal screenings. All patients presented with moderate-to-severe neonatal hypothyroidism and were diagnosed with transient CH after re-evaluation of thyroid function. Two siblings were compound heterozygous for p.[R1110Q]+[Y1180X] in DUOX2; one of them was also heterozygous for p.[R361L] in TPO. The third patient was compound heterozygous for p.[L1160del]+[R1334W] in DUOX2 and heterozygous for p.[P883S] in TPO. This is the first report of a de novo L1160del mutation affecting the DUOX2 gene and of the novel mutations Y1180X in DUOX2 and R361L in TPO. R1110Q and L1160del were found to reduce H2O2 production (5%-9%, p<0.01), while Y1180X, which introduces a premature stop codon, did not confer detectable H2O2 production (-0.7%±0.6%, p<0.01). Moreover, R1334W, a missense mutation possibly affecting electron transfer, led to reduced H2O2 production (24%±0.9%, p<0.01) in vitro, and R1110Q and R1334W resulted in reduced protein expression. Y1180X was detected in a 120 kDa truncated form, whereas L1160del expression was maintained. Further, R361L, a novel missense mutation in TPO, caused partial reduction in peroxidase activity (20.6%±0.8%, p=0.01), whereas P883S, a missense variant, increased it (133.7%±2.8%, p=0.02). The protein expression levels in the case of R361L and P883S were maintained. In conclusion, we provide clinical and in vitro demonstrations of different functional defects and phenotypic heterogeneity in the same thyroid hormonogenesis pathway.

  7. Truncating Mutations of MAGEL2, a Gene within the Prader-Willi Locus, Are Responsible for Severe Arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Mejlachowicz, Dan; Nolent, Flora; Maluenda, Jérome; Ranjatoelina-Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Giuliano, Fabienne; Gut, Ivo; Sternberg, Damien; Laquerrière, Annie; Melki, Judith

    2015-10-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by the presence of multiple joint contractures resulting from reduced or absent fetal movement. Here, we report two unrelated families affected by lethal AMC. By genetic mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a multiplex family, a heterozygous truncating MAGEL2 mutation leading to frameshift and a premature stop codon (c.1996delC, p.Gln666Serfs∗36) and inherited from the father was identified in the probands. In another family, a distinct heterozygous truncating mutation leading to frameshift (c.2118delT, p.Leu708Trpfs∗7) and occurring de novo on the paternal allele of MAGEL2 was identified in the affected individual. In both families, RNA analysis identified the mutated paternal MAGEL2 transcripts only in affected individuals. MAGEL2 is one of the paternally expressed genes within the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) locus. PWS is associated with, to varying extents, reduced fetal mobility, severe infantile hypotonia, childhood-onset obesity, hypogonadism, and intellectual disability. MAGEL2 mutations have been recently reported in affected individuals with features resembling PWS and called Schaaf-Yang syndrome. Here, we show that paternal MAGEL2 mutations are also responsible for lethal AMC, recapitulating the clinical spectrum of PWS and suggesting that MAGEL2 is a PWS-determining gene. PMID:26365340

  8. Truncating Mutations of MAGEL2, a Gene within the Prader-Willi Locus, Are Responsible for Severe Arthrogryposis

    PubMed Central

    Mejlachowicz, Dan; Nolent, Flora; Maluenda, Jérome; Ranjatoelina-Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Giuliano, Fabienne; Gut, Ivo; Sternberg, Damien; Laquerrière, Annie; Melki, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by the presence of multiple joint contractures resulting from reduced or absent fetal movement. Here, we report two unrelated families affected by lethal AMC. By genetic mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a multiplex family, a heterozygous truncating MAGEL2 mutation leading to frameshift and a premature stop codon (c.1996delC, p.Gln666Serfs∗36) and inherited from the father was identified in the probands. In another family, a distinct heterozygous truncating mutation leading to frameshift (c.2118delT, p.Leu708Trpfs∗7) and occurring de novo on the paternal allele of MAGEL2 was identified in the affected individual. In both families, RNA analysis identified the mutated paternal MAGEL2 transcripts only in affected individuals. MAGEL2 is one of the paternally expressed genes within the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) locus. PWS is associated with, to varying extents, reduced fetal mobility, severe infantile hypotonia, childhood-onset obesity, hypogonadism, and intellectual disability. MAGEL2 mutations have been recently reported in affected individuals with features resembling PWS and called Schaaf-Yang syndrome. Here, we show that paternal MAGEL2 mutations are also responsible for lethal AMC, recapitulating the clinical spectrum of PWS and suggesting that MAGEL2 is a PWS-determining gene. PMID:26365340

  9. Heterozygous Mutation of Opa1 in Drosophila Shortens Lifespan Mediated through Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sha; Le, Phung Khanh; Tse, Stephanie; Wallace, Douglas C.; Huang, Taosheng

    2009-01-01

    Optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) is a dynamin-like GTPase located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and mutations in OPA1 are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). OPA1 plays important roles in mitochondrial fusion, cristae remodeling and apoptosis. Our previous study showed that dOpa1 mutation caused elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and resulted in damage and death of the cone and pigment cells in Drosophila eyes. Since ROS-induced oxidative damage to the cells is one of the primary causes of aging, in this study, we examined the effects of heterozygous dOpa1 mutation on the lifespan. We found that heterozygous dOpa1 mutation caused shortened lifespan, increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and elevated production of ROS in the whole Drosophila. Antioxidant treatment partially restored lifespan in the male dOpa1 mutants, but had no effects in the females. Heterozygous dOpa1 mutation caused an impairment of respiratory chain complex activities, especially complexes II and III, and reversible decreased aconitase activity. Heterozygous dOpa1 mutation is also associated with irregular and dysmorphic mitochondria in the muscle. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate the important role of OPA1 in aging and lifespan, which is most likely mediated through augmented ROS production. PMID:19221591

  10. A novel heterozygous SOX2 mutation causing congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Macchiaroli, Annamaria; Kelberman, Daniel; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Drury, Suzanne; Islam, Lily; Giangiobbe, Sara; Ironi, Gabriele; Lench, Nicholas; Sowden, Jane C; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario; Cavallo, Luciano; Gasperi, Maurizio; Faienza, Maria Felicia

    2014-01-25

    Heterozygous de novo mutations in SOX2 have been reported in approximately 10-20% of patients with unilateral or bilateral anophthalmia or microphthalmia. An additional phenotype of hypopituitarism, with anterior pituitary hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, has been reported in patients carrying SOX2 alterations. We report a novel heterozygous mutation in the SOX2 gene in a male affected with congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation we describe is a cytosine deletion in position 905 (c905delC) which causes frameshift and an aberrant C-terminal domain. Our report highlights the fact that subjects affected with eye anomalies and harboring SOX2 mutations are at high risk for gonadotropin deficiency, which has important implications for their clinical management.

  11. Genome editing. The mutagenic chain reaction: a method for converting heterozygous to homozygous mutations.

    PubMed

    Gantz, Valentino M; Bier, Ethan

    2015-04-24

    An organism with a single recessive loss-of-function allele will typically have a wild-type phenotype, whereas individuals homozygous for two copies of the allele will display a mutant phenotype. We have developed a method called the mutagenic chain reaction (MCR), which is based on the CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing system for generating autocatalytic mutations, to produce homozygous loss-of-function mutations. In Drosophila, we found that MCR mutations efficiently spread from their chromosome of origin to the homologous chromosome, thereby converting heterozygous mutations to homozygosity in the vast majority of somatic and germline cells. MCR technology should have broad applications in diverse organisms. PMID:25908821

  12. A Heterozygous RAB27A Mutation Associated with Delayed Cytolytic Granule Polarization and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingce; Bracaglia, Claudia; Prencipe, Giusi; Bemrich-Stolz, Christina J; Beukelman, Timothy; Dimmitt, Reed A; Chatham, W Winn; Zhang, Kejian; Li, Hao; Walter, Mark R; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Grom, Alexei A; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-03-15

    Frequently fatal, primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) occurs in infancy resulting from homozygous mutations in NK and CD8 T cell cytolytic pathway genes. Secondary HLH presents after infancy and may be associated with heterozygous mutations in HLH genes. We report two unrelated teenagers with HLH and an identical heterozygous RAB27A mutation (c.259G→C). We explore the contribution of this Rab27A missense (p.A87P) mutation on NK cell cytolytic function by cloning it into a lentiviral expression vector prior to introduction into the human NK-92 cell line. NK cell degranulation (CD107a expression), target cell conjugation, and K562 target cell lysis was compared between mutant- and wild-type-transduced NK-92 cells. Polarization of granzyme B to the immunologic synapse and interaction of mutant Rab27A (p.A87P) with Munc13-4 were explored by confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay, respectively. Overexpression of the RAB27A mutation had no effect on cell conjugate formation between the NK and target cells but decreased NK cell cytolytic activity and degranulation. Moreover, the mutant Rab27A protein decreased binding to Munc13-4 and delayed granzyme B polarization toward the immunologic synapse. This heterozygous RAB27A mutation blurs the genetic distinction between primary and secondary HLH by contributing to HLH via a partial dominant-negative effect. PMID:26880764

  13. A Heterozygous RAB27A Mutation Associated with Delayed Cytolytic Granule Polarization and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingce; Bracaglia, Claudia; Prencipe, Giusi; Bemrich-Stolz, Christina J; Beukelman, Timothy; Dimmitt, Reed A; Chatham, W Winn; Zhang, Kejian; Li, Hao; Walter, Mark R; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Grom, Alexei A; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-03-15

    Frequently fatal, primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) occurs in infancy resulting from homozygous mutations in NK and CD8 T cell cytolytic pathway genes. Secondary HLH presents after infancy and may be associated with heterozygous mutations in HLH genes. We report two unrelated teenagers with HLH and an identical heterozygous RAB27A mutation (c.259G→C). We explore the contribution of this Rab27A missense (p.A87P) mutation on NK cell cytolytic function by cloning it into a lentiviral expression vector prior to introduction into the human NK-92 cell line. NK cell degranulation (CD107a expression), target cell conjugation, and K562 target cell lysis was compared between mutant- and wild-type-transduced NK-92 cells. Polarization of granzyme B to the immunologic synapse and interaction of mutant Rab27A (p.A87P) with Munc13-4 were explored by confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay, respectively. Overexpression of the RAB27A mutation had no effect on cell conjugate formation between the NK and target cells but decreased NK cell cytolytic activity and degranulation. Moreover, the mutant Rab27A protein decreased binding to Munc13-4 and delayed granzyme B polarization toward the immunologic synapse. This heterozygous RAB27A mutation blurs the genetic distinction between primary and secondary HLH by contributing to HLH via a partial dominant-negative effect.

  14. Heterozygous PTCH1 Mutations Impact the Bone Metabolism in Patients With Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Likely by Regulating SPARC Expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yingying; Zhang, Jianyun; Zhang, Heyu; Li, Xuefen; Qu, Jiafei; Zhai, Jiemei; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Feng; Li, Tiejun

    2016-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bone and skin abnormalities and a predisposition to various tumors. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), which are common tumors of the jaw that cause extensive damage to the jawbone, are usually accompanied with NBCCS. Germline PTCH1 mutations in NBCCS tumorigenesis have been frequently studied; however, little is known regarding the pathogenesis of bone abnormalities in this disease. This study sought to investigate the mechanism underlying heterozygous PTCH1 mutation-mediated abnormal bone metabolism in patients with NBCCS. Stromal cells were isolated from the fibrous capsules of patients with NBCCS-associated or non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors and non-syndromic tumor stromal cells without PTCH1 mutations served as controls. Germline PTCH1 heterozygous mutations were confirmed in all NBCCS samples and differential protein expression was identified using tandem mass tag-labeled proteomics analysis. Our findings revealed that osteonectin/SPARC expression was significantly downregulated in syndromic stromal cells compared with non-syndromic stromal cells. SPARC expression was even lower in stromal cells carrying PTCH1 protein truncation mutations. PTCH1 siRNA transfection demonstrated that SPARC downregulation correlates with decreased PTCH1 expression. Furthermore, exogenous SPARC promoted osteogenic differentiation of syndromic stromal cells with enhanced development of calcium nodules. In addition, bone mineral density tests showed that patients with NBCCS exhibit weak bone mass compared with sex- and age-matched controls. This study indicates that germline PTCH1 heterozygous mutations play a major role in bone metabolism in patients with NBCCS, in particular in those with PTCH1 protein truncation mutations. SPARC may represent an important downstream modulator of PTCH1 mediation of bone metabolism. Thus, bone mineral density monitoring is critical

  15. Novel Compound Heterozygous Nonsense PRX Mutations in a Korean Dejerine-Sottas Neuropathy Family

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ye Ji; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Soo Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Hong, Young Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in the gene encoding periaxin (PRX) are known to cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy (DSN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F. However, there have been no reports describing Korean patients with these mutations. Case Report We examined a Korean DSN patient with an early-onset, slowly progressive, demyelinating neuropathy with prominent sensory involvement. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent capillary sequencing revealed novel compound heterozygous nonsense mutations (p.R392X and p.R679X) in PRX. One mutation was transmitted from each of the patient's parents. No unaffected family member had both mutations, and the mutations were not found in healthy controls. Conclusions We believe that these novel compound heterozygous nonsense mutations are the underlying cause of DSN. The clinical, electrophysiologic, and pathologic phenotypes in this family were similar to those described previously for patients with PRX mutations. We have identified the first PRX mutation in a Korean patient with DSN. PMID:25628743

  16. Mutational and protein analysis of patients and heterozygous women with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenbaum, V.; Guidoux, S.; Aubourg, P.

    1996-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired {beta}-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA), is due to mutations in a gene encoding a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (ALD protein [ALDP]). We analyzed the open reading frame of the ALD gene in 44 French ALD kindred by using SSCP or denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis and studied the effect of mutations on ALDP by immunocytofluorescence and western blotting of fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. Mutations were detected in 37 of 44 kindreds and were distributed over the whole protein-coding region, with the exception of the C terminus encoded in exon 10. Except for two mutations (delAG1801 and P560L) observed four times each, nearly every ALD family has a different mutation. Twenty-four of 37 mutations were missense mutations leading to amino acid changes located in or close to putative transmembrane segments (TMS 2, 3, 4, and 5), in the EAA-like motif and in the nucleotide fold of the ATP-binding domain of ALDP. Of 38 ALD patients tested, 27 (71%) lacked ALDP immunoreactivity in their fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. More than half of missense mutations studied (11 of 21) resulted in a complete lack of ALDP immunoreactivity, and six missense mutations resulted in decreased ALDP expression. The fibroblasts and/or white blood cells of 15 of 15 heterozygous carrier from ALD kindred with no ALDP showed a mixture of positive- and negative-ALDP immunoreactivity due to X-inactivation. Since 5%-15% of heterozygous women have normal VLCFA levels, the immunodetection of ALDP in white blood cells can be applicable in a majority of ALD kindred, to identify heterozygous women, particularly when the ALD gene mutation has not yet been identified. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Heterozygous colon cancer-associated mutations of SAMHD1 have functional significance

    PubMed Central

    Rentoft, Matilda; Lindell, Kristoffer; Tran, Phong; Chabes, Anna Lena; Watt, Danielle L.; Marjavaara, Lisette; Nilsson, Anna Karin; Melin, Beatrice; Trygg, Johan; Johansson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Even small variations in dNTP concentrations decrease DNA replication fidelity, and this observation prompted us to analyze genomic cancer data for mutations in enzymes involved in dNTP metabolism. We found that sterile alpha motif and histidine-aspartate domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1), a deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that decreases dNTP pools, is frequently mutated in colon cancers, that these mutations negatively affect SAMHD1 activity, and that several SAMHD1 mutations are found in tumors with defective mismatch repair. We show that minor changes in dNTP pools in combination with inactivated mismatch repair dramatically increase mutation rates. Determination of dNTP pools in mouse embryos revealed that inactivation of one SAMHD1 allele is sufficient to elevate dNTP pools. These observations suggest that heterozygous cancer-associated SAMHD1 mutations increase mutation rates in cancer cells. PMID:27071091

  18. The risk for developing cancer in Israeli ATM, BLM, and FANCC heterozygous mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Laitman, Yael; Boker-Keinan, Lital; Berkenstadt, Michal; Liphsitz, Irena; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Ries-Levavi, Liat; Sarouk, Ifat; Pras, Elon; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer risks in heterozygous mutation carriers of the ATM, BLM, and FANCC genes are controversial. To shed light on this issue, cancer rates were evaluated by cross referencing asymptomatic Israeli heterozygous mutation carriers in the ATM, BLM, and FANCC genes with cancer diagnoses registered at the Israeli National Cancer Registry (INCR). Comparison of observed to expected Standardized Incidence Rates (SIR) was performed. Overall, 474 individuals participated in the study: 378 females; 25 Arab and 31 Jewish ATM carriers, 152 BLM carriers, and 170 FANCC carriers (all Ashkenazim). Age range at genotyping was 19-53 years (mean + SD 30.6 + 5 years). In addition, 96 males were included; 5, 34, and 57 ATM, BLM, and FANCC mutation carriers, respectively. Over 5-16 years from genotyping (4721 person/years), 15 new cancers were diagnosed in mutation carriers: 5 breast, 4 cervical, 3 melanomas, and one each bone sarcoma, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer. No single cancer diagnosis was more prevalent then expected in all groups combined or per gene analyzed. Specifically breast cancer SIR was 0.02-0.77. We conclude that Israeli ATM, BLM, and FANCC heterozygous mutation carriers are not at an increased risk for developing cancer.

  19. Recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and cataract associated with novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA1

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JINHO; JUNG, SUNG-CHUL; HONG, YOUNG BIN; YOO, JEONG HYUN; KOO, HEASOO; LEE, JA HYUN; HONG, HYUN DAE; KIM, SANG-BEOM; CHUNG, KI WHA; CHOI, BYUNG-OK

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and 20% of patients demonstrate extra-ocular manifestations. In addition to these autosomal dominant cases, only a few syndromic cases have been reported thus far with compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations, suggestive of either recessive or semi-dominant patterns of inheritance. The majority of these patients were diagnosed with Behr syndrome, characterized by optic atrophy, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The present study describes a 10-year-old boy with Behr syndrome presenting with early-onset severe optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy, ataxia and congenital cataracts. He had optic atrophy and was declared legally blind at six years old. Electrophysiological, radiological, and histopathological findings were compatible with axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. At birth, he presented with a congenital cataract, which has not been previously described in patients with OPA1 mutations. Whole exome sequencing indicated a pair of novel compound heterozygous mutations: p.L620fs*13 (c.1857–1858delinsT) and p.R905Q (c.G2714A). Neither mutation was observed in controls (n=300), and thus, they were predicted to be pathogenic by multiple in silico analyses. The mutation sites were highly conserved throughout different vertebrate species. The patients parents did not have any ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms and the results of electrophysiological studies were normal, suggestive of an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The present study identified novel compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations in a patient with recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and congenital cataracts, indicating an expansion of the clinical spectrum of pathologies associated with OPA1 mutations. Thus, OPA1 gene screening is advisable in the workup of patients with recessive optic atrophy, particularly with Behr syndrome and cataracts. PMID:27150940

  20. Crystalline cataract caused by a heterozygous missense mutation in γD-crystallin (CRYGD)

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Caroline; Nihalani, Bharti R.; Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe phenotypic characteristics of two pedigrees manifesting early onset crystalline cataract with mutations in the γD-crystallin gene (CRYGD). Methods A detailed medical history was obtained from two Caucasian pedigrees manifesting autosomal dominant congenital cataracts. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva (DNA Genotek). Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) based genome analysis of the larger pedigree revealed linkage to an 8.2 MB region on chromosome 2q33-q35 which encompassed the crystallin-gamma gene cluster (CRYG). Exons and flanking introns of CRYGA, CRYGB, CRYGC and CRYGD were amplified and sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Results A morphologically unique cataract with extensive refractile “crystals” scattered throughout the nucleus and perinuclear cortex was found in the probands from both pedigrees. A heterozygous C→A mutation was identified at position 109 of the coding sequence (R36S of the processed protein) in exon 2 of CRYGD and this missense mutation was found to cosegregate with the disease in the larger family; this mutation was then identified in affected individuals of pedigree 2 as well. Conclusions The heterozygous 109C→A CRYGD missense mutation is associated with a distinct crystalline cataract in two US Caucasian pedigrees. This confirms crystalline cataract formation with this mutation, as previously reported in sporadic childhood case from the Czech Republic and in members of a Chinese family. PMID:22219628

  1. STAT5B mutations in heterozygous state have negative impact on height: another clue in human stature heritability

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Renata C; Hwa, Vivian; Domené, Horacio M.; Jasper, Héctor G.; Belgorosky, Alicia; Marino, Roxana; Pereira, Alberto M.; Tonelli, Carlos A.; Wit, Jan M.; Rosenfeld, Ron G.; Jorge, Alexander A.L.

    2016-01-01

    Context and objective Growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction caused by signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) mutations is an autosomal recessive condition. Heterozygous mutations in other genes involved in growth regulation were previously associated with a mild height reduction. Our objective was to assess for the first time the phenotype of heterozygous STAT5B mutations. Methods We genotyped and performed clinical and laboratorial evaluations in 52 relatives of 2 previously described Brazilian brothers with homozygous STAT5B c.424_427del mutation (21 heterozygous). Additionally, we obtained height data and genotype from 1,104 adult control individuals from the same region in Brazil and identified 5 additional families harboring the same mutation (18 individuals, 11 heterozygous). Furthermore, we gathered the available height data from first-degree relatives of patients with homozygous STAT5B mutations (17 individuals from 7 families). Data from heterozygous individuals and non-carriers were compared. Results Individuals carrying heterozygous STAT5B c.424_427del mutation were 0.6 SDS shorter than their non-carrier relatives (p= 0.009). Heterozygous subjects also had significantly lower SDS for serum concentrations of IGF-1 (p=0.028) and IGFBP-3 (p=0.02) than their non-carrier relatives. The 17 heterozygous first-degree relatives of patients carrying homozygous STAT5B mutations had an average height SDS of −1.4 ± 0.8 when compared with population-matched controls (p < 0.001). Conclusions STAT5B mutations in heterozygous state have a significant negative impact on height (approximately 3.9 cm). This effect is milder than the effect seen in the homozygous state, with height usually within the normal range. Our results support the hypothesis that heterozygosity of rare pathogenic variants contributes to normal height heritability. PMID:26034074

  2. Incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis from a heterozygous mutation of the V-ATPase B1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianning; Fuster, Daniel G.; Cameron, Mary Ann; Quiñones, Henry; Griffith, Carolyn; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2014-01-01

    Congenital distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA) from mutations of the B1 subunit of V-ATPase is considered an autosomal recessive disease. We analyzed a distal RTA kindred with a truncation mutation of B1 (p.Phe468fsX487) previously shown to have failure of assembly into the V1 domain of V-ATPase. All heterozygous carriers in this kindred have normal plasma HCO3− concentrations and thus evaded the diagnosis of RTA. However, inappropriately high urine pH, hypocitraturia, and hypercalciuria were present either individually or in combination in the heterozygotes at baseline. Two of the heterozygotes studied also had inappropriate urinary acidification with acute ammonium chloride loading and an impaired urine-blood Pco2 gradient during bicarbonaturia, indicating the presence of a H+ gradient and flux defects. In normal human renal papillae, wild-type B1 is located primarily on the plasma membrane, but papilla from one of the heterozygote who had kidney stones but not nephrocalcinosis showed B1 in both the plasma membrane as well as diffuse intracellular staining. Titration of increasing amounts of the mutant B1 subunit did not exhibit negative dominance over the expression, cellular distribution, or H+ pump activity of wild-type B1 in mammalian human embryonic kidney-293 cells and in V-ATPase-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This is the first demonstration of renal acidification defects and nephrolithiasis in heterozygous carriers of a mutant B1 subunit that cannot be attributable to negative dominance. We propose that heterozygosity may lead to mild real acidification defects due to haploinsufficiency. B1 heterozygosity should be considered in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis and urinary abnormalities such as alkalinuria or hypocitraturia. PMID:25164082

  3. Compound heterozygous PANK2 mutations confirm HARP and Hallervorden-Spatz syndromes are allelic.

    PubMed

    Houlden, H; Lincoln, S; Farrer, M; Cleland, P G; Hardy, J; Orrell, R W

    2003-11-25

    The authors describe a patient with hypoprebetalipoproteinemia, acanthocytosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and pallidal degeneration (HARP) who has two compound heterozygote mutations of the PANK2 gene. IVS4-1 G>T segregates with the lipid and erythrocyte changes in the mother and sister. No other family members have the lipid, erythrocyte, or clinical abnormalities. The father and two brothers are heterozygous for Met327Thr. One other mutation has been found in this PANK2 region associated with the HARP phenotype, suggesting a local genotype effect.

  4. SOFT syndrome caused by compound heterozygous mutations of POC1A and its skeletal manifestation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Min; Jung, Soyoon; Seo, Jieun; Shin, Choong Ho; Cheong, Hae Il; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    SOFT syndrome (MIM614813) is an extremely rare primordial dwarfism characterized by short stature, onychodysplasia, facial dysmorphism and hypotrichosis, which is caused by biallelic mutations in the POC1A gene. Only 19 patients with mutation-confirmed SOFT syndrome have been reported to date, all of whom carried homozygous variants that were strongly associated with consanguineous marriages. We report an 8.5-year-old boy with SOFT syndrome showing primordial dwarfism, no effect of growth-hormone therapy and skeletal dysplasia. This is the first report of compound heterozygous variants in POC1A, one previously reported and the other novel. A characteristic skeletal manifestation is reported. PMID:26791357

  5. Efficient introduction of specific homozygous and heterozygous mutations using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Dominik; Kwart, Dylan; Chen, Antonia; Sproul, Andrew; Jacob, Samson; Teo, Shaun; Olsen, Kimberly Moore; Gregg, Andrew; Noggle, Scott; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system allows sequence-specific gene editing in many organisms and holds promise as a tool to generate models of human diseases, for example, in human pluripotent stem cells. CRISPR/Cas9 introduces targeted double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with high efficiency, which are typically repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) resulting in nonspecific insertions, deletions or other mutations (indels). DSBs may also be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) using a DNA repair template, such as an introduced single-stranded oligo DNA nucleotide (ssODN), allowing knock-in of specific mutations. Although CRISPR/Cas9 is used extensively to engineer gene knockouts through NHEJ, editing by HDR remains inefficient and can be corrupted by additional indels, preventing its widespread use for modelling genetic disorders through introducing disease-associated mutations. Furthermore, targeted mutational knock-in at single alleles to model diseases caused by heterozygous mutations has not been reported. Here we describe a CRISPR/Cas9-based genome-editing framework that allows selective introduction of mono- and bi-allelic sequence changes with high efficiency and accuracy. We show that HDR accuracy is increased dramatically by incorporating silent CRISPR/Cas-blocking mutations along with pathogenic mutations, and establish a method termed 'CORRECT' for scarless genome editing. By characterizing and exploiting a stereotyped inverse relationship between a mutation's incorporation rate and its distance to the DSB, we achieve predictable control of zygosity. Homozygous introduction requires a guide RNA targeting close to the intended mutation, whereas heterozygous introduction can be accomplished by distance-dependent suboptimal mutation incorporation or by use of mixed repair templates. Using this approach, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells with heterozygous and homozygous dominant early onset Alzheimer's disease-causing mutations in

  6. The mutagenic chain reaction: a method for converting heterozygous to homozygous mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gantz, Valentino M.; Bier, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    An organism with a single recessive loss-of-function allele will typically have a wild-type phenotype while individuals homozygous for two copies of the allele will display a mutant phenotype. Here, we develop a method that we refer to as the mutagenic chain reaction (MCR), which is based on the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system for generating autocatalytic mutations to generate homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We demonstrate in Drosophila that MCR mutations efficiently spread from their chromosome of origin to the homologous chromosome thereby converting heterozygous mutations to homozygosity in the vast majority of somatic and germline cells. MCR technology should have broad applications in diverse organisms. PMID:25908821

  7. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis. PMID:27042825

  8. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis.

  9. Delayed onset of congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy due to compound heterozygous SLC4A11 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Babu Lal; Gupta, Ranjan; Sharma, Arundhati; Sen, Seema; Gupta, Shikha; Tandon, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bilateral, symmetrical, noninflammatory corneal clouding (edema) present at birth or shortly thereafter. This study reports on an unusual delayed presentation of CHED with compound heterozygous SLC4A11 mutations. Materials and Methods: A 45-year-old female, presenting with bilateral decreased vision since childhood that deteriorated in the last 5 years, was evaluated to rule out trauma, viral illness, chemical injury, glaucoma, and corneal endothelial dystrophies. Tear sample was sent for herpes simplex viral (HSV) antigen testing. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood was screened for mutations in all exons of SLC4A11 by direct sequencing. Full-thickness penetrating keratoplasty was done and corneal button was sent for histopathological examination. Results: Slit-lamp findings revealed bilateral diffuse corneal edema and left eye spheroidal degeneration with scarring. Increased corneal thickness (762 μm and 854 μm in the right and left eyes, respectively), normal intraocular pressure (12 mmHg and 16 mmHg in the right and left eyes, respectively), inconclusive confocal scan, and specular microscopy, near normal tear film parameters, were the other clinical features. HSV-polymerase chain reaction was negative. Histopathological examination revealed markedly thickened Descemet's membrane with subepithelial spheroidal degeneration. SLC4A11 screening showed a novel variant p.Ser415Asn, reported mutation p.Cys386Arg and two polymorphisms, all in the heterozygous state and not identified in 100 controls. Conclusions: The study shows, for the first time, compound heterozygous SLC4A11 mutations impair protein function leading to delayed onset of the disease. PMID:27609159

  10. Genotype-phenotype correlation in cystic fibrosis patients compound heterozygous for the A455E mutation.

    PubMed

    De Braekeleer, M; Allard, C; Leblanc, J P; Simard, F; Aubin, G

    1997-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a high incidence in the French-Canadian population of Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec). The A455E mutation accounts for 8.3% of the CF chromosomes. This mutation was shown to be associated with a milder lung disease in the Dutch population. Twenty two CF patients distributed in 17 families and compound heterozygotes for the A455E mutation have been followed at the Clinique de Fibrose Kystique de Chicoutimi. Fourteen patients also carried the delta F508 mutation while the remaining eight patients had the 621 + 1G-->T mutation. Each patient was matched by sex and age to a patient homozygous for the delta F508 mutation. The pairs were analyzed for several clinical and laboratory variables. The A455E compound heterozygotes were diagnosed at a later age (P = 0.003) and had chloride concentrations at the sweat test lower than those homozygous for the delta F508 mutation (P = 0.007). More patients were pancreatic sufficient (P = 0.004). They had a higher Shwachman score (P = 0.001) and better pulmonary function tests (P < 0.02). CF patients compound heterozygous for the A455E mutation have a milder pancreatic and lung disease than the delta F508 homozygotes. Therefore, the A455E should be associated with a better prognosis.

  11. A novel heterozygous SOX2 mutation causing anophthalmia/microphthalmia with genital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Pedace, Lucia; Castori, Marco; Binni, Francesco; Pingi, Alberto; Grammatico, Barbara; Scommegna, Salvatore; Majore, Silvia; Grammatico, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia is a rare developmental craniofacial defect, which recognizes a wide range of causes, including chromosomal abnormalities, single-gene mutations as well as environmental factors. Heterozygous mutations in the SOX2 gene are the most common monogenic form of anophthalmia/microphthalmia, as they are reported in up to 10-15% cases. Here, we describe a sporadic patient showing bilateral anophthalmia/microphthalmia and micropenis caused by a novel mutation (c.59_60insGG) in the SOX2 gene. Morphological and endocrinological evaluations excluded any anomaly of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. Our finding supports the hypothesis that SOX2 is particularly prone to slipped-strand mispairing, which results in a high frequency of point deletions/insertions.

  12. Novel compound heterozygous PIGT mutations caused multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 3.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Mitsuko; Kashii, Hirofumi; Murakami, Yoshiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Kubota, Masaya; Kinoshita, Taroh; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-08-01

    Recessive mutations in genes of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor synthesis pathway have been demonstrated as causative of GPI deficiency disorders associated with intellectual disability, seizures, and diverse congenital anomalies. We performed whole exome sequencing in a patient with progressive encephalopathies and multiple dysmorphism with hypophosphatasia and identified novel compound heterozygous mutations, c.250G>T (p. Glu84*) and c.1342C>T (p. Arg488Trp), in PIGT encoding a subunit of the GPI transamidase complex. The surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on patient granulocytes was lower than that of healthy controls. Transfection of the Arg488Trp mutant PIGT construct, but not the Glu84* mutant, into PIGT-deficient cells partially restored the expression of GPI-APs DAF and CD59. These results indicate that PIGT mutations caused neurological impairment and multiple congenital anomalies in this patient.

  13. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Udhaya H.; Movva, Sireesha; Sharma, Deepak; Verma, Jyotsna; Puri, Ratna Dua; Verma, Ishwar Chander

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E) substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT) in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein. PMID:25222778

  14. Augmentation of phenotype in a transgenic Parkinson mouse heterozygous for a Gaucher mutation.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ianai; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Giasson, Benoit I; Nussbaum, Robert L

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of the protein α-synuclein (SNCA) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is strongly supported by the facts that (i) missense and copy number mutations in the SNCA gene can cause inherited Parkinson's disease; and (ii) Lewy bodies in sporadic Parkinson's disease are largely composed of aggregated SNCA. Unaffected heterozygous carriers of Gaucher disease mutations have an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. As mutations in the GBA gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GBA) are known to interfere with lysosomal protein degradation, GBA heterozygotes may demonstrate reduced lysosomal SNCA degradation, leading to increased steady-state SNCA levels and promoting its aggregation. We have created mouse models to investigate the interaction between GBA mutations and synucleinopathies. We investigated the rate of SNCA degradation in cultured primary cortical neurons from mice expressing wild-type mouse SNCA, wild-type human SNCA, or mutant A53T SNCA, in a background of either wild-type Gba or heterozygosity for the L444P GBA mutation associated with Gaucher disease. We also tested the effect of this Gaucher mutation on motor and enteric nervous system function in these transgenic animals. We found that human SNCA is stable, with a half-life of 61 h, and that the A53T mutation did not significantly affect its half-life. Heterozygosity for a naturally occurring Gaucher mutation, L444P, reduced GBA activity by 40%, reduced SNCA degradation and triggered accumulation of the protein in culture. This mutation also resulted in the exacerbation of motor and gastrointestinal deficits found in the A53T mouse model of Parkinson's disease. This study demonstrates that heterozygosity for a Gaucher disease-associated mutation in Gba interferes with SNCA degradation and contributes to its accumulation, and exacerbates the phenotype in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25351739

  15. Loss of B Cells in Patients with Heterozygous Mutations in IKAROS

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Rundles, C.; Reichenbach, J.; Stray-Pedersen, A.; Gelfand, E.W.; Maffucci, P.; Pierce, K.R.; Abbott, J.K.; Voelkerding, K.V.; South, S.T.; Augustine, N.H.; Bush, J.S.; Dolen, W.K.; Wray, B.B.; Itan, Y.; Cobat, A.; Sorte, H.S.; Ganesan, S.; Prader, S.; Martins, T.B.; Lawrence, M.G.; Orange, J.S.; Calvo, K.R.; Niemela, J.E.; Casanova, J.-L.; Fleisher, T.A.; Hill, H.R.; Kumánovics, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by late-onset hypogammaglobulinemia in the absence of predisposing factors. The genetic cause is unknown in the majority of cases, and less than 10% of patients have a family history of the disease. Most patients have normal numbers of B cells but lack plasma cells. METHODS We used whole-exome sequencing and array-based comparative genomic hybridization to evaluate a subset of patients with CVID and low B-cell numbers. Mutant proteins were analyzed for DNA binding with the use of an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) and confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to analyze peripheral-blood lymphocytes and bone marrow aspirates. RESULTS Six different heterozygous mutations in IKZF1, the gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS, were identified in 29 persons from six families. In two families, the mutation was a de novo event in the proband. All the mutations, four amino acid substitutions, an intragenic deletion, and a 4.7-Mb multigene deletion involved the DNA-binding domain of IKAROS. The proteins bearing missense mutations failed to bind target DNA sequences on EMSA and confocal microscopy; however, they did not inhibit the binding of wild-type IKAROS. Studies in family members showed progressive loss of B cells and serum immunoglobulins. Bone marrow aspirates in two patients had markedly decreased early B-cell precursors, but plasma cells were present. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed in 2 of the 29 patients. CONCLUSIONS Heterozygous mutations in the transcription factor IKAROS caused an autosomal dominant form of CVID that is associated with a striking decrease in B-cell numbers. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:26981933

  16. Novel compound heterozygous mutations T2C and 1149insT in the KCNQ1 gene cause Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Rong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yin-Hui; Wang, Lin-Lin; Teng, Si-Yong; Pu, Jie-Lin

    2011-07-01

    Mutations in the KCNQ1 gene account for more than 90% of the individuals with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS). In this study, we identified and characterized two novel KCNQ1 mutations that caused JLNS. A 6-year-old deaf girl suffering from recurrent syncope had a documented electrocardiogram with polymorphic ventricular fibrillation since the age of 4 years. The baseline electrocardiogram showed a significantly prolonged corrected QT interval (524 msec). Genetic analysis revealed that the proband carried two heterozygous mutations of T2C and 1149insT in the KCNQ1 gene on separate alleles. Patch-clamp analysis demonstrated that the T2C mutation resulted in significant reduction in the slowly activated delayed rectifier current (IKs). Furthermore, western blot analysis and confocal imaging revealed that the T2C mutation produced a truncated protein with trafficking defects. In contrast, the 1149insT mutation failed to generate any measurable current, consistent with no protein expression in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm. Moreover, co-expression of the T2C and 1149insT mutations significantly reduced the peak tail current density to 8.27% of the wild-type (WT) current value, while co-transfected WT channels with either T2C or 1149insT mutant channels produced comparable current and channel kinetics to that of WT channels. Our study demonstrates that the compound heterozygous mutations T2C and 1149insT cause the 'loss-of-function' of the IKs that may account for the clinical phenotype of the proband. Multiple mechanisms have been involved in the pathogenesis of 'loss-of-function' of IKs. PMID:21380488

  17. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galant, Damien; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Desgrouas, Camille; Abdesselam, Ines; Bernard, Monique; Levy, Nicolas; Merono, Françoise; Coirault, Catherine; Roll, Patrice; Lagarde, Arnaud; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Dutour, Anne; Badens, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD), Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD). We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:27120622

  18. Heterozygous PALB2 c.1592delT mutation channels DNA double-strand break repair into error-prone pathways in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, K; Sachsenweger, J; Friedl, T W P; Pospiech, H; Winqvist, R; Wiesmüller, L

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary heterozygous mutations in a variety of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair genes have been associated with increased breast cancer risk. In the Finnish population, PALB2 (partner and localizer of BRCA2) represents a major susceptibility gene for female breast cancer, and so far, only one mutation has been described, c.1592delT, which leads to a sixfold increased disease risk. PALB2 is thought to participate in homologous recombination (HR). However, the effect of the Finnish founder mutation on DSB repair has not been investigated. In the current study, we used a panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from seven heterozygous female PALB2 c.1592delT mutation carriers with variable health status and six wild-type matched controls. The results of our DSB repair analysis showed that the PALB2 mutation causes specific changes in pathway usage, namely increases in error-prone single-strand annealing (SSA) and microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) compared with wild-type LCLs. These data indicated haploinsufficiency regarding the suppression of error-prone DSB repair in PALB2 mutation carriers. To the contrary, neither reduced HR activities, nor impaired RAD51 filament assembly, nor sensitization to PARP inhibition were consistently observed. Expression of truncated mutant versus wild-type PALB2 verified a causal role of PALB2 c.1592delT in the shift to error-prone repair. Discrimination between healthy and malignancy-presenting PALB2 mutation carriers revealed a pathway shift particularly in the breast cancer patients, suggesting interaction of PALB2 c.1592delT with additional genomic lesions. Interestingly, the studied PALB2 mutation was associated with 53BP1 accumulation in the healthy mutation carriers but not the patients, and 53BP1 was limiting for error-prone MMEJ in patients but not in healthy carriers. Our study identified a rise in error-prone DSB repair as a potential threat to genomic integrity in heterozygous PALB2 mutation carriers

  19. Heterozygous PALB2 c.1592delT mutation channels DNA double-strand break repair into error-prone pathways in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, K; Sachsenweger, J; Friedl, T W P; Pospiech, H; Winqvist, R; Wiesmüller, L

    2016-07-21

    Hereditary heterozygous mutations in a variety of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair genes have been associated with increased breast cancer risk. In the Finnish population, PALB2 (partner and localizer of BRCA2) represents a major susceptibility gene for female breast cancer, and so far, only one mutation has been described, c.1592delT, which leads to a sixfold increased disease risk. PALB2 is thought to participate in homologous recombination (HR). However, the effect of the Finnish founder mutation on DSB repair has not been investigated. In the current study, we used a panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from seven heterozygous female PALB2 c.1592delT mutation carriers with variable health status and six wild-type matched controls. The results of our DSB repair analysis showed that the PALB2 mutation causes specific changes in pathway usage, namely increases in error-prone single-strand annealing (SSA) and microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) compared with wild-type LCLs. These data indicated haploinsufficiency regarding the suppression of error-prone DSB repair in PALB2 mutation carriers. To the contrary, neither reduced HR activities, nor impaired RAD51 filament assembly, nor sensitization to PARP inhibition were consistently observed. Expression of truncated mutant versus wild-type PALB2 verified a causal role of PALB2 c.1592delT in the shift to error-prone repair. Discrimination between healthy and malignancy-presenting PALB2 mutation carriers revealed a pathway shift particularly in the breast cancer patients, suggesting interaction of PALB2 c.1592delT with additional genomic lesions. Interestingly, the studied PALB2 mutation was associated with 53BP1 accumulation in the healthy mutation carriers but not the patients, and 53BP1 was limiting for error-prone MMEJ in patients but not in healthy carriers. Our study identified a rise in error-prone DSB repair as a potential threat to genomic integrity in heterozygous PALB2 mutation carriers

  20. Older individuals heterozygous for a growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor gene mutation are shorter than normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H; Cardoso-Filho, Marco A; Pereira, Rossana M C; Oliveira, Carla R P; Souza, Anita H O; Santos, Elenilde G; Campos, Viviane C; Valença, Eugênia H O; de Oliveira, Francielle T; Oliveira-Neto, Luiz A; Gois-Junior, Miburge B; Oliveira-Santos, Alecia A; Salvatori, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is the most important stimulus for GH secretion by the pituitary gland. Subjects homozygous for GHRH receptor (GHRHR) gene (GHRHR) inactivating mutations have severe GH deficiency, resulting in severe short stature if not treated. We previously reported that young adults heterozygous for the c.57+1G>A null GHRHR mutation (MUT/N) have reduced weight and body mass index (BMI) but normal stature. Here we have studied whether older MUT/N have an additional phenotype. In a cross-sectional study, we measured height, weight and blood pressure, and calculated BMI in two groups (young, 20-40 years of age) and old (60-80 years) of individuals heterozygous for the same GHRHR mutation, and compared with a large number of individuals of normal genotype residing in the same geographical area. Standard deviation score (SDS) of weight was lower, and BMI had a trend toward reduction in young heterozygous compared with young normals, without significant difference in stature. Conversely, SDS of height was lower in older heterozygous individuals than in controls, corresponding to a reduction of 4.2 cm. These data show a reduced stature in older subjects heterozygous for the c.57+1G>A GHRHR mutation, indicating different effects of heterozygosis through lifespan. PMID:25761575

  1. Homozygous and compound-heterozygous mutations in TGDS cause Catel-Manzke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ehmke, Nadja; Caliebe, Almuth; Koenig, Rainer; Kant, Sarina G; Stark, Zornitza; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hoff, Kirstin; Kawalia, Amit; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Knaus, Alexej; Zhu, Na; Heinrich, Verena; Huber, Celine; Harabula, Izabela; Spielmann, Malte; Horn, Denise; Kornak, Uwe; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter M; Nürnberg, Peter; Siebert, Reiner; Manzke, Hermann; Mundlos, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Catel-Manzke syndrome is characterized by Pierre Robin sequence and a unique form of bilateral hyperphalangy causing a clinodactyly of the index finger. We describe the identification of homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in TGDS in seven unrelated individuals with typical Catel-Manzke syndrome by exome sequencing. Six different TGDS mutations were detected: c.892A>G (p.Asn298Asp), c.270_271del (p.Lys91Asnfs(∗)22), c.298G>T (p.Ala100Ser), c.294T>G (p.Phe98Leu), c.269A>G (p.Glu90Gly), and c.700T>C (p.Tyr234His), all predicted to be disease causing. By using haplotype reconstruction we showed that the mutation c.298G>T is probably a founder mutation. Due to the spectrum of the amino acid changes, we suggest that loss of function in TGDS is the underlying mechanism of Catel-Manzke syndrome. TGDS (dTDP-D-glucose 4,6-dehydrogenase) is a conserved protein belonging to the SDR family and probably plays a role in nucleotide sugar metabolism.

  2. Heterozygous HTRA1 mutations are associated with autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Verdura, Edgard; Hervé, Dominique; Scharrer, Eva; Amador, Maria Del Mar; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Philippi, Anne; Corlobé, Astrid; Bergametti, Françoise; Gazal, Steven; Prieto-Morin, Carol; Beaufort, Nathalie; Le Bail, Benoit; Viakhireva, Irina; Dichgans, Martin; Chabriat, Hugues; Haffner, Christof; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease represents a heterogeneous group of disorders leading to stroke and cognitive impairment. While most small vessel diseases appear sporadic and related to age and hypertension, several early-onset monogenic forms have also been reported. However, only a minority of patients with familial small vessel disease carry mutations in one of known small vessel disease genes. We used whole exome sequencing to identify candidate genes in an autosomal dominant small vessel disease family in which known small vessel disease genes had been excluded, and subsequently screened all candidate genes in 201 unrelated probands with a familial small vessel disease of unknown aetiology, using high throughput multiplex polymerase chain reaction and next generation sequencing. A heterozygous HTRA1 variant (R166L), absent from 1000 Genomes and Exome Variant Server databases and predicted to be deleterious by in silico tools, was identified in all affected members of the index family. Ten probands of 201 additional unrelated and affected probands (4.97%) harboured a heterozygous HTRA1 mutation predicted to be damaging. There was a highly significant difference in the number of likely deleterious variants in cases compared to controls (P = 4.2 × 10(-6); odds ratio = 15.4; 95% confidence interval = 4.9-45.5), strongly suggesting causality. Seven of these variants were located within or close to the HTRA1 protease domain, three were in the N-terminal domain of unknown function and one in the C-terminal PDZ domain. In vitro activity analysis of HTRA1 mutants demonstrated a loss of function effect. Clinical features of this autosomal dominant small vessel disease differ from those of CARASIL and CADASIL by a later age of onset and the absence of the typical extraneurological features of CARASIL. They are similar to those of sporadic small vessel disease, except for their familial nature. Our data demonstrate that heterozygous HTRA1 mutations are an important cause

  3. Molecular dissection of mutations at the heterozygous thymidine kinase locus in mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, M L; Moore, M M; Broder, C B; Burrell, A; Juhn, G; Kasweck, K L; Lin, P F; Wadhams, A; Hozier, J C

    1990-01-01

    The mouse lymphoma L5178Y TK+/- 3.7.2C cell line allows quantitation of induced TK(+/-)----TK-/- mutations at the heterozygous thymidine kinase (Tk) locus. TK-/- mutant colonies show a bimodal size distribution, reflecting a difference in the growth rates of the two size classes that is hypothesized to result from different degrees of genetic damage. The two homologous chromosomes 11 containing the alleles of the Tk gene in L5178Y 3.7.2C TK+/- cells are distinguishable at the cytogenetic level. We find, in addition, that the two alleles are distinguishable at the molecular level because of an Nco I restriction fragment length polymorphism at the 3' end of the gene. In a set of 51 large-colony and 48 small-colony TK-/- mutants induced by ionizing radiation or by chemical mutagens, we find that 78, including all except one of the small-colony mutants, have lost the Tk+ allele and that some of these have two to four copies of the remaining Tk- allele. Nineteen of the large-colony TK-/- mutants that do not show Tk+ allele loss show no other structural changes detectable at the level of Southern blot analysis. One shows a partial deletion. The variety of mutagenic lesions recorded at the heterozygous Tk locus may be representative of events observed in human malignancy and may include a wider range of mutagenic events than can be observed at hemizygous test loci. Images PMID:1967496

  4. A compound heterozygous mutation in GPD1 causes hepatomegaly, steatohepatitis, and hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mugdha; Eagan, Jacqueline; Desai, Nirav K; Newton, Stephanie A; Towne, Meghan C; Marinakis, Nicholas S; Esteves, Kristyn M; De Ferranti, Sarah; Bennett, Michael J; McIntyre, Adam; Beggs, Alan H; Berry, Gerard T; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2014-10-01

    The constellation of clinico-pathological and laboratory findings including massive hepatomegaly, steatosis, and marked hypertriglyceridemia in infancy is extremely rare. We describe a child who is presented with the above findings, and despite extensive diagnostic testing no cause could be identified. Whole exome sequencing was performed on the patient and parents' DNA. Mutations in GPD1 encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that catalyzes the reversible redox reaction of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and NADH to glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and NAD(+) were identified. The proband inherited a GPD1 deletion from the father determined using copy number analysis and a missense change p.(R229Q) from the mother. GPD1 protein was absent in the patient's liver biopsy on western blot. Low normal activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferases, CPT1 and CPT2, was present in the patient's skin fibroblasts, without mutations in genes encoding for these proteins. This is the first report of compound heterozygous mutations in GPD1 associated with a lack of GPD1 protein and reduction in CPT1 and CPT2 activity.

  5. Heterozygous mutations in HSD17B4 cause juvenile peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Amor, David J.; Marsh, Ashley P.L.; Storey, Elsdon; Tankard, Rick; Gillies, Greta; Delatycki, Martin B.; Pope, Kate; Bromhead, Catherine; Leventer, Richard J.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic cause of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in 5 patients from 3 different families. Methods: The patients comprised 2 sib pairs and 1 sporadic patient. Clinical assessment included history, physical examination, and brain MRI. Linkage analysis was performed separately on the 2 sets of sib pairs using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays, followed by analysis of the intersection of the regions. Exome sequencing was performed on 1 affected patient with variant filtering and prioritization undertaken using these intersected regions. Results: Using a combination of sequencing technologies, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in HSD17B4 in all 5 affected patients. In all 3 families, peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein (DBP) deficiency was caused by compound heterozygosity for 1 nonsense/deletion mutation and 1 missense mutation. Conclusions: We describe 5 patients with juvenile DBP deficiency from 3 different families, bringing the total number of reported patients to 14, from 8 families. This report broadens and consolidates the phenotype associated with juvenile DBP deficiency. PMID:27790638

  6. TP53 exon-6 truncating mutations produce separation of function isoforms with pro-tumorigenic functions

    PubMed Central

    Shirole, Nitin H; Pal, Debjani; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Senturk, Serif; Boroda, Joseph; Pisterzi, Paola; Miller, Madison; Munoz, Gustavo; Anderluh, Marko; Ladanyi, Marc; Lowe, Scott W; Sordella, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    TP53 truncating mutations are common in human tumors and are thought to give rise to p53-null alleles. Here, we show that TP53 exon-6 truncating mutations occur at higher than expected frequencies and produce proteins that lack canonical p53 tumor suppressor activities but promote cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastasis. Functionally and molecularly, these p53 mutants resemble the naturally occurring alternative p53 splice variant, p53-psi. Accordingly, these mutants can localize to the mitochondria where they promote tumor phenotypes by binding and activating the mitochondria inner pore permeability regulator, Cyclophilin D (CypD). Together, our studies reveal that TP53 exon-6 truncating mutations, contrary to current beliefs, act beyond p53 loss to promote tumorigenesis, and could inform the development of strategies to target cancers driven by these prevalent mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17929.001 PMID:27759562

  7. [Stroke and iridodonesis revealing a homocystinuria caused by a compound heterozygous mutation of cystathionine beta-synthase].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, R; Triquenot-Bagan, A; Quillard, M; Genevois, O; Hannequin, D

    2008-01-01

    Iridodonesis or tremulous iris is a clinical sign of ectopia lentis which is frequently associated with homocystinuria. We present a forty-two-year-old woman victim of a left middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke. The clinical examination found bilateral iridodonesis and laboratory tests showed an increased level of serum homocysteine and homocystinuria. Homocystinuria was caused by a compound heterozygous I278T and D444N mutation of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) gene and also a C667T heterozygous polymorphism of methylene-tetrahydrofolate-reductase gene. This case was atypical because of the incomplete phenotype, development of complications in adulthood and the association of a rare compound heterozygous mutation of the CBS gene. PMID:18805305

  8. [Stroke and iridodonesis revealing a homocystinuria caused by a compound heterozygous mutation of cystathionine beta-synthase].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, R; Triquenot-Bagan, A; Quillard, M; Genevois, O; Hannequin, D

    2008-01-01

    Iridodonesis or tremulous iris is a clinical sign of ectopia lentis which is frequently associated with homocystinuria. We present a forty-two-year-old woman victim of a left middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke. The clinical examination found bilateral iridodonesis and laboratory tests showed an increased level of serum homocysteine and homocystinuria. Homocystinuria was caused by a compound heterozygous I278T and D444N mutation of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) gene and also a C667T heterozygous polymorphism of methylene-tetrahydrofolate-reductase gene. This case was atypical because of the incomplete phenotype, development of complications in adulthood and the association of a rare compound heterozygous mutation of the CBS gene.

  9. Renal transplantation experience in a patient with factor V Leiden homozygous, MTHFR C677T heterozygous, and PAI heterozygous mutation.

    PubMed

    Gülhan, Bora; Tavil, Betül; Gümrük, Fatma; Aki, Tuncay F; Topaloglu, Rezan

    2015-08-01

    Vascular complications are important causes of allograft loss in renal transplantation. A two and a half-month-old boy was diagnosed with posterior urethral valve and progressed to end-stage renal disease at eight yr of age. During the HD period, a central venous catheter was replaced three times for repeated thrombosis. The boy was found to be homozygous for FVL and heterozygous for both MTHFR (C677T) and PAI. At the age of 12, renal transplantation was performed from a deceased donor. Postoperative anticoagulation therapy was initiated with continuous intravenous administration of heparin at the dose of 10 IU/kg/h. HD was performed for the first three days. By the fourth day of transplantation, his urine output had increased gradually. Heparin infusion was continued for 18 days during hospitalization at the same dosage. Thereafter, he was discharged with LMWH. On the third month after transplantation, his serum creatinine level was 1.1 mg/dL and eGFR was 75.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2). He has still been using LMWH, and his eGFR was 78.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2) eight months after transplantation. Postoperative low-dose heparin treatment is a safe strategy for managing a patient with multiple thrombotic risk factors. PMID:25996881

  10. Identification of Nine New RAI1-Truncating Mutations in Smith-Magenis Syndrome Patients without 17p11.2 Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Dubourg, C.; Bonnet-Brilhault, F.; Toutain, A.; Mignot, C.; Jacquette, A.; Dieux, A.; Gérard, M.; Beaumont-Epinette, M.-P.; Julia, S.; Isidor, B.; Rossi, M.; Odent, S.; Bendavid, C.; Barthélémy, C.; Verloes, A.; David, V.

    2014-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is an intellectual disability syndrome with sleep disturbance, self-injurious behaviors and dysmorphic features. It is estimated to occur in 1/25,000 births, and in 90% of cases it is associated with interstitial deletions of chromosome 17p11.2. RAI1 (retinoic acid induced 1; OMIM 607642) mutations are the second most frequent molecular etiology, with this gene being located in the SMS locus at 17p11.2. Here, we report 9 new RAI1-truncating mutations in nonrelated individuals referred for molecular analysis due to a possible SMS diagnosis. None of these patients carried a 17p11.2 deletion. The 9 mutations include 2 nonsense mutations and 7 heterozygous frameshift mutations leading to protein truncation. All mutations map in exon 3 of RAI1 which codes for more than 98% of the protein. RAI1 regulates gene transcription, and its targets are themselves involved in transcriptional regulation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucide metabolisms, neurological development, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. We report the clinical features of the patients carrying these deleterious mutations in comparison with those of patients carrying 17p11.2 deletions. PMID:24715852

  11. Truncating mutations in APP cause a distinct neurological phenotype.

    PubMed

    Klein, Steven; Goldman, Alexander; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Bhakta, Viraj; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2016-09-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) gene have been implicated in early onset Alzheimer disease. These mutations alter protein structure to favor the pathologic production of Aβ. We report that homozygous nonsense mutations in APP are associated with decreased somatic growth, microcephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, thinning of the corpus callosum, and seizures. We compare the phenotype of this case to those reported in mouse models and demonstrate multiple similarities, strengthening the role of amyloid precursor protein in normal brain function and development. Ann Neurol 2016;80:456-460. PMID:27422356

  12. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia: a novel SLC19A2 compound heterozygous mutation in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Mozzillo, Enza; Melis, Daniela; Falco, Mariateresa; Fattorusso, Valentina; Taurisano, Roberta; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Franzese, Adriana

    2013-08-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by loss of function mutations in the SLC19A2 gene. TRMA is characterized by anemia, deafness, and diabetes. In some cases, optic atrophy or more rarely retinitis pigmentosa is noted. We now report two sisters, the eldest of which presented to a different hospital during childhood with sensorineural deafness, which was treated with a hearing prosthesis, insulin requiring diabetes, retinitis pigmentosa, optic atrophy, and macrocytic anemia. These features initially suggested a clinical diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome (WS). Therapy with thiamine was initiated which resulted in the resolution of the anemia. The younger sister, who was affected with sensorineural deafness, was referred to our hospital for non-autoimmune diabetes. She was found to have macrocytosis and ocular abnormalities. Because a diagnosis of TRMA was suspected, therapy with insulin and thiamine was started. Sequencing analysis of the SLC19A2 gene identified a compound heterozygous mutation p.Y81X/p.L457X (c.242insA/c.1370delT) in both sisters. Non-autoimmune diabetes associated with deafness and macrocytosis, without anemia, suggests a diagnosis of TRMA. Patients clinically diagnosed with WS with anemia and/or macrocytosis should be reevaluated for TRMA. PMID:23289844

  13. Ataxia-telangiectasia: Mutations in ATM cDNA detected by protein-truncation screening

    SciTech Connect

    Telatar, M.; Wang, Z.; Udar, N.

    1996-07-01

    We have examined the distal half of the ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) gene transcript for truncation mutations in 48 A-T affecteds. We found 21 mutations; 4 of the mutations were seen in more than one individual. Genotyping of the individuals sharing mutations, by using nearby microsatellite markers, established that three of the four groups shared common haplotypes, indicating that these were probably founder effects, not public mutations. The one public mutation was found in two American families, one of Ashkenazi Jewish background and the other not. Most truncations deleted the PI3-kinase domain, although some exceptions to this were found in patients with typical A-T phenotypes. All patients not previously known to be consanguineous were found to be compound heterozygotes when mutations could be identified - that is, normal and abnormal protein segments were seen on SDS-PAGE gels. All 48 patients gave RT-PCR products, indicating the presence of relatively stable mRNAs despite their mutations. These results suggest that few public mutations or hot spots can be expected in the A-T gene and that epidemiological studies of A-T carrier status and associated health risks will have to be designed around populations with frequent founder-effect mutations, despite the obvious limitations of this approach. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Identification of compound heterozygous mutations in GNPTG in three siblings of a Chinese family with mucolipidosis type III gamma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong; Yang, Kangjuan; Xu, Shujiang; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Zibo; Yuan, Mingxiong; Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Mugen; Wang, Qing K; Liu, Jing Yu

    2011-01-01

    Mucolipidosis III gamma is an autosomal recessive disorder with defective phosphorylation and trafficking of lysosomal enzymes. In a Chinese family with three siblings, linkage analysis revealed positive linkage of the family to GNPTG. Direct DNA sequence analysis identified two novel compound heterozygous mutations, c.471delC in exon 7 and IVS4-1G>C, in three patients. The two mutations cause frameshift and abnormal splicing, respectively, and represent the first series of GNPTG mutations in the Chinese population. PMID:20951619

  15. [Formation of para-Bombay phenotype caused by homozygous or heterozygous mutation of FUT1 gene].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zheng, Yan; Sun, Dong-Ni

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms for para-Bombay phenotype formation. The H antigen of these individuals were identified by serological techniques. The full coding region of alpha (1, 2) fucosyltransferase (FUT1) gene of these individuals was amplified by high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR product was identified by TOPO cloning sequencing. Analysis and comparison were used to explore the mechanisms of para-bombay phenotype formation in individuals. The results indicated that the full coding region of FUT1 DNA was successfully amplified by PCR and gel electrophoresis. DNA sequencing and analysis found that h1 (547-552delAG) existed in one chromosome and h4 (35C > T) existed in the other chromosome of NO.1 individual. Meantime, h1 (547-552delAG) was found in two chromosomes of NO.2 and NO.3 individual. It also means that FUT1 gene of NO.1 individual was h1h4 heterozygote, FUT1 gene of NO.2 and NO.3 individuals were h1h1 homozygote. It is concluded that homozygous and heterozygous mutation of FUT1 gene can lead to the formation of para-Bombay phenotype.

  16. Impaired water maze learning performance without altered dopaminergic function in mice heterozygous for the GDNF mutation.

    PubMed

    Gerlai, R; McNamara, A; Choi-Lundberg, D L; Armanini, M; Ross, J; Powell-Braxton, L; Phillips, H S

    2001-10-01

    Exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) exhibits potent survival-promoting effects on dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway that is implicated in Parkinson's disease and also protects neurons in forebrain ischemia of animal models. However, a role for endogenous GDNF in brain function has not been established. Although mice homozygous for a targeted deletion of the GDNF gene have been generated, these mice die within hours of birth because of deficits in kidney morphogenesis, and, thus, the effect of the absence of GDNF on brain function could not be studied. Herein, we sought to determine whether adult mice, heterozygous for a GDNF mutation on two different genetic backgrounds, demonstrate alterations in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system or in cognitive function. While both neurochemical and behavioural measures suggested that reduction of GDNF gene expression in the mutant mice does not alter the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system, it led to a significant and selective impairment of performance in the spatial version of the Morris water maze. A standard panel of blood chemistry tests and basic pathological analyses did not reveal alterations in the mutants that could account for the observed performance deficit. These results suggest that endogenous GDNF may not be critical for the development and functioning of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system but it plays an important role in cognitive abilities. PMID:11683907

  17. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-06-23

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A-producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  18. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D.; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D.; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A–producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  19. A novel compound heterozygous mutation in the GJB2 gene causing non-syndromic hearing loss in a family.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinjun; Liu, Youguo; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yajie; Xing, Guangqian; Cao, Xin

    2014-02-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene are responsible for up to 50% of cases of non-syndromic recessive hearing loss, with c.35delG, c.167delT and c.235delC being the predominant mutations in many world populations. However, a large number of rare mutations in this gene may also contribute to hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to conduct a clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with non-syndromic hearing loss. Sequence analysis of the GJB2 gene led to the identification of a novel compound heterozygous mutation c.257C>G (p.T86R)/c.605ins46 in two profoundly deaf siblings whose hearing parents were each heterozygous, either for the c.257C>G (paternal) or for the c.605ins46 (maternal) mutations. Both c.257C>G and c.605ins46 are rare GJB2 mutations that have previously been reported to segregate with autosomal recessive hearing loss exclusively in East Asian populations. To study the pathogenic effect of the compound heterozygous mutation, a three-dimensional model was constructed and Anolea mean force potential energy was predicted for a bioinformatic structural analysis. HEK293 cells were used to study the pathogenic effect of mutant connexin 26 proteins. The results suggested that the c.257C>G (p.T86R)/c.605ins46 mutations in the GJB2 gene provides a novel molecular explanation for the role of the GJB2 gene in hearing loss.

  20. Transcript analysis of CFTR frameshift mutations in lymphocytes using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique and the protein truncation test.

    PubMed

    Romey, M C; Tuffery, S; Desgeorges, M; Bienvenu, T; Demaille, J; Claustres, M

    1996-09-01

    mRNA transcripts of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene were analyzed from lymphocytes of two cystic fibrosis compound heterozygotes (394delTT/3195del6 and 1215delG/ 2423delG), of five related carriers heterozygous for one of these mutations, and of five normal individuals. After reverse transcription of total RNA and amplification by the polymerase chain reaction, fragments were investigated by sequencing and by the protein truncation test (PTT). The three frameshift mutants were correctly detected by PTT, as they introduced a premature termination codon resulting in shortened protein products. The PTT approach thus provides a simple and reliable alternative method for detecting frameshift, nonsense, or splice site mutations, and for ascertaining their putative effect on the reading frame of the mRNA. In addition, we have identified 6 alternatively spliced forms of CFTR mRNA, two of which (transcripts lacking 4 + 5 or 17B) have not been described previously.

  1. A novel frameshift mutation in BLM gene associated with high sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in heterozygous family members.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Ghada; Hadj Salem, Ikhlas; Masmoudi, Abderrahmen; Kallabi, Fakhri; Turki, Hamida; Fakhfakh, Faiza; Ayadi, Hamadi; Kamoun, Hassen

    2014-11-01

    The Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomic recessive disorder comprising a wide range of abnormalities, including stunted growth, immunodeficiency, sun sensitivity and increased frequency of various types of cancer. Bloom syndrome cells display a high level of genetic instability, including a 10-fold increase in the sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) level. Bloom syndrome arises through mutations in both alleles of the BLM gene, which was identified as a member of the RecQ helicase family. In this study, we screened a Tunisian family with three BS patients. Cytogenetic analysis showed several chromosomal aberrations, and an approximately 14-fold elevated SCE frequency in BS cells. A significant increase in SCE frequency was observed in some family members but not reaching the BS patients values, leading to suggest that this could be due to the heterozygous profile. Microsatellite genotyping using four fluorescent dye-labeled microsatellite markers revealed evidence of linkage to BLM locus and the healthy members, sharing higher SCE frequency, showed heterozygous haplotypes as expected. Additionally, the direct BLM gene sequencing identified a novel homozygous frameshift mutation c.3617-3619delAA (p.K1207fsX9) in BS patients and a heterozygous BLM mutation in the family members with higher SCE frequency. Our findings suggest that this latter mutation likely leads to a reduced BLM activity explaining the homologous recombination repair defect and, therefore, the increase in SCE. Based on the present data, the screening of this mutation could contribute to the rapid diagnosis of BS. The genetic confirmation of the mutation in BLM gene provides crucial information for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  2. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay was demonstrated in two hypofibrinogenemias caused by heterozygous nonsense mutations of FGG, Shizuoka III and Kanazawa II.

    PubMed

    Soya, Keisuke; Takezawa, Yuka; Okumura, Nobuo; Terasawa, Fumiko

    2013-10-01

    We report two novel hypofibrinogenemias, Shizuoka III and Kanazawa II, which are caused by heterozygous mutations in FGG. Shizuoka III showed c.147delT and 147_149insACA in FGG exon 3 and a subsequent frameshift mutation, resulting in mature protein γ23X (native protein: γ49X), and Kanazawa II showed c.1205G>A in FGG exon 9, resulting in γ376X (native protein: γ402X). To determine whether the truncated γ-chains, γ23X and γ376X, were synthesized and participated in the assembly of fibrinogen, mutant-type cDNA vectors were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Significant levels of mutant fibrinogen were not detected by ELISA in the culture media and cell lysates. Immunoblot analysis of cell lysates revealed that the mutant γ-chain of γ376X was observed but intact fibrinogen was not. On the other hand, mutant γ-chain was not observed in γ23X-expressing cells. To demonstrate the involvement of the mechanisms of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), we cloned wild- and mutant-type mini-genes containing γ23 or γ376 codon and transfected these into CHO cell lines in the absence or presence of cycloheximide as an NMD inhibitor. mRNA levels were determined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR in CHO cells. In the absence of cycloheximide, levels of mRNAs transcribed from the mutant gene were lower than from the wild-type gene whereas, in the presence of cycloheximide, levels of mRNAs transcribed from the mutant gene increased dose-dependently. Finally, these results demonstrated that mRNAs containing γ23X or γ376X are degraded by the NMD system and translation of the truncated γ-chain polypeptide decrease in patients' hepatocytes, resulting in hypofibrinogenemias.

  3. [Mutation spectrum of Gaucher disease in Tunisia: high frequency of N370S/Rec NciI compound heterozygous].

    PubMed

    Cherif, W; Ben Turkia, H; Tebib, N; Amaral, O; Ben Rhouma, F; Abdelmoula, M S; Azzouz, H; Caillaud, C; Sà Miranda, M-C; Abdelhak, S; Ben Dridi, M-F

    2007-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysosomal storage disorder, it results from the inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, the accumulation of its substrate causes many clinical manifestations. Since the discovery of GBA gene, more than 200 different mutations have been identified, but only handful mutations are recurrent (N370S, L444P and c.84insG). In order to determine the mutation spectrum in Tunisia, we performed recurrent mutation screening in ten unrelated Tunisian children with Gaucher disease. Screening of recurrent mutation by PCR/RFLP and direct sequencing, has shown that N370S is the most frequent mutation (6/20 mutant alleles, 30%), followed by recombinant allele (RecNciI) which is found in five patients (5/20 mutant alleles, 25%), the L444P mutation represent 20% (4/20 mutant alleles). Our findings revealed that five among ten studied patients, were compound heterozygous N370S/RecNciI (50%). The screening of these mutations provides a simple tool for molecular diagnosis of Gaucher disease in Tunisian patients and allows also genetic counselling for their family members.

  4. Rapid detection of translation-terminating mutations at the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene by direct protein truncation test

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Luut, R.; Khan, P.M.; Van Leeuwen, C.; Tops, C.; Roest, P.; Den Dunnen, J. )

    1994-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is usually associated with protein truncating mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The APC mutations are known to play a major role in colorectal carcinogensis. For the identification of protein truncating mutations of the APC gene, the authors developed a rapid, sensitive, and direct screening procedure. The technique is based on the in vitro transcription and translation of the genomic PCR products and is called the protein truncation test. Samples of DNA from individual FAP patients, members of a FAP family, colorectal tumors, and colorectal tumor-derived cell lines were used to show the effectiveness of this method. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Heterozygous M1V variant of ELA-2 gene mutation associated with G-CSF refractory severe congenital neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Setty, Bhuvana A; Yeager, Nicholas D; Bajwa, Rajinder P

    2011-09-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by maturation arrest at the promyelocyte/myelocyte phase in the bone marrow, absolute neutrophil count <0.5 × 10(9) /L and recurrent bacterial infections. Homozygous mutations of either HAX-1 or ELA-2 have been described. We report the case of a premature male infant with congenital neutropenia, associated with multiple infections, refractory to treatment with granulocyte colony stimulating factor who subsequently underwent matched sibling donor stem-cell transplant. He was found to be heterozygous for the M1V variant of the ELA-2 gene that we postulate to be causative for his severe neutropenia

  6. Effects of mutation, truncation, and temperature on the folding kinetics of a WW domain.

    PubMed

    Maisuradze, Gia G; Zhou, Rui; Liwo, Adam; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A

    2012-07-20

    The purpose of this work is to show how mutation, truncation, and change of temperature can influence the folding kinetics of a protein. This is accomplished by principal component analysis of molecular-dynamics-generated folding trajectories of the triple β-strand WW domain from formin binding protein 28 (FBP28) (Protein Data Bank ID: 1E0L) and its full-size, and singly- and doubly-truncated mutants at temperatures below and very close to the melting point. The reasons for biphasic folding kinetics [i.e., coexistence of slow (three-state) and fast (two-state) phases], including the involvement of a solvent-exposed hydrophobic cluster and another delocalized hydrophobic core in the folding kinetics, are discussed. New folding pathways are identified in free-energy landscapes determined in terms of principal components for full-size mutants. Three-state folding is found to be a main mechanism for folding the FBP28 WW domain and most of the full-size and truncated mutants. The results from the theoretical analysis are compared to those from experiment. Agreements and discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental results are discussed. Because of its importance in understanding protein kinetics and function, the diffusive mechanism by which the FBP28 WW domain and its full-size and truncated mutants explore their conformational space is examined in terms of the mean-square displacement and principal component analysis eigenvalue spectrum analyses. Subdiffusive behavior is observed for all studied systems. PMID:22560992

  7. Two novel compound heterozygous mutations in the BCKDHB gene that cause the intermittent form of maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Liming, Liu; Jiang, Li

    2015-12-01

    Intermittent maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a potentially life-threatening metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex. In contrast to classic MSUD, children with the intermittent form usually have an atypical clinical manifestation. Here, we describe the presenting symptoms and clinical course of a Chinese boy with intermittent MSUD. Mutation analysis identified two previously unreported mutations in exon 7 of the BCKDHB gene: c.767A > G (p.Y256C) and c.768C > G (p.Y256X); the parents were each heterozygous for one of these mutations. In silico analysis predicted Y256C probably affects protein structure; Y256X leads to a premature stop codon. This case demonstrates intermittent MSUD should be suspected in cases with symptoms of recurrent encephalopathy, especially ataxia or marked drowsiness, which usually present after the neonatal period and in conjunction with infection. symmetrical basal ganglia damage but normal myelination in the posterior limb will assist differential diagnosis; alloisoleucine is a useful diagnostic marker and mutation analysis may be of prognostic value. These novel mutations Y256C and Y256X result in the clinical manifestation of a variant form of MSUD, expanding the mutation spectrum of this disease.

  8. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Deik, A.; Johannes, B.; Rucker, J. C.; Sánchez, E.; Brodie, S. E.; Deegan, E.; Landy, K.; Kajiwara, Y.; Scelsa, S.; Saunders-Pullman, R.

    2014-01-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher–Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher–Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher–Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient’s genomic DNA from coding exons 26–29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases. PMID:25267340

  9. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia.

    PubMed

    Deik, A; Johannes, B; Rucker, J C; Sánchez, E; Brodie, S E; Deegan, E; Landy, K; Kajiwara, Y; Scelsa, S; Saunders-Pullman, R; Paisán-Ruiz, C

    2014-12-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher-Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher-Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher-Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient's genomic DNA from coding exons 26-29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases.

  10. Two novel compound heterozygous mutations in the BCKDHB gene that cause the intermittent form of maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Liming, Liu; Jiang, Li

    2015-12-01

    Intermittent maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a potentially life-threatening metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex. In contrast to classic MSUD, children with the intermittent form usually have an atypical clinical manifestation. Here, we describe the presenting symptoms and clinical course of a Chinese boy with intermittent MSUD. Mutation analysis identified two previously unreported mutations in exon 7 of the BCKDHB gene: c.767A > G (p.Y256C) and c.768C > G (p.Y256X); the parents were each heterozygous for one of these mutations. In silico analysis predicted Y256C probably affects protein structure; Y256X leads to a premature stop codon. This case demonstrates intermittent MSUD should be suspected in cases with symptoms of recurrent encephalopathy, especially ataxia or marked drowsiness, which usually present after the neonatal period and in conjunction with infection. symmetrical basal ganglia damage but normal myelination in the posterior limb will assist differential diagnosis; alloisoleucine is a useful diagnostic marker and mutation analysis may be of prognostic value. These novel mutations Y256C and Y256X result in the clinical manifestation of a variant form of MSUD, expanding the mutation spectrum of this disease. PMID:26239723

  11. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia.

    PubMed

    Deik, A; Johannes, B; Rucker, J C; Sánchez, E; Brodie, S E; Deegan, E; Landy, K; Kajiwara, Y; Scelsa, S; Saunders-Pullman, R; Paisán-Ruiz, C

    2014-12-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher-Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher-Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher-Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient's genomic DNA from coding exons 26-29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases. PMID:25267340

  12. The rate of mutation and the homozygous and heterozygous mutational effects for competitive viability: a long-term experiment with Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Chavarrías, D; López-Fanjul, C; García-Dorado, A

    2001-01-01

    The effect of 250 generations of mutation accumulation (MA) on the second chromosome competitive viability of Drosophila melanogaster was analyzed both in homozygous and heterozygous conditions. We used full-sib MA lines, where selection hampers the accumulation of severely deleterious mutations but is ineffective against mildly deleterious ones. A large control population was simultaneously evaluated. Competitive viability scores, unaffected by the expression of mutations in heterozygosis, were obtained relative to a Cy/L(2) genotype. The rate of decline in mean DeltaM approximately 0.1% was small. However, that of increase in variance DeltaV approximately 0.08 x 10(-3) was similar to the values obtained in previous experiments when severely deleterious mutations were excluded. The corresponding estimates of the mutation rate lambda > or = 0.01 and the average effect of mutations E(s) < or = 0.08 are in good agreement with Bateman-Mukai and minimum distance estimates for noncompetitive viability obtained from the same MA lines after 105 generations. Thus, competitive and noncompetitive viability show similar mutational properties. The regression estimate of the degree of dominance for mild-to-moderate deleterious mutations was approximately 0.3, suggesting that the pertinent value for new unselected mutations should be somewhat smaller. PMID:11404332

  13. Similar patterns of clonally expanded somatic mtDNA mutations in the colon of heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and ageing humans.

    PubMed

    Baines, Holly L; Stewart, James B; Stamp, Craig; Zupanic, Anze; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Turnbull, Douglass M; Greaves, Laura C

    2014-07-01

    Clonally expanded mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations resulting in focal respiratory chain deficiency in individual cells are proposed to contribute to the ageing of human tissues that depend on adult stem cells for self-renewal; however, the consequences of these mutations remain unclear. A good animal model is required to investigate this further; but it is unknown whether mechanisms for clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations, and the mutational spectra, are similar between species. Here we show that mice, heterozygous for a mutation disrupting the proof-reading activity of mtDNA polymerase (PolgA(+/mut)) resulting in an increased mtDNA mutation rate, accumulate clonally expanded mtDNA point mutations in their colonic crypts with age. This results in focal respiratory chain deficiency, and by 81 weeks of age these animals exhibit a similar level and pattern of respiratory chain deficiency to 70-year-old human subjects. Furthermore, like in humans, the mtDNA mutation spectrum appears random and there is an absence of selective constraints. Computer simulations show that a random genetic drift model of mtDNA clonal expansion can accurately model the data from the colonic crypts of wild-type, PolgA(+/mut) animals, and humans, providing evidence for a similar mechanism for clonal expansion of mtDNA point mutations between these mice and humans.

  14. Phenotypic Characterization of Mice Heterozygous for a Null Mutation of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liqun; Picker, Jonathan D.; Schaevitz, Laura R.; Tsai, Guochuan; Feng, Jiamin; Jiang, Zhichun; Chu, Hillary C.; Basu, Alo C.; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne; Coyle, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. Disturbed glutamate signaling resulting in hypofunction of NMDA receptors has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) hydrolyzes N-acetyl-alpha L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA). NAAG is a neuropeptide that is an NMDA receptor antagonist as well as an agonist for the metabotropic glutamate receptor-3 (mGluR3), which inhibits glutamate release. The aggregate effect of NAAG is thus to attenuate NMDA receptor activation. To manipulate the expression of GCP II, loxP sites were inserted flanking exon 1 and 2, which were excised by crossing with a Cre-expressing mouse. The mice heterozygous for this deletion showed a 50% reduction in the expression level of protein and functional activity of GCP II in brain samples. Heterozygous mutant crosses did not yield any homozygous null animals at birth or as embryos (N >200 live births and fetuses). These data are consistent with the previous report that GCP II homozygous mutant mice generated by removing exons 9 and 10 of GCP II gene were embryonically lethal and confirm our hypothesis that GCP II plays an essential role early in embryonic development. Heterozygous mice, however, developed normally to adulthood and exhibited increased locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, and a subtle cognitive deficit in working memory. PMID:19347959

  15. Polyneuropathy in a young Belgian patient: A novel heterozygous mutation in the WNK1/HSN2 gene.

    PubMed

    de Filette, Jeroen; Hasaerts, Danielle; Seneca, Sara; Gheldof, Alexander; Stouffs, Katrien; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Velkeniers, Brigitte

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) is a rare condition, predominantly affecting the peripheral sensory nervous system, although variable motor and dysautonomic symptoms can be present. At least 7 clinical types of HSAN have been described, and different genetic mutations have been identified for each of these. HSAN IIA (OMIM #201300) is characterized by loss of pain and loss of temperature and touch sensation, with onset usually before the first decade. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive.(1) The causative gene, WNK1/HSN2, is located on locus 12p13.33 and is an isoform of the WNK1 (lysine deficient protein kinase 1) gene, which contains the HSN2 exon.(2,3) We describe 2 new heterozygous mutations in the WNK1/HSN2 gene in a Belgian patient with early-onset sensory polyneuropathy.

  16. Polyneuropathy in a young Belgian patient: A novel heterozygous mutation in the WNK1/HSN2 gene.

    PubMed

    de Filette, Jeroen; Hasaerts, Danielle; Seneca, Sara; Gheldof, Alexander; Stouffs, Katrien; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Velkeniers, Brigitte

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) is a rare condition, predominantly affecting the peripheral sensory nervous system, although variable motor and dysautonomic symptoms can be present. At least 7 clinical types of HSAN have been described, and different genetic mutations have been identified for each of these. HSAN IIA (OMIM #201300) is characterized by loss of pain and loss of temperature and touch sensation, with onset usually before the first decade. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive.(1) The causative gene, WNK1/HSN2, is located on locus 12p13.33 and is an isoform of the WNK1 (lysine deficient protein kinase 1) gene, which contains the HSN2 exon.(2,3) We describe 2 new heterozygous mutations in the WNK1/HSN2 gene in a Belgian patient with early-onset sensory polyneuropathy. PMID:27066579

  17. Novel Compound Heterozygous Spatacsin Mutations in a Greek Kindred with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia SPG11 and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Fraidakis, Matthew J; Brunetti, Maura; Blackstone, Craig; Filippi, Massimo; Chiò, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    SPG11 belongs to the autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) and presents during childhood or puberty with a complex clinical phenotype encompassing learning difficulties, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, amyotrophy, and mental retardation. We hereby present the case of a 30-year-old female patient with complex autosomal recessive HSP with thinning of the corpus callosum (TCC) and dementia that was compound heterozygous with two novel mutations in the SPG11 gene. Sequence analysis of the SPG11 gene revealed two novel mutations in a compound heterozygous state in the index patient (c.2431C>T/p.Gln811Ter and c.6755_6756insT/p.Glu2252Aspfs*88). MRI showed abnormal TCC, white matter (WM) hyperintensities periventricularly, and the 'ears of the lynx' sign. Diffusion tensor imaging showed a mild-to-moderate decrease in fractional anisotropy and an increase in mean diffusivity in WM compared to age-matched controls, while magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed abnormal findings in affected WM with a decrease in N-acetyl-aspartate in WM regions of interest. This is the first SPG11 kindred from the Greek population to be reported in the medical literature. PMID:27318863

  18. A novel homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation implicated in retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Carrigan, Matthew; Humphries, Pete; Palfi, Arpad; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background The GNAT1 gene encodes the α subunit of the rod transducin protein, a key element in the rod phototransduction cascade. Variants in GNAT1 have been implicated in stationary night-blindness in the past, but unlike other proteins in the same pathway, it has not previously been implicated in retinitis pigmentosa. Methods A panel of 182 retinopathy-associated genes was sequenced to locate disease-causing mutations in patients with inherited retinopathies. Results Sequencing revealed a novel homozygous truncating mutation in the GNAT1 gene in a patient with significant pigmentary disturbance and constriction of visual fields, a presentation consistent with retinitis pigmentosa. This is the first report of a patient homozygous for a complete loss-of-function GNAT1 mutation. The clinical data from this patient provide definitive evidence of retinitis pigmentosa with late onset in addition to the lifelong night-blindness that would be expected from a lack of transducin function. Conclusion These data suggest that some truncating GNAT1 variants can indeed cause a recessive, mild, late-onset retinal degeneration in human beings rather than just stationary night-blindness as reported previously, with notable similarities to the phenotype of the Gnat1 knockout mouse. PMID:26472407

  19. Nateglinide is Effective for Diabetes Mellitus with Reactive Hypoglycemia in a Child with a Compound Heterozygous ABCC8 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Yorifuji, Tohru; Kanno, Junko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2012-07-01

    ABCC8 encodes the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) subunits of the beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel playing a critical role in the regulation of insulin secretion, and inactivating mutations in ABCC8 cause congenital hyperinsulinism. Recently, ABCC8 inactivating mutations were reported to be involved in the development of diabetes mellitus later in life. We report a girl who was born macrosomic with transient hypoglycemia and thereafter developed diabetes mellitus accompanied by severe reactive hypoglycemia at the age of 11 yr. An OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) revealed hyperglycemia due to poor early insulin response and subsequent hypoglycemia due to delayed prolonged insulin secretion. Hypoglycemia was improved by the combination of nateglinide, which stimulates early insulin secretion, and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, voglibose. Sequencing of the ABCC8 identified a compound heterozygous mutation (R1420H/F591fs604X), suggesting that this mutation may alter regulation of insulin secretion with advancing age, leading to diabetes mellitus with reactive hypoglycemia from hyperinsulinism. Therefore, long-term follow-up and periodic OGTTs are important for early detection of insulin dysregulation in congenital hyperinsulinism patients carrying the ABCC8 mutation, even though hypoglycemia resolves spontaneously during infancy. Furthermore, nateglinide may be useful therapeutically in the treatment of not only diabetes mellitus but also reactive hypoglycemia. PMID:23926410

  20. New Codanin-1 Gene Mutations in a Italian Patient with Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type I and Heterozygous Beta-Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    D'Alcamo, Elena; Agrigento, V; Pitrolo, L; Sclafani, S; Barone, R; Calvaruso, G; Buffa, V; Maggio, A

    2016-06-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with macrocytic anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis, iron overloading and characterized by abnormal chromatin ultrastructure in erythroblasts such as internuclear chromatin bridges, spongy heterochromatin and invagination of the nuclear membrane. A 58-year-old Causasian man with chronic hemolytic anemia, heterozygous for β (+) -globin IVS1, nt110 G>A mutation (causing abnormal alpha:beta globin chain ratio) showed clinical, laboratory and hematological features suggesting diagnosis of CDA1. Sequence analysis of CDA-related genes revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel mutations in the CDAN1 gene: a frameshift mutation 3367 del 4 (TTAG) in exon 25 and a missense mutation c.1811 G>T in exon 11 causing an aminoacid change from glycine to valine at codon 565 (G565V). One of the propositus' brothers showed the same gene mutations. As the CDA1 can mimic thalassemia, a frequent misdiagnosis is possible especially in countries where the prevalence of thalassemia is high. A strong clinical suspicion in patients who do not reveal a clear genetic basis for presumed thalassemia may help clinch the correct diagnosis. PMID:27408412

  1. Truncation and microdeletion of EVC/EVC2 with missense mutation of EFCAB7 in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tran Quynh Nhu; Saitoh, Makiko; Trinh, Huu Tung; Doan, Nguyen Minh Thien; Mizuno, Yoko; Seki, Masafumi; Sato, Yusuke; Ogawa, Seishi; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a ciliopathy with cardiac anomalies, disproportionate short stature, polydactyly, dystrophic nails and oral defects. To obtain further insight into the genetics of EvC, we screened EVC/EVC2 mutations in eight Vietnamese EvC patients. All the patients had a congenital heart defect with atypical oral and/or skeletal abnormalities. One had compound heterozygous EVC2 mutations: a novel mutation c.769G > T-p.E177X in exon 6 inherited from father and another previously reported c.2476C > T-p.R826X mutation in exon 14 inherited from mother. The EVC2 mRNA expression level was significantly lower in the patient and her parents compared to controls. Another case had a novel heterozygous EVC mutation (c.1717C > G-p.S572X) in exon 12, inherited from his father. Of note, the mother without any EVC mutation on Sanger sequencing showed a lower expression level of EVC mRNA compared with controls. SNP array analysis revealed that the patient and mother had a heterozygous 16.4 kb deletion in EVC. This patient also had a heterozygous novel variant in exon 9 of EFCAB7 (c.1171 T > C-p.Y391H), inherited from his father. The atypical cardiac phenotype of this patient and the father suggested that EFCAB7 may modify the phenotype by interacting with EVC. In conclusion, we detected two novel nonsense mutations and a partial deletion of EVC/EVC2 in two Vietnamese families with EvC. Moreover, we found in one family a missense mutation of EFCAB7, a possible modifier gene in EvC and its related disorders.

  2. Truncating mutation in the autophagy gene UVRAG confers oncogenic properties and chemosensitivity in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    He, Shanshan; Zhao, Zhen; Yang, Yongfei; O'Connell, Douglas; Zhang, Xiaowei; Oh, Soohwan; Ma, Binyun; Lee, Joo-Hyung; Zhang, Tian; Varghese, Bino; Yip, Janae; Dolatshahi Pirooz, Sara; Li, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Li, Guo-Min; Ellen Martin, Sue; Machida, Keigo; Liang, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy-related factors are implicated in metabolic adaptation and cancer metastasis. However, the role of autophagy factors in cancer progression and their effect in treatment response remain largely elusive. Recent studies have shown that UVRAG, a key autophagic tumour suppressor, is mutated in common human cancers. Here we demonstrate that the cancer-related UVRAG frameshift (FS), which does not result in a null mutation, is expressed as a truncated UVRAGFS in colorectal cancer (CRC) with microsatellite instability (MSI), and promotes tumorigenesis. UVRAGFS abrogates the normal functions of UVRAG, including autophagy, in a dominant-negative manner. Furthermore, expression of UVRAGFS can trigger CRC metastatic spread through Rac1 activation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, independently of autophagy. Interestingly, UVRAGFS expression renders cells more sensitive to standard chemotherapy regimen due to a DNA repair defect. These results identify UVRAG as a new MSI target gene and provide a mechanism for UVRAG participation in CRC pathogenesis and treatment response. PMID:26234763

  3. Homozygosity for a novel truncating mutation confirms TBX15 deficiency as the cause of Cousin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dikoglu, Esra; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Ozlem; Utine, Gulen Eda; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Boduroglu, Koray; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Unger, Sheila

    2013-12-01

    Cousin syndrome, also called pelviscapular dysplasia (OMIM 260660), is characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and multiple skeletal anomalies. Following its description in two sibs in 1982, no new cases have been observed until the observation of two unrelated cases in 2008 who were homozygous for frameshift mutations in TBX15. We investigated an adult individual with short stature, a complex craniofacial dysmorphism, malformed and rotated ears, short neck, elbow contractures, hypoacusis, and hypoplasia of scapula and pelvis on radiographs. We identified homozygosity for a novel nonsense mutation (c.841C>T) in TBX15 predicted to cause a premature stop (p.Arg281*) with truncation of the protein. This observation confirms that Cousin syndrome is a consistent and clinically recognizable phenotype caused by loss of function of TBX15.

  4. De novo RYR1 heterozygous mutation (I4898T) causing lethal core-rod myopathy in twins.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Lain, Aurelio; Husson, Isabelle; Monnier, Nicole; Farnoux, Caroline; Brochier, Guy; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Beuvin, Maud; Viou, Mait; Manéré, Linda; Claeys, Kristl G; Fardeau, Michel; Lunardi, Joël; Voit, Thomas; Romero, Norma Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    "Core-rod myopathy" is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by the presence of "cores" and "rods" in distinct locations in the same or different muscle fibres. This association is linked currently to mutations in RYR1, NEB and ACTA1 genes. We report identical twins who presented with polyhydramnios and loss of fetal motility during pregnancy; hypotonia, arthrogryposis and swallowing impairment at birth; need of immediate respiratory support and death at 27 and 50 days of life. Muscle biopsies, performed at 27 days of life in twin 1 and at 49 days in twin 2, showed the presence of separate cores and rods in the muscle fibres, both at light and electron microscopy. The molecular analysis showed a heterozygous de novo mutation (Ile4898Thr) of the RYR1 gene. The molecular study of ACTA1, TMP2 and TMP3 genes did not show abnormalities. This is the first report of a lethal form of congenital "core-rod myopathy". The mutation Ile4898Thr has been previously described in central core disease but not in core-rod myopathy. The report enlarges the phenotypic spectrum of "core-rod myopathy" and highlights the morphological variability associated to special RYR1 mutations. PMID:20888934

  5. Novel heterozygous OTX2 mutations and whole gene deletions in anophthalmia, microphthalmia and coloboma.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Alexander; Bakrania, Preeti; Bunyan, David J; Osborne, Robert J; Crolla, John A; Salt, Alison; Ayuso, Carmen; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Abou-Rayyah, Y; Collin, J Richard O; Robinson, David; Ragge, Nicola

    2008-11-01

    Severe ocular malformations, including anophthalmia-microphthalmia (AM), are responsible for around 25% of severe visual impairment in childhood. Recurrent interstitial deletions of 14q22-23 are associated with AM and a wide range of extra-ocular phenotypes including brain anomalies. The homeobox gene OTX2 is located at 14q22.3 and has recently been identified as mutated in AM patients. Eight human OTX2 mutations have been reported in subjects with severe eye malformations, including AM, and variable developmental delay. We screened a novel AM cohort for mutations and deletions in OTX2, and identified four new mutations in six individuals and two cases of whole gene deletions. Our data suggest that OTX2 mutations and deletions account for 2-3% of AM cases.

  6. The clinical picture of the Börjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome in males and heterozygous females with PHF6 mutations.

    PubMed

    Turner, G; Lower, K M; White, S M; Delatycki, M; Lampe, A K; Wright, M; Smith, J Clayton; Kerr, B; Schelley, S; Hoyme, H E; De Vries, B B A; Kleefstra, T; Grompe, M; Cox, B; Gecz, J; Partington, M

    2004-03-01

    The usual description of the Börjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (BFLS) is that of a rare, X-linked, partially dominant condition with severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, microcephaly, coarse facial features, long ears, short stature, obesity, gynecomastia, tapering fingers, and shortened toes. Recently, mutations have been identified in the PHF6 gene in nine families with this syndrome. The clinical history and physical findings in the affected males reveal that the phenotype is milder and more variable than previously described and evolves with age. Generally, in the first year, the babies are floppy, with failure to thrive, big ears, and small external genitalia. As schoolboys, the picture is one of learning problems, moderate short stature, with emerging truncal obesity and gynecomastia. Head circumferences are usually normal, and macrocephaly may be seen. Big ears and small genitalia remain. The toes are short and fingers tapered and malleable. In late adolescence and adult life, the classically described heavy facial appearance emerges. Some heterozygous females show milder clinical features such as tapering fingers and shortened toes. Twenty percent have significant learning problems, and 95% have skewed X inactivation. We conclude that this syndrome may be underdiagnosed in males in their early years and missed altogether in isolated heterozygous females.

  7. Compound heterozygous mutations in NEK8 in siblings with end-stage renal disease with hepatic and cardiac anomalies.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Grochowski, Christopher M; Gilbert, Melissa A; Falsey, Alexandra M; Coleman, Karlene; Romero, Rene; Loomes, Kathleen M; Piccoli, David A; Devoto, Marcella; Spinner, Nancy B

    2016-03-01

    We studied two brothers who presented in the newborn period with cardiac, renal, and hepatic anomalies that were initially suggestive of ALGS, although no mutations in JAG1 or NOTCH2 were identified. Exome sequencing demonstrated compound heterozygous mutations in the NEK8 gene (Never in mitosis A-related Kinase 8), a ciliary kinase indispensable for cardiac and renal development based on murine studies. The mutations included a c.2069_2070insC variant (p.Ter693LeufsTer86), and a c.1043C>T variant (p.Thr348Met) in the highly conserved RCC1 (Regulation of Chromosome Condensation 1) domain. The RCC1 domain is crucial for localization of the NEK8 protein to the centrosomes and cilia. Mutations in NEK8 have been previously reported in three fetuses (from a single family) with renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia 2 (RHPD2), similar to Ivemark syndrome, and in three individuals with nephronophthisis (NPHP9). This is the third report of disease-causing mutations in the NEK8 gene in humans and only the second describing multi-organ involvement. The clinical features we describe differ from those in the previously published report in that (1) a pancreatic phenotype was not observed in the individuals reported here, (2) there were more prominent cardiac findings, (consistent with observations in murine models), and (3) we observed bile duct hypoplasia rather than ductal plate malformation. The patients reported here expand our understanding of the NEK8-associated phenotype. Our findings highlight the variable phenotypic expressivity and the spectrum of clinical manifestations due to mutations in the NEK8 gene. PMID:26697755

  8. A C-terminal truncated mutation of spr-3 gene extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Sun, Ruilin; Yao, Minghui; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Zhugang; Fei, Jian

    2013-07-01

    The lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans is determined by various genetic and environmental factors. In this paper, spr-3, a C. elegans homologous gene of the mammalian neural restrictive silencing factor (NRSF/REST), is reported to be an important gene regulating lifespan of C. elegans. A deletion mutation of spr-3, spr-3(ok2525), or RNAi inhibition of spr-3 expression led to the short lifespan phenotype in C. elegans. However, a nonsense mutation of spr-3, spr-3(by108), increased the lifespan by 26% when compared with that of wild-type nematode. The spr-3(by108) also showed increased resistance to environmental stress. The spr-3(by108) mutated gene encodes a C-terminal truncated protein with a structure comparable with the REST4, a splice variant of the NRSF/REST in mammalian. The long lifespan phenotype of spr-3(by108) mutant is confirmed as a gain of function and dependent on normal functions of daf-16 and glp-1. The lifespan of the spr-3(by108) can be synergistically enhanced by inducing a mutation in daf-2. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the expression of daf-16 as well as its target gene sod-3, mtl-1, and sip-1 was up-regulated in the spr-3(by108) mutant. These results would be helpful to further understand the complex function of NRSF/REST gene in mammalian, especially in the aging process and longevity determination. PMID:23692984

  9. A truncating mutation in Alzheimer's disease inactivates neuroligin-1 synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Tristán-Clavijo, Enriqueta; Camacho-Garcia, Rafael J; Robles-Lanuza, Estefanía; Ruiz, Agustín; van der Zee, Julie; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Hernandez, Isabel; Martinez-Mir, Amalia; Scholl, Francisco G

    2015-12-01

    Neuroligins (NLs) are cell-adhesion proteins that regulate synapse formation and function. Neuroligin 1 (NL1) promotes the formation of glutamatergic synapses and mediates long-term potentiation in mouse models. Thus, altered NL1 function could mediate the synaptic and memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we describe a frameshift mutation, c.875_876insTT, in the neuroligin 1 gene (NLGN1) in a patient with AD and familial history of AD. The insertion generates a premature stop codon in the extracellular domain of NL1 (p.Thr271fs). Expression of mutant NL1 shows accumulation of truncated NL1 proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. In hippocampal neurons, the p.Thr271fs mutation abolishes the ability of NL1 to promote the formation of glutamatergic synapses. Our data support a role for inactivating mutations in NLGN1 in AD. Previous studies have reported rare mutations in X-linked NLGNL3 and NLGNL4 genes in patients with autism, which result in the inactivation of the mutant alleles. Therefore, together with a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, altered NL function could underlie the molecular mechanisms associated with brain diseases in the elderly.

  10. Truncating mutations in LRP4 lead to a prenatal lethal form of Cenani-Lenz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lindy, Amanda S; Bupp, Caleb P; McGee, Stephen J; Steed, Erin; Stevenson, Roger E; Basehore, Monica J; Friez, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Cenani-Lenz syndrome (CLS) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia that results in malformations of the distal limb, renal anomalies, and characteristic facies. In 2010, this condition was found to be caused by mutations in LRP4, a member of the low-density lipoprotein family of receptors. LRP4 has been shown to antagonize LRP5/LRP6 activation of WNT and β-catenin signaling. Loss of LRP4 function leads to excessive Wnt and β-catenin signaling in the limb bud, which causes abnormal limb development. The large majority of patients with CLS reported in the literature have splicing and missense mutations, which result in syndactyly, oligodactyly, and minor renal malformations. More recently, a patient with CLS has been identified with a homozygous nonsense mutation and a more severe presentation of findings typically associated with this condition. Here we present two sibling fetuses with a prenatal lethal presentation of mesomelic limb reductions, oligosyndactyly, genitourinary malformation and compound heterozygosity for two novel truncating mutations in LRP4. These findings lend further support to the CLS genotype-phenotype correlation presented in recent publications.

  11. [Neonatal renal vein thrombosis in a heterozygous carrier of both factor V Leiden and the MTHFR gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Wannes, S; Soua, H; Ghanmi, S; Braham, H; Hassine, M; Hamza, H A; Ben Hamouda, H; Sfar, M-T

    2012-04-01

    Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is a rare but potentially serious neonatal disease. Its epidemiology and its clinical and biological expression are currently well known, but its etiological exploration, like that of venous thromboembolism, is increasingly complex. Perinatal risk factors such as prematurity, dehydration, and birth asphyxia have lost their direct accountability at the expense of their interaction with constitutional disorders of hemostasis. We report a case of RVT in a newborn who was a heterozygous carrier of both factor V Leiden and the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutation. We recall the clinical and epidemiological characteristics. A search for inborn blood coagulation disorders should be systematic in the newborn infant with venous thrombosis because of the risk of recurrence, taking into account perinatal factors and maternal thrombophilia (especially if RVT is established during the prenatal period).

  12. Heterozygous M1V variant of ELA-2 gene mutation associated with G-CSF refractory severe congenital neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Setty, Bhuvana A; Yeager, Nicholas D; Bajwa, Rajinder P

    2011-09-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by maturation arrest at the promyelocyte/myelocyte phase in the bone marrow, absolute neutrophil count <0.5 × 10(9) /L and recurrent bacterial infections. Homozygous mutations of either HAX-1 or ELA-2 have been described. We report the case of a premature male infant with congenital neutropenia, associated with multiple infections, refractory to treatment with granulocyte colony stimulating factor who subsequently underwent matched sibling donor stem-cell transplant. He was found to be heterozygous for the M1V variant of the ELA-2 gene that we postulate to be causative for his severe neutropenia PMID:21618407

  13. Osteogenesis imperfecta Type VI with severe bony deformities caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in SERPINF1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Sohn, Young Bae; Kim, Su Jin; Maeng, Se Hyun; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2013-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by bone fragility, frequent fractures, and low bone mass. Dominantly inherited COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutations appear to be causative in the majority of OI types, but rare recessively inherited genes have also been reported. Recently, SERPINF1 has been reported as another causative gene in OI type VI. To date, only eight SERPINF1 mutations have been reported and all are homozygous. Our patient showed no abnormalities at birth, frequent fractures, osteopenia, and poor response on pamidronate therapy. At the time of her most recent evaluation, she was 8 yr old, and could not walk independently due to frequent lower-extremity fractures, resulting in severe deformity. No clinical signs were seen of hearing impairment, blue sclera, or dentinogenesis imperfecta. In this study, we describe the clinical and radiological findings of one Korean patient with novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.77dupC and c.421dupC) of SERPINF1.

  14. Osteogenesis imperfecta Type VI with severe bony deformities caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in SERPINF1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Sohn, Young Bae; Kim, Su Jin; Maeng, Se Hyun; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2013-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by bone fragility, frequent fractures, and low bone mass. Dominantly inherited COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutations appear to be causative in the majority of OI types, but rare recessively inherited genes have also been reported. Recently, SERPINF1 has been reported as another causative gene in OI type VI. To date, only eight SERPINF1 mutations have been reported and all are homozygous. Our patient showed no abnormalities at birth, frequent fractures, osteopenia, and poor response on pamidronate therapy. At the time of her most recent evaluation, she was 8 yr old, and could not walk independently due to frequent lower-extremity fractures, resulting in severe deformity. No clinical signs were seen of hearing impairment, blue sclera, or dentinogenesis imperfecta. In this study, we describe the clinical and radiological findings of one Korean patient with novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.77dupC and c.421dupC) of SERPINF1. PMID:23853499

  15. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 4H Resulting from Compound Heterozygous Mutations in FGD4 from Nonconsanguineous Korean Families.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Young Se; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Hye Jin; Hong, Young Bin; Koo, Heasoo; Smith, Alec S T; Kim, Deok-Ho; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2015-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4H (CMT4H) is an autosomal recessive demyelinating subtype of peripheral enuropathies caused by mutations in the FGD4 gene. Most CMT4H patients are in consanguineous Mediterranean families characterized by early onset and slow progression. We identified two CMT4H patients from a Korean CMT cohort, and performed a detailed genetic and clinical analysis in both cases. Both patients from nonconsanguineous families showed characteristic clinical manifestations of CMT4H including early onset, scoliosis, areflexia, and slow disease progression. Exome sequencing revealed novel compound heterozygous mutations in FGD4 as the underlying cause in both families (p.Arg468Gln and c.1512-2A>C in FC73, p.Met345Thr and c.2043+1G>A (p.Trp663Trpfs*30) in FC646). The missense mutations were located in highly conserved RhoGEF and PH domains which were predicted to be pathogenic in nature by in silico modeling. The CMT4H occurrence frequency was calculated to 0.7% in the Korean demyelinating CMT patients. This study is the first report of CMT4H in Korea. FGD4 assay could be considered as a means of molecular diagnosis for sporadic cases of demyelinating CMT with slow progression.

  16. POC1A truncation mutation causes a ciliopathy in humans characterized by primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Shamseldin, Hanan E; Noche, Ramil R; Sunker, Asma; Alshammari, Muneera J; Al-Sheddi, Tarfa; Adly, Nouran; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Megason, Sean G; Al-Husain, Muneera; Al-Mohanna, Futwan; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2012-08-10

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a phenotype characterized by profound growth retardation that is prenatal in onset. Significant strides have been made in the last few years toward improved understanding of the molecular underpinning of the limited growth that characterizes the embryonic and postnatal development of PD individuals. These include impaired mitotic mechanics, abnormal IGF2 expression, perturbed DNA-damage response, defective spliceosomal machinery, and abnormal replication licensing. In three families affected by a distinct form of PD, we identified a founder truncating mutation in POC1A. This gene is one of two vertebrate paralogs of POC1, which encodes one of the most abundant proteins in the Chlamydomonas centriole proteome. Cells derived from the index individual have abnormal mitotic mechanics with multipolar spindles, in addition to clearly impaired ciliogenesis. siRNA knockdown of POC1A in fibroblast cells recapitulates this ciliogenesis defect. Our findings highlight a human ciliopathy syndrome caused by deficiency of a major centriolar protein.

  17. Truncating mutations of MAGEL2 cause Prader-Willi phenotypes and autism.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Christian P; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Xia, Fan; Potocki, Lorraine; Gripp, Karen W; Zhang, Baili; Peters, Brock A; McElwain, Mark A; Drmanac, Radoje; Beaudet, Arthur L; Caskey, C Thomas; Yang, Yaping

    2013-11-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by the absence of paternally expressed, maternally silenced genes at 15q11-q13. We report four individuals with truncating mutations on the paternal allele of MAGEL2, a gene within the PWS domain. The first subject was ascertained by whole-genome sequencing analysis for PWS features. Three additional subjects were identified by reviewing the results of exome sequencing of 1,248 cases in a clinical laboratory. All four subjects had autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disability and a varying degree of clinical and behavioral features of PWS. These findings suggest that MAGEL2 is a new gene causing complex ASD and that MAGEL2 loss of function can contribute to several aspects of the PWS phenotype.

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies de novo heterozygous CAV1 mutations associated with a novel neonatal onset lipodystrophy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Kircher, Martin; Del Campo, Miguel; Amato, R Stephen; Agarwal, Anil K

    2015-08-01

    Despite remarkable progress in identifying causal genes for many types of genetic lipodystrophies in the last decade, the molecular basis of many extremely rare lipodystrophy patients with distinctive phenotypes remains unclear. We conducted whole exome sequencing of the parents and probands from six pedigrees with neonatal onset of generalized loss of subcutaneous fat with additional distinctive phenotypic features and report de novo heterozygous null mutations, c.424C>T (p.Q142*) and c.479_480delTT (p.F160*), in CAV1 in a 7-year-old male and a 3-year-old female of European origin, respectively. Both the patients had generalized fat loss, thin mottled skin and progeroid features at birth. The male patient had cataracts requiring extraction at age 30 months and the female patient had pulmonary arterial hypertension. Dermal fibroblasts of the female patient revealed negligible CAV1 immunofluorescence staining compared to control but there were no differences in the number and morphology of caveolae upon electron microscopy examination. Based upon the similarities in the clinical features of these two patients, previous reports of CAV1 mutations in patients with lipodystrophies and pulmonary hypertension, and similar features seen in CAV1 null mice, we conclude that these variants are the most likely cause of one subtype of neonatal onset generalized lipodystrophy syndrome.

  19. Heterozygous Mutations in MAP3K7, Encoding TGF-β-Activated Kinase 1, Cause Cardiospondylocarpofacial Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Carine; Rogers, Curtis; Le Goff, Wilfried; Pinto, Graziella; Bonnet, Damien; Chrabieh, Maya; Alibeu, Olivier; Nistchke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Picard, Capucine; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiospondylocarpofacial (CSCF) syndrome is characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, brachydactyly with carpal-tarsal fusion and extensive posterior cervical vertebral synostosis, cardiac septal defects with valve dysplasia, and deafness with inner ear malformations. Whole-exome sequencing identified heterozygous MAP3K7 mutations in six distinct CSCF-affected individuals from four families and ranging in age from 5 to 37 years. MAP3K7 encodes transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which is involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 signaling pathway. MAPK-p38 signaling was markedly altered when expression of non-canonical TGF-β-driven target genes was impaired. These findings support the loss of transcriptional control of the TGF-β-MAPK-p38 pathway in fibroblasts obtained from affected individuals. Surprisingly, although TAK1 is located at the crossroad of inflammation, immunity, and cancer, this study reports MAP3K7 mutations in a developmental disorder affecting mainly cartilage, bone, and heart. PMID:27426734

  20. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.; Yang, Xiaojiang; Songya Pang

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD gene region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Three cases of congenital dysfibrinogenemia in unrelated Chinese families: heterozygous missense mutation in fibrinogen alpha chain Argl6His.

    PubMed

    Luo, Meiling; Deng, Donghong; Xiang, Liqun; Cheng, Peng; Liao, Lin; Deng, Xuelian; Yan, Jie; Lin, Faquan

    2016-09-01

    Congenital dysfibrinogenemia (CD) is a qualitative fibrinogen disorder caused by an abnormal fibrinogen molecule structure, leading to dysfunctional blood coagulation. This study describes 3 cases of dysfibrinogenemia identified in the unrelated Chinese pedigrees.Routine coagulation screening tests were performed on the probands and their families. The antigens and functionality of fibrinogen was measured using an immunoturbidimetry assay and the Clauss method, respectively. To identify the genetic mutation responsible for these dysfibrinogens, genomic DNA extracted from the blood was analyzed using PCR amplification and direct sequencing. The presence of the mutant chains was determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Purified plasma fibrinogen of 3 probands was analyzed using SDS-PAGE, fibrinogen clottability, fibrin polymerization, fibrinopeptide release, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).The 3 probands had a long thrombin time. Levels of functional fibrinogen were found to be very low, while the fibrinogen antigen was within the normal range. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous Arg16His substitution in the fibrinogen Aα chain (FGA). The mutant chains were found to be expressed using MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. SDS-PAGE did not reveal any difference in the molecular weights of 3 polypeptide chains between normal and abnormal fibrinogens. Fibrinogen clottability showed a slower fibrin clot formation than the healthy control. Fibrin polymerization, after addition of thrombin, showed a prolonged lag phase and decreased final turbidity. The kinetics of fibrinopeptides release revealed a decreased amount of the released fibrinopeptide A. SEM of the patient's fibrin clot was found to be abnormal.Results indicate that the 3 probands with dysfibrinogenemia were caused by mutations of Aα chain Arg16His. Mutation of this fibrinogen induced dysfunction of plasma fibrinogen. PMID:27684817

  2. Chromosomal breakage in human spermatozoa, a heterozygous effect of the bloom syndrome mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.; Rademaker, A.; German, J.

    1994-12-01

    The chromosome complements of 662 spermatozoa produced by the three fathers of individuals with Bloom syndrome (BS) were analyzed to determine whether the BS mutation could affect chromosome segregation and the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm. The frequency of numerical abnormalities was not significantly different from that in normal controls studied in our laboratory, but the frequencies of structural abnormalities were significantly increased in two of the men, 14.3% and 15.9%, versus 8.6% in controls. More striking was the increase in these two men of cells with multiple structural abnormalities: 8.1% and 6.7% with multiple abnormalities, versus 2.3% in controls.

  3. Compound heterozygous PMP22 deletion mutations causing severe Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1.

    PubMed

    Abe, Akiko; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Numakura, Chikahiko; Honma, Tomomi; Seiwa, Chizuru; Shirahata, Emi; Itoh, Aiko; Kishikawa, Yumiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2010-11-01

    We present a 3⅓-year-old girl with severe Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (Dejerine-Sottas disease), who was a compound heterozygote carrying a deletion of the whole peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) and a deletion of exon 5 in the other PMP22 allele. Haplotype analyses and sequence determination revealed a 11.2 kb deletion spanning from intron 4 to 3'-region of PMP22, which was likely generated by nonhomologous end joining. Severely affected patients carrying a PMP22 deletion must be analyzed for the mutations of the other copy of PMP22. PMID:20739940

  4. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alison A; Mehler, Vera J; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2.

  5. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, Vera J.; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2. PMID:27442528

  6. Investigation of the atypical FBXW7 mutation spectrum in human tumours by conditional expression of a heterozygous propellor tip missense allele in the mouse intestines

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Hayley; Lewis, Annabelle; Behrens, Axel; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Objective FBXW7 encodes the substrate recognition component of a ubiquitin ligase that degrades targets such as Notch1, c-Jun, c-Myc and cyclin E. FBXW7 mutations occur in several tumour types, including colorectal cancers. The FBXW7 mutation spectrum in cancers is unusual. Some tumours have biallelic loss of function mutations but most have monoallelic missense mutations involving specific arginine residues at β-propellor tips involved in substrate recognition. Design FBXW7 functional studies have generally used null systems. In order to analyse the most common mutations in human tumours, we created a Fbxw7fl(R482Q)/+ mouse and conditionally expressed this mutation in the intestines using Vill-Cre. We compared these mice with heterozygous null (Fbxw7+/−) mutants. Results A few sizeable intestinal adenomas occurred in approximately 30% of R482Q/+ and Fbxw7+/− mice at age >300 days. Breeding the R482Q allele onto Apc mutant backgrounds led to accelerated morbidity and increased polyp numbers and size. Within the small bowel, polyp distribution was shifted proximally. Elevated levels of two particular Fbxw7 substrates, Klf5 and Tgif1, were found in normal intestine and adenomas of R482Q/+, R482Q/R482Q and Fbxw7−/− mice, but not Fbxw7+/− animals. On the Apc mutant background, Fbxw7+/− mutants had a phenotype intermediate between Fbxw7 wild-type and R482Q/+ mice. Conclusions Heterozygous Fbxw7 propellor tip (R482Q) mutations promote intestinal tumorigenesis on an Apc mutant background. Klf5 and Tgif1 are strong candidates for mediating this effect. Although heterozygous null Fbxw7 mutations also promote tumour growth, these have a weaker effect than R482Q. These findings explain the FBXW7 mutation spectrum found in human cancers, and emphasise the need for animal models faithfully to reflect human disease. PMID:23676439

  7. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 in a family with severe opsismodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Feist, Cori; Holden, Paul; Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetic basis of a severe skeletal lethal dysplasia. The main clinical features of two affected fetuses included short limbs with flared metaphyses, bowed radii, femora and tibiae, irregular ossification of hands and feet, and marked platyspondyly. Affected and nonaffected family members were subjected to whole-exome sequencing, followed by immunoblot analysis on amniocytes isolated from one of the affected individuals. Unique compound heterozygous variants in the inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1) gene encoding the SHIP2 protein were identified in both affected individuals. One variant was inherited from each unaffected parent. Both allelic variants, c.(2327-1G>C);(1150_1151delGA), are predicted to result in premature stop codons leading to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay of the mutant alleles and no production of SHIP2. The absence of SHIP2 was confirmed by immunoblot analysis of proband amniocytes. This skeletal disorder is caused by the complete absence of the SHIP2 protein. INPPL1 mutations have been reported in opsismodysplasia, an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasias with significant delayed bone formation. Our finding highlights the critical role that INPPL1/SHIP2 plays in skeletal development. PMID:27233067

  8. Probing the Effect of Two Heterozygous Mutations in Codon 723 of SLC26A4 on Deafness Phenotype Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Qian, Xuli; Bao, Jingxiao; Wei, Qinjun; Lu, Yajie; Zheng, Heng; Cao, Xin; Xing, Guangqian

    2015-01-01

    A Chinese family was identified with clinical features of enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome (EVAS). The mutational analysis showed that the proband (III-2) had EVAS with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and carried a rare compound heterozygous mutation of SLC26A4 (IVS7-2A>G, c.2167C>G), which was inherited from the same mutant alleles of IVS7-2A>G heterozygous father and c.2167C>G heterozygous mother. Compared with another confirmed pathogenic biallelic mutation in SLC26A4 (IVS7-2A>G, c.2168A>G), these two biallelic mutations shared one common mutant allele and the same codon of the other mutant allele, but led to different changes of amino acid (p.H723D, p.H723R) and both resulted in the deafness phenotype. Structure-modeling indicated that these two mutant alleles changed the shape of pendrin protein encoded by SLC26A4 with increasing randomness in conformation, and might impair pendrin's ability as an anion transporter. The molecular dynamics simulations also revealed that the stability of mutant pendrins was reduced with increased flexibility of backbone atoms, which was consistent with the structure-modeling results. These evidences indicated that codon 723 was a hot-spot region in SLC26A4 with a significant impact on the structure and function of pendrin, and acted as one of the genetic factors responsible for the development of hearing loss.

  9. A frameshift mutation results in a truncated nonfunctional carboxyl-terminal pro alpha 1(I) propeptide of type I collagen in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Lamande, S R; Dahl, H H; Chan, D; Mascara, T; Cole, W G

    1989-07-01

    A codon frameshift mutation caused by a single base (U) insertion after base pair 4088 of prepro alpha 1(I) mRNA of type I procollagen was identified in a baby with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The mutation was identified in fibroblast RNA by a new method that allows the direct detection of mismatched bases by chemical modification and cleavage in heteroduplexes formed between mRNA and control cDNA probes. The region of mismatches was specifically amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The heterozygous mutation in the amplified cDNA most likely resulted from a T insertion in exon 49 of COL1A1. The frameshift resulted in a truncated pro alpha 1(I) carboxyl-terminal propeptide in which the amino acid sequence was abnormal from Val1146 to the carboxyl terminus. The propeptide lacked Asn1187, which normally carries an N-linked oligosaccharide unit, and was more basic than the normal propeptide. The distribution of cysteines was altered and the mutant propeptide was unable to form normal interchain disulfide bonds. Some of the mutant pro alpha 1(I)' chains were incorporated into type I procollagen molecules but resulted in abnormal helix formation with over-hydroxylation of lysine residues, increased degradation, and poor secretion. Only normal type I collagen was incorporated into the extracellular matrix in vivo resulting in a tissue type I collagen content approximately 20% of that of control (Bateman, J. F., Chan, D., Mascara, T., Rogers, J. G., and Cole, W. G. (1986) Biochem. J. 240, 699-708).

  10. Truncating PREX2 mutations activate its GEF activity and alter gene expression regulation in NRAS-mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lissanu Deribe, Yonathan; Shi, Yanxia; Rai, Kunal; Nezi, Luigi; Amin, Samir B.; Wu, Chia-Chin; Akdemir, Kadir C.; Mahdavi, Mozhdeh; Peng, Qian; Chang, Qing Edward; Hornigold, Kirsti; Arold, Stefan T.; Welch, Heidi C. E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Chin, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    PREX2 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent Rac-exchange factor 2) is a PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) binding protein that is significantly mutated in cutaneous melanoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Here, genetic and biochemical analyses were conducted to elucidate the nature and mechanistic basis of PREX2 mutation in melanoma development. By generating an inducible transgenic mouse model we showed an oncogenic role for a truncating PREX2 mutation (PREX2E824*) in vivo in the context of mutant NRAS. Using integrative cross-species gene expression analysis, we identified deregulated cell cycle and cytoskeleton organization as significantly perturbed biological pathways in PREX2 mutant tumors. Mechanistically, truncation of PREX2 activated its Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, abolished binding to PTEN and activated the PI3K (phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase)/Akt signaling pathway. We further showed that PREX2 truncating mutations or PTEN deletion induces down-regulation of the tumor suppressor and cell cycle regulator CDKN1C (also known as p57KIP2). This down-regulation occurs, at least partially, through DNA hypomethylation of a differentially methylated region in chromosome 11 that is a known regulatory region for expression of the CDKN1C gene. Together, these findings identify PREX2 as a mediator of NRAS-mutant melanoma development that acts through the PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway to regulate gene expression of a cell cycle regulator. PMID:26884185

  11. Compound heterozygous β(+) β(0) mutation of HBB gene leading to β-thalassemia major in a Gujarati family - A case study.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Spandan; Dhawan, Dipali; Bagali, Prashanth G; S Chaudhary, Pooja; Chaudhary, Abhinav; Singh, Sanjay; Vudathala, Srinivas

    2016-06-01

    β-Thalassemia is a genetic disease characterized by reduced or non-functionality of β-globin gene expression, which is caused due to a number of variations and indels (insertions and deletions). In this case study, we have reported a rare occurrence of compound heterozygosity of two different variants, namely, HBBc.92G > C and HBBc.92 + 5G > C in maternal amniotic fluid sample. Prenatal β-thalassemia mutation detection in fetal DNA was carried out using nucleotide sequencing method. After analysis, the father was found to be heterozygous for HBBc.92G > C (Codon 30 (G > C)) mutation which is β(0) type and the mother was heterozygous for HBBc.92 + 5G > C (IVS I-5 (G > C)) mutation which is β(+) type. When amniotic fluid sample was analyzed for β-globin gene (HBB), we found the occurrence of heterozygous allelic pattern for aforesaid mutations. This compound heterozygous state of fetus sample was considered as β(+)/β(0) category of β thalassemia which was clinically and genotypically interpreted as β-thalassemia major. Regular blood transfusions are required for the survival of thalassemia major patients hence prenatal diagnosis is imperative for timely patient management. Prenatal diagnosis helps the parents to know the thalassemic status of the fetus and enables an early decision on the pregnancy. In the present study, we have identified compound heterozygosity for β-thalassemia in the fetus which portrays the importance of prenatal screening. PMID:27134826

  12. Molecular defects in the factor X gene caused by novel heterozygous mutations IVS5+1G>A and Asp409del.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J W; Liang, Q; Chen, Q; Xie, Y; Ding, Q L; Wang, X F; Xi, X D; Wang, H L

    2013-01-01

    Factor X (FX) deficiency is a rare autosomal-recessive bleeding disorder caused by diverse mutations in the F10 gene. To investigate the molecular basis of severe FX deficiency in a mildly hemorrhagic patient, variants of the F10 gene were detected by sequencing. A missense mutation was analysed by in vitro expression and modelling analysis, and a splice mutation using ectopic transcript analysis. The levels of activity of FX (FX:C) were <1% in both intrinsic and extrinsic pathway assays and 1.71% in chromogenic assay, the level of FX antigen (FX:Ag) was 53.36% in the proband. Two novel heterozygous mutations (IVS5+1G>A and Asp409del) were identified in the F10 gene. Ectopic transcript expression combined with informative marker (heterozygous Asp409del) analysis of the splice mutation (IVS5+1G>A) revealed and confirmed that the transcript from the mutated allele was absent, likely caused by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. In vitro expression analysis showed that the Asp409del mutant led to a loss of enzymatic activity rather than impaired expression. Molecular modelling analysis confirmed that the Asp409del mutant dramatically altered the conformation of the 185-189 loop and impaired binding of the loop to sodium ions (Na(+) ), diminishing the enzymatic activity of FXa. This is the first report to clarify the molecular mechanisms of two naturally occurring F10 gene variants that cause severe FX deficiency.

  13. Distinct but milder phenotypes with choreiform movements in siblings with compound heterozygous mutations in the transcription preinitiation mediator complex subunit 17 (MED17).

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Shinichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Two siblings born to non-consanguineous parents showed nystagmus and sudden opistotonic posturing from the early infancy, and subsequent developmental delay and marked choreiform movements with hypotonia in the childhood. The brother had a mild postnatal microcephaly. Brain MRI of the sister showed mild delay of myelination, dilated anterior horn and mild cerebellar atrophy. Whole exome sequencing (WES) revealed compound heterozygous mutations in MED17 gene in both siblings: c.1013-5A>G and c.1484T>G mutations transmitted from their father and mother, respectively. The c.1013-5A>G mutation caused insertion of 4 bases of intron 6 in the transcript, resulting in frameshift (p. Ser338Asnfs*15), and mutant transcript underwent nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in lymphoblastoid cells derived from two siblings. The c.1484T>G mutation substituted a leucine residue, which is highly conserved among the vertebrates, and was predicted to be damaging by in silico analysis programs. Both mutations were not registered in dbSNP data and in our 575 control exomes. These results suggest that the siblings' mutations are likely to be pathogenic. This is the second case report concerning MED17 mutations. Compared with the first reported cases of Caucasian Jewish origin, the clinical symptoms and courses are much milder and slower, respectively, in our cases. Genotype difference (a homozygous mutation versus compound heterozygous mutations) might explain these clinical differences between two cases, though early-onset nystagmus and later choreiform movements were unique in our cases. Clinical spectrum and phenotype-genotype correlations in this rare mutation should be further elucidated. PMID:26004231

  14. A novel compound heterozygous ROMK mutation presenting as late onset Bartter syndrome associated with nephrocalcinosis and elevated 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D levels.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amita; Linshaw, Micheal A

    2011-08-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) is a rare renal tubular disorder presenting with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, which is classified into five types. KCNJ1 mutations usually cause the neonatal form of BS, type II BS (OMIM 241200). However, this report concerns a female patient with a novel, compound heterozygous KCNJ1 mutation that causes late-onset BS. The unique clinical findings of this case include persistently elevated 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D levels, possibly due to increase prostaglandin E(2) levels, and medullary nephrocalcinosis. Treatment with COX-2 inhibitors resolved her hypercalciuria and improved her height and weight; renal function remains stable and there is no progression of nephrocalcinosis. PMID:21431899

  15. Clinical consequences in truncating mutations in exon 34 of NOTCH2: report of six patients with Hajdu-Cheney syndrome and a patient with serpentine fibula polycystic kidney syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Yoko; Min, Byung-Joo; Shimizu, Kenji; Kazukawa, Itsuro; Sameshima, Kiyoko; Nakamura, Koichi; Kosho, Tomoki; Rhee, Yumie; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Park, Woong-Yang; Nishimura, Gen

    2013-03-01

    It is debatable whether Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HCS) and serpentine fibula-polycystic kidney syndrome (SFPKS) represent a single clinical entity with a variable degree of expression or two different entities, because both disorders share common clinical and radiological manifestations, including similar craniofacial characteristics, and defective bone mineralization. Since it was shown that heterozygous truncating mutations in NOTCH2 are responsible for both HCS and SFPKS, 37 patients with HCS and four patients with SFPKS are reported. To elucidate the clinical consequences of NOTCH2 mutations, we present detailed clinical information for seven patients with truncating mutations in exon 34 of NOTCH2, six with HCS and one with SFPKS. In addition, we review all the reported patients whose clinical manifestations are available. We found 13 manifestations including craniofacial features, acroosteolysis, Wormian bones, and osteoporosis in >75% of NOTCH2-positive patients. Acroosteolysis was observed in two patients with SFPKS and bowing fibulae were found in two patients with HCS. These clinical and molecular data would support the notion that HCS and SFPKS are a single disorder. PMID:23401378

  16. BRCA1-mutated and basal-like breast cancers have similar aCGH profiles and a high incidence of protein truncating TP53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Basal-like breast cancers (BLBC) are aggressive breast cancers for which, so far, no targeted therapy is available because they typically lack expression of hormone receptors and HER2. Phenotypic features of BLBCs, such as clinical presentation and early age of onset, resemble those of breast tumors from BRCA1-mutation carriers. The genomic instability of BRCA1-mutated tumors can be effectively targeted with DNA-damaging agents and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors. Molecular similarities between BLBCs and BRCA1-mutated tumors may therefore provide predictive markers for therapeutic response of BLBCs. Methods There are several known molecular features characteristic for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors: 1) increased numbers of genomic aberrations, 2) a distinct pattern of genomic aberrations, 3) a high frequency of TP53 mutations and 4) a high incidence of complex, protein-truncating TP53 mutations. We compared the frequency of TP53 mutations and the pattern and amount of genomic aberrations between BRCA1-mutated breast tumors, BLBCs and luminal breast tumors by TP53 gene sequencing and array-based comparative genomics hybridization (aCGH) analysis. Results We found that the high incidence of protein truncating TP53 mutations and the pattern and amount of genomic aberrations specific for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors are also characteristic for BLBCs and different from luminal breast tumors. Conclusions Complex, protein truncating TP53 mutations in BRCA1-mutated tumors may be a direct consequence of genomic instability caused by BRCA1 loss, therefore, the presence of these types of TP53 mutations in sporadic BLBCs might be a hallmark of BRCAness and a potential biomarker for sensitivity to PARP inhibition. Also, our data suggest that a small subset of genomic regions may be used to identify BRCA1-like BLBCs. BLBCs share molecular features that were previously found to be specific for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors. These features might be useful

  17. Compound heterozygous DUOX2 gene mutations (c.2335-1G>C/c.3264_3267delCAGC) associated with congenital hypothyroidism. Characterization of complex cryptic splice sites by minigene analysis.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Fiorella S; Citterio, Cintia E; Testa, Graciela; Olcese, María Cecilia; Sobrero, Gabriela; Miras, Mirta B; Targovnik, Héctor M; Rivolta, Carina M

    2016-01-01

    Iodide Organification defects (IOD) represent 10% of cases of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) being the main genes affected that of TPO (thyroid peroxidase) and DUOX2 (dual oxidasa 2). From a patient with clinical and biochemical criteria suggestive with CH associated with IOD, TPO and DUOX2 genes were analyzed by means of PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis and sequencing. A novel heterozygous compound to the mutations c.2335-1G>C (paternal mutation, intron 17) and c.3264_3267delCAGC (maternal mutation, exon 24) was identified in the DUOX2 gene. Ex-vivo splicing assays and subsequent RT-PCR and sequencing analyses were performed on mRNA isolated from the HeLa cells transfected with wild-type and mutant pSPL3 expression vectors. The wild-type and c.2335-1G>C mutant alleles result in the complete inclusion or exclusion of exon 18, or in the activation of an exonic cryptic 5' ss with the consequent deletion of 169 bp at the end of this exon. However, we observed only a band of the expected size in normal thyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Additionally, the c.2335-1G>C mutation activates an unusual cryptic donor splice site in intron 17, located at position -14 of the authentic intron 17/exon 18 junction site, with an insertion of the last 14 nucleotides of the intron 17 in mutant transcripts with complete and partial inclusion of exon 18. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutation, predicted with the bioinformatics NNSplice, Fsplice, SPL, SPLM and MaxEntScan programs were investigated and evaluated in relation with the experimental evidence. These analyses confirm that c.2335-1G>C mutant allele would result in the abolition of the authentic splice acceptor site. The results suggest the coexistence in our patient of four putative truncated proteins of 786, 805, 806 and 1105 amino acids, with conservation of peroxidase-like domain and loss of gp91(phox)/NOX2-like domain. In conclusion a novel heterozygous compound was identified being responsible of

  18. A novel ZRS mutation leads to preaxial polydactyly type 2 in a heterozygous form and Werner mesomelic syndrome in a homozygous form.

    PubMed

    VanderMeer, Julia E; Lozano, Reymundo; Sun, Miao; Xue, Yuan; Daentl, Donna; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Wilcox, William R; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-08-01

    Point mutations in the zone of polarizing activity regulatory sequence (ZRS) are known to cause human limb malformations. Although most mutations cause preaxial polydactyly (PPD), triphalangeal thumb (TPT) or both, a mutation in position 404 of the ZRS causes more severe Werner mesomelic syndrome (WMS) for which malformations include the distal arm or leg bones in addition to the hands and/or feet. Of more than 15 reported families with ZRS mutations, only one homozygous individual has been reported, with no change in phenotype compared with heterozygotes. Here, we describe a novel point mutation in the ZRS, 402C>T (AC007097.4:g.105548C>T), that is transmitted through two Mexican families with one homozygous individual. The homozygous phenotype for this mutation, WMS, is more severe than the numerous heterozygous individuals genotyped from both families who have TPT and PPD. A mouse transgenic enhancer assay shows that this mutation causes an expansion of the enhancer's expression domain in the developing mouse limb, confirming its pathogenicity. Combined, our results identify a novel ZRS mutation in the Mexican population, 402C>T, and suggest that a dosage effect exists for this ZRS mutation.

  19. A null c-myc mutation causes lethality before 10.5 days of gestation in homozygotes and reduced fertility in heterozygous female mice.

    PubMed

    Davis, A C; Wims, M; Spotts, G D; Hann, S R; Bradley, A

    1993-04-01

    To directly assess c-myc function in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and embryogenesis, we have used homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells to generate both heterozygous and homozygous c-myc mutant ES cell lines. The mutation is a null allele at the protein level. Mouse chimeras from seven heterozygous cell lines transmitted the mutant allele to their offspring. The analysis of embryos from two clones has shown that the mutation is lethal in homozygotes between 9.5 and 10.5 days of gestation. The embryos are generally smaller and retarded in development compared with their littermates. Pathologic abnormalities include the heart, pericardium, neural tube, and delay or failure in turning of the embryo. Heterozygous females have reduced fertility owing to embryonic resorption before 9.5 days of gestation in 14% of implanted embryos. c-Myc protein is necessary for embryonic survival beyond 10.5 days of gestation; however, it appears to be dispensable for cell division both in ES cell lines and in the embryo before that time.

  20. Detection of both the normal and mutant alleles in single cells of individuals heterozygous for the sickle cell mutation--prelude to preimplantation diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Monk, M; Kenealy, M R; Mohadjerani, S

    1993-01-01

    As a preliminary step to preimplantation diagnosis of sickle cell disease in unfertilized eggs or 8-cell embryos of heterozygous parents, we established quality control for detection of the mutant and normal alleles of the beta-haemoglobin gene using single buccal cells. Efficient polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a 680 base pair sequence of the beta-globin gene spanning the site of the sickle cell mutation was obtained for 79 per cent of single heterozygous cells. In 71 per cent of cases, both alleles were detected. With this current efficiency, we predict that a clinical preimplantation diagnosis at the 8-cell embryo stage could be carried out safely and reliably for a couple at risk of transmitting sickle cell disease to their children.

  1. Heterozygous splice mutation in PIK3R1 causes human immunodeficiency with lymphoproliferation due to dominant activation of PI3K

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Carrie L.; Zhang, Yu; Venida, Anthony; Wang, Ying; Hughes, Jason; McElwee, Joshua; Butrick, Morgan; Matthews, Helen; Price, Susan; Biancalana, Matthew; Wang, Xiaochuan; Richards, Michael; Pozos, Tamara; Barlan, Isil; Ozen, Ahmet; Rao, V. Koneti; Su, Helen C.

    2014-01-01

    Class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), which generate PIP3 as a signal for cell growth and proliferation, exist as an intracellular complex of a catalytic subunit bound to a regulatory subunit. We and others have previously reported that heterozygous mutations in PIK3CD encoding the p110δ catalytic PI3K subunit cause a unique disorder termed p110δ-activating mutations causing senescent T cells, lymphadenopathy, and immunodeficiency (PASLI) disease. We report four patients from three families with a similar disease who harbor a recently reported heterozygous splice site mutation in PIK3R1, which encodes the p85α, p55α, and p50α regulatory PI3K subunits. These patients suffer from recurrent sinopulmonary infections and lymphoproliferation, exhibit hyperactive PI3K signaling, and have prominent expansion and skewing of peripheral blood CD8+ T cells toward terminally differentiated senescent effector cells with short telomeres. The PIK3R1 splice site mutation causes skipping of an exon, corresponding to loss of amino acid residues 434–475 in the inter-SH2 domain. The mutant p85α protein is expressed at low levels in patient cells and activates PI3K signaling when overexpressed in T cells from healthy subjects due to qualitative and quantitative binding changes in the p85α–p110δ complex and failure of the C-terminal region to properly inhibit p110δ catalytic activity. PMID:25488983

  2. Identification of compound heterozygous KCNJ1 mutations (encoding ROMK) in a kindred with Bartter's syndrome and a functional analysis of their pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shalabh; Li, Dimin; Edwards, Noel; Hynes, Ann-M; Wood, Katrina; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Wroe, Anna C; Reaich, David; Moochhala, Shabbir H; Welling, Paul A; Sayer, John A

    2013-11-01

    A multiplex family was identified with biochemical and clinical features suggestive of Bartter's syndrome (BS). The eldest sibling presented with developmental delay and rickets at 4 years of age with evidence of hypercalciuria and hypokalemia. The second sibling presented at 1 year of age with urinary tract infections, polyuria, and polydipsia. The third child was born after a premature delivery with a history of polyhydramnios and neonatal hypocalcemia. Following corrective treatment she also developed hypercalciuria and a hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis. There was evidence of secondary hyperreninemia and hyperaldosteronism in all three siblings consistent with BS. Known BS genes were screened and functional assays of ROMK (alias KCNJ1, Kir1.1) were carried out in Xenopus oocytes. We detected compound heterozygous missense changes in KCNJ1, encoding the potassium channel ROMK. The S219R/L220F mutation was segregated from father and mother, respectively. In silico modeling of the missense mutations suggested deleterious changes. Studies in Xenopus oocytes revealed that both S219R and L220F had a deleterious effect on ROMK-mediated potassium currents. Coinjection to mimic the compound heterozygosity produced a synergistic decrease in channel function and revealed a loss of PKA-dependent stabilization of PIP2 binding. In conclusion, in a multiplex family with BS, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in KCNJ1. Functional studies of ROMK confirmed the pathogenicity of these mutations and defined the mechanism of channel dysfunction. PMID:24400161

  3. Heterozygous de novo and inherited mutations in the smooth muscle actin (ACTG2) gene underlie megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wangler, Michael F; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Gambin, Tomasz; Penney, Samantha; Moss, Timothy; Chopra, Atul; Probst, Frank J; Xia, Fan; Yang, Yaping; Werlin, Steven; Eglite, Ieva; Kornejeva, Liene; Bacino, Carlos A; Baldridge, Dustin; Neul, Jeff; Lehman, Efrat Lev; Larson, Austin; Beuten, Joke; Muzny, Donna M; Jhangiani, Shalini; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Beaudet, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare disorder of enteric smooth muscle function affecting the intestine and bladder. Patients with this severe phenotype are dependent on total parenteral nutrition and urinary catheterization. The cause of this syndrome has remained a mystery since Berdon's initial description in 1976. No genes have been clearly linked to MMIHS. We used whole-exome sequencing for gene discovery followed by targeted Sanger sequencing in a cohort of patients with MMIHS and intestinal pseudo-obstruction. We identified heterozygous ACTG2 missense variants in 15 unrelated subjects, ten being apparent de novo mutations. Ten unique variants were detected, of which six affected CpG dinucleotides and resulted in missense mutations at arginine residues, perhaps related to biased usage of CpG containing codons within actin genes. We also found some of the same heterozygous mutations that we observed as apparent de novo mutations in MMIHS segregating in families with intestinal pseudo-obstruction, suggesting that ACTG2 is responsible for a spectrum of smooth muscle disease. ACTG2 encodes γ2 enteric actin and is the first gene to be clearly associated with MMIHS, suggesting an important role for contractile proteins in enteric smooth muscle disease.

  4. Heterozygous De Novo and Inherited Mutations in the Smooth Muscle Actin (ACTG2) Gene Underlie Megacystis-Microcolon-Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wangler, Michael F.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Gambin, Tomasz; Penney, Samantha; Moss, Timothy; Chopra, Atul; Probst, Frank J.; Xia, Fan; Yang, Yaping; Werlin, Steven; Eglite, Ieva; Kornejeva, Liene; Bacino, Carlos A.; Baldridge, Dustin; Neul, Jeff; Lehman, Efrat Lev; Larson, Austin; Beuten, Joke; Muzny, Donna M.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Beaudet, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare disorder of enteric smooth muscle function affecting the intestine and bladder. Patients with this severe phenotype are dependent on total parenteral nutrition and urinary catheterization. The cause of this syndrome has remained a mystery since Berdon's initial description in 1976. No genes have been clearly linked to MMIHS. We used whole-exome sequencing for gene discovery followed by targeted Sanger sequencing in a cohort of patients with MMIHS and intestinal pseudo-obstruction. We identified heterozygous ACTG2 missense variants in 15 unrelated subjects, ten being apparent de novo mutations. Ten unique variants were detected, of which six affected CpG dinucleotides and resulted in missense mutations at arginine residues, perhaps related to biased usage of CpG containing codons within actin genes. We also found some of the same heterozygous mutations that we observed as apparent de novo mutations in MMIHS segregating in families with intestinal pseudo-obstruction, suggesting that ACTG2 is responsible for a spectrum of smooth muscle disease. ACTG2 encodes γ2 enteric actin and is the first gene to be clearly associated with MMIHS, suggesting an important role for contractile proteins in enteric smooth muscle disease. PMID:24676022

  5. USH1G with unique retinal findings caused by a novel truncating mutation identified by genome-wide linkage analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taibah, Khalid; Bin-Khamis, Ghada; Kennedy, Shelley; Hemidan, Amal; Al-Qahtani, Faisal; Tabbara, Khalid; Mubarak, Bashayer Al; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Meyer, Brian F.; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder divided into three distinct clinical subtypes based on the severity of the hearing loss, manifestation of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa and visual symptoms. To date, mutations in seven different genes have been reported to cause USH type 1 (USH1), the most severe form. Patients diagnosed with USH1 are known to be ideal candidates to benefit from cochlear implantation. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10K arrays were performed in three cochlear implanted Saudi siblings born from a consanguineous marriage, clinically diagnosed with USH1 by comprehensive clinical, audiological, and ophthalmological examinations. From the linkage results, the USH1G gene was screened for mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons. Results We report the identification of a novel p.S243X truncating mutation in USH1G that segregated with the disease phenotype and was not present in 300 ethnically matched normal controls. We also report on the novel retinal findings and the outcome of cochlear implantation in the affected individuals. Conclusions In addition to reporting a novel truncating mutation, this report expands the retinal phenotype in USH1G and presents the first report of successful cochlear implants in this disease. PMID:22876113

  6. Postnatal microcephaly and pain insensitivity due to a de novo heterozygous DNM1L mutation causing impaired mitochondrial fission and function.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, Ruth; Douiev, Liza; Edvardson, Simon; Shaag, Avraham; Tamimi, Khaled; Soiferman, Devorah; Meiner, Vardiella; Saada, Ann

    2016-06-01

    An emerging class of mitochondrial disorders is caused by mutations in nuclear genes affecting mitochondrial dynamics and function. One of these is the DNM1L gene encoding the dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), which is pivotal in the mitochondrial fission process. Here, we describe a patient with a novel dominant-negative, de novo DNM1L mutation, which expands the clinical spectrum. The patient reported here exhibits a chronic neurological disorder, characterized by postnatal microcephaly, developmental delay, and pain insensitivity. Muscle biopsy disclosed decreased respiratory chain complex IV activity. Exome sequencing showed a de novo heterozygous c.1084G>A (p.G362S) mutation. Subsequent studies of patient skin fibroblasts showed markedly impaired mitochondrial fission and a partial respiratory chain defect while peroxisomal morphology remained intact. Human foreskin fibroblasts over-expressing the mutant DNM1L gene displayed aberrant mitochondrial morphology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26992161

  7. Postnatal microcephaly and pain insensitivity due to a de novo heterozygous DNM1L mutation causing impaired mitochondrial fission and function.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, Ruth; Douiev, Liza; Edvardson, Simon; Shaag, Avraham; Tamimi, Khaled; Soiferman, Devorah; Meiner, Vardiella; Saada, Ann

    2016-06-01

    An emerging class of mitochondrial disorders is caused by mutations in nuclear genes affecting mitochondrial dynamics and function. One of these is the DNM1L gene encoding the dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), which is pivotal in the mitochondrial fission process. Here, we describe a patient with a novel dominant-negative, de novo DNM1L mutation, which expands the clinical spectrum. The patient reported here exhibits a chronic neurological disorder, characterized by postnatal microcephaly, developmental delay, and pain insensitivity. Muscle biopsy disclosed decreased respiratory chain complex IV activity. Exome sequencing showed a de novo heterozygous c.1084G>A (p.G362S) mutation. Subsequent studies of patient skin fibroblasts showed markedly impaired mitochondrial fission and a partial respiratory chain defect while peroxisomal morphology remained intact. Human foreskin fibroblasts over-expressing the mutant DNM1L gene displayed aberrant mitochondrial morphology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genotypes and phenotypes of a family with a deaf child carrying combined heterozygous mutations in SLC26A4 and GJB3 genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunlong; Zhu, Baosheng

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene have been shown to cause a type of deafness referred to as large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS), whereas mutations in the GJB3 gene have been associated with nonsyndromic deafness. However, the clinical phenotypes of these mutations vary and remain to be fully elucidated. The present study performed genetic analysis of a Chinese family, in which the child was deaf and the parents were healthy. Sanger sequencing demonstrated that the affected individual harbored three heterogeneous mutations in the SLC26A4 and GJB3 genes, as follows: SLC26A4 IVS-2 A>G, SLC26A4 c.2168 A>G and GJB3 c.538 C>T. The affected individual exhibited hearing loss and was diagnosed with LVAS by computed tomography scan. The mother and father of the affected individual harbored the heterogeneous mutations of SLC26A4 IVS-2 A>G and GJB3 c.538 C>T, and the heterozygous mutation of SLC26A4 c.2168 A>G, respectively. Neither parents exhibited any hearing loss. The results obtained from the deaf patient provided genetic and clinical evidence that carrying combined heterogeneous mutations in the GJB3 and SLC26A4 genes may be involved in the etiology of severe hearing loss, of which the mechanism requires further examination. PMID:27176802

  9. An ABCA1 truncation shows no dominant negative effect in a familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia pedigree with three ABCA1 mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrenson, Brie; Suetani, Rachel J.; Bickley, Vivienne M.; George, Peter M.; Williams, Michael J.A.; Scott, Russell S.; McCormick, Sally P.A.

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Characterisation of an ABCA1 truncation mutant, C978fsX988, in a pedigree with three ABCA1 mutations. {yields} Functional analysis of C978fsX988 in patient fibroblasts and HEK 293 cells shows no cholesterol efflux function. {yields} Allele-specific quantification shows C978fsX988 not expressed at mRNA level in fibroblasts. {yields} Unlike other ABCA1 truncations, C978fsX988 mutant shows no dominant negative effect at mRNA or protein level. -- Abstract: The ATP binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) A1 is a key determinant of circulating high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Mutations in ABCA1 are a major genetic contributor to low HDL-C levels within the general population. Following the finding of three different ABCA1 mutations, p.C978fsX988, p.T1512M and p.N1800H in a subject with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, we aimed to establish whether the p.C978fsX988 truncation exerted a dominant negative effect on the full-length ABCA1 alleles within family members as has been reported for other ABCA1 truncations. Characterisation of the p.C978fsX988 mutant in transfected HEK 293 cells showed it to be expressed as a GFP fusion protein but lacking in cholesterol efflux function. This was in keeping with results from cholesterol efflux assays in the fibroblasts of p.C978fsX988 carriers which also showed impaired efflux. Allele- specific quantification of p.C978fsX988 mRNA and analysis of ABCA1 protein levels in the fibroblasts of p.C978fsX988 heterozygotes showed negligible levels of mRNA and protein expression. There was no evidence of a dominant negative effect on wildtype or p.N1800H protein levels. We conclude that in the case of the p.C978fsX988 truncated mutant a lack of expression precludes it from having a dominant negative effect.

  10. Exome sequencing reveals two novel compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutations in a Polish patient with Desbuquois dysplasia type 2 and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer, Aleksander; Olech, Ewelina M; Kozłowski, Kazimierz; Niedziela, Marek; Sowińska-Seidler, Anna; Obara-Moszyńska, Monika; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Karczewski, Marek; Zemojtel, Tomasz

    2016-07-01

    Desbuquois dysplasia type 2 (DBQD2) is a rare recessively inherited skeletal genetic disorder characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, generalized joint laxity with dislocation of large joints and facial dysmorphism. The condition was recently described to result from autosomal recessive mutations in XYLT1, encoding the enzyme xylosyltransferase-1. In this paper, we report on a Polish patient with DBQD2 who presented with severe short stature of prenatal onset, joint laxity, psychomotor retardation and multiple radiological abnormalities including short metacarpals, advanced bone age and exaggerated trochanters. Endocrinological examinations revealed that sleep-induced growth hormone (GH) release and GH peak in clonidine- and glucagon-induced provocative tests as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein-3 levels were all markedly decreased, confirming deficiency of GH secretion. Bone age, unlikely to GH deficiency, was significantly advanced. To establish the diagnosis at a molecular level, we performed whole-exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis in the index patient, which revealed compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutations: c.595C>T(p.Gln199*) and c.1651C>T(p.Arg551Cys), both of which are novel. Sanger sequencing showed that the former mutation was inherited from the healthy mother, whereas the latter one most probably occurred de novo. Our study describes the first case of DBQD2 resulting from compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutation, expands the mutational spectrum of the disease and provides evidence that the severe growth retardation and microsomia observed in DBQD2 patients may result not only from the skeletal dysplasia itself but also from GH and IGF-1 deficiency. PMID:27030147

  11. Novel heterozygous C243Y A20/TNFAIP3 gene mutation is responsible for chronic inflammation in autosomal-dominant Behçet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shigemura, Tomonari; Kaneko, Naoe; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Nakano, Naoko; Masumoto, Junya; Agematsu, Kazunaga

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of uncertain aetiology, the existence of familial BD with autosomal-dominant traits suggests that a responsibility gene (or genes) exists. We investigated a Japanese family with a history of BD to search for pathogenic mutations underlying the biological mechanisms of BD. Methods 6 patients over 4 generations who had suffered from frequent oral ulcers, genital ulcers and erythaema nodosum-like lesions in the skin were assessed. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on genomic DNA, and cytokine production was determined from stimulated mononuclear cells. Inflammatory cytokine secretion and Nod2-mediated NF-κB activation were analysed using the transfected cells. Results By whole-exome sequencing, we identified a common heterozygous missense mutation in A20/TNFAIP3, a gene known to regulate NF-κB signalling, for which all affected family members carried a heterozygous C243Y mutation in the ovarian tumour domain. Mononuclear cells obtained from the proband and his mother produced large amounts of interleukin 1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-a) on stimulation as compared with those from normal controls. Although inflammatory cytokine secretion was suppressed by wild-type transfected cells, it was suppressed to a much lesser extent by mutated C243Y A20/TNFAIP3-transfected cells. In addition, impaired suppression of Nod2-mediated NF-κB activation by C243Y A20/TNFAIP3 was observed. Conclusions A C243Y mutation in A20/TNFAIP3 was likely responsible for increased production of human inflammatory cytokines by reduced suppression of NF-κB activation, and may have accounted for the autosomal-dominant Mendelian mode of BD transmission in this family. PMID:27175295

  12. A POT1 mutation implicates defective telomere end fill-in and telomere truncations in Coats plus.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hiroyuki; Jenkinson, Emma; Kabir, Shaheen; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Najm-Tehrani, Nasrin; Chitayat, David A; Crow, Yanick J; de Lange, Titia

    2016-04-01

    Coats plus (CP) can be caused by mutations in the CTC1 component of CST, which promotes polymerase α (polα)/primase-dependent fill-in throughout the genome and at telomeres. The cellular pathology relating to CP has not been established. We identified a homozygous POT1 S322L substitution (POT1(CP)) in two siblings with CP. POT1(CP)induced a proliferative arrest that could be bypassed by telomerase. POT1(CP)was expressed at normal levels, bound TPP1 and telomeres, and blocked ATR signaling. POT1(CP)was defective in regulating telomerase, leading to telomere elongation rather than the telomere shortening observed in other telomeropathies. POT1(CP)was also defective in the maintenance of the telomeric C strand, causing extended 3' overhangs and stochastic telomere truncations that could be healed by telomerase. Consistent with shortening of the telomeric C strand, metaphase chromosomes showed loss of telomeres synthesized by leading strand DNA synthesis. We propose that CP is caused by a defect in POT1/CST-dependent telomere fill-in. We further propose that deficiency in the fill-in step generates truncated telomeres that halt proliferation in cells lacking telomerase, whereas, in tissues expressing telomerase (e.g., bone marrow), the truncations are healed. The proposed etiology can explain why CP presents with features distinct from those associated with telomerase defects (e.g., dyskeratosis congenita).

  13. A POT1 mutation implicates defective telomere end fill-in and telomere truncations in Coats plus

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Hiroyuki; Jenkinson, Emma; Kabir, Shaheen; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Najm-Tehrani, Nasrin; Chitayat, David A.; Crow, Yanick J.; de Lange, Titia

    2016-01-01

    Coats plus (CP) can be caused by mutations in the CTC1 component of CST, which promotes polymerase α (polα)/primase-dependent fill-in throughout the genome and at telomeres. The cellular pathology relating to CP has not been established. We identified a homozygous POT1 S322L substitution (POT1CP) in two siblings with CP. POT1CP induced a proliferative arrest that could be bypassed by telomerase. POT1CP was expressed at normal levels, bound TPP1 and telomeres, and blocked ATR signaling. POT1CP was defective in regulating telomerase, leading to telomere elongation rather than the telomere shortening observed in other telomeropathies. POT1CP was also defective in the maintenance of the telomeric C strand, causing extended 3′ overhangs and stochastic telomere truncations that could be healed by telomerase. Consistent with shortening of the telomeric C strand, metaphase chromosomes showed loss of telomeres synthesized by leading strand DNA synthesis. We propose that CP is caused by a defect in POT1/CST-dependent telomere fill-in. We further propose that deficiency in the fill-in step generates truncated telomeres that halt proliferation in cells lacking telomerase, whereas, in tissues expressing telomerase (e.g., bone marrow), the truncations are healed. The proposed etiology can explain why CP presents with features distinct from those associated with telomerase defects (e.g., dyskeratosis congenita). PMID:27013236

  14. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in DYNC2H1 in a patient with severe short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III phenotype.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toshio; Nagaya, Ken; Kawata, Yumi; Asai, Hiroko; Tsuchida, Etsushi; Nohara, Fumikatsu; Okajima, Kazuki; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive lethal skeletal ciliopathy, which is phenotypically similar to nonlethal asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy. Mutations in DYNC2H1 have been identified in both of these disorders, indicating that they are variants of a single disorder. However, short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III is the more severe variant. Here, we report novel compound heterozygous mutations in DYNC2H1 (p.E1894fsX10 and p.R3004C) in a patient with typical short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III phenotype. R3004 is located within the microtubule-binding domain of DYNC2H1, and its substitution is predicted to disrupt the interaction with microtubules. Considering the severe phenotype of our patient, our findings suggest that R3004 may be a key residue for the microtubule-binding affinity of dynein.

  15. Heterozygous Mutation in IκBNS Leads to Reduced Levels of Natural IgM Antibodies and Impaired Responses to T-Independent Type 2 Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Gabriel K.; Ádori, Monika; Stark, Julian M.; Khoenkhoen, Sharesta; Arnold, Carrie; Beutler, Bruce; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in central components of classical NF-κB signaling have low levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and fail to respond to immunization with T-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens. A plausible explanation for these defects is the severely reduced numbers of B-1 and marginal zone B (MZB) cells in such mice. By using an ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a role for the atypical IκB protein IκBNS in humoral immunity. IκBNS-deficient mice lack B-1 cells and have severely reduced numbers of MZB cells, and thus resemble several other strains with defects in classical NF-κB signaling. We analyzed mice heterozygous for the identified IκBNS mutation and demonstrate that these mice have an intermediary phenotype in terms of levels of circulating IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. However, in contrast to mice that are homozygous for the IκBNS mutation, the heterozygous mice had normal frequencies of B-1 and MZB cells. These results suggest that there is a requirement for IκBNS expression from two functional alleles for maintaining normal levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. PMID:26973645

  16. Heterozygous Mutation in IκBNS Leads to Reduced Levels of Natural IgM Antibodies and Impaired Responses to T-Independent Type 2 Antigens.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Gabriel K; Ádori, Monika; Stark, Julian M; Khoenkhoen, Sharesta; Arnold, Carrie; Beutler, Bruce; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in central components of classical NF-κB signaling have low levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and fail to respond to immunization with T-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens. A plausible explanation for these defects is the severely reduced numbers of B-1 and marginal zone B (MZB) cells in such mice. By using an ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a role for the atypical IκB protein IκBNS in humoral immunity. IκBNS-deficient mice lack B-1 cells and have severely reduced numbers of MZB cells, and thus resemble several other strains with defects in classical NF-κB signaling. We analyzed mice heterozygous for the identified IκBNS mutation and demonstrate that these mice have an intermediary phenotype in terms of levels of circulating IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. However, in contrast to mice that are homozygous for the IκBNS mutation, the heterozygous mice had normal frequencies of B-1 and MZB cells. These results suggest that there is a requirement for IκBNS expression from two functional alleles for maintaining normal levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens.

  17. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with a heterozygous deactivating LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutation and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cook, Fiona J; Mumm, Steven; Whyte, Michael P; Wenkert, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) is a rare, idiopathic disorder that usually presents with vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) within 6 months of a first pregnancy and delivery. Spontaneous improvement is typical. There is no known genetic basis for PAO. A 26-year-old primagravida with a neonatal history of unilateral blindness attributable to hyperplastic primary vitreous sustained postpartum VCFs consistent with PAO. Her low bone mineral density (BMD) seemed to respond to vitamin D and calcium therapy, with no fractures after her next successful pregnancy. Investigation of subsequent fetal losses revealed homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism associated both with fetal loss and with osteoporosis (OP). Because her neonatal unilateral blindness and OP were suggestive of loss-of-function mutation(s) in the gene that encodes LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), LRP5 exon and splice site sequencing was also performed. This revealed a unique heterozygous 12-bp deletion in exon 21 (c.4454_4465del, p.1485_1488del SSSS) in the patient, her mother and sons, but not her father or brother. Her mother had a normal BMD, no history of fractures, PAO, ophthalmopathy, or fetal loss. Her two sons had no ophthalmopathy and no skeletal issues. Her osteoporotic father (with a family history of blindness) and brother had low BMDs first documented at ages ∼40 and 32 years, respectively. Serum biochemical and bone turnover studies were unremarkable in all subjects. We postulate that our patient's heterozygous LRP5 mutation together with her homozygous MTHFR polymorphism likely predisposed her to low peak BMD. However, OP did not cosegregate in her family with the LRP5 mutation, the homozygous MTHFR polymorphism, or even the combination of the two, implicating additional genetic or nongenetic factors in her PAO. Nevertheless, exploration for potential genetic contributions to PAO may explain part of the pathogenesis of this

  18. A Dominant Negative Heterozygous G87R Mutation in the Zinc Transporter, ZnT-2 (SLC30A2), Results in Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lasry, Inbal; Seo, Young Ah; Ityel, Hadas; Shalva, Nechama; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Glaser, Fabian; Berman, Bluma; Berezovsky, Igor; Goncearenco, Alexander; Klar, Aharon; Levy, Jacob; Anikster, Yair; Kelleher, Shannon L.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential mineral, and infants are particularly vulnerable to zinc deficiency as they require large amounts of zinc for their normal growth and development. We have recently described the first loss-of-function mutation (H54R) in the zinc transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) in mothers with infants harboring transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD). Here we identified and characterized a novel heterozygous G87R ZnT-2 mutation in two unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish mothers with infants displaying TNZD. Transient transfection of G87R ZnT-2 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi retention, whereas the WT transporter properly localized to intracellular secretory vesicles in HC11 and MCF-7 cells. Consequently, G87R ZnT-2 showed decreased stability compared with WT ZnT-2 as revealed by Western blot analysis. Three-dimensional homology modeling based on the crystal structure of YiiP, a close zinc transporter homologue from Escherichia coli, revealed that the basic arginine residue of the mutant G87R points toward the membrane lipid core, suggesting misfolding and possible loss-of-function. Indeed, functional assays including vesicular zinc accumulation, zinc secretion, and cytoplasmic zinc pool assessment revealed markedly impaired zinc transport in G87R ZnT-2 transfectants. Moreover, co-transfection experiments with both mutant and WT transporters revealed a dominant negative effect of G87R ZnT-2 over the WT ZnT-2; this was associated with mislocalization, decreased stability, and loss of zinc transport activity of the WT ZnT-2 due to homodimerization observed upon immunoprecipitation experiments. These findings establish that inactivating ZnT-2 mutations are an underlying basis of TNZD and provide the first evidence for the dominant inheritance of heterozygous ZnT-2 mutations via negative dominance due to homodimer formation. PMID:22733820

  19. Pathogenic effects of a novel heterozygous R350P desmin mutation on the assembly of desmin intermediate filaments in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bär, Harald; Fischer, Dirk; Goudeau, Bertrand; Kley, Rudolf A; Clemen, Christoph S; Vicart, Patrick; Herrmann, Harald; Vorgerd, Matthias; Schröder, Rolf

    2005-05-15

    Mutations of the human desmin gene on chromosome 2q35 cause a familial or sporadic form of skeletal myopathy frequently associated with cardiac abnormalities. Here, we report the pathogenic effects of a novel heterozygous R350P desmin missense mutation, which resides in the evolutionary highly conserved coil 2B domain of the alpha-helical coiled-coil desmin rod domain, on the assembly of desmin intermediate filaments (IF) in cultured cells and in vitro. By transfection experiments, we show that R350P desmin is incapable of de novo formation of a desmin IF network in vimentin-free BMGE+H, MCF7 and SW13 cells and that it disrupts the endogenous vimentin cytoskeleton in 3T3 fibroblast cells. Hence, transfected cells displayed abnormal cytoplasmic protein aggregates reminiscent of desmin-positive protein deposits seen in the immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis of skeletal muscle derived from the index patient of the affected family. To study the functional effects of the R350P desmin mutation at the protein level, we performed in vitro assembly studies with wild-type (WT) and mutant desmin protein. Our analysis revealed that the in vitro assembly process of R350P desmin is already disturbed at the unit length filament level and that further association reactions generate huge, tightly packed protein aggregates. On assessing the pathogenic effects of R350P desmin in various mixtures with WT desmin, we show that a ratio of 1 : 3 (R350P desmin/WT desmin) is sufficient to effectively block the normal polymerization process of desmin IFs. Our findings indicate that the heterozygous R350P desmin mutation exerts a dominant negative effect on the ordered lateral arrangement of desmin subunits. This disturbance of the lateral packing taking place in the first phase of assembly is ultimately leading to abnormal protein aggregation. PMID:15800015

  20. A novel DMD IRES results in a functional N-truncated dystrophin, providing a potential route to therapy for patients with 5’ mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Nicolas; Vulin, Adeline; Sofia Falzarano, Maria; Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Christina; Maiti, Baijayanta; Findlay, Andrew; Heller, Kristin N; Uhlén, Mathias; Bakthavachalu, Baskar; Messina, Sonia; Vita, Giuseppe; Passarelli, Chiara; Gualandi, Francesca; Wilton, Steve D; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Yang, Lin; Dunn, Diane M.; Schoenberg, Daniel; Weiss, Robert B.; Howard, Michael T.; Ferlini, Alessandra; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Most mutations that truncate the reading frame of the DMD gene cause loss of dystrophin expression and lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, amelioration of disease severity can result from alternate translation initiation beginning in DMD exon 6 that leads to expression of a highly functional N-truncated dystrophin. This novel isoform results from usage of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within exon 5 that is glucocorticoid-inducible. IRES activity is confirmed in patient muscle by both peptide sequencing and ribosome profiling. Generation of a truncated reading frame upstream of the IRES by exon skipping leads to synthesis of a functional N-truncated isoform in both patient-derived cell lines and in a new DMD mouse model, where expression protects muscle from contraction-induced injury and corrects muscle force to the same level as control mice. These results support a novel therapeutic approach for patients with mutations within the 5’ exons of DMD. PMID:25108525

  1. Heterozygous mutation of c.3521C>T in COL1A1 may cause mild osteogenesis imperfecta/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianlong; Lu, Yanqin; Wang, Yanzhou; Zhang, Yu-ang; Teng, Yuanwei; Han, Wanshui; Han, Zhenzhong; Li, Tianyou; Chen, Mei; Liu, Junlong; Fang, Fengling; Dou, Conghui; Ren, Xiuzhi; Han, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inheritable connective tissue disorder with a broad clinical heterozygosis, which can be complicated by other connective tissue disorders like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). OI/EDS are rarely documented. Most OI/EDS mutations are located in the N-anchor region of type I procollagen and predominated by glycine substitution. We identified a c.3521C>T (p.A1174V) heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 gene in a four-generation pedigree with proposed mild OI/EDS phenotype. The affected individuals had blue sclera and dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) was uniformly absent. The OI phenotype varied from mild to moderate, with the absence of scoliosis and increased skin extensibility. Easy bruising, joint dislocations and high Beighton score were present in some affected individuals. EDS phenotype is either mild or unremarkable in some individuals. The mutation is poorly conserved and in silico prediction support the relatively mild phenotype. The molecular mechanisms of the mutation that leads to the possible OI/EDS phenotype should be further identified by biochemical analysis of N-propeptide processing and steady state collagen analysis. PMID:25674388

  2. Two novel heterozygous mutations of EVC2 cause a mild phenotype of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenjing; Han, Dong; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Hongshan; Feng, Hailan

    2011-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, chondroectodermal dysplasia; OMIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia with associated multisystem involvement. The syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, and abnormal teeth. Congenital heart defects occur in 50-60% of cases. In this study, we report EvC in a 6-year-old Chinese girl with hypodontia and polydactyly, mild short stature, and abnormalities of the knee joints. No signs of short ribs, narrow thorax, or congenital heart defects were found in this patient. The EvC phenotype shares some similarity with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyer; OMIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, and dysplastic teeth. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 are associated with both EvC syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis, but the two conditions differ in the severity of the phenotype and their pattern of inheritance. In this study, two novel heterozygous EVC2 mutations, IVS5-2A > G and c.2653C > T (Arg885X), were identified in the patient. The IVS5-2A > G mutation was inherited from the patient's mother and the c.2653C > T from her father. Her parents have no phenotypic symptoms similar to those of the patient. These findings extend the mutation spectrum of this malformation syndrome and provide the possibility of prenatal diagnosis for future offspring in this family.

  3. Unusual cutaneous features associated with a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in IFIH1: overlap between Aicardi–Goutières and Singleton–Merten syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bursztejn, A.-C.; Briggs, T.A.; del Toro Duany, Y.; Anderson, B.H.; O’Sullivan, J.; Williams, S.G.; Bodemer, C.; Fraitag, S.; Gebhard, F.; Leheup, B.; Lemelle, I.; Oojageer, A.; Raffo, E.; Schmitt, E.; Rice, G.I.; Hur, S.; Crow, Y.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cutaneous lesions described as chilblain lupus occur in the context of familial chilblain lupus or Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. To date, seven genes related to Aicardi–Goutières syndrome have been described. The most recently described encodes the cytosolic double-stranded RNA receptor IFIH1 (also known as MDA5), a key component of the antiviral type I interferon-mediated innate immune response. Enhanced type I interferon signalling secondary to gain-of-function mutations in IFIH1 can result in a range of neuroinflammatory phenotypes including classical Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. It is of note that none of the patients with a neurological phenotype so far described with mutations in this gene was reported to demonstrate cutaneous involvement. We present a family segregating a heterozygous pathogenic mutation in IFIH1 showing dermatological involvement as a prominent feature, variably associated with neurological disturbance and premature tooth loss. All three affected individuals exhibited increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in whole blood, and the mutant protein resulted in enhanced interferon signalling in vitro, both in the basal state and following ligand stimulation. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in IFIH1, indicating that the disease can be confined predominantly to the skin, while also highlighting phenotypic overlap with both Aicardi–Goutières syndrome and Singleton–Merten syndrome. PMID:26284909

  4. The two mutations, Q204X and nt821, of the myostatin gene affect carcass and meat quality in young heterozygous bulls of French beef breeds.

    PubMed

    Allais, S; Levéziel, H; Payet-Duprat, N; Hocquette, J F; Lepetit, J; Rousset, S; Denoyelle, C; Bernard-Capel, C; Journaux, L; Bonnot, A; Renand, G

    2010-02-01

    The availability of genetic tests to detect different mutations in the myostatin gene allows the identification of heterozygous animals and would warrant the superiority of these animals for slaughter performance if this superiority is confirmed. Thus, 2 mutations of this gene, Q204X and nt821, were studied in 3 French beef breeds in the program Qualvigène. This work was done with 1,114 Charolais, 1,254 Limousin, and 981 Blonde d'Aquitaine young bulls from, respectively, 48, 36, and 30 sires and slaughtered from 2004 to 2006. In addition to the usual carcass traits recorded at slaughter (e.g., carcass yield, muscle score), carcass composition was estimated by weighing internal fat and dissecting the 6th rib. The muscle characteristic traits analyzed were lipid and collagen contents, muscle fiber section area, and pH. Regarding meat quality, sensory qualities of meat samples were evaluated by a taste panel, and Warner-Bratzler shear force was measured. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from the blood samples of all calves, the blood samples of 78% of the dams, and the blood or semen samples of all the sires. Genotypes were determined for 2 disruptive mutations, Q204X and nt821. Analyses were conducted by breed. The superiority of carcass traits of calves carrying one copy of the mutated allele (Q204X or nt821) over noncarrier animals was approximately +1 SD in the Charolais and Limousin breeds but was not significant in the Blonde d'Aquitaine. In the Charolais breed, for which the frequency was the greatest (7%), young bulls carrying the Q204X mutation presented a carcass with less fat, less intramuscular fat and collagen contents, and a clearer and more tender meat than those of homozygous-normal cattle. The meat of these animals also had slightly less flavor. Also in the Charolais breed, 13 of 48 sires were heterozygous. For each sire, the substitution effect of the wild allele by the mutant allele was approximately +1 SD for carcass conformation and yield

  5. The two mutations, Q204X and nt821, of the myostatin gene affect carcass and meat quality in young heterozygous bulls of French beef breeds.

    PubMed

    Allais, S; Levéziel, H; Payet-Duprat, N; Hocquette, J F; Lepetit, J; Rousset, S; Denoyelle, C; Bernard-Capel, C; Journaux, L; Bonnot, A; Renand, G

    2010-02-01

    The availability of genetic tests to detect different mutations in the myostatin gene allows the identification of heterozygous animals and would warrant the superiority of these animals for slaughter performance if this superiority is confirmed. Thus, 2 mutations of this gene, Q204X and nt821, were studied in 3 French beef breeds in the program Qualvigène. This work was done with 1,114 Charolais, 1,254 Limousin, and 981 Blonde d'Aquitaine young bulls from, respectively, 48, 36, and 30 sires and slaughtered from 2004 to 2006. In addition to the usual carcass traits recorded at slaughter (e.g., carcass yield, muscle score), carcass composition was estimated by weighing internal fat and dissecting the 6th rib. The muscle characteristic traits analyzed were lipid and collagen contents, muscle fiber section area, and pH. Regarding meat quality, sensory qualities of meat samples were evaluated by a taste panel, and Warner-Bratzler shear force was measured. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from the blood samples of all calves, the blood samples of 78% of the dams, and the blood or semen samples of all the sires. Genotypes were determined for 2 disruptive mutations, Q204X and nt821. Analyses were conducted by breed. The superiority of carcass traits of calves carrying one copy of the mutated allele (Q204X or nt821) over noncarrier animals was approximately +1 SD in the Charolais and Limousin breeds but was not significant in the Blonde d'Aquitaine. In the Charolais breed, for which the frequency was the greatest (7%), young bulls carrying the Q204X mutation presented a carcass with less fat, less intramuscular fat and collagen contents, and a clearer and more tender meat than those of homozygous-normal cattle. The meat of these animals also had slightly less flavor. Also in the Charolais breed, 13 of 48 sires were heterozygous. For each sire, the substitution effect of the wild allele by the mutant allele was approximately +1 SD for carcass conformation and yield

  6. Misfolding of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase due to carboxy-terminal truncation can be corrected by second-site mutations.

    PubMed

    Van der Schueren, J; Robben, J; Volckaert, G

    1998-12-01

    Folding of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in Escherichia coli is hampered by deletion of the carboxy-terminal tail including the last residue of the carboxy-terminal alpha-helix. Such truncated CAT polypeptides quantitatively aggregate into cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, which results in absence of a chloramphenicol-resistant phenotype for the producing host. In this paper, a genetic approach is presented to examine this aggregation process in more detail. Random mutagenesis of inactive CAT followed by direct phenotypic selection for revertants with restored chloramphenicol resistance was used to isolate second-site suppressors of inactive truncation mutants of CAT. Two random mutagenesis procedures, independently of each other, yielded a unique substitution of Phe for Leu at amino acid position 145. This second-site mutation does not drastically affect the proteins' stability under normal growth conditions of E. coli. Hence, the introduction of Phe at amino acid position 145 improves the ability of the protein to fold into a soluble, enzymatically active conformation. The conservative character of the Leu145Phe replacement indicates that limited changes at crucial positions can have important effects on protein folding in vivo.

  7. Deep venous thrombosis caused by congenital inferior vena cava agenesis and heterozygous factor V Leiden mutation – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Vasco, Pablo Guisado; López, Angel Ruedas; Piñeiro, María Laiño; Rivera, José Ignacio Gallego

    2009-01-01

    The unusual clinical presentation, importance of imaging techniques and role of low molecular weight heparin are described for an initial treatment of thrombosis in inferior vena cava agenesis associated with heterozygous factor V Leiden. The patient, a 36-year-old woman, presented to the emergency room with sudden onset of back pain, swelling of the legs and thighs, and claudication while walking. Abdominal ultrasonography was immediately ordered. Anomalies in vascular blood flow were detected. Computed tomography was performed, and initially showed a complete absence of the infrarenal segment of inferior vena cava caudally to the origin of both renal veins. Treatment with enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice per day) was started. The patient was discharged and returned to her activities of daily living two weeks after admission. This vascular abnormality is mostly incidentally diagnosed in adults and only a few cases are described as being associated with thrombophilia. PMID:22477517

  8. Compound heterozygous mutations in the SRD5A2 gene exon 4 in a male pseudohermaphrodite patient of Chinese origin.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Nistal, Manuel; Gracia, Ricardo; Molina, M Antonia; Tovar, Juan Antonio; Esteban, Cristina; Carrascosa, Antonio; Audí, Laura

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform 5-alpha-reductase type 2 gene (SRD5A2) analysis in a male pseudohermaphrodite (MPH) patient with normal testosterone (T) production and normal androgen receptor (AR) gene coding sequences. A patient of Chinese origin with ambiguous genitalia at 14 months, a 46,XY karyotype, and normal T secretion under human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation underwent a gonadectomy at 20 months. Exons 1-8 of the AR gene and exons 1-5 of the SRD5A2 gene were sequenced from peripheral blood DNA. AR gene coding sequences were normal. SRD5A2 gene analysis revealed 2 consecutive mutations in exon 4, each located in a different allele: 1) a T nucleotide deletion, which predicts a frameshift mutation from codon 219, and 2) a missense mutation at codon 227, where the substitution of guanine (CGA) by adenine (CAA) predicts a glutamine replacement of arginine (R227Q). Testes located in the inguinal canal showed a normal morphology for age. The patient was a compound heterozygote for SRD5A2 mutations, carrying 2 mutations in exon 4. The patient showed an R227Q mutation that has been described in an Asian population and MPH patients, along with a novel frameshift mutation, Tdel219. Testis morphology showed that, during early infancy, the 5-alpha-reductase enzyme deficiency may not have affected interstitial or tubular development.

  9. Compound heterozygous desmoplakin mutations result in a phenotype with a combination of myocardial, skin, hair, and enamel abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, My G; Sadowski, Sara; Brennan, Donna; Pikander, Pekka; Saukko, Pekka; Wahl, James; Aho, Heikki; Heikinheimo, Kristiina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Fertala, Andrzej; Peltonen, Juha; Uitto, Jouni; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2010-04-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) anchors the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to the desmosomal cadherins and thereby confers structural stability to tissues. In this study, we present a patient with extensive mucocutaneous blisters, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, nail dystrophy, enamel dysplasia, and sparse woolly hair. The patient died at the age of 14 years from undiagnosed cardiomyopathy. The skin showed hyperplasia and acantholysis in the mid- and lower epidermal layers, whereas the heart showed extensive fibrosis and fibrofatty replacement in both ventricles. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a reduction in the C-terminal domain of DP in the skin and oral mucosa. Sequencing of the DP gene showed undescribed mutations in the maternal and paternal alleles. Both mutations affected exon 24 encoding the C-terminal domain. The paternal mutation, c.6310delA, leads to a premature stop codon. The maternal mutation, c.7964 C to A, results in a substitution of an aspartic acid for a conserved alanine residue at amino acid 2655 (A2655D). Structural modeling indicated that this mutation changes the electrostatic potential of the mutated region of DP, possibly altering functions that depend on intermolecular interactions. To conclude, we describe a combination of DP mutation phenotypes affecting the skin, heart, hair, and teeth. This patient case emphasizes the importance of heart examination of patients with desmosomal genodermatoses.

  10. Compound Heterozygous Desmoplakin Mutations Result in a Phenotype with a Combination of Myocardial, Skin, Hair, and Enamel Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Mỹ G.; Sadowski, Sara; Brennan, Donna; Pikander, Pekka; Saukko, Pekka; Wahl, James; Aho, Heikki; Heikinheimo, Kristiina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Fertala, Andrzej; Peltonen, Juha; Uitto, Jouni; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2014-01-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) anchors the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to the desmosomal cadherins and thereby confers structural stability to tissues. In this study, we present a patient with extensive mucocutaneous blisters, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, nail dystrophy, enamel dysplasia, and sparse woolly hair. The patient died at the age of 14 years from undiagnosed cardiomyopathy. The skin showed hyperplasia and acantholysis in the mid- and lower epidermal layers, whereas the heart showed extensive fibrosis and fibrofatty replacement in both ventricles. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a reduction in the C-terminal domain of DP in the skin and oral mucosa. Sequencing of the DP gene showed undescribed mutations in the maternal and paternal alleles. Both mutations affected exon 24 encoding the C-terminal domain. The paternal mutation, c.6310delA, leads to a premature stop codon. The maternal mutation, c.7964 C to A, results in a substitution of an aspartic acid for a conserved alanine residue at amino acid 2655 (A2655D). Structural modeling indicated that this mutation changes the electrostatic potential of the mutated region of DP, possibly altering functions that depend on intermolecular interactions. To conclude, we describe a combination of DP mutation phenotypes affecting the skin, heart, hair, and teeth. This patient case emphasizes the importance of heart examination of patients with desmosomal genodermatoses. PMID:19924139

  11. A novel mutation in IFN-gamma receptor 2 with dominant negative activity: biological consequences of homozygous and heterozygous states.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Dorman, Susan E; Uzel, Gulbu; Shaw, Stephen; Scurlock, Amy; Brown, Margaret R; Buckley, Rebecca H; Holland, Steven M

    2004-09-15

    We identified two siblings homozygous for a single base pair deletion in the IFN-gammaR2 transmembrane domain (791delG) who presented with multifocal Mycobacterium abscessus osteomyelitis (patient 1) and disseminated CMV and Mycobacterium avium complex infection (patient 2), respectively. Although the patients showed no IFN-gammaR activity, their healthy heterozygous parents showed only partial IFN-gammaR activity. An HLA-identical bone marrow transplant from the mother led patient 1 to complete hemopoietic reconstitution, but only partial IFN-gammaR function. We cloned and expressed fluorescent fusion proteins of the wild-type IFN-gammaR2, an IFN-gammaR2 mutant previously described to produce a complete autosomal recessive deficiency (278del2), and of 791delG to determine whether the intermediate phenotype in the 791delG heterozygous state was caused by haploinsufficiency or a dominant negative effect. When cotransfected together with the wild-type vector into IFN-gammaR2-deficient fibroblasts, the fusion protein with 791delG inhibited IFN-gammaR function by 48.7 +/- 5%, whereas fusion proteins with 278del2 had no inhibitory effect. Confocal microscopy of 791delG fusion proteins showed aberrant diffuse intracellular accumulation without plasma membrane localization. The fusion protein created by 791delG did not complete Golgi processing, and was neither expressed on the plasma membrane, nor shed extracellularly. The mutant construct 791delG exerts dominant negative effects on IFN-gamma signaling without cell surface display, suggesting that it is acting on pathways other than those involved in cell surface recognition of ligand.

  12. Pulmonary Thromboembolism Following Radio-Frequency Ablation of the Atrioventricular Node in a Patient Heterozygous for the Factor V Leiden and the Mthfr C677T Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pešut, DP; Raljević, SV; Kontić, MDj; Božić, DZ; Buha, IB; Stević, RS

    2011-01-01

    Patients who undergo radiofrequency ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) node rarely develop acute major complications. A 41-year-old Caucasian male smoker, was admitted to the Pulmology Teaching Hospital at Belgrade, Serbia, for sharp persistent chest pain, fever and fatigue following AV node radiofrequency ablation for arrhythmia. Chest X-ray showed obtuse right costo-phrenic angle and laminar atelectasis in the right lower lung lobe. The plasma D-dimer level was elevated. A perfusion lung scan showed multiple bilateral perfusion defects and multislice computed tomography showed thrombotic mass in the right pulmonary artery. Genetic analysis revealed that he was heterozygous for the prothrombin Factor V (FV) Leiden and MTHFR C677T mutations. Therapy started with intravenous heparin, followed by warfarin. He had no other episodes over a 2-year follow-up. Lifelong oral anticoagulant therapy was recommended. PMID:24052703

  13. Combined portal, splenic and mesenteric venous thrombosis in inactive ulcerative colitis with heterozygous mutation in MTHFR gene: A rare case of thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Gül; Cimbek, Ahmet; Acar, Yaşar; Erol, Birsen; Dal, Hayriye Cankar; Evrin, Nuray; Gungor, Aslı

    2011-11-01

    Thrombophilia is a rare but potentially catastrophic phenomenon occurring in patients having tendency of thrombosis. It may lead to serious complications. The etiology of thrombophilia is thought to be multifactorial and related to both acquired and inherited factors. Inflammatory bowel disease is an acquired cause of thrombophilia. Thromboembolic events are seen during inflammatory bowel disease, especially during the active period of the disease. In inflammatory bowel disease, thrombus formation in portal, splenic and mesenteric veins are not common. Besides, the association of genetic disorders related to metabolism of homocysteine with inflammatory bowel disease has been evidenced, especially in Crohn disease and rarely in ulcerative colitis. We present a rare case of ulcerative colitis in association with combined portal, splenic and mesenteric vein thrombosis. The patient was recently diagnosed with the disease which was in the inactive period. Interestingly, our patient was also heterozygous for the mutation in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene.

  14. Heterozygous Cylindromatosis Gene Mutation c.1628_1629delCT in a Family with Brook-Spiegler Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Cintia Arjona; De la Varga Martínez, Raquel; García, Lidia Ossorio; Jiménez-Gallo, David; Planelles, Cristina Albarrán; Barrios, Mario Linares

    2016-01-01

    Brooke-Spiegler Syndrome (BSS) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by the progressive formation of adnexal skin tumors in the scalp and face, mainly trichoepitheliomas, cylindromas, and spiradenomas. It has also been associated with salivary glands neoplasms. It is due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene cylindromatosis (CYLD gene) localized on chromosome 16q12-q13. Around 93 mutations have been described. The study of CYLD gene in patients and their relatives is of vital importance to establish the molecular diagnosis and offer appropriate genetic counseling. There is a low risk of malignancy and patients require long-term follow-up. A case of BSS in a family is described. The existence of the genetic mutation at the CYLD gene c. 1628_1629delCT in three of the women affected was demonstrated. This mutation has only been described once in a previous study. PMID:27688459

  15. Heterozygous Cylindromatosis Gene Mutation c.1628_1629delCT in a Family with Brook-Spiegler Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Cintia Arjona; De la Varga Martínez, Raquel; García, Lidia Ossorio; Jiménez-Gallo, David; Planelles, Cristina Albarrán; Barrios, Mario Linares

    2016-01-01

    Brooke–Spiegler Syndrome (BSS) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by the progressive formation of adnexal skin tumors in the scalp and face, mainly trichoepitheliomas, cylindromas, and spiradenomas. It has also been associated with salivary glands neoplasms. It is due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene cylindromatosis (CYLD gene) localized on chromosome 16q12−q13. Around 93 mutations have been described. The study of CYLD gene in patients and their relatives is of vital importance to establish the molecular diagnosis and offer appropriate genetic counseling. There is a low risk of malignancy and patients require long-term follow-up. A case of BSS in a family is described. The existence of the genetic mutation at the CYLD gene c. 1628_1629delCT in three of the women affected was demonstrated. This mutation has only been described once in a previous study. PMID:27688459

  16. Heterozygous Cylindromatosis Gene Mutation c.1628_1629delCT in a Family with Brook-Spiegler Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Cintia Arjona; De la Varga Martínez, Raquel; García, Lidia Ossorio; Jiménez-Gallo, David; Planelles, Cristina Albarrán; Barrios, Mario Linares

    2016-01-01

    Brooke–Spiegler Syndrome (BSS) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by the progressive formation of adnexal skin tumors in the scalp and face, mainly trichoepitheliomas, cylindromas, and spiradenomas. It has also been associated with salivary glands neoplasms. It is due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene cylindromatosis (CYLD gene) localized on chromosome 16q12−q13. Around 93 mutations have been described. The study of CYLD gene in patients and their relatives is of vital importance to establish the molecular diagnosis and offer appropriate genetic counseling. There is a low risk of malignancy and patients require long-term follow-up. A case of BSS in a family is described. The existence of the genetic mutation at the CYLD gene c. 1628_1629delCT in three of the women affected was demonstrated. This mutation has only been described once in a previous study.

  17. Exome sequencing reveals a novel WDR45 frameshift mutation and inherited POLR3A heterozygous variants in a female with a complex phenotype and mixed brain MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Naffaa, Lena

    2015-08-01

    WDR45 and POLR3A are newly recognized genes; each is associated with a distinct neurodegenerative disease. WDR45 is an X-linked gene associated with a dominant form of Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), manifested by progressive disabilities, dystonia, cognitive decline, spastic paraplegia, neuropsychiatric abnormalities and iron deposition in the basal ganglia on brain imaging. POLR3A, on the other hand, is an autosomal gene, and its mutations cause a recessive form of a hypomyelination with leukodystrophy disease, also known as 4H syndrome, characterized by congenital Hypomyelination with thinning of the corpus callosum, Hypodontia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism. We report on a female child with severe intellectual disability, aphasia, short stature, ataxia, failure to thrive and structural brain abnormalities. Brain MRI obtained in late infancy showed hypomyelination involving the central periventricular white matter and thinning of the corpus callosum with no evidence of iron accumulation. Brain MRI obtained in childhood showed stable hypomyelination, with progressive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia, in particular in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra. Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) identified a novel WDR45 frameshift deleterious mutation in Exon 9 (c.587-588del) and also revealed three POLR3A missense heterozygous variants. The first is a maternally inherited novel missense variant in exon 4 (c.346A > G). Exon 13 carried two heterozygous missense variants, a maternally inherited variant (c.1724A > T) and a paternally inherited variant (1745G > A). These variants are considered likely damaging. The patient's complex clinical phenotype and mixed brain MRI findings might be attributed to the confounding effects of the expression of these two mutant genes.

  18. Canine Chondrodysplasia Caused by a Truncating Mutation in Collagen-Binding Integrin Alpha Subunit 10

    PubMed Central

    Kyöstilä, Kaisa; Lappalainen, Anu K.; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal dysplasias are disorders of the bone and cartilage tissues. Similarly to humans, several dog breeds have been reported to suffer from different types of genetic skeletal disorders. We have studied the molecular genetic background of an autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia that affects the Norwegian Elkhound and Karelian Bear Dog breeds. The affected dogs suffer from disproportionate short stature dwarfism of varying severity. Through a genome-wide approach, we mapped the chondrodysplasia locus to a 2-Mb region on canine chromosome 17 in nine affected and nine healthy Elkhounds (praw = 7.42×10−6, pgenome-wide = 0.013). The associated locus contained a promising candidate gene, cartilage specific integrin alpha 10 (ITGA10), and mutation screening of its 30 exons revealed a nonsense mutation in exon 16 (c.2083C>T; p.Arg695*) that segregated fully with the disease in both breeds (p = 2.5×10−23). A 24% mutation carrier frequency was indicated in NEs and an 8% frequency in KBDs. The ITGA10 gene product, integrin receptor α10-subunit combines into a collagen-binding α10β1 integrin receptor, which is expressed in cartilage chondrocytes and mediates chondrocyte-matrix interactions during endochondral ossification. As a consequence of the nonsense mutation, the α10-protein was not detected in the affected cartilage tissue. The canine phenotype highlights the importance of the α10β1 integrin in bone growth, and the large animal model could be utilized to further delineate its specific functions. Finally, this study revealed a candidate gene for human chondrodysplasias and enabled the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes to eradicate the disease from the two dog breeds. PMID:24086591

  19. Profound defects in pancreatic beta-cell function in mice with combined heterozygous mutations in Pdx-1, Hnf-1alpha, and Hnf-3beta.

    PubMed

    Shih, David Q; Heimesaat, Markus; Kuwajima, Satoru; Stein, Roland; Wright, Christopher V E; Stoffel, Markus

    2002-03-19

    Defects in pancreatic beta-cell function contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes, a polygenic disease that is characterized by insulin resistance and compromised insulin secretion. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) -1alpha, -3beta, -4alpha, and Pdx-1 contribute in the complex transcriptional circuits within the pancreas that are involved in beta-cell development and function. In mice, a heterozygous mutation in Pdx-1 alone, but not Hnf-1alpha(+/-), Hnf-3beta(+/-), or Hnf-4alpha(+/-), causes impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice. To investigate the possible functional relationships between these transcription factors on beta-cell activity in vivo, we generated mice with the following combined heterozygous mutations: Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-), Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-), Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-), Hnf-1alpha(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-), and Hnf-3beta(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-). The greatest loss in function was in combined heterozygous null alleles of Pdx-1 and Hnf-1alpha (Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-)), or Pdx-1 and Hnf-3beta (Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-)). Both double mutants develop progressively impaired glucose tolerance and acquire a compromised first- and second-phase insulin secretion profile in response to glucose compared with Pdx-1(+/-) mice alone. The loss in beta-cell function in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-) mice was associated with decreased expression of Nkx-6.1, glucokinase (Gck), aldolase B (aldo-B), and insulin, whereas Nkx2.2, Nkx-6.1, Glut-2, Gck, aldo-B, the liver isoform of pyruvate kinase, and insulin expression was reduced in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-) mice. The islet cell architecture was also abnormal in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-) and Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-) mice, with glucagon-expressing cells scattered throughout the islet, a defect that may be connected to decreased E-cadherin expression. Our data suggest that functional interactions between key islet regulatory factors play an important role in maintaining islet architecture and

  20. An internal promoter underlies the difference in disease severity between N- and C-terminal truncation mutations of Titin in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Tran, Diana; Baalbaki, Mai; Tang, Ling Fung; Poon, Annie; Pelonero, Angelo; Titus, Erron W; Yuan, Christiana; Shi, Chenxu; Patchava, Shruthi; Halper, Elizabeth; Garg, Jasmine; Movsesyan, Irina; Yin, Chaoying; Wu, Roland; Wilsbacher, Lisa D; Liu, Jiandong; Hager, Ronald L; Coughlin, Shaun R; Jinek, Martin; Pullinger, Clive R; Kane, John P; Hart, Daniel O; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Deo, Rahul C

    2015-01-01

    Truncating mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein Titin result in dilated cardiomyopathy and skeletal myopathy. The most severely affected dilated cardiomyopathy patients harbor Titin truncations in the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein, suggesting that mutation position might influence disease mechanism. Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated six zebrafish lines with Titin truncations in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Although all exons were constitutive, C-terminal mutations caused severe myopathy whereas N-terminal mutations demonstrated mild phenotypes. Surprisingly, neither mutation type acted as a dominant negative. Instead, we found a conserved internal promoter at the precise position where divergence in disease severity occurs, with the resulting protein product partially rescuing N-terminal truncations. In addition to its clinical implications, our work may shed light on a long-standing mystery regarding the architecture of the sarcomere. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09406.001 PMID:26473617

  1. The heterozygous A53T mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene in a Chinese Han patient with Parkinson disease: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei-Xi; Sun, Yi-Min; Guan, Rong-Yuan; Luo, Su-Shan; Chen, Chen; An, Yu; Wang, Jian; Wu, Jian-Jun

    2016-10-01

    The missense mutation A53T of alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA) was reported to be a rare but definite cause of sporadic and familial Parkinson disease (PD). It seemed to be restricted geographically in Greece and Italy. We aimed to identify the SNCA mutations in a Chinese PD cohort. Ninety-one early onset PD patients or familial PD probands were collected consecutively for the screening of PD-related genes. The genetic analysis was carried out by target sequencing of the exons and the corresponding flanking regions of the PD-related genes using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer and further confirmed by Sanger sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Dosage mutations of exons in these genes were carried out by multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification. Among the 91 patients, we found only one heterozygous mutation of SNCA A53T, in a 23-year-old male patient with negative family history. The [(11)C]-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropan (CFT) PET and PD-related spatial covariance pattern (PDRP) via [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucos (FDG) PET confirmed a typical pattern of PD. After examining his parents, we found his mother was an asymptomatic carrier, with declined hand dexterity detected by quantitative motor tests. Reduced dopamine transporter uptake of his mother was identified by CFT PET, and abnormal PDRP pattern was found by FDG PET. Our investigation expanded the clinical and genetic spectrum of Chinese PD patients, and we suggested SNCA mutations to be screened in familial and early onset Chinese PD patients. PMID:27393118

  2. The heterozygous A53T mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene in a Chinese Han patient with Parkinson disease: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei-Xi; Sun, Yi-Min; Guan, Rong-Yuan; Luo, Su-Shan; Chen, Chen; An, Yu; Wang, Jian; Wu, Jian-Jun

    2016-10-01

    The missense mutation A53T of alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA) was reported to be a rare but definite cause of sporadic and familial Parkinson disease (PD). It seemed to be restricted geographically in Greece and Italy. We aimed to identify the SNCA mutations in a Chinese PD cohort. Ninety-one early onset PD patients or familial PD probands were collected consecutively for the screening of PD-related genes. The genetic analysis was carried out by target sequencing of the exons and the corresponding flanking regions of the PD-related genes using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer and further confirmed by Sanger sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Dosage mutations of exons in these genes were carried out by multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification. Among the 91 patients, we found only one heterozygous mutation of SNCA A53T, in a 23-year-old male patient with negative family history. The [(11)C]-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropan (CFT) PET and PD-related spatial covariance pattern (PDRP) via [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucos (FDG) PET confirmed a typical pattern of PD. After examining his parents, we found his mother was an asymptomatic carrier, with declined hand dexterity detected by quantitative motor tests. Reduced dopamine transporter uptake of his mother was identified by CFT PET, and abnormal PDRP pattern was found by FDG PET. Our investigation expanded the clinical and genetic spectrum of Chinese PD patients, and we suggested SNCA mutations to be screened in familial and early onset Chinese PD patients.

  3. Isomerization and Oligomerization of Truncated and Mutated Tau Forms by FKBP52 are Independent Processes.

    PubMed

    Kamah, A; Cantrelle, F X; Huvent, I; Giustiniani, J; Guillemeau, K; Byrne, C; Jacquot, Y; Landrieu, I; Baulieu, E E; Smet, C; Chambraud, B; Lippens, G

    2016-03-27

    The aggregation of the neuronal Tau protein is one molecular hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and other related tauopathies, but the precise molecular mechanisms of the aggregation process remain unclear. The FK506 binding protein FKBP52 is able to induce oligomers in the pathogenic Tau P301L mutant and in a truncated form of the wild-type human Tau protein. Here, we investigate whether FKBP52's capacity to induce Tau oligomers depends on its prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity. We find that FKBP52 indeed can isomerize selected prolyl bonds in the different Tau proteins, and that this activity is carried solely by its first FK506 binding domain. Its capacity to oligomerize Tau is, however, not linked to this peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity. In addition, we identified a novel molecular interaction implying the PHF6 peptide of Tau and the FK1/FK2 domains of FKBP52 independent of FK506 binding; these data point toward a non-catalytic molecular interaction that might govern the effect of FKBP52 on Tau.

  4. Isomerization and Oligomerization of Truncated and Mutated Tau Forms by FKBP52 are Independent Processes.

    PubMed

    Kamah, A; Cantrelle, F X; Huvent, I; Giustiniani, J; Guillemeau, K; Byrne, C; Jacquot, Y; Landrieu, I; Baulieu, E E; Smet, C; Chambraud, B; Lippens, G

    2016-03-27

    The aggregation of the neuronal Tau protein is one molecular hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and other related tauopathies, but the precise molecular mechanisms of the aggregation process remain unclear. The FK506 binding protein FKBP52 is able to induce oligomers in the pathogenic Tau P301L mutant and in a truncated form of the wild-type human Tau protein. Here, we investigate whether FKBP52's capacity to induce Tau oligomers depends on its prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity. We find that FKBP52 indeed can isomerize selected prolyl bonds in the different Tau proteins, and that this activity is carried solely by its first FK506 binding domain. Its capacity to oligomerize Tau is, however, not linked to this peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity. In addition, we identified a novel molecular interaction implying the PHF6 peptide of Tau and the FK1/FK2 domains of FKBP52 independent of FK506 binding; these data point toward a non-catalytic molecular interaction that might govern the effect of FKBP52 on Tau. PMID:26903089

  5. Heterozygous germline mutations in A2ML1 are associated with a disorder clinically related to Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Bonetti, Monica; Paardekooper Overman, Jeroen; Nillesen, Willy M; Frints, Suzanna G M; de Ligt, Joep; Zampino, Giuseppe; Justino, Ana; Machado, José C; Schepens, Marga; Brunner, Han G; Veltman, Joris A; Scheffer, Hans; Gros, Piet; Costa, José L; Tartaglia, Marco; van der Burgt, Ineke; Yntema, Helger G; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2015-03-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a developmental disorder characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphisms and congenital heart defects. To date, all mutations known to cause NS are dominant, activating mutations in signal transducers of the RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In 25% of cases, however, the genetic cause of NS remains elusive, suggesting that factors other than those involved in the canonical RAS/MAPK pathway may also have a role. Here, we used family-based whole exome sequencing of a case-parent trio and identified a de novo mutation, p.(Arg802His), in A2ML1, which encodes the secreted protease inhibitor α-2-macroglobulin (A2M)-like-1. Subsequent resequencing of A2ML1 in 155 cases with a clinical diagnosis of NS led to the identification of additional mutations in two families, p.(Arg802Leu) and p.(Arg592Leu). Functional characterization of these human A2ML1 mutations in zebrafish showed NS-like developmental defects, including a broad head, blunted face and cardiac malformations. Using the crystal structure of A2M, which is highly homologous to A2ML1, we identified the intramolecular interaction partner of p.Arg802. Mutation of this residue, p.Glu906, induced similar developmental defects in zebrafish, strengthening our conclusion that mutations in A2ML1 cause a disorder clinically related to NS. This is the first report of the involvement of an extracellular factor in a disorder clinically related to RASopathies, providing potential new leads for better understanding of the molecular basis of this family of developmental diseases. PMID:24939586

  6. Ataxia and myoclonic epilepsy due to a heterozygous new mutation in KCNA2: proposal for a new channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Pena, S D J; Coimbra, R L M

    2015-02-01

    We have recently performed exome analysis in a 7 year boy who presented in infancy with an encephalopathy characterized by ataxia and myoclonic epilepsy. Parents were not consanguineous and there was no family history of the disease. Exome analysis did not show any pathogenic variants in genes known to be associated with seizures and/or ataxia in children, including all known human channelopathies. However, we have identified a mutation in KCNA2 that we believe to be responsible for the disease in our patient. This gene, which encodes a member of the potassium channel, voltage-gated, shaker-related subfamily, has not been previously described as a cause of disease in humans, but mutations of the orthologous gene in mice (Kcna2) are known to cause both ataxia and convulsions. The mutation is c.890C>A, leading to the amino acid substitution p.Arg297Gln, which involves the second of the critical arginines in the S4 voltage sensor. This mutation is characterized as pathogenic by five different prediction programs. RFLP analysis and Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of the mutation in the patient, but not in his parents, characterizing it as de novo. We believe that this discovery characterizes a new channelopathy.

  7. De Novo Truncating Mutations in the Kinetochore-Microtubules Attachment Gene CHAMP1 Cause Syndromic Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Isidor, Bertrand; Küry, Sébastien; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Besnard, Thomas; Schmitt, Sébastien; Joss, Shelagh; Davies, Sally J; Lebel, Robert Roger; Henderson, Alex; Schaaf, Christian P; Streff, Haley E; Yang, Yaping; Jain, Vani; Chida, Nodoka; Latypova, Xenia; Le Caignec, Cédric; Cogné, Benjamin; Mercier, Sandra; Vincent, Marie; Colin, Estelle; Bonneau, Dominique; Denommé, Anne-Sophie; Parent, Philippe; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Odent, Sylvie; Toutain, Annick; Piton, Amélie; Dina, Christian; Donnart, Audrey; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Charpentier, Eric; Redon, Richard; Iemura, Kenji; Ikeda, Masanori; Tanaka, Kozo; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    A rare syndromic form of intellectual disability with impaired speech was recently found associated with mutations in CHAMP1 (chromosome alignment-maintaining phosphoprotein 1), the protein product of which is directly involved in microtubule-kinetochore attachment. Through whole-exome sequencing in six unrelated nonconsanguineous families having a sporadic case of intellectual disability, we identified six novel de novo truncating mutations in CHAMP1: c.1880C>G p.(Ser627*), c.1489C>T; p.(Arg497*), c.1876_1877delAG; p.(Ser626Leufs*4), c.1043G>A; p.(Trp348*), c.1002G>A; p.(Trp334*), and c.958_959delCC; p.(Pro320*). Our clinical observations confirm the phenotypic homogeneity of the syndrome, which represents therefore a distinct clinical entity. Besides, our functional studies show that CHAMP1 protein variants are delocalized from chromatin and are unable to bind to two of its direct partners, POGZ and HP1. These data suggest a pathogenic mechanism of the CHAMP1-associated intellectual disability syndrome mediated by direct interacting partners of CHAMP1, several of which are involved in chromo/kinetochore-related disorders. PMID:26751395

  8. Compound heterozygous mutations in the noncoding RNU4ATAC cause Roifman Syndrome by disrupting minor intron splicing

    PubMed Central

    Merico, Daniele; Roifman, Maian; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Yuen, Ryan K. C.; Alexandrova, Roumiana; Bates, Andrea; Reid, Brenda; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Wang, Zhuozhi; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Gray, Paul; Kakakios, Alyson; Peake, Jane; Hogarth, Stephanie; Manson, David; Buncic, Raymond; Pereira, Sergio L.; Herbrick, Jo-Anne; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Roifman, Chaim M.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Roifman Syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by growth retardation, cognitive delay, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and antibody deficiency. Here we utilize whole-genome sequencing of Roifman Syndrome patients to reveal compound heterozygous rare variants that disrupt highly conserved positions of the RNU4ATAC small nuclear RNA gene, a minor spliceosome component that is essential for minor intron splicing. Targeted sequencing confirms allele segregation in six cases from four unrelated families. RNU4ATAC rare variants have been recently reported to cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type I (MOPD1), whose phenotype is distinct from Roifman Syndrome. Strikingly, all six of the Roifman Syndrome cases have one variant that overlaps MOPD1-implicated structural elements, while the other variant overlaps a highly conserved structural element not previously implicated in disease. RNA-seq analysis confirms extensive and specific defects of minor intron splicing. Available allele frequency data suggest that recessive genetic disorders caused by RNU4ATAC rare variants may be more prevalent than previously reported. PMID:26522830

  9. Molecular analysis of the fibrinogen gene cluster in 16 patients with congenital afibrinogenemia: novel truncating mutations in the FGA and FGG genes.

    PubMed

    Neerman-Arbez, M; de Moerloose, P; Honsberger, A; Parlier, G; Arnuti, B; Biron, C; Borg, J Y; Eber, S; Meili, E; Peter-Salonen, K; Ripoll, L; Vervel, C; d'Oiron, R; Staeger, P; Antonarakis, S E; Morris, M A

    2001-03-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the complete absence of detectable fibrinogen. We previously identified the first causative mutations for this disease in a non-consanguineous Swiss family. These were homozygous deletions of approximately 11 kb of the fibrinogen alpha chain gene (FGA). Our subsequent study revealed that the majority of cases were attributable to truncating mutations in FGA, with the most common mutation affecting the donor splice site in FGA intron 4 (IVS4+1 G-->T). Here, we report 13 further unrelated patients with mutations in FGA, confirming the relative importance of this gene compared with FGG and FGB in the molecular aetiology of afibrinogenemia. Three other patients were homozygous for mutations in FGG. Eight novel mutations were identified: five in FGA and three in FGG. Sufficient mutation data is now available to permit an effective strategy for the genetic diagnosis of congenital afibrinogenemia.

  10. The identification of point mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients by using reverse-transcription PCR and the protein truncation test

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, R.J.; Bobrow, M.; Roberts, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The protein truncation test (PTT) is a mutation-detection method that monitors the integrity of the open reading frame (ORF). More than 60% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) result from gross frameshifting deletions in the dystrophin gene that are detectable by multiplex PCR system. It has become apparent that virtually all of the remaining DMD mutations also disrupt the translational reading frame, making the PTT a logical next step toward a comprehensive strategy for the identification of all DMD mutations. We report here a pilot study involving 22 patients and describe the mutations characterized. These constitute 12 point mutations or small insertions/deletions and 4 gross rearrangements. We also have a remaining five patients in whom there does not appear to be mutation in the ORF. We believe that reverse-transcription-PCR/PTT is an efficient method by which to screen for small mutations in DMD patients with no deletion. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity and diastolic dysfunction as early consequences of Mybpc3 mutation in heterozygous knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraysse, Bodvaël; Weinberger, Florian; Bardswell, Sonya C.; Cuello, Friederike; Vignier, Nicolas; Geertz, Birgit; Starbatty, Jutta; Krämer, Elisabeth; Coirault, Catherine; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Kentish, Jonathan C.; Avkiran, Metin; Carrier, Lucie

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is frequently caused by mutations in MYBPC3 encoding cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C). The mechanisms leading from gene mutations to the HCM phenotype remain incompletely understood, partially because current mouse models of HCM do not faithfully reflect the human situation and early hypertrophy confounds the interpretation of functional alterations. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether myofilament Ca2+ sensitization and diastolic dysfunction are associated or precede the development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in HCM. We evaluated the function of skinned and intact cardiac myocytes, as well as the intact heart in a recently developed Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mouse model carrying a point mutation frequently associated with HCM. Compared to wild-type, 10-week old homozygous knock-in mice exhibited i) higher myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity in skinned ventricular trabeculae, ii) lower diastolic sarcomere length, and faster Ca2+ transient decay in intact myocytes, and iii) LVH, reduced fractional shortening, lower E/A and E′/A′, and higher E/E′ ratios by echocardiography and Doppler analysis, suggesting systolic and diastolic dysfunction. In contrast, heterozygous knock-in mice, which mimic the human HCM situation, did not exhibit LVH or systolic dysfunction, but exhibited higher myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, faster Ca2+ transient decay, and diastolic dysfunction. These data demonstrate that myofilament Ca2+ sensitization and diastolic dysfunction are early phenotypic consequences of Mybpc3 mutations independent of LVH. The accelerated Ca2+ transients point to compensatory mechanisms directed towards normalization of relaxation. We propose that HCM is a model for diastolic heart failure and this mouse model could be valuable in studying mechanisms and treatment modalities. PMID:22465693

  12. Targeted next-generation sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous mutations of DYNC2H1 in a fetus with short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type III.

    PubMed

    Mei, Libin; Huang, Yanru; Pan, Qian; Su, Wei; Quan, Yi; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-07-20

    A 26-year-old woman with a past history of fetal skeletal dysplasia was referred to our institution at 24weeks of gestation following a routine sonographic diagnosis of short limbs in the fetus. A fetal ultrasound showed short limbs, a narrow thorax, short ribs with marginal spurs, and polydactyly. Conventional cytogenetics analysis of cultured amniocytes demonstrated that the fetal karyotype was normal. Using targeted exome sequencing of 226 known genes implicated in inherited skeletal dysplasia, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in the DYNC2H1 gene in the fetus with short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type III (SRPS III), c.1151 C>T(p.Ala384Val) and c.4351 C>T (p.Gln1451*), which were inherited from paternally and maternally, respectively. These variants were further confirmed using Sanger sequencing and have not been previously reported. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DYNC2H1 mutations causing SRPS III, in the Chinese population. Our findings expand the number of reported cases of this rare disease, and indicate that targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method in the genetic diagnosis of fetal skeletal dysplasia.

  13. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome in a girl caused by heterozygous WASP mutation and extremely skewed X-chromosome inactivation: a novel association with maternal uniparental isodisomy 6.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Tomohito; Takada, Hidetoshi; Ishimura, Masataka; Kirino, Makiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Ohara, Osamu; Morio, Tomohiro; Hara, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked disease characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema and immune deficiency, caused primarily by mutations in the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) gene. Female carriers are usually asymptomatic because of the preferential activation of the normal, nonmutated X-chromosome in their hematopoietic cells. We report our observations of a female child with WAS, who displayed symptoms of congenital thrombocytopenia. DNA sequencing analysis of the WASP gene revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 10. The expressions of WASP and normal WASP mRNA were defective. We found preferential inactivation of the X-chromosome on which wild-type WASP was located. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray testing and the analysis of the polymorphic variable number of tandem repeat regions revealed maternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 6 (UPD6). Our results underscore the importance of WASP evaluation in females with congenital thrombocytopenia and suggest that UPD6 might be related to the pathophysiology of nonrandom X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:25633059

  14. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E; Nöthen, Markus M; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U

    2016-04-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10(-2)). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10(-5); ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6-3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10(-9)). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  15. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  16. Molecular characterization of minor gene rearrangements in Finnish patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: identification of two common missense mutations (Gly823-->Asp and Leu380-->His) and eight rare mutations of the LDL receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, U M; Viikari, J S; Kontula, K

    1995-01-01

    Two deletions of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were previously shown to account for about two thirds of all mutations causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Finland. We screened the DNA samples from a cohort representing the remaining 30% of Finnish heterozygous FH patients by amplifying all the 18 exons of the receptor gene by PCR and searching for DNA variations with the SSCP technique. Ten novel mutations were identified, comprising two nonsense and seven missense mutations as well as one frameshift mutation caused by a 13-bp deletion. A single nucleotide change, substituting adenine for guanidine at position 2533 and resulting in an amino acid change of glycine to aspartic acid at codon 823, was found in DNA samples from 14 unrelated FH probands. This mutation (FH-Turku) affects the sequence encoding the putative basolateral sorting signal of the LDL receptor protein; however, the exact functional consequences of this mutation are yet to be examined. The FH-Turku gene and another point mutation (Leu380-->His or FH-Pori) together account for approximately 8% of the FH-causing genes in Finland and are particularly common among FH patients from the southwestern part of the country (combined, 30%). Primer-introduced restriction analysis was applied for convenient assay of the FH-Turku and FH-Pori point mutations. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates the unique genetic background of FH in Finland and describes a commonly occurring FH gene with a missense mutation closest to the C terminus thus far reported. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7573037

  17. Girl with signs of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease heterozygous for a mutation in exon 2 of the proteolipid protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hodes, M.E.; DeMyer, W.E.; Pratt, V.M.

    1995-02-13

    We studied a female infant with clinical signs of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), who has a familial mutation (C{sup 41}{r_arrow}T) in exon 2 of the proteolipid protein gene (PLP), and selected relatives. While the carrier mother and grandmother of the proposita currently are neurologically normal and show normal T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, the infant has a neurological picture, MRIs, and brain auditory evoked response (BAER) consistent with that diagnosis. The data here presented show that PMD can occur in females carrying a mutation in the PLP gene. Our experience with the MRIs of this patient, her mother and grandmother, and those of a previously reported family show that molecular genetic analysis and not MRI is the appropriate means for carrier detection. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Identification of a De Novo Heterozygous Missense FLNB Mutation in Lethal Atelosteogenesis Type I by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ga Won; Lee, Mi-Na; Jung, Ji Mi; Hong, Seong Yeon; Kim, Young Nam; Sin, Jong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Background Atelosteogenesis type I (AO-I) is a rare lethal skeletal dysplastic disorder characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism and dislocated hips, knees, and elbows. AO-I is caused by mutations in the filamin B (FLNB) gene; however, several other genes can cause AO-like lethal skeletal dysplasias. Methods In order to screen all possible genes associated with AO-like lethal skeletal dysplasias simultaneously, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a female newborn having clinical features of AO-I. Results Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.517G>A; p.Ala173Thr) in exon 2 of the FLNB gene in the patient. Sanger sequencing validated this variant, and genetic analysis of the patient's parents suggested a de novo occurrence of the variant. Conclusions This study shows that exome sequencing can be a useful tool for the identification of causative mutations in lethal skeletal dysplasia patients. PMID:24624349

  19. Two heterozygous mutations of the AMH gene in a Japanese patient with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Shuntaro; Moriya, Kimihiko; Ishizu, Katsura; Tajima, Toshihiro

    2014-11-01

    Persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is an autosomal recessive disorder of sex development (DSD) characterized by the presence of Müllerian duct derivatives in 46, XY phenotypic males. To date, more than 50 different mutations of the anti-Müllerian hormone gene (AMH) have been reported. Here, we report two novel mutations of AMH in a Japanese patient with PMDS. A 1-year-old male presented with bilateral cryptorchidism and normal male external genitalia. A laparoscopic surgery revealed a uterus and fallopian tubes. Serum AMH was very low. The patient's elder brother was also diagnosed as having PMDS at another hospital. Genetic analysis of AMH showed two novel mutations of p.N486T and p.V527L. Given that these two amino acids are well conserved among different species of AMH, the substitution of two amino acids might affect the normal function of AMH. In conclusion, PMDS should be included in differential diagnoses of cryptorchidism. PMID:25026127

  20. Congenital IL-12R1β receptor deficiency and thrombophilia in a girl homozygous for an IL12RB1 mutation and compound heterozygous for MTFHR mutations: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kose, M.; Ceylan, O.; Patiroglu, T.; Bustamante, J.; Casanova, J. L.; Akyildiz, B. N.; Doganay, S.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) plays an important role in the production of interferon gamma from T cells and natural killer cells and is essential for protection against intra-macrophagic pathogens such as Mycobacterium and Salmonella. Here, we describe a 16-year-old girl with homozygous mutation in exon 12 of the IL12RB1 gene, which causes complete IL-12Rβ1 deficiency in association with heterozygous mutation (C677T and A1298C) in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene. She presented with disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection, retroperitoneal fungal abscess and also thrombosis in the superior mesenteric–portal vein junction. This is the first case report of a primary immunodeficiency associated with a genetically determined venous thrombosis. PMID:24678409

  1. A novel heterozygous mutation in the ATP6V0A4 gene encoding the V-ATPase a4 subunit in an adult patient with incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Eri; Kaneko, Shuzo; Mori, Takayasu; Okado, Tomokazu; Uchida, Shinichi; Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old Japanese man who had a medical history of hypokalemic periodic paralysis 4 months prior was hospitalized to undergo a cholecystectomy. Hypokalemia, nephrocalcinosis and alkaluria suggesting distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) were detected, but metabolic acidosis was not evident. An ammonium chloride/furosemide–fludrocortisone/bicarbonate loading test demonstrated a remarkable disability in urinary H+ excretion. A novel heterozygous mutation in the ATP6V0A4 gene encoding the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) a4 subunit p.S544L was detected. Among cases of V-ATPase a4 mutations, this is the first case in which a heterozygous mutation developed to an incomplete or latent form of dRTA. PMID:27274828

  2. A novel heterozygous mutation in the ATP6V0A4 gene encoding the V-ATPase a4 subunit in an adult patient with incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Imai, Eri; Kaneko, Shuzo; Mori, Takayasu; Okado, Tomokazu; Uchida, Shinichi; Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    A 40-year-old Japanese man who had a medical history of hypokalemic periodic paralysis 4 months prior was hospitalized to undergo a cholecystectomy. Hypokalemia, nephrocalcinosis and alkaluria suggesting distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) were detected, but metabolic acidosis was not evident. An ammonium chloride/furosemide-fludrocortisone/bicarbonate loading test demonstrated a remarkable disability in urinary H(+) excretion. A novel heterozygous mutation in the ATP6V0A4 gene encoding the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) a4 subunit p.S544L was detected. Among cases of V-ATPase a4 mutations, this is the first case in which a heterozygous mutation developed to an incomplete or latent form of dRTA. PMID:27274828

  3. Specific combination of compound heterozygous mutations in 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4) defines a new subtype of D-bifunctional protein deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background D-bifunctional protein (DBP) deficiency is typically apparent within the first month of life with most infants demonstrating hypotonia, psychomotor delay and seizures. Few children survive beyond two years of age. Among patients with prolonged survival all demonstrate severe gross motor delay, absent language development, and severe hearing and visual impairment. DBP contains three catalytically active domains; an N-terminal dehydrogenase, a central hydratase and a C-terminal sterol carrier protein-2-like domain. Three subtypes of the disease are identified based upon the domain affected; DBP type I results from a combined deficiency of dehydrogenase and hydratase activity; DBP type II from isolated hydratase deficiency and DBP type III from isolated dehydrogenase deficiency. Here we report two brothers (16½ and 14 years old) with DBP deficiency characterized by normal early childhood followed by sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cerebellar and sensory ataxia and subclinical retinitis pigmentosa. Methods and results Biochemical analysis revealed normal levels of plasma VLCFA, phytanic acid and pristanic acid, and normal bile acids in urine; based on these results no diagnosis was made. Exome analysis was performed using the Agilent SureSelect 50Mb All Exon Kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 next-generation-sequencing (NGS) platform. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing within the dehydrogenase domain (c.101C>T; p.Ala34Val) and hydratase domain (c.1547T>C; p.Ile516Thr) of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 gene (HSD17B4). These mutations have been previously reported in patients with severe-forms of DBP deficiency, however each mutation was reported in combination with another mutation affecting the same domain. Subsequent studies in fibroblasts revealed normal VLCFA levels, normal C26:0 but reduced pristanic acid beta-oxidation activity. Both DBP hydratase and dehydrogenase

  4. Novel and recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes.

    PubMed

    Léger, Sandy; Balguerie, Xavier; Goldenberg, Alice; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Cabot, Annick; Amstutz-Montadert, Isabelle; Young, Paul; Joly, Pascal; Bodereau, Virginie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jamieson, Robyn V; Krause, Amanda; Chen, Hongsheng; Baumann, Clarisse; Nunes, Luis; Dollfus, Hélène; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Véronique

    2012-05-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor, which regulates melanocyte development and the biosynthetic melanin pathway. A notable relationship has been described between non-truncating mutations of its basic domain and Tietz syndrome, which is characterized by albinoid-like hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, rather than the patchy depigmentation seen in Waardenburg syndrome, and severe hearing loss. Twelve patients with new or recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain from six families were enrolled in this study. We observed a wide range of phenotypes and some unexpected features. All the patients had blue irides and pigmentation abnormalities that ranged from diffuse hypopigmentation to Waardenburg-like patches. In addition, they showed congenital complete hearing loss, diffuse hypopigmentation of the skin, freckling and ocular abnormalities, more frequently than patients with MITF mutations outside the basic domain. In conclusion, the non-truncating mutations of the basic domain do not always lead to Tietz syndrome but rather to a large range of phenotypes. Sun-exposed freckles are interestingly observed more frequently in Asian populations. This variability argues for the possible interaction with modifier loci. PMID:22258527

  5. Diagnostic analysis of the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: five cosmids should be used for microdeletion detection and low number of protein truncating mutations

    PubMed Central

    Petrij, F.; Dauwerse, H.; Blough, R.; Giles, R.; van der Smagt, J. J; Wallerstein, R.; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P.; van Karnebeek, C. D; van Ommen, G.-J. B; van Haeringen, A.; Rubinstein, J.; Saal, H.; Hennekam, R.; Peters, D.; Breuning, M.

    2000-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a malformation syndrome characterised by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs, broad big toes, and mental retardation. In a subset of RTS patients, microdeletions, translocations, and inversions involving chromosome band 16p13.3 can be detected. We have previously shown that disruption of the human CREB binding protein (CREBBP or CBP) gene, either by these gross chromosomal rearrangements or by point mutations, leads to RTS. CBP is a large nuclear protein involved in transcription regulation, chromatin remodelling, and the integration of several different signal transduction pathways. Here we report diagnostic analysis of CBP in 194 RTS patients, divided into several subsets. In one case the mother is also suspect of having RTS. Analyses of the entire CBP gene by the protein truncation test showed 4/37 truncating mutations. Two point mutations, one 11 bp deletion, and one mutation affecting the splicing of the second exon were detected by subsequent sequencing. Screening the CBP gene for larger deletions, by using different cosmid probes in FISH, showed 14/171 microdeletions. Using five cosmid probes that contain the entire gene, we found 8/89 microdeletions of which 4/8 were 5' or interstitial. This last subset of microdeletions would not have been detected using the commonly used 3' probe RT1, showing the necessity of using all five probes.


Keywords: Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS); CREB binding protein (CBP/CREBBP); protein truncation test (PTT); microdeletion PMID:10699051

  6. Deep vein thrombosis, ecythyma gangrenosum and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia occurring in a man with a heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation

    PubMed Central

    Apostolova, Mariya; Weng, Baoying; Pote, Harry H.; Ashcraft, Harold; Goldblatt, Curtis; Woolley, Paul V.

    2012-01-01

    Skin necrosis and limb gangrene are occasional thrombotic manifestations of anticoagulation therapy. We report a man heterozygous for the Factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, and with a history of recurrent deep venous thrombosis, who initially presented with a necrotic skin lesion of the right flank while on warfarin therapy with a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin was discontinued and he received intravenous heparin. Thereafter he developed thrombocytopenia and pedal erythema and was diagnosed with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Heparin was replaced with argatroban. He ultimately underwent bilateral below-knee amputations for the thrombotic complications of the HIT. The initial necrotic lesion healed with antibiotics and wound care. Pathologic examination of multiple biopsy specimens revealed two separate lesions. One was necrotic tissue infiltrated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus having features of ecthyma gangrenosum. The second showed thrombotic changes consistent with HIT. The case illustrates the differential diagnosis of skin necrosis and limb gangrene in patients on warfarin and heparin, and also the clinical complexities that can occur in a FVL heterozygote. PMID:23355938

  7. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function SEC61A1 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Tubulo-Interstitial and Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease with Anemia.

    PubMed

    Bolar, Nikhita Ajit; Golzio, Christelle; Živná, Martina; Hayot, Gaëlle; Van Hemelrijk, Christine; Schepers, Dorien; Vandeweyer, Geert; Hoischen, Alexander; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Raes, Ann; Matthys, Erve; Sys, Emiel; Azou, Myriam; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Praet, Marleen; Van Camp, Guy; McFadden, Kelsey; Pediaditakis, Igor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vyleťal, Petr; Hartmannová, Hana; Stránecký, Viktor; Hůlková, Helena; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Sovová, Jana; Hnízda, Aleš; Kidd, Kendrah; Bleyer, Anthony J; Spong, Richard S; Vande Walle, Johan; Mortier, Geert; Brunner, Han; Van Laer, Lut; Kmoch, Stanislav; Katsanis, Nicholas; Loeys, Bart L

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal-dominant tubulo-interstitial kidney disease (ADTKD) encompasses a group of disorders characterized by renal tubular and interstitial abnormalities, leading to slow progressive loss of kidney function requiring dialysis and kidney transplantation. Mutations in UMOD, MUC1, and REN are responsible for many, but not all, cases of ADTKD. We report on two families with ADTKD and congenital anemia accompanied by either intrauterine growth retardation or neutropenia. Ultrasound and kidney biopsy revealed small dysplastic kidneys with cysts and tubular atrophy with secondary glomerular sclerosis, respectively. Exclusion of known ADTKD genes coupled with linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted re-sequencing identified heterozygous missense variants in SEC61A1-c.553A>G (p.Thr185Ala) and c.200T>G (p.Val67Gly)-both affecting functionally important and conserved residues in SEC61. Both transiently expressed SEC6A1A variants are delocalized to the Golgi, a finding confirmed in a renal biopsy from an affected individual. Suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletions of sec61al2 in zebrafish embryos induced convolution defects of the pronephric tubules but not the pronephric ducts, consistent with the tubular atrophy observed in the affected individuals. Human mRNA encoding either of the two pathogenic alleles failed to rescue this phenotype as opposed to a complete rescue by human wild-type mRNA. Taken together, these findings provide a mechanism by which mutations in SEC61A1 lead to an autosomal-dominant syndromic form of progressive chronic kidney disease. We highlight protein translocation defects across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the principal role of the SEC61 complex, as a contributory pathogenic mechanism for ADTKD. PMID:27392076

  8. Heterozygous Mutations of FREM1 Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Isolated Metopic Craniosynostosis in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kieran M.; Wiradjaja, Fenny; Janssen, Irene M.; Jehee, Fernanda; Bertola, Debora; Liu, Jia; Yagnik, Garima; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Kiyozumi, Daiji; van Bokhoven, Hans; Marcelis, Carlo; Cunningham, Michael L.; Anderson, Peter J.; Boyadjiev, Simeon A.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Veltman, Joris A.; Smyth, Ian; Buckley, Michael F.; Roscioli, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The premature fusion of the paired frontal bones results in metopic craniosynostosis (MC) and gives rise to the clinical phenotype of trigonocephaly. Deletions of chromosome 9p22.3 are well described as a cause of MC with variably penetrant midface hypoplasia. In order to identify the gene responsible for the trigonocephaly component of the 9p22.3 syndrome, a cohort of 109 patients were assessed by high-resolution arrays and MLPA for copy number variations (CNVs) involving 9p22. Five CNVs involving FREM1, all of which were de novo variants, were identified by array-based analyses. The remaining 104 patients with MC were then subjected to targeted FREM1 gene re-sequencing, which identified 3 further mutant alleles, one of which was de novo. Consistent with a pathogenic role, mouse Frem1 mRNA and protein expression was demonstrated in the metopic suture as well as in the pericranium and dura mater. Micro-computed tomography based analyses of the mouse posterior frontal (PF) suture, the human metopic suture equivalent, revealed advanced fusion in all mice homozygous for either of two different Frem1 mutant alleles, while heterozygotes exhibited variably penetrant PF suture anomalies. Gene dosage-related penetrance of midfacial hypoplasia was also evident in the Frem1 mutants. These data suggest that CNVs and mutations involving FREM1 can be identified in a significant percentage of people with MC with or without midface hypoplasia. Furthermore, we present Frem1 mutant mice as the first bona fide mouse model of human metopic craniosynostosis and a new model for midfacial hypoplasia. PMID:21931569

  9. Hereditary truncating mutations of DNA repair and other genes in BRCA1/BRCA2/PALB2-negatively tested breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lhota, F; Zemankova, P; Kleiblova, P; Soukupova, J; Vocka, M; Stranecky, V; Janatova, M; Hartmannova, H; Hodanova, K; Kmoch, S; Kleibl, Z

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary breast cancer comprises a minor but clinically meaningful breast cancer (BC) subgroup. Mutations in the major BC-susceptibility genes are important prognostic and predictive markers; however, their carriers represent only 25% of high-risk BC patients. To further characterize variants influencing BC risk, we performed SOLiD sequencing of 581 genes in 325 BC patients (negatively tested in previous BRCA1/BRCA2/PALB2 analyses). In 105 (32%) patients, we identified and confirmed 127 truncating variants (89 unique; nonsense, frameshift indels, and splice site), 19 patients harbored more than one truncation. Forty-six (36 unique) truncating variants in 25 DNA repair genes were found in 41 (12%) patients, including 16 variants in the Fanconi anemia (FA) genes. The most frequent variant in FA genes was c.1096_1099dupATTA in FANCL that also show a borderline association with increased BC risk in subsequent analysis of enlarged groups of BC patients and controls. Another 81 (53 unique) truncating variants were identified in 48 non-DNA repair genes in 74 patients (23%) including 16 patients carrying variants in genes coding proteins of estrogen metabolism/signaling. Our results highlight the importance of mutations in the FA genes' family, and indicate that estrogen metabolism genes may reveal a novel candidate genetic component for BC susceptibility. PMID:26822949

  10. A novel translation re-initiation mechanism for the p63 gene revealed by amino-terminal truncating mutations in Rapp-Hodgkin/Hay-Wells-like syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rinne, Tuula; Clements, Suzanne E; Lamme, Evert; Duijf, Pascal H G; Bolat, Emine; Meijer, Rowdy; Scheffer, Hans; Rosser, Elisabeth; Tan, Tiong Yang; McGrath, John A; Schalkwijk, Joost; Brunner, Han G; Zhou, Huiqing; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2008-07-01

    Missense mutations in the 3' end of the p63 gene are associated with either RHS (Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome) or AEC (Ankyloblepharon Ectodermal defects Cleft lip/palate) syndrome. These mutations give rise to mutant p63alpha protein isoforms with dominant effects towards their wild-type counterparts. Here we report four RHS/AEC-like patients with mutations (p.Gln9fsX23, p.Gln11X, p.Gln16X), that introduce premature termination codons in the N-terminal part of the p63 protein. These mutations appear to be incompatible with the current paradigms of dominant-negative/gain-of-function outcomes for other p63 mutations. Moreover it is difficult to envisage how the remaining small N-terminal polypeptide contributes to a dominant disease mechanism. Primary keratinocytes from a patient containing the p.Gln11X mutation revealed a normal and aberrant p63-related protein that was just slightly smaller than the wild-type p63. We show that the smaller p63 protein is produced by translation re-initiation at the next downstream methionine, causing truncation of a non-canonical transactivation domain in the DeltaN-specific isoforms. Interestingly, this new DeltaDeltaNp63 isoform is also present in the wild-type keratinocytes albeit in small amounts compared with the p.Gln11X patient. These data establish that the p.Gln11X-mutation does not represent a null-allele leading to haploinsufficiency, but instead gives rise to a truncated DeltaNp63 protein with dominant effects. Given the nature of other RHS/AEC-like syndrome mutations, we conclude that these mutations affect only the DeltaNp63alpha isoform and that this disruption is fundamental to explaining the clinical characteristics of these particular ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. PMID:18364388

  11. No Evidence for Association of Autism with Rare Heterozygous Point Mutations in Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2), or in Other Contactin-Associated Proteins or Contactins

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, John D.; Gupta, Abha R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Walker, Michael F.; Keaney, John; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Murtha, Michael T.; Anyanwu, Samuel; Ober, Gordon T.; Raubeson, Melanie J.; DiLullo, Nicholas M.; Villa, Natalie; Waqar, Zainabdul; Sullivan, Catherine; Gonzalez, Luis; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Choe, So-Yeon; Neale, Benjamin M.; Daly, Mark J.; State, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Contactins and Contactin-Associated Proteins, and Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2) in particular, have been widely cited as autism risk genes based on findings from homozygosity mapping, molecular cytogenetics, copy number variation analyses, and both common and rare single nucleotide association studies. However, data specifically with regard to the contribution of heterozygous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) have been inconsistent. In an effort to clarify the role of rare point mutations in CNTNAP2 and related gene families, we have conducted targeted next-generation sequencing and evaluated existing sequence data in cohorts totaling 2704 cases and 2747 controls. We find no evidence for statistically significant association of rare heterozygous mutations in any of the CNTN or CNTNAP genes, including CNTNAP2, placing marked limits on the scale of their plausible contribution to risk. PMID:25621974

  12. No evidence for association of autism with rare heterozygous point mutations in Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2), or in Other Contactin-Associated Proteins or Contactins.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, John D; Gupta, Abha R; Sanders, Stephan J; Walker, Michael F; Keaney, John; Fernandez, Thomas V; Murtha, Michael T; Anyanwu, Samuel; Ober, Gordon T; Raubeson, Melanie J; DiLullo, Nicholas M; Villa, Natalie; Waqar, Zainabdul; Sullivan, Catherine; Gonzalez, Luis; Willsey, A Jeremy; Choe, So-Yeon; Neale, Benjamin M; Daly, Mark J; State, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Contactins and Contactin-Associated Proteins, and Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2) in particular, have been widely cited as autism risk genes based on findings from homozygosity mapping, molecular cytogenetics, copy number variation analyses, and both common and rare single nucleotide association studies. However, data specifically with regard to the contribution of heterozygous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) have been inconsistent. In an effort to clarify the role of rare point mutations in CNTNAP2 and related gene families, we have conducted targeted next-generation sequencing and evaluated existing sequence data in cohorts totaling 2704 cases and 2747 controls. We find no evidence for statistically significant association of rare heterozygous mutations in any of the CNTN or CNTNAP genes, including CNTNAP2, placing marked limits on the scale of their plausible contribution to risk.

  13. Recurrent truncating mutations in alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase gene in two South Indian families with primary hyperoxaluria type 1 causing later onset end-stage kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, A. K.; Paulose, B. K.; Danda, S.; Alexander, S.; Tamilarasi, V.; Omprakash, S.

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism due to liver-specific peroxisomal enzyme alanine-glyoxylate transaminase deficiency. Here, we describe two unrelated patients who were diagnosed to have primary hyperoxaluria. Homozygous c.445_452delGTGCTGCT (p.L151Nfs*14) (Transcript ID: ENST00000307503; human genome assembly GRCh38.p2) (HGMD ID CD073567) mutation was detected in both the patients and the parents were found to be heterozygous carriers. Our patients developed end-stage renal disease at 23 years and 35 years of age. However, in the largest series published from OxalEurope cohort, the median age of end-stage renal disease for null mutations carriers was 9.9 years, which is much earlier than our cases. Our patients had slower progressions as compared to three unrelated patients from North India and Pakistan, who had homozygous c.302T>C (p.L101P) (HGMD ID CM093792) mutation in exon 2. Further, patients need to be studied to find out if c.445_452delGTGCTGCT mutation represents a founder mutation in Southern India. PMID:27512303

  14. Diagnostic analysis of the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: five cosmids should be used for microdeletion detection and low number of protein truncating mutations.

    PubMed

    Petrij, F; Dauwerse, H G; Blough, R I; Giles, R H; van der Smagt, J J; Wallerstein, R; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D; van Karnebeek, C D; van Ommen, G J; van Haeringen, A; Rubinstein, J H; Saal, H M; Hennekam, R C; Peters, D J; Breuning, M H

    2000-03-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a malformation syndrome characterised by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs, broad big toes, and mental retardation. In a subset of RTS patients, microdeletions, translocations, and inversions involving chromosome band 16p13.3 can be detected. We have previously shown that disruption of the human CREB binding protein (CREBBP or CBP) gene, either by these gross chromosomal rearrangements or by point mutations, leads to RTS. CBP is a large nuclear protein involved in transcription regulation, chromatin remodelling, and the integration of several different signal transduction pathways. Here we report diagnostic analysis of CBP in 194 RTS patients, divided into several subsets. In one case the mother is also suspect of having RTS. Analyses of the entire CBP gene by the protein truncation test showed 4/37 truncating mutations. Two point mutations, one 11 bp deletion, and one mutation affecting the splicing of the second exon were detected by subsequent sequencing. Screening the CBP gene for larger deletions, by using different cosmid probes in FISH, showed 14/171 microdeletions. Using five cosmid probes that contain the entire gene, we found 8/89 microdeletions of which 4/8 were 5' or interstitial. This last subset of microdeletions would not have been detected using the commonly used 3' probe RT1, showing the necessity of using all five probes.

  15. Bi-allelic Truncating Mutations in CEP78, Encoding Centrosomal Protein 78, Cause Cone-Rod Degeneration with Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Prasanthi; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Khateb, Samer; Lazar, Csilla H; Kinarty, Yael; Obolensky, Alexey; Erdinest, Inbar; Marks-Ohana, Devorah; Pras, Eran; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Newman, Hadas; Gross, Menachem; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2016-09-01

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) are a diverse group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous retinal abnormalities. The present study was designed to identify genetic defects in individuals with an uncommon combination of autosomal recessive progressive cone-rod degeneration accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss (arCRD-SNHL). Homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing (WES) and founder mutation screening revealed two truncating rare variants (c.893-1G>A and c.534delT) in CEP78, which encodes centrosomal protein 78, in six individuals of Jewish ancestry with CRD and SNHL. RT-PCR analysis of CEP78 in blood leukocytes of affected individuals revealed that the c.893-1G>A mutation causes exon 7 skipping leading to deletion of 65bp, predicted to result in a frameshift and therefore a truncated protein (p.Asp298Valfs(∗)17). RT-PCR analysis of 17 human tissues demonstrated ubiquitous expression of different CEP78 transcripts. RNA-seq analysis revealed three transcripts in the human retina and relatively higher expression in S-cone-like photoreceptors of Nrl-knockout retina compared to rods. Immunohistochemistry studies in the human retina showed intense labeling of cone inner segments compared to rods. CEP78 was reported previously to interact with c-nap1, encoded by CEP250 that we reported earlier to cause atypical Usher syndrome. We conclude that truncating mutations in CEP78 result in a phenotype involving both the visual and auditory systems but different from typical Usher syndrome. PMID:27588452

  16. Biallelic truncating mutations in FMN2, encoding the actin-regulatory protein Formin 2, cause nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Law, Rosalind; Dixon-Salazar, Tracy; Jerber, Julie; Cai, Na; Abbasi, Ansar A; Zaki, Maha S; Mittal, Kirti; Gabriel, Stacey B; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Khan, Valeed; Nguyen, Maria; Ali, Ghazanfar; Copeland, Brett; Scott, Eric; Vasli, Nasim; Mikhailov, Anna; Khan, Muhammad Nasim; Andrade, Danielle M; Ayaz, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2014-12-01

    Dendritic spines represent the major site of neuronal activity in the brain; they serve as the receiving point for neurotransmitters and undergo rapid activity-dependent morphological changes that correlate with learning and memory. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and next-generation sequencing in two consanguineous families affected by nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we identified truncating mutations in formin 2 (FMN2), encoding a protein that belongs to the formin family of actin cytoskeleton nucleation factors and is highly expressed in the maturing brain. We found that FMN2 localizes to punctae along dendrites and that germline inactivation of mouse Fmn2 resulted in animals with decreased spine density; such mice were previously demonstrated to have a conditioned fear-learning defect. Furthermore, patient neural cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells showed correlated decreased synaptic density. Thus, FMN2 mutations link intellectual disability either directly or indirectly to the regulation of actin-mediated synaptic spine density.

  17. Mutation of critical serine residues in HIV-1 matrix result in an envelope incorporation defect which can be rescued by truncation of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Ajay K.; Kaushik, Rajnish; Campbell, Nancy A.; Pontow, Suzanne E.; Ratner, Lee

    2009-02-05

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix (MA) domain is involved in both early and late events of the viral life cycle. Simultaneous mutation of critical serine residues in MA has been shown previously to dramatically reduce phosphorylation of MA. However, the role of phosphorylation in viral replication remains unclear. Viruses harboring serine to alanine substitutions at positions 9, 67, 72, and 77 are severely impaired in their ability to infect target cells. In addition, the serine mutant viruses are defective in their ability to fuse with target cell membranes. Interestingly, both the fusion defect and the infectivity defect can be rescued by truncation of the long cytoplasmic tail of gp41 envelope protein (gp41CT). Sucrose density gradient analysis also reveals that these mutant viruses have reduced levels of gp120 envelope protein incorporated into the virions as compared to wild type virus. Truncation of the gp41CT rescues the envelope incorporation defect. Here we propose a model in which mutation of specific serine residues prevents MA interaction with lipid rafts during HIV-1 assembly and thereby impairs recruitment of envelope to the sites of viral budding.

  18. Acute intermittent porphyria: A single-base deletion and a nonsense mutation in the human hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene, predicting truncations of the enzyme polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.L.; Astrin, K.H.; Desnick, R.J.

    1995-08-28

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal-dominant inborn error of metabolism that results from the half-normal activity of the third enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). AIP is an ecogenetic condition, since the life-threatening acute attacks are precipitated by various factors, including drugs, alcohol, fasting, and certain hormones. Biochemical diagnosis is problematic, and the identification of mutations in the HMB-synthase gene provides accurate detection of presymptomatic heterozygotes, permitting avoidance of the acute precipitating factors. By direct solid-phase sequencing, two mutations causing AIP were identified, an adenine deletion at position 629 in exon 11(629delA), which alters the reading frame and predicts premature truncation of the enzyme protein after amino acid 255, and a nonsense mutation in exon 12 (R225X). These mutations were confirmed by either restriction enzyme analysis or family studies of symptomatic patients, permitting accurate presymptomatic diagnosis of affected relatives. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  19. A novel homozygous Fas ligand mutation leads to early protein truncation, abrogation of death receptor and reverse signaling and a severe form of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Schaper, Jörg; Kuhlen, Michaela; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Fischer, Ute

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel type of mutation in the death ligand FasL that was associated with a severe phenotype of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in two patients. A frameshift mutation in the intracellular domain led to complete loss of FasL expression. Cell death signaling via its receptor and reverse signaling via its intracellular domain were completely abrogated. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation induced by weak T cell receptor stimulation could be blocked and cell death was induced by engagement of FasL in T cells derived from healthy individuals and a heterozygous carrier, but not in FasL-deficient patient derived cells. Expression of genes implicated in lymphocyte proliferation and activation (CCND1, NFATc1, NF-κB1) was increased in FasL-deficient T cells and could not be downregulated by FasL engagement as in healthy cells. Our data thus suggest, that deficiency in FasL reverse signaling may contribute to the clinical lymphoproliferative phenotype of ALPS. PMID:25451160

  20. Rippling muscle disease and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy-like phenotype in a patient carrying a heterozygous CAV3 T78M mutation and a D4Z4 partial deletion: Further evidence for “double trouble” overlapping syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Giulia; Scionti, Isabella; Alì, Greta; Volpi, Leda; Zampa, Virna; Fanin, Marina; Angelini, Corrado; Politano, Luisa; Tupler, Rossella; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    We report the first case of a heterozygous T78M mutation in the caveolin-3 gene (CAV3) associated with rippling muscle disease and proximal myopathy. The patient displayed also bilateral winged scapula with limited abduction of upper arms and marked asymmetric atrophy of leg muscles shown by magnetic resonance imaging. Immunohistochemistry on the patient’s muscle biopsy demonstrated a reduction of caveolin-3 staining, compatible with the diagnosis of caveolinopathy. Interestingly, consistent with the possible diagnosis of FSHD, the patient carried a 35 kb D4Z4 allele on chromosome 4q35. We discuss the hypothesis that the two genetic mutations may exert a synergistic effect in determining the phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:22245016

  1. Identification of Unique, Heterozygous Germline Mutation, STK11 (p.F354L), in a Child with an Encapsulated Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma within Six Months of Completing Treatment for Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Buryk, Melissa A; Picarsic, Jennifer L; Creary, Susan E; Shaw, Peter H; Simons, Jeffrey P; Deutsch, Melvin; Monaco, Sara E; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is rare in children, although it is a known secondary malignancy after treatment for neuroblastoma (NB). The interval between NB treatment completion and PTC is usually more than 5 years. A 4-year-old, female patient with a high risk adrenal NB was found to have a 2.9-cm, right thyroid nodule on surveillance chest computed tomography (CT) 6 months after completion of her NB treatment (induction chemotherapy, tumor resection, autologous stem cell transplantation, external beam radiation to the abdominal tumor site, immunotherapy, and retinoic acid). Posttreatment surveillance included iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine scans and CT scans. Fine-needle aspiration of the thyroid nodule diagnosed a follicular neoplasm, which was negative for BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, PAX8/PPARg, and RET/PTC mutations, without evidence of metastatic NB. Nodule histology demonstrated an encapsulated follicular variant of PTC (FVPTC). Next-generation sequence analysis for a 46 cancer-gene profile was performed on both tumors with subsequent peripheral blood DNA testing. A heterozygous missense mutation in STK11 (F354L) was identified in both the NB and FVPTC. This mutation was also detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Two additional heterozygous somatic missense mutations of uncertain significance were identified: KDR/VEGF receptor 2 (Q472H) on chromosome 4 and MET (N375S) on chromosome 7. To our knowledge, this is the shortest reported duration from completion of NB treatment to detection of thyroid cancer. The association of the STK11 gene with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, lung adenocarcinomas, and medullary thyroid cancer leads to a possible association between this genetic variant and our patient's tumors.

  2. Exome sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous IFNA4 and IFNA10 mutations as a cause of impaired function in Crohn’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Xiao, Jing-Jing; Xu, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Huan-Huan; Chen, Xu; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Li, Ping; Shi, Ying; Nie, Yong-Zhan; Li, Shao; Wu, Kai-Chun; Liu, Zhan-Ju; Ren, Jian-Lin; Guleng, Bayasi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the role of genetic predispositions in disease, and several genes had been identified as important in Crohn’s disease (CD). However, many of these genes are likely rare and not associated with susceptibility in Chinese CD patients. We found 294 shared identical variants in the CD patients of which 26 were validated by Sanger sequencing. Two heterozygous IFN variants (IFNA10 c.60 T > A; IFNA4 c.60 A > T) were identified as significantly associated with CD susceptibility. The single-nucleotide changes alter a cysteine situated before the signal peptide cleavage site to a stop code (TGA) in IFNA10 result in the serum levels of IFNA10 were significantly decreased in the CD patients compared to the controls. Furthermore, the IFNA10 and IFNA4 mutants resulted in an impairment of the suppression of HCV RNA replication in HuH7 cells, and the administration of the recombinant IFN subtypes restored DSS-induced colonic inflammation through the upregulation of CD4+ Treg cells. We identified heterozygous IFNA10 and IFNA4 variants as a cause of impaired function and CD susceptibility genes in Chinese patients from multiple center based study. These findings might provide clues in the understanding of the genetic heterogeneity of CD and lead to better screening and improved treatment. PMID:26000985

  3. Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy due to the association of a truncating mutation in PMP22 with the classical HNPP deletion.

    PubMed

    Jouaud, Maxime; Gonnaud, Pierre-Marie; Richard, Laurence; Latour, Philippe; Ollagnon-Roman, Elisabeth; Sturtz, Franck; Mathis, Stéphane; Magy, Laurent; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy appears early in life, resulting in a delay of motor and sensory development. Mutations involve genes such as myelin protein zero (MPZ), peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), and early growth response 2 (EGR2). We present a patient with two compound mutations in PMP22: a point mutation causing a premature STOP codon in exon 3 was inherited from the mother on the first allele, and the "typical" PMP22 deletion in the 17p11.2-p12 region was inherited from the father on the other allele. A sural biopsy was performed at age four. The patient has been followed from 28 months to 21 years of age; he presented significant sensory disturbances, with a slight motor deficit. PMP22 mRNA quantitation showed a severe decrease of PMP22 protein. No myelin sheaths were observed in the biopsy; mesaxons failed to form. The absence of PMP22 provides new insights into the role of this protein. PMID:27067623

  4. Novel compound heterozygous mutation in LAMC2 genes (c.79G>A and 382insT) in Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Jeon, In Kyung; Kim, Song-Ee; Kim, Soo-Chan

    2014-04-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a heritable blistering skin disease characterized by separation within the lamina lucida. It is caused by mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes encoding the α3-, β3- and γ2-chains, respectively, of laminin-332. JEB Herlitz type (JEB-H) is a lethal blistering disease with severe cutaneous and extracutaneous involvements caused by null mutations in the gene encoding laminin-332. Here, we report a proband with JEB-H who is a compound heterozygote for two novel mutations in LAMC2; a missense mutation (c.79G>A) and an insertion mutation (382insT) leading to a premature termination codon. PMID:24533970

  5. Aromatase deficiency in a Chinese adult man caused by novel compound heterozygous CYP19A1 mutations: Effects of estrogen replacement therapy on the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhike; Wang, Ou; Nie, Min; Elison, Kathleen; Zhou, Dujin; Li, Mei; Jiang, Yan; Xia, Weibo; Meng, Xunwu; Chen, Shiuan; Xing, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Aromatase deficiency is a rare disorder resulting in estrogen insufficiency in humans. It has been reported in remarkably few men with loss-of-function mutations in the CYP19A1 gene encoding the aromatase, a cytochrome P450 enzyme that plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens. We investigated a non-consanguineous family including an adult man with clinical features of aromatase deficiency, and studied the effects of estrogen replacement in the man. Methods We investigated the clinical and biochemical phenotype, performed CYP19A1 mutational analysis in the family and 50 unrelated persons, studied the effects of CYP19A1 mutations on aromatase protein structure, functionally characterized the mutations by cell-based aromatase activity assays, and studied the effects of estrogen replacement on the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism. Results The man with clinical features of aromatase deficiency had novel compound heterozygous CYP19A1 mutations (Y81C and L451P) that were not found in 50 unrelated persons. Three-dimensional modeling predicted that Y81C and L451P mutants disrupted protein structure. Functional studies on the basis of in vitro expression showed that Y81C and L45P mutants significantly decreased the aromatase activity and catalytic efficiency. Estrogen replacement in the man increased bone mineral density, accelerated bone maturation, improved lipid profile and liver steatosis, and improved glucose levels but not insulin resistance. Conclusions We have identified two novel CYP19A1 missense mutations in an aromatase-deficient man. Estrogen replacement in the man shows great impact on recovering the impairments in the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism, but fails to improve insulin resistance. PMID:25301327

  6. Leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivation of luteinizing hormone receptor by a novel homozygous nonsense truncation mutation in the seventh transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Salameh, W; Choucair, M; Guo, T B; Zahed, L; Wu, S-M; Leung, M Y-K; Rennert, O M; Chan, W-Y

    2005-01-14

    Inactivating mutations in the LH receptor are the predominant cause for male pseudohermaphroditism in subjects with Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH). The severity of the mutations, correlates with residual receptor activities. Here, we detail the clinical presentation of one subject with complete male pseudohermaphroditism and LCH. We identify within the proband and her similarly afflicted sibling a homozygous T to G transversion at nucleotide 1836 in exon 11 of the LH/CGR gene. This causes conversion of a tyrosine codon into a stop codon at codon 612 in the seventh transmembrane domain, resulting in a truncated receptor that lacks a cytoplasmic tail. In vitro, in contrast to cells expressing a normal LHR, cells transfected with the mutant cDNA exhibit neither surface binding of radiolabeled hCG nor cAMP generation. In vitro expression under the control of the LHR signal peptide of either a wild type or mutant LHR-GFP fusion protein shows no differences in receptor cellular localization. In conclusion, the in vitro studies suggest that residues in the seventh transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail are important for receptor binding and activation without playing a major role in receptor cellular trafficking.

  7. Leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivation of luteinizing hormone receptor by a novel homozygous nonsense truncation mutation in the seventh transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Salameh, W; Choucair, M; Guo, T B; Zahed, L; Wu, S-M; Leung, M Y-K; Rennert, O M; Chan, W-Y

    2005-01-14

    Inactivating mutations in the LH receptor are the predominant cause for male pseudohermaphroditism in subjects with Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH). The severity of the mutations, correlates with residual receptor activities. Here, we detail the clinical presentation of one subject with complete male pseudohermaphroditism and LCH. We identify within the proband and her similarly afflicted sibling a homozygous T to G transversion at nucleotide 1836 in exon 11 of the LH/CGR gene. This causes conversion of a tyrosine codon into a stop codon at codon 612 in the seventh transmembrane domain, resulting in a truncated receptor that lacks a cytoplasmic tail. In vitro, in contrast to cells expressing a normal LHR, cells transfected with the mutant cDNA exhibit neither surface binding of radiolabeled hCG nor cAMP generation. In vitro expression under the control of the LHR signal peptide of either a wild type or mutant LHR-GFP fusion protein shows no differences in receptor cellular localization. In conclusion, the in vitro studies suggest that residues in the seventh transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail are important for receptor binding and activation without playing a major role in receptor cellular trafficking. PMID:15607529

  8. EDAR-induced hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: a clinical study on signs and symptoms in individuals with a heterozygous c.1072C > T mutation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in the EDAR-gene cause hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, however, the oral phenotype has been described in a limited number of cases. The aim of the present study was to clinically describe individuals with the c.1072C > T mutation (p. Arg358X) in the EDAR gene with respect to dental signs and saliva secretion, symptoms from other ectodermal structures and to assess orofacial function. Methods Individuals in three families living in Sweden, where some members had a known c.1072C > T mutation in the EDAR gene with an autosomal dominant inheritance (AD), were included in a clinical investigation on oral signs and symptoms and self-reported symptoms from other ectodermal structures (n = 37). Confirmation of the c.1072C > T mutation in the EDAR gene were performed by genomic sequencing. Orofacial function was evaluated with NOT-S. Results The mutation was identified in 17 of 37 family members. The mean number of missing teeth due to agenesis was 10.3 ± 4.1, (range 4–17) in the mutation group and 0.1 ± 0.3, (range 0–1) in the non-mutation group (p < 0.01). All individuals with the mutation were missing the maxillary lateral incisors and one or more of the mandibular incisors; and 81.3% were missing all four. Stimulated saliva secretion was 0.9 ± 0.5 ml/min in the mutation group vs 1.7 ± 0.6 ml/min in the non-mutation group (p < 0.01). Reduced ability to sweat was reported by 82% in the mutation group and by 20% in the non-mutation group (p < 0.01). The mean NOT-S score was 3.0 ± 1.9 (range 0–6) in the mutation group and 1.5 ± 1.1 (range 0–5) in the non-mutation group (p < 0.01). Lisping was present in 56% of individuals in the mutation group. Conclusions Individuals with a c.1072C > T mutation in the EDAR-gene displayed a typical pattern of congenitally missing teeth in the frontal area with functional consequences. They therefore have a need for special attention in dental

  9. A truncating SOD1 mutation, p.Gly141X, is associated with clinical and pathologic heterogeneity, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masataka; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Murray, Melissa E.; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Desaro, Pamela; Baker, Matthew C.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Robertson, Janice; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W.; Boylan, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disorder affecting upper and lower motor neurons, but it is increasingly recognized to affect other systems, with cognitive impairment resembling frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in some patients. We report clinical and pathologic findings of a family with ALS due to a truncating mutation, p.Gly141X, in copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The proband presented clinically with FTD and later showed progressive motor neuron disease, while all other family members had early-onset and rapidly progressive ALS without significant cognitive deficits. Pathologic examination of both the proband and her daughter revealed degeneration of corticospinal tracts and motor neurons in brain and spinal cord compatible with ALS. On the other hand, the proband also had neocortical and limbic system degeneration with pleomorphic neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions. Extramotor pathology in her daughter was relatively restricted to the hypothalamus and extrapyramidal system, but not the neocortex. The inclusions in the proband and her daughter were immunoreactive for SOD1, but negative for TAR DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43). In the proband, a number of the neocortical inclusions were immunopositive for α-internexin, initially suggesting a diagnosis of atypical FTLD, but there was no evidence of fused in sarcoma (FUS) immunoreactivity, which is often detected in atypical FTLD. Analogous to atypical FTLD, neuronal inclusions had variable co-localization of SOD1 and α-internexin. The current classification of FTLD is based on the major constituent protein: FTLD-tau, FTLD-TDP-43, and FTLD-FUS. The proband in this family indicates that SOD1, while rare, can also be the substrate of FTLD, in addition to the more common presentation of ALS. The explanation for clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of SOD1 mutations, including the p.Gly141X mutation, remains unresolved. PMID:25917047

  10. Infertility due to congenital absence of vas deferens in mainly caused by variable exon 9 skipping of the CFTR gene in heterozygous males for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Chillon, M.; Casals, T.; Nunes, V.

    1994-09-01

    About 65% or the individuals with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) have mutations in at least one of the CFTR alleles. We have studied the phenotypic effects of the CFTR gene intron 8 polyT tract 5T allele in 90 CBAVD subjects and in parents of CF patients. This group was compared with normal individuals, and with fathers and mothers of CF patients. Allele 5T was significantly associated with CBAVD (19.6%) when compared to the general population (5.2%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 33.3%; p<<0.0001). It was represented poorly in fathers of CF patients (1.3%). Mutations were identified in one (60%) or both CFTR alleles (8.9%) of CBAVD patients. Heterozygosity for the 5T allele was strongly associated with heterozygosity for CF mutations ({chi}{sup 2} = 10.9; p<0.0004). The strong correlation between allele 5T and CBAVD, together with the low frequency of this allele in fathers of CF patients, demonstrates that variable {Delta}exon 9 produces infertility in males if associated with a CF mutation on the other chromosome. The 30% of CBAVD cases with only one CFTR mutation and without a 5T-allele may be due to other molecular mechanisms involving CFTR, distinct from {Delta}exon 9. Since there is a relatively high proportion of CBAVD without CF mutations (25%), other gene(s), distinct from CFTR, may have a role in the CBAVD phenotype.

  11. Insights Into the Pathogenicity of Rare Missense GCK Variants From the Identification and Functional Characterization of Compound Heterozygous and Double Mutations Inherited in Cis

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Nicola L.; Osbak, Kara K.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Tribble, Nicholas D.; Steele, Anna M.; Wensley, Kirsty J.; Edghill, Emma L.; Colcough, Kevin; Barrett, Amy; Valentínová, Lucia; Rundle, Jana K.; Raimondo, Anne; Grimsby, Joseph; Ellard, Sian; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the importance of using a combined genetic and functional approach to correctly interpret a genetic test for monogenic diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We identified three probands with a phenotype consistent with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) subtype GCK-MODY, in whom two potential pathogenic mutations were identified: [R43H/G68D], [E248 K/I225M], or [G261R/D217N]. Allele-specific PCR and cosegregation were used to determine phase. Single and double mutations were kinetically characterized. RESULTS The mutations occurred in cis (double mutants) in two probands and in trans in one proband. Functional studies of all double mutants revealed inactivating kinetics. The previously reported GCK-MODY mutations R43H and G68D were inherited from an affected father and unaffected mother, respectively. Both our functional and genetic studies support R43H as the cause of GCK-MODY and G68D as a neutral rare variant. CONCLUSIONS These data highlight the need for family/functional studies, even for previously reported pathogenic mutations. PMID:22611063

  12. Immunohistochemical marker for Na+ CP type Valpha (C-20) and heterozygous nonsense SCN5A mutation W822X in a sudden cardiac death induced by mild anaphylactic reaction.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Pomara, Cristoforo; La Rocca, Giampiero; Neri, Margherita; Riezzo, Irene; Karch, Steven B; Anzalone, Rita; Lo Iacono, Melania; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2009-07-01

    A sudden death likely due to mild anaphylactic reaction in a young man is described. Autoptic, histologic, immunohistochemical, and laboratory findings were strongly consistent with the diagnosis of a mild anaphylactic reaction. Genetic molecular analysis, performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, showed a mutation described as W822X in a family with electrocardiographic pattern typical of Brugada Syndrome. It results in a nonsense mutation generating a truncated form of the channel protein. The mutation is due to a point substitution of a guanine with an adenine residue (G2466A). Immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy on sections from heart formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues led us to confirm the cellular localization of the Na+ CP type Valpha (C-20) at the intercalated disks of ventricular myocytes and nearly 50% reduction in Na+ channels expression in ventricular myocytes when compared with control cases. We suggest that the anaphylactic reaction that occurred in the young man could serve as a trigger mechanism, responsible for his sudden death with a SCN5A mutation associated with the Brugada syndrome.

  13. Establishment of Mouse Model of MYH9 Disorders: Heterozygous R702C Mutation Provokes Macrothrombocytopenia with Leukocyte Inclusion Bodies, Renal Glomerulosclerosis and Hearing Disability

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuaki; Kunishima, Shinji; Ikejiri, Makoto; Maruyama, Shoichi; Sone, Michihiko; Takagi, Akira; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Saito, Hidehiko; Naoe, Tomoki; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHCIIA) encoded by MYH9 is associated with autosomal dominantly inherited diseases called MYH9 disorders. MYH9 disorders are characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and very characteristic inclusion bodies in granulocytes. MYH9 disorders frequently cause nephritis, sensorineural hearing disability and cataracts. One of the most common and deleterious mutations causing these disorders is the R702C missense mutation. We generated knock-in mice expressing the Myh9 R702C mutation. R702C knock-in hetero mice (R702C+/− mice) showed macrothrombocytopenia. We studied megakaryopoiesis of cultured fetal liver cells of R702C+/− mice and found that proplatelet formation was impaired: the number of proplatelet tips was decreased, proplatelet size was increased, and proplatelet shafts were short and enlarged. Although granulocyte inclusion bodies were not visible by May–Grünwald Giemsa staining, immunofluorescence analysis indicated that NMMHCIIA proteins aggregated and accumulated in the granulocyte cytoplasm. In other organs, R702C+/− mice displayed albuminuria which increased with age. Renal pathology examination revealed glomerulosclerosis. Sensory hearing loss was indicated by lowered auditory brainstem response. These findings indicate that Myh9 R702C knock-in mice mirror features of human MYH9 disorders arising from the R702C mutation. PMID:23976996

  14. Truncating Mutations in the Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor G2 Gene ADGRG2 Cause an X-Linked Congenital Bilateral Absence of Vas Deferens.

    PubMed

    Patat, Olivier; Pagin, Adrien; Siegfried, Aurore; Mitchell, Valérie; Chassaing, Nicolas; Faguer, Stanislas; Monteil, Laetitia; Gaston, Véronique; Bujan, Louis; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique; Marcelli, François; Lalau, Guy; Rigot, Jean-Marc; Mieusset, Roger; Bieth, Eric

    2016-08-01

    In 80% of infertile men with obstructive azoospermia caused by a congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD), mutations are identified in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). For the remaining 20%, the origin of the CBAVD is unknown. A large cohort of azoospermic men with CBAVD was retrospectively reassessed with more stringent selection criteria based on consistent clinical data, complete description of semen and reproductive excurrent ducts, extensive CFTR testing, and kidney ultrasound examination. To maximize the phenotypic prioritization, men with CBAVD and with unilateral renal agenesis were considered ineligible for the present study. We performed whole-exome sequencing on 12 CFTR-negative men with CBAVD and targeted sequencing on 14 additional individuals. We identified three protein-truncating hemizygous mutations, c.1545dupT (p.Glu516Ter), c.2845delT (p.Cys949AlafsTer81), and c.2002_2006delinsAGA (p.Leu668ArgfsTer21), in ADGRG2, encoding the epididymal- and efferent-ducts-specific adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G2, in four subjects, including two related individuals with X-linked transmission of their infertility. Previous studies have demonstrated that Adgrg2-knockout male mice develop obstructive infertility. Our study confirms the crucial role of ADGRG2 in human male fertility and brings new insight into congenital obstructive azoospermia pathogenesis. In men with CBAVD who are CFTR-negative, ADGRG2 testing could allow for appropriate genetic counseling with regard to the X-linked transmission of the molecular defect. PMID:27476656

  15. Compound heterozygous protein C deficiency in a family with venous thrombosis: Identification and in vitro study of p.Asp297His and p.Val420Leu mutations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Hua-Fang; Tang, Liang; Yang, Yan; Wang, Qing-Yun; Zeng, Wei; Wu, Ying-Ying; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Guo, Tao; Hu, Yu

    2015-05-25

    Hereditary protein C deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal inherited disorder associated with high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study aimed to explore the functional consequences of two missense mutations, p.Asp297His and p.Val420Ile, responsible for type I/II PCD and recurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a Chinese family. The plasma protein C activities (PC:A) of the proband and his sister were reduced to 4% and 5% of normal activity. However, protein C antigen (PC:Ag) concentrations were not equally decreased, with levels of 90.5% and 88.7%, respectively. Two missense mutations p.Asp297His and p.Val420Leu were identified in the protein C gene (PROC). The PC:A and PC:Ag levels in heterozygous state for p.Asp297His were 66% and 64.8%, whereas in heterozygous state for p.Val420Leu, these levels were 67% and 145%, respectively. Wild type (WT) and two mutant PROC cDNA expression plasmids were constructed and transfected into HEK 293T cells. Western blot analysis revealed that both p.Asp297His and p.Val420Leu showed a normal intracellular protein level. The extracellular protein level and specific activity of p.Asp297His were equally reduced to 37.7 ± 4.3% and 22.1 ± 2.5%, respectively. Mutant p.Val420Leu showed a relatively higher PC:Ag level and undetectable PC:A. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that WT and p.Val420Leu proteins were largely co-localized with both the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and cis-Golgi Marker (GM130), while the PC p.Asp297His mutant protein was mainly co-localized with PDI and much less co-localized with GM130. The thrombosis symptom in this family was associated with the two missense mutations in the PROC gene.

  16. Leukemogenesis in heterozygous PU.1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Genik, Paula C; Vyazunova, Irina; Steffen, Leta S; Bacher, Jeffery W; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; McKercher, Scott; Ullrich, Robert L; Fallgren, Christina M; Weil, Michael M; Ray, F Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Most murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemias involve biallelic inactivation of the PU.1 gene, with one allele being lost through a radiation-induced chromosomal deletion and the other allele affected by a recurrent point mutation in codon 235 that is likely to be spontaneous. The short latencies of acute myeloid leukemias occurring in nonirradiated mice engineered with PU.1 conditional knockout or knockdown alleles suggest that once both copies of PU.1 have been lost any other steps involved in leukemogenesis occur rapidly. Yet, spontaneous acute myeloid leukemias have not been reported in mice heterozygous for a PU.1 knockout allele, an observation that conflicts with the understanding that the PU.1 codon 235 mutation is spontaneous. Here we describe experiments that show that the lack of spontaneous leukemia in PU.1 heterozygous knockout mice is not due to insufficient monitoring times or mouse numbers or the genetic background of the knockout mice. The results reveal that spontaneous leukemias that develop in mice of the mixed 129S2/SvPas and C57BL/6 background of knockout mice arise by a pathway that does not involve biallelic PU.1 mutation. In addition, the latency of radiation-induced leukemia in PU.1 heterozygous mice on a genetic background susceptible to radiation-induced leukemia indicates that the codon 235 mutation is not a rate-limiting step in radiation leukemogenesis driven by PU.1 loss.

  17. Heterozygous mutations in cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase-4D (PDE4D) and protein kinase A (PKA) provide new insights into the molecular pathology of acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Kaname, Tadashi; Ki, Chang-Seok; Niikawa, Norio; Baillie, George S; Day, Jonathan P; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Ohta, Tohru; Nishimura, Gen; Mastuura, Nobuo; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Sohn, Young Bae; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Sung Yoon; Ko, Ah-Ra; Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Hyun Wook; Ryu, Sung Ho; Rhee, Hwanseok; Yang, Kap-Seok; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Kim, Chi Hwa; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Dongsan; Yanagi, Kumiko; Naritomi, Kenji; Yoshiura, Ko-Ichiro; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Nii, Eiji; Tonoki, Hidefumi; Houslay, Miles D; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Acrodysostosis without hormone resistance is a rare skeletal disorder characterized by brachydactyly, nasal hypoplasia, mental retardation and occasionally developmental delay. Recently, loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding cAMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase-4D (PDE4D) have been reported to cause this rare condition but the pathomechanism has not been fully elucidated. To understand the pathogenetic mechanism of PDE4D mutations, we conducted 3D modeling studies to predict changes in the binding efficacy of cAMP to the catalytic pocket in PDE4D mutants. Our results indicated diminished enzyme activity in the two mutants we analyzed (Gly673Asp and Ile678Thr; based on PDE4D4 residue numbering). Ectopic expression of PDE4D mutants in HEK293 cells demonstrated this reduction in activity, which was identified by increased cAMP levels. However, the cells from an acrodysostosis patient showed low cAMP accumulation, which resulted in a decrease in the phosphorylated cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein (pCREB)/CREB ratio. The reason for this discrepancy was due to a compensatory increase in expression levels of PDE4A and PDE4B isoforms, which accounted for the paradoxical decrease in cAMP levels in the patient cells expressing mutant isoforms with a lowered PDE4D activity. Skeletal radiographs of 10-week-old knockout (KO) rats showed that the distal part of the forelimb was shorter than in wild-type (WT) rats and that all the metacarpals and phalanges were also shorter in KO, as the name acrodysostosis implies. Like the G-protein α-stimulatory subunit and PRKAR1A, PDE4D critically regulates the cAMP signal transduction pathway and influences bone formation in a way that activity-compromising PDE4D mutations can result in skeletal dysplasia. We propose that specific inhibitory PDE4D mutations can lead to the molecular pathology of acrodysostosis without hormone resistance but that the pathological phenotype may well be dependent on an over-compensatory induction

  18. Case Report: Compound heterozygous nonsense mutations in TRMT10A are associated with microcephaly, delayed development, and periventricular white matter hyperintensities.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Mohan; Ramsey, Keri; Grebe, Theresa; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Huentelman, Matthew; Craig, David; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    Microcephaly is a fairly common feature observed in children with delayed development, defined as head circumference less than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. It may be the result of an acquired insult to the brain, such prenatal or perinatal brain injury (congenital infection or hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy), or be a part of a genetic syndrome. There are over 1000 conditions listed in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) where microcephaly is a key finding; many of these are associated with specific somatic features and non-CNS anomalies. The term primary microcephaly is used when microcephaly and delayed development are the primary features, and they are not part of another recognized syndrome. In this case report, we present the clinical features of siblings (brother and sister) with primary microcephaly and delayed development, and subtle dysmorphic features. Both children had brain MRI studies that showed periventricular and subcortical T2/FLAIR hyperintensities, without signs of white matter volume loss, and no parenchymal calcifications by CT scan. The family was enrolled in a research study for whole exome sequencing of probands and parents. Analysis of variants determined that the children were compound heterozygotes for nonsense mutations, c.277C>T (p.Arg93*) and c.397C>T (p.Arg133*), in the TRMT10A gene. Mutations in this gene have only recently been reported in children with microcephaly and early onset diabetes mellitus. Our report adds to current knowledge of TRMT10A related neurodevelopmental disorders and demonstrates imaging findings suggestive of delayed or abnormal myelination of the white matter in this disorder. Accurate diagnosis through genomic testing, as in the children described here, allows for early detection and management of medical complications, such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:26535115

  19. Case Report: Compound heterozygous nonsense mutations in TRMT10A are associated with microcephaly, delayed development, and periventricular white matter hyperintensities

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Mohan; Ramsey, Keri; Grebe, Theresa; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Huentelman, Matthew; Craig, David; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    Microcephaly is a fairly common feature observed in children with delayed development, defined as head circumference less than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. It may be the result of an acquired insult to the brain, such prenatal or perinatal brain injury (congenital infection or hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy), or be a part of a genetic syndrome. There are over 1000 conditions listed in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) where microcephaly is a key finding; many of these are associated with specific somatic features and non-CNS anomalies. The term primary microcephaly is used when microcephaly and delayed development are the primary features, and they are not part of another recognized syndrome. In this case report, we present the clinical features of siblings (brother and sister) with primary microcephaly and delayed development, and subtle dysmorphic features. Both children had brain MRI studies that showed periventricular and subcortical T2/FLAIR hyperintensities, without signs of white matter volume loss, and no parenchymal calcifications by CT scan. The family was enrolled in a research study for whole exome sequencing of probands and parents. Analysis of variants determined that the children were compound heterozygotes for nonsense mutations, c.277C>T (p.Arg93*) and c.397C>T (p.Arg133*), in the TRMT10A gene. Mutations in this gene have only recently been reported in children with microcephaly and early onset diabetes mellitus. Our report adds to current knowledge of TRMT10A related neurodevelopmental disorders and demonstrates imaging findings suggestive of delayed or abnormal myelination of the white matter in this disorder. Accurate diagnosis through genomic testing, as in the children described here, allows for early detection and management of medical complications, such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:26535115

  20. Molecular characterization of minor gene rearrangements in Finnish patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: Identification of two common missense mutations (Gly823{r_arrow}Asp and Leu380{r_arrow}His) and eight rare mutations of the LDL receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, U.M.; Viikari, J.S.; Kontula, K.

    1995-10-01

    Two deletions of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were previously shown to account for about two thirds of all mutations causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Finland. We screened the DNA samples from a cohort representing the remaining 30% of Finnish heterozygous FH patients by amplifying all the 18 exons of the receptor gene by PCR and searching for DNA variations with the SSCP technique. Ten novel mutations were identified, comprising two nonsense and seven missense mutations as well as one frameshift mutation caused by a 13-bp deletion. A single nucleotide change, substituting adenine for guanidine at position 2533 and resulting in an amino acid change of glycine to aspartic acid at codon 823, was found in DNA samples from 14 unrelated FH probands. This mutation (FH-Turku) affects the sequence encoding the putative basolateral sorting signal of the LDL receptor protein; however, the exact functional consequences of this mutation are yet to be examined. The FH-Turku gene and another point mutation (Leu380{r_arrow}His or FH-Pori) together account for {approximately}8% of the FH-causing genes in Finland and are particularly common among FH patients from the southwestern part of the country (combined, 30%). Primer-introduced restriction analysis was applied for convenient assay of the FH-Turku and FH-Pori point mutations. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates the unique genetic background of FH in Finland and describes a commonly occurring FH gene with a missense mutation closest to the C terminus thus far reported. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Mutation in the protease cleavage site of GDF9 increases ovulation rate and litter size in heterozygous ewes and causes infertility in homozygous ewes.

    PubMed

    Souza, C J H; McNeilly, A S; Benavides, M V; Melo, E O; Moraes, J C F

    2014-10-01

    Litter size (LS) in sheep is determined mainly by ovulation rate (OR). Several polymorphisms have been identified in the growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) gene that result in an increase in OR and prolificacy of sheep. Screening the databank of the Brazilian Sheep Breeders Association for triplet delivery, we identified flocks of prolific Ile de France ewes. After resequencing of GDF9, a point mutation (c.943C>T) was identified, resulting in a non-conservative amino acid change (p.Arg315Cys) in the cleavage site of the propeptide. This new allele was called Vacaria (FecG(v) ). A flock of half-sib ewes was evaluated for OR in the first three breeding seasons, and Vacaria heterozygotes had higher OR (P < 0.001), averaging 2.1 ± 0.1 when compared to 1.2 ± 0.1 in wild-type ewes. The OR was also influenced by age, increasing in the second and third breeding seasons (P < 0.001). In flocks segregating this allele, the LS was higher in mutant sheep (P < 0.001), averaging 1.61 ± 0.07 in heterozygotes and 1.29 ± 0.03 in wild-type ewes. Analysis of homozygote reproductive tract morphology revealed uterine and ovarian hypoplasia. Ovarian follicles continue to develop up to small antral stages, although with abnormal oocyte morphology and altered arrangement of granulosa cells. After the collapse of the oocyte in most follicles, the remaining cells formed clusters that persisted in the ovary. This SNP is useful to improve selection for dam prolificacy and also as a model to investigate GDF9 post-translation processing and the fate of the follicular cells that remain after the oocyte demise.

  2. Novel mutations of ABCA1 transporter in patients with Tangier disease and familial HDL deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Tommaso; Zanoni, Paolo; Rabacchi, Claudio; Pisciotta, Livia; Favari, Elda; Adorni, Maria Pia; Deegan, Patrick B; Park, Adrian; Hlaing, Thinn; Feher, Michael D; Jones, Ben; Uzak, Asli Subasioglu; Kardas, Fatih; Dardis, Andrea; Sechi, Annalisa; Bembi, Bruno; Minuz, Pietro; Bertolini, Stefano; Bernini, Franco; Calandra, Sebastiano

    2012-11-01

    The objective of the study was the characterization of ABCA1 gene mutations in 10 patients with extremely low HDL-cholesterol. Five patients (aged 6 months to 76 years) presented with splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia suggesting the diagnosis of Tangier disease (TD). Three of them were homozygous for novel mutations either in intron (c.4465-34A>G) or in exons (c.4376delT and c.5449C>T), predicted to encode truncated proteins. One patient was compound heterozygous for a nucleotide insertion (c.1758_1759insG), resulting in a truncated protein and for a nucleotide substitution c.4799A>G, resulting in a missense mutation (p.H1600R). The last TD patient, found to be heterozygous for a known mutation (p.D1009Y), had a complete defect in ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux in fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of a second undetected mutant allele. Among the other patients, four were asymptomatic, but one, with multiple risk factors, had severe peripheral artery disease. Three of these patients were heterozygous for known mutations (p.R130K+p.N1800H, p.R1068C, p.N1800H), while two were carriers of novel mutations (c.1195-27G>A and c.396_397insA), predicted to encode truncated proteins. The pathogenic effect of the two intronic mutations (c. 1195-27G>A and c.4465-34A>G) was demonstrated by the analysis of the transcripts of splicing reporter mutant minigenes expressed in COS-1 cells. Both mutations activated an intronic acceptor splice site which resulted in a partial intron retention in mature mRNA with the production of truncated proteins. This study confirms the allelic heterogeneity of TD and suggests that the diagnosis of TD must be considered in patients with an unexplained splenomegaly, associated with thrombocytopenia and hypocholesterolemia. PMID:22959828

  3. An Upstream Truncation of the furA-katG Operon Confers High-Level Isoniazid Resistance in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolate with No Known Resistance-Associated Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Wing Cheong; Zhang, Ying; Kao, Richard Y. T.

    2014-01-01

    Although the major causes of isoniazid (INH) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis are confined to structural mutations in katG and promoter mutations in the mabA-inhA operon, a significant proportion of INH-resistant strains have unknown resistance mechanisms. Recently, we identified a high-level INH-resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolate, GB005, with no known resistance-associated mutations. A comprehensive study was performed to investigate the molecular basis of drug resistance in this strain. Although no mutations were found throughout the katG and furA-katG intergenic region, the katG expression and the catalase activity were greatly diminished compared to those in H37Rv (P < 0.01). Northern blotting revealed that the katG transcript from the isolate was smaller than that of H37Rv. Sequencing analysis of furA and upstream genes discovered a 7.2-kb truncation extended from the 96th base preceding the initiation codon of katG. Complementation of the M. tuberculosis Δ(furA-katG) strain with katG and different portions of the truncated region identified a 134-bp upstream fragment of furA that was essential for full catalase activity and INH susceptibility in M. tuberculosis. The promoter activity of this fragment was also shown to be stronger than that of the furA-katG intergenic region (P < 0.01). Collectively, these findings demonstrate that deletion of the 134-bp furA upstream fragment is responsible for the reduction in katG expression, resulting in INH resistance in GB005. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that deletion of the upstream region preceding the furA-katG operon causes high-level INH resistance in a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. PMID:25092698

  4. The sodium-phosphate co-transporter SLC34A2, and pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: Presentation of an inbred family and a novel truncating mutation in exon 3

    PubMed Central

    Vismara, Marco Favio Michele; Colao, Emma; Fabiani, Fernanda; Bombardiere, Francesco; Tamburrini, Oscar; Alessio, Caterina; Manti, Francesco; Pelaia, Gerolamo; Romeo, Pasquale; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Perrotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a disorder in which many tiny fragments (microliths) of calcium phosphate gradually accumulate in alveoli. Loss of function mutations in the gene SLC34A2 coding for the sodium phosphate co-transporter (NaPi-IIb) are responsible for genetic forms of alveolar microlithiasis. We now report a consanguineous Italian family from Calabria with two affected members segregating alveolar microlithiasis in a recessive fashion. We describe, for the first time, a novel loss of function mutation in the gene coding for NaPi-IIb. A careful description of the clinical phenotype is provided together with technical details for direct sequencing of the gene. PMID:26744662

  5. Novel autosomal recessive gene mutations in aquaporin-2 in two Chinese congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Jing; Nie, Min; Duan, Lian; Gu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has linked novel mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2) and aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2) present in Southeast Asian populations to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). To investigate mutations in 2 distinct Chinese pedigrees with NDI patients, clinical data, laboratory findings, and genomic DNA sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed in two 5.5- and 8-year-old boys (proband 1 and 2, respectively) and their first-degree relatives. Water intake, urinary volume, body weight and medication use were recorded. Mutations in coding regions and intron-exon borders of both AQP2 and AVPR2 gene were sequenced. Three mutations in AQP2 were detected, including previously reported heterozygous frameshift mutation (c.127_128delCA, p.Gln43Aspfs ×63) inherited from the mother, a novel frameshift mutation (c.501_502insC, p.Val168Argfs ×30, inherited from the father) in proband 1 and a novel missense mutation (c. 643G>A, p. G215S), inherited from both parents in proband 2. In family 2 both parents and one sister were heterozygous carriers of the novel missense mutation. Neither pedigree exhibited mutation in the AVPR2 gene. The patient with truncated AQP2 may present with much more severe NDI manifestations. Identification of these novel AQP2 gene mutations expands the AQP2 genotypic spectrum and may contribute to etiological diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:26064258

  6. ABCA12 mutations and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: a review of genotype/phenotype correlations and of pathogenetic concepts.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masashi

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in ABCA12 have been described in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI) including harlequin ichthyosis (HI), congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE), and lamellar ichthyosis (LI). HI shows the most severe phenotype. CIE and LI are clinically characterized by fine, whitish scales on a background of erythematous skin, and large, thick, dark scales over the entire body without serious background erythroderma, respectively. To date, a total of 56 ABCA12 mutations have been reported in 66 ARCI families including 48 HI, 10 LI, and 8 CIE families of African, European, Pakistani/Indian, and Japanese origin (online database: http://www.derm-hokudai.jp/ABCA12/). A total of 62.5% of reported ABCA12 mutations are expected to lead to truncated proteins. Most mutations in HI are truncation mutations and homozygous or compound heterozygous truncation mutations always results in HI phenotype. In CIE families, at least one mutation on each allele is typically a missense mutation. Combinations of missense mutations in the first ATP-binding cassette of ABCA12 underlie the LI phenotype. ABCA12 is a keratinocyte lipid transporter associated with lipid transport in lamellar granules, and loss of ABCA12 function leads to a defective lipid barrier in the stratum corneum, resulting in an ichthyotic phenotype. Recent work using mouse models confirmed ABCA12 roles in skin barrier formation.

  7. Production of truncated MBD4 protein by frameshift mutation in DNA mismatch repair-deficient cells enhances 5-fluorouracil sensitivity that is independent of hMLH1 status.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie; Hamaya, Yasushi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Kanaoka, Shigeru; Sugimoto, Ken; Carethers, John M

    2016-07-01

    Methyl-CpG binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) is a DNA glycosylase that can remove 5-fluorodeoxyuracil from DNA as well as repair T:G or U:G mismatches. MBD4 is a target for frameshift mutation with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency, creating a truncated MBD4 protein (TruMBD4) that lacks its glycosylase domain. Here we show that TruMBD4 plays an important role for enhancing 5-fluorouracil (5FU) sensitivity in MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cells. We found biochemically that TruMBD4 binds to 5FU incorporated into DNA with higher affinity than MBD4. TruMBD4 reduced the 5FU affinity of the MMR recognition complexes that determined 5FU sensitivity by previous reports, suggesting other mechanisms might be operative to trigger cytotoxicity. To analyze overall 5FU sensitivity with TruMBD4, we established TruMBD4 overexpression in hMLH1-proficient or -deficient colorectal cancer cells followed by treatment with 5FU. 5FU-treated TruMBD4 cells demonstrated diminished growth characteristics compared to controls, independently of hMLH1 status. Flow cytometry revealed more 5FU-treated TruMBD4 cells in S phase than controls. We conclude that patients with MMR-deficient cancers, which show characteristic resistance to 5FU therapy, may be increased for 5FU sensitivity via secondary frameshift mutation of the base excision repair gene MBD4.

  8. Recessive nephrocerebellar syndrome on the Galloway-Mowat syndrome spectrum is caused by homozygous protein-truncating mutations of WDR73

    PubMed Central

    Puffenberger, Erik G.; Baple, Emma; Harding, Brian; Crino, Peter; Fogo, Agnes B.; Wenger, Olivia; Xin, Baozhong; Koehler, Alanna E.; McGlincy, Madeleine H.; Provencher, Margaret M.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Tran, Linh; Al Turki, Saeed; Chioza, Barry A.; Cross, Harold; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Maroofian, Reza; Heaps, Adam D.; Morton, Mary C.; Stempak, Lisa; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Zaritsky, Joshua; Campellone, Kenneth; Morton, D. Holmes; Wang, Heng; Crosby, Andrew; Strauss, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel nephrocerebellar syndrome on the Galloway-Mowat syndrome spectrum among 30 children (ages 1.0 to 28 years) from diverse Amish demes. Children with nephrocerebellar syndrome had progressive microcephaly, visual impairment, stagnant psychomotor development, abnormal extrapyramidal movements and nephrosis. Fourteen died between ages 2.7 and 28 years, typically from renal failure. Post-mortem studies revealed (i) micrencephaly without polymicrogyria or heterotopia; (ii) atrophic cerebellar hemispheres with stunted folia, profound granule cell depletion, Bergmann gliosis, and signs of Purkinje cell deafferentation; (iii) selective striatal cholinergic interneuron loss; and (iv) optic atrophy with delamination of the lateral geniculate nuclei. Renal tissue showed focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and extensive effacement and microvillus transformation of podocyte foot processes. Nephrocerebellar syndrome mapped to 700 kb on chromosome 15, which contained a single novel homozygous frameshift variant (WDR73 c.888delT; p.Phe296Leufs*26). WDR73 protein is expressed in human cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cultured embryonic kidney cells. It is concentrated at mitotic microtubules and interacts with α-, β-, and γ-tubulin, heat shock proteins 70 and 90 (HSP-70; HSP-90), and the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 2/aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase multi-enzyme complex. Recombinant WDR73 p.Phe296Leufs*26 and p.Arg256Profs*18 proteins are truncated, unstable, and show increased interaction with α- and β-tubulin and HSP-70/HSP-90. Fibroblasts from patients homozygous for WDR73 p.Phe296Leufs*26 proliferate poorly in primary culture and senesce early. Our data suggest that in humans, WDR73 interacts with mitotic microtubules to regulate cell cycle progression, proliferation and survival in brain and kidney. We extend the Galloway-Mowat syndrome spectrum with the first description of diencephalic and striatal neuropathology. PMID:26070982

  9. Role of local structure and dynamics of small ligand migration in proteins: a study of a mutated truncated hemoprotein from Thermobifida fusca by time resolved MIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, Barbara; Lapini, Andrea; Di Donato, Mariangela; Marcelli, Agnese; Lima, Manuela; Righini, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Baiocco, Paola; Bonamore, Alessandra; Boffi, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Carbon monoxide recombination dynamics in a mutant of the truncated hemoglobin from Thermobida fusca (3F-Tf-trHb) has been analyzed by means of ultrafast Visible-pump/MidIR-probe spectroscopy and compared with that of the wild-type protein. In 3F-Tf-trHb, three topologically relevant amino acids, responsible for the ligand stabilization through the formation of a H-bond network (TyrB10 TyrCD1 and TrpG8), have been replaced by Phe residues. X-ray diffraction data show that Phe residues in positions B10 and G8 maintain the same rotameric arrangements as Tyr and Trp in the wild-type protein, while Phe in position CD1 displays significant rotameric heterogeneity. Photodissociation of the ligand has been induced by exciting the sample with 550 nm pump pulses and the CO rebinding has been monitored in two mid-IR regions respectively corresponding to the ν(CO) stretching vibration of the iron-bound CO (1880-1980 cm(-1)) and of the dissociated free CO (2050-2200 cm(-1)). In both the mutant and wild-type protein, a significant amount of geminate CO rebinding is observed on a subnanosecond time scale. Despite the absence of the distal pocket hydrogen-bonding network, the kinetics of geminate rebinding in 3F-Tf-trHb is very similar to the wild-type, showing how the reactivity of dissociated CO toward the heme is primarily regulated by the effective volume and flexibility of the distal pocket and by caging effects exerted on the free CO on the analyzed time scale. PMID:25019316

  10. Activation of the gab Operon in an RpoS-Dependent Manner by Mutations That Truncate the Inner Core of Lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Joloba, Moses L.; Clemmer, Katy M.; Sledjeski, Darren D.; Rather, Philip N.

    2004-01-01

    The gab operon (gabDTPC) in Escherichia coli functions in the conversion of γ-aminobutyrate to succinate. One component of gab operon regulation involves the RpoS sigma factor, which mediates activation at high cell density. Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify new genes that regulate gab operon expression in rich media. A Tn5tmp insertion in the hldD (formerly rfaD) gene increased gabT::lacZ expression 12-fold. The hldD gene product, an ADP-l-glycerol-d-mannoheptose-6-epimerase, catalyzes the conversion of ADP-d-glycerol-d-mannoheptose to ADP-l-glycerol-d-mannoheptose, a precursor for the synthesis of inner-core lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Defined mutations in hldE, required for heptose synthesis, and waaF, required for the addition of the second heptose to the inner core, also resulted in high-level gabT::lacZ expression. The hldD, hldE, and waaF mutants exhibited a mucoid colony phenotype due to production of a colanic acid capsule. However, in the hldD::cat background, the high-level expression of gabT::lacZ was independent of the regulatory components for colanic acid synthesis (rcsA, rcsB, and rcsC) and also independent of manC (cpsB), a structural gene for colanic acid synthesis. Activation of gabT::lacZ in the hldD::cat background was dependent on the RpoS sigma factor. The hldD::cat mutation resulted in a sixfold increase in the levels of a translational RpoS-LacZ fusion and had a marginal effect on a transcriptional fusion. This study reveals a stress-induced pathway, mediated by loss of the LPS inner core, that increases RpoS translation and gab operon expression in E. coli. PMID:15576807

  11. WT1 mutations in T-ALL.

    PubMed

    Tosello, Valeria; Mansour, Marc R; Barnes, Kelly; Paganin, Maddalena; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Jenkinson, Sarah; Allen, Christopher G; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Palomero, Teresa; Real, Pedro; Murty, Vundavalli; Yao, Xiaopan; Richards, Susan M; Goldstone, Anthony; Rowe, Jacob; Basso, Giuseppe; Wiernik, Peter H; Paietta, Elisabeth; Pieters, Rob; Horstmann, Martin; Meijerink, Jules P P; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2009-07-30

    The molecular mechanisms involved in disease progression and relapse in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) are poorly understood. We used single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis to analyze paired diagnostic and relapsed T-ALL samples to identify recurrent genetic alterations in T-ALL. This analysis showed that diagnosis and relapsed cases have common genetic alterations, but also that relapsed samples frequently lose chromosomal markers present at diagnosis, suggesting that relapsed T-ALL emerges from an ancestral clone different from the major leukemic population at diagnosis. In addition, we identified deletions and associated mutations in the WT1 tumor suppressor gene in 2 of 9 samples. Subsequent analysis showed WT1 mutations in 28 of 211 (13.2%) of pediatric and 10 of 85 (11.7%) of adult T-ALL cases. WT1 mutations present in T-ALL are predominantly heterozygous frameshift mutations resulting in truncation of the C-terminal zinc finger domains of this transcription factor. WT1 mutations are most prominently found in T-ALL cases with aberrant rearrangements of the oncogenic TLX1, TLX3, and HOXA transcription factor oncogenes. Survival analysis demonstrated that WT1 mutations do not confer adverse prognosis in pediatric and adult T-ALL. Overall, these results identify the presence of WT1 mutations as a recurrent genetic alteration in T-ALL. PMID:19494353

  12. Mutational analysis of AGXT in two Chinese families with primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease of glyoxylate metabolism caused by a defect in the liver-specific peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) that leads to hyperoxaluria, recurrent urolithiasis, and nephrocalcinosis. Methods Two unrelated patients with recurrent urolithiasis, along with members of their families, exhibited mutations in the AGXT gene by PCR direct sequencing. Results Two heterozygous mutations that predict truncated proteins, p.S81X and p.S275delinsRAfs, were identified in one patient. The p.S81X mutation is novel. Two heterozygous missense mutations, p.M1T and p.I202N, were detected in another patient but were not identified in her sibling. These four mutations were confirmed to be of paternal and maternal origin. Conclusions These are the first cases of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 to be diagnosed by clinical manifestations and AGXT gene mutations in mainland China. The novel p.S81X and p.I202N mutations detected in our study extend the spectrum of known AGXT gene mutations. PMID:24934730

  13. Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia caused by a mutation in the apolipoprotein B gene that results in a truncated species of apolipoprotein B (B-31). A unique mutation that helps to define the portion of the apolipoprotein B molecule required for the formation of buoyant, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Young, S G; Hubl, S T; Smith, R S; Snyder, S M; Terdiman, J F

    1990-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B-100 has a crucial structural role in the formation of VLDL and LDL. Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia, a syndrome in which the concentration of LDL cholesterol in plasma is abnormally low, can be caused by mutations in the apo B gene that prevent the translation of a full-length apo B-100 molecule. Prior studies have revealed that truncated species of apo B [e.g., apo B-37 (1728 amino acids), apo B-46 (2057 amino acids)] can occasionally be identified in the plasma of subjects with familial hypobetalipoproteinemia; in each of these cases, the truncated apo B species has been a prominent protein component of VLDL. In this report, we describe a kindred with hypobetalipoproteinemia in which the plasma of four affected heterozygotes contained a unique truncated apo B species, apo B-31. Apolipoprotein B-31 is caused by the deletion of a single nucleotide in the apo B gene, and it is predicted to contain 1425 amino acids. Apolipoprotein B-31 is the shortest of the mutant apo B species to be identified in the plasma of a subject with hypobetalipoproteinemia. In contrast to longer truncated apo B species, apo B-31 was undetectable in the VLDL and the LDL; however, it was present in the HDL fraction and the lipoprotein-deficient fraction of plasma. The density distribution of apo B-31 in the plasma suggests the possibility that the amino-terminal 1425 amino acids of apo B-100 are sufficient to permit the formation and secretion of small, dense lipoproteins but are inadequate to support the formation of the more lipid-rich VLDL and LDL particles. Images PMID:2312735

  14. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P.

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Yen, Hai-Yun; Austria, Theresa; Pettersson, Jonas; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Maxson, Robert; Widschwendter, Martin; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r) promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30%) rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001), attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms. PMID:26629527

  16. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Yen, Hai-Yun; Austria, Theresa; Pettersson, Jonas; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Maxson, Robert; Widschwendter, Martin; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-10-01

    Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r) promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30%) rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001), attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  17. Behavioral and electrophysiological characterization of Dyt1 heterozygous knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Chen, Huan-Xin; Dang, Mai Tu; Cheetham, Chad C; Campbell, Susan L; Roper, Steven N; Sweatt, J David; Li, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is an inherited movement disorder caused by mutations in DYT1 (TOR1A), which codes for torsinA. Most of the patients have a trinucleotide deletion (ΔGAG) corresponding to a glutamic acid in the C-terminal region (torsinA(ΔE)). Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in (KI) mice, which mimic ΔGAG mutation in the endogenous gene, exhibit motor deficits and deceased frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs) and normal theta-burst-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 region. Although Dyt1 KI mice show decreased hippocampal torsinA levels, it is not clear whether the decreased torsinA level itself affects the synaptic plasticity or torsinA(ΔE) does it. To analyze the effect of partial torsinA loss on motor behaviors and synaptic transmission, Dyt1 heterozygous knock-out (KO) mice were examined as a model of a frame-shift DYT1 mutation in patients. Consistent with Dyt1 KI mice, Dyt1 heterozygous KO mice showed motor deficits in the beam-walking test. Dyt1 heterozygous KO mice showed decreased hippocampal torsinA levels lower than those in Dyt1 KI mice. Reduced sEPSCs and normal miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) were also observed in the acute hippocampal brain slices from Dyt1 heterozygous KO mice, suggesting that the partial loss of torsinA function in Dyt1 KI mice causes action potential-dependent neurotransmitter release deficits. On the other hand, Dyt1 heterozygous KO mice showed enhanced hippocampal LTP, normal input-output relations and paired pulse ratios in the extracellular field recordings. The results suggest that maintaining an appropriate torsinA level is important to sustain normal motor performance, synaptic transmission and plasticity. Developing therapeutics to restore a normal torsinA level may help to prevent and treat the symptoms in DYT1 dystonia. PMID:25799505

  18. Cancer-associated ASXL1 mutations may act as gain-of-function mutations of the ASXL1–BAP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Anand; Larjo, Antti; Bassein, Jed A.; Chang, Xing; Hastie, Ryan B.; Togher, Susan M.; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    ASXL1 is the obligate regulatory subunit of a deubiquitinase complex whose catalytic subunit is BAP1. Heterozygous mutations of ASXL1 that result in premature truncations are frequent in myeloid leukemias and Bohring–Opitz syndrome. Here we demonstrate that ASXL1 truncations confer enhanced activity on the ASXL1–BAP1 complex. Stable expression of truncated, hyperactive ASXL1–BAP1 complexes in a haematopoietic precursor cell line results in global erasure of H2AK119Ub, striking depletion of H3K27me3, selective upregulation of a subset of genes whose promoters are marked by both H2AK119Ub and H3K4me3, and spontaneous differentiation to the mast cell lineage. These outcomes require the catalytic activity of BAP1, indicating that they are downstream consequences of H2AK119Ub erasure. In bone marrow precursors, expression of truncated ASXL1–BAP1 complex cooperates with TET2 loss-of-function to increase differentiation to the myeloid lineage in vivo. Our data raise the possibility that ASXL1 truncation mutations confer gain-of-function on the ASXL–BAP1 complex. PMID:26095772

  19. A novel homozygous COL11A2 deletion causes a C-terminal protein truncation with incomplete mRNA decay in a Turkish patient.

    PubMed

    Kayserili, Hülya; Wollnik, Bernd; Güven, Gamze; Emiroğlu, Melike Ulubil; Başerer, Nermin; Uyguner, Z Oya

    2011-01-01

    Recessive mutations in COL11A2 (collagen, type XI, alpha 2), are responsible for otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED) and non-syndromic hearing loss while dominant mutations are associated with Stickler type III, isolated cleft palate, Robin sequence, non-ophthalmic Stickler syndrome, early onset osteoarthritis and autosomal dominant hearing loss. We describe here the clinical findings of two Turkish cousins with OSMED carrying a novel homozygous truncating mutation in exon 38 of COL11A2 gene, c.2763delT, identified on cDNA and confirmed at gDNA. This mutation is located on triple helix repeat domain of the collagen alpha-2(XI) chain, where the majority of the previously identified mutations are located. Real-time RT-PCR experiment provided that mutated transcript does not decay completely. Although our analysis displays the partial survival of the mutant transcript from blood tissue, not from cartilage, we propose that this mechanism may play an important role on the variable expressivity of the heterozygous COL11A2 gene mutations. PMID:21204229

  20. [Mutation analysis of the pathogenic gene in a Chinese family with hereditary hemochromatosis].

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Li; Hongxing, Zhang; Haitao, Zhang; Xiaobo, Peng; Lili, Bai; Fuchu, He; Zewu, Qiu; Gangqiao, Zhou

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. We recruited a consanguineous Chinese family including the proband with HHC and other four members without HHC. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified two homozygous mutations (c.G18C [p.Q6H] and c.GC962_963AA [p.C321X]) in the hemojuvelin gene (HJV) in the proband with HHC. No mutation was found in other four previously identified HHC related genes, HAMP, TFR2, FPN and HFE. The functional impact of p.Q6H mutation is weak whereas p.C321X, a premature termination mutation, results in a truncated HJV protein, which lacks the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor domain. In addition to the mutations in HJV, other 12 homozygous mutations were identified in this patient. However, none of these mutations showed strong damaging impact and the mutated genes are not related to iron metabolism. Our in-house data further demonstrated that p.C321X is absent in the general Chinese population, suggesting that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV is causative in the patient with HHC. Accordingly, all of the four members without HHC from the same family carried wild-type alleles or heterozygous mutations, but not the homozygous mutation in this site. Thus, we found for the first time that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV can result in HHC, which will help genetic diagnosis and prenatal counseling for HHC.

  1. Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: an underrecognized cause of early cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, George; Wang, Jian; Hegele, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) is a monogenic disorder that affects about 1 in 500 people, with a higher prevalence in certain subpopulations such as people of Quebecois, Christian Lebanese and Dutch South Afrikaner extraction. HeFH is characterized by cholesterol deposits affecting the corneas, eyelids and extensor tendons; elevated plasma concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; and accelerated vascular disease, especially coronary artery disease (CAD). Although HeFH is genetically heterogeneous, it is most often caused by heterozygous mutations in the LDLR gene encoding the LDL receptor. We describe a man who was diagnosed with HeFH after he had a myocardial infarction at 33 years of age. By DNA sequence analysis, he was found to have a heterozygous splicing mutation in his LDLR gene. This discovery expanded the growing mutational spectrum in patients with HeFH in Ontario. Given that HeFH is a treatable cause of early vascular disease, it is important that this condition be recognized, diagnosed and treated in affected patients; but as yet, there is no consensus on the best approach. Diagnostic criteria based on family history and clinical presentation have been proposed for patients with suspected HeFH. Biochemical or molecular screening might be considered to detect new cases of HeFH in populations with a relatively high HeFH prevalence and a relatively small number of possible causative mutations. So far, however, the most cost-effective and efficient systematic strategy to detect previously undiagnosed cases of HeFH is still cascade testing: clinical and biochemical screening of close relatives of the proband patient diagnosed with HeFH. Pharmacologic treatment of HeFH is cost-effective. PMID:16606962

  2. GJB2 Mutations and Degree of Hearing Loss: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Snoeckx, Rikkert L.; Huygen, Patrick L. M.; Feldmann, Delphine; Marlin, Sandrine; Denoyelle, Françoise; Waligora, Jaroslaw; Mueller-Malesinska, Malgorzata; Pollak, Agneszka; Ploski, Rafal; Murgia, Alessandra; Orzan, Eva; Castorina, Pierangela; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Nowakowska-Szyrwinska, Ewa; Bal, Jerzy; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Janecke, Andreas R.; Nekahm-Heis, Doris; Seeman, Pavel; Bendova, Olga; Kenna, Margaret A.; Frangulov, Anna; Rehm, Heidi L.; Tekin, Mustafa; Incesulu, Armagan; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; du Sart, Desirée; Jenkins, Lucy; Lucas, Deirdre; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Avraham, Karen B.; Brownstein, Zippora; del Castillo, Ignacio; Moreno, Felipe; Blin, Nikolaus; Pfister, Markus; Sziklai, Istvan; Toth, Timea; Kelley, Philip M.; Cohn, Edward S.; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Hilbert, Pascale; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Cremers, Cor W. R. J.; Löppönen, Tuija; Löppönen, Heikki; Parving, Agnete; Gronskov, Karen; Schrijver, Iris; Roberson, Joseph; Gualandi, Francesca; Martini, Alessandro; Lina-Granade, Geneviève; Pallares-Ruiz, Nathalie; Correia, Céu; Fialho, Graça; Cryns, Kim; Hilgert, Nele; Van de Heyning, Paul; Nishimura, Carla J.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Van Camp, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) affects 1 in 650 newborns, which makes it the most common congenital sensory impairment. Despite extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, mutations in one gene, GJB2, which encodes the connexin 26 protein and is involved in inner ear homeostasis, are found in up to 50% of patients with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss. Because of the high frequency of GJB2 mutations, mutation analysis of this gene is widely available as a diagnostic test. In this study, we assessed the association between genotype and degree of hearing loss in persons with HI and biallelic GJB2 mutations. We performed cross-sectional analyses of GJB2 genotype and audiometric data from 1,531 persons, from 16 different countries, with autosomal recessive, mild-to-profound nonsyndromic HI. The median age of all participants was 8 years; 90% of persons were within the age range of 0–26 years. Of the 83 different mutations identified, 47 were classified as nontruncating, and 36 as truncating. A total of 153 different genotypes were found, of which 56 were homozygous truncating (T/T), 30 were homozygous nontruncating (NT/NT), and 67 were compound heterozygous truncating/nontruncating (T/NT). The degree of HI associated with biallelic truncating mutations was significantly more severe than the HI associated with biallelic nontruncating mutations (P<.0001). The HI of 48 different genotypes was less severe than that of 35delG homozygotes. Several common mutations (M34T, V37I, and L90P) were associated with mild-to-moderate HI (median 25–40 dB). Two genotypes—35delG/R143W (median 105 dB) and 35delG/dela(GJB6-D13S1830) (median 108 dB)—had significantly more-severe HI than that of 35delG homozygotes. PMID:16380907

  3. A novel nonsense mutation of the KAL1 gene (p.Trp204*) in Kallmann syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El Husny, Antonette Souto; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Fernandes-Caldato, Milena Coelho; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe a novel KAL1 mutation in patients affected by Kallmann syndrome. Setting Endocrinology Clinic of the João de Barros Barreto University Hospital – Federal University of Pará, Brazil. Methods Clinical examination, hormone assays and sequencing of exons 5, 6 and 9 of the KAL1 gene in four Brazilian brothers with Kallmann syndrome. Results Detected a novel KAL1 mutation, c.612G.A/p.Trp204*, in four hemizygous brothers with Kallmann syndrome, and five heterozygous female family members. Conclusion The novel p.Trp204* mutation of the KAL1 gene results in the production of a truncated anosmin-1 enzyme in patients with Kallmann syndrome. This finding broadens the spectrum of pathogenic mutations for this disease. PMID:25328414

  4. Identification of a nonsense mutation in the PAX9 gene in molar oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, P; Arte, S; Tanner, D; Paulin, L; Alaluusua, S; Thesleff, I; Pirinen, S

    2001-10-01

    Development of dentition is controlled by numerous genes, as has been shown by experimental animal studies and mutations that have been identified by genetic studies in man. Here we report a nonsense mutation in the PAX9 gene that is associated with molar tooth agenesis in a Finnish family. The A340T transversion creates a stop codon at lysine 114, and truncates the coded PAX9 protein at the end of the DNA-binding paired-box. All the affected members of the family were heterozygous for the mutation. The tooth agenesis phenotype involves all permanent second and third molars and most of the first molars and resembles the earlier reported phenotype that was also associated with a PAX9 mutation. The phenotype is presumably a consequence of haploinsufficiency of PAX9. In another Finnish family with molar tooth agenesis, we could not find similar sequence changes in PAX9. PMID:11781684

  5. Identification of a nonsense mutation in the PAX9 gene in molar oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, P; Arte, S; Tanner, D; Paulin, L; Alaluusua, S; Thesleff, I; Pirinen, S

    2001-10-01

    Development of dentition is controlled by numerous genes, as has been shown by experimental animal studies and mutations that have been identified by genetic studies in man. Here we report a nonsense mutation in the PAX9 gene that is associated with molar tooth agenesis in a Finnish family. The A340T transversion creates a stop codon at lysine 114, and truncates the coded PAX9 protein at the end of the DNA-binding paired-box. All the affected members of the family were heterozygous for the mutation. The tooth agenesis phenotype involves all permanent second and third molars and most of the first molars and resembles the earlier reported phenotype that was also associated with a PAX9 mutation. The phenotype is presumably a consequence of haploinsufficiency of PAX9. In another Finnish family with molar tooth agenesis, we could not find similar sequence changes in PAX9.

  6. Clinical, biochemical and morphologic diagnostic markers in an infant male pseudohermaphrodite patient with compound heterozygous mutations (G115D/R246W) in SRD5A2 gene.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Rodó, Joan; Andaluz, Pilar; Martínez de Osaba, María Jesús; Rodríguez-Hierro, Francisco; Esteban, Cristina; Carrascosa, Antonio; Audí, Laura

    2004-01-01

    A patient with male pseudohermaphroditism and clinical diagnosis of partial androgen insensitivity in the neonatal period was studied at pubertal age for a molecular diagnosis. Hormone studies were conducted at baseline and under hCG stimulation for testosterone and dihydrotestosterone determinations at 2 months of age. Gonadectomy was performed at 4 months. At the age of 13 years genital skin fibroblasts were studied for androgen binding and 5alpha-reductase activity and peripheral blood DNA was available for androgen receptor (AR) and 5alpha-reductase (SRD5A2) gene analysis. Exons 1-8 of AR gene and exons 1-5 of SRD5A2 gene were sequenced. AR gene coding sequences were normal. SRD5A2 gene analysis revealed two heterozygote mutations (G115D and R246W), with the mother carrying the G115D and the father the R246W mutations. The compound heterozygote mutations in SRD5A2 gene explained an extremely low 5alpha-reductase enzyme activity in genital skin fibroblasts. Revision of hormonal data from the neonatal period revealed an increased testosterone-to-dihydrotestosterone ratio at the end of an hCG stimulation test, which concurred with the molecular diagnosis. Testis morphology at 4 months of age was normal. Clinical and biochemical differential diagnosis between partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and 5alpha-reductase enzyme deficiency is difficult in the neonatal period and before puberty. Our results show that in our patient the testosterone-to-dihydrotestosterone ratio would have adequately orientated the diagnosis. The two mutations in SRD5A2 gene have been described in patients of different lineages, though not in combination to date. Testis morphology showed that, during early infancy, the 5alpha-reductase deficiency may not have affected interstitial or tubular development.

  7. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype.

  8. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype. PMID:26799614

  9. A possible heterozygous advantage in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Emery, A E H

    2016-01-01

    In certain autosomal recessive disorders there is suggestive evidence that heterozygous carriers may have some selective advantage over normal homozygotes. These include, for example, cystic fibrosis, Tay-Sachs disease and phenylketonuria. The best example so far, however, is that of significant heterozygous advantage in sickle-cell anaemia with increased resistance to falciparum malaria. PMID:27245530

  10. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M; Sutton, V Reid; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; van Bon, Bregje W M; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2015-04-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct -1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects' leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. PMID:25817016

  11. SLC1A4 mutations cause a novel disorder of intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly, spasticity and thin corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Heimer, G; Marek-Yagel, D; Eyal, E; Barel, O; Oz Levi, D; Hoffmann, C; Ruzzo, E K; Ganelin-Cohen, E; Lancet, D; Pras, E; Rechavi, G; Nissenkorn, A; Anikster, Y; Goldstein, D B; Ben Zeev, B

    2015-10-01

    Two unrelated patients, presenting with significant global developmental delay, severe progressive microcephaly, seizures, spasticity and thin corpus callosum (CC) underwent trio whole-exome sequencing. No candidate variant was found in any known genes related to the phenotype. However, crossing the data of the patients illustrated that they both manifested pathogenic variants in the SLC1A4 gene which codes the ASCT1 transporter of serine and other neutral amino acids. The Ashkenazi patient is homozygous for a deleterious missense c.766G>A, p.(E256K) mutation whereas the Ashkenazi-Iraqi patient is compound heterozygous for this mutation and a nonsense c.945delTT, p.(Leu315Hisfs*42) mutation. Structural prediction demonstrates truncation of significant portion of the protein by the nonsense mutation and speculates functional disruption by the missense mutation. Both mutations are extremely rare in general population databases, however, the missense mutation was found in heterozygous mode in 1:100 Jewish Ashkenazi controls suggesting a higher carrier rate among Ashkenazi Jews. We conclude that SLC1A4 is the disease causing gene of a novel neurologic disorder manifesting with significant intellectual disability, severe postnatal microcephaly, spasticity and thin CC. The role of SLC1A4 in the serine transport from astrocytes to neurons suggests a possible pathomechanism for this disease and implies a potential therapeutic approach.

  12. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy with digital clubbing and palmoplantar hyperhidrosis caused by 15-PGHD/HPGD loss-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Carsten; Wobser, Marion; Morbach, Henner; Falkenbach, Albrecht; Wittenhagen, Dietrich; Lassay, Lisa; Ott, Hagen; Zerres, Klaus; Girschick, Herman J; Hamm, Henning

    2011-06-01

    Digital clubbing is the most prominent feature in primary (PHO) and secondary (pulmonary) hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HO). Homozygous and compound heterozygous germline mutations in the 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) gene encoding the major prostaglandin PGE2 catabolizing enzyme have been recently described in familial PHO cases. Elevated prostaglandin levels in affected individuals with cytokine-mediated tissue remodelling and vascular stimulation may underlie PHO and associated features as hyperhidrosis, acroosteolysis, pachyderma, periostosis and arthritis. We present clinical and biochemical data of three unrelated PHO families with HPGD mutations. The truncating mutation c.175_176del was found in two of our families and in one of the recently described pedigrees, all of European origin. We present evidence that c.175_176del is a recurrent mutation rather than an ancient founder allele. Two novel heterozygous HPGD mutations, the nonsense mutation c.118G>T (p.Glu40X) and the missense mutation c.563C>T (p.Thr188Ile), could be identified in a third family. We postulate that all HPGD mutations constitute loss-of-function alleles due to protein truncation or missense changes that affect hydrogen bonds lining the 15-PGDH enzyme reaction cavity. Elevated prostaglandin levels may give rise to use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; however, therapeutic strategies have not been reported to date. Naproxen treatment in one of our mutation-positive patients resulted in alleviation of pain caused by periostosis and arthritis as well as reduction in substantially elevated prostaglandin levels, while no significant effects on digital clubbing, hyperhidrosis and pachyderma were observed. Further experience with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in PHO is awaited. PMID:21426412

  13. Investigation of Truncated Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, David T.; Henry, Ross M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of truncated circular and square waveguide cross-sections are presented. An emphasis is placed upon numerical and experimental validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of these structures. A test component, a 90-degree phase shifter, was fabricated and tested at 30 GHz. The concepts explored can be directly applied in the design, synthesis and optimization of components in the microwave to sub-millimeter wavebands.

  14. Mutations in the SPG7 gene cause chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia through disordered mitochondrial DNA maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Gorman, Gráinne S; Griffin, Helen; Kurzawa-Akanbi, Marzena; Blakely, Emma L.; Wilson, Ian; Sitarz, Kamil; Moore, David; Murphy, Julie L.; Alston, Charlotte L.; Pyle, Angela; Coxhead, Jon; Payne, Brendan; Gorrie, George H.; Longman, Cheryl; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; McConville, John; Dick, David; Imam, Ibrahim; Hilton, David; Norwood, Fiona; Baker, Mark R.; Jaiser, Stephan R.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Farrell, Michael; McCarthy, Allan; Lynch, Timothy; McFarland, Robert; Schaefer, Andrew M.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Horvath, Rita; Taylor, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite being a canonical presenting feature of mitochondrial disease, the genetic basis of progressive external ophthalmoplegia remains unknown in a large proportion of patients. Here we show that mutations in SPG7 are a novel cause of progressive external ophthalmoplegia associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions. After excluding known causes, whole exome sequencing, targeted Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis were used to study 68 adult patients with progressive external ophthalmoplegia either with or without multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. Nine patients (eight probands) were found to carry compound heterozygous SPG7 mutations, including three novel mutations: two missense mutations c.2221G>A; p.(Glu741Lys), c.2224G>A; p.(Asp742Asn), a truncating mutation c.861dupT; p.Asn288*, and seven previously reported mutations. We identified a further six patients with single heterozygous mutations in SPG7, including two further novel mutations: c.184-3C>T (predicted to remove a splice site before exon 2) and c.1067C>T; p.(Thr356Met). The clinical phenotype typically developed in mid-adult life with either progressive external ophthalmoplegia/ptosis and spastic ataxia, or a progressive ataxic disorder. Dysphagia and proximal myopathy were common, but urinary symptoms were rare, despite the spasticity. Functional studies included transcript analysis, proteomics, mitochondrial network analysis, single fibre mitochondrial DNA analysis and deep re-sequencing of mitochondrial DNA. SPG7 mutations caused increased mitochondrial biogenesis in patient muscle, and mitochondrial fusion in patient fibroblasts associated with the clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA mutations. In conclusion, the SPG7 gene should be screened in patients in whom a disorder of mitochondrial DNA maintenance is suspected when spastic ataxia is prominent. The complex neurological phenotype is likely a result of the clonal

  15. Identification of a Novel p.Q1772X ANK1 Mutation in a Korean Family with Hereditary Spherocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hoon; Kim, So Won; Lee, Min Goo; Koh, Hong; Lee, Ji Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS), a common form of inherited hemolytic anemia, is a heterogeneous group of disorders with regard to clinical severity, protein defects, and mode of inheritance. Causal mutations in at least five genes have been reported so far. Because multiple genes have been associated with HS, clinical genetic testing that relies on direct sequencing will be a challenge. In this study, we used whole exome sequencing to identify a novel nonsense mutation in ANK1 (p.Q1772X, NM_020476) that resulted in a truncated protein in a Korean patient with HS. Sanger sequencing confirmed the two affected individuals in the patient’s family were heterozygous for the mutation. This is the first report of a Korean family that carries an ANK1 mutation responsible for HS. Our results demonstrate that next generation sequencing is a powerful approach for rapidly determining the genetic etiology of HS. PMID:26107955

  16. LAMB3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Seymen, F; Lee, K E; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Kyun, H K; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2013-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can be either isolated or part of a larger syndrome. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a collection of autosomal-recessive disorders featuring AI associated with skin fragility and other symptoms. JEB is a recessive syndrome usually caused by mutations in both alleles of COL17A1, LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2. In rare cases, heterozygous carriers in JEB kindreds display enamel malformations in the absence of skin fragility (isolated AI). We recruited two kindreds with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) characterized by generalized severe enamel hypoplasia with deep linear grooves and pits. Whole-exome sequencing of both probands identified novel heterozygous mutations in the last exon of LAMB3 that likely truncated the protein. The mutations perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in both families. In Family 1, an 8-bp deletion (c.3446_3453del GACTGGAG) shifted the reading frame (p.Gly 1149Glufs*8). In Family 2, a single nucleotide substitution (c.C3431A) generated an in-frame translation termination codon (p.Ser1144*). We conclude that enamel formation is particularly sensitive to defects in hemidesmosome/basement-membrane complexes and that syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AI can be etiologically related. PMID:23958762

  17. Hereditary protein C deficiency caused by compound heterozygous mutants in two independent Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Ting; Yue, Fei; Wang, Min; Lu, Ye-Ling; Dai, Jing; Ding, Qiu-Lan; Wang, Hong-Li; Chen, Hui-Fen; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2014-12-01

    We report two compound heterozygous mutants that caused severe type I protein C (PC) deficiency in two independent Chinese families.PC antigen was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and PC activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Genetic mutations were screened with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by direct sequencing. PC mutants were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells for the evaluation of PC secretory activity and function. The subcellular location was visualised by immunofluorescence assay. The structural analysis of mutation was performed as well.Compound heterozygous mutations of Arg178Trp and Asp255His with reduced PC activity and antigen levels were identified in Proband 1, a 28-year-old male with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism. The other mutations of Leu-34Pro and Thr295Ile with reduced PC activity and antigen levels were identified in Proband 2, a 19-year-old male with DVT. The PC activities with Arg178Trp, Asp255His, Leu-34Pro and Thr295Ile mutations decreased significantly. Immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that only trace amount of PC with novel Thr295Ile mutation was transported to the Golgi apparatus. Subsequent structural analysis indicated severe impairments of intracellular folding and secretion.The two rare compound heterozygous mutations could cause type I PC deficiency via impairment of secretory activity of PC.

  18. Fat Mass Reduction With Adipocyte Hypertrophy and Insulin Resistance in Heterozygous PPARγ Mutant Rats.

    PubMed

    Gumbilai, Valentino; Ebihara, Ken; Aizawa-Abe, Megumi; Ebihara, Chihiro; Zhao, Mingming; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mashimo, Tomoji; Hosoda, Kiminori; Serikawa, Tadao; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2016-10-01

    Agonist-induced activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) stimulates adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity. Patients with heterozygous PPARγ dominant-negative mutation develop partial lipodystrophy and insulin resistance. Inconsistent with this evidence in humans, it was reported that heterozygous PPARγ knockout mice have increased insulin sensitivity and that mice with heterozygous PPARγ dominant-negative mutation have normal insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance. In the context of the interspecies intranslatability of PPARγ-related findings, we generated a PPARγ mutant rat with a loss-of-function mutation (Pparg(mkyo)) without dominant-negative activity by using the ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) mutagenesis method. Heterozygous Pparg(mkyo/+) rats showed reduced fat mass with adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin resistance, which were highly predictable from known actions of PPARγ agonists and phenotypes of patients with the PPARγ mutation. This report is the first in our knowledge to clearly demonstrate that both alleles of PPARγ are required for normal adipocyte development and insulin sensitivity in vivo. Furthermore, the study indicates that PPARγ regulates mainly adipocyte number rather than adipocyte size in vivo. The choice of appropriate species as experimental models is critical, especially for the study of PPARγ.

  19. Impaired learning and motor behavior in heterozygous Pafah1b1 (Lis1) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Paylor, R; Hirotsune, S; Gambello, M J; Yuva-Paylor, L; Crawley, J N; Wynshaw-Boris, A

    1999-01-01

    Heterozygous mutation or deletion of Pafab1b1 (LIS1) in humans is associated with syndromes with type 1 lissencephaly, a severe brain developmental disorder resulting from abnormal neuronal migration. We have created Lis1 heterozygous mutant mice by gene targeting. Heterozygous mutant mice are viable and fertile, but display global organizational brain defects as a result of impaired neuronal migration. To assess the functional impact of the mutation, Lis1 heterozygous mice and their wild-type littermates were evaluated on a wide variety of behavioral tests. Lis1 mutant mice displayed abnormal hindpaw clutching responses and were impaired on a rotarod test. Lis1 heterozygous mice were also impaired in the spatial learning version of the Morris water task. Impaired motor behavior and spatial learning and memory in Lis1 mutant mice indicates that impaired neuronal migration can have functional effects on complex behavioral responses. The behavioral findings also support the use of the Lis1 mutant mice as a model from human type 1 lissencephaly.

  20. A Novel CCM2 Gene Mutation Associated with Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Qing; Lu, Cong-Xia; Zhang, Ya; Yi, Ke-Hui; Cai, Liang-Liang; Li, Ming-Li; Wang, Han; Lin, Qing; Tzeng, Chi-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are common vascular malformations that predominantly arise in the central nervous system and are mainly characterized by enlarged vascular cavities without intervening brain parenchyma. Familial CCMs (FCCMs) is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern with incomplete penetrance and variable symptoms. Methods: Mutations of three pathogenic genes, CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3, were investigated by direct DNA sequencing in a Chinese family with multiple CCM lesions. Results: Four heterozygous variants in the CCM2 gene, including one deletion (c.95delC), a missense mutation (c.358G>A, p.V120I), one silent mutation (c.915G>A, p.T305T), and a substitution (c. *1452 T>C), were identified in the subjects with multiple CCM lesions, but not in a healthy sibling. Among these variants, the c.95delC deletion is a novel mutation which is expected to cause a premature termination codon. It is predicted to produce a truncated CCM2 protein lacking the PTB and C-terminal domains, thus disrupting the molecular functions of CCM2. Conclusions: The novel truncating mutation in the CCM2 gene, c.95delC, may be responsible for multiple CCM lesions in a part of FCCM. In addition, it may represent a potential genetic biomarker for early diagnosis of FCCM. PMID:27708576

  1. Mutations in a new gene in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Perez, V L; Ide, S E; Strom, T M; Lorenz, B; Wilson, D; Woods, K; King, L; Francomano, C; Freisinger, P; Spranger, S; Marino, B; Dallapiccola, B; Wright, M; Meitinger, T; Polymeropoulos, M H; Goodship, J

    2000-03-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, MIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. Congenital cardiac defects, most commonly a defect of primary atrial septation producing a common atrium, occur in 60% of affected individuals. The disease was mapped to chromosome 4p16 in nine Amish subpedigrees and single pedigrees from Mexico, Ecuador and Brazil. Weyers acrodental dysostosis (MIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder with a similar but milder phenotype, has been mapped in a single pedigree to an area including the EvC critical region. We have identified a new gene (EVC), encoding a 992-amino-acid protein, that is mutated in individuals with EvC. We identified a splice-donor change in an Amish pedigree and six truncating mutations and a single amino acid deletion in seven pedigrees. The heterozygous carriers of these mutations did not manifest features of EvC. We found two heterozygous missense mutations associated with a phenotype, one in a man with Weyers acrodental dysostosis and another in a father and his daughter, who both have the heart defect characteristic of EvC and polydactyly, but not short stature. We suggest that EvC and Weyers acrodental dysostosis are allelic conditions.

  2. Mutations in TBX18 Cause Dominant Urinary Tract Malformations via Transcriptional Dysregulation of Ureter Development.

    PubMed

    Vivante, Asaf; Kleppa, Marc-Jens; Schulz, Julian; Kohl, Stefan; Sharma, Amita; Chen, Jing; Shril, Shirlee; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Kaminski, Michael M; Shukrun, Rachel; Kemper, Markus J; Lehnhardt, Anja; Beetz, Rolf; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Verbitsky, Miguel; Gharavi, Ali G; Stuart, Helen M; Feather, Sally A; Goodship, Judith A; Goodship, Timothy H J; Woolf, Adrian S; Westra, Sjirk J; Doody, Daniel P; Bauer, Stuart B; Lee, Richard S; Adam, Rosalyn M; Lu, Weining; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Mancini, Erika J; Lifton, Richard P; Tasic, Velibor; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Jüppner, Harald; Kispert, Andreas; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-08-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in the first three decades of life. Identification of single-gene mutations that cause CAKUT permits the first insights into related disease mechanisms. However, for most cases the underlying defect remains elusive. We identified a kindred with an autosomal-dominant form of CAKUT with predominant ureteropelvic junction obstruction. By whole exome sequencing, we identified a heterozygous truncating mutation (c.1010delG) of T-Box transcription factor 18 (TBX18) in seven affected members of the large kindred. A screen of additional families with CAKUT identified three families harboring two heterozygous TBX18 mutations (c.1570C>T and c.487A>G). TBX18 is essential for developmental specification of the ureteric mesenchyme and ureteric smooth muscle cells. We found that all three TBX18 altered proteins still dimerized with the wild-type protein but had prolonged protein half life and exhibited reduced transcriptional repression activity compared to wild-type TBX18. The p.Lys163Glu substitution altered an amino acid residue critical for TBX18-DNA interaction, resulting in impaired TBX18-DNA binding. These data indicate that dominant-negative TBX18 mutations cause human CAKUT by interference with TBX18 transcriptional repression, thus implicating ureter smooth muscle cell development in the pathogenesis of human CAKUT. PMID:26235987

  3. Tay-Sachs disease in an Arab family due to c.78G>A HEXA nonsense mutation encoding a p.W26X early truncation enzyme peptide.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Alireza; Masri, Amira; Kornreich, Ruth; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), a pan-ethnic, autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal disease, results from deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity due to β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (HEXA) mutations. Prenatal/premarital carrier screening programs in the Ashkenazi Jewish community have markedly reduced disease occurrence. We report the first Jordanian Arab TSD patient diagnosed by deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity. HEXA mutation analysis revealed homozygosity for a nonsense mutation, c.78G>A (p.W26X). Previously reported in Arab patients, this mutation is a candidate for TSD screening in Arab populations.

  4. Tay-Sachs disease in an Arab family due to c.78G>A HEXA nonsense mutation encoding a p.W26X early truncation enzyme peptide.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Alireza; Masri, Amira; Kornreich, Ruth; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), a pan-ethnic, autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal disease, results from deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity due to β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (HEXA) mutations. Prenatal/premarital carrier screening programs in the Ashkenazi Jewish community have markedly reduced disease occurrence. We report the first Jordanian Arab TSD patient diagnosed by deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity. HEXA mutation analysis revealed homozygosity for a nonsense mutation, c.78G>A (p.W26X). Previously reported in Arab patients, this mutation is a candidate for TSD screening in Arab populations. PMID:21967858

  5. Hypoparathyroidism in a 3-year-old Korean boy with Sotos syndrome and a novel mutation in NSD1.

    PubMed

    Wejaphikul, Karn; Cho, Sung Yoon; Huh, Rimm; Kwun, Younghee; Lee, Jieun; Ki, Chang-Seok; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is a common genetic overgrowth syndrome caused by a mutation of the NSD1 gene, which is located at chromosome 5q35 and normally encodes a histone methyltransferase protein. The general characteristics of this syndrome include a characteristic facial appearance, developmental delay, and overgrowth, resulting in macrocephaly and tall stature. We describe rhabdomyolysis and hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism in a 3-year-old Korean boy with Sotos syndrome. He was diagnosed with Sotos syndrome based on the typical phenotype and has a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.4710C>A [p.Cys1570*]) of the NSD1 gene, which causes a premature stop codon and a truncating protein mutation. Hypoparathyroidism has never been described in Sotos syndrome. This report may therefore expand the phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome.

  6. Molecular characterization of Hb Hamilton Hill (HBA2: c.388delC), a novel HBA2 variant generating a premature termination codon and truncated HBA2 chain.

    PubMed

    Qadah, Talal; Finlayson, Jill; North, Emma; Ghassemifar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the identification of α-thalassemias caused by nondeletional mutations has increased significantly due to the advancement of sensitive molecular genetics tools. We report clinical and experimental data for a novel frameshift mutation caused by a single base deletion at position 388 in exon 3 of the α2-globin gene (HBA2: c.388delC; Hb Hamilton Hill), resulting in the phenotype of α-thalassemia (α-thal). Hb Hamilton Hill was identified in an adult female of unknown ethnicity investigated for unexplained microcytosis. Direct DNA sequencing of the HBA2 gene revealed a heterozygous mutation, HBA2: c.388delC, and the molecular effect of this mutation was assessed experimentally using our previously described in vitro model. The experimental analysis involved transfection of a human bladder carcinoma (5637) cell line with expression vectors carrying either HBA2-wild type (HBA2-WT) or HBA2: c.388delC followed by total RNA purification and cDNA synthesis. Both wild type and mutant gene expression was studied and compared at the transcriptional and translational levels using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qReTi-PCR) and immunofluorochemistry (IFC), respectively. Our experimental data showed a significant reduction by 25.0% (p = 0.04) in the transcriptional activity generated from HBA2: c.388delC compared to HBA2-WT. As a result of this base deletion, a frameshift in the open reading frame generates a premature termination codon (PTC) at codon 132 of exon 3 resulting in the formation of a truncated α-globin chain. The truncated α-globin chain, observed by the IFC technique, is most likely unstable and undergoes a rapid turnover resulting in the thalassemic phenotype.

  7. Incomplete dominant osteochondrodysplasia in heterozygous Scottish Fold cats.

    PubMed

    Takanosu, M; Takanosu, T; Suzuki, H; Suzuki, K

    2008-04-01

    This report describes an autosomal incomplete dominant pattern of inheritance for osteochondrodysplasia in the Scottish Fold cats. A three-generation pedigree was analysed. Cats with folded ears were mated with cats with normal ears. All cats with folded ears, which were presumably heterozygous for the mutated allele, developed osteochondrodysplasia in distal fore- and hindlimbs but not in other bones, including the tail in which bone deformity had been demonstrated in previous studies. The severity of the skeletal lesions of osteochondrodysplasia was different in each affected cat. Most of the cats with severe osteochondrodysplasia showed some clinical signs, but cats with mild disease were clinically unaffected. All Scottish Fold-related cats with folded-ear phenotype, even if heterozygotes, suffered from some degree of osteochondrodysplasia of the distal limbs. PMID:18339089

  8. Mutations in NEUROD1 are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Malecki, M T; Jhala, U S; Antonellis, A; Fields, L; Doria, A; Orban, T; Saad, M; Warram, J H; Montminy, M; Krolewski, A S

    1999-11-01

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein NEUROD1 (also known as BETA2) functions as a regulatory switch for endocrine pancreatic development. In mice homozygous for a targeted disruption of Neurod, pancreatic islet morphogenesis is abnormal and overt diabetes develops due in part to inadequate expression of the insulin gene (Ins2). NEUROD1, following its heterodimerization with the ubiquitous HLH protein E47, regulates insulin gene (INS) expression by binding to a critical E-box motif on the INS promoter. Here we describe two mutations in NEUROD1, which are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes in the heterozygous state. The first, a missense mutation at Arg 111 in the DNA-binding domain, abolishes E-box binding activity of NEUROD1. The second mutation gives rise to a truncated polypeptide lacking the carboxy-terminal trans-activation domain, a region that associates with the co-activators CBP and p300 (refs 3,4). The clinical profile of patients with the truncated NEUROD1 polypeptide is more severe than that of patients with the Arg 111 mutation. Our findings suggest that deficient binding of NEUROD1 or binding of a transcriptionally inactive NEUROD1 polypeptide to target promoters in pancreatic islets leads to the development of type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:10545951

  9. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liao, Yong; Guo, Luo; Wang, Honglian; He, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xing, Qinghe

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser) in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203) containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  10. Recessive and Dominant De Novo ITPR1 Mutations Cause Gillespie Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Sylvie; Alzayady, Kamil J.; Burglen, Lydie; Brémond-Gignac, Dominique; Marchesin, Valentina; Roche, Olivier; Rio, Marlène; Funalot, Benoit; Calmon, Raphaël; Durr, Alexandra; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lucia; Ribeiro Bittar, Maria Fernanda; Orssaud, Christophe; Héron, Bénédicte; Ayoub, Edward; Berquin, Patrick; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bole, Christine; Masson, Cécile; Munnich, Arnold; Simons, Matias; Delous, Marion; Dollfus, Helene; Boddaert, Nathalie; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Kaplan, Josseline; Calvas, Patrick; Yule, David I.; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Fares Taie, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Gillespie syndrome (GS) is a rare variant form of aniridia characterized by non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, and iris hypoplasia. Unlike the more common dominant and sporadic forms of aniridia, there has been no significant association with PAX6 mutations in individuals with GS and the mode of inheritance of the disease had long been regarded as uncertain. Using a combination of trio-based whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five simplex GS-affected families, we found homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations (c.4672C>T [p.Gln1558∗], c.2182C>T [p.Arg728∗], c.6366+3A>T [p.Gly2102Valfs5∗], and c.6664+5G>T [p.Ala2221Valfs23∗]) and de novo heterozygous mutations (c.7687_7689del [p.Lys2563del] and c.7659T>G [p.Phe2553Leu]) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 gene (ITPR1). ITPR1 encodes one of the three members of the IP3-receptors family that form Ca2+ release channels localized predominantly in membranes of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. The truncation mutants, which encompass the IP3-binding domain and varying lengths of the modulatory domain, did not form functional channels when produced in a heterologous cell system. Furthermore, ITPR1 p.Lys2563del mutant did not form IP3-induced Ca2+ channels but exerted a negative effect when co-produced with wild-type ITPR1 channel activity. In total, these results demonstrate biallelic and monoallelic ITPR1 mutations as the underlying genetic defects for Gillespie syndrome, further extending the spectrum of ITPR1-related diseases. PMID:27108797

  11. Recessive and Dominant De Novo ITPR1 Mutations Cause Gillespie Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Sylvie; Alzayady, Kamil J; Burglen, Lydie; Brémond-Gignac, Dominique; Marchesin, Valentina; Roche, Olivier; Rio, Marlène; Funalot, Benoit; Calmon, Raphaël; Durr, Alexandra; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lucia; Ribeiro Bittar, Maria Fernanda; Orssaud, Christophe; Héron, Bénédicte; Ayoub, Edward; Berquin, Patrick; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bole, Christine; Masson, Cécile; Munnich, Arnold; Simons, Matias; Delous, Marion; Dollfus, Helene; Boddaert, Nathalie; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Kaplan, Josseline; Calvas, Patrick; Yule, David I; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Fares Taie, Lucas

    2016-05-01

    Gillespie syndrome (GS) is a rare variant form of aniridia characterized by non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, and iris hypoplasia. Unlike the more common dominant and sporadic forms of aniridia, there has been no significant association with PAX6 mutations in individuals with GS and the mode of inheritance of the disease had long been regarded as uncertain. Using a combination of trio-based whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five simplex GS-affected families, we found homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations (c.4672C>T [p.Gln1558(∗)], c.2182C>T [p.Arg728(∗)], c.6366+3A>T [p.Gly2102Valfs5(∗)], and c.6664+5G>T [p.Ala2221Valfs23(∗)]) and de novo heterozygous mutations (c.7687_7689del [p.Lys2563del] and c.7659T>G [p.Phe2553Leu]) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 gene (ITPR1). ITPR1 encodes one of the three members of the IP3-receptors family that form Ca(2+) release channels localized predominantly in membranes of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores. The truncation mutants, which encompass the IP3-binding domain and varying lengths of the modulatory domain, did not form functional channels when produced in a heterologous cell system. Furthermore, ITPR1 p.Lys2563del mutant did not form IP3-induced Ca(2+) channels but exerted a negative effect when co-produced with wild-type ITPR1 channel activity. In total, these results demonstrate biallelic and monoallelic ITPR1 mutations as the underlying genetic defects for Gillespie syndrome, further extending the spectrum of ITPR1-related diseases. PMID:27108797

  12. A novel spontaneous mutation of BCAR3 results in extrusion cataracts in CF#1 mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tomohiro; Nakamori, Taketo; Nagai, Hiroaki; Takeshita, Ai; Kusakabe, Ken-Takeshi; Okada, Toshiya

    2016-10-01

    A substrain of mice originating from the CF#1 strain (an outbred colony) reared at Osaka Prefecture University (CF#1/lr mice) develops cataracts beginning at 4 weeks of age. Affected mice were fully viable and fertile and developed cataracts by 14 weeks of age. Histologically, CF#1/lr mice showed vacuolation of the lens cortex, swollen lens fibers, lens rupture and nuclear extrusion. To elucidate the mode of inheritance, we analyzed heterozygous mutant hybrids generated from CF#1/lr mice and wild-type BALB/c mice. None of the heterozygous mutants were affected, and the ratio of affected to unaffected mice was 1:3 among the offspring of the heterozygous mutants. For the initial genome-wide screening and further mapping, we used affected progeny of CF#1/lr × (CF#1/lr × BALB/c) mice. We concluded that the cataracts in CF#1/lr mice are inherited through an autosomal recessive mutation and that the mutant gene is located on mouse chromosome 3 between D3Mit79 and D3Mit216. In this region, we identified 8 genes associated with ocular disease. All 8 genes were sequenced and a novel point mutation (1 bp insertion of cytosine) in exon 7 of the Bcar3 gene was identified. This mutation produced a premature stop codon and a truncated protein. In conclusion, we have identified the first spontaneous mutation in the Bcar3 gene associated with lens extrusion cataracts. This novel cataract model may provide further knowledge of the molecular biology of cataractogenesis and the function of the BCAR3 protein. PMID:27364350

  13. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of a Chinese family with congenital X-linked adrenal hypoplasia caused by novel mutation 1268delA in the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Feng, Ye; Ye, Dan; Li, Cheng-jiang; Dong, Feng-qin; Tong, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Congenital X-linked adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) is a rare disease characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency before adolescence and by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG) during adolescence. In this paper, we present a Chinese family with AHC. Two brothers, misdiagnosed with adrenal insufficiency of unknown etiology at the age of 9, were correctly diagnosed with AHC when delayed puberty, HHG, and testicular defects were observed. We investigated the clinical features and identified the dosage-sensitive sex reversal AHC critical region of the X chromosome gene 1 (DAX-1) mutation in this kindred. Direct sequencing of the DAX-1 gene revealed that the two siblings have a novel mutation (1268delA) of which their mother is a heterozygous carrier. This mutation causes a frameshift and a premature stop codon at position 436, encoding a truncated protein. It is important to increase knowledge of the mutational spectrum in genes related to this disease, linking phenotype to genotype. PMID:26537215

  14. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of a Chinese family with congenital X-linked adrenal hypoplasia caused by novel mutation 1268delA in the DAX-1 gene*

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Zhe; FENG, Ye; YE, Dan; LI, Cheng-jiang; DONG, Feng-qin; TONG, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Congenital X-linked adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) is a rare disease characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency before adolescence and by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG) during adolescence. In this paper, we present a Chinese family with AHC. Two brothers, misdiagnosed with adrenal insufficiency of unknown etiology at the age of 9, were correctly diagnosed with AHC when delayed puberty, HHG, and testicular defects were observed. We investigated the clinical features and identified the dosage-sensitive sex reversal AHC critical region of the X chromosome gene 1 (DAX-1) mutation in this kindred. Direct sequencing of the DAX-1 gene revealed that the two siblings have a novel mutation (1268delA) of which their mother is a heterozygous carrier. This mutation causes a frameshift and a premature stop codon at position 436, encoding a truncated protein. It is important to increase knowledge of the mutational spectrum in genes related to this disease, linking phenotype to genotype. PMID:26537215

  15. Dominant Mutations in KAT6A Cause Intellectual Disability with Recognizable Syndromic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Emma; Lindstrand, Anna; Santani, Avni; Malmgren, Helena; Nesbitt, Addie; Dubbs, Holly A.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Parker, Michael J.; Millan, Francisca; Rosenbaum, Kenneth; Wilson, Golder N.; Nordgren, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Through a multi-center collaboration study, we here report six individuals from five unrelated families, with mutations in KAT6A/MOZ detected by whole-exome sequencing. All five different de novo heterozygous truncating mutations were located in the C-terminal transactivation domain of KAT6A: NM_001099412.1: c.3116_3117 delCT, p.(Ser1039∗); c.3830_3831insTT, p.(Arg1278Serfs∗17); c.3879 dupA, p.(Glu1294Argfs∗19); c.4108G>T p.(Glu1370∗) and c.4292 dupT, p.(Leu1431Phefs∗8). An additional subject with a 0.23 MB microdeletion including the entire KAT6A reading frame was identified with genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization. Finally, by detailed clinical characterization we provide evidence that heterozygous mutations in KAT6A cause a distinct intellectual disability syndrome. The common phenotype includes hypotonia, intellectual disability, early feeding and oromotor difficulties, microcephaly and/or craniosynostosis, and cardiac defects in combination with subtle facial features such as bitemporal narrowing, broad nasal tip, thin upper lip, posteriorly rotated or low-set ears, and microretrognathia. The identification of human subjects complements previous work from mice and zebrafish where knockouts of Kat6a/kat6a lead to developmental defects. PMID:25728777

  16. Reduced Ciliary Polycystin-2 in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients with PKD1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.; Lam, Albert Q.; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Iatrino, Rossella; Su, Xuefeng; Koon, Sarah J.; Wu, Maoqing; Daheron, Laurence; Harris, Peter C.; Zhou, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in PKD1 or PKD2, which encode polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively, cause autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD), whereas mutations in PKHD1, which encodes fibrocystin/polyductin (FPC), cause autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD). However, the relationship between these proteins and the pathogenesis of PKD remains unclear. To model PKD in human cells, we established induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from fibroblasts of three ADPKD and two ARPKD patients. Genetic sequencing revealed unique heterozygous mutations in PKD1 of the parental ADPKD fibroblasts but no pathogenic mutations in PKD2. Undifferentiated PKD iPS cells, control iPS cells, and embryonic stem cells elaborated primary cilia and expressed PC1, PC2, and FPC at similar levels, and PKD and control iPS cells exhibited comparable rates of proliferation, apoptosis, and ciliogenesis. However, ADPKD iPS cells as well as somatic epithelial cells and hepatoblasts/biliary precursors differentiated from these cells expressed lower levels of PC2 at the cilium. Additional sequencing confirmed the retention of PKD1 heterozygous mutations in iPS cell lines from two patients but identified possible loss of heterozygosity in iPS cell lines from one patient. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type PC1 in ADPKD iPS-derived hepatoblasts rescued ciliary PC2 protein expression levels, and overexpression of PC1 but not a carboxy-terminal truncation mutant increased ciliary PC2 expression levels in mouse kidney cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PC1 regulates ciliary PC2 protein expression levels and support the use of PKD iPS cells for investigating disease pathophysiology. PMID:24009235

  17. Whole-exome sequencing identifies mutations of TBC1D1 encoding a Rab-GTPase-activating protein in patients with congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT).

    PubMed

    Kosfeld, Anne; Kreuzer, Martin; Daniel, Christoph; Brand, Frank; Schäfer, Anne-Kathrin; Chadt, Alexandra; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Riehmer, Vera; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Klintschar, Michael; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Amann, Kerstin; Pape, Lars; Kispert, Andreas; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Haffner, Dieter; Weber, Ruthild G

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT) are genetically highly heterogeneous leaving most cases unclear after mutational analysis of the around 30 causative genes known so far. Assuming that phenotypes frequently showing dominant inheritance, such as CAKUT, can be caused by de novo mutations, de novo analysis of whole-exome sequencing data was done on two patient-parent-trios to identify novel CAKUT genes. In one case, we detected a heterozygous de novo frameshift variant in TBC1D1 encoding a Rab-GTPase-activating protein regulating glucose transporter GLUT4 translocation. Sequence analysis of 100 further CAKUT cases yielded three novel or rare inherited heterozygous TBC1D1 missense variants predicted to be pathogenic. TBC1D1 mutations affected Ser237-phosphorylation or protein stability and thereby act as hypomorphs. Tbc1d1 showed widespread expression in the developing murine urogenital system. A mild CAKUT spectrum phenotype, including anomalies observed in patients carrying TBC1D1 mutations, was found in kidneys of some Tbc1d1 (-/-) mice. Significantly reduced Glut4 levels were detected in kidneys of Tbc1d1 (-/-) mice and the dysplastic kidney of a TBC1D1 mutation carrier versus controls. TBC1D1 and SLC2A4 encoding GLUT4 were highly expressed in human fetal kidney. The patient with the truncating TBC1D1 mutation showed evidence for insulin resistance. These data demonstrate heterozygous deactivating TBC1D1 mutations in CAKUT patients with a similar renal and ureteral phenotype, and provide evidence that TBC1D1 mutations may contribute to CAKUT pathogenesis, possibly via a role in glucose homeostasis. PMID:26572137

  18. [Mutation analysis of the pathogenic gene in a Chinese family with hereditary hemochromatosis].

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Li; Hongxing, Zhang; Haitao, Zhang; Xiaobo, Peng; Lili, Bai; Fuchu, He; Zewu, Qiu; Gangqiao, Zhou

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. We recruited a consanguineous Chinese family including the proband with HHC and other four members without HHC. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified two homozygous mutations (c.G18C [p.Q6H] and c.GC962_963AA [p.C321X]) in the hemojuvelin gene (HJV) in the proband with HHC. No mutation was found in other four previously identified HHC related genes, HAMP, TFR2, FPN and HFE. The functional impact of p.Q6H mutation is weak whereas p.C321X, a premature termination mutation, results in a truncated HJV protein, which lacks the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor domain. In addition to the mutations in HJV, other 12 homozygous mutations were identified in this patient. However, none of these mutations showed strong damaging impact and the mutated genes are not related to iron metabolism. Our in-house data further demonstrated that p.C321X is absent in the general Chinese population, suggesting that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV is causative in the patient with HHC. Accordingly, all of the four members without HHC from the same family carried wild-type alleles or heterozygous mutations, but not the homozygous mutation in this site. Thus, we found for the first time that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV can result in HHC, which will help genetic diagnosis and prenatal counseling for HHC. PMID:25567873

  19. Heterozygous L1-deficient mice express an autism-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher; Netrakanti, Meera; Saylor, Joshua; Schachner, Melitta; Matzel, Louis D

    2015-10-01

    The L1CAM (L1) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule that contributes to several important processes in the developing and adult nervous system, including neuronal migration, survival, and plasticity. In humans and mice, mutations in the X chromosome-linked gene L1 cause severe neurological defects in males. L1 heterozygous female mice with one functional copy of the L1 gene show complex morphological features that are different from L1 fully-deficient and wild-type littermate mice. However, almost no information is available on the behavior of L1 heterozygous mice and humans. Here, we investigated the behavior of heterozygous female mice in which the L1 gene is constitutively inactivated. These mice were compared to wild-type littermate females. Animals were assessed in five categories of behavioral tests: five tests for anxiety/stress/exploration, four tests for motor abilities, two tests for spatial learning, three tests for social behavior, and three tests for repetitive behavior. We found that L1 heterozygous mice express an autism-like phenotype, comprised of reduced social behaviors and excessive self-grooming (a repetitive behavior also typical in animal models of autism). L1 heterozygous mice also exhibited an increase in sensitivity to light, assessed by a reluctance to enter the lighted areas of novel environments. However, levels of anxiety, stress, motor abilities, and spatial learning in L1 heterozygous mice were similar to those of wild-type mice. These observations raise the possibility that using molecules known to trigger L1 functions may become valuable in the treatment of autism in humans. PMID:26079769

  20. Heterozygous L1-deficient mice express an autism-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher; Netrakanti, Meera; Saylor, Joshua; Schachner, Melitta; Matzel, Louis D

    2015-10-01

    The L1CAM (L1) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule that contributes to several important processes in the developing and adult nervous system, including neuronal migration, survival, and plasticity. In humans and mice, mutations in the X chromosome-linked gene L1 cause severe neurological defects in males. L1 heterozygous female mice with one functional copy of the L1 gene show complex morphological features that are different from L1 fully-deficient and wild-type littermate mice. However, almost no information is available on the behavior of L1 heterozygous mice and humans. Here, we investigated the behavior of heterozygous female mice in which the L1 gene is constitutively inactivated. These mice were compared to wild-type littermate females. Animals were assessed in five categories of behavioral tests: five tests for anxiety/stress/exploration, four tests for motor abilities, two tests for spatial learning, three tests for social behavior, and three tests for repetitive behavior. We found that L1 heterozygous mice express an autism-like phenotype, comprised of reduced social behaviors and excessive self-grooming (a repetitive behavior also typical in animal models of autism). L1 heterozygous mice also exhibited an increase in sensitivity to light, assessed by a reluctance to enter the lighted areas of novel environments. However, levels of anxiety, stress, motor abilities, and spatial learning in L1 heterozygous mice were similar to those of wild-type mice. These observations raise the possibility that using molecules known to trigger L1 functions may become valuable in the treatment of autism in humans.

  1. Feline polycystic kidney disease mutation identified in PKD1.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Leslie A; Biller, David S; Erdman, Carolyn A; Lipinski, Monika J; Young, Amy E; Roe, Bruce A; Qin, Baifang; Grahn, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a commonly inherited disorder in humans that causes the formation of fluid-filled renal cysts, often leading to renal failure. PKD1 mutations cause 85% of ADPKD. Feline PKD is autosomal dominant and has clinical presentations similar to humans. PKD affects approximately 38% of Persian cats worldwide, which is approximately 6% of cats, making it the most prominent inherited feline disease. Previous analyses have shown significant linkage between the PKD phenotype and microsatellite markers linked to the feline homolog for PKD1. In this report, the feline PKD1 gene was scanned for causative mutations and a C>A transversion was identified at c.10063 (human ref NM_000296) in exon 29, resulting in a stop mutation at position 3284, which suggests a loss of approximately 25% of the C-terminus of the protein. The same mutation has not been identified in humans, although similar regions of the protein are truncated. The C>A transversion has been identified in the heterozygous state in 48 affected cats examined, including 41 Persians, a Siamese, and several other breeds that have been known to outcross with Persians. In addition, the mutation is segregating concordantly in all available PKD families. No unaffected cats have been identified with the mutation. No homozygous cats have been identified, supporting the suggestion that the mutation is embryonic lethal. These data suggest that the stop mutation causes feline PKD, providing a test to identify cats that will develop PKD and demonstrating that the domestic cat is an ideal model for human PKD. PMID:15466259

  2. Osteoporosis-Pseudoglioma in a Mauritanian Child due to a Novel Mutation in LRP5

    PubMed Central

    Biha, Noura; Ghaber, S. M.; Hacen, M. M.; Collet, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma (OPPG) syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. It manifests by severe juvenile osteoporosis with congenital or infancy-onset visual loss. We describe a case of OPPG due to novel mutation in LRP5 gene, occurring in a female Mauritanian child. This 10-year-old female child was born blind, and after then multiple fragility fractures appeared. PCR amplification and sequencing revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 10 of the LRP5 gene (c.2270G>A; pTrP757⁎); this mutation leads to the production of a truncated protein containing 757 amino acids instead of 1615, located in the third β-propeller domain of the LRP5 protein. Both parents were heterozygous for the mutation. This is the first case of the OPPG described in black Africans, which broadens the spectrum of LRP5 gene mutations in OPPG. PMID:26904320

  3. Identification of a novel WFS1 homozygous nonsense mutation in Jordanian children with Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bodoor, Khaldon; Batiha, Osama; Abu-Awad, Ayman; Al-Sarihin, Khaldon; Ziad, Haya; Jarun, Yousef; Abu-Sheikha, Aya; Abu Jalboush, Sara; Alibrahim, Khoulod S

    2016-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presentation of early onset type I diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy with later onset diabetes insipidus and deafness. WFS1 gene was identified on chromosome 4p16.1 as the gene responsible for WS disease given that most of the WS patients were found to carry mutations in this gene. This study was carried out to investigate the molecular spectrum of WFS1 gene in Jordanian families. Molecular and clinical characterization was performed on five WS patients from two unrelated Jordanian families. Our data indicated that WS patients of the first family harbored two deletion mutations (V415del and F247fs) located in exon 8 and exon 7 respectively, with a compound heterozygous pattern of inheritance; while in the second family, we identified a novel nonsense mutation (W185X) located in exon 5 in the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain with a homozygous pattern of inheritance. This mutation can be considered as loss of function mutation since the resulting truncated protein lost both the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal domain. Additionally, the W185X mutation lies within the CaM binding domain in wolframin protein which is thought to have a role in the regulation of wolframin function in response to calcium levels. PMID:27617222

  4. Different inactivating mutations of the mineralocorticoid receptor in fourteen families affected by type I pseudohypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Sartorato, Paola; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Armanini, Decio; Kuhnle, Ursula; Khaldi, Yasmina; Salomon, Rémi; Abadie, Véronique; Di Battista, Eliana; Naselli, Arturo; Racine, Alain; Bosio, Maurizio; Caprio, Massimiliano; Poulet-Young, Véronique; Chabrolle, Jean-Pierre; Niaudet, Patrick; De Gennes, Christiane; Lecornec, Marie-Hélène; Poisson, Elodie; Fusco, Anna Maria; Loli, Paola; Lombès, Marc; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2003-06-01

    We have analyzed the human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) gene in 14 families with autosomal dominant or sporadic pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1), a rare form of mineralocorticoid resistance characterized by neonatal renal salt wasting and failure to thrive. Six heterozygous mutations were detected. Two frameshift mutations in exon 2 (insT1354, del8bp537) and one nonsense mutation in exon 4 (C2157A, Cys645stop) generate truncated proteins due to premature stop codons. Three missense mutations (G633R, Q776R, L979P) differently affect hMR function. The DNA binding domain mutant R633 exhibits reduced maximal transactivation, although its binding characteristics and ED(50) of transactivation are comparable with wild-type hMR. Ligand binding domain mutants R776 and P979 present reduced or absent aldosterone binding, respectively, which is associated with reduced or absent ligand-dependent transactivation capacity. Finally, P979 possesses a transdominant negative effect on wild-type hMR activity, whereas mutations G633R and Q776R probably result in haploinsufficiency in PHA1 patients. We conclude that hMR mutations are a common feature of autosomal dominant PHA1, being found in 70% of our familial cases. Their absence in some families underscores the importance of an extensive investigation of the hMR gene and the role of precise diagnostic procedures to allow for identification of other genes potentially involved in the disease. PMID:12788847

  5. Different inactivating mutations of the mineralocorticoid receptor in fourteen families affected by type I pseudohypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Sartorato, Paola; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Armanini, Decio; Kuhnle, Ursula; Khaldi, Yasmina; Salomon, Rémi; Abadie, Véronique; Di Battista, Eliana; Naselli, Arturo; Racine, Alain; Bosio, Maurizio; Caprio, Massimiliano; Poulet-Young, Véronique; Chabrolle, Jean-Pierre; Niaudet, Patrick; De Gennes, Christiane; Lecornec, Marie-Hélène; Poisson, Elodie; Fusco, Anna Maria; Loli, Paola; Lombès, Marc; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2003-06-01

    We have analyzed the human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) gene in 14 families with autosomal dominant or sporadic pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1), a rare form of mineralocorticoid resistance characterized by neonatal renal salt wasting and failure to thrive. Six heterozygous mutations were detected. Two frameshift mutations in exon 2 (insT1354, del8bp537) and one nonsense mutation in exon 4 (C2157A, Cys645stop) generate truncated proteins due to premature stop codons. Three missense mutations (G633R, Q776R, L979P) differently affect hMR function. The DNA binding domain mutant R633 exhibits reduced maximal transactivation, although its binding characteristics and ED(50) of transactivation are comparable with wild-type hMR. Ligand binding domain mutants R776 and P979 present reduced or absent aldosterone binding, respectively, which is associated with reduced or absent ligand-dependent transactivation capacity. Finally, P979 possesses a transdominant negative effect on wild-type hMR activity, whereas mutations G633R and Q776R probably result in haploinsufficiency in PHA1 patients. We conclude that hMR mutations are a common feature of autosomal dominant PHA1, being found in 70% of our familial cases. Their absence in some families underscores the importance of an extensive investigation of the hMR gene and the role of precise diagnostic procedures to allow for identification of other genes potentially involved in the disease.

  6. Increased plasma plant sterol concentrations and a heterozygous amino acid exchange in ATP binding cassette transporter ABCG5: a case report.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sylvia; Prechtl, Danielle; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Ceglarek, Uta; Thiery, Joachim; Schmitz, Gerd; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Whilst conducting a scientific study, an elevated plasma plant sterol concentration of 3.07 mg/dL was established in one proband. Similar levels found in his mothers plasma (2.73 mg/dL) were suggestive of a heterozygous sitosterolemia. The resulting gene analysis for ATP binding cassette transporter G5/G8 (ABCG5/G8) revealed a heterozygous polymorphism in ABCG8 (Thr400Lys, rs4148217), which the proband had inherited from his father. However, a heterozygous amino acid exchange (Arg406Gln) in exon 9 of ABCG5 was revealed, which was inherited from his mother. Although not sufficient evidence exists to regard this sequence variation as a mutation, this previously unreleased sequence variation occurred in a "hot spot" area for sitosterolemia of the ABCG5 gene (exon 9) and the similar increased plasma plant sterol concentrations of the heterozygous mother contribute to the notion, that this very likely presents an inactivating mutation.

  7. Mutations in the Complex III Assembly Factor Tetratricopeptide 19 Gene TTC19 Are a Rare Cause of Leigh Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Atwal, P S

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with Leigh syndrome shown to have two previously undescribed truncating mutations in the TTC19 gene. Our patient is a 4-year-old boy with global developmental delay, language regression at 13 months, and brain MRI showing T2 high-signal lesions involving the putamen, caudate body, and the brainstem, which appear to be progressing. Molecular testing showed our patient is heterozygous for two previously undescribed mutations in the TTC19 gene, c.577G>A (p.Trp186Stop) and c.964_967delGGCT (p.Gly322MetfsX8), both of which are predicted to cause loss of protein function due to either protein truncation or nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. TTC19 encodes tetratricopeptide 19 (TTC19) and is thought to be a complex III (CIII) assembly factor that is embedded on the inner mitochondrial membrane as part of two high-molecular-weight complexes, one of which coincides with CIII. The initial presentations of previously described patients with TTC19 mutations are heterogeneous and can be from childhood to adulthood. In summary, TTC19 mutations have been shown to affect CIII complex function, which results in a heterogeneous clinical phenotype including Leigh syndrome. PMID:24368687

  8. Mutations in the Complex III Assembly Factor Tetratricopeptide 19 Gene TTC19 Are a Rare Cause of Leigh Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Atwal, P S

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with Leigh syndrome shown to have two previously undescribed truncating mutations in the TTC19 gene. Our patient is a 4-year-old boy with global developmental delay, language regression at 13 months, and brain MRI showing T2 high-signal lesions involving the putamen, caudate body, and the brainstem, which appear to be progressing. Molecular testing showed our patient is heterozygous for two previously undescribed mutations in the TTC19 gene, c.577G>A (p.Trp186Stop) and c.964_967delGGCT (p.Gly322MetfsX8), both of which are predicted to cause loss of protein function due to either protein truncation or nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. TTC19 encodes tetratricopeptide 19 (TTC19) and is thought to be a complex III (CIII) assembly factor that is embedded on the inner mitochondrial membrane as part of two high-molecular-weight complexes, one of which coincides with CIII. The initial presentations of previously described patients with TTC19 mutations are heterogeneous and can be from childhood to adulthood. In summary, TTC19 mutations have been shown to affect CIII complex function, which results in a heterogeneous clinical phenotype including Leigh syndrome.

  9. Phenotypic variability in a seven-generation Swedish family segregating autosomal dominant hearing impairment due to a novel EYA4 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, Carina; Klar, Joakim; Arnesson, Hanna; Rehnman, Anna-Carin; Lodahl, Marianne; Wedén, Ulla; Dahl, Niklas; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna D

    2015-05-25

    Linkage to an interval overlapping the DFNA10 locus on chromosome 6q22-23 was found through genome wide linkage analysis in a seven-generation Swedish family segregating postlingual, autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing impairment. A novel heterozygous frame-shift mutation (c.579_580insTACC, p.(Asp194Tyrfs*52)) in EYA4 was identified that truncates the so-called variable region of the protein. The mutation is predicted to result in haploinsufficiency of the EYA4 product. No evidence for dilated cardiomyopathy was found in the family, contrasting to a previous family with a deletion resulting in a similar truncation in the variable region. A highly variable age of onset was seen in the mutation carriers. For assessment of the aetiology of this variability, clinical and audiometric data analyses were performed. The affected family members all had similar cross-sectional and longitudinal deterioration of pure tone average (PTA) once the process of hearing deterioration had started, and no gender, parent-of-origin or family branch differences on PTA could be found. Age at onset varied between the family branches. In summary, this is the ninth published genetically verified DFNA10 family. The results imply that unidentified factors, genetic or environmental, other than the EYA4 mutation, are of importance for the age at onset of DFNA10, and that mutation early in the variable region of the EYA4 protein can occur in the absence of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  10. Bleeding symptoms in heterozygous carriers of inherited coagulation disorders in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Mojtaba; Peyvandi, Flora; Afrasiabi, AbdolReza; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Karimi, Mehran

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of bleeding symptoms in individuals who are heterozygous for recessively inherited coagulation disorders (RICDs) and to determine the association of these bleeding symptoms with type of RICDs. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study being performed in Shiraz Hemophilia Society (Shiraz, Southern Iran). In this study, bleeding symptoms of the parents (heterozygous) of the patients (homozygous) who were registered and had definite diagnosis as autosomal recessive coagulation disorder were evaluated. These inherited disorders include factor I, V, VII, X, XI, XIII deficiency, combined factor VII and X deficiency, combined factor V and VIII deficiency, all platelet disorders and von Willebrand disease (VWD) type III. 50.3% individuals underwent genotype and mutation study to confirm their heterozygosity. We included 350 heterozygote individuals for inherited coagulation disorders among whom there were 175 (50%) men and 175 (50%) women. Those who were heterozygous for factor VII deficiency had significantly higher prevalence of subcutaneous hematoma (P=0.011). In the same way heterozygous patients for Bernard-Soulier syndrome had higher prevalence of hypermenorrhea (P=0.012) and obstetric (normal vaginal delivery or cesarean delivery) bleeding (P=0.012). Heterozygosity for factor X and XIII deficiency was associated with prolonged or massive bleeding during operations (P=0.001) and after minor traumas (P=0.019), respectively. Heterozygosity for RICDs is associated with some bleeding symptoms. Thus bleeding tendency and homeostasis disturbance should be kept in mind in those who are heterozygous for RICDs and more preoperative care and correction of coagulation indices is highly recommended.

  11. Rapamycin extends lifespan and delays tumorigenesis in heterozygous p53+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Komarova, Elena A; Antoch, Marina P; Novototskaya, Liliya R; Chernova, Olga B; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine; Leontieva, Olga V; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V; Gudkov, Andrei V

    2012-10-01

    TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway accelerates cellular and organismal aging. Similar to rapamycin, p53 can inhibit the mTOR pathway in some mammalian cells. Mice lacking one copy of p53 (p53+/- mice) have an increased cancer incidence and a shorter lifespan. We hypothesize that rapamycin can delay cancer in heterozygous p53+/- mice. Here we show that rapamycin (given in a drinking water) extended the mean lifespan of p53+/- mice by 10% and when treatment started early in life (at the age less than 5 months) by 28%. In addition, rapamycin decreased the incidence of spontaneous tumors. This observation may have applications in management of Li-Fraumeni syndrome patients characterized by heterozygous mutations in the p53 gene.

  12. A new AURKC mutation causing macrozoospermia: implications for human spermatogenesis and clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Khelifa, Mariem; Zouari, Raoudha; Harbuz, Radu; Halouani, Lazhar; Arnoult, Christophe; Lunardi, Joël; Ray, Pierre F.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of close to 100% large-headed multi-tailed spermatozoa in the ejaculate has been described as a rare phenotype of male infertility with a very poor prognosis. We demonstrated previously that most cases were caused by a homozygous mutation (c.144delC) in the Aurora Kinase C gene (AURKC) leading to the absence or the production of a nonfunctional protein. AURKC deficiency in these patients blocked meiosis and resulted in the production of tetraploid spermatozoa unsuitable for fertilization. We describe here the study of two brothers presenting with large-headed spermatozoa. Molecular analysis of the AURKC gene was carried out in two brothers presenting with a typical large headed spermatozoa phenotype. Both affected brothers were heterozygous for the c.144delC mutation. After complete sequencing of the gene a new heterozygous variant, c.436-2A>G, was identified in both patients. This mutation is located in the acceptor consensus splice site of exon 5. AURKC transcripts were extracted from one of the patient’s leukocytes and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) could be realised showing the presence of a truncated transcript indicating that c.436-2A>G leads to the skipping of exon 5. These results indicate that AURKC molecular analysis of patients with large-headed spermatozoa should not be stopped in the absence of a homozygous recurrent mutation on exon 3 but complete sequence analysis should be performed. This diagnosis is important as the identification of AURKC mutations in patients indicates that all spermatozoa will be chromosomally abnormal and that ICSI should not be attempted. PMID:21733974

  13. Truncated variants of apolipoprotein B cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, D R; Knott, T J; Pease, R J; Powell, L M; Wallis, S C; Robertson, S; Pullinger, C R; Milne, R W; Marcel, Y L; Humphries, S E

    1988-01-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder in which levels of apo-B-containing plasma lipoproteins are approximately half-normal in heterozygotes and virtually absent in homozygotes. Here we describe mutations of the apo-B gene that cause two different truncated variants of apo-B in unrelated individuals with hypobetalipoproteinaemia. One variant, apo-B(His1795----Met-Trp-Leu-Val-Thr-Term) is predicted to be 1799 amino acids long and arises from deletion of a single nucleotide (G) from leucine codon 1794. This protein was found at low levels in very low density and low density lipoprotein fractions in the blood. The second, shorter variant, apo-B(Arg1306----Term), is caused by mutation of a CpG dinucleotide in arginine codon 1306 converting it to a stop codon and predicting a protein of 1305 residues. The product of this allele could not be detected in the circulation. The differences in size and behaviour of these two variants compared to apo-B100 or apo-B48 point to domains that may be important for the assembly, secretion or stability of apo-B-containing lipoproteins. Images PMID:2843815

  14. Laboratory and Genetic Investigation of Mutations Accounting for Congenital Fibrinogen Disorders.

    PubMed

    Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; de Moerloose, Philippe; Casini, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Congenital fibrinogen disorders are classified into two types of plasma fibrinogen defects: type I (quantitative fibrinogen deficiencies), that is, hypofibrinogenemia or afibrinogenemia, in which there are low or absent plasma fibrinogen antigen levels, respectively, and type II (qualitative fibrinogen deficiencies), that is, dysfibrinogenemia or hypodysfibrinogenemia, in which there are normal or reduced antigen levels associated with disproportionately low functional activity. These disorders are caused by mutations in the three fibrinogen-encoding genes FGA, FGB, and FGG. Afibrinogenemia is associated with mild to severe bleeding, whereas hypofibrinogenemia is often asymptomatic. For these quantitative disorders, the majority of mutations prevent protein production. However, in some cases, missense or late-truncating nonsense mutations allow synthesis of the mutant fibrinogen chain, but intracellular fibrinogen assembly and/or secretion are impaired. Qualitative fibrinogen disorders are associated with bleeding, thrombosis, or both thrombosis and bleeding, but many dysfibrinogenemias are asymptomatic. The majority of cases are caused by heterozygous missense mutations. Here, we review the laboratory and genetic diagnosis of fibrinogen gene anomalies with an updated discussion of causative mutations identified.

  15. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients. PMID:25117323

  16. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  17. Truncated RASSF7 promotes centrosomal defects and cell death.

    PubMed

    Gulsen, Tulay; Hadjicosti, Irene; Li, Yueshi; Zhang, Xinyun; Whitley, Paul R; Chalmers, Andrew D

    2016-01-15

    RASSF7 protein localises to the centrosome and plays a key role in mitosis. Its expression is also increased in a range of tumour types. However, little is known about the molecular basis of RASSF7's function and it is not clear if it acts as an oncogene in the cancers where its levels are elevated. Here, we carry out the first analysis of the domains of rassf7, focusing on which of them are responsible for its localisation to the centrosome. Constructs were generated to allow the expression of a series of truncated versions of rassf7 and the level of centrosomal localisation shown by each protein quantified. This analysis was carried out in Xenopus embryos which are a tractable system where rassf7 localisation can easily be studied. Our data shows that the coiled-coil domain of rassf7 is required and sufficient to direct its centrosomal localisation. The RA domain did not appear to have a role in mediating localisation. Surprisingly, removal of the extreme C-terminus of the protein caused rassf7 to accumulate at the centrosome and drive centrosome defects, including accumulation of the centrosomal protein γ-tubulin and an amplification of the number of γ-tubulin foci. These effects required the centrosomal localisation mediated by the coiled-coil domain. Later in development cells expressing this truncated rassf7 protein underwent cell death. Finally, analysis of a database of tumour sequences identified a mutation in RASSF7 which would cause a similar C-terminal truncation of the protein. Based on our data this truncated protein might drive centrosomal defects and we propose the hypothesis that truncated RASSF7 could act as an oncogene in a small subset of tumours where it is mutated in this way.

  18. Clinical, Biochemical, and Molecular Characterization of Novel Mutations in ABCA1 in Families with Tangier Disease.

    PubMed

    Brunham, Liam R; Kang, Martin H; Van Karnebeek, Clara; Sadananda, Singh N; Collins, Jennifer A; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Sayson, Bryan; Miao, Fudan; Stockler, Sylvia; Frohlich, Jiri; Cassiman, David; Rabkin, Simon W; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Tangier disease is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ABCA1 gene and is characterized by near absence of plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, accumulation of cholesterol in multiple tissues, peripheral neuropathy, and accelerated atherosclerosis. Here we report three new kindreds with Tangier disease harboring both known and novel mutations in ABCA1. One patient was identified to be homozygous for a nonsense mutation, p.Gln1038*. In a remarkably large Tangier disease pedigree with four affected siblings, we identified compound heterozygosity for previously reported missense variants, p.Arg937Val and p.Thr940Met, and show that both of these mutations result in significantly impaired cholesterol efflux in transfected cells. In a third pedigree, the proband was identified to be compound heterozygous for two novel mutations, a frameshift (p.Ile1200Hisfs*4) and an intronic variant (c.4176-11T>G), that lead to the creation of a cryptic splice site acceptor and premature truncation, p.Ser1392Argfs*6. We demonstrate that this mutation arose de novo, the first demonstration of a pathogenic de novo mutation in ABCA1 associated with Tangier disease. We also report results of glucose tolerance testing in a Tangier disease kindred for the first time, showing a gene-dose relationship between ABCA1 activity and glucose tolerance and suggesting that Tangier disease patients may have substantially impaired islet function. Our findings provide insight into the diverse phenotypic manifestations of this rare disorder, expand the list of pathogenic mutations in ABCA1, and increase our understanding of how specific mutations in this gene lead to abnormal cellular and physiological phenotypes.

  19. Prenatal identification of a heterozygous status in two fetuses at risk for glucose-galactose malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Martín, M G; Turk, E; Kerner, C; Zabel, B; Wirth, S; Wright, E M

    1996-05-01

    Glucose-galactose malabsorption (GGM) is an autosomal recessive disorder which presents with severe osmotic diarrhoea shortly after birth. Two proband siblings with GGM were previously demonstrated to contain a missense mutation (D28N) in the Na(+)-dependent glucose/galactose cotransporter (SGLT1) that accounts for the defect in sugar absorption. Prenatal screening for GGM was performed in two subsequent pregnancies in this large consanguineous family. The first exon of the SGLT1 gene was PCR-amplified from genomic DNA and screened for the presence of the D28N mutation by EcoRV restriction digestion. The proband's sibling was heterozygous and a cousin was not a carrier of the D28N mutation. Both children at 2-years of age remain healthy and have had no diarrhoeal symptoms. Molecular biology techniques will allow a prospective determination of the presence of an abnormal SGLT1 allete and potentially decrease the postnatal morbidity. PMID:8844006

  20. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  1. Identification of 70 calcium-sensing receptor mutations in hyper- and hypo-calcaemic patients: evidence for clustering of extracellular domain mutations at calcium-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Nesbit, M Andrew; Zhang, Chen; Cranston, Treena; Curley, Alan J; Harding, Brian; Fratter, Carl; Rust, Nigel; Christie, Paul T; Turner, Jeremy J O; Lemos, Manuel C; Bowl, Michael R; Bouillon, Roger; Brain, Caroline; Bridges, Nicola; Burren, Christine; Connell, John M; Jung, Heike; Marks, Eileen; McCredie, David; Mughal, Zulf; Rodda, Christine; Tollefsen, Sherida; Brown, Edward M; Yang, Jenny J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2012-06-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that has an extracellular bilobed venus flytrap domain (VFTD) predicted to contain five calcium (Ca(2+))-binding sites. To elucidate the structure-function relationships of the VFTD, we investigated 294 unrelated probands with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH), neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) or autosomal dominant hypocalcaemic hypercalciuria (ADHH) for CaSR mutations and performed in vitro functional expression studies and three-dimensional modelling of mutations involving the VFTD. A total of 70 different CaSR mutations were identified: 35 in FHH, 10 in NSHPT and 25 in ADHH patients. Furthermore, a CaSR variant (Glu250Lys) was identified in FHH and ADHH probands and demonstrated to represent a functionally neutral polymorphism. NSHPT was associated with a large proportion of truncating CaSR mutations that occurred in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. Thirty-four VFTD missense mutations were identified, and 18 mutations were located within 10 Å of one or more of the predicted Ca(2+)-binding sites, particularly at the VFTD cleft, which is the principal site of Ca(2+) binding. Mutations of residues 173 and 221, which are located at the entrance to the VFTD cleft binding site, were associated with both receptor activation (Leu173Phe and Pro221Leu) and inactivation (Leu173Pro and Pro221Gln), thereby highlighting the importance of these residues for entry and binding of Ca(2+) by the CaSR. Thus, these studies of disease-associated CaSR mutations have further elucidated the role of the VFTD cleft region in Ca(2+) binding and the function of the CaSR. PMID:22422767

  2. Identification of 70 calcium-sensing receptor mutations in hyper- and hypo-calcaemic patients: evidence for clustering of extracellular domain mutations at calcium-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Nesbit, M Andrew; Zhang, Chen; Cranston, Treena; Curley, Alan J; Harding, Brian; Fratter, Carl; Rust, Nigel; Christie, Paul T; Turner, Jeremy J O; Lemos, Manuel C; Bowl, Michael R; Bouillon, Roger; Brain, Caroline; Bridges, Nicola; Burren, Christine; Connell, John M; Jung, Heike; Marks, Eileen; McCredie, David; Mughal, Zulf; Rodda, Christine; Tollefsen, Sherida; Brown, Edward M; Yang, Jenny J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2012-06-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that has an extracellular bilobed venus flytrap domain (VFTD) predicted to contain five calcium (Ca(2+))-binding sites. To elucidate the structure-function relationships of the VFTD, we investigated 294 unrelated probands with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH), neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) or autosomal dominant hypocalcaemic hypercalciuria (ADHH) for CaSR mutations and performed in vitro functional expression studies and three-dimensional modelling of mutations involving the VFTD. A total of 70 different CaSR mutations were identified: 35 in FHH, 10 in NSHPT and 25 in ADHH patients. Furthermore, a CaSR variant (Glu250Lys) was identified in FHH and ADHH probands and demonstrated to represent a functionally neutral polymorphism. NSHPT was associated with a large proportion of truncating CaSR mutations that occurred in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. Thirty-four VFTD missense mutations were identified, and 18 mutations were located within 10 Å of one or more of the predicted Ca(2+)-binding sites, particularly at the VFTD cleft, which is the principal site of Ca(2+) binding. Mutations of residues 173 and 221, which are located at the entrance to the VFTD cleft binding site, were associated with both receptor activation (Leu173Phe and Pro221Leu) and inactivation (Leu173Pro and Pro221Gln), thereby highlighting the importance of these residues for entry and binding of Ca(2+) by the CaSR. Thus, these studies of disease-associated CaSR mutations have further elucidated the role of the VFTD cleft region in Ca(2+) binding and the function of the CaSR.

  3. Mutations in ribosomal proteins: Apoptosis, cell competition, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicholas E; Kale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affecting multiple ribosomal proteins are implicated in cancer. Using genetic mosaics in the fruit fly Drosophila, we describe 3 apoptotic mechanisms that affect Rp/Rp homozygous mutant cells, Rp/+ heterozygous cells, or Rp/+ heterozygous cells in competition with nearby wild type cells, and discuss how apoptosis might be related to cancer predisposition. PMID:27308545

  4. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  5. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  6. Unusual xanthomas in a young patient with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and type III hyperlipoproteinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Feussner, G.; Dobmeyer, J.; Nissen, H.; Hansen, T.S.

    1996-10-16

    We report on a 20-year-old man with the combination of two independent familial lipoprotein disorders: heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP). Familial hypercholesterolemia was diagnosed by elevated total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and family history. By denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, a G{r_arrow}A splice donor mutation in intron 3 of the proband`s low density lipoprotein receptor gene was identified as the underlying molecular defect. This mutation was described previously as a receptor-negative founder mutation in Norway (FH-Elverum) and subsequently in 6 unrelated heterozygous English patients, creating a severe phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia. Type III HLP was confirmed by homozygosity for apolipoprotein (apo) E2 and an elevated ratio of very low density lipoprotein cholesterol to serum triglycerides (0.40; normal ratio about 0.20). The patient has unusual flat xanthomas in the interdigital webs of the hands which are normally not found in either disease. These dermatological findings might therefore be indicative of the rare combination of both disorders of lipoprotein metabolism in one individual. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Increased frequency of double and triple heterozygous gene variants in children with intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Monique L.; Mourya, Reena; Connor, Jessica; Dexheimer, Phillip; Karns, Rebekah; Miethke, Alexander; Sheridan, Rachel; Zhang, Kejian; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Single-gene mutations cause syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis, but previous multi-gene mutation screening in children with idiopathic cholestasis failed to fulfill diagnostic criteria in about two-thirds of children. In adults with fibrosing cholestatic disease, heterozygous ABCB4 mutations were present in 34% of patients. Here, we hypothesized that children with idiopathic cholestasis have a higher frequency of heterozygous non-synonymous gene sequence variants. Methods We analyzed the frequency and types of variants in 717 children in whom high-throughput sequencing of the genes SERPINA1, JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, and ABCB4 was performed as part of an evaluation for intrahepatic idiopathic cholestasis. The frequency of non-synonymous variants (NSVs) was compared to those of 1092 control subjects enrolled in the 1000-Genome-Project. Results The frequency of NSVs in single genes was similar between disease (25%) and controls (26%, P=0.518). In contrast, double or triple NSVs in 2 or more genes were more frequent in disease (N= 7%) than controls (N=4.7%, P=0.028). Detailed review of clinical and laboratory information in a subgroup of double or triple heterozygous patients revealed variable GGT levels and severity of pruritus, with liver biopsies showing stage 2–3 fibrosis. Conclusion Children with intrahepatic idiopathic cholestasis have a higher frequency of double or triple NSVs in SERPINA1, JAG1, ATPB1, ABCB11, or ABCB4. These findings raise the potential role for gene-gene relationships in determining the phenotype of cholestatic liver disease in children. PMID:26126923

  8. A de novo mutation in PRICKLE1 in fetal agenesis of the corpus callosum and polymicrogyria.

    PubMed

    Bassuk, Alexander G; Sherr, Elliott H

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous recessive mutations in the PRICKLE1 gene were originally reported in three consanguineous families with myoclonic epilepsy. Subsequently, several studies have identified neurological abnormalities in animal models with both heterozygous and homozygous mutations in PRICKLE1 orthologues, including epilepsy in flies and in mice with heterozygous PRICKLE1 mutations. We describe a fetus with a novel de novo mutation in PRICKLE1 associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum.

  9. Truncations of random orthogonal matrices.

    PubMed

    Khoruzhenko, Boris A; Sommers, Hans-Jürgen; Życzkowski, Karol

    2010-10-01

    Statistical properties of nonsymmetric real random matrices of size M, obtained as truncations of random orthogonal N×N matrices, are investigated. We derive an exact formula for the density of eigenvalues which consists of two components: finite fraction of eigenvalues are real, while the remaining part of the spectrum is located inside the unit disk symmetrically with respect to the real axis. In the case of strong nonorthogonality, M/N=const, the behavior typical to real Ginibre ensemble is found. In the case M=N-L with fixed L, a universal distribution of resonance widths is recovered.

  10. Truncations of random orthogonal matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoruzhenko, Boris A.; Sommers, Hans-Jürgen; Życzkowski, Karol

    2010-10-01

    Statistical properties of nonsymmetric real random matrices of size M , obtained as truncations of random orthogonal N×N matrices, are investigated. We derive an exact formula for the density of eigenvalues which consists of two components: finite fraction of eigenvalues are real, while the remaining part of the spectrum is located inside the unit disk symmetrically with respect to the real axis. In the case of strong nonorthogonality, M/N=const , the behavior typical to real Ginibre ensemble is found. In the case M=N-L with fixed L , a universal distribution of resonance widths is recovered.

  11. Redundans: an assembly pipeline for highly heterozygous genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Gabaldón, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Many genomes display high levels of heterozygosity (i.e. presence of different alleles at the same loci in homologous chromosomes), being those of hybrid organisms an extreme such case. The assembly of highly heterozygous genomes from short sequencing reads is a challenging task because it is difficult to accurately recover the different haplotypes. When confronted with highly heterozygous genomes, the standard assembly process tends to collapse homozygous regions and reports heterozygous regions in alternative contigs. The boundaries between homozygous and heterozygous regions result in multiple assembly paths that are hard to resolve, which leads to highly fragmented assemblies with a total size larger than expected. This, in turn, causes numerous problems in downstream analyses such as fragmented gene models, wrong gene copy number, or broken synteny. To circumvent these caveats we have developed a pipeline that specifically deals with the assembly of heterozygous genomes by introducing a step to recognise and selectively remove alternative heterozygous contigs. We tested our pipeline on simulated and naturally-occurring heterozygous genomes and compared its accuracy to other existing tools. Our method is freely available at https://github.com/Gabaldonlab/redundans. PMID:27131372

  12. Mutations in PSMB8 Cause CANDLE Syndrome with Evidence of Genetic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Ramot, Yuval; Torrelo, Antonio; Paller, Amy S.; Si, Nuo; Babay, Sofia; Kim, Peter W.; Sheikh, Afzal; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Chen, Yongqing; Vera, Angel; Zhang, Xue; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Zlotogorski, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome is an autoinflammatory syndrome recently described in children. We investigated the clinical phenotype, genetic cause and the immune dysregulation in nine CANDLE patients. Methods Genomic DNA from all patients was screened for PSMB8 (Proteasome subunit beta type-8) mutations. Serum cytokine levels were measured from four patients. Skin biopsies were evaluated immunohistochemically and blood microarray profile (n=4) and stat-1 phosphorylation (n=3) were assessed. Results One patient was homozygous for a novel nonsense mutation in PSMB8 (c.405C>A) suggesting a protein truncation, four patients were homozygous and two were heterozygous for a previously reported missense mutation (c.224C>T), and one patient showed no mutation. None of these sequence changes was observed in chromosomes from 750 healthy controls. Of the four patients with the same mutation, only two share the same haplotype indicating a mutational hot spot. PSMB8 mutation-positive and -negative patients expressed high IP-10 (Interferon gamma-induced protein 10) levels. Levels of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1Ra were moderately elevated. Microarray profiles and monocyte stat-1 activation suggested a unique interferon (IFN) signaling signature, unlike in other autoinflammatory disorders. Conclusion CANDLE is caused by mutations in PSMB8, a gene recently reported to cause JMP syndrome (joint contractures, muscle atrophy and panniculitis induced lipodystrophy) in adults. We extend the clinical and pathogenic description of this novel autoinflammatory syndrome, thereby expanding the clinical and genetic disease spectrum of PSMB8-associated disorders. IFN may be a key mediator of the inflammatory response and may present a therapeutic target. PMID:21953331

  13. Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Prescott, Trine E; Lee, Sora; Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ahmed, Sohnee; Alders, Marielle; Gerstner, Thorsten; Aslaksen, Kathinka; Tétreault, Martine; Qin, Wen; Hartley, Taila; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Lupski, James R; Ren, Dejian; Yoon, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are required for both the establishment of resting membrane potentials and the generation of action potentials. Hundreds of mutations in genes encoding voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential generation have been found to cause severe neurological diseases. In contrast, the roles of voltage-independent "leak" channels, important for the establishment and maintenance of resting membrane potentials upon which action potentials are generated, are not well established in human disease. UNC80 is a large component of the NALCN sodium-leak channel complex that regulates the basal excitability of the nervous system. Loss-of-function mutations of NALCN cause infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF). We report four individuals from three unrelated families who have homozygous missense or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in UNC80 and persistent hypotonia, encephalopathy, growth failure, and severe intellectual disability. Compared to control cells, HEK293T cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the c.5098C>T (p.Pro1700Ser) UNC80 mutation found in one individual showed markedly decreased NALCN channel currents. Our findings demonstrate the fundamental significance of UNC80 and basal ionic conductance to human health. PMID:26708751

  14. Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Prescott, Trine E; Lee, Sora; Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ahmed, Sohnee; Alders, Marielle; Gerstner, Thorsten; Aslaksen, Kathinka; Tétreault, Martine; Qin, Wen; Hartley, Taila; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Lupski, James R; Ren, Dejian; Yoon, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are required for both the establishment of resting membrane potentials and the generation of action potentials. Hundreds of mutations in genes encoding voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential generation have been found to cause severe neurological diseases. In contrast, the roles of voltage-independent "leak" channels, important for the establishment and maintenance of resting membrane potentials upon which action potentials are generated, are not well established in human disease. UNC80 is a large component of the NALCN sodium-leak channel complex that regulates the basal excitability of the nervous system. Loss-of-function mutations of NALCN cause infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF). We report four individuals from three unrelated families who have homozygous missense or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in UNC80 and persistent hypotonia, encephalopathy, growth failure, and severe intellectual disability. Compared to control cells, HEK293T cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the c.5098C>T (p.Pro1700Ser) UNC80 mutation found in one individual showed markedly decreased NALCN channel currents. Our findings demonstrate the fundamental significance of UNC80 and basal ionic conductance to human health.

  15. Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Prescott, Trine E.; Lee, Sora; Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ahmed, Sohnee; Alders, Marielle; Gerstner, Thorsten; Aslaksen, Kathinka; Tétreault, Martine; Qin, Wen; Hartley, Taila; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; van Karnebeek, Clara D.M.; Lupski, James R.; Ren, Dejian; Yoon, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are required for both the establishment of resting membrane potentials and the generation of action potentials. Hundreds of mutations in genes encoding voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential generation have been found to cause severe neurological diseases. In contrast, the roles of voltage-independent “leak” channels, important for the establishment and maintenance of resting membrane potentials upon which action potentials are generated, are not well established in human disease. UNC80 is a large component of the NALCN sodium-leak channel complex that regulates the basal excitability of the nervous system. Loss-of-function mutations of NALCN cause infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF). We report four individuals from three unrelated families who have homozygous missense or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in UNC80 and persistent hypotonia, encephalopathy, growth failure, and severe intellectual disability. Compared to control cells, HEK293T cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the c.5098C>T (p.Pro1700Ser) UNC80 mutation found in one individual showed markedly decreased NALCN channel currents. Our findings demonstrate the fundamental significance of UNC80 and basal ionic conductance to human health. PMID:26708751

  16. Phenotypic variation of a novel nonsense mutation in the P0 intracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Senderek, J; Ramaekers, V T; Zerres, K; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Schröder, J M; Bergmann, C

    2001-11-15

    Mutations in the gene for the peripheral myelin protein zero (P0, MPZ) cause type 1B of Charcot-Marie-Tooth sensorimotor neuropathy (CMT1B). Here we report a German family with a novel heterozygous P0 nonsense mutation (G206X) that supposedly removes four-fifths of the amino acid residues constituting the P0 intracellular domain. The 12-year-old propositus had childhood-onset CMT1B associated with bilateral pes cavus, moderate lower limb weakness, and mildly reduced sensory qualities in the distal legs. The electrophysiology was consistent with a demyelinating neuropathy. He inherited the mutation from his mother who had no complaints but slight pes cavus deformity and slow nerve conduction velocities (NCV). Conclusively, truncating mutations within the P0 intracellular domain do not necessarily cause a severe phenotype such as Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) or congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy (CHN), but can result in mild or moderate CMT1B with intrafamilial clinical variability. PMID:11701152

  17. Truncated ERG Oncoproteins from TMPRSS2-ERG Fusions Are Resistant to SPOP-Mediated Proteasome Degradation.

    PubMed

    An, Jian; Ren, Shancheng; Murphy, Stephen J; Dalangood, Sumiya; Chang, Cunjie; Pang, Xiaodong; Cui, Yangyan; Wang, Liguo; Pan, Yunqian; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Yasheng; Wang, Chenji; Halling, Geoffrey C; Cheng, Liang; Sukov, William R; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Vasmatzis, George; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Jun; Cheville, John C; Yan, Jun; Sun, Yinghao; Huang, Haojie

    2015-09-17

    SPOP mutations and TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements occur collectively in up to 65% of human prostate cancers. Although the two events are mutually exclusive, it is unclear whether they are functionally interrelated. Here, we demonstrate that SPOP, functioning as an E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate-binding protein, promotes ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of wild-type ERG by recognizing a degron motif at the N terminus of ERG. Prostate cancer-associated SPOP mutations abrogate the SPOP-mediated degradation function on the ERG oncoprotein. Conversely, the majority of TMPRSS2-ERG fusions encode N-terminal-truncated ERG proteins that are resistant to the SPOP-mediated degradation because of degron impairment. Our findings reveal degradation resistance as a previously uncharacterized mechanism that contributes to elevation of truncated ERG proteins in prostate cancer. They also suggest that overcoming ERG resistance to SPOP-mediated degradation represents a viable strategy for treatment of prostate cancers expressing either mutated SPOP or truncated ERG.

  18. Manifestation of hawkinsinuria in a patient compound heterozygous for hawkinsinuria and tyrosinemia III.

    PubMed

    Item, Chike Bellarmine; Mihalek, Ivana; Lichtarge, Oliver; Jalan, Anil; Vodopiutz, Julia; Muhl, Adolf; Bodamer, Olaf A

    2007-08-01

    Mutations in the gene for 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) cause either autosomal recessive tyrosinemia type III or autosomal dominant hawkinsinuria. We report a 6-month-old Indian infant who is compound heterozygous for both alleles and who has hawkinsinuria but not tyrosinemia type III based on biochemical investigations. The HPD gene was directly sequenced in the proband and both parents. The mechanistic model of the enzymatic function was built using the known structure of rat HPD. We identified a novel hawkinsinuria mutation, Asn241Ser, and a known tyrosinemia type III mutation, Ile335Met, in trans configuration. The structural analysis of the active site revealed that the IIe335Met mutation is situated in the close vicinity of one of the two highly conserved Phe rings which stack with the phenol ring of the substrate. The Asn241Ser mutation is situated further away from the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate binding pocket. Assuming that Asn241Ser causes hawkinsinuria, we propose positioning the dioxygen molecule in the HPD-catalyzed reaction as a novel role for the Asn residue. The IIe335Met allele is equivalent to a null mutation while the Asn241Ser allele results in a partially active enzyme with an uncoupled turnover causing hawkinsinuria.

  19. Homozygous Mutations in NEUROD1 Are Responsible for a Novel Syndrome of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes and Neurological Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Minton, Jayne A.L.; Kantor, Iren; Williams, Denise; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE NEUROD1 is expressed in both developing and mature β-cells. Studies in mice suggest that this basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor is critical in the development of endocrine cell lineage. Heterozygous mutations have previously been identified as a rare cause of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). We aimed to explore the potential contribution of NEUROD1 mutations in patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We sequenced the NEUROD1 gene in 44 unrelated patients with permanent neonatal diabetes of unknown genetic etiology. RESULTS Two homozygous mutations in NEUROD1 (c.427_ 428del and c.364dupG) were identified in two patients. Both mutations introduced a frameshift that would be predicted to generate a truncated protein completely lacking the activating domain. Both patients had permanent diabetes diagnosed in the first 2 months of life with no evidence of exocrine pancreatic dysfunction and a morphologically normal pancreas on abdominal imaging. In addition to diabetes, they had learning difficulties, severe cerebellar hypoplasia, profound sensorineural deafness, and visual impairment due to severe myopia and retinal dystrophy. CONCLUSIONS We describe a novel clinical syndrome that results from homozygous loss of function mutations in NEUROD1. It is characterized by permanent neonatal diabetes and a consistent pattern of neurological abnormalities including cerebellar hypoplasia, learning difficulties, sensorineural deafness, and visual impairment. This syndrome highlights the critical role of NEUROD1 in both the development of the endocrine pancreas and the central nervous system in humans. PMID:20573748

  20. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Mutations and a Severe Recessive Pseudohypoaldosteronism Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Edwige-Ludiwyne; Teissier, Raphaël; Fernandes-Rosa, Fábio L.; Fay, Michel; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Metz, Chantal; Escoubet, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is a rare genetic disease of mineralocorticoid resistance characterized by salt wasting and failure to thrive in infancy. Here we describe the first case of a newborn with severe recessive PHA1 caused by two heterozygous mutations in NR3C2, gene coding for the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Independent segregation of the mutations occurred in the family, with p.Ser166X being transmitted from the affected father and p.Trp806X from the asymptomatic mother Whereas the truncated MR166X protein was degraded, MR806X was expressed both at the mRNA and protein level. Functional studies demonstrated that despite its inability to bind aldosterone, MR806X had partial ligand-independent transcriptional activity. Partial nuclear localization of MR806X in the absence of hormone was identified as a prerequisite to initiate transcription. This exceptional case broadens the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of PHA1 and demonstrates that minimal residual activity of MR is compatible with life. It also suggests that rare hypomorphic NR3C2 alleles may be more common than expected from the prevalence of detected PHA1 cases. This might prove relevant for patient's care in neonatal salt losing disorders and may affect renal salt handling and blood pressure in the general population. PMID:21903996

  1. Truncated Glycolytic System in Veillonella

    PubMed Central

    Rogosa, M.; Krichevsky, M. I.; Bishop, F. S.

    1965-01-01

    Rogosa, M., (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.), M. I. Krichevsky, and F. S. Bishop. Truncated glycolytic system in Veillonella. J. Bacteriol. 90:164–171. 1965.—Intact Veillonella cells do not utilize carbohydrates for growth, nor are carbohydrates fermented. In cell extracts, there is no detectable glucokinase or fructokinase. Cell extracts do not degrade glucose or fructose unless supplemented with yeast hexokinase. Under these conditions, triose phosphates are formed in the presence of a hydrazine trap. When glucose-C14 plus added hexokinase or fructose-1,6-diphosphate-C14 was incubated with cell extracts, the production of CO2, acetate, pyruvate, propionate, and lactate was detected. It is concluded that, except for a hexokinase, all the activities required for a glycolytic system are present. PMID:16562014

  2. Comparative analyses of lung transcriptomes in patients with alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins and in foxf1 heterozygous knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of Pulmonary Veins (ACDMPV) is a developmental disorder of the lungs, primarily affecting their vasculature. FOXF1 haploinsufficiency due to heterozygous genomic deletions and point mutations have been reported in most patients with ACDMPV. The majority...

  3. Two novel heterozygous missense variations within the GLI2 gene in two unrelated Argentine patients.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Matías; Di Palma, Isabel; Ciaccio, Marta; Marino, Roxana; Ramírez, Pablo C; Pérez Garrid, Natalia; Maceiras, Mercedes; Lazzati, Juan M; Rivarola, Marco A; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Several heterozygous GLI2 gene mutations have been reported in patients with isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD) with or without other malformations. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the presence of GLI2 gene alterations in a cohort of patients with IGHD or MPHD and ectopic/absent posterior pituitary. The coding sequence and flanking intronic regions of GLI2 gene were amplified and directly sequenced from gDNA of 18 affected subjects and relatives. In silico tools were applied to identify the functional impact of newly found variants (Polyphen2, SIFT, Mutation Taster). We identified two novel heterozygous missense variations in two unrelated patients, p.Arg231Gln and p.Arg226Leu, located in the repressor domain of the protein. Both variations affect highly conserved amino acids of the Gli2 protein and were not found in the available databases. In silico tools suggest that these variations might be disease causing. Our study suggests that the GLI2 gene may be one of the candidate genes to analyze when an association of pituitary hormone deficiency and developmental defects in posterior pituitary gland. The highly variable phenotype found suggests the presence of additional unknown factors that could contribute to the phenotype observed in these patients. PMID:27576279

  4. Reducing Truncation Error In Integer Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. Brooks; Berner, Jeffrey B.; Graham, J. Scott

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of rounding off (truncation of least-significant bits) in integer processing of data devised. Provides for reduction, to extremely low value, of numerical bias otherwise generated by accumulation of truncation errors from many arithmetic operations. Devised for use in integer signal processing, in which rescaling and truncation usually performed to reduce number of bits, which typically builds up in sequence of operations. Essence of method to alternate direction of roundoff (plus, then minus) on alternate occurrences of truncated values contributing to bias.

  5. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burrage, Lindsay C.; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Willer, Jason R.; Davis, Erica E.; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S.; Akdemir, Zeynep C.; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P.; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A.; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Brunner, Han G.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R.; Lupski, James R.; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; Yang, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5′ end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1st coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6∗) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs∗4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5′ end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5′ to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. PMID:26637980

  6. Juvenile Paget’s Disease With Heterozygous Duplication In TNFRSF11A Encoding RANK

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Michael P.; Tau, Cristina; McAlister, William H.; Zhang, Xiafang; Novack, Deborah V.; Preliasco, Virginia; Santini-Araujo, Eduardo; Mumm, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian disorders of RANKL/OPG/RANK signaling feature the extremes of aberrant osteoclastogenesis and cause either osteopetrosis or rapid turnover skeletal disease. The patients with autosomal dominant accelerated bone remodeling have familial expansile osteolysis, early-onset Paget’s disease of bone, expansile skeletal hyperphosphatasia, or panostotic expansile bone disease due to heterozygous 18-, 27-, 15-, and 12-bp insertional duplications, respectively, within exon 1 of TNFRSF11A that encodes the signal peptide of RANK. Juvenile Paget’s disease (JPD), an autosomal recessive disorder, manifests extremely fast skeletal remodeling, and is usually caused by loss-of-function mutations within TNFRSF11B that encodes OPG. These disorders are ultra-rare. A 13-year-old Bolivian girl was referred at age 3 years. One femur was congenitally short and curved. Then, both bowed. Deafness at age 2 years involved missing ossicles and eroded cochleas. Teeth often had absorbed roots, broke, and were lost. Radiographs had revealed acquired tubular bone widening, cortical thickening, and coarse trabeculation. Biochemical markers indicated rapid skeletal turnover. Histopathology showed accelerated remodeling with abundant osteoclasts. JPD was diagnosed. Immobilization from a femur fracture caused severe hypercalcemia that responded rapidly to pamidronate treatment followed by bone turnover marker and radiographic improvement. No TNFRSF11B mutation was found. Instead, a unique heterozygous 15-bp insertional tandem duplication (87dup15) within exon 1 of TNFRSF11A predicted the same pentapeptide extension of RANK that causes expansile skeletal hyperphosphatasia (84dup15). Single nucleotide polymorphisms in TNFRSF11A and TNFRSF11B possibly impacted her phenotype. Our findings: i) reveal that JPD can be associated with an activating mutation within TNFRSF11A, ii) expand the range and overlap of phenotypes among the mendelian disorders of RANK activation, and iii) call for mutation

  7. A patient showing features of both SBBYSS and GPS supports the concept of a KAT6B-related disease spectrum, with mutations in mid-exon 18 possibly leading to combined phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Vlckova, Marketa; Simandlova, Martina; Zimmermann, Pavel; Stranecky, Viktor; Hartmannova, Hana; Hodanova, Katerina; Havlovicova, Marketa; Hancarova, Miroslava; Kmoch, Stanislav; Sedlacek, Zdenek

    2015-10-01

    Genitopatellar syndrome (GPS) and Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson syndrome (SBBYSS) are two distinct clinically overlapping syndromes caused by de novo heterozygous truncating mutations in the KAT6B gene encoding lysine acetyltransferase 6B, a part of the histone H3 acetyltransferase complex. We describe an 8-year-old girl with a KAT6B mutation and a combined GPS/SBBYSS phenotype. The comparison of this patient with 61 previously published cases with KAT6B mutations and GPS, SBBYSS or combined GPS/SBBYSS phenotypes allowed us to separate the KAT6B mutations into four groups according to their position in the gene (reflecting nonsense mediated RNA decay and protein domains) and their clinical outcome. We suggest that mutations in mid-exon 18 corresponding to the C-terminal end of the acidic (Asp/Glu-rich) domain of KAT6B may have more variable expressivity leading to GPS, SBBYSS or combined phenotypes, in contrast to defects in other regions of the gene which contribute more specifically to either GPS or SBBYSS. Notwithstanding the clinical overlap, our cluster analysis of phenotypes of all known patients with KAT6B mutations supports the existence of two clinical entities, GPS and SBBYSS, as poles within the KAT6B-related disease spectrum. The awareness of these phenomena is important for qualified genetic counselling of patients with KAT6B mutations.

  8. A patient showing features of both SBBYSS and GPS supports the concept of a KAT6B-related disease spectrum, with mutations in mid-exon 18 possibly leading to combined phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Vlckova, Marketa; Simandlova, Martina; Zimmermann, Pavel; Stranecky, Viktor; Hartmannova, Hana; Hodanova, Katerina; Havlovicova, Marketa; Hancarova, Miroslava; Kmoch, Stanislav; Sedlacek, Zdenek

    2015-10-01

    Genitopatellar syndrome (GPS) and Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson syndrome (SBBYSS) are two distinct clinically overlapping syndromes caused by de novo heterozygous truncating mutations in the KAT6B gene encoding lysine acetyltransferase 6B, a part of the histone H3 acetyltransferase complex. We describe an 8-year-old girl with a KAT6B mutation and a combined GPS/SBBYSS phenotype. The comparison of this patient with 61 previously published cases with KAT6B mutations and GPS, SBBYSS or combined GPS/SBBYSS phenotypes allowed us to separate the KAT6B mutations into four groups according to their position in the gene (reflecting nonsense mediated RNA decay and protein domains) and their clinical outcome. We suggest that mutations in mid-exon 18 corresponding to the C-terminal end of the acidic (Asp/Glu-rich) domain of KAT6B may have more variable expressivity leading to GPS, SBBYSS or combined phenotypes, in contrast to defects in other regions of the gene which contribute more specifically to either GPS or SBBYSS. Notwithstanding the clinical overlap, our cluster analysis of phenotypes of all known patients with KAT6B mutations supports the existence of two clinical entities, GPS and SBBYSS, as poles within the KAT6B-related disease spectrum. The awareness of these phenomena is important for qualified genetic counselling of patients with KAT6B mutations. PMID:26370006

  9. Prevalence of Titin Truncating Variants in General Population

    PubMed Central

    Akinrinade, Oyediran; Koskenvuo, Juha W.; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Background Truncating titin (TTN) mutations, especially in A-band region, represent the most common cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Clinical interpretation of these variants can be challenging, as these variants are also present in reference populations. We carried out systematic analyses of TTN truncating variants (TTNtv) in publicly available reference populations, including, for the first time, data from Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). The goal was to establish more accurate estimate of prevalence of different TTNtv to allow better clinical interpretation of these findings. Methods and Results Using data from 1000 Genomes Project, Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and ExAC, we estimated the prevalence of TTNtv in the population. In the three population datasets, 52–54% of TTNtv were not affecting all TTN transcripts. The frequency of truncations affecting all transcripts in ExAC was 0.36% (0.32% - 0.41%, 95% CI) and 0.19% (0.16% - 0.23%, 95% CI) for those affecting the A-band. In the A-band region, the prevalences of frameshift, nonsense and essential splice site variants were 0.057%, 0.090%, and 0.047% respectively. Cga/Tga (arginine/nonsense–R/*) transitional change at CpG mutation hotspots was the most frequent type of TTN nonsense mutation accounting for 91.3% (21/23) of arginine residue nonsense mutation (R/*) at TTN A-band region. Non-essential splice-site variants had significantly lower proportion of private variants and higher proportion of low-frequency variants compared to essential splice-site variants (P = 0.01; P = 5.1 X 10−4, respectively). Conclusion A-band TTNtv are more rare in the general population than previously reported. Based on this analysis, one in 500 carries a truncation in TTN A-band suggesting the penetrance of these potentially harmful variants is still poorly understood, and some of these variants do not manifest as autosomal dominant DCM. This calls for caution when interpreting TTNtv in individuals and families

  10. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F.; Carino, C.

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Ramifications of four concurrent thrombophilic mutations and one hypofibrinolytic mutation.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping; Aregawi, Dawit

    2004-10-01

    A kindred was examined in which the 48-year-old white female proband with three deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary emboli events had four thrombophilic and one hypofibrinolytic mutations, and in which her 14-year-old asymptomatic daughter had four thrombophilic mutations. The proband was heterozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden, G20210A prothrombin, and platelet glycoprotein IIIa PL A1/A2 mutations, had high factor VIII (221%), and was homozygous for the 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene mutation, with high plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (23.7 U/mL). Her 14-year-old daughter was homozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2/A2 mutations, compound heterozygous for the C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations, and heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin mutation, a combination with an estimated likelihood of 1.6 x 10(-7). In 247 white healthy controls, there was no V Leiden homozygosity and no V Leiden-prothrombin gene compound heterozygosity. Heterozygosity for the V Leiden and prothrombin gene mutations was 3.2% and 4.1%, respectively. Homozygosity for the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2A2, PAI-1 gene 4G4G, and C677T MTHFR mutations was 3.2%, 22.7%, and 12%, respectively. The proband will receive anticoagulation therapy for life. Beyond aspirin, avoidance of exogenous estrogens, and enoxaparin prophylaxis during pregnancy, it is not known whether the proband's daughter should have lifelong anticoagulation therapy, or only after her first thrombotic event. PMID:15497023

  12. Perspective on rainbow-ladder truncation

    SciTech Connect

    Eichmann, G.; Alkofer, R.; Krassnigg, A.; Cloeet, I. C.; Roberts, C. D.

    2008-04-15

    Prima facie the systematic implementation of corrections to the rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations will uniformly reduce in magnitude those calculated mass-dimensioned results for pseudoscalar and vector meson properties that are not tightly constrained by symmetries. The aim and interpretation of studies employing rainbow-ladder truncation are reconsidered in this light.

  13. A novel TBX20 loss‑of‑function mutation contributes to adult‑onset dilated cardiomyopathy or congenital atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-Meng; Dai, Xiao-Yong; Huang, Ri-Tai; Xue, Song; Xu, Ying-Jia; Qiu, Xing-Biao; Yang, Yi-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is the most prevalent form of primary cardiomyopathy in humans and is a leading cause of heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Genetic abnormalities have been demonstrated to be a major contributor to the development of DCM. However, DCM is a genetically heterogeneous disease, and the genetic basis underlying DCM in a significant proportion of patients remains unclear. In the current study, the coding exons and splicing junction sites of the T‑Box 20 (TBX20) gene, which encodes a T‑box transcription factor essential for cardiac morphogenesis and structural remodeling, were sequenced in 115 unrelated patients with idiopathic DCM, and a novel heterozygous mutation, p.E143X, was identified in one patient. Genetic analysis of the mutation carrier's pedigree indicated that the nonsense mutation was present in all the living family members with DCM, and also in a female patient with a congenital atrial septal defect. The mutation, which was predicted to generate a truncated protein with only the N‑terminus and a fraction of the T‑box domain remaining, was absent in 800 control chromosomes. Functional assays using a dual‑luciferase reporter assay system revealed that the truncated TBX20 protein had no transcriptional activity in contrast to its wild‑type counterpart. Furthermore, the mutation abolished the synergistic activation between TBX20 and NK2 homeobox 5, or between TBX20 and GATA binding protein 4. The observations of the current study expand the mutation spectrum of TBX20 associated with DCM and congenital heart disease (CHD), which provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM and CHD, suggesting the potential implications for the effective and personalized treatment of these diseases. PMID:27510170

  14. Myo1c mutations associated with hearing loss cause defects in the interaction with nucleotide and actin

    PubMed Central

    Adamek, Nancy; Geeves, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Three heterozygous missense mutations in the motor domain of myosin 1c (Myo1c), which mediates adaptation in the inner ear, are associated with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in humans. With transient kinetic analyses, steady-state ATPase and motility assays, and homology modeling, we studied the interaction of these mutants with nucleotide and actin using a truncated construct, Myo1c1IQ-SAH, which includes an artificial lever arm. Results indicate that mutation R156W, near switch 1, affects the nucleotide-binding pocket and the calcium binding by disrupting switch 1 movement. Mutation V252A, in the K helix of the upper 50 kDa domain, showed reduced actin affinity consistent with disruption of communication between the actin- and nucleotide-binding sites. T380M, in a Myo1c-specific insert in the HO linker, displayed aberrant changes in most kinetic parameters and uncoupling of the ATPase from motility. These data allow for an interpretation of how these mutations might affect adaptation. PMID:20640478

  15. A novel IRF6 nonsense mutation (Y67X) in a German family with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Sibylle; Baur, Manuela; Blin, Nikolaus; Reinert, Siegmar; Pfister, Markus

    2007-07-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is the most common type of syndromic orofacial cleft, which accounts for approximately 2% of all cleft lip and palate cases. It is characterised by variable association of lower lip pits, cleft lip and cleft palate, and hypodontia. VWS arises as the result of mutations in the gene encoding interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6). The disorder is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Very recently, mutations of the IRF6 gene in exons 2-9 have been found in VWS patients, suggesting that this gene plays an important role in orofacial development. We report a novel mutation of the IRF6 gene in a German family. Five out of the 12 persons affected were able to be investigated. The mutation produced a stop codon within exon 4 of the IRF6 gene. All 5 patients were heterozygous for a base substitution c.201C>A changing the tyrosine codon at amino acid position 67 into a stop codon (p.Y67X) in exon 4. The premature stop codon was responsible for a truncated protein lacking parts of the DNA- binding domain and the complete Smad-interferon regulatory factor-binding domain probably essential for interactions with the Smad transcription factors. PMID:17549393

  16. Structural and functional mutations of the perlecan gene cause Schwartz-Jampel syndrome, with myotonic myopathy and chondrodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Le, Alexander H; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ho, Nicola C; Francomano, Clair A; Govindraj, Prasanthi; Hassell, John R; Devaney, Joseph M; Spranger, Jürgen; Stevenson, Roger E; Iannaccone, Susan; Dalakas, Marinos C; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2002-05-01

    Perlecan, a large heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a component of the basement membrane and other extracellular matrices and has been implicated in multiple biological functions. Mutations in the perlecan gene (HSPG2) cause two classes of skeletal disorders: the relatively mild Schwartz-Jampel syndrome (SJS) and severe neonatal lethal dyssegmental dysplasia, Silverman-Handmaker type (DDSH). SJS is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by varying degrees of myotonia and chondrodysplasia, and patients with SJS survive. The molecular mechanism underlying the chondrodystrophic myotonia phenotype of SJS is unknown. In the present report, we identify five different mutations that resulted in various forms of perlecan in three unrelated patients with SJS. Heterozygous mutations in two patients with SJS either produced truncated perlecan that lacked domain V or significantly reduced levels of wild-type perlecan. The third patient had a homozygous 7-kb deletion that resulted in reduced amounts of nearly full-length perlecan. Unlike DDSH, the SJS mutations result in different forms of perlecan in reduced levels that are secreted to the extracellular matrix and are likely partially functional. These findings suggest that perlecan has an important role in neuromuscular function and cartilage formation, and they define the molecular basis involved in the difference in the phenotypic severity between DDSH and SJS.

  17. Biallelic RFX6 mutations can cause childhood as well as neonatal onset diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Francis H; Kirel, Birgül; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana; Flanagan, Sarah E; Hattersley, Andrew T; Ellard, Sian; Shaw-Smith, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diabetes is a highly genetically heterogeneous disorder. There are over 20 distinct syndromic and non-syndromic forms, including dominant, recessive and X-linked subtypes. Biallelic truncating or mis-sense mutations in the DNA-binding domain of the RFX6 transcription factor cause an autosomal recessive, syndromic form of neonatal diabetes previously described as Mitchell–Riley syndrome. In all, eight cases have been reported, with the age at onset of diabetes in the first 2 weeks of life. Here we report two individuals born to double first cousins in whom intestinal atresias consistent with a diagnosis of Mitchell–Riley syndrome were diagnosed at birth, but in whom diabetes did not present until the ages of 3 and 6 years. Novel compound heterozygous RFX6 nonsense mutations (p.Arg726X/p.Arg866X) were identified at the 3′ end of the gene. The later onset of diabetes in these patients may be due to incomplete inactivation of RFX6. Genetic testing for RFX6 mutations should be considered in patients presenting with intestinal atresias in the absence of neonatal diabetes. PMID:26264437

  18. Novel GATA6 mutations in patients with pancreatic agenesis and congenital heart malformations.

    PubMed

    Chao, Christina S; McKnight, Kristen D; Cox, Kenneth L; Chang, Anne L; Kim, Seung K; Feldman, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic agenesis are born without a pancreas, causing permanent neonatal diabetes and pancreatic enzyme insufficiency. These patients require insulin and enzyme replacement therapy to survive, grow, and maintain normal blood glucose levels. Pancreatic agenesis is an uncommon condition but high-throughput sequencing methods provide a rare opportunity to identify critical genes that are necessary for human pancreas development. Here we present the clinical history, evaluation, and the genetic and molecular analysis from two patients with pancreatic agenesis. Both patients were born with intrauterine growth restriction, minor heart defects and neonatal diabetes. In both cases, pancreatic agenesis was confirmed by imaging studies. The patients are clinically stable with pancreatic enzymes and insulin therapy. In order identify the etiology for their disease, we performed whole exome sequencing on both patients. For each proband we identified a de novo heterozygous mutation in the GATA6 gene. GATA6 is a homeobox containing transcription factor involved in both early development of the pancreas and heart. In vitro functional analysis of one of the variants revealed that the mutation creates a premature stop codon in the coding sequence resulting in the production of a truncated protein with loss of activity. These results show how genetic mutations in GATA6 may lead to functional inactivity and pancreatic agenesis in humans. PMID:25706805

  19. A novel mutation in the GCM2 gene causing severe congenital isolated hypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Daniel; Kirwin, Susan M.; Sol-Church, Katia; Levine, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the GCM2 gene in three siblings with congenital hypoparathyroidism and perform functional analysis. Materials and methods We sequenced the GCM2 gene by PCR and analyzed the functional consequence of the mutation by transient transfection studies. Haplotype analysis was performed. Results We identified a nucleotide change, c.408C>A, in exon 3 that is predicted to truncate the Gcm2 protein (p.Tyr136Ter). All three affected siblings were homozygous and both parents were heterozygous for the mutation. Transfection studies revealed the mutant mRNA but not expression of the Gcm2 protein. Haplotype analysis revealed that the two mutant GCM2 alleles shared genotypes on chromosome 6p24.2. Conclusions We describe the first GCM2 mutation in exon 3 in patients with severe congenital hypoparathyroidism. Informative genetic markers could not exclude identity by descent for the mutant alleles. Gcm2 protein was not detected after transfection, suggesting that complete lack of Gcm2 action accounts for severe hypoparathyroidism. PMID:23155703

  20. A novel recessive 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase mutation in a family with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Erken, Eren; Köroğlu, Çiğdem; Yıldız, Fatih; Özer, Hüseyin T E; Gülek, Bozkurt; Tolun, Aslıhan

    2015-03-01

    We present two PHO siblings having a novel homozygous truncating mutation in HPGD. The purpose of the study was to attempt medical treatment, and to find the HPGD mutation causing the disease, in a 22-year old Turkish male and his 23-year old sister afflicted with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO). In combination with NSAIDs and colchicine, treatment with sulfasalazine was started in both cases, and methotrexate was added to the treatment regimen of the female patient at the end of the first year. The patients were found to be typical PHO. Ultrasonographic examination of the joints revealed synovitis and inflammation by B mode and power Doppler ultrasonography. Joint symptoms responded to sulfasalazine treatment in both patients. However, after the addition of methotrexate, the female patient had better remission. All exons of HPGD, the known disease gene, were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. A homozygous 2-bp deletion (c.310_311delCT or p.L104AfsX3) was identified. Seven relatives carrying the mutation in the heterozygous state were examined and none was found affected. Although not specific for this disease, skin, soft tissue and joint ultrasonography can be helpful for evaluation of the musculoskeletal findings in the patients. PMID:24533558

  1. Identification of the First ATRIP–Deficient Patient and Novel Mutations in ATR Define a Clinical Spectrum for ATR–ATRIP Seckel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stiff, Tom; Hobson, Emma; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Carpenter, Gillian; Prescott, Katrina; Suri, Mohnish; Byrd, Philip J.; Matsuse, Michiko; Mitsutake, Norisato; Nakazawa, Yuka; Vasudevan, Pradeep; Barrow, Margaret; Stewart, Grant S.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A.

    2012-01-01

    A homozygous mutational change in the Ataxia-Telangiectasia and RAD3 related (ATR) gene was previously reported in two related families displaying Seckel Syndrome (SS). Here, we provide the first identification of a Seckel Syndrome patient with mutations in ATRIP, the gene encoding ATR–Interacting Protein (ATRIP), the partner protein of ATR required for ATR stability and recruitment to the site of DNA damage. The patient has compound heterozygous mutations in ATRIP resulting in reduced ATRIP and ATR expression. A nonsense mutational change in one ATRIP allele results in a C-terminal truncated protein, which impairs ATR–ATRIP interaction; the other allele is abnormally spliced. We additionally describe two further unrelated patients native to the UK with the same novel, heterozygous mutations in ATR, which cause dramatically reduced ATR expression. All patient-derived cells showed defective DNA damage responses that can be attributed to impaired ATR–ATRIP function. Seckel Syndrome is characterised by microcephaly and growth delay, features also displayed by several related disorders including Majewski (microcephalic) osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism (MOPD) type II and Meier-Gorlin Syndrome (MGS). The identification of an ATRIP–deficient patient provides a novel genetic defect for Seckel Syndrome. Coupled with the identification of further ATR–deficient patients, our findings allow a spectrum of clinical features that can be ascribed to the ATR–ATRIP deficient sub-class of Seckel Syndrome. ATR–ATRIP patients are characterised by extremely severe microcephaly and growth delay, microtia (small ears), micrognathia (small and receding chin), and dental crowding. While aberrant bone development was mild in the original ATR–SS patient, some of the patients described here display skeletal abnormalities including, in one patient, small patellae, a feature characteristically observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome. Collectively, our analysis exposes an

  2. FAK-heterozygous mice display enhanced tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kostourou, Vassiliki; Lechertier, Tanguy; Reynolds, Louise E.; Lees, Delphine M.; Baker, Marianne; Jones, Dylan T.; Tavora, Bernardo; Ramjaun, Antoine R.; Birdsey, Graeme M.; Robinson, Stephen D.; Parsons, Maddy; Randi, Anna M.; Hart, Ian R; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic ablation of endothelial Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) can inhibit pathological angiogenesis, suggesting that loss of endothelial FAK is sufficient to reduce neovascularisation. Here we show that reduced stromal-FAK expression in FAK-heterozygous mice unexpectedly enhances both B16F0 and CMT19T tumour growth and angiogenesis. We further demonstrate that cell proliferation and microvessel sprouting, but not migration, are increased in serum-stimulated FAK-heterozygous endothelial cells. FAK-heterozygous endothelial cells display an imbalance in FAK phosphorylation at pY397 and pY861 without changes in Pyk2 or Erk1/2 activity. By contrast, serum-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt is enhanced in FAK-heterozygous endothelial cells and these cells are more sensitive to Akt inhibition. Additionally, low doses of a pharmacological FAK inhibitor, although too low to affect FAK autophosphorylation in vitro, can enhance angiogenesis ex vivo and tumor growth in vivo. Our results highlight a potential novel role for FAK as a non-linear, dose-dependent regulator of angiogenesis where heterozygous levels of FAK enhance angiogenesis. PMID:23799510

  3. Experiences of Being Heterozygous for Fabry Disease: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan C; Harris, Anna; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the experiences of women with Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to explore women's experiences of being heterozygous for Fabry disease. We used an explorative qualitative study design and selected ten Norwegian women who were known heterozygous for Fabry disease to participate. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and analyzed the interviews using inductive thematic analysis. We found that learning about one's heterozygous status may be devastating for some. However, for most of the participants, heterozygous status, as well as doctors' acceptance of symptoms in women heterozygous for Fabry disease, provided an explanation and relief. Although many women did not consider themselves ill, they wished to be acknowledged as more than "just carriers." The participants were grateful for enzyme replacement therapy, although it had its burdens regarding time, planning, and absences from school or work. Women with Fabry disease felt that the lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals about Fabry disease was frustrating and worrisome. These findings suggest that healthcare professionals should acknowledge the different ways women react to their diagnosis, and be aware of the personal costs of receiving treatment. PMID:26948256

  4. Experiences of Being Heterozygous for Fabry Disease: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan C; Harris, Anna; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the experiences of women with Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to explore women's experiences of being heterozygous for Fabry disease. We used an explorative qualitative study design and selected ten Norwegian women who were known heterozygous for Fabry disease to participate. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and analyzed the interviews using inductive thematic analysis. We found that learning about one's heterozygous status may be devastating for some. However, for most of the participants, heterozygous status, as well as doctors' acceptance of symptoms in women heterozygous for Fabry disease, provided an explanation and relief. Although many women did not consider themselves ill, they wished to be acknowledged as more than "just carriers." The participants were grateful for enzyme replacement therapy, although it had its burdens regarding time, planning, and absences from school or work. Women with Fabry disease felt that the lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals about Fabry disease was frustrating and worrisome. These findings suggest that healthcare professionals should acknowledge the different ways women react to their diagnosis, and be aware of the personal costs of receiving treatment.

  5. Immature truncated O-glycophenotype of cancer directly induces oncogenic features

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Dabelsteen, Sally; Madsen, Frey Brus; Francavilla, Chiara; Kopp, Katharina L.; Steentoft, Catharina; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Hansen, Lars; Bennett, Eric P.; Woetmann, Anders; Yin, Guangliang; Chen, Longyun; Song, Haiyan; Bak, Mads; Hlady, Ryan A.; Peters, Staci L.; Opavsky, Rene; Thode, Christenze; Qvortrup, Klaus; Schjoldager, Katrine T.-B. G.; Clausen, Henrik; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of immature truncated O-glycans is a characteristic feature observed on virtually all epithelial cancer cells, and a very high frequency is observed in early epithelial premalignant lesions that precede the development of adenocarcinomas. Expression of the truncated O-glycan structures Tn and sialyl-Tn is strongly associated with poor prognosis and overall low survival. The genetic and biosynthetic mechanisms leading to accumulation of truncated O-glycans are not fully understood and include mutation or dysregulation of glycosyltransferases involved in elongation of O-glycans, as well as relocation of glycosyltransferases controlling initiation of O-glycosylation from Golgi to endoplasmic reticulum. Truncated O-glycans have been proposed to play functional roles for cancer-cell invasiveness, but our understanding of the biological functions of aberrant glycosylation in cancer is still highly limited. Here, we used exome sequencing of most glycosyltransferases in a large series of primary and metastatic pancreatic cancers to rule out somatic mutations as a cause of expression of truncated O-glycans. Instead, we found hypermethylation of core 1 β3-Gal-T-specific molecular chaperone, a key chaperone for O-glycan elongation, as the most prevalent cause. We next used gene editing to produce isogenic cell systems with and without homogenous truncated O-glycans that enabled, to our knowledge, the first polyomic and side-by-side evaluation of the cancer O-glycophenotype in an organotypic tissue model and in xenografts. The results strongly suggest that truncation of O-glycans directly induces oncogenic features of cell growth and invasion. The study provides support for targeting cancer-specific truncated O-glycans with immunotherapeutic measures. PMID:25118277

  6. Mutation analysis in patients with Wilson disease: identification of 4 novel mutations. Mutation in brief no. 250. Online.

    PubMed

    Haas, R; Gutierrez-Rivero, B; Knoche, J; Böker, K; Manns, M P; Schmidt, H H

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain novel mutations in the recently discovered Wilson disease gene, we screened 5 unrelated German individuals for mutations in the 21 exons and their flanking intronic sequences. We detected 9 mutations affecting the Wilson disease gene. Four of those, designated 802-808delTGTAAGT, 2008-2013delTATATG, Cys985Thr, and Ile1148Thr have not yet been reported. One patient had a homozygous mutation whereas the remaining four subjects were compound heterozygous. Therefore these data confirm, that mutations causing Wilson disease are frequently found in affected subjects and they are very heterogenous. PMID:10447265

  7. Distal myopathy with coexisting heterozygous TIA1 and MYH7 Variants.

    PubMed

    Brand, Patricio; Dyck, P James B; Liu, Jie; Berini, Sarah; Selcen, Duygu; Milone, Margherita

    2016-08-01

    TIA1 mutations cause Welander distal myopathy. MYH7 mutations result in various clinical phenotypes, including Laing distal myopathy and cardiomyopathy. We describe a family with coexisting TIA1 and MYH7 variants. The proband is a 67-year-old woman with easy tripping since childhood and progressive asymmetric distal limb weakness, but no cardiac involvement. Muscle biopsy showed rare rimmed vacuoles, minicore-like structures and congophilic inclusions. Her 66-year-old sister has a mild distal myopathy, supraventricular tachycardia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Both sisters carry the only known pathogenic TIA1 mutation and a heterozygous MYH7 variant (c.5459G > A; p.Arg1820Gln). Another sibling with isolated distal myopathy carries only the TIA1 mutation. MYH7 p.Arg1820Gln involves a highly conserved residue and is predicted to be deleterious. Furthermore, the proband's childhood-onset distal leg weakness and sister's cardiomyopathy suggest that MYH7 p.Arg1820Gln likely affects function, favoring a digenic etiology of the myopathy. PMID:27282841

  8. A novel heterozygous deletion in the EVC2 gene causes Weyers acrofacial dysostosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoqian; Song, Guangtai; Fan, Mingwen; Shi, Lisong; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Huang, Shangzhi; Guo, Ruiqiang; Bian, Zhuan

    2006-03-01

    Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (MIM 193530) is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy and dysplastic teeth. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, MIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a similar, but more severe phenotype. Mutations in the EVC have been identified in both syndromes. However, the EVC mutations only occur in a small proportion of EvC patients. Recently, mutations in a new gene, EVC2, were found to be associated with other EvC cases. The EVC and EVC2 are located close to each other in a head-to-head configuration and may be functionally related. In this study, we report identification of a novel heterozygous deletion in the EVC2 that is responsible for autosomal dominant Weyers acrofacial dysostosis in a large Chinese family. This constitutes the first report of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis caused by this gene. Hence, the spectrum of malformation syndromes due to EVC2 mutations is further extended. Our data provides conclusive evidence that Weyers acrofacial dysostosis and EvC syndrome are allelic and genetically heterogeneous conditions.

  9. Molecular analysis of the PAX6 gene in Mexican patients with congenital aniridia: report of four novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Villarroel, Camilo E.; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina; Orozco, Lorena; Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel Angel; Jiménez, Diana F.; Ordaz, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Paired box gene 6 (PAX6) heterozygous mutations are well known to cause congenital non-syndromic aniridia. These mutations produce primarily protein truncations and have been identified in approximately 40%–80% of all aniridia cases worldwide. In Mexico, there is only one previous report describing three intragenic deletions in five cases. In this study, we further analyze PAX6 variants in a group of Mexican aniridia patients and describe associated ocular findings. Methods We evaluated 30 nonrelated probands from two referral hospitals. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing, and novel missense mutations and intronic changes were analyzed by in silico analysis. One intronic variation (IVS2+9G>A), which in silico analysis suggested had no pathological effects, was searched in 103 unaffected controls. Results Almost all cases exhibited phenotypes that were at the severe end of the aniridia spectrum with associated ocular alterations such as nystagmus, macular hypoplasia, and congenital cataracts. The mutation detection rate was 30%. Eight different mutations were identified: four (c.184_188dupGAGAC, c.361T>C, c.879dupC, and c.277G>A) were novel, and four (c.969C>T, IVS6+1G>C, c.853delC, and IVS7–2A>G) have been previously reported. The substitution at position 969 was observed in two patients. None of the intragenic deletions previously reported in Mexican patients were found. Most of the mutations detected predict either truncation of the PAX6 protein or conservative amino acid changes in the paired domain. We also detected two intronic non-pathogenic variations, IVS9–12C>T and IVS2+9G>A, that had been previously reported. Because the latter variation was considered potentially pathogenic, it was analyzed in 103 healthy Mexican newborns where we found an allelic frequency of 0.1116 for the A allele. Conclusions This study adds four novel mutations to the worldwide PAX6 mutational spectrum, and

  10. Novel Mutations Causing C5 Deficiency in Three North-African Families.

    PubMed

    Colobran, Roger; Franco-Jarava, Clara; Martín-Nalda, Andrea; Baena, Neus; Gabau, Elisabeth; Padilla, Natàlia; de la Cruz, Xavier; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo; Comas, David; Soler-Palacín, Pere; Hernández-González, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    The complement system plays a central role in defense to encapsulated bacteria through opsonization and membrane attack complex (MAC) dependent lysis. The three activation pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) converge in the cleavage of C5, which initiates MAC formation and target lysis. C5 deficiency is associated to recurrent infections by Neisseria spp. In the present study, complement deficiency was suspected in three families of North-African origin after one episode of invasive meningitis due to a non-groupable and two uncommon Meningococcal serotypes (E29, Y). Activity of alternative and classical pathways of complement were markedly reduced and the measurement of terminal complement components revealed total C5 absence. C5 gene analysis revealed two novel mutations as causative of the deficiency: Family A propositus carried a homozygous deletion of two adenines in the exon 21 of C5 gene, resulting in a frameshift and a truncated protein (c.2607_2608del/p.Ser870ProfsX3 mutation). Families B and C probands carried the same homozygous deletion of three consecutive nucleotides (CAA) in exon 9 of the C5 gene, leading to the deletion of asparagine 320 (c.960_962del/p.Asn320del mutation). Family studies confirmed an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Although sharing the same geographical origin, families B and C were unrelated. This prompted us to investigate this mutation prevalence in a cohort of 768 North-African healthy individuals. We identified one heterozygous carrier of the p.Asn320del mutation (allelic frequency = 0.065 %), indicating that this mutation is present at low frequency in North-African population.

  11. LGI2 Truncation Causes a Remitting Focal Epilepsy in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Jokinen, Tarja S.; Fukata, Masaki; Fukata, Yuko; Webster, Matthew T.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Kilpinen, Sami K.; Steffen, Frank; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Leeb, Tosso; Eklund, Ranja; Zhao, Xiaochu; Rilstone, Jennifer J.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Minassian, Berge A.; Lohi, Hannes

    2011-01-01

    One quadrillion synapses are laid in the first two years of postnatal construction of the human brain, which are then pruned until age 10 to 500 trillion synapses composing the final network. Genetic epilepsies are the most common neurological diseases with onset during pruning, affecting 0.5% of 2–10-year-old children, and these epilepsies are often characterized by spontaneous remission. We previously described a remitting epilepsy in the Lagotto romagnolo canine breed. Here, we identify the gene defect and affected neurochemical pathway. We reconstructed a large Lagotto pedigree of around 34 affected animals. Using genome-wide association in 11 discordant sib-pairs from this pedigree, we mapped the disease locus to a 1.7 Mb region of homozygosity in chromosome 3 where we identified a protein-truncating mutation in the Lgi2 gene, a homologue of the human epilepsy gene LGI1. We show that LGI2, like LGI1, is neuronally secreted and acts on metalloproteinase-lacking members of the ADAM family of neuronal receptors, which function in synapse remodeling, and that LGI2 truncation, like LGI1 truncations, prevents secretion and ADAM interaction. The resulting epilepsy onsets at around seven weeks (equivalent to human two years), and remits by four months (human eight years), versus onset after age eight in the majority of human patients with LGI1 mutations. Finally, we show that Lgi2 is expressed highly in the immediate post-natal period until halfway through pruning, unlike Lgi1, which is expressed in the latter part of pruning and beyond. LGI2 acts at least in part through the same ADAM receptors as LGI1, but earlier, ensuring electrical stability (absence of epilepsy) during pruning years, preceding this same function performed by LGI1 in later years. LGI2 should be considered a candidate gene for common remitting childhood epilepsies, and LGI2-to-LGI1 transition for mechanisms of childhood epilepsy remission. PMID:21829378

  12. Living-Donor Liver Transplantation From a Heterozygous Parent for Infantile Refsum Disease.

    PubMed

    Matsunami, Masatoshi; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Fukuda, Akinari; Kumagai, Tadayuki; Kubota, Masaya; Chong, Pin Fee; Kasahara, Mureo

    2016-06-01

    Infantile Refsum disease (IRD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of peroxisome biogenesis characterized by generalized peroxisomal metabolic dysfunction, including accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) and phytanic acid (PA), as well as decreased plasmalogen contents (PL). An effective therapy for this intractable disease has not been established, and only supportive management with docosahexaenoic acid supplementation and low PA diet has been reported so far. A boy of 3 years and 8 months presented with facial dysmorphism, transaminitis, and psychomotor retardation. Biochemical analysis showed elevated PA and VLCFAs, with reduced PL in the serum. Immunofluorescence study of fibroblasts from the patient indicated a mosaic pattern of catalase-positive and -negative particles, and molecular analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutations of PEX6 The failure of medical management to prevent the progression of clinical symptoms and abnormal biochemistry prompted us to consider liver transplantation (LT). With the chances of receiving a deceased donor liver being poor, we performed a living-donor LT from the patient's heterozygous mother. At 6-month follow-up, the patient's serum PA levels had normalized. VLCFAs and PL levels had declined and increased, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case in which IRD was treated by living-donor LT by using a heterozygous donor. Only long-term follow-up will reveal if there is any clinical improvement in the present case. With the liver being a major site for peroxisomal pathways, its replacement by LT may work as a form of partial enzyme therapy for patients with IRD.

  13. Germline Heterozygous Variants in SEC23B Are Associated with Cowden Syndrome and Enriched in Apparently Sporadic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Lamis; Niazi, Farshad; Ni, Ying; Ngeow, Joanne; Sankunny, Madhav; Liu, Zhigang; Wei, Wei; Mester, Jessica L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Zhang, Bin; Eng, Charis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-predisposing genes associated with inherited cancer syndromes help explain mechanisms of sporadic carcinogenesis and often inform normal development. Cowden syndrome (CS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by high lifetime risks of epithelial cancers, such that ∼50% of affected individuals are wild-type for known cancer-predisposing genes. Using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of a multi-generation CS family affected by thyroid and other cancers, we identified a pathogenic missense heterozygous SEC23B variant (c.1781T>G [p.Val594Gly]) that segregates with the phenotype. We also found germline heterozygous SEC23B variants in 3/96 (3%) unrelated mutation-negative CS probands with thyroid cancer and in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), representing apparently sporadic cancers. We note that the TCGA thyroid cancer dataset is enriched with unique germline deleterious SEC23B variants associated with a significantly younger age of onset. SEC23B encodes Sec23 homolog B (S. cerevisiae), a component of coat protein complex II (COPII), which transports proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus. Interestingly, germline homozygous or compound-heterozygous SEC23B mutations cause an unrelated disorder, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, and SEC23B-deficient mice suffer from secretory organ degeneration due to ER-stress-associated apoptosis. By characterizing the p.Val594Gly variant in a normal thyroid cell line, we show that it is a functional alteration that results in ER-stress-mediated cell-colony formation and survival, growth, and invasion, which reflect aspects of a cancer phenotype. Our findings suggest a different role for SEC23B, whereby germline heterozygous variants associate with cancer predisposition potentially mediated by ER stress “addiction.” PMID:26522472

  14. Truncated Moment Analysis of Nucleon Structure Functions

    SciTech Connect

    A. Psaker; W. Melnitchouk; M. E. Christy; C. E. Keppel

    2007-11-16

    We employ a novel new approach using "truncated" moments, or integrals of structure functions over restricted regions of x, to study local quark-hadron duality, and the degree to which individual resonance regions are dominated by leading twists. Because truncated moments obey the same Q^2 evolution equations as the leading twist parton distributions, this approach makes possible for the first time a description of resonance region data and the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality directly from QCD.

  15. Separation of roles of Zip1 in meiosis revealed in heterozygous mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klutstein, Michael; Xaver, Martin; Shemesh, Ronen; Zenvirth, Drora; Klein, Franz; Simchen, Giora

    2009-11-01

    Synapsis of homologs during meiotic prophase I is associated with a protein complex built along the bivalents--the synaptonemal complex (SC). Mutations in the SC-component gene ZIP1 diminish SC formation, leading to reduced recombination levels and low spore viability. Here we show that in SK1 strains heterozygous for a deletion of ZIP1 in certain regions meiotic interference are impaired with no decrease in recombination levels. The extent of synapsis is over all reduced and NDJ levels of a large endogenous chromosome and of artificial chromosomes (YACs) rise to twice the level of wild type strains. A substantial proportion of mis-segregating YACs had undergone crossing over. This demonstrates that different functions of Zip1 display differential sensitivities to changes in expression levels. PMID:19714362

  16. Cysteamine treatment ameliorates alterations in GAD67 expression and spatial memory in heterozygous reeler mice.

    PubMed

    Kutiyanawalla, Ammar; Promsote, Wanwisa; Terry, Alvin; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2012-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling through its receptor, TrkB is known to regulate GABAergic function and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 expression in neurons. Alterations in BDNF signalling have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and as a result, they are a potential therapeutic target. Interestingly, heterozygous reeler mice (HRM) have decreased GAD67 expression in the frontal cortex and hippocampus and they exhibit many behavioural and neurochemical abnormalities similar to schizophrenia. In this study, we evaluated the potential of cysteamine, a neuroprotective compound to improve the deficits in GAD67 expression and cognitive function in HRM. We found that cysteamine administration (150 mg/kg.d, through drinking water) for 30 d significantly ameliorated the decreases in GAD67, mature BDNF and full-length TrkB protein levels found in frontal cortex and hippocampus of HRM. A significant attenuation of the increased levels of truncated BDNF in frontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as truncated TrkB in frontal cortex of HRM was also observed following cysteamine treatment. In behavioural studies, HRM were impaired in a Y-maze spatial recognition memory task, but not in a spontaneous alternation task or a sensorimotor, prepulse inhibition (PPI) procedure. Cysteamine improved Y-maze spatial recognition in HRM to the level of wide-type controls and it improved PPI in both wild-type and HRM. Finally, mice deficient in TrkB, showed a reduced response to cysteamine in GAD67 expression suggesting that TrkB signalling plays an important role in GAD67 regulation by cysteamine.

  17. [Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sumangali Chandra; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Bygum, Anette

    2011-02-14

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is a common genetic skin disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1:250 caused by mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin. This disorder manifests itself within the first year of life and is clinically characterized by dry, scaly skin, keratosis pilaris, palmar hyperlinearity and atopic manifestations. Patients with a severe phenotype are homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations, whereas heterozygous patients show mild disease, suggesting semidominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. We present a patient with classic severe ichthyosis vulgaris, atopic eczema and two loss-of-function mutations.

  18. A COL7A1 Mutation Causes Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa in Rotes Höhenvieh Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Menoud, Annie; Welle, Monika; Tetens, Jens; Lichtner, Peter; Drögemüller, Cord

    2012-01-01

    We identified a congenital mechanobullous skin disorder in six calves on a single farm of an endangered German cattle breed in 2010. The condition presented as a large loss of skin distal to the fetlocks and at the mucosa of the muzzle. All affected calves were euthanized on humane grounds due to the severity, extent and progression of the skin and oral lesions. Examination of skin samples under light microscopy revealed detachment of the epidermis from the dermis at the level of the dermo epidermal junction, leading to the diagnosis of a subepidermal bullous dermatosis such as epidermolysis bullosa. The pedigree was consistent with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the causative mutation to an 18 Mb interval on chromosome 22 by homozygosity mapping. The COL7A1 gene encoding collagen type VII alpha 1 is located within this interval and COL7A1 mutations have been shown to cause inherited dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) in humans. A SNP in the bovine COL7A1 exon 49 (c.4756C>T) was perfectly associated with the observed disease. The homozygous mutant T/T genotype was exclusively present in affected calves and their parents were heterozygous C/T confirming the assumed recessive mode of inheritance. All known cases and genotyped carriers were related to a single cow, which is supposed to be the founder animal. The mutant T allele was absent in 63 animals from 24 cattle breeds. The identified mutation causes a premature stop codon which leads to a truncated protein representing a complete loss of COL7A1 function (p.R1586*). We thus have identified a candidate causative mutation for this genetic disease using only three cases to unravel its molecular basis. Selection against this mutation can now be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the Rotes Höhenvieh breed. PMID:22715415

  19. Biological insights into BRAFV600 mutations in melanoma patient

    PubMed Central

    Improta, Giuseppina; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Tamborini, Elena; Donia, Marco; Santinami, Mario; de Braud, Filippo; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Some experimental evidence indicates that uncommon BRAF mutations consisting in the substitution of 2 adjacent nucleotides within codon 600 are in a cis configuration and associate with BRAF gene amplification. These findings suggest that BRAFV600 mutations are unlikely to occur as homozygous alterations in clinical melanoma samples, with gene amplification perhaps contributing to mask the heterozygous state. PMID:24179707

  20. Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin 20210A Mutations among Turkish Pediatric Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Dilara Fatma; Sipahi, Kadir; Kayaalp, Tuğba; Eğin, Yonca; Taşdelen, Serpil; Kürekçi, Emin; Ezer, Üstün; Akar, Nejat

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of the Factor V 1691 G-A and PT 20210 G-A mutations in Turkish children with leukemia. We genotyped 135 pediatric leukemia patients with for these mutations. Eleven (8%) of the 135 patients were heterozygous for the FV 1691 G-A mutation. Seven (5,1%) of the patients carried the PT 20210 G-A heterozygous mutation. Of the 135 patients, only three had thrombotic event, none of which had these two mutations, which is common in Turkish population. Our findings revealed a controversial compared to the previous reports, which needs further investigation. PMID:23198154

  1. Molecular bases of dominant negative and loss of function mutations at the murine c-kit/white spotting locus: W37, Wv, W41 and W.

    PubMed Central

    Nocka, K; Tan, J C; Chiu, E; Chu, T Y; Ray, P; Traktman, P; Besmer, P

    1990-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-kit encodes a transmembrane tyrosine protein kinase receptor for an unknown ligand and is allelic with the murine white-spotting locus (W). Mutations at the W locus affect various aspects of hematopoiesis, the proliferation and migration of primordial germ cells and melanoblasts during development. The original W mutation and W37 are severe lethal mutations when homozygous. In the heterozygous state the W mutation has a weak phenotype while W37 has dominant characteristics. Wv and W41 are weak W mutations with dominant characteristics. We have characterized the molecular basis of these four W mutations and determined their effects on mast cell differentiation by using a fibroblast/mast cell co-culture assay. We show that W37, Wv and W41 are the result of missense mutations in the kinase domain of the c-kit coding sequence (W37 E----K at position 582; Wv T----M position 660 and W41 V----M position 831), which affect the c-kit associated tyrosine kinase to varying degrees. The c-kit protein products in homozygous mutant mast cells are expressed normally, although the 160 kd cell membrane form of the c-kitW37 protein displays accelerated turnover characteristics. The W mutation is the result of a 78 amino acid deletion which includes the transmembrane domain of the c-kit protein. A 125 kd c-kit protein was detected in homozygous W/W mast cells which lacks kinase activity and is not expressed on the cell surface.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:1693331

  2. Thalassemia Intermedia Caused by 16p13.3 Sectional Duplication in a β-Thalassemia Heterozygous Child.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Jiang, Hua; Wu, Man-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Ling; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia intermedia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by a significant genetic and clinical heterogeneity. A wide spectrum of different genotypes-homozygous, heterozygous, and compound heterozygous-have been found to be responsible for it. The authors describe a Chinese child of β-thalassemia heterozygote with the mutation IVS2-654 (C→T) (HBB:c.316-197C→T) presenting with severe thalassemia intermedia. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of the α gene cluster revealed an approximate 146-kb duplication at 16p13.3 including the complete α gene cluster. The duplicated allele and the normal allele in trans result in a total of 6 active α genes. The severe clinical phenotype seemed to be related to the considerable excess of the α-globin and the β-globin deficit caused by the presence of the β-thalassemia. The α gene duplication should be considered in patients heterozygous for β-thalassemia who show a more severe phenotype than β-thalassemia trait.

  3. Allelic Mutations of KITLG, Encoding KIT Ligand, Cause Asymmetric and Unilateral Hearing Loss and Waardenburg Syndrome Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Zazo Seco, Celia; Serrão de Castro, Luciana; van Nierop, Josephine W.; Morín, Matías; Jhangiani, Shalini; Verver, Eva J.J.; Schraders, Margit; Maiwald, Nadine; Wesdorp, Mieke; Venselaar, Hanka; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Oostrik, Jaap; Schoots, Jeroen; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Insenser, María; Admiraal, Ronald J.C.; Pennings, Ronald J.E.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Arias-Vásquez, Alejandro; de Ligt, Joep; Yntema, Helger G.; Jansen, Joop H.; Muzny, Donna M.; Huls, Gerwin; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Lupski, James R.; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel Angel; Kunst, Henricus P.M.; Kremer, Hannie

    2015-01-01

    Linkage analysis combined with whole-exome sequencing in a large family with congenital and stable non-syndromic unilateral and asymmetric hearing loss (NS-UHL/AHL) revealed a heterozygous truncating mutation, c.286_303delinsT (p.Ser96Ter), in KITLG. This mutation co-segregated with NS-UHL/AHL as a dominant trait with reduced penetrance. By screening a panel of probands with NS-UHL/AHL, we found an additional mutation, c.200_202del (p.His67_Cys68delinsArg). In vitro studies revealed that the p.His67_Cys68delinsArg transmembrane isoform of KITLG is not detectable at the cell membrane, supporting pathogenicity. KITLG encodes a ligand for the KIT receptor. Also, KITLG-KIT signaling and MITF are suggested to mutually interact in melanocyte development. Because mutations in MITF are causative of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2), we screened KITLG in suspected WS2-affected probands. A heterozygous missense mutation, c.310C>G (p.Leu104Val), that segregated with WS2 was identified in a small family. In vitro studies revealed that the p.Leu104Val transmembrane isoform of KITLG is located at the cell membrane, as is wild-type KITLG. However, in culture media of transfected cells, the p.Leu104Val soluble isoform of KITLG was reduced, and no soluble p.His67_Cys68delinsArg and p.Ser96Ter KITLG could be detected. These data suggest that mutations in KITLG associated with NS-UHL/AHL have a loss-of-function effect. We speculate that the mechanism of the mutation underlying WS2 and leading to membrane incorporation and reduced secretion of KITLG occurs via a dominant-negative or gain-of-function effect. Our study unveils different phenotypes associated with KITLG, previously associated with pigmentation abnormalities, and will thereby improve the genetic counseling given to individuals with KITLG variants. PMID:26522471

  4. AIP mutations in young patients with acromegaly and the Tampico Giant: the Mexican experience.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly; Vargas, Guadalupe; Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Ana Laura; Sosa, Ernesto; González, Baldomero; Zúñiga, Sergio; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Stals, Karen; Bussell, Anne-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Dang, Mary; Iacovazzo, Donato; Kapur, Sonal; Gabrovska, Plamena; Radian, Serban; Roncaroli, Federico; Korbonits, Márta; Mercado, Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Although aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly, their prevalence among young patients is nonnegligible. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of AIP mutations in a cohort of Mexican patients with acromegaly with disease onset before the age of 30 and to search for molecular abnormalities in the AIP gene in teeth obtained from the "Tampico Giant". Peripheral blood DNA from 71 patients with acromegaly (51 females) with disease onset <30 years was analysed (median age of disease onset of 23 years) and correlated with clinical, biochemical and imaging characteristics. Sequencing was also carried out in DNA extracted from teeth of the Tampico Giant. Five patients (7 %) harboured heterozygous, germline mutations of the AIP gene. In two of them (a 9-year-old girl with gigantism and a young man with symptoms of GH excess since age 14) the c.910C>T (p.Arg304Ter), well-known truncating mutation was identified; in one of these two cases and her identical twin sister, the mutation proved to be a de novo event, since neither of their parents were found to be carriers. In the remaining three patients, new mutations were identified: a frameshift mutation (c.976_977insC, p.Gly326AfsTer), an in-frame deletion (c.872_877del, p.Val291_Leu292del) and a nonsense mutation (c.868A > T, p.Lys290Ter), which are predicted to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis. Patients with AIP mutations tended to have an earlier onset of acromegaly and harboured larger and more invasive tumours. A previously described genetic variant of unknown significance (c.869C > T, p.Ala299Val) was identified in DNA from the Tampico Giant. The prevalence of AIP mutations in young Mexican patients with acromegaly is similar to that of European cohorts. Our results support the need for genetic evaluation of patients with early onset acromegaly.

  5. AIP mutations in young patients with acromegaly and the Tampico Giant: the Mexican experience.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly; Vargas, Guadalupe; Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Ana Laura; Sosa, Ernesto; González, Baldomero; Zúñiga, Sergio; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Stals, Karen; Bussell, Anne-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Dang, Mary; Iacovazzo, Donato; Kapur, Sonal; Gabrovska, Plamena; Radian, Serban; Roncaroli, Federico; Korbonits, Márta; Mercado, Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Although aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly, their prevalence among young patients is nonnegligible. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of AIP mutations in a cohort of Mexican patients with acromegaly with disease onset before the age of 30 and to search for molecular abnormalities in the AIP gene in teeth obtained from the "Tampico Giant". Peripheral blood DNA from 71 patients with acromegaly (51 females) with disease onset <30 years was analysed (median age of disease onset of 23 years) and correlated with clinical, biochemical and imaging characteristics. Sequencing was also carried out in DNA extracted from teeth of the Tampico Giant. Five patients (7 %) harboured heterozygous, germline mutations of the AIP gene. In two of them (a 9-year-old girl with gigantism and a young man with symptoms of GH excess since age 14) the c.910C>T (p.Arg304Ter), well-known truncating mutation was identified; in one of these two cases and her identical twin sister, the mutation proved to be a de novo event, since neither of their parents were found to be carriers. In the remaining three patients, new mutations were identified: a frameshift mutation (c.976_977insC, p.Gly326AfsTer), an in-frame deletion (c.872_877del, p.Val291_Leu292del) and a nonsense mutation (c.868A > T, p.Lys290Ter), which are predicted to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis. Patients with AIP mutations tended to have an earlier onset of acromegaly and harboured larger and more invasive tumours. A previously described genetic variant of unknown significance (c.869C > T, p.Ala299Val) was identified in DNA from the Tampico Giant. The prevalence of AIP mutations in young Mexican patients with acromegaly is similar to that of European cohorts. Our results support the need for genetic evaluation of patients with early onset acromegaly. PMID:27033541

  6. Truncation correction for oblique filtering lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Stefan; Hornegger, Joachim; Lauritsch, Guenter; Dennerlein, Frank; Noo, Frederic

    2008-12-15

    State-of-the-art filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms often define the filtering operation to be performed along oblique filtering lines in the detector. A limited scan field of view leads to the truncation of those filtering lines, which causes artifacts in the final reconstructed volume. In contrast to the case where filtering is performed solely along the detector rows, no methods are available for the case of oblique filtering lines. In this work, the authors present two novel truncation correction methods which effectively handle data truncation in this case. Method 1 (basic approach) handles data truncation in two successive preprocessing steps by applying a hybrid data extrapolation method, which is a combination of a water cylinder extrapolation and a Gaussian extrapolation. It is independent of any specific reconstruction algorithm. Method 2 (kink approach) uses similar concepts for data extrapolation as the basic approach but needs to be integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. Experiments are presented from simulated data of the FORBILD head phantom, acquired along a partial-circle-plus-arc trajectory. The theoretically exact M-line algorithm is used for reconstruction. Although the discussion is focused on theoretically exact algorithms, the proposed truncation correction methods can be applied to any FBP algorithm that exposes oblique filtering lines.

  7. Truncation correction for oblique filtering lines.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Stefan; Hornegger, Joachim; Lauritsch, Günter; Dennerlein, Frank; Noo, Frédéric

    2008-12-01

    State-of-the-art filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms often define the filtering operation to be performed along oblique filtering lines in the detector. A limited scan field of view leads to the truncation of those filtering lines, which causes artifacts in the final reconstructed volume. In contrast to the case where filtering is performed solely along the detector rows, no methods are available for the case of oblique filtering lines. In this work, the authors present two novel truncation correction methods which effectively handle data truncation in this case. Method 1 (basic approach) handles data truncation in two successive preprocessing steps by applying a hybrid data extrapolation method, which is a combination of a water cylinder extrapolation and a Gaussian extrapolation. It is independent of any specific reconstruction algorithm. Method 2 (kink approach) uses similar concepts for data extrapolation as the basic approach but needs to be integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. Experiments are presented from simulated data of the FORBILD head phantom, acquired along a partial-circle-plus-arc trajectory. The theoretically exact M-line algorithm is used for reconstruction. Although the discussion is focused on theoretically exact algorithms, the proposed truncation correction methods can be applied to any FBP algorithm that exposes oblique filtering lines.

  8. Quantifying truncation errors in effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnstahl, R. J.; Klco, N.; Phillips, D. R.; Wesolowski, S.

    2015-08-01

    Bayesian procedures designed to quantify truncation errors in perturbative calculations of quantum chromodynamics observables are adapted to expansions in effective field theory (EFT). In the Bayesian approach, such truncation errors are derived from degree-of-belief (DOB) intervals for EFT predictions. Computation of these intervals requires specification of prior probability distributions ("priors") for the expansion coefficients. By encoding expectations about the naturalness of these coefficients, this framework provides a statistical interpretation of the standard EFT procedure where truncation errors are estimated using the order-by-order convergence of the expansion. It also permits exploration of the ways in which such error bars are, and are not, sensitive to assumptions about EFT-coefficient naturalness. We first demonstrate the calculation of Bayesian probability distributions for the EFT truncation error in some representative examples and then focus on the application of chiral EFT to neutron-proton scattering. Epelbaum, Krebs, and Meißner recently articulated explicit rules for estimating truncation errors in such EFT calculations of few-nucleon-system properties. We find that their basic procedure emerges generically from one class of naturalness priors considered and that all such priors result in consistent quantitative predictions for 68% DOB intervals. We then explore several methods by which the convergence properties of the EFT for a set of observables may be used to check the statistical consistency of the EFT expansion parameter.

  9. Familial polycythemia due to truncations of the erythropoietin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Forget, B. G.; Degan, B. A.; Arcasoy, M. O.

    2000-01-01

    We studied a kindred with dominantly inherited familial erythrocytosis associated with heterozygosity for a deletion of seven nucleotides in exon 8 of the EpoR gene resulting in an EpoR peptide that is truncated by 59 amino acids in its C-terminal intracytoplasmic signal transduction domain. A seven basepair direct repeat sequence is present in the normal EpoR gene at the site of this mutation, consistent with the slipped mispairing model for the generation of short deletions during DNA replication. Hypersensitivity to erythropoietin of primary erythroid progenitors from an affected individual was observed in in vitro cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, as indicated by the growth, at suboptimal concentrations of added Epo, of more numerous and larger BFU-E-derived erythroid cell colonies compared to those obtained from a normal control subject. To study mutant EpoR function, the cDNA encoding the mutant EpoR was stably transfected into murine growth factor (IL-3)-dependent 32D tissue culture cells. In proliferation assays, cells expressing the mutant EpoR displayed 5 to 10-fold increased sensitivity to Epo compared to cells expressing similar numbers of the wild type EpoR. In addition, the cells transfected with the mutant truncated receptor demonstrated prolonged activity of Jak2 kinase and Stat5 activity, molecules that mediate signal transduction by the EpoR. PMID:10881330

  10. A novel truncated form of HMGA2 in tumors of the ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Antonio; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Davidson, Ben; Trope, Claes Goran; Heim, Sverre; Micci, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasms of the ovary are the second most common tumor of the female reproductive system, and the most lethal of the gynecological malignancies. Ovarian tumors are divided into a copious number of different groups reflecting their different features. The present study analyzed 187 ovarian tumors (39 sex-cord stromal tumors, 22 borderline tumors and 126 carcinomas) for the expression of the high-mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) gene, for mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)) 1, cytosolic (IDH1), isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)) 2, mitochondrial (IDH2) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) genes, and for methylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that HMGA2 was expressed in 74.5% of the samples (120/161). A truncated transcript of HMGA2 was identified in 11 cases. A novel truncated form of HMGA2 was found in 4 serous high-grade carcinomas. Only 4 tumors (4/185) showed the TERT C228T mutation. No IDH1 or IDH2 mutations were found. Methylation of the promoter of MGMT was found in 2 borderline tumors (2/185). HMGA2 was expressed, in its truncated and native form, in different ovarian tumors, even the less aggressive types, underscoring the general importance of this gene in ovarian tumorigenesis. Mutations involving TERT, as well as MGMT promoter methylation, are rare events in ovarian tumors. PMID:27446471

  11. Image reconstruction via truncated lambda tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hengyong; Ye, Yangbo; Wang, Ge

    2006-08-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of reconstructing a Computed Tomography (CT) image from truncated Lambda Tomography (LT), a gradient-like image of it's original. An LT image can be regarded as a convolution of the object image and the point spread function (PSF) of the Calderon operator. The PSF's infinite support provides the LT image infinite support; even the original CT image is of compact support. When the support of a truncated LT image fully covers the compact support of the corresponding CT image, we develop an extrapolation method to recover the CT image more precisely. When the support of the CT image fully covers the support of the truncated LT image, we design a template-based scheme to compensate the cupping effects and reconstruct a satisfactory image. Our algorithms are evaluated in numerical simulations and the results demonstrate the feasibilities of our methods. Our approaches provide a new way to reconstruct high-quality CT images.

  12. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  13. De novo dominant ASXL3 mutations alter H2A deubiquitination and transcription in Bainbridge-Ropers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anshika; Ritesh, K C; Tsan, Yao-Chang; Liao, Rosy; Su, Fengyun; Cao, Xuhong; Hannibal, Mark C; Keegan, Catherine E; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Martin, Donna M; Bielas, Stephanie L

    2016-02-01

    De novo truncating mutations in Additional sex combs-like 3 (ASXL3) have been identified in individuals with Bainbridge-Ropers syndrome (BRS), characterized by failure to thrive, global developmental delay, feeding problems, hypotonia, dysmorphic features, profound speech delays and intellectual disability. We identified three novel de novo heterozygous truncating variants distributed across ASXL3, outside the original cluster of ASXL3 mutations previously described for BRS. Primary skin fibroblasts established from a BRS patient were used to investigate the functional impact of pathogenic variants. ASXL3 mRNA transcripts from the mutated allele are prone to nonsense-mediated decay, and expression of ASXL3 is reduced. We found that ASXL3 interacts with BAP1, a hydrolase that removes mono-ubiquitin from histone H2A lysine 119 (H2AK119Ub1) as a component of the Polycomb repressive deubiquitination (PR-DUB) complex. A significant increase in H2AK119Ub1 was observed in ASXL3 patient fibroblasts, highlighting an important functional role for ASXL3 in PR-DUB mediated deubiquitination. Transcriptomes of ASXL3 patient and control fibroblasts were compared to investigate the impact of chromatin changes on transcriptional regulation. Out of 564 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in ASXL3 patient fibroblasts, 52% were upregulated and 48% downregulated. DEGs were enriched in molecular processes impacting transcriptional regulation, development and proliferation, consistent with the features of BRS. This is the first single gene disorder linked to defects in deubiquitination of H2AK119Ub1 and suggests an important role for dynamic regulation of H2A mono-ubiquitination in transcriptional regulation and the pathophysiology of BRS.

  14. A secreted WNT-ligand-binding domain of FZD5 generated by a frameshift mutation causes autosomal dominant coloboma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunqiao; Widen, Sonya A; Williamson, Kathleen A; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Rainger, Joe; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Strachan, Erin; Manjunath, Souparnika H; Balakrishnan, Archana; Floyd, James A; Li, Tiansen; Waskiewicz, Andrew; Brooks, Brian P; Lehmann, Ordan J; FitzPatrick, David R; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Ocular coloboma is a common eye malformation resulting from incomplete fusion of the optic fissure during development. Coloboma is often associated with microphthalmia and/or contralateral anophthalmia. Coloboma shows extensive locus heterogeneity associated with causative mutations identified in genes encoding developmental transcription factors or components of signaling pathways. We report an ultra-rare, heterozygous frameshift mutation in FZD5 (p.Ala219Glufs*49) that was identified independently in two branches of a large family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic coloboma. FZD5 has a single-coding exon and consequently a transcript with this frameshift variant is not a canonical substrate for nonsense-mediated decay. FZD5 encodes a transmembrane receptor with a conserved extracellular cysteine rich domain for ligand binding. The frameshift mutation results in the production of a truncated protein, which retains the Wingless-type MMTV integration site family member-ligand-binding domain, but lacks the transmembrane domain. The truncated protein was secreted from cells, and behaved as a dominant-negative FZD5 receptor, antagonizing both canonical and non-canonical WNT signaling. Expression of the resultant mutant protein caused coloboma and microphthalmia in zebrafish, and disruption of the apical junction of the retinal neural epithelium in mouse, mimicking the phenotype of Fz5/Fz8 compound conditional knockout mutants. Our studies have revealed a conserved role of Wnt-Frizzled (FZD) signaling in ocular development and directly implicate WNT-FZD signaling both in normal closure of the human optic fissure and pathogenesis of coloboma.

  15. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart.

  16. Novel and recurrent mutations in the laminin-5 genes causing lethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa: molecular basis and clinical course of Herlitz disease.

    PubMed

    Mühle, Christiane; Jiang, Qiu-Jie; Charlesworth, Alexandra; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Schneider, Holm

    2005-01-01

    Herlitz disease (H-JEB), the lethal form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa, is a rare genodermatosis presenting from birth with widespread erosions and blistering of skin and mucosae because of tissue cleavage within the epidermal basement membrane. Mutations in any of the three genes encoding the alpha3, beta3 and gamma2 chains of laminin-5 underlie this recessively inherited disorder. Here, we report the molecular basis and clinical course of H-JEB in 12 patients. Two novel nonsense mutations in the gene LAMA3 (E281X and K1299X) and a novel frame-shift mutation in the gene LAMB3 (1628insG) leading to a premature termination codon were identified by DNA sequencing and confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. In the four patients affected, neither the resulting truncated polypeptide chains nor assembled laminin-5 protein were detectable by immunofluorescence. Three patients were found to be heterozygous for the known hotspot mutation R635X and the recurrent mutations Q373X or 29insC in the gene LAMB3, whereas five others were homozygous for R635X. Significant variations in the disease progression and survival times between 1 and 30 months in this group of H-JEB patients emphasised the impact of modifying factors and the importance of immunostaining or mRNA assessment as parallel diagnostic methods. Interestingly, the only patients who survived for longer than 6 months were four females carrying the mutation R635X homozygously. In one of them, the clinical course may have been improved by treatment with artificial skin equivalents. These data may stimulate further investigation of genotype-phenotype correlations and facilitate mutation analysis and genetic counselling of affected families. PMID:15538630

  17. Impact of predicted protein-truncating genetic variants on the human transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Conrad, Donald F.; Lek, Monkol; Tsang, Emily K.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Maller, Julian B.; Kukurba, Kimberly R.; DeLuca, David; Fromer, Menachem; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Smith, Kevin S.; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Fengmei; Banks, Eric; Poplin, Ryan; Ruderfer, Douglas; Purcell, Shaun M.; Tukiainen, Taru; Minikel, Eric V.; Stenson, Peter D.; Cooper, David N.; Huang, Katharine H.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Nedzel, Jared; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Li, Jin Billy; Daly, Mark J.; Guigo, Roderic; Donnelly, Peter; Ardlie, Kristin; Sammeth, Michael; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; McCarthy, Mark I.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Lappalainen, Tuuli; MacArthur, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the functional impact of genetic variation is critical for clinical genome interpretation. We systematically characterized the transcriptome effects of protein-truncating variants (PTVs), a class of variants expected to have profound impacts on gene function, using data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) and Geuvadis projects. We quantitate tissue-specific and positional effects on nonsense-mediated transcript decay, and present an improved predictive model for this decay. We directly measure the impact of variants both proximal and distal to splice junctions. Furthermore, we find that robustness to heterozygous gene inactivation is not due to dosage compensation. Our results illustrate the value of transcriptome data in the functional interpretation of genetic variants. PMID:25954003

  18. Human genomics. Effect of predicted protein-truncating genetic variants on the human transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Conrad, Donald F; Lek, Monkol; Tsang, Emily K; Karczewski, Konrad J; Maller, Julian B; Kukurba, Kimberly R; DeLuca, David S; Fromer, Menachem; Ferreira, Pedro G; Smith, Kevin S; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Fengmei; Banks, Eric; Poplin, Ryan; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Purcell, Shaun M; Tukiainen, Taru; Minikel, Eric V; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Huang, Katharine H; Sullivan, Timothy J; Nedzel, Jared; Bustamante, Carlos D; Li, Jin Billy; Daly, Mark J; Guigo, Roderic; Donnelly, Peter; Ardlie, Kristin; Sammeth, Michael; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Stephen B; Lappalainen, Tuuli; MacArthur, Daniel G

    2015-05-01

    Accurate prediction of the functional effect of genetic variation is critical for clinical genome interpretation. We systematically characterized the transcriptome effects of protein-truncating variants, a class of variants expected to have profound effects on gene function, using data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) and Geuvadis projects. We quantitated tissue-specific and positional effects on nonsense-mediated transcript decay and present an improved predictive model for this decay. We directly measured the effect of variants both proximal and distal to splice junctions. Furthermore, we found that robustness to heterozygous gene inactivation is not due to dosage compensation. Our results illustrate the value of transcriptome data in the functional interpretation of genetic variants. PMID:25954003

  19. Irregularly Shaped Space-Filling Truncated Octahedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, John Robert

    2008-01-01

    For any parent tetrahedron ABCD, centroids of selected sub-tetrahedra form the vertices of an irregularly shaped space-filling truncated octahedron. To reflect these properties, such a figure will be called an ISTO. Each edge of the ISTO is parallel to and one-eighth the length of one of the edges of tetrahedron ABCD and the volume of the ISTO is…

  20. Quantifying truncation errors in effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnstahl, R. J.; Klco, N.; Phillips, D. R.; Wesolowski, S.

    2015-10-01

    Bayesian procedures designed to quantify truncation errors in perturbative calculations of QCD observables are adapted to expansions in effective field theory (EFT). In the Bayesian approach, such truncation errors are derived from degree-of-belief (DOB) intervals for EFT predictions. Computation of these intervals requires specification of prior probability distributions (``priors'') for the expansion coefficients. By encoding expectations about the naturalness of these coefficients, this framework provides a statistical interpretation of the standard EFT procedure where truncation errors are estimated using the order-by-order convergence of the expansion. It also permits exploration of the ways in which such error bars are, and are not, sensitive to assumptions about EFT-coefficient naturalness. We demonstrate the calculation of Bayesian DOB intervals for the EFT truncation error in some representative cases and explore several methods by which the convergence properties of the EFT for a set of observables may be used to check the statistical consistency of the EFT expansion parameter. Supported in part by the NSF and the DOE.

  1. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  2. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  3. The roles played by highly truncated splice variants of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes greatly increases the total number of receptor isoforms which may be expressed in a cell-dependent and time-dependent manner. This increased diversity of cell signaling options caused by the generation of splice variants is further enhanced by receptor dimerization. When alternative splicing generates highly truncated GPCRs with less than seven transmembrane (TM) domains, the predominant effect in vitro is that of a dominant-negative mutation associated with the retention of the wild-type receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). For constitutively active (agonist-independent) GPCRs, their attenuated expression on the cell surface, and consequent decreased basal activity due to the dominant-negative effect of truncated splice variants, has pathological consequences. Truncated splice variants may conversely offer protection from disease when expression of co-receptors for binding of infectious agents to cells is attenuated due to ER retention of the wild-type co-receptor. In this review, we will see that GPCRs retained in the ER can still be functionally active but also that highly truncated GPCRs may also be functionally active. Although rare, some truncated splice variants still bind ligand and activate cell signaling responses. More importantly, by forming heterodimers with full-length GPCRs, some truncated splice variants also provide opportunities to generate receptor complexes with unique pharmacological properties. So, instead of assuming that highly truncated GPCRs are associated with faulty transcription processes, it is time to reassess their potential benefit to the host organism. PMID:22938630

  4. A Novel Missense Mutation in POMT1 Modulates the Severe Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype Associated with POMT1 Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie E.; Conta, Jessie H.; Winder, Thomas L.; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M.; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P.; Moore, Steven A.; Gospe, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  5. Heterozygous disruption of renal outer medullary potassium channel in rats is associated with reduced blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zuo; Shin, Myung Kyun; Horwitz, Sarah Beth; Levorse, John M; Zhu, Lei; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Streltsov, Denis Y; Dajee, Maya; Hernandez, Melba; Pan, Yi; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Wang, Li; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Zhu, Yonghua; Cui, Yan; Michael, Bindhu; Balogh, Leslie Ann; Welling, Paul A; Wade, James B; Roy, Sophie; Sullivan, Kathleen A

    2013-08-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, KCNJ1) mediates potassium recycling and facilitates sodium reabsorption through the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter in the loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct. Human genetic studies indicate that ROMK homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause type II Bartter syndrome, featuring polyuria, renal salt wasting, and hypotension; humans heterozygous for ROMK mutations identified in the Framingham Heart Study have reduced blood pressure. ROMK null mice recapitulate many of the features of type II Bartter syndrome. We have generated an ROMK knockout rat model in Dahl salt-sensitive background by using zinc finger nuclease technology and investigated the effects of knocking out ROMK on systemic and renal hemodynamics and kidney histology in the Dahl salt-sensitive rats. The ROMK(-/-) pups recapitulated features identified in the ROMK null mice. The ROMK(+/-) rats, when challenged with a 4% salt diet, exhibited a reduced blood pressure compared with their ROMK(+/+) littermates. More importantly, when challenged with an 8% salt diet, the Dahl salt-sensitive rats with 50% less ROMK expression showed increased protection from salt-induced blood pressure elevation and signs of protection from renal injury. Our findings in ROMK knockout Dahl salt-sensitive rats, together with the previous reports in humans and mice, underscore a critical role of ROMK in blood pressure regulation. PMID:23753405

  6. Heterozygous disruption of renal outer medullary potassium channel in rats is associated with reduced blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zuo; Shin, Myung Kyun; Horwitz, Sarah Beth; Levorse, John M; Zhu, Lei; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Streltsov, Denis Y; Dajee, Maya; Hernandez, Melba; Pan, Yi; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Wang, Li; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Zhu, Yonghua; Cui, Yan; Michael, Bindhu; Balogh, Leslie Ann; Welling, Paul A; Wade, James B; Roy, Sophie; Sullivan, Kathleen A

    2013-08-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, KCNJ1) mediates potassium recycling and facilitates sodium reabsorption through the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter in the loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct. Human genetic studies indicate that ROMK homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause type II Bartter syndrome, featuring polyuria, renal salt wasting, and hypotension; humans heterozygous for ROMK mutations identified in the Framingham Heart Study have reduced blood pressure. ROMK null mice recapitulate many of the features of type II Bartter syndrome. We have generated an ROMK knockout rat model in Dahl salt-sensitive background by using zinc finger nuclease technology and investigated the effects of knocking out ROMK on systemic and renal hemodynamics and kidney histology in the Dahl salt-sensitive rats. The ROMK(-/-) pups recapitulated features identified in the ROMK null mice. The ROMK(+/-) rats, when challenged with a 4% salt diet, exhibited a reduced blood pressure compared with their ROMK(+/+) littermates. More importantly, when challenged with an 8% salt diet, the Dahl salt-sensitive rats with 50% less ROMK expression showed increased protection from salt-induced blood pressure elevation and signs of protection from renal injury. Our findings in ROMK knockout Dahl salt-sensitive rats, together with the previous reports in humans and mice, underscore a critical role of ROMK in blood pressure regulation.

  7. Nonsense Mutations in AAGAB Cause Punctate Palmoplantar Keratoderma Type Buschke-Fischer-Brauer

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Kathrin A.; Eckstein, Gertrud N.; Pasternack, Sandra M.; Praetzel-Wunder, Silke; Ruzicka, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Seidl, Kerstin; Rogers, Mike; Graf, Elisabeth; Langbein, Lutz; Braun-Falco, Markus; Betz, Regina C.; Strom, Tim M.

    2012-01-01

    Punctate palmoplantar keratodermas (PPKPs) are rare autosomal-dominant inherited skin diseases that are characterized by multiple hyperkeratotic plaques distributed on the palms and soles. To date, two different loci in chromosomal regions 15q22-15q24 and 8q24.13-8q24.21 have been reported. Pathogenic mutations, however, have yet to be identified. In order to elucidate the genetic cause of PPKP type Buschke-Fischer-Brauer (PPKP1), we performed exome sequencing in five affected individuals from three families, and we identified in chromosomal region 15q22.33-q23 two heterozygous nonsense mutations—c.370C>T (p.Arg124∗) and c.481C>T (p.Arg161∗)—in AAGAB in all affected individuals. Using immunoblot analysis, we showed that both mutations result in premature termination of translation and truncated protein products. Analyses of mRNA of affected individuals revealed that the disease allele is either not detectable or only detectable at low levels. To assess the consequences of the mutations in skin, we performed immunofluorescence analyses. Notably, the amount of granular staining in the keratinocytes of affected individuals was lower in the cytoplasm but higher around the nucleus than it was in the keratinocytes of control individuals. AAGAB encodes the alpha-and gamma-adaptin-binding protein p34 and might play a role in membrane traffic as a chaperone. The identification of mutations, along with the results from additional studies, defines the genetic basis of PPKP1 and provides evidence that AAGAB plays an important role in skin integrity. PMID:23000146

  8. Mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient heterozygous for factor V Leiden and G20210A prothrombin genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Karmacharya, Paras; Aryal, Madan Raj; Donato, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) is a rare but life threatening form of bowel ischemia. It is implicated in 6%-9% of all cases of acute mesenteric ischemia. The proportion of patients with primary (or idiopathic) MVT varies from 0% to 49%, with a decrease in frequency secondary to more recent availability of newer investigations for hypercoagulability. The presence of factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin G20210A mutations (PGM) have been well documented in these cases. However, there have been scarce case reports describing MVT in heterozygotes of both these mutations occurring simultaneously and its implications on long term management. Our case describes acute MVT in a previously asymptomatic young patient with no prior history of venous thromboembolism. The patient was found to be heterozygous for FVL and PGM and treated with lifelong anticoagulation with warfarin (goal international normalized ratio: 2-3) and avoidance of hormonal contraceptives. PMID:24282370

  9. Mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient heterozygous for factor V Leiden and G20210A prothrombin genotypes.

    PubMed

    Karmacharya, Paras; Aryal, Madan Raj; Donato, Anthony

    2013-11-21

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) is a rare but life threatening form of bowel ischemia. It is implicated in 6%-9% of all cases of acute mesenteric ischemia. The proportion of patients with primary (or idiopathic) MVT varies from 0% to 49%, with a decrease in frequency secondary to more recent availability of newer investigations for hypercoagulability. The presence of factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin G20210A mutations (PGM) have been well documented in these cases. However, there have been scarce case reports describing MVT in heterozygotes of both these mutations occurring simultaneously and its implications on long term management. Our case describes acute MVT in a previously asymptomatic young patient with no prior history of venous thromboembolism. The patient was found to be heterozygous for FVL and PGM and treated with lifelong anticoagulation with warfarin (goal international normalized ratio: 2-3) and avoidance of hormonal contraceptives.

  10. SPG11 mutations cause Kjellin syndrome, a hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and central retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Orlén, Hanna; Melberg, Atle; Raininko, Raili; Kumlien, Eva; Entesarian, Miriam; Söderberg, Per; Påhlman, Magnus; Darin, Niklas; Kyllerman, Mårten; Holmberg, Eva; Engler, Henry; Eriksson, Urban; Dahl, Niklas

    2009-10-01

    Autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (ARHSP) with thin corpus callosum (TCC) is genetically heterogenous and approximately 35% of patients carry mutations in either of the SPG11 or SPG15 genes. Disease onset is during the first three decades of life with spastic paraplegia and mental impairment. Peripheral neuropathy and amyotrophy may occur. Kjellin syndrome is characterized by central retinal degeneration in addition to ARHSP-TCC and the disease is associated with mutations in the SPG15 gene. We identified five patients in four unrelated kindreds with spastic paraplegia and mental impairment. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed TCC, atrophy elsewhere in the brain and increased T2 signal intensity in the periventricular white matter. Probands from the four kindreds were screened for mutations in the SPG11 gene. All patients were found homozygous or compound heterozygous for truncating SPG11 mutations of which four are reported for the first time. Ophthalmological investigations revealed that the four index cases have central retinal degeneration consistent with Kjellin syndrome. PET examinations with N-[11C-methyl]-L-deuterodeprenyl (DED) and fluor-18 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) were performed in two patients with Kjellin syndrome. We observed a reduced glucose uptake in the thalami, anterior cingulum, and sensorimotor cortex indicating neuronal loss, and an increased DED binding in the thalami and pons which suggests astrogliosis. From our results we extend the SPG11 associated phenotype to comprise also Kjellin syndrome, previously found to be associated with mutations in the SPG15 gene. We anticipate that degeneration of the central retina is a common and previously unrecognized feature in SPG11 related disease.

  11. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model.

  12. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model. PMID:27354540

  13. Additive effect of mutations in LDLR and PCSK9 genes on the phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, Livia; Priore Oliva, Claudio; Cefalù, Angelo Baldassare; Noto, Davide; Bellocchio, Antonella; Fresa, Raffaele; Cantafora, Alfredo; Patel, Dilip; Averna, Maurizio; Tarugi, Patrizia; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2006-06-01

    Patients homozygous or compound heterozygous for LDLR mutations or double heterozygous for LDLR and apo B R3500Q mutation have higher LDL-C levels, more extensive xanthomatosis and more severe premature coronary disease (pCAD) than simple heterozygotes for mutations in either these genes or for missense mutations in PCSK9 gene. It is not known whether combined mutations in LDLR and PKCS9 are associated with such a severe phenotype. We sequenced Apo B and PCSK9 genes in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of homozygous FH who were heterozygous for LDLR gene mutations. Proband Z.P. (LDL-C 13.39 mmol/L and pCAD) was heterozygous for an LDLR mutation (p.E228K) inherited from her father (LDL-C 8.07 mmol/L) and a PCSK9 mutation (p.R496W) from her mother (LDL-C 5.58 mmol/L). Proband L.R. and her sister (LDL-C 11.51 and 10.47 mmol/L, xanthomatosis and carotid atherosclerosis) were heterozygous for an LDLR mutation (p.Y419X) inherited from their mother (LDL-C 6.54 mmol/L) and a PCSK9 mutation (p.N425S) probably from their deceased father. The LDL-C levels in double heterozygotes of these two families were 56 and 44% higher than those found in simple heterozygotes for the two LDLR mutations, respectively. The two PCSK9 mutations are novel and were not found in 110 controls and 80 patients with co-dominant hypercholesterolemia. These observations indicate that rare missense mutations of PCSK9 may worsen the clinical phenotype of patients carrying LDLR mutations. PMID:16183066

  14. Case Report: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in a woman heterozygous for G6PD A-.

    PubMed

    Perdigones, Nieves; Morales, Mariela; Mason, Philip; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) in a woman who is heterozygous for the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase A-   ( G6PDA-) allele. PNH is associated with one or more clones of cells that lack complement inhibition due to loss of function somatic mutations in the PIGA gene.  PIGA encodes the enzyme phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class A, which catalyses the first step of glycosylphosphatidylinisotol ( GPI)  anchor synthesis. Two GPI anchored red cell surface antigens regulate complement lysis. G6PD catalyses the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway and enzyme variants, frequent in some populations have been selected because they confer resistance to malaria, are associated with hemolysis in the presence of oxidizing agents including several drugs. The patient had suffered a hemolytic attack after taking co-trimoxazole, a drug that precipitates hemolysis in G6PD deficient individuals. Since both G6PD and PIGA are X-linked we hypothesized that the PIGA mutation was on the X-chromosome carrying the G6PDA- allele. Investigations showed that in fact the PIGA mutation was on the X-chromosome carrying the normal G6PD B allele. We speculate that complement activation on G6PD A- red cells exposed to Bactrim might have triggered complement activation inducing the lysis of G6PD B PNH Type II red blood cells or that the patient may have had a PNH clone expressing G6PDA- at the time of the hemolytic episode. PMID:25713697

  15. Approximate truncation robust computed tomography—ATRACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennerlein, Frank; Maier, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    We present an approximate truncation robust algorithm to compute tomographic images (ATRACT). This algorithm targets at reconstructing volumetric images from cone-beam projections in scenarios where these projections are highly truncated in each dimension. It thus facilitates reconstructions of small subvolumes of interest, without involving prior knowledge about the object. Our method is readily applicable to medical C-arm imaging, where it may contribute to new clinical workflows together with a considerable reduction of x-ray dose. We give a detailed derivation of ATRACT that starts from the conventional Feldkamp filtered-backprojection algorithm and that involves, as one component, a novel original formula for the inversion of the two-dimensional Radon transform. Discretization and numerical implementation are discussed and reconstruction results from both, simulated projections and first clinical data sets are presented.

  16. Phase diagram of a truncated tetrahedral model.

    PubMed

    Krcmar, Roman; Gendiar, Andrej; Nishino, Tomotoshi

    2016-08-01

    Phase diagram of a discrete counterpart of the classical Heisenberg model, the truncated tetrahedral model, is analyzed on the square lattice, when the interaction is ferromagnetic. Each spin is represented by a unit vector that can point to one of the 12 vertices of the truncated tetrahedron, which is a continuous interpolation between the tetrahedron and the octahedron. Phase diagram of the model is determined by means of the statistical analog of the entanglement entropy, which is numerically calculated by the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. The obtained phase diagram consists of four different phases, which are separated by five transition lines. In the parameter region, where the octahedral anisotropy is dominant, a weak first-order phase transition is observed. PMID:27627273

  17. Block truncation signature coding for hyperspectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces a new signature coding which is designed based on the well-known Block Truncation Coding (BTC). It comprises of bit-maps of the signature blocks generated by different threshold criteria. Two new BTC-based algorithms are developed for signature coding, to be called Block Truncation Signature Coding (BTSC) and 2-level BTSC (2BTSC). In order to compare the developed BTC based algorithms with current binary signature coding schemes such as Spectral Program Analysis Manager (SPAM) developed by Mazer et al. and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) by Qian et al., three different thresholding functions, local block mean, local block gradient, local block correlation are derived to improve the BTSC performance where the combined bit-maps generated by these thresholds can provide better spectral signature characterization. Experimental results reveal that the new BTC-based signature coding performs more effectively in characterizing spectral variations than currently available binary signature coding methods.

  18. Phase diagram of a truncated tetrahedral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krcmar, Roman; Gendiar, Andrej; Nishino, Tomotoshi

    2016-08-01

    Phase diagram of a discrete counterpart of the classical Heisenberg model, the truncated tetrahedral model, is analyzed on the square lattice, when the interaction is ferromagnetic. Each spin is represented by a unit vector that can point to one of the 12 vertices of the truncated tetrahedron, which is a continuous interpolation between the tetrahedron and the octahedron. Phase diagram of the model is determined by means of the statistical analog of the entanglement entropy, which is numerically calculated by the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. The obtained phase diagram consists of four different phases, which are separated by five transition lines. In the parameter region, where the octahedral anisotropy is dominant, a weak first-order phase transition is observed.

  19. Unquenched Studies Using the Truncated Determinant Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    A. Duncan, E. Eichten and H. Thacker

    2001-11-29

    A truncated determinant algorithm is used to study the physical effects of the quark eigenmodes associated with eigenvalues below 420 MeV. This initial high statistics study focuses on coarse (6{sup 4}) lattices (with O(a{sup 2}) improved gauge action), light internal quark masses and large physical volumes. Three features of full QCD are examined: topological charge distributions, string breaking as observed in the static energy and the eta prime mass.

  20. Truncated Dual-Cap Nucleation Site Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Douglas M.; Sander, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    During heterogeneous nucleation within a metastable mushy-zone, several geometries for nucleation site development must be considered. Traditional spherical dual cap and crevice models are compared to a truncated dual cap to determine the activation energy and critical cluster growth kinetics in ternary Fe-Cr-Ni steel alloys. Results of activation energy results indicate that nucleation is more probable at grain boundaries within the solid than at the solid-liquid interface.

  1. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  2. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with a V203I homozygous mutation in the prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Junji; Sakai, Kenji; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Iwasa, Kazuo; Yamada, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    We report a Japanese patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) with a V203I homozygous mutation of the prion protein gene (PRNP). A 73-year-old woman developed rapidly progressive gait disturbance and cognitive dysfunction. Four months after the onset, she entered a state of an akinetic mutism. Gene analysis revealed a homozygous V203I mutation in the PRNP. Familial CJD with a V203I mutation is rare, and all previously reported cases had a heterozygous mutation showing manifestations similar to those of typical sporadic CJD. Although genetic prion diseases with homozygous PRNP mutations often present with an earlier onset and more rapid clinical course than those with heterozygous mutations, no difference was found in clinical phenotype between our homozygous case and reported heterozygous cases.

  3. Novel, Compound Heterozygous, Single Nucleotide Variants in MARS2 Associated with Developmental Delay, Poor Growth, and Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Bryn D.; Wheeler, Patricia G.; Hagen, Jacob J.; Cohen, Ninette; Linderman, Michael D.; Diaz, George A.; Naidich, Thomas P.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Houten, Sander M.; Schadt, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Novel, single nucleotide mutations were identified in the mitochondrial methionyl amino-acyl-tRNA synthetase gene (MARS2) via whole exome sequencing in two affected siblings with developmental delay, poor growth, and sensorineural hearing loss. We show that compound heterozygous mutations c.550C>T:p.Gln184* and c.424C>T:p.Arg142Trp in MARS2 lead to decreased MARS2 protein levels in patient lymphoblasts. Analysis of respiratory complex (RC) enzyme activities in patient fibroblasts revealed decreased Complex I and IV activities. Immunoblotting of patient fibroblast and lymphoblast samples revealed reduced protein levels of NDUFB8 and COXII, representing Complex I and IV respectively. Additionally, overexpression of wild-type MARS2 in patient fibroblasts increased NDUFB8 and COXII protein levels. These findings suggest that recessive single nucleotide mutations in MARS2 are causative for a new mitochondrial translation deficiency disorder with a primary phenotype including developmental delay and hypotonia. Identification of additional patients with single nucleotide mutations in MARS2 is necessary to determine if pectus carinatum is also a consistent feature of this syndrome. PMID:25754315

  4. Cornelia de Lange syndrome caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24: comments on the article by Pereza et al. [2012].

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2015-06-01

    In the March issue of the Journal in 2012, we reported on a girl with Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at 8q23.3q24.13, encompassing the EXT1, but not the TRPS1 gene. Recent discoveries have shown that heterozygous intragenic mutations or contiguous gene deletions including the RAD21 gene, which is located downstream of the TRPS1 gene, are the cause of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4. Considering that the interstitial deletion in our patient included the RAD21 and 30 other RefSeq genes, we would like to suggest a revision of the diagnosis reported in our previous paper and compare our patient to other reported patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4 caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25899858

  5. The central limit theorem under random truncation

    PubMed Central

    Stute, Winfried; Wang, Jane-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Under left truncation, data (Xi, Yi) are observed only when Yi ≤ Xi. Usually, the distribution function F of the Xi is the target of interest. In this paper, we study linear functionals ∫ φ dFn of the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of F, the Lynden-Bell estimator Fn. A useful representation of ∫ φ dFn is derived which yields asymptotic normality under optimal moment conditions on the score function φ. No continuity assumption on F is required. As a by-product, we obtain the distributional convergence of the Lynden-Bell empirical process on the whole real line. PMID:22844204

  6. RNF43 is frequently mutated in colorectal and endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Yamauchi, Mai; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Cibulskis, Kristian; Saksena, Gordon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Qian, ZhiRong; Nishihara, Reiko; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Hahn, William C.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2014-01-01

    We report somatic mutations of RNF43 in over 18% of colorectal adenocarcinomas and endometrial carcinomas. RNF43 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that negatively regulates Wnt signaling. Truncating mutations of RNF43 are more prevalent in microsatellite-unstable tumors and show mutual exclusivity with inactivating APC mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas. These results indicate that RNF43 is one of the most commonly mutated genes in colorectal and endometrial cancers. PMID:25344691

  7. [Foam cell nephropathy in heterozygous female with Fabry's disease].

    PubMed

    Vera-Sempere, F J; García, A; Sánchez, M A; Moll, J L; Pérez, A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the clinical and pathological characteristics of a 49 year-old heterozygous female carrier of Anderson-Fabry's disease. Light microscopy and ultrastructural study of a renal biopsy showed the presence of foam cell nephropathy and galactosylceramide deposits affecting podocytes, the parietal epithelium of Bowman's capsule and the distal tubular cells, endothelial cells and medullary interstitial elements. Retrospectively, the presence of storage disease was confirmed in a hysterectomy specimen obtained two years previously. Our observation shows that heterozygotes for this disorder can not only carry and transmit the disease but may also develop pathological deposits in various organs. A renal biopsy from these carriers allows precise identification of the disease, facilitates adequate genetic counseling and gives the option of enzyme replacement therapy in patients who have pathological deposits.

  8. Loss-of-Function Mutations in the WNT Co-receptor LRP6 Cause Autosomal-Dominant Oligodontia

    PubMed Central

    Massink, Maarten P.G.; Créton, Marijn A.; Spanevello, Francesca; Fennis, Willem M.M.; Cune, Marco S.; Savelberg, Sanne M.C.; Nijman, Isaäc J.; Maurice, Madelon M.; van den Boogaard, Marie-José H.; van Haaften, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    Tooth agenesis is one of the most common developmental anomalies in man. Oligodontia, a severe form of tooth agenesis, occurs both as an isolated anomaly and as a syndromal feature. We performed exome sequencing on 20 unrelated individuals with apparent non-syndromic oligodontia and failed to detect mutations in genes previously associated with oligodontia. In three of the probands, we detected heterozygous variants in LRP6, and sequencing of additional oligodontia-affected individuals yielded one additional mutation in LRP6. Three mutations (c.1144_1145dupAG [p.Ala383Glyfs∗8], c.1779dupT [p.Glu594∗], and c.2224_2225dupTT [p.Leu742Phefs∗7]) are predicted to truncate the protein, whereas the fourth (c.56C>T [p.Ala19Val]) is a missense variant of a conserved residue located at the cleavage site of the protein’s signal peptide. All four affected individuals harboring a LRP6 mutation had a family history of tooth agenesis. LRP6 encodes a transmembrane cell-surface protein that functions as a co-receptor with members from the Frizzled protein family in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. In this same pathway, WNT10A was recently identified as a major contributor in the etiology of non-syndromic oligodontia. We show that the LRP6 missense variant (c.56C>T) results in altered glycosylation and improper subcellular localization of the protein, resulting in abrogated activation of the Wnt pathway. Our results identify LRP6 variants as contributing to the etiology of non-syndromic autosomal-dominant oligodontia and suggest that this gene is a candidate for screening in DNA diagnostics. PMID:26387593

  9. Irradiated HMEC from A-T Heterozygous Breast Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert; Bors, Karen; Cruz, Angela; Pettengil, Olive; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Women who are heterozygous for ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) carry a single defective ATM gene in chromosome 11 q22-23, and have been statistically determined with high significance within a defined database to be approximately 5-fold more susceptible for developing breast cancer than their noma1 counterpart. Breast cancer susceptibility of these A-T heterozygotes has been hypothesized to include consequence of response to damage caused by low levels of ionizing radiation. Prophylactic mastectomy specimens were donated by a 41 year-old obligate A-T heterozygote who was located prior to her elective surgery through an existing pedigree. Harvest of that breast tissue provided an isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), designated WH612/3. An isolate of presumed normal long-term growth HMEC, designated 48R, was obtained from Dr. Martha Stampfer (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California), and the A-T heterozygous HMEC were transformed with E6 and E7 oncogenes of human papilloma virus Type-16 in the laboratory of Dr. Ray White (Hunt- Cancer Institute, University of Utah) for use in this study. The objective of this study is to study the expression of end points that may bear on cancer outcome following irradiation of HMEC. Specific end points are cell survival, cell cycle, p53 expression, and apoptosis. Survival curves, immunostaining, and flow cytometery are used to examine these end points. Radiation-induced cell killing shows less shoulder development in the survival curve for WH61U3 compared to 48R HMEC, suggesting less repair of damage in the former HMEC. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  10. Mice heterozygous for cathepsin D deficiency exhibit mania-related behavior and stress-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Lu, Yi; Han, Yong; Li, Xia; Lou, Huifang; Zhu, Liya; Zhen, Xuechu; Duan, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in cathepsin D (CTSD), an aspartic protease in the endosomal-lysosomal system, underlie congenital neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (cNCL, also known as CLN10), a devastating neurodegenerative disease. CLN10 patients die within the first few days of life, and in the few patients who live into adulthood psychopathological symptoms have not been reported. Extensive neuropathology and altered neurotransmission have been reported in CTSD-deficient mice; however signs of neuropsychiatric behavior in these mice are not well characterized due to the severe movement disorder and premature death of the animal. In the present study, we show that heterozygous CTSD-deficient (CTSD HET) mice display an overall behavioral profile that is similar to human mania, including hyperlocomotion, d-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, sleep-disturbance, and reduced anxiety-like behavior. However, under stressful conditions CTSD HET mice manifest depressive-like behavior, including anhedonia, behavioral despair, and enhanced learned helplessness. Chronic administration of lithium chloride or valproic acid, two clinically effective mood stabilizers, reverses the majority of these behavioral abnormalities. In addition, CTSD HET mice display stress-induced hypersecretion of corticosterone. These findings suggest an important role for CTSD in the regulation of mood stabilization.

  11. Heterozygous Disruption of Autism susceptibility candidate 2 Causes Impaired Emotional Control and Cognitive Memory

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Kei; Nagai, Taku; Shan, Wei; Sakamoto, Asami; Abe, Manabu; Yamazaki, Maya; Sakimura, Kenji; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Hoshino, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) have been associated with a broad range of psychiatric illnesses including autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability and schizophrenia. We previously demonstrated that the cytoplasmic AUTS2 acts as an upstream factor for the Rho family small GTPase Rac1 and Cdc42 that regulate the cytoskeletal rearrangements in neural cells. Moreover, genetic ablation of the Auts2 gene in mice has resulted in defects in neuronal migration and neuritogenesis in the developing cerebral cortex caused by inactivation of Rac1-signaling pathway, suggesting that AUTS2 is required for neural development. In this study, we conducted a battery of behavioral analyses on Auts2 heterozygous mutant mice to examine the involvement of Auts2 in adult cognitive brain functions. Auts2-deficient mice displayed a decrease in exploratory behavior as well as lower anxiety-like behaviors in the absence of any motor dysfunction. Furthermore, the capability for novel object recognition and cued associative memory were impaired in Auts2 mutant mice. Social behavior and sensory motor gating functions were, however, normal in the mutant mice as assessed by the three-chamber test and prepulse inhibition test, respectively. Together, our findings indicate that AUTS2 is critical for the acquisition of neurocognitive function. PMID:26717414

  12. Investigating the role of rare heterozygous TREM2 variants in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Cuyvers, Elise; Bettens, Karolien; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Van Langenhove, Tim; Gijselinck, Ilse; van der Zee, Julie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Van Dongen, Jasper; Geerts, Nathalie; Maes, Githa; Mattheijssens, Maria; Peeters, Karin; Cras, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cruts, Marc; Sleegers, Kristel

    2014-03-01

    Homozygous mutations in exon 2 of TREM2, a gene involved in Nasu-Hakola disease, can cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Moreover, a rare TREM2 exon 2 variant (p.R47H) was reported to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with an odds ratio as strong as that for APOEε4. We systematically screened the TREM2 coding region within a Belgian study on neurodegenerative brain diseases (1216 AD patients, 357 FTD patients, and 1094 controls). We observed an enrichment of rare variants across TREM2 in both AD and FTD patients compared to controls, most notably in the extracellular IgV-set domain (relative risk = 3.84 [95% confidence interval = 1.29-11.44]; p = 0.009 for AD; relative risk = 6.19 [95% confidence interval = 1.86-20.61]; p = 0.0007 for FTD). None of the rare variants individually reached significant association, but the frequency of p.R47H was increased ~ 3-fold in both AD and FTD patients compared to controls, in line with previous reports. Meta-analysis including 11 previously screened AD cohorts confirmed the association of p.R47H with AD (p = 2.93×10(-17)). Our data corroborate and extend previous findings to include an increased frequency of rare heterozygous TREM2 variations in AD and FTD, and show that TREM2 variants may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases in general.

  13. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of RNG105 (Caprin1) heterozygous mice: Reduced social interaction and attenuated response to novelty

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Rie; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    RNG105 (also known as Caprin1) is a major RNA-binding protein in neuronal RNA granules, and is responsible for mRNA transport to dendrites and neuronal network formation. A recent study reported that a heterozygous mutation in the Rng105 gene was found in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between RNG105 deficiency and ASD. Here, we subjected Rng105+/− mice to a comprehensive behavioral test battery, and revealed the influence of RNG105 deficiency on mouse behavior. Rng105+/− mice exhibited a reduced sociality in a home cage and a weak preference for social novelty. Consistently, the Rng105+/− mice also showed a weak preference for novel objects and novel place patterns. Furthermore, although the Rng105+/− mice exhibited normal memory acquisition, they tended to have relative difficulty in reversal learning in the spatial reference tasks. These findings suggest that the RNG105 heterozygous knockout leads to a reduction in sociality, response to novelty and flexibility in learning, which are implicated in ASD-like behavior. PMID:26865403

  14. Interactions between canine RAD51 and full length or truncated BRCA2 BRC repeats.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, K; Yoshikawa, Y; Oonuma, T; Tomioka, Y; Hashizume, K; Morimatsu, M

    2011-11-01

    In humans, mutations in the gene for the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA2 affect its interactions with the recombinase RAD51 and are associated with an increased risk of cancer. This interaction occurs through a series of eight BRC repeat sequences in BRCA2. A mammalian two-hybrid assay using individual BRC repeats demonstrated that BRC6 did not bind to RAD51, whereas there was strong (BRC1, 2 and 4), intermediate (BRC8), or weak (BRC3, 5 and 7) binding of other BRC repeats to RAD51. In serial deletion mutation experiments, binding strengths were increased when the C-terminal BRC repeat was removed from BRC1-8, BRC1-5 and BRC1-3. These results may provide an insight into the effects of missense or truncation mutations in BRCA2 in canine tumours.

  15. A previously unknown mutation in the pyruvate kinase gene (PKLR) identified from a neonate with severe jaundice.

    PubMed

    Yaish, Hassan M; Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Agarwal, Archana M; Siddiqui, Abdul H; Christensen, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    We report a neonate with early and severe hemolytic jaundice and low erythrocyte pyruvate kinase enzymatic activity (<2 U/g hemoglobin, reference interval 9-22). We found her asymptomatic mother to be heterozygous for a novel PKLR mutation (c.1573delT) with an erythrocyte PK activity of 6.2 U/g hemoglobin. Her asymptomatic father was heterozygous for the common Northern European PKLR mutation (c.1529A) with an erythrocyte PK activity of 3.6 U/g. The neonate was a compound heterozygote with both mutations, but with no other mutations identified by sequencing a panel of 27 genes involved in severe neonatal jaundice.

  16. Homozygous HOXA1 mutations disrupt human brainstem, inner ear, cardiovascular and cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Tischfield, Max A; Bosley, Thomas M; Salih, Mustafa A M; Alorainy, Ibrahim A; Sener, Emin C; Nester, Michael J; Oystreck, Darren T; Chan, Wai-Man; Andrews, Caroline; Erickson, Robert P; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2005-10-01

    We identified homozygous truncating mutations in HOXA1 in three genetically isolated human populations. The resulting phenotype includes horizontal gaze abnormalities, deafness, facial weakness, hypoventilation, vascular malformations of the internal carotid arteries and cardiac outflow tract, mental retardation and autism spectrum disorder. This is the first report to our knowledge of viable homozygous truncating mutations in any human HOX gene and of a mendelian disorder resulting from mutations in a human HOX gene critical for development of the central nervous system. PMID:16155570

  17. Biological insights into BRAF(V600) mutations in melanoma patient: Not mere therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Improta, Giuseppina; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Tamborini, Elena; Donia, Marco; Santinami, Mario; de Braud, Filippo; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2013-08-01

    Some experimental evidence indicates that uncommon BRAF mutations consisting in the substitution of 2 adjacent nucleotides within codon 600 are in a cis configuration and associate with BRAF gene amplification. These findings suggest that BRAF(V600) mutations are unlikely to occur as homozygous alterations in clinical melanoma samples, with gene amplification perhaps contributing to mask the heterozygous state. PMID:24179707

  18. GnRH-Deficient Phenotypes in Humans and Mice with Heterozygous Variants in KISS1/Kiss1

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yee-Ming; Broder-Fingert, Sarabeth; Paraschos, Sophia; Lapatto, Risto; Au, Margaret; Hughes, Virginia; Bianco, Suzy D. C.; Min, Le; Plummer, Lacey; Cerrato, Felecia; De Guillebon, Adelaide; Wu, I-Hsuan; Wahab, Fazal; Dwyer, Andrew; Kirsch, Susan; Quinton, Richard; Cheetham, Timothy; Ozata, Metin; Ten, Svetlana; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Pitteloud, Nelly; Martin, Kathryn A.; Schiffmann, Raphael; Van der Kamp, Hetty J.; Nader, Shahla; Hall, Janet E.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2011-01-01

    Context: KISS1 is a candidate gene for GnRH deficiency. Objective: Our objective was to identify deleterious mutations in KISS1. Patients and Methods: DNA sequencing and assessment of the effects of rare sequence variants (RSV) were conducted in 1025 probands with GnRH-deficient conditions. Results: Fifteen probands harbored 10 heterozygous RSV in KISS1 seen in less than 1% of control subjects. Of the variants that reside within the mature kisspeptin peptide, p.F117L (but not p.S77I, p.Q82K, p.H90D, or p.P110T) reduces inositol phosphate generation. Of the variants that lie within the coding region but outside the mature peptide, p.G35S and p.C53R (but not p.A129V) are predicted in silico to be deleterious. Of the variants that lie outside the coding region, one (g.1-3659C→T) impairs transcription in vitro, and another (c.1-7C→T) lies within the consensus Kozak sequence. Of five probands tested, four had abnormal baseline LH pulse patterns. In mice, testosterone decreases with heterozygous loss of Kiss1 and Kiss1r alleles (wild-type, 274 ± 99, to double heterozygotes, 69 ± 16 ng/dl; r2 = 0.13; P = 0.03). Kiss1/Kiss1r double-heterozygote males have shorter anogenital distances (13.0 ± 0.2 vs. 15.6 ± 0.2 mm at P34, P < 0.001), females have longer estrous cycles (7.4 ± 0.2 vs. 5.6 ± 0.2 d, P < 0.01), and mating pairs have decreased litter frequency (0.59 ± 0.09 vs. 0.71 ± 0.06 litters/month, P < 0.04) and size (3.5 ± 0.2 vs. 5.4 ± 0.3 pups/litter, P < 0.001) compared with wild-type mice. Conclusions: Deleterious, heterozygous RSV in KISS1 exist at a low frequency in GnRH-deficient patients as well as in the general population in presumably normal individuals. As in Kiss1+/−/Kiss1r+/− mice, heterozygous KISS1 variants in humans may work with other genetic and/or environmental factors to cause abnormal reproductive function. PMID:21880801

  19. RELN Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Dawn B.; Howell, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    RELN encodes a large, secreted glycoprotein integral to proper neuronal positioning during development and regulation of synaptic function postnatally. Rare, homozygous, null mutations lead to lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH), accompanied by developmental delay and epilepsy. Until recently, little was known about the frequency or consequences of heterozygous mutations. Several lines of evidence from multiple studies now implicate heterozygous mutations in RELN in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). RELN maps to the AUTS1 locus on 7q22, and at this time over 40 distinct mutations have been identified that would alter the protein sequence, four of which are de novo. The RELN mutations that are most clearly consequential are those that are predicted to inactivate the signaling function of the encoded protein and those that fall in a highly conserved RXR motif found at the core of the 16 Reelin subrepeats. Despite the growing evidence of RELN dysfunction in ASD, it appears that these mutations in isolation are insufficient and that secondary genetic or environmental factors are likely required for a diagnosis. PMID:27064498

  20. Occurrence of a 2-bp (AT) deletion allele and a nonsense (G-to-T) mutant allele at the E2 (DBT) locus of six patients with maple syrup urine disease: Multiple-exon skipping as a secondary effect of the mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, C.W.; Fisher, C.R.; Chuang, J.L.; Lau, K.S.; Chuang, D.T.; Cox, R.P. )

    1993-02-01

    The authors have identified two novel mutant alleles in the transacylase (E2) gene of the human branched-chain [alpha]-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD) complex in 6 of 38 patients with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). One mutation, a 2-bp (AT) deletion in exon 2 of the E2 gene, causes a frameshift downstream of residue ([minus]26) in the mitochondrial targeting presequence. The second mutation, a G-to-T transversion in exon 6 of the E2 gene, produces a premature stop codon at Glu-163 (E163*). Transfection of constructs harboring the E163* mutation into an E2-deficient MSUD cell line produced a truncated E2 subunit. However, this mutant E2 chain is unable to assemble into a 24-mer cubic structure and is degraded in the cell. The 2-bp (AT) deletion and the E163* mutant alleles occur in either the homozygous or compound-heterozygous state in the 6 of 38 unrelated MSUD patients studied. Moreover, an array of precise single- and multiple-exon deletions were observed in many amplified E2 mutant cDNAs. The latter results appear to represent secondary effects on RNA processing that are associated with the MSUD mutations at the E2 locus. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Novel CYP27B1 Gene Mutations in Patients with Vitamin D-Dependent Rickets Type 1A.

    PubMed

    Demir, Korcan; Kattan, Walaa E; Zou, Minjing; Durmaz, Erdem; BinEssa, Huda; Nalbantoğlu, Özlem; Al-Rijjal, Roua A; Meyer, Brian; Özkan, Behzat; Shi, Yufei

    2015-01-01

    The CYP27B1 gene encodes 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase. Mutations of this gene cause vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR-IA, OMIM 264700), which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. To investigate CYP27B1 mutations, we studied 8 patients from 7 unrelated families. All coding exons and intron-exon boundaries of CYP27B1 gene were amplified by PCR from peripheral leukocyte DNA and subsequently sequenced. Homozygous mutations in the CYP27B1 gene were found in all the patients and heterozygous mutations were present in their normal parents. One novel single nucleotide variation (SNV, c.1215 T>C, p.R379R in the last nucleotide of exon 7) and three novel mutations were identified:, a splice donor site mutation (c.1215+2T>A) in intron 7, a 16-bp deletion in exon 6 (c.1022-1037del16), and a 2-bp deletion in exon 5 (c.934_935delAC). Both c.1215 T>C and c.1215+2T>A were present together in homozygous form in two unrelated patients, and caused exon 7 skipping. However, c.1215 T>C alone has no effect on pre-mRNA splicing. The skipping of exon 7 resulted in a shift of downstream reading frame and a premature stop codon 57 amino acids from L380 (p.L380Afs*57). The intra-exon deletions of c.1022-1037del16 and c.934_935delAC also resulted in a frameshift and the creation of premature stop codons at p.T341Rfs*5, and p.T312Rfs*19, respectively, leading to the functional inactivation of the CYP27B1 gene. Clinically, all the patients required continued calcitriol treatment and the clinical presentations were consistent with the complete loss of vitamin D1α-hydroxylase activity. In conclusion, three novel mutations have been identified. All of them caused frameshift and truncated proteins. The silent c.1215 T>C SNV has no effect on pre-mRNA splicing and it is likely a novel SNP. The current study further expands the CYP27B1 mutation spectrum.

  2. The spatial learning phenotype of heterozygous leaner mice is robust to systematic variation of the housing environment.

    PubMed

    Marques, Joana M; Alonso, Isabel; Santos, Cristina; Silveira, Isabel; Olsson, I Anna S

    2009-04-01

    Providing stimulation and allowing the performance of motivated behaviors through environmental enrichment improves learning and memory in rodents and delays cognitive impairment in neurodegenerative disease models. The leaner mutation affects the Ca(v)2.1 voltage-gated calcium channel alpha(1A)-subunit gene, and homozygous mice show severe phenotypic alterations. Although several authors have described heterozygous mice as normal, recent studies in our laboratory indicate motor and cognitive impairment in tg(la)/+ mice. In the present study, we evaluated whether this impairment is robust to systematic variation of the housing environment from barren to standard and furnished (enriched) cages. Wildtype (n = 55) and tg(la)/+ (n = 79) C57Bl/6J mice were assigned randomly to 1 of the 3 housing systems and tested on the Morris water maze at 6, 12, and 20 mo of age. The results confirmed impaired performance in tg(la)/+ mice, particularly in older mice. At 12 and 20 mo, only wildtype (and not tg(la)/+) mice showed evidence of learning (spending increased time in the target quadrant) during the probe trial. Housing also affected performance: at 12 mo, only mice from furnished cages showed evidence of learning, and in aged mice (20 mo), only those housed in more complex environments showed long-term memory (8 mo after previous testing) of the platform position. In conclusion, a heterozygous mutation in a Ca(2+) channel gene causes cognitive deficits in leaner mice that are robust to environmental variation but attenuated by physical and behavioral stimulation.

  3. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  4. Entanglement entropy from the truncated conformal space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmai, T.

    2016-08-01

    A new numerical approach to entanglement entropies of the Rényi type is proposed for one-dimensional quantum field theories. The method extends the truncated conformal spectrum approach and we will demonstrate that it is especially suited to study the crossover from massless to massive behavior when the subsystem size is comparable to the correlation length. We apply it to different deformations of massless free fermions, corresponding to the scaling limit of the Ising model in transverse and longitudinal fields. For massive free fermions the exactly known crossover function is reproduced already in very small system sizes. The new method treats ground states and excited states on the same footing, and the applicability for excited states is illustrated by reproducing Rényi entropies of low-lying states in the transverse field Ising model.

  5. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) as a fast molecular diagnosis tool for left ventricular noncompaction in an infant with compound mutations in the MYBPC3 gene.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Elise; Helms, Pauline; Marcellin, Luc; Desprez, Philippe; Billaud, Philippe; Chanavat, Valérie; Rousson, Robert; Millat, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by a trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular myocardial recesses that communicate with the left ventricular cavity. LVNC is classified as a rare genetic cardiomyopathy. Molecular diagnosis is a challenge for the medical community as the condition shares morphologic features of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Several genetic causes of LVNC have been reported, with variable modes of inheritance, including autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance, but relatively few responsible genes have been identified. In this report, we describe a case of a severe form of LVNC leading to death at 6 months of life. NGS sequencing using a custom design for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy panel allowed us to identify compound heterozygosity in the MYBPC3 gene (p.Lys505del, p.Pro955fs) in 3 days, confirming NGS sequencing as a fast molecular diagnosis tool. Other studies have reported neonatal presentation of cardiomyopathies associated with compound heterozygous or homozygous MYBPC3 mutations. In this family and in families in which parental truncating MYBPC3 mutations are identified, preimplantation or prenatal genetic screening should be considered as these genotypes leads to neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  6. Clinical and Genetic Characterization of Manifesting Carriers of DMD Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Soltanzadeh, Payam; Friez, Michael J.; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Gurvich, Olga L.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Sampson, Jacinda B.; Pestronk, Alan; Connolly, Anne M.; Florence, Julaine M.; Finkel, Richard S.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Mendell, Jerry R.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Wong, Brenda L.; Sussman, Michael D.; Zonana, Jonathan; Kovak, Karen; Gospe, Sidney M.; Gappmaier, Eduard; Taylor, Laura E.; Howard, Michael T.; Weiss, Robert B.; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Manifesting carriers of DMD gene mutations may present diagnostic challenges, particularly in the absence of a family history of dystrophinopathy. We review the clinical and genetic features in fifteen manifesting carriers identified among 860 subjects within the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a large clinical dystrophinopathy cohort whose members undergo comprehensive DMD mutation analysis. We defined manifesting carriers as females with significant weakness, excluding those with only myalgias/cramps. DNA extracted from peripheral blood was used to study X chromosome inactivation patterns. Among these manifesting carriers, age at symptom onset ranged from 2 to 47 years. Seven had no family history and eight had male relatives with Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD). Clinical severity among the manifesting carriers varied from a DMD-like progression to a very mild Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype. Eight had exonic deletions or duplications and six had point mutations. One patient had two mutations (an exonic deletion and a splice site mutation), consistent with a heterozygous compound state. The X chromosome inactivation pattern was skewed toward nonrandom in four out of seven informative deletions or duplications but was random in all cases with nonsense mutations. We present the results of DMD mutation analysis in this manifesting carrier cohort, including the first example of a presumably compound heterozygous DMD mutation. Our results demonstrate that improved molecular diagnostic methods facilitate the identification of DMD mutations in manifesting carriers, and confirm the heterogeneity of mutational mechanisms as well as the wide spectrum of phenotypes. PMID:20630757

  7. Norepinephrine transporter heterozygous knockout mice exhibit altered transport and behavior.

    PubMed

    Fentress, H M; Klar, R; Krueger, J J; Sabb, T; Redmon, S N; Wallace, N M; Shirey-Rice, J K; Hahn, M K

    2013-11-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET(+/-) ), demonstrating that they display an approximately 50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET(+/-) mouse establishes an activated state of existing surface NET proteins. The NET(+/-) mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris water maze. These data suggest that recovery of near basal activity in NET(+/-) mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET(+/-) mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders.

  8. Transponder-induced sarcoma in the heterozygous p53+/- mouse.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, K T; Barthel, C; French, J E; Holden, H E; Moretz, R; Pack, F D; Tennant, R W; Stoll, R E

    1999-01-01

    Heterozygous p53+/- transgenic mice are being studied for utility as a short-term alternative model to the 2-yr rodent carcinogenicity bioassay. During a 26-wk study to assess the potential carcinogenicity of oxymetholone using p-cresidine as a positive control, glass/polypropylene microchips (radio transponder identification devices) were subcutaneously implanted into male and female p53+/- mice. During week 15, the first palpable mass was clinically observed at an implant site. This rapidly growing mass virtually quadrupled in size by week 25. Microscopic examination of all implant sites revealed that 18 of 177 animals had a subcutaneous histologically malignant sarcoma. The neoplasms were characterized as undifferentiated sarcomas unrelated to drug treatment, as indicated by the relatively even distribution among dose groups, including controls. An unusual preneoplastic mesenchymal change characterized by the term "mesenchymal dysplasia" was present in most groups and was considered to be a prodromal change to sarcoma development. The tumors were observed to arise from dysplastic mesenchymal tissue that developed within the tissue capsule surrounding the transponder. The preneoplastic changes, including mesenchymal dysplasia, appeared to arise at the transponder's plastic anchoring barb and then progressed as a neoplasm to eventually surround the entire microchip. Capsule membrane endothelialization, inflammation, mesenchymal basophilia and dysplasia, and sarcoma were considered unequivocal preneoplastic/neoplastic responses to the transponder and were not related to treatment with either oxymetholone or p-cresidine.

  9. Genetic Instability of Heterozygous, Hybrid, Natural Wine Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Manuel; Vinagre, Antonia; Ambrona, Jesús; Molina, Felipe; Maqueda, Matilde; Rebollo, JoséE.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a genetic instability found in natural wine yeasts but not in the common laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Spontaneous cyh2R/cyh2R mutants resistant to high levels of cycloheximide can be directly isolated from cyh2S/cyh2S wine yeasts. Heterozygous cyh2R/cyh2S hybrid clones vary in genetic instability as measured by loss of heterozygosity at cyh2. There were two main classes of hybrids. The lawn hybrids have high genetic instability and generally become cyh2R/cyh2R homozygotes and lose the killer phenotype under nonselective conditions. The papilla hybrids have a much lower rate of loss of heterozygosity and maintain the killer phenotype. The genetic instability in lawn hybrids is 3 to 5 orders of magnitude greater than the highest loss-of-heterozygosity rates previously reported. Molecular mechanisms such as DNA repair by break-induced replication might account for the asymmetrical loss of heterozygosity. This loss-of-heterozygosity phenomenon could be economically important if it causes sudden phenotype changes in industrial or pathogenic yeasts and of more basic importance to the degree that it influences the evolution of naturally occurring yeast populations. PMID:15294803

  10. Heterozygous Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Derived from Nonhuman Primate Parthenotes

    PubMed Central

    Dighe, Vikas; Clepper, Lisa; Pedersen, Darlene; Byrne, James; Ferguson, Betsy; Gokhale, Sumita; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2009-01-01

    Monoparental parthenotes represent a potential source of histocompatible stem cells that should be isogenic with the oocyte donor and therefore suitable for use in cell or tissue replacement therapy. We generated five rhesus monkey parthenogenetic embryonic stem cell (PESC) lines with stable, diploid female karyotypes that were morphologically indistinguishable from biparental controls, expressed key pluripotent markers, and generated cell derivatives representative of all three germ layers following in vivo and in vitro differentiation. Interestingly, high levels of heterozygosity were observed at the majority of loci that were polymorphic in the oocyte donors. Some PESC lines were also heterozygous in the major histocompatibility complex region, carrying haplotypes identical to those of the egg donor females. Expression analysis revealed transcripts from some imprinted genes that are normally expressed from only the paternal allele. These results indicate that limitations accompanying the potential use of PESC-derived phenotypes in regenerative medicine, including aberrant genomic imprinting and high levels of homozygosity, are cell line-dependent and not always present. PESC lines were derived in high enough yields to be practicable, and their derivatives are suitable for autologous transplantation into oocyte donors or could be used to establish a bank of histocompatible cell lines for a broad spectrum of patients. PMID:18192229

  11. Heterozygous embryonic stem cell lines derived from nonhuman primate parthenotes.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Vikas; Clepper, Lisa; Pedersen, Darlene; Byrne, James; Ferguson, Betsy; Gokhale, Sumita; Penedo, M Cecilia T; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2008-03-01

    Monoparental parthenotes represent a potential source of histocompatible stem cells that should be isogenic with the oocyte donor and therefore suitable for use in cell or tissue replacement therapy. We generated five rhesus monkey parthenogenetic embryonic stem cell (PESC) lines with stable, diploid female karyotypes that were morphologically indistinguishable from biparental controls, expressed key pluripotent markers, and generated cell derivatives representative of all three germ layers following in vivo and in vitro differentiation. Interestingly, high levels of heterozygosity were observed at the majority of loci that were polymorphic in the oocyte donors. Some PESC lines were also heterozygous in the major histocompatibility complex region, carrying haplotypes identical to those of the egg donor females. Expression analysis revealed transcripts from some imprinted genes that are normally expressed from only the paternal allele. These results indicate that limitations accompanying the potential use of PESC-derived phenotypes in regenerative medicine, including aberrant genomic imprinting and high levels of homozygosity, are cell line-dependent and not always present. PESC lines were derived in high enough yields to be practicable, and their derivatives are suitable for autologous transplantation into oocyte donors or could be used to establish a bank of histocompatible cell lines for a broad spectrum of patients.

  12. Norepinephrine Transporter Heterozygous Knockout Mice Exhibit Altered Transport and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fentress, HM; Klar, R; Krueger, JK; Sabb, T; Redmon, SN; Wallace, NM; Shirey-Rice, JK; Hahn, MK

    2013-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically-driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET+/−), demonstrating that they display an ~50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity, assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET+/− mouse establishes an activated state of existing, surface NET proteins. NET+/− mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris Water Maze. These data suggest recovery of near basal activity in NET+/− mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET+/− mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  13. Disruption of NBS1 gene leads to early embryonic lethality in homozygous null mice and induces specific cancer in heterozygous mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Henrie, Melinda; Ouyang, Honghai; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Ito, Hisao; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B.; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Gloria C.; Chen, David J.

    2002-04-15

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive chromosome instability syndrome characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition, with cellular features similar to that of ataxia telangiectasia (AT). NBS results from mutations in the mammalian gene Nbs1 that codes for a 95-kDa protein called nibrin, NBS1, or p95. To establish an animal model for NBS, we attempted to generate NBS1 knockout mice. However, NBS1 gene knockouts were lethal at an early embryonic stage. NBS1 homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured in vitro showed retarded growth and subsequently underwent growth arrest within 5 days of culture. Apoptosis, assayed by TUNEL staining, was observed in NBSI homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured for four days. NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice were normal, and exhibited no specific phenotype for at least one year. However, fibroblast cells from NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice displayed an enhanced frequency of spontaneous transformation to anchorage-independent growth as compared to NBS1 wild-type(+/+) cells. Furthermore, heterozygous(+/-) mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after one year compared to wild-type mice, even though no significant differences in the incidence of other tumors such as lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma were observed. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that NBS1 heterozygosity and reduced NBSI expression induces formation of specific tumors in mice.

  14. Caspase-Mediated Truncation of Tau Potentiates Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangmook; Shea, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Caspase-mediated truncation of tau is associated with aggregation. We examined the impact of manipulation of caspase activity on intracellular aggregation of a mutant form of tau (3PO) that forms spontaneous aggregates. Treatment with the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk reduced both N and C-terminal tau truncation but did not significantly reduce aggregation. Treatment with staurosporine, which activated caspases, increased C-terminal but not N-terminal truncation and enhanced aggregation. These findings suggest that caspase activation is one potential route, rather than an obligatory initiation step, in aggregation, and that N- and C-terminal truncation contribute differentially to aggregation. PMID:22988541

  15. Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa with Early Macular Affectation Caused by Premature Truncation in PROM1