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Sample records for heuristic mastermind strategies

  1. Properties of heuristic search strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbrug, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    A directed graph is used to model the search space of a state space representation with single input operators, an AND/OR is used for problem reduction representations, and a theorem proving graph is used for state space representations with multiple input operators. These three graph models and heuristic strategies for searching them are surveyed. The completeness, admissibility, and optimality properties of search strategies which use the evaluation function f = (1 - omega)g = omega(h) are presented and interpreted using a representation of the search process in the plane. The use of multiple output operators to imply dependent successors, and thus obtain a formalism which includes all three types of representations, is discussed.

  2. Heuristics: Intelligent search strategies for computer problem solving

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, J.

    1984-01-01

    Heuristics stand for strategies using readily accessible information to control problem-solving processes in man and machine. This book presents an analysis of the nature and the power of typical heuristic methods, primarily those used in artificial intelligence and operations research, to solve problems in areas such as reasoning, design, scheduling, planning, signal interpretation, symbolic computation, and combinatorial optimization. It is intended for advanced undergraduate or graduate students in artificial intelligence and for researchers in engineering, mathematics, and operations research.

  3. Heuristical Strategies on the Study Theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons -- Alkenes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naumescu, Adrienne Kozan; Pasca, Roxana-Diana

    2011-01-01

    The influence of heuristical strategies upon the level of two experimental classes is studied in this paper. The didactic experiment took place at secondary school in Cluj-Napoca, in 2008-2009 school year. The study theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons--Alkenes" has been efficiently learned by using the most active methods: laboratory…

  4. Compensatory Reading among ESL Learners: A Reading Strategy Heuristic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Shaik Abdul Malik Mohamed; Petras, Yusof Ede; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid; Eng, Lin Siew

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to gain an insight to the relationship of two different concepts about reading comprehension, namely, the linear model of comprehension and the interactive compensatory theory. Drawing on both the above concepts, a heuristic was constructed about three different reading strategies determined by the specific ways the literal,…

  5. Analysis of complex network performance and heuristic node removal strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanpour, Ehsan; Chen, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Removing important nodes from complex networks is a great challenge in fighting against criminal organizations and preventing disease outbreaks. Six network performance metrics, including four new metrics, are applied to quantify networks' diffusion speed, diffusion scale, homogeneity, and diameter. In order to efficiently identify nodes whose removal maximally destroys a network, i.e., minimizes network performance, ten structured heuristic node removal strategies are designed using different node centrality metrics including degree, betweenness, reciprocal closeness, complement-derived closeness, and eigenvector centrality. These strategies are applied to remove nodes from the September 11, 2001 hijackers' network, and their performance are compared to that of a random strategy, which removes randomly selected nodes, and the locally optimal solution (LOS), which removes nodes to minimize network performance at each step. The computational complexity of the 11 strategies and LOS is also analyzed. Results show that the node removal strategies using degree and betweenness centralities are more efficient than other strategies.

  6. Cracking Bank PINs by Playing Mastermind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, Riccardo; Luccio, Flaminia L.

    The bank director was pretty upset noticing Joe, the system administrator, spending his spare time playing Mastermind, an old useless game of the 70ies. He had fought the instinct of telling him how to better spend his life, just limiting to look at him in disgust long enough to be certain to be noticed. No wonder when the next day the director fell on his chair astonished while reading, on the newspaper, about a huge digital fraud on the ATMs of his bank, with millions of Euros stolen by a team of hackers all around the world. The article mentioned how the hackers had 'played with the bank computers just like playing Mastermind', being able to disclose thousands of user PINs during the one-hour lunch break. That precise moment, a second before falling senseless, he understood the subtle smile on Joe's face the day before, while training at his preferred game, Mastermind.

  7. Fieldwork Game Play: Masterminding Evidentiality in Desano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Wilson; AnderBois, Scott

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a methodology for collecting naturally occurring data on evidentials and epistemic modals. We use Desano (Eastern Tukanoan) as a case study. This language has a complex evidential system with six evidential forms. The methodology in question consists of having Desano speakers to play a logic game, "Mastermind".…

  8. A philosophical evaluation of adaptationism as a heuristic strategy.

    PubMed

    Green, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Adaptationism has prompted many a debate in philosophy of biology but the focus is usually on empirical and explanatory issues rather than methodological adaptationism (MA). Likewise, the context of evolutionary biology has provided the grounding for most discussions of the heuristic role of adaptationism. This paper extends the debate by drawing on case studies from physiology and systems biology to discuss the productive and problematic aspects of adaptationism in functional as well as evolutionary studies at different levels of biological organization. Gould and Lewontin's Spandrels-paper famously criticized adaptationist methodology for implying a risk of generating 'blind spots' with respect to non-selective effects on evolution. Some have claimed that this bias can be accommodated through the testing of evolutionary hypotheses. Although this is an important aspect of overcoming the pitfalls of adaptationism, I argue that the issue of methodological biases is broader than the question of testability. I demonstrate the productivity of adaptationist heuristics but also discuss the deeper problematic aspects associated with the imperialistic tendencies of the strong account of MA.

  9. The Development of a Culture of Problem Solving with Secondary Students through Heuristic Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenmann, Petr; Novotná, Jarmila; Pribyl, Jirí; Brehovský, Jirí

    2015-01-01

    The article reports the results of a longitudinal research study conducted in three mathematics classes in Czech schools with 62 pupils aged 12-18 years. The pupils were exposed to the use of selected heuristic strategies in mathematical problem solving for a period of 16 months. This was done through solving problems where the solution was the…

  10. Superheroes and masterminds of plant domestication.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ainsworth, Natalia E; Tenaillon, Maud I

    2016-01-01

    Domestication is one of the most fundamental changes in the evolution of human societies. The geographical origins of domesticated plants are inferred from archaeology, ecology and genetic data. Scenarios vary among species and include single, diffuse or multiple independent domestications. Cultivated plants present a panel of traits, the "domestication syndrome" that distinguish them from their wild relatives. It encompasses yield-, food usage-, and cultivation-related traits. Most genes underlying those traits are "masterminds" affecting the regulation of gene networks. Phenotypic convergence of domestication traits across species or within species between independently domesticated forms rarely coincides with convergence at the gene level. We review here current data/models that propose a protracted transition model for domestication and investigate the impact of mating system, life cycle and gene flow on the pace of domestication. Finally, we discuss the cost of domestication, pointing to the importance of characterizing adaptive functional variation in wild resources. PMID:27317057

  11. Superheroes and masterminds of plant domestication.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ainsworth, Natalia E; Tenaillon, Maud I

    2016-01-01

    Domestication is one of the most fundamental changes in the evolution of human societies. The geographical origins of domesticated plants are inferred from archaeology, ecology and genetic data. Scenarios vary among species and include single, diffuse or multiple independent domestications. Cultivated plants present a panel of traits, the "domestication syndrome" that distinguish them from their wild relatives. It encompasses yield-, food usage-, and cultivation-related traits. Most genes underlying those traits are "masterminds" affecting the regulation of gene networks. Phenotypic convergence of domestication traits across species or within species between independently domesticated forms rarely coincides with convergence at the gene level. We review here current data/models that propose a protracted transition model for domestication and investigate the impact of mating system, life cycle and gene flow on the pace of domestication. Finally, we discuss the cost of domestication, pointing to the importance of characterizing adaptive functional variation in wild resources.

  12. The development of a culture of problem solving with secondary students through heuristic strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, Petr; Novotná, Jarmila; Přibyl, Jiří; Břehovský, Jiří

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the results of a longitudinal research study conducted in three mathematics classes in Czech schools with 62 pupils aged 12-18 years. The pupils were exposed to the use of selected heuristic strategies in mathematical problem solving for a period of 16 months. This was done through solving problems where the solution was the most efficient if heuristic strategies were used. The authors conducted a two-dimensional classification of the use of heuristic strategies based on the work of Pólya (2004) and Schoenfeld (1985). We developed a tool that allows for the description of a pupil's ability to solve problems. Named, the Culture of Problem Solving (CPS), this tool consists of four components: intelligence, text comprehension, creativity and the ability to use existing knowledge. The pupils' success rate in problem solving and the changes in some of the CPS factors pre- and post-experiment were monitored. The pupils appeared to considerably improve in the creativity component. In addition, the results indicate a positive change in the students' attitude to problem solving. As far as the teachers participating in the experiment are concerned, a significant change was in their teaching style to a more constructivist, inquiry-based approach, as well as their willingness to accept a student's non-standard approach to solving a problem. Another important outcome of the research was the identification of the heuristic strategies that can be taught via long-term guided solutions of suitable problems and those that cannot. Those that can be taught include systematic experimentation, guess-check-revise and introduction of an auxiliary element. Those that cannot be taught (or can only be taught with difficulty) include the strategies of specification and generalization and analogy.

  13. Mastermind: An Activity for Becoming Aware of Negative Mental Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershaw, David A.

    Since 1974, the game, Mastermind, has been a partial requirement for an introduction to psychology course at Arizona Western College. The game is designed to help students become aware of negative mental sets and apply critical thinking skills, and requires students to duplicate a code consisting of four different colored pegs arranged in a…

  14. Industrial waste recycling strategies optimization problem: mixed integer programming model and heuristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiafu; Liu, Yang; Fung, Richard; Luo, Xinggang

    2008-12-01

    Manufacturers have a legal accountability to deal with industrial waste generated from their production processes in order to avoid pollution. Along with advances in waste recovery techniques, manufacturers may adopt various recycling strategies in dealing with industrial waste. With reuse strategies and technologies, byproducts or wastes will be returned to production processes in the iron and steel industry, and some waste can be recycled back to base material for reuse in other industries. This article focuses on a recovery strategies optimization problem for a typical class of industrial waste recycling process in order to maximize profit. There are multiple strategies for waste recycling available to generate multiple byproducts; these byproducts are then further transformed into several types of chemical products via different production patterns. A mixed integer programming model is developed to determine which recycling strategy and which production pattern should be selected with what quantity of chemical products corresponding to this strategy and pattern in order to yield maximum marginal profits. The sales profits of chemical products and the set-up costs of these strategies, patterns and operation costs of production are considered. A simulated annealing (SA) based heuristic algorithm is developed to solve the problem. Finally, an experiment is designed to verify the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method. By comparing a single strategy to multiple strategies in an example, it is shown that the total sales profit of chemical products can be increased by around 25% through the simultaneous use of multiple strategies. This illustrates the superiority of combinatorial multiple strategies. Furthermore, the effects of the model parameters on profit are discussed to help manufacturers organize their waste recycling network.

  15. Heuristic Chemistry--A Qualitative Study on Teaching Domain-Specific Strategies for the Six-Electron Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graulich, Nicole; Tiemann, Rudiger; Schreiner, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the efficiency of domain-specific heuristic strategies in mastering and predicting pericyclic six-electron rearrangements. Based on recent research findings on these types of reactions a new concept has been developed that should help students identify and describe six-electron rearrangements more readily in complex molecules. The…

  16. Response demands and the recruitment of heuristic strategies in syllogistic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Reverberi, Carlo; Rusconi, Patrice; Paulesu, Eraldo; Cherubini, Paolo

    2009-03-01

    Two experiments investigated whether dealing with a homogeneous subset of syllogisms with time-constrained responses encouraged participants to develop and use heuristics for abstract (Experiment 1) and thematic (Experiment 2) syllogisms. An atmosphere-based heuristic accounted for most responses with both abstract and thematic syllogisms. With thematic syllogisms, a weaker effect of a belief heuristic was also observed, mainly where the correct response was inconsistent with the atmosphere of the premises. Analytic processes appear to have played little role in the time-constrained condition, whereas their involvement increased in a self-paced, unconstrained condition. From a dual-process perspective, the results further specify how task demands affect the recruitment of heuristic and analytic systems of reasoning. Because the syllogisms and experimental procedure were the same as those used in a previous neuroimaging study by Goel, Buchel, Frith, and Dolan (2000), the result also deepen our understanding of the cognitive processes investigated by that study.

  17. Heuristic decision making.

    PubMed

    Gigerenzer, Gerd; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    As reflected in the amount of controversy, few areas in psychology have undergone such dramatic conceptual changes in the past decade as the emerging science of heuristics. Heuristics are efficient cognitive processes, conscious or unconscious, that ignore part of the information. Because using heuristics saves effort, the classical view has been that heuristic decisions imply greater errors than do "rational" decisions as defined by logic or statistical models. However, for many decisions, the assumptions of rational models are not met, and it is an empirical rather than an a priori issue how well cognitive heuristics function in an uncertain world. To answer both the descriptive question ("Which heuristics do people use in which situations?") and the prescriptive question ("When should people rely on a given heuristic rather than a complex strategy to make better judgments?"), formal models are indispensable. We review research that tests formal models of heuristic inference, including in business organizations, health care, and legal institutions. This research indicates that (a) individuals and organizations often rely on simple heuristics in an adaptive way, and (b) ignoring part of the information can lead to more accurate judgments than weighting and adding all information, for instance for low predictability and small samples. The big future challenge is to develop a systematic theory of the building blocks of heuristics as well as the core capacities and environmental structures these exploit.

  18. Durga: A heuristically-optimized data collection strategy for volumetric magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Christopher Kumar; Curtis, Andrew Thomas; Kumar, Rakshit

    2008-02-01

    A heuristic design method for rapid volumetric magnetic resonance imaging data acquisition trajectories is presented, using a series of second-order cone optimization subproblems. Other researchers have considered non-raster data collection trajectories and under-sampled data patterns. This work demonstrates that much higher rates of under-sampling are possible with an asymmetric set of trajectories, with very little loss in resolution, but the addition of noise-like artefacts. The proposed data collection trajectory, Durga, further minimizes collection time by incorporating short un-refocused excitation pulses, resulting in above 98% collection efficiency for balanced steady state free precession imaging. The optimization subproblems are novel, in that they incorporate all requirements, including data collection (coverage), physicality (device limits), and signal generation (zeroth- and higher- moment properties) in a single convex problem, which allows the resulting trajectories to exhibit a higher collection efficiency than any existing trajectory design.

  19. Heuristic decision making in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Marewski, Julian N.; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Can less information be more helpful when it comes to making medical decisions? Contrary to the common intuition that more information is always better, the use of heuristics can help both physicians and patients to make sound decisions. Heuristics are simple decision strategies that ignore part of the available information, basing decisions on only a few relevant predictors. We discuss: (i) how doctors and patients use heuristics; and (ii) when heuristics outperform information-greedy methods, such as regressions in medical diagnosis. Furthermore, we outline those features of heuristics that make them useful in health care settings. These features include their surprising accuracy, transparency, and wide accessibility, as well as the low costs and little time required to employ them. We close by explaining one of the statistical reasons why heuristics are accurate, and by pointing to psychiatry as one area for future research on heuristics in health care. PMID:22577307

  20. A Heuristic for Generating and Organizing the Strategy or Policy Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kathleen; Weaver, Natalie Taylor

    1997-01-01

    Describes a model organization tree for the typical report expected of students in the strategy or policy course. Argues that, by defining relationships between the various analytical tasks and the overall strategy recommendation, the model helps students not only organize the final report but also understand the process by which they arrive at a…

  1. Surgical heuristics.

    PubMed

    Patkin, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Heuristics are rules of thumb. Rarely described in surgical or other publications, they are an essential part of safe and expert performance. This study translates such implicit or procedural knowledge into explicit or declarative knowledge, with a view to improving both training and retraining of surgeons in the steps of dissection. Tools used include ordinary observation accompanied by introspection, and study of operative videos. Validation of the value of such heuristics is yet to be achieved.

  2. Linking model systems to cancer therapeutics: the case of Mastermind

    PubMed Central

    Yedvobnick, Barry; Moberg, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Genetics, and more recently genomics, reveal striking conservation in the fundamental signaling pathways that underlie normal and aberrant cell processes. Consequently, various genetic model organisms are now attracting the interest of biomedical scientists who are focused on therapeutic approaches to human disease. There are now several examples of studies in which Drosophila seems likely to facilitate advances in potential therapies, and a recent report has demonstrated the utility of the fly model for understanding and treating human disease. Basic developmental genetic information first obtained in Drosophila was used to design a therapeutic block to oncogenic Notch signaling that was associated with leukemia in mice. The story of Notch signaling in Drosophila demonstrates the potential for standard Drosophila molecular genetics in developing therapeutic strategies that are relevant to human disease. PMID:20663965

  3. Heuristic status polling

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2011-06-07

    Methods, compute nodes, and computer program products are provided for heuristic status polling of a component in a computing system. Embodiments include receiving, by a polling module from a requesting application, a status request requesting status of a component; determining, by the polling module, whether an activity history for the component satisfies heuristic polling criteria; polling, by the polling module, the component for status if the activity history for the component satisfies the heuristic polling criteria; and not polling, by the polling module, the component for status if the activity history for the component does not satisfy the heuristic criteria.

  4. Search and heuristics

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, J.

    1983-01-01

    This work is comprised of articles which are representative of current research on search and heuristics. The general theme is the quest for understanding the workings of heuristic knowledge; how it is acquired, stored and used by people, how it can be represented and utilized by machines and what makes one heuristic succeed where others fail. Topics covered include the following: search and reasoning in problem solving; theory formation by heuristic search; the nature of heuristics II: background and examples; Eurisko: a program that learns new heuristics and domain concepts; the nature of heuristics III: program design and results; searching for an optimal path in a tree with random costs; search rearrangement backtracking and polynomial average time; consistent-labeling problems and their algorithms: expected-complexities and theory-based heuristics; general branch and bound formulation for understanding and synthesizing and/or tree search procedures; a minimax algorithm better than alpha-beta. yes and no; and pathology on game trees revisited, and an alternative to minimaxing.

  5. Recursive heuristic classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, David C.

    1994-01-01

    The author will describe a new problem-solving approach called recursive heuristic classification, whereby a subproblem of heuristic classification is itself formulated and solved by heuristic classification. This allows the construction of more knowledge-intensive classification programs in a way that yields a clean organization. Further, standard knowledge acquisition and learning techniques for heuristic classification can be used to create, refine, and maintain the knowledge base associated with the recursively called classification expert system. The method of recursive heuristic classification was used in the Minerva blackboard shell for heuristic classification. Minerva recursively calls itself every problem-solving cycle to solve the important blackboard scheduler task, which involves assigning a desirability rating to alternative problem-solving actions. Knowing these ratings is critical to the use of an expert system as a component of a critiquing or apprenticeship tutoring system. One innovation of this research is a method called dynamic heuristic classification, which allows selection among dynamically generated classification categories instead of requiring them to be prenumerated.

  6. Pitfalls in Teaching Judgment Heuristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepperd, James A.; Koch, Erika J.

    2005-01-01

    Demonstrations of judgment heuristics typically focus on how heuristics can lead to poor judgments. However, exclusive focus on the negative consequences of heuristics can prove problematic. We illustrate the problem with the representativeness heuristic and present a study (N = 45) that examined how examples influence understanding of the…

  7. Testing Mars-inspired operational strategies for semi-autonomous rovers on the Moon: The GeoHeuristic Operational Strategies Test in New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, R. Aileen; Cohen, B. A.; Crumpler, L.; Schmidt, M. E.; Schrader, C. M.

    Background: We tested the science operational strategy used for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission on Mars to determine its suitability for conducting remote geology on the Moon by conducting a field test at Cerro de Santa Clara, New Mexico. This region contains volcanic and sedimentary products from a variety of provenances, mimicking the variety that might be found at a lunar site such as South Pole-Aitken Basin. Method: At each site a Science Team broke down observational "days" into a sequence of observations of features and targets of interest. The number, timing, and sequence of observations was chosen to mimic those used by the MERs when traversing. Images simulating high-resolution stereo and hand lens-scale images were taken using a professional SLR digital camera; multispectral and XRD data were acquired from samples to mimic the availability of geochemical data. A separate Tiger Team followed the Science Team and examined each site using traditional terrestrial field methods, facilitating comparison between what was revealed by human versus rover-inspired methods. Lessons Learned: We conclude from this field test that MER-inspired methodology is not conducive to utilizing all acquired data in a timely manner for the case of any lunar architecture that involves the acquisition of rover data in near real- time. We additionally conclude that a methodology similar to that used for MER can be adapted for use on the Moon if mission goals are focused on reconnaissance. If the goal is to locate and identify a specific feature or material, such as water ice, a different methodology will likely be needed.

  8. ALMA Pipeline Heuristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightfoot, J.; Wyrowski, F.; Muders, D.; Boone, F.; Davis, L.; Shepherd, D.; Wilson, C.

    2006-07-01

    The ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) Pipeline Heuristics system is being developed to automatically reduce data taken with the standard observing modes. The goal is to make ALMA user-friendly to astronomers who are not experts in radio interferometry. The Pipeline Heuristics system must capture the expert knowledge required to provide data products that can be used without further processing. Observing modes to be processed by the system include single field interferometry, mosaics and single dish `on-the-fly' maps, and combinations of these modes. The data will be produced by the main ALMA array, the ALMA Compact Array (ACA) and single dish antennas. The Pipeline Heuristics system is being developed as a set of Python scripts. For interferometry these use as data processing engines the CASA/AIPS++ libraries and their bindings as CORBA objects within the ALMA Common Software (ACS). Initial development has used VLA and Plateau de Bure data sets to build and test a heuristic script capable of reducing single field data. In this paper we describe the reduction datapath and the algorithms used at each stage. Test results are presented. The path for future development is outlined.

  9. The Nuclear Protein Encoded by the Drosophila Neurogenic Gene Mastermind Is Widely Expressed and Associates with Specific Chromosomal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B.

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. PMID:8725234

  10. Heuristic Reasoning in Chemistry: Making decisions about acid strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClary, LaKeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-07-01

    The characterization of students' reasoning strategies is of central importance in the development of instructional strategies that foster meaningful learning. In particular, the identification of shortcut reasoning procedures (heuristics) used by students to reduce cognitive load can help us devise strategies to facilitate the development of more analytical ways of thinking. The central goal of this qualitative study was thus to investigate heuristic reasoning as used by organic chemistry college students, focusing our attention on their ability to predict the relative acid strength of chemical compounds represented using explicit composition and structural features (i.e., structural formulas). Our results indicated that many study participants relied heavily on one or more of the following heuristics to make most of their decisions: reduction, representativeness, and lexicographic. Despite having visual access to reach structural information about the substances included in each ranking task, many students relied on isolated composition features to make their decisions. However, the specific characteristics of the tasks seemed to trigger heuristic reasoning in different ways. Although the use of heuristics allowed students to simplify some components of the ranking tasks and generate correct responses, it often led them astray. Very few study participants predicted the correct trends based on scientifically acceptable arguments. Our results suggest the need for instructional interventions that explicitly develop college chemistry students' abilities to monitor their thinking and evaluate the effectiveness of analytical versus heuristic reasoning strategies in different contexts.

  11. Heuristic Reasoning in Chemistry: Making Decisions about Acid Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, Lakeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of students' reasoning strategies is of central importance in the development of instructional strategies that foster meaningful learning. In particular, the identification of shortcut reasoning procedures (heuristics) used by students to reduce cognitive load can help us devise strategies to facilitate the development of more…

  12. The Recognition Heuristic: A Review of Theory and Tests

    PubMed Central

    Pachur, Thorsten; Todd, Peter M.; Gigerenzer, Gerd; Schooler, Lael J.; Goldstein, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    The recognition heuristic is a prime example of how, by exploiting a match between mind and environment, a simple mental strategy can lead to efficient decision making. The proposal of the heuristic initiated a debate about the processes underlying the use of recognition in decision making. We review research addressing four key aspects of the recognition heuristic: (a) that recognition is often an ecologically valid cue; (b) that people often follow recognition when making inferences; (c) that recognition supersedes further cue knowledge; (d) that its use can produce the less-is-more effect – the phenomenon that lesser states of recognition knowledge can lead to more accurate inferences than more complete states. After we contrast the recognition heuristic to other related concepts, including availability and fluency, we carve out, from the existing findings, some boundary conditions of the use of the recognition heuristic as well as key questions for future research. Moreover, we summarize developments concerning the connection of the recognition heuristic with memory models. We suggest that the recognition heuristic is used adaptively and that, compared to other cues, recognition seems to have a special status in decision making. Finally, we discuss how systematic ignorance is exploited in other cognitive mechanisms (e.g., estimation and preference). PMID:21779266

  13. Reexamining Our Bias against Heuristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Kevin; Eva, Kevin W.; Norman, Geoff R.

    2014-01-01

    Using heuristics offers several cognitive advantages, such as increased speed and reduced effort when making decisions, in addition to allowing us to make decision in situations where missing data do not allow for formal reasoning. But the traditional view of heuristics is that they trade accuracy for efficiency. Here the authors discuss sources…

  14. Heuristic-biased stochastic sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Bresina, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a search technique for scheduling problems, called Heuristic-Biased Stochastic Sampling (HBSS). The underlying assumption behind the HBSS approach is that strictly adhering to a search heuristic often does not yield the best solution and, therefore, exploration off the heuristic path can prove fruitful. Within the HBSS approach, the balance between heuristic adherence and exploration can be controlled according to the confidence one has in the heuristic. By varying this balance, encoded as a bias function, the HBSS approach encompasses a family of search algorithms of which greedy search and completely random search are extreme members. We present empirical results from an application of HBSS to the realworld problem of observation scheduling. These results show that with the proper bias function, it can be easy to outperform greedy search.

  15. Heuristic and algorithmic processing in English, mathematics, and science education.

    PubMed

    Sharps, Matthew J; Hess, Adam B; Price-Sharps, Jana L; Teh, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Many college students experience difficulties in basic academic skills. Recent research suggests that much of this difficulty may lie in heuristic competency--the ability to use and successfully manage general cognitive strategies. In the present study, the authors evaluated this possibility. They compared participants' performance on a practice California Basic Educational Skills Test and on a series of questions in the natural sciences with heuristic and algorithmic performance on a series of mathematics and reading comprehension exercises. Heuristic competency in mathematics was associated with better scores in science and mathematics. Verbal and algorithmic skills were associated with better reading comprehension. These results indicate the importance of including heuristic training in educational contexts and highlight the importance of a relatively domain-specific approach to questions of cognition in higher education.

  16. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B.

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Mastermind-like transcriptional co-activator-mediated Notch signaling is indispensable for maintaining conjunctival epithelial identity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujin; Lam, Oliver; Nguyen, Minh-Thanh T.; Ng, Gracia; Pear, Warren S.; Ai, Walden; Wang, I-Jong; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Liu, Chia-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Conjunctival goblet cells primarily synthesize mucins to lubricate the ocular surface, which is essential for normal vision. Notch signaling has been known to associate with goblet cell differentiation in intestinal and respiratory tracts, but its function in ocular surface has yet to be fully characterized. Herein, we demonstrate that conditional inhibition of canonical Notch signaling by expressing dominant negative mastermind-like 1 (dnMaml1) in ocular surface epithelia resulted in complete suppression of goblet cell differentiation during and subsequent to development. When compared with the ocular surface of wild-type mice (OSWt), expression of dnMaml1 at the ocular surface (OSdnMaml1) caused conjunctival epithelial hyperplasia, aberrant desquamation, failure of Mucin 5ac (Muc5ac) synthesis, subconjunctival inflammation and epidermal metaplasia in cornea. In addition, conditional deletion of Notch1 from the ocular surface epithelia partially recapitulated OSdnMaml1 phenotypes. We have demonstrated that N1-ICD (Notch1 intracellular domain) transactivated the mouse Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf) promoter and that Klf4 directly bound to and significantly potentiated the Muc5ac promoter. By contrast, OSdnMaml1 dampened Klf4 and Klf5 expression, and diminished Muc5ac synthesis. Collectively, these findings indicated that Maml-mediated Notch signaling plays a pivotal role in the initiation and maintenance of goblet cell differentiation for normal ocular surface morphogenesis and homeostasis through regulation of Klf4 and Klf5. PMID:23293291

  18. Paranoid thinking as a heuristic.

    PubMed

    Preti, Antonio; Cella, Matteo

    2010-08-01

    Paranoid thinking can be viewed as a human heuristic used by individuals to deal with uncertainty during stressful situations. Under stress, individuals are likely to emphasize the threatening value of neutral stimuli and increase the reliance on paranoia-based heuristic to interpreter events and guide their decisions. Paranoid thinking can also be activated by stress arising from the possibility of losing a good opportunity; this may result in an abnormal allocation of attentional resources to social agents. A better understanding of the interplay between cognitive heuristics and emotional processes may help to detect situations in which paranoid thinking is likely to exacerbate and improve intervention for individuals with delusional disorders. PMID:20712733

  19. New insights into diversification of hyper-heuristics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhilei; Jiang, He; Xuan, Jifeng; Hu, Yan; Luo, Zhongxuan

    2014-10-01

    There has been a growing research trend of applying hyper-heuristics for problem solving, due to their ability of balancing the intensification and the diversification with low level heuristics. Traditionally, the diversification mechanism is mostly realized by perturbing the incumbent solutions to escape from local optima. In this paper, we report our attempt toward providing a new diversification mechanism, which is based on the concept of instance perturbation. In contrast to existing approaches, the proposed mechanism achieves the diversification by perturbing the instance under solving, rather than the solutions. To tackle the challenge of incorporating instance perturbation into hyper-heuristics, we also design a new hyper-heuristic framework HIP-HOP (recursive acronym of HIP-HOP is an instance perturbation-based hyper-heuristic optimization procedure), which employs a grammar guided high level strategy to manipulate the low level heuristics. With the expressive power of the grammar, the constraints, such as the feasibility of the output solution could be easily satisfied. Numerical results and statistical tests over both the Ising spin glass problem and the p -median problem instances show that HIP-HOP is able to achieve promising performances. Furthermore, runtime distribution analysis reveals that, although being relatively slow at the beginning, HIP-HOP is able to achieve competitive solutions once given sufficient time. PMID:25222719

  20. New insights into diversification of hyper-heuristics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhilei; Jiang, He; Xuan, Jifeng; Hu, Yan; Luo, Zhongxuan

    2014-10-01

    There has been a growing research trend of applying hyper-heuristics for problem solving, due to their ability of balancing the intensification and the diversification with low level heuristics. Traditionally, the diversification mechanism is mostly realized by perturbing the incumbent solutions to escape from local optima. In this paper, we report our attempt toward providing a new diversification mechanism, which is based on the concept of instance perturbation. In contrast to existing approaches, the proposed mechanism achieves the diversification by perturbing the instance under solving, rather than the solutions. To tackle the challenge of incorporating instance perturbation into hyper-heuristics, we also design a new hyper-heuristic framework HIP-HOP (recursive acronym of HIP-HOP is an instance perturbation-based hyper-heuristic optimization procedure), which employs a grammar guided high level strategy to manipulate the low level heuristics. With the expressive power of the grammar, the constraints, such as the feasibility of the output solution could be easily satisfied. Numerical results and statistical tests over both the Ising spin glass problem and the p -median problem instances show that HIP-HOP is able to achieve promising performances. Furthermore, runtime distribution analysis reveals that, although being relatively slow at the beginning, HIP-HOP is able to achieve competitive solutions once given sufficient time.

  1. Heuristic Learning and Programmed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okon, Wincenty

    1969-01-01

    Flexibility in the application of instructional methods is the best approach to a teaching situation. Insofar as possible, a combination of traditional learning methods with heuristic (problem solving) and programed ones should be used. (CK)

  2. Critical Systems Heuristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Werner; Reynolds, Martin

    Critical systems heuristics (CSH) is a framework for reflective professional practice organised around the central tool of boundary critique. This paper, written jointly by the original developer, Werner Ulrich, and Martin Reynolds, an experienced practitioner of CSH, offers a systematic introduction to the idea and use of boundary critique. Its core concepts are explained in detail and their use is illustrated by means of two case studies from the domain of environmental planning and management. A particular focus is on working constructively with tensions between opposing perspectives as they arise in many situations of professional intervention. These include tensions such as ‘situation' versus ‘system', ‘is' versus ‘ought' judgements, concerns of ‘those involved' versus ‘those affected but not involved', stakeholders' ‘stakes' versus ‘stakeholding issues', and others. Accordingly, boundary critique is presented as a participatory process of unfolding and questioning boundary judgements rather than as an expert-driven process of boundary setting. The paper concludes with a discussion of some essential skills and considerations regarding the practice of boundary critique.

  3. Memory-Based Decision-Making with Heuristics: Evidence for a Controlled Activation of Memory Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khader, Patrick H.; Pachur, Thorsten; Meier, Stefanie; Bien, Siegfried; Jost, Kerstin; Rosler, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Many of our daily decisions are memory based, that is, the attribute information about the decision alternatives has to be recalled. Behavioral studies suggest that for such decisions we often use simple strategies (heuristics) that rely on controlled and limited information search. It is assumed that these heuristics simplify decision-making by…

  4. A dynamic multiarmed bandit-gene expression programming hyper-heuristic for combinatorial optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Sabar, Nasser R; Ayob, Masri; Kendall, Graham; Qu, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Hyper-heuristics are search methodologies that aim to provide high-quality solutions across a wide variety of problem domains, rather than developing tailor-made methodologies for each problem instance/domain. A traditional hyper-heuristic framework has two levels, namely, the high level strategy (heuristic selection mechanism and the acceptance criterion) and low level heuristics (a set of problem specific heuristics). Due to the different landscape structures of different problem instances, the high level strategy plays an important role in the design of a hyper-heuristic framework. In this paper, we propose a new high level strategy for a hyper-heuristic framework. The proposed high-level strategy utilizes a dynamic multiarmed bandit-extreme value-based reward as an online heuristic selection mechanism to select the appropriate heuristic to be applied at each iteration. In addition, we propose a gene expression programming framework to automatically generate the acceptance criterion for each problem instance, instead of using human-designed criteria. Two well-known, and very different, combinatorial optimization problems, one static (exam timetabling) and one dynamic (dynamic vehicle routing) are used to demonstrate the generality of the proposed framework. Compared with state-of-the-art hyper-heuristics and other bespoke methods, empirical results demonstrate that the proposed framework is able to generalize well across both domains. We obtain competitive, if not better results, when compared to the best known results obtained from other methods that have been presented in the scientific literature. We also compare our approach against the recently released hyper-heuristic competition test suite. We again demonstrate the generality of our approach when we compare against other methods that have utilized the same six benchmark datasets from this test suite. PMID:24951713

  5. A dynamic multiarmed bandit-gene expression programming hyper-heuristic for combinatorial optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Sabar, Nasser R; Ayob, Masri; Kendall, Graham; Qu, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Hyper-heuristics are search methodologies that aim to provide high-quality solutions across a wide variety of problem domains, rather than developing tailor-made methodologies for each problem instance/domain. A traditional hyper-heuristic framework has two levels, namely, the high level strategy (heuristic selection mechanism and the acceptance criterion) and low level heuristics (a set of problem specific heuristics). Due to the different landscape structures of different problem instances, the high level strategy plays an important role in the design of a hyper-heuristic framework. In this paper, we propose a new high level strategy for a hyper-heuristic framework. The proposed high-level strategy utilizes a dynamic multiarmed bandit-extreme value-based reward as an online heuristic selection mechanism to select the appropriate heuristic to be applied at each iteration. In addition, we propose a gene expression programming framework to automatically generate the acceptance criterion for each problem instance, instead of using human-designed criteria. Two well-known, and very different, combinatorial optimization problems, one static (exam timetabling) and one dynamic (dynamic vehicle routing) are used to demonstrate the generality of the proposed framework. Compared with state-of-the-art hyper-heuristics and other bespoke methods, empirical results demonstrate that the proposed framework is able to generalize well across both domains. We obtain competitive, if not better results, when compared to the best known results obtained from other methods that have been presented in the scientific literature. We also compare our approach against the recently released hyper-heuristic competition test suite. We again demonstrate the generality of our approach when we compare against other methods that have utilized the same six benchmark datasets from this test suite.

  6. Beyond Decision Making: Cultural Ideology as Heuristic Paradigmatic Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, L. Darrell

    A paradigmatic model of cultural ideology provides a context for understanding the relationship between decision-making and personal and cultural rationality. Cultural rules or heuristics exist which indicate that many decisions can be made on the basis of established strategy rather than continual analytical calculations. When an optimal solution…

  7. Using Heuristic Evaluation to Foster Visualization Analysis and Design Skills.

    PubMed

    Sousa Santos, Beatriz; Quintino Ferreira, Beatriz; Dias, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to develop visualization analysis and design skills in master's level information visualization students, the authors use a well-known analytical usability evaluation method, heuristic evaluation, with different sets of heuristics to teach students to analyze visualization applications. The proposed approach, used for three consecutive years, has successfully stimulated critical analysis and discussion sessions as well as helped raise students' awareness concerning the benefit of using systematic analysis methods and the strategies and guidelines that should be used to design visualization applications. PMID:26780763

  8. Regarding Chilcott's "Structural Functionalism as a Heuristic Device" Heuristically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blot, Richard K.

    1998-01-01

    The heuristic value of Chilcott's essay lies less in its support for structural functionalism and more in its concern to reexamine theory in the work of earlier educational anthropologists for what earlier theories and practices can add to current research. (SLD)

  9. Rubrics: Heuristics for Developing Writing Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Paz, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Rubrics are an integral part of many writing programs, and they represent elements of good writing in essays, stories, poems, as well as other genres and forms of text. Although it is possible to use rubrics to teach students about the processes underlying effective writing, a more common practice is to use rubrics as a means of assessment, after…

  10. Heuristic Methodology and New Science Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Susan L.; Erwin, John R.

    This paper considers the use of heuristic methodology as a research vehicle for new science investigations in education. The paper describes heuristic methodology and its use as a means of new science-based research in schools. It also describes how heuristic methodology was used in a 2002 study to explain educational practices through the…

  11. A Geographical Heuristic Routing Protocol for VANETs.

    PubMed

    Urquiza-Aguiar, Luis; Tripp-Barba, Carolina; Aguilar Igartua, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) leverage the communication system of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). Recently, Delay-Tolerant Network (DTN) routing protocols have increased their popularity among the research community for being used in non-safety VANET applications and services like traffic reporting. Vehicular DTN protocols use geographical and local information to make forwarding decisions. However, current proposals only consider the selection of the best candidate based on a local-search. In this paper, we propose a generic Geographical Heuristic Routing (GHR) protocol that can be applied to any DTN geographical routing protocol that makes forwarding decisions hop by hop. GHR includes in its operation adaptations simulated annealing and Tabu-search meta-heuristics, which have largely been used to improve local-search results in discrete optimization. We include a complete performance evaluation of GHR in a multi-hop VANET simulation scenario for a reporting service. Our study analyzes all of the meaningful configurations of GHR and offers a statistical analysis of our findings by means of MANOVA tests. Our results indicate that the use of a Tabu list contributes to improving the packet delivery ratio by around 5% to 10%. Moreover, if Tabu is used, then the simulated annealing routing strategy gets a better performance than the selection of the best node used with carry and forwarding (default operation). PMID:27669254

  12. A Geographical Heuristic Routing Protocol for VANETs.

    PubMed

    Urquiza-Aguiar, Luis; Tripp-Barba, Carolina; Aguilar Igartua, Mónica

    2016-09-23

    Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) leverage the communication system of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). Recently, Delay-Tolerant Network (DTN) routing protocols have increased their popularity among the research community for being used in non-safety VANET applications and services like traffic reporting. Vehicular DTN protocols use geographical and local information to make forwarding decisions. However, current proposals only consider the selection of the best candidate based on a local-search. In this paper, we propose a generic Geographical Heuristic Routing (GHR) protocol that can be applied to any DTN geographical routing protocol that makes forwarding decisions hop by hop. GHR includes in its operation adaptations simulated annealing and Tabu-search meta-heuristics, which have largely been used to improve local-search results in discrete optimization. We include a complete performance evaluation of GHR in a multi-hop VANET simulation scenario for a reporting service. Our study analyzes all of the meaningful configurations of GHR and offers a statistical analysis of our findings by means of MANOVA tests. Our results indicate that the use of a Tabu list contributes to improving the packet delivery ratio by around 5% to 10%. Moreover, if Tabu is used, then the simulated annealing routing strategy gets a better performance than the selection of the best node used with carry and forwarding (default operation).

  13. Fluency heuristic: a model of how the mind exploits a by-product of information retrieval.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Ralph; Herzog, Stefan M; Schooler, Lael J; Reimer, Torsten

    2008-09-01

    Boundedly rational heuristics for inference can be surprisingly accurate and frugal for several reasons. They can exploit environmental structures, co-opt complex capacities, and elude effortful search by exploiting information that automatically arrives on the mental stage. The fluency heuristic is a prime example of a heuristic that makes the most of an automatic by-product of retrieval from memory, namely, retrieval fluency. In 4 experiments, the authors show that retrieval fluency can be a proxy for real-world quantities, that people can discriminate between two objects' retrieval fluencies, and that people's inferences are in line with the fluency heuristic (in particular fast inferences) and with experimentally manipulated fluency. The authors conclude that the fluency heuristic may be one tool in the mind's repertoire of strategies that artfully probes memory for encapsulated frequency information that can veridically reflect statistical regularities in the world.

  14. Familiarity and recollection in heuristic decision making.

    PubMed

    Schwikert, Shane R; Curran, Tim

    2014-12-01

    Heuristics involve the ability to utilize memory to make quick judgments by exploiting fundamental cognitive abilities. In the current study we investigated the memory processes that contribute to the recognition heuristic and the fluency heuristic, which are both presumed to capitalize on the byproducts of memory to make quick decisions. In Experiment 1, we used a city-size comparison task while recording event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the potential contributions of familiarity and recollection to the 2 heuristics. ERPs were markedly different for recognition heuristic-based decisions and fluency heuristic-based decisions, suggesting a role for familiarity in the recognition heuristic and recollection in the fluency heuristic. In Experiment 2, we coupled the same city-size comparison task with measures of subjective preexperimental memory for each stimulus in the task. Although previous literature suggests the fluency heuristic relies on recognition speed alone, our results suggest differential contributions of recognition speed and recollected knowledge to these decisions, whereas the recognition heuristic relies on familiarity. Based on these results, we created a new theoretical framework that explains decisions attributed to both heuristics based on the underlying memory associated with the choice options. PMID:25347534

  15. Social biases determine spatiotemporal sparseness of ciliate mating heuristics.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin B

    2012-01-01

    Ciliates become highly social, even displaying animal-like qualities, in the joint presence of aroused conspecifics and nonself mating pheromones. Pheromone detection putatively helps trigger instinctual and learned courtship and dominance displays from which social judgments are made about the availability, compatibility, and fitness representativeness or likelihood of prospective mates and rivals. In earlier studies, I demonstrated the heterotrich Spirostomum ambiguum improves mating competence by effecting preconjugal strategies and inferences in mock social trials via behavioral heuristics built from Hebbian-like associative learning. Heuristics embody serial patterns of socially relevant action that evolve into ordered, topologically invariant computational networks supporting intra- and intermate selection. S. ambiguum employs heuristics to acquire, store, plan, compare, modify, select, and execute sets of mating propaganda. One major adaptive constraint over formation and use of heuristics involves a ciliate's initial subjective bias, responsiveness, or preparedness, as defined by Stevens' Law of subjective stimulus intensity, for perceiving the meaningfulness of mechanical pressures accompanying cell-cell contacts and additional perimating events. This bias controls durations and valences of nonassociative learning, search rates for appropriate mating strategies, potential net reproductive payoffs, levels of social honesty and deception, successful error diagnosis and correction of mating signals, use of insight or analysis to solve mating dilemmas, bioenergetics expenditures, and governance of mating decisions by classical or quantum statistical mechanics. I now report this same social bias also differentially affects the spatiotemporal sparseness, as measured with metric entropy, of ciliate heuristics. Sparseness plays an important role in neural systems through optimizing the specificity, efficiency, and capacity of memory representations. The present

  16. Social biases determine spatiotemporal sparseness of ciliate mating heuristics.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin B

    2012-01-01

    Ciliates become highly social, even displaying animal-like qualities, in the joint presence of aroused conspecifics and nonself mating pheromones. Pheromone detection putatively helps trigger instinctual and learned courtship and dominance displays from which social judgments are made about the availability, compatibility, and fitness representativeness or likelihood of prospective mates and rivals. In earlier studies, I demonstrated the heterotrich Spirostomum ambiguum improves mating competence by effecting preconjugal strategies and inferences in mock social trials via behavioral heuristics built from Hebbian-like associative learning. Heuristics embody serial patterns of socially relevant action that evolve into ordered, topologically invariant computational networks supporting intra- and intermate selection. S. ambiguum employs heuristics to acquire, store, plan, compare, modify, select, and execute sets of mating propaganda. One major adaptive constraint over formation and use of heuristics involves a ciliate's initial subjective bias, responsiveness, or preparedness, as defined by Stevens' Law of subjective stimulus intensity, for perceiving the meaningfulness of mechanical pressures accompanying cell-cell contacts and additional perimating events. This bias controls durations and valences of nonassociative learning, search rates for appropriate mating strategies, potential net reproductive payoffs, levels of social honesty and deception, successful error diagnosis and correction of mating signals, use of insight or analysis to solve mating dilemmas, bioenergetics expenditures, and governance of mating decisions by classical or quantum statistical mechanics. I now report this same social bias also differentially affects the spatiotemporal sparseness, as measured with metric entropy, of ciliate heuristics. Sparseness plays an important role in neural systems through optimizing the specificity, efficiency, and capacity of memory representations. The present

  17. Application of heuristic optimization in aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenning

    Genetic algorithms and the related heuristic optimization strategies are introduced and their applications in the aircraft design are developed. Generally speaking, genetic algorithms belong to non-deterministic direct search methods, which are most powerful in finding optimum or near-optimum solutions of a very complex system where a little priori knowledge is known. Therefore they have a wide application in aerospace systems. Two major aircraft optimal design projects are illustrated in this dissertation. The first is the application of material optimization of aligned fiber laminate composites in the presence of stress concentrations. After a large number of tests on laminates with different layers, genetic algorithms find an alignment pattern in a certain range for the Boeing Co. specified material. The second project is the application of piezoelectric actuator placement on a generic tail skins to reduce the 2nd mode vibration caused by buffet, which is part of a Boeing project to control the buffet effect on aircraft. In this project, genetic algorithms are closely involved with vibration analysis and finite element analysis. Actuator optimization strategies are first tested on the theoretical beam models to gain experience, and then the generic tail model is applied. Genetic algorithms achieve a great success in optimizing up to 888 actuator parameters on the tail skins.

  18. A Heuristic Approach to Scheduling University Timetables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, E. H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Categories of facilities utilization and scheduling requirements to be considered when using a heuristic approach to timetabling are described together with a nine-step algorithm and the computerized timetabling system, Timetable Schedules System (TTS); TTS utilizes heuristic approach. An example demonstrating use of TTS and a program flowchart…

  19. "A Heuristic for Visual Thinking in History"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This article details a heuristic history teachers can use in assigning and evaluating multimedia projects in history. To use this heuristic successfully, requires more than simply following the steps in the list or stages in a recipe: in many ways, it requires a reorientation in what it means to think like an historian. This article, as much as…

  20. Minimizing conflicts: A heuristic repair method for constraint-satisfaction and scheduling problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Steve; Johnston, Mark; Philips, Andrew; Laird, Phil

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a simple heuristic approach to solving large-scale constraint satisfaction and scheduling problems. In this approach one starts with an inconsistent assignment for a set of variables and searches through the space of possible repairs. The search can be guided by a value-ordering heuristic, the min-conflicts heuristic, that attempts to minimize the number of constraint violations after each step. The heuristic can be used with a variety of different search strategies. We demonstrate empirically that on the n-queens problem, a technique based on this approach performs orders of magnitude better than traditional backtracking techniques. We also describe a scheduling application where the approach has been used successfully. A theoretical analysis is presented both to explain why this method works well on certain types of problems and to predict when it is likely to be most effective.

  1. The Role of Intuitive Heuristics in Students' Thinking: Ranking Chemical Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeyer, Jenine; Talanquer, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of students' cognitive biases is of central importance in the development of curriculum and teaching strategies that better support student learning in science. In particular, the identification of shortcut reasoning procedures (heuristics) used by students to reduce cognitive load can help us devise strategies to foster the…

  2. Automatic Generation of Heuristics for Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert A.; Bresina, John L.; Rodgers, Stuart M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a technique, called GenH, that automatically generates search heuristics for scheduling problems. The impetus for developing this technique is the growing consensus that heuristics encode advice that is, at best, useful in solving most, or typical, problem instances, and, at worst, useful in solving only a narrowly defined set of instances. In either case, heuristic problem solvers, to be broadly applicable, should have a means of automatically adjusting to the idiosyncrasies of each problem instance. GenH generates a search heuristic for a given problem instance by hill-climbing in the space of possible multi-attribute heuristics, where the evaluation of a candidate heuristic is based on the quality of the solution found under its guidance. We present empirical results obtained by applying GenH to the real world problem of telescope observation scheduling. These results demonstrate that GenH is a simple and effective way of improving the performance of an heuristic scheduler.

  3. Frequency-based heuristics for material perception.

    PubMed

    Giesel, Martin; Zaidi, Qasim

    2013-12-06

    People often make rapid visual judgments of the properties of surfaces they are going to walk on or touch. How do they do this when the interactions of illumination geometry with 3-D material structure and object shape result in images that inverse optics algorithms cannot resolve without externally imposed constraints? A possibly effective strategy would be to use heuristics based on information that can be gleaned rapidly from retinal images. By using perceptual scaling of a large sample of images, combined with correspondence and canonical correlation analyses, we discovered that material properties, such as roughness, thickness, and undulations, are characterized by specific scales of luminance variations. Using movies, we demonstrate that observers' percepts of these 3-D qualities vary continuously as a function of the relative energy in corresponding 2-D frequency bands. In addition, we show that judgments of roughness, thickness, and undulations are predictably altered by adaptation to dynamic noise at the corresponding scales. These results establish that the scale of local 3-D structure is critical in perceiving material properties, and that relative contrast at particular spatial frequencies is important for perceiving the critical 3-D structure from shading cues, so that cortical mechanisms for estimating material properties could be constructed by combining the parallel outputs of sets of frequency-selective neurons. These results also provide methods for remote sensing of material properties in machine vision, and rapid synthesis, editing and transfer of material properties for computer graphics and animation.

  4. When Less Is More: Evolutionary Origins of the Affect Heuristic

    PubMed Central

    Kralik, Jerald D.; Xu, Eric R.; Knight, Emily J.; Khan, Sara A.; Levine, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The human mind is built for approximations. When considering the value of a large aggregate of different items, for example, we typically do not summate the many individual values. Instead, we appear to form an immediate impression of the likeability of the option based on the average quality of the full collection, which is easier to evaluate and remember. While useful in many situations, this affect heuristic can lead to apparently irrational decision-making. For example, studies have shown that people are willing to pay more for a small set of high-quality goods than for the same set of high-quality goods with lower-quality items added [e.g. 1]. We explored whether this kind of choice behavior could be seen in other primates. In two experiments, one in the laboratory and one in the field, using two different sets of food items, we found that rhesus monkeys preferred a highly-valued food item alone to the identical item paired with a food of positive but lower value. This finding provides experimental evidence that, under certain conditions, macaque monkeys follow an affect heuristic that can cause them to prefer less food. Conservation of this affect heuristic could account for similar ‘irrational’ biases in humans, and may reflect a more general complexity reduction strategy in which averages, prototypes, or stereotypes represent a set or group. PMID:23056270

  5. A heuristic multiple target tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaupre, J. C. F.; Farooq, M.; Roy, J. M. J.

    1992-04-01

    The potential of applying recent developments in expert systems to multiple target tracking (MTT) is investigated. Standard MTT algorithms can generate relatively unreliable target state estimates. The multiple hypotheses tracker (MHT) is a very powerful algorithm, and demanding in computer resources, which can handle difficult situations by differing the formulation of hard decisions and which forms hypothetical tracks with associated probability values. It is proposed that heuristics can be formulated to improve MHT performance. These rules act on the tracks, hypotheses, and corresponding probability values to decide which hypotheses are most representative of reality. In effect, the MHT algorithm is modified to accept and process knowledge of the context or environment in which it operates and on its own strengths and weaknesses. To evaluate the performance of this concept, a prototype has been built which simulates the environment of a small military flight training school as viewed through the returns of a modified area surveillance radar. In a scenario involving nine targets behaving within regulated directives, the tracking prototype successfully displays timely, accurate, and dependable information.

  6. Establishing usability heuristics for heuristics evaluation in a specific domain: Is there a consensus?

    PubMed

    Hermawati, Setia; Lawson, Glyn

    2016-09-01

    Heuristics evaluation is frequently employed to evaluate usability. While general heuristics are suitable to evaluate most user interfaces, there is still a need to establish heuristics for specific domains to ensure that their specific usability issues are identified. This paper presents a comprehensive review of 70 studies related to usability heuristics for specific domains. The aim of this paper is to review the processes that were applied to establish heuristics in specific domains and identify gaps in order to provide recommendations for future research and area of improvements. The most urgent issue found is the deficiency of validation effort following heuristics proposition and the lack of robustness and rigour of validation method adopted. Whether domain specific heuristics perform better or worse than general ones is inconclusive due to lack of validation quality and clarity on how to assess the effectiveness of heuristics for specific domains. The lack of validation quality also affects effort in improving existing heuristics for specific domain as their weaknesses are not addressed. PMID:27184309

  7. Parallel Heuristics for Scalable Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Howard; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Choudhury, Sutanay

    2014-05-17

    Community detection has become a fundamental operation in numerous graph-theoretic applications. It is used to reveal natural divisions that exist within real world networks without imposing prior size or cardinality constraints on the set of communities. Despite its potential for application, there is only limited support for community detection on large-scale parallel computers, largely owing to the irregular and inherently sequential nature of the underlying heuristics. In this paper, we present parallelization heuristics for fast community detection using the Louvain method as the serial template. The Louvain method is an iterative heuristic for modularity optimization. Originally developed by Blondel et al. in 2008, the method has become increasingly popular owing to its ability to detect high modularity community partitions in a fast and memory-efficient manner. However, the method is also inherently sequential, thereby limiting its scalability to problems that can be solved on desktops. Here, we observe certain key properties of this method that present challenges for its parallelization, and consequently propose multiple heuristics that are designed to break the sequential barrier. Our heuristics are agnostic to the underlying parallel architecture. For evaluation purposes, we implemented our heuristics on shared memory (OpenMP) and distributed memory (MapReduce-MPI) machines, and tested them over real world graphs derived from multiple application domains (internet, biological, natural language processing). Experimental results demonstrate the ability of our heuristics to converge to high modularity solutions comparable to those output by the serial algorithm in nearly the same number of iterations, while also drastically reducing time to solution.

  8. Using tree diversity to compare phylogenetic heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Seung-Jin; Matthews, Suzanne; Williams, Tiffani L

    2009-01-01

    Background Evolutionary trees are family trees that represent the relationships between a group of organisms. Phylogenetic heuristics are used to search stochastically for the best-scoring trees in tree space. Given that better tree scores are believed to be better approximations of the true phylogeny, traditional evaluation techniques have used tree scores to determine the heuristics that find the best scores in the fastest time. We develop new techniques to evaluate phylogenetic heuristics based on both tree scores and topologies to compare Pauprat and Rec-I-DCM3, two popular Maximum Parsimony search algorithms. Results Our results show that although Pauprat and Rec-I-DCM3 find the trees with the same best scores, topologically these trees are quite different. Furthermore, the Rec-I-DCM3 trees cluster distinctly from the Pauprat trees. In addition to our heatmap visualizations of using parsimony scores and the Robinson-Foulds distance to compare best-scoring trees found by the two heuristics, we also develop entropy-based methods to show the diversity of the trees found. Overall, Pauprat identifies more diverse trees than Rec-I-DCM3. Conclusion Overall, our work shows that there is value to comparing heuristics beyond the parsimony scores that they find. Pauprat is a slower heuristic than Rec-I-DCM3. However, our work shows that there is tremendous value in using Pauprat to reconstruct trees—especially since it finds identical scoring but topologically distinct trees. Hence, instead of discounting Pauprat, effort should go in improving its implementation. Ultimately, improved performance measures lead to better phylogenetic heuristics and will result in better approximations of the true evolutionary history of the organisms of interest. PMID:19426451

  9. Prediction-based dynamic load-sharing heuristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, Kumar K.; Devarakonda, Murthy; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present dynamic load-sharing heuristics that use predicted resource requirements of processes to manage workloads in a distributed system. A previously developed statistical pattern-recognition method is employed for resource prediction. While nonprediction-based heuristics depend on a rapidly changing system status, the new heuristics depend on slowly changing program resource usage patterns. Furthermore, prediction-based heuristics can be more effective since they use future requirements rather than just the current system state. Four prediction-based heuristics, two centralized and two distributed, are presented. Using trace driven simulations, they are compared against random scheduling and two effective nonprediction based heuristics. Results show that the prediction-based centralized heuristics achieve up to 30 percent better response times than the nonprediction centralized heuristic, and that the prediction-based distributed heuristics achieve up to 50 percent improvements relative to their nonprediction counterpart.

  10. Heuristics as a Basis for Assessing Creative Potential: Measures, Methods, and Contingencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, William B.; Mumford, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of creative thinking skills have generally measured a single aspect of creativity, divergent thinking. A number of other processes involved in creative thought have been identified. Effective execution of these processes is held to depend on the strategies applied in process execution, or heuristics. In this article, we review prior…

  11. Principals Reflecting on Their Leadership Learning with an Heuristic: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempster, Neil; Fluckiger, Bev; Lovett, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on a small pilot study in which an heuristic was used to enable principals to reflect on the confidence they have in their existing leadership knowledge and how they might add to that knowledge in the future. The motivation for the study arose from a literature review of strategies for leadership development…

  12. Common-Sense Chemistry: The Use of Assumptions and Heuristics in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeyer, Jenine Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Students experience difficulty learning and understanding chemistry at higher levels, often because of cognitive biases stemming from common sense reasoning constraints. These constraints can be divided into two categories: assumptions (beliefs held about the world around us) and heuristics (the reasoning strategies or rules used to build…

  13. The effects of Polya's heuristic and diary writing on children's problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Jacobbe, Tim

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that aimed at increasing students' problem-solving skills. Polya's (1985) heuristic for problem solving was used and students were required to articulate their thought processes through the use of a structured diary. The diary prompted students to answer questions designed to engage them in the phases of Polya's (1985) heuristic. While it appeared as though most students did not internalise the diary questions, further analysis of students' responses indicated that most students showed improvement in their solution strategies. These results indicate that having students write about their thinking may be beneficial for developing their problem-solving skills.

  14. Science writing heuristic effects on students' understanding of the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickerson, Caroline E.

    Recently there has been a shift in science education that has encouraged teachers to place less emphasis on science content and more emphasis on teaching the Nature of Science. Thus, it is helpful for science educators to be aware of teaching strategies that produce better nature of science learning outcomes. The literature review focuses on the known benefits of using the Science Writing Heuristic. This research focused on the effectiveness of the Science Writing Heuristic in improving Nature of Science learning outcomes among biology students. The data from this research suggests that the Science Writing Heuristic does help students learn the Nature of Science but that this learning is not a significant improvement as compared to more traditional teaching methods. However, more research is needed, as the sample size and research time were a limiting factor in this study.

  15. Combining heuristic and statistical techniques in landslide hazard assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda, Jose; Schwendtner, Barbara; Quan, Byron; Nadim, Farrokh; Diaz, Manuel; Molina, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    As a contribution to the Global Assessment Report 2013 - GAR2013, coordinated by the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction - UNISDR, a drill-down exercise for landslide hazard assessment was carried out by entering the results of both heuristic and statistical techniques into a new but simple combination rule. The data available for this evaluation included landslide inventories, both historical and event-based. In addition to the application of a heuristic method used in the previous editions of GAR, the availability of inventories motivated the use of statistical methods. The heuristic technique is largely based on the Mora & Vahrson method, which estimates hazard as the product of susceptibility and triggering factors, where classes are weighted based on expert judgment and experience. Two statistical methods were also applied: the landslide index method, which estimates weights of the classes for the susceptibility and triggering factors based on the evidence provided by the density of landslides in each class of the factors; and the weights of evidence method, which extends the previous technique to include both positive and negative evidence of landslide occurrence in the estimation of weights for the classes. One key aspect during the hazard evaluation was the decision on the methodology to be chosen for the final assessment. Instead of opting for a single methodology, it was decided to combine the results of the three implemented techniques using a combination rule based on a normalization of the results of each method. The hazard evaluation was performed for both earthquake- and rainfall-induced landslides. The country chosen for the drill-down exercise was El Salvador. The results indicate that highest hazard levels are concentrated along the central volcanic chain and at the centre of the northern mountains.

  16. Negations in syllogistic reasoning: evidence for a heuristic-analytic conflict.

    PubMed

    Stupple, Edward J N; Waterhouse, Eleanor F

    2009-08-01

    An experiment utilizing response time measures was conducted to test dominant processing strategies in syllogistic reasoning with the expanded quantifier set proposed by Roberts (2005). Through adding negations to existing quantifiers it is possible to change problem surface features without altering logical validity. Biases based on surface features such as atmosphere, matching, and the probability heuristics model (PHM; Chater & Oaksford, 1999; Wetherick & Gilhooly, 1995) would not be expected to show variance in response latencies, but participant responses should be highly sensitive to changes in the surface features of the quantifiers. In contrast, according to analytic accounts such as mental models theory and mental logic (e.g., Johnson-Laird & Byrne, 1991; Rips, 1994) participants should exhibit increased response times for negated premises, but not be overly impacted upon by the surface features of the conclusion. Data indicated that the dominant response strategy was based on a matching heuristic, but also provided evidence of a resource-demanding analytic procedure for dealing with double negatives. The authors propose that dual-process theories offer a stronger account of these data whereby participants employ competing heuristic and analytic strategies and fall back on a heuristic response when analytic processing fails.

  17. Heuristic Classification. Technical Report Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clancey, William J.

    A broad range of well-structured problems--embracing forms of diagnosis, catalog selection, and skeletal planning--are solved in expert computer systems by the method of heuristic classification. These programs have a characteristic inference structure that systematically relates data to a pre-enumerated set of solutions by abstraction, heuristic…

  18. Describing a Performance Improvement Specialist: The Heurist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westgaard, Odin

    1997-01-01

    Describes the work of performance improvement specialists and presents a method for determining whether a particular person or position meets the job criteria. Discusses the attributes of being a heurist, or taking a holistic approach to problem solving. Lists 10 steps for a needs assessment and 30 characteristics of successful performance…

  19. Heuristic approach to launch vehicle trajectory design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Kazuyuki

    A heuristic method of designing the launch trajectory is proposed. The objective of our research is 'to search for the trajectory which can insert maximum payload into the target orbit, while satisfying all the given constraints'. Difficulties in achieving this goal come from the numerous design parameters and various constraints inherent to the trajectory design problem. The employed design methodology is based on numerical integration and heuristic search. By numerical integration, any type of constraints can be taken into account, and heuristic search can reduce the search space to a manageable level, which otherwise causes combinatorial explosion. We divide the period of time in launch operations into some phases, in each of which we integrate numerically the trajectory for every combination of variables related to that phase. The heuristic rule can reduce the number of combinations to be investigated in the phase, and the constraints can reduce the space of final condition of this phase, which results in the reduction of the search space of the initial conditions of the next phase. To estimate the effect of this methodology, we applied it to an example problem of the launch trajectory design of BS-3b satellite by H-1 rocket. Some simulation results are discussed, especially in terms of search space reduction and the features of the generated trajectories.

  20. Investigating Heuristic Evaluation: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Kate Haley; Bendoly, Laura

    When museum professionals speak of evaluating a web site, they primarily mean formative evaluation, and by that they primarily mean testing the usability of the site. In the for-profit world, usability testing is a multi-million dollar industry, while non-profits often rely on far too few dollars to do too much. Hence, heuristic evaluation is one…

  1. Engineering applications of heuristic multilevel optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1988-01-01

    Some engineering applications of heuristic multilevel optimization methods are presented and the discussion focuses on the dependency matrix that indicates the relationship between problem functions and variables. Coordination of the subproblem optimizations is shown to be typically achieved through the use of exact or approximate sensitivity analysis. Areas for further development are identified.

  2. Engineering applications of heuristic multilevel optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1989-01-01

    Some engineering applications of heuristic multilevel optimization methods are presented and the discussion focuses on the dependency matrix that indicates the relationship between problem functions and variables. Coordination of the subproblem optimizations is shown to be typically achieved through the use of exact or approximate sensitivity analysis. Areas for further development are identified.

  3. Structural Functionalism as a Heuristic Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilcott, John H.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that structural functionalism as a method for conducting fieldwork and as a format for the analysis of ethnographic data remains a powerful model, one that is easily understood by professional educators. As a heuristic device, functionalist theory can help in the solution of a problem that is otherwise incapable of theoretical…

  4. Teaching a Heuristic Approach to Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses lifelong learning and the need for information retrieval skills, and describes how Northwest Missouri State University incorporates a heuristic model of library instruction in which students continually evaluate and refine information-seeking practices while progressing through all levels of courses in diverse disciplines. (Author/LRW)

  5. Heuristic Presentations: The Role of Structuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leron, Uri

    1985-01-01

    Discusses insufficiency of the linear method and some informal practices (or heuristics) used by expositors in trying to alleviate it. Uses the Cantor-Bernstein theorem to illustrate the linear proof, structuring, and the structure proof. Argues that the informal practices considered be consistently applied to the presentation of pivots and…

  6. The Heuristic Interpretation of Box Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lem, Stephanie; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Box plots are frequently used, but are often misinterpreted by students. Especially the area of the box in box plots is often misinterpreted as representing number or proportion of observations, while it actually represents their density. In a first study, reaction time evidence was used to test whether heuristic reasoning underlies this…

  7. Heuristic Diagrams as a Tool to Teach History of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamizo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The graphic organizer called here heuristic diagram as an improvement of Gowin's Vee heuristic is proposed as a tool to teach history of science. Heuristic diagrams have the purpose of helping students (or teachers, or researchers) to understand their own research considering that asks and problem-solving are central to scientific activity. The…

  8. A Variable-Selection Heuristic for K-Means Clustering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Cradit, J. Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Presents a variable selection heuristic for nonhierarchical (K-means) cluster analysis based on the adjusted Rand index for measuring cluster recovery. Subjected the heuristic to Monte Carlo testing across more than 2,200 datasets. Results indicate that the heuristic is extremely effective at eliminating masking variables. (SLD)

  9. Heuristics Made Easy: An Effort-Reduction Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Anuj K.; Oppenheimer, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a new framework for understanding and studying heuristics. The authors posit that heuristics primarily serve the purpose of reducing the effort associated with a task. As such, the authors propose that heuristics can be classified according to a small set of effort-reduction principles. The authors use this…

  10. Heuristic control of the Utah/MIT dextrous robot hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, Andrew H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Basic hand grips and sensor interactions that a dextrous robot hand will need as part of the operation of an EVA Retriever are analyzed. What is to be done with a dextrous robot hand is examined along with how such a complex machine might be controlled. It was assumed throughout that an anthropomorphic robot hand should perform tasks just as a human would; i.e., the most efficient approach to developing control strategies for the hand would be to model actual hand actions and do the same tasks in the same ways. Therefore, basic hand grips that human hands perform, as well as hand grip action were analyzed. It was also important to examine what is termed sensor fusion. This is the integration of various disparate sensor feedback paths. These feedback paths can be spatially and temporally separated, as well as, of different sensor types. Neural networks are seen as a means of integrating these varied sensor inputs and types. Basic heuristics of hand actions and grips were developed. These heuristics offer promise of control dextrous robot hands in a more natural and efficient way.

  11. Heuristic Evaluation of E-Learning Courses: A Comparative Analysis of Two E-Learning Heuristic Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharias, Panagiotis; Koutsabasis, Panayiotis

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss heuristic evaluation as a method for evaluating e-learning courses and applications and more specifically to investigate the applicability and empirical use of two customized e-learning heuristic protocols. Design/methodology/approach: Two representative e-learning heuristic protocols were chosen…

  12. Learning process mapping heuristics under stochastic sampling overheads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ieumwananonthachai, Arthur; Wah, Benjamin W.

    1991-01-01

    A statistical method was developed previously for improving process mapping heuristics. The method systematically explores the space of possible heuristics under a specified time constraint. Its goal is to get the best possible heuristics while trading between the solution quality of the process mapping heuristics and their execution time. The statistical selection method is extended to take into consideration the variations in the amount of time used to evaluate heuristics on a problem instance. The improvement in performance is presented using the more realistic assumption along with some methods that alleviate the additional complexity.

  13. Vervet monkeys use paths consistent with context-specific spatial movement heuristics.

    PubMed

    Teichroeb, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Animal foraging routes are analogous to the computationally demanding "traveling salesman problem" (TSP), where individuals must find the shortest path among several locations before returning to the start. Humans approximate solutions to TSPs using simple heuristics or "rules of thumb," but our knowledge of how other animals solve multidestination routing problems is incomplete. Most nonhuman primate species have shown limited ability to route plan. However, captive vervets were shown to solve a TSP for six sites. These results were consistent with either planning three steps ahead or a risk-avoidance strategy. I investigated how wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) solved a path problem with six, equally rewarding food sites; where site arrangement allowed assessment of whether vervets found the shortest route and/or used paths consistent with one of three simple heuristics to navigate. Single vervets took the shortest possible path in fewer than half of the trials, usually in ways consistent with the most efficient heuristic (the convex hull). When in competition, vervets' paths were consistent with different, more efficient heuristics dependent on their dominance rank (a cluster strategy for dominants and the nearest neighbor rule for subordinates). These results suggest that, like humans, vervets may solve multidestination routing problems by applying simple, adaptive, context-specific "rules of thumb." The heuristics that were consistent with vervet paths in this study are the same as some of those asserted to be used by humans. These spatial movement strategies may have common evolutionary roots and be part of a universal mental navigational toolkit. Alternatively, they may have emerged through convergent evolution as the optimal way to solve multidestination routing problems. PMID:26668734

  14. On the heuristic nature of medical decision-support systems.

    PubMed

    Aliferis, C F; Miller, R A

    1995-03-01

    In the realm of medical decision-support systems, the term "heuristic systems" is often considered to be synonymous with "medical artificial intelligence systems" or with "systems employing informal model(s) of problem solving". Such a view may be inaccurate and possibly impede the conceptual development of future systems. This article examines the nature of heuristics and the levels at which heuristic solutions are introduced during system design and implementation. The authors discuss why heuristics are ubiquitous in all medical decision-support systems operating at non-trivial domains, and propose a unifying definition of heuristics that encompasses formal and ad hoc systems. System developers should be aware of the heuristic nature of all problem solving done in complex real world domains, and characterize their own use of heuristics in describing system development and implementation. PMID:9082138

  15. More than one way to see it: Individual heuristics in avian visual computation

    PubMed Central

    Ravignani, Andrea; Westphal-Fitch, Gesche; Aust, Ulrike; Schlumpp, Martin M.; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2015-01-01

    Comparative pattern learning experiments investigate how different species find regularities in sensory input, providing insights into cognitive processing in humans and other animals. Past research has focused either on one species’ ability to process pattern classes or different species’ performance in recognizing the same pattern, with little attention to individual and species-specific heuristics and decision strategies. We trained and tested two bird species, pigeons (Columba livia) and kea (Nestor notabilis, a parrot species), on visual patterns using touch-screen technology. Patterns were composed of several abstract elements and had varying degrees of structural complexity. We developed a model selection paradigm, based on regular expressions, that allowed us to reconstruct the specific decision strategies and cognitive heuristics adopted by a given individual in our task. Individual birds showed considerable differences in the number, type and heterogeneity of heuristic strategies adopted. Birds’ choices also exhibited consistent species-level differences. Kea adopted effective heuristic strategies, based on matching learned bigrams to stimulus edges. Individual pigeons, in contrast, adopted an idiosyncratic mix of strategies that included local transition probabilities and global string similarity. Although performance was above chance and quite high for kea, no individual of either species provided clear evidence of learning exactly the rule used to generate the training stimuli. Our results show that similar behavioral outcomes can be achieved using dramatically different strategies and highlight the dangers of combining multiple individuals in a group analysis. These findings, and our general approach, have implications for the design of future pattern learning experiments, and the interpretation of comparative cognition research more generally. PMID:26113444

  16. A System for Automatically Generating Scheduling Heuristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this research is to improve the performance of automated schedulers by designing and implementing an algorithm by automatically generating heuristics by selecting a schedule. The particular application selected by applying this method solves the problem of scheduling telescope observations, and is called the Associate Principal Astronomer. The input to the APA scheduler is a set of observation requests submitted by one or more astronomers. Each observation request specifies an observation program as well as scheduling constraints and preferences associated with the program. The scheduler employs greedy heuristic search to synthesize a schedule that satisfies all hard constraints of the domain and achieves a good score with respect to soft constraints expressed as an objective function established by an astronomer-user.

  17. Computational Experiments with the RAVE Heuristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, David; Müller, Martin

    The Monte-Carlo tree search algorithm Upper Confidence bounds applied to Trees (UCT) has become extremely popular in computer games research. The Rapid Action Value Estimation (RAVE) heuristic is a strong estimator that often improves the performance of UCT-based algorithms. However, there are situations where RAVE misleads the search whereas pure UCT search can find the correct solution. Two games, the simple abstract game Sum of Switches (SOS) and the game of Go, are used to study the behavior of the RAVE heuristic. In SOS, RAVE updates are manipulated to mimic game situations where RAVE misleads the search. Such false RAVE updates are used to create RAVE overestimates and underestimates. A study of the distributions of mean and RAVE values reveals great differences between Go and SOS. While the RAVE-max update rule is able to correct extreme cases of RAVE underestimation, it is not effective in closer to practical settings and in Go.

  18. Heuristic edge detector for noisy range images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kung C.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents a heuristic edge detector for extracting wireframe representations of objects from noisy range data. Jump and roof edges were detected successfully from range images containing additive white Gaussian noise with a standard deviation equal to as high as 1.2% of the measured range values. This represents an appreciable amount of noise since approximately 5% of the errors are greater than 12 cm and 32% of errors are greater than 6 cm at a distance of 5 meters. The noise insensitive characteristic of the heuristic edge detector enables low cost range scanners to be used for practical industrial applications. The availability of low cost active vision systems greatly broadens the horizon of integrating robotics vision systems to manufacturing automation.

  19. Heuristics, LPs, and treeds on trees

    SciTech Connect

    Mirchandani, P.; Magnanti, T.L.; Balakrishnan, A.

    1994-12-31

    We discuss the worst-case behavior of heuristics and linear programming relaxations for a class of overlay optimization problems that combine linked subproblems by {open_quotes}overlaying{close_quotes} higher level subproblems on top of the solution of the lower level subproblems. Even though the subproblems (for example, shortest path, minimum spanning tree, etc.) might independently be polynomially solvable, the simplest special cases of the overlay optimization problems are NP-hard. Using bounds on the heuristics of the underlying subproblems, our analysis develops worst-case bounds of {open_quotes}composite{close_quotes} heuristics for several classes of the overlay optimization problem; we also develop bounds on the degree of suboptimality of the linear programming relaxation of the overlay optimization model. As a part of this development, we introduce a new class of multi-tier multi-connected network design problems; these models generalize several telecommunication survivability models in the literature. We also discuss how our general analysis of the overly optimization extends to these survivable network design problems.

  20. Paging Doctor Google! Heuristics vs. technology.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Kenar D; Schrier, Peter B; Mattana, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic development in medical decision-making technology has been the advent of the Internet. This has had an impact not only on clinicians, but has also become an important resource for patients who often approach their doctors with medical information they have obtained from the Internet.  Increasingly, medical students, residents and attending physicians have been using the Internet as a tool for diagnosing and treating disease. Internet-based resources that are available take various forms, including informational websites, online journals and textbooks, and social media.  Search engines such as Google have been increasingly used to help in making diagnoses of disease entities. Do these search methods fare better than experienced heuristic methods? In a small study, we examined the comparative role of heuristics versus the 'Google' mode of thinking. Internal medicine residents were asked to "google" key words to come up with a diagnosis. Their results were compared to experienced nephrology faculty and fellows in training using heuristics and no additional help of internet. Overall, with the aid of Google, the novices (internal medicine residents) correctly diagnosed renal diseases less often than the experts (the attendings) but with the same frequency as the intermediates (nephrology fellows).  However, in a subgroup analysis of both common diseases and rare diseases, the novices correctly diagnosed renal diseases less often than the experts but more often than the intermediates in each analysis.  The novices correctly diagnosed renal diseases with the same frequency as nephrology fellows in training.

  1. Need for closure and heuristic information processing: the moderating role of the ability to achieve the need for closure.

    PubMed

    Kossowska, Małgorzata; Bar-Tal, Yoram

    2013-11-01

    In contrast to the ample research that shows a positive relationship between the need for closure (NFC) and heuristic information processing, this research examines the hypothesis that this relationship is moderated by the ability to achieve closure (AAC), that is, the ability to use information-processing strategies consistent with the level of NFC. Three different operationalizations of heuristic information processing were used: recall of information consistent with the impression (Study 1); pre-decisional information search (Study 2); and stereotypic impression formation (Study 3). The results of the studies showed that there were positive relationships between NFC and heuristic information processing when participants assessed themselves as being able to use cognitive strategies consistent with their level of NFC (high AAC). For individuals with low AAC, the relationships were negative. Our data show that motivation-cognition interactions influence the information-processing style. PMID:24094278

  2. A lack of appetite for information and computation. Simple heuristics in food choice.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Michael; Sohn, Matthias; de Bellis, Emanuel; Martin, Nathalie; Hertwig, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    The predominant, but largely untested, assumption in research on food choice is that people obey the classic commandments of rational behavior: they carefully look up every piece of relevant information, weight each piece according to subjective importance, and then combine them into a judgment or choice. In real world situations, however, the available time, motivation, and computational resources may simply not suffice to keep these commandments. Indeed, there is a large body of research suggesting that human choice is often better accommodated by heuristics-simple rules that enable decision making on the basis of a few, but important, pieces of information. We investigated the prevalence of such heuristics in a computerized experiment that engaged participants in a series of choices between two lunch dishes. Employing MouselabWeb, a process-tracing technique, we found that simple heuristics described an overwhelmingly large proportion of choices, whereas strategies traditionally deemed rational were barely apparent in our data. Replicating previous findings, we also observed that visual stimulus segments received a much larger proportion of attention than any nutritional values did. Our results suggest that, consistent with human behavior in other domains, people make their food choices on the basis of simple and informationally frugal heuristics. PMID:23994507

  3. Paging Doctor Google! Heuristics vs. technology.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Kenar D; Schrier, Peter B; Mattana, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic development in medical decision-making technology has been the advent of the Internet. This has had an impact not only on clinicians, but has also become an important resource for patients who often approach their doctors with medical information they have obtained from the Internet.  Increasingly, medical students, residents and attending physicians have been using the Internet as a tool for diagnosing and treating disease. Internet-based resources that are available take various forms, including informational websites, online journals and textbooks, and social media.  Search engines such as Google have been increasingly used to help in making diagnoses of disease entities. Do these search methods fare better than experienced heuristic methods? In a small study, we examined the comparative role of heuristics versus the 'Google' mode of thinking. Internal medicine residents were asked to "google" key words to come up with a diagnosis. Their results were compared to experienced nephrology faculty and fellows in training using heuristics and no additional help of internet. Overall, with the aid of Google, the novices (internal medicine residents) correctly diagnosed renal diseases less often than the experts (the attendings) but with the same frequency as the intermediates (nephrology fellows).  However, in a subgroup analysis of both common diseases and rare diseases, the novices correctly diagnosed renal diseases less often than the experts but more often than the intermediates in each analysis.  The novices correctly diagnosed renal diseases with the same frequency as nephrology fellows in training. PMID:24627777

  4. A general heuristic for genome rearrangement problems.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ulisses; Galvão, Gustavo Rodrigues; Lintzmayer, Carla Négri; Dias, Zanoni

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present a general heuristic for several problems in the genome rearrangement field. Our heuristic does not solve any problem directly, it is rather used to improve the solutions provided by any non-optimal algorithm that solve them. Therefore, we have implemented several algorithms described in the literature and several algorithms developed by ourselves. As a whole, we implemented 23 algorithms for 9 well known problems in the genome rearrangement field. A total of 13 algorithms were implemented for problems that use the notions of prefix and suffix operations. In addition, we worked on 5 algorithms for the classic problem of sorting by transposition and we conclude the experiments by presenting results for 3 approximation algorithms for the sorting by reversals and transpositions problem and 2 approximation algorithms for the sorting by reversals problem. Another algorithm with better approximation ratio can be found for the last genome rearrangement problem, but it is purely theoretical with no practical implementation. The algorithms we implemented in addition to our heuristic lead to the best practical results in each case. In particular, we were able to improve results on the sorting by transpositions problem, which is a very special case because many efforts have been made to generate algorithms with good results in practice and some of these algorithms provide results that equal the optimum solutions in many cases. Our source codes and benchmarks are freely available upon request from the authors so that it will be easier to compare new approaches against our results. PMID:24969750

  5. Heuristic determination of quantitative data for knowledge acquisition in medicine.

    PubMed

    Giuse, D A; Giuse, N B; Bankowitz, R A; Miller, R A

    1991-06-01

    Knowledge acquisition for medical knowledge bases can be aided by programs that suggest possible values for portions of the data. The paper presents an experiment which was used in designing a heuristic to help the process of knowledge acquisition. The heuristic helps to determine numerical data from stylized literature excerpts in the context of knowledge acquisition for the QMR medical knowledge base. Quantitative suggestions from the heuristics are shown to agree substantially with the data incorporated in the final version of the knowledge base. The experiment shows the potential of knowledge base specific heuristics in simplifying the task of knowledge base creation. PMID:1868695

  6. Intelligent process mapping through systematic improvement of heuristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ieumwananonthachai, Arthur; Aizawa, Akiko N.; Schwartz, Steven R.; Wah, Benjamin W.; Yan, Jerry C.

    1992-01-01

    The present system for automatic learning/evaluation of novel heuristic methods applicable to the mapping of communication-process sets on a computer network has its basis in the testing of a population of competing heuristic methods within a fixed time-constraint. The TEACHER 4.1 prototype learning system implemented or learning new postgame analysis heuristic methods iteratively generates and refines the mappings of a set of communicating processes on a computer network. A systematic exploration of the space of possible heuristic methods is shown to promise significant improvement.

  7. A Graph Search Heuristic for Shortest Distance Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, E

    2005-03-24

    This paper presents a heuristic for guiding A* search for finding the shortest distance path between two vertices in a connected, undirected, and explicitly stored graph. The heuristic requires a small amount of data to be stored at each vertex. The heuristic has application to quickly detecting relationships between two vertices in a large information or knowledge network. We compare the performance of this heuristic with breadth-first search on graphs with various topological properties. The results show that one or more orders of magnitude improvement in the number of vertices expanded is possible for large graphs, including Poisson random graphs.

  8. Heuristic reconstructions of neutron penumbral images

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Shinya; Chen Yenwei

    2004-10-01

    Penumbral imaging is a technique of coded aperture imaging proposed for imaging of highly penetrating radiations. To date, the penumbral imaging technique has been successfully applied to neutron imaging in laser fusion experiments. Since the reconstruction of penumbral images is based on linear deconvolution methods, such as inverse filter and Wiener filer, the point spread function of apertures should be space invariant; it is also sensitive to the noise contained in penumbral images. In this article, we propose a new heuristic reconstruction method for neutron penumbral imaging, which can be used for a space-variant imaging system and is also very tolerant to the noise.

  9. Heuristic theory of positron-helium scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An error in a previous modified adiabatic approximation (Drachman, 1966), due to a lack of generality in the form of the short-range correlation part of the wave function for L greater than zero, is corrected heuristically by allowing the monopole suppression parameter to depend on L. An L-dependent local potential is constructed to fit the well-known positron-hydrogen s, p, and d wave phase shifts below the rearrangement threshold. The same form of potential yields a positron-helium cross-section in agreement with a recent experimental measurement near threshold.

  10. Risky Choice with Heuristics: Reply to Birnbaum (2008), Johnson, Schulte-Mecklenbeck, and Willemsen (2008), and Rieger and Wang (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandstatter, Eduard; Gigerenzer, Gerd; Hertwig, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    E. Brandstatter, G. Gigerenzer, and R. Hertwig (2006) showed that the priority heuristic matches or outperforms modifications of expected utility theory in predicting choice in 4 diverse problem sets. M. H. Birnbaum (2008) argued that sets exist in which the opposite is true. The authors agree--but stress that all choice strategies have regions of…

  11. How do people judge risks: availability heuristic, affect heuristic, or both?

    PubMed

    Pachur, Thorsten; Hertwig, Ralph; Steinmann, Florian

    2012-09-01

    How does the public reckon which risks to be concerned about? The availability heuristic and the affect heuristic are key accounts of how laypeople judge risks. Yet, these two accounts have never been systematically tested against each other, nor have their predictive powers been examined across different measures of the public's risk perception. In two studies, we gauged risk perception in student samples by employing three measures (frequency, value of a statistical life, and perceived risk) and by using a homogeneous (cancer) and a classic set of heterogeneous causes of death. Based on these judgments of risk, we tested precise models of the availability heuristic and the affect heuristic and different definitions of availability and affect. Overall, availability-by-recall, a heuristic that exploits people's direct experience of occurrences of risks in their social network, conformed to people's responses best. We also found direct experience to carry a high degree of ecological validity (and one that clearly surpasses that of affective information). However, the relative impact of affective information (as compared to availability) proved more pronounced in value-of-a-statistical-life and perceived-risk judgments than in risk-frequency judgments. Encounters with risks in the media, in contrast, played a negligible role in people's judgments. Going beyond the assumption of exclusive reliance on either availability or affect, we also found evidence for mechanisms that combine both, either sequentially or in a composite fashion. We conclude with a discussion of policy implications of our results, including how to foster people's risk calibration and the success of education campaigns. PMID:22564084

  12. Memorability in Context: A Heuristic Story.

    PubMed

    Geurten, Marie; Meulemans, Thierry; Willems, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    We examined children's ability to employ a metacognitive heuristic based on memorability expectations to reduce false recognitions, and explored whether these expectations depend on the context in which the items are presented. Specifically, 4-, 6-, and 9-year-old children were presented with high-, medium-, and low-memorability words, either mixed together (Experiment 1) or separated into two different lists (Experiment 2). Results revealed that only children with a higher level of executive functioning (9-year-olds) used the memorability-based heuristic when all types of items were presented within the same list. However, all children, regardless of age or executive level, implemented the metacognitive rule when high- and low-memorability words were presented in two separate lists. Moreover, the results of Experiment 2 showed that participants processed medium-memorability words more conservatively when they were presented in a low- than in a high-memorability list, suggesting that children's memorability expectations are sensitive to list-context effects. PMID:26592531

  13. University Research Centers: Heuristic Categories, Issues, and Administrative Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    University-based research centers can bring prestige and revenue to the institutions of higher education with which they are affiliated. Collaborating with corporations, units of government, and foundations, centers provide services to organizational leaders, policy makers, and communities. University research centers continue to increase in…

  14. Instructional Design for Heuristic-Based Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Albert L.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of instructional design models focuses on a study concerned with developing effective instruction in heuristic-based problem solving for computer programing. Highlights include distinctions between algorithms and heuristics; pretests and posttests; revised instructional design procedures; student attitudes; task analysis; and…

  15. Experimental Matching of Instances to Heuristics for Constraint Satisfaction Problems.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Scott, Jorge Humberto; Ortiz-Bayliss, José Carlos; Terashima-Marín, Hugo; Conant-Pablos, Santiago Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are of special interest for the artificial intelligence and operations research community due to their many applications. Although heuristics involved in solving these problems have largely been studied in the past, little is known about the relation between instances and the respective performance of the heuristics used to solve them. This paper focuses on both the exploration of the instance space to identify relations between instances and good performing heuristics and how to use such relations to improve the search. Firstly, the document describes a methodology to explore the instance space of constraint satisfaction problems and evaluate the corresponding performance of six variable ordering heuristics for such instances in order to find regions on the instance space where some heuristics outperform the others. Analyzing such regions favors the understanding of how these heuristics work and contribute to their improvement. Secondly, we use the information gathered from the first stage to predict the most suitable heuristic to use according to the features of the instance currently being solved. This approach proved to be competitive when compared against the heuristics applied in isolation on both randomly generated and structured instances of constraint satisfaction problems. PMID:26949383

  16. Inferring heuristic classification hierarchies from natural language input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Richard; Gomez, Fernando

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for inferring hierarchies representing heuristic knowledge about the check out, control, and monitoring sub-system (CCMS) of the space shuttle launch processing system from natural language input is explained. Our method identifies failures explicitly and implicitly described in natural language by domain experts and uses those descriptions to recommend classifications for inclusion in the experts' heuristic hierarchies.

  17. Heuristic Inquiry: A Personal Journey of Acculturation and Identity Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djuraskovic, Ivana; Arthur, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Heuristic methodology attempts to discover the nature and meaning of phenomenon through internal self-search, exploration, and discovery. Heuristic methodology encourages the researcher to explore and pursue the creative journey that begins inside one's being and ultimately uncovers its direction and meaning through internal discovery (Douglass &…

  18. Experimental Matching of Instances to Heuristics for Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Scott, Jorge Humberto; Ortiz-Bayliss, José Carlos; Terashima-Marín, Hugo; Conant-Pablos, Santiago Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are of special interest for the artificial intelligence and operations research community due to their many applications. Although heuristics involved in solving these problems have largely been studied in the past, little is known about the relation between instances and the respective performance of the heuristics used to solve them. This paper focuses on both the exploration of the instance space to identify relations between instances and good performing heuristics and how to use such relations to improve the search. Firstly, the document describes a methodology to explore the instance space of constraint satisfaction problems and evaluate the corresponding performance of six variable ordering heuristics for such instances in order to find regions on the instance space where some heuristics outperform the others. Analyzing such regions favors the understanding of how these heuristics work and contribute to their improvement. Secondly, we use the information gathered from the first stage to predict the most suitable heuristic to use according to the features of the instance currently being solved. This approach proved to be competitive when compared against the heuristics applied in isolation on both randomly generated and structured instances of constraint satisfaction problems. PMID:26949383

  19. Swift and Smart Decision Making: Heuristics that Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Wayne K.; Tarter, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to examine the research literature on decision making and identify and develop a set of heuristics that work for school decision makers. Design/methodology/approach: This analysis is a synthesis of the research on decision-making heuristics that work. Findings: A set of nine rules for swift and smart decision…

  20. Theory in the Classroom: Teaching Heuristics as Cognitive Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas Bradley

    A review of rhetorical techniques and behavioral and cognitive goals in the composition classroom leads to the conclusion that the center of rhetoric is invention. An analysis of heuristics in contemporary rhetoric demonstrates several benefits to the rhetor: first, a heuristic provides a structure on which to hand a vision of the range of…

  1. HEURISTIC OPTIMIZATION AND ALGORITHM TUNING APPLIED TO SORPTIVE BARRIER DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    While heuristic optimization is applied in environmental applications, ad-hoc algorithm configuration is typical. We use a multi-layer sorptive barrier design problem as a benchmark for an algorithm-tuning procedure, as applied to three heuristics (genetic algorithms, simulated ...

  2. Heuristic Diagrams as a Tool to Teach History of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, José A.

    2012-05-01

    The graphic organizer called here heuristic diagram as an improvement of Gowin's Vee heuristic is proposed as a tool to teach history of science. Heuristic diagrams have the purpose of helping students (or teachers, or researchers) to understand their own research considering that asks and problem-solving are central to scientific activity. The left side originally related in Gowin's Vee with philosophies, theories, models, laws or regularities now agrees with Toulmin's concepts (language, models as representation techniques and application procedures). Mexican science teachers without experience in science education research used the heuristic diagram to learn about the history of chemistry considering also in the left side two different historical times: past and present. Through a semantic differential scale teachers' attitude to the heuristic diagram was evaluated and its usefulness was demonstrated.

  3. An extended abstract: A heuristic repair method for constraint-satisfaction and scheduling problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Steven; Johnston, Mark D.; Philips, Andrew B.; Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The work described in this paper was inspired by a surprisingly effective neural network developed for scheduling astronomical observations on the Hubble Space Telescope. Our heuristic constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) method was distilled from an analysis of the network. In the process of carrying out the analysis, we discovered that the effectiveness of the network has little to do with its connectionist implementation. Furthermore, the ideas employed in the network can be implemented very efficiently within a symbolic CSP framework. The symbolic implementation is extremely simple. It also has the advantage that several different search strategies can be employed, although we have found that hill-climbing methods are particularly well-suited for the applications that we have investigated. We begin the paper with a brief review of the neural network. Following this, we describe our symbolic method for heuristic repair.

  4. Regularity of free boundaries a heuristic retro

    PubMed Central

    Caffarelli, Luis A.; Shahgholian, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This survey concerns regularity theory of a few free boundary problems that have been developed in the past half a century. Our intention is to bring up different ideas and techniques that constitute the fundamentals of the theory. We shall discuss four different problems, where approaches are somewhat different in each case. Nevertheless, these problems can be divided into two groups: (i) obstacle and thin obstacle problem; (ii) minimal surfaces, and cavitation flow of a perfect fluid. In each case, we shall only discuss the methodology and approaches, giving basic ideas and tools that have been specifically designed and tailored for that particular problem. The survey is kept at a heuristic level with mainly geometric interpretation of the techniques and situations in hand. PMID:26261372

  5. A synthesized heuristic task scheduling algorithm.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanyan; Zhang, Xiangli

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at the static task scheduling problems in heterogeneous environment, a heuristic task scheduling algorithm named HCPPEFT is proposed. In task prioritizing phase, there are three levels of priority in the algorithm to choose task. First, the critical tasks have the highest priority, secondly the tasks with longer path to exit task will be selected, and then algorithm will choose tasks with less predecessors to schedule. In resource selection phase, the algorithm is selected task duplication to reduce the interresource communication cost, besides forecasting the impact of an assignment for all children of the current task permits better decisions to be made in selecting resources. The algorithm proposed is compared with STDH, PEFT, and HEFT algorithms through randomly generated graphs and sets of task graphs. The experimental results show that the new algorithm can achieve better scheduling performance.

  6. Interim Report on Heuristics about Inspection Parameters: Updates to Heuristics Resulting from Refinement on Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Forrest; Seaman, Carolyn; Feldman, Raimund; Haingaertner, Ralf; Regardie, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, we have continued analyzing the inspection data in an effort to better understand the applicability and effect of the inspection heuristics on inspection outcomes. Our research goals during this period are: 1. Investigate the effect of anomalies in the dataset (e.g. the very large meeting length values for some inspections) on our results 2. Investigate the effect of the heuristics on other inspection outcome variables (e.g. effort) 3. Investigate whether the recommended ranges can be modified to give inspection planners more flexibility without sacrificing effectiveness 4. Investigate possible refinements or modifications to the heuristics for specific subdomains (partitioned, e.g., by size, domain, or Center) This memo reports our results to date towards addressing these goals. In the next section, the first goal is addressed by describing the types of anomalies we have found in our dataset, how we have addressed them, and the effect of these changes on our previously reported results. In the following section, on "methodology", we describe the analyses we have conducted to address the other three goals and the results of these analyses are described in the "results" section. Finally, we conclude with future plans for continuing our investigation.

  7. Innovative Meta-Heuristic Approach Application for Parameter Estimation of Probability Distribution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. S.; Yoon, S.; Jeong, C.

    2012-12-01

    The primary purpose of frequency analysis in hydrology is to estimate the magnitude of an event with a given frequency of occurrence. The precision of frequency analysis depends on the selection of an appropriate probability distribution model (PDM) and parameter estimation techniques. A number of PDMs have been developed to describe the probability distribution of the hydrological variables. For each of the developed PDMs, estimated parameters are provided based on alternative estimation techniques, such as the method of moments (MOM), probability weighted moments (PWM), linear function of ranked observations (L-moments), and maximum likelihood (ML). Generally, the results using ML are more reliable than the other methods. However, the ML technique is more laborious than the other methods because an iterative numerical solution, such as the Newton-Raphson method, must be used for the parameter estimation of PDMs. In the meantime, meta-heuristic approaches have been developed to solve various engineering optimization problems (e.g., linear and stochastic, dynamic, nonlinear). These approaches include genetic algorithms, ant colony optimization, simulated annealing, tabu searches, and evolutionary computation methods. Meta-heuristic approaches use a stochastic random search instead of a gradient search so that intricate derivative information is unnecessary. Therefore, the meta-heuristic approaches have been shown to be a useful strategy to solve optimization problems in hydrology. A number of studies focus on using meta-heuristic approaches for estimation of hydrological variables with parameter estimation of PDMs. Applied meta-heuristic approaches offer reliable solutions but use more computation time than derivative-based methods. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to enhance the meta-heuristic approach for the parameter estimation of PDMs by using a recently developed algorithm known as a harmony search (HS). The performance of the HS is compared to the

  8. Teaching Evolution: A Heuristic Study of Personal and Cultural Dissonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, Larry G.

    Darwinian evolution is a robustly supported scientific theory. Yet creationists continue to challenge its teaching in American public schools. Biology teachers in all 50 states are responsible for teaching science content standards that include evolution. As products of their backgrounds and affiliations teachers bring personal attitudes and beliefs to their teaching. The purpose of this study was to explore how biology teachers perceive, describe, and value their teaching of evolution. This research question was explored through a heuristic qualitative methodology. Eight veteran California high school biology teachers were queried as to their beliefs, perceptions, experiences and practices of teaching evolution. Both personal and professional documents were collected. Data was presented in the form of biographical essays that highlight teachers' backgrounds, experiences, perspectives and practices of teaching evolution. Of special interest was how they describe pressure over teaching evolution during a decade of standards and No Child Left Behind high-stakes testing mandates. Five common themes emerged. Standards have increased the overall amount of evolution that is taught. High-stakes testing has decreased the depth at which evolution is taught. Teacher belief systems strongly influence how evolution is taught. Fear of creationist challenges effect evolution teaching strategies. And lastly, concern over the potential effects of teaching evolution on student worldviews was mixed. Three categories of teacher concern over the potential impact of evolution on student worldviews were identified: Concerned, Strategist, and Carefree. In the final analysis teacher beliefs and attitudes still appeared to he the most important factor influencing how evolution is taught.

  9. Application of a heuristic search method for generation of fuel reload configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Galperin, A.; Nissan, E. )

    1988-08-01

    A computerized heuristic search method for the generation and optimization of fuel reload configurations is proposed and investigated. The heuristic knowledge is expressed modularly in the form of ''IF-THEN'' production rules. The method was implemented in a program coded in the Franz LISP programming language and executed under the UNIX operating system. A test problem was formulated, based on a typical light water reactor reload problem with a few simplifications assumed, in order to allow formulation of the reload strategy into a relatively small number of rules. A computer run of the problem was performed with a VAX-780 machine. A set of 312 solutions was generated in -- 20 min of execution time. Testing of a few arbitrarily chosen configurations demonstrated reasonably good performance for the computer-generated solutions. A computerized generator of reload configurations may be used for the fast generation or modification of reload patterns and as a tool for the formulation, tuning, and testing of the heuristic knowledge rules used by an ''expert'' fuel manager.

  10. Economic tour package model using heuristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Syariza Abdul; Benjamin, Aida Mauziah; Bakar, Engku Muhammad Nazri Engku Abu

    2014-07-01

    A tour-package is a prearranged tour that includes products and services such as food, activities, accommodation, and transportation, which are sold at a single price. Since the competitiveness within tourism industry is very high, many of the tour agents try to provide attractive tour-packages in order to meet tourist satisfaction as much as possible. Some of the criteria that are considered by the tourist are the number of places to be visited and the cost of the tour-packages. Previous studies indicate that tourists tend to choose economical tour-packages and aiming to visit as many places as they can cover. Thus, this study proposed tour-package model using heuristic approach. The aim is to find economical tour-packages and at the same time to propose as many places as possible to be visited by tourist in a given geographical area particularly in Langkawi Island. The proposed model considers only one starting point where the tour starts and ends at an identified hotel. This study covers 31 most attractive places in Langkawi Island from various categories of tourist attractions. Besides, the allocation of period for lunch and dinner are included in the proposed itineraries where it covers 11 popular restaurants around Langkawi Island. In developing the itinerary, the proposed heuristic approach considers time window for each site (hotel/restaurant/place) so that it represents real world implementation. We present three itineraries with different time constraints (1-day, 2-day and 3-day tour-package). The aim of economic model is to minimize the tour-package cost as much as possible by considering entrance fee of each visited place. We compare the proposed model with our uneconomic model from our previous study. The uneconomic model has no limitation to the cost with the aim to maximize the number of places to be visited. Comparison between the uneconomic and economic itinerary has shown that the proposed model have successfully achieved the objective that

  11. Cognitive Abilities, Monitoring Confidence, and Control Thresholds Explain Individual Differences in Heuristics and Biases

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Simon A.; Kleitman, Sabina; Howie, Pauline; Stankov, Lazar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether individual differences in performance on heuristic and biases tasks can be explained by cognitive abilities, monitoring confidence, and control thresholds. Current theories explain individual differences in these tasks by the ability to detect errors and override automatic but biased judgments, and deliberative cognitive abilities that help to construct the correct response. Here we retain cognitive abilities but disentangle error detection, proposing that lower monitoring confidence and higher control thresholds promote error checking. Participants (N = 250) completed tasks assessing their fluid reasoning abilities, stable monitoring confidence levels, and the control threshold they impose on their decisions. They also completed seven typical heuristic and biases tasks such as the cognitive reflection test and Resistance to Framing. Using structural equation modeling, we found that individuals with higher reasoning abilities, lower monitoring confidence, and higher control threshold performed significantly and, at times, substantially better on the heuristic and biases tasks. Individuals with higher control thresholds also showed lower preferences for risky alternatives in a gambling task. Furthermore, residual correlations among the heuristic and biases tasks were reduced to null, indicating that cognitive abilities, monitoring confidence, and control thresholds accounted for their shared variance. Implications include the proposal that the capacity to detect errors does not differ between individuals. Rather, individuals might adopt varied strategies that promote error checking to different degrees, regardless of whether they have made a mistake or not. The results support growing evidence that decision-making involves cognitive abilities that construct actions and monitoring and control processes that manage their initiation. PMID:27790170

  12. Impact of heuristics in clustering large biological networks.

    PubMed

    Shafin, Md Kishwar; Kabir, Kazi Lutful; Ridwan, Iffatur; Anannya, Tasmiah Tamzid; Karim, Rashid Saadman; Hoque, Mohammad Mozammel; Rahman, M Sohel

    2015-12-01

    Traditional clustering algorithms often exhibit poor performance for large networks. On the contrary, greedy algorithms are found to be relatively efficient while uncovering functional modules from large biological networks. The quality of the clusters produced by these greedy techniques largely depends on the underlying heuristics employed. Different heuristics based on different attributes and properties perform differently in terms of the quality of the clusters produced. This motivates us to design new heuristics for clustering large networks. In this paper, we have proposed two new heuristics and analyzed the performance thereof after incorporating those with three different combinations in a recently celebrated greedy clustering algorithm named SPICi. We have extensively analyzed the effectiveness of these new variants. The results are found to be promising. PMID:26386663

  13. Plying Your Craft: Instructional Development and the Use of Heuristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, Kent L.; Hewlett, Brent

    1981-01-01

    Examines an instructional systems design (ISD) model used by Bell Laboratories as an illustration of how heuristics can be brought to bear upon the design and development of instructional materials. Ten references are listed. (Author/MER)

  14. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J; Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-03-11

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reactive potential energy surfaces and are combined here with quantum chemical structure optimizations, which yield the structures and energies of the reaction intermediates and products. Application of heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology to the formose reaction reproduces the experimentally observed reaction products, major reaction pathways, and autocatalytic cycles.

  15. The Priority Heuristic: Making Choices Without Trade-Offs

    PubMed Central

    Brandstätter, Eduard; Gigerenzer, Gerd; Hertwig, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Bernoulli's framework of expected utility serves as a model for various psychological processes, including motivation, moral sense, attitudes, and decision making. To account for evidence at variance with expected utility, we generalize the framework of fast and frugal heuristics from inferences to preferences. The priority heuristic predicts (i) Allais' paradox, (ii) risk aversion for gains if probabilities are high, (iii) risk seeking for gains if probabilities are low (lottery tickets), (iv) risk aversion for losses if probabilities are low (buying insurance), (v) risk seeking for losses if probabilities are high, (vi) certainty effect, (vii) possibility effect, and (viii) intransitivities. We test how accurately the heuristic predicts people's choices, compared to previously proposed heuristics and three modifications of expected utility theory: security-potential/aspiration theory, transfer-of-attention-exchange model, and cumulative prospect theory. PMID:16637767

  16. Scheduling constrained tools using heuristic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maram, Venkataramana; Rahman, Syariza Abdul; Maram, Sandhya Rani

    2015-12-01

    One of the main challenge to the current manufacturing production planning is to provide schedules of operations to maximize resource utilization to yield highest overall productivity. This is achieved by scheduling available resources to activities. There can be many different real time scenarios with different combination of input resources to produce parts. In this paper, the problem is simplified to single machine with individual process times and due dates to represent the real world scheduling problem. The main objective function is to minimize the total tardiness or late jobs. Nearest greedy method of assignment problem algorithm is used to find the initial solution followed by Simulated Annealing (SA) algorithm for the improvement part. Simulated Annealing is one of the meta-heuristic techniques in solving combinatorial optimization problem. The general purpose Microsoft Visual C++ is used to developed algorithm for finding the best solution. The proposed hybrid approach able to generate best schedule in 7th and optimal in 170th iteration with tardiness 8 and 7 hours respectively.

  17. Heuristic Medicine: The Methodists and Metalepsis.

    PubMed

    Webster, Colin

    2015-09-01

    In the first century B.C.E., a group of Greek physicians called the Methodists denied that medicine could be based on such "hidden causes" as humors, atoms, or elements. They argued that the inner workings of the body were ultimately unknowable, existing beyond the limits of human knowledge and inference. Yet they insisted that medical certainty was still possible, claiming that every disease shared one of three directly apprehensible "manifest commonalities"--stricture, laxity, or some mixture of the two. Medicine could therefore be a science; it was simply noncausal in structure. This essay examines these medical theories in light of Herbert Simon's concept of "bounded rationality," suggesting that the Methodists were proposing a type of medical "heuristic" in response to the limitations of human knowledge and processing power. At the same time, the essay suggests that such an epistemology had its consequences, setting up an ontological crunch whereby the demands formerly placed on diseases and their causes transferred to "affections" and the commonalities, with successive generations of Methodists disagreeing about the status of symptoms, signs, and diseased states. Borrowing vocabulary from the Methodists themselves, the essay calls the consequent ontological slippage between causes and effects "metalepsis". PMID:26685524

  18. Heuristics-Guided Exploration of Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bergeler, Maike; Simm, Gregor N; Proppe, Jonny; Reiher, Markus

    2015-12-01

    For the investigation of chemical reaction networks, the efficient and accurate determination of all relevant intermediates and elementary reactions is mandatory. The complexity of such a network may grow rapidly, in particular if reactive species are involved that might cause a myriad of side reactions. Without automation, a complete investigation of complex reaction mechanisms is tedious and possibly unfeasible. Therefore, only the expected dominant reaction paths of a chemical reaction network (e.g., a catalytic cycle or an enzymatic cascade) are usually explored in practice. Here, we present a computational protocol that constructs such networks in a parallelized and automated manner. Molecular structures of reactive complexes are generated based on heuristic rules derived from conceptual electronic-structure theory and subsequently optimized by quantum-chemical methods to produce stable intermediates of an emerging reaction network. Pairs of intermediates in this network that might be related by an elementary reaction according to some structural similarity measure are then automatically detected and subjected to an automated search for the connecting transition state. The results are visualized as an automatically generated network graph, from which a comprehensive picture of the mechanism of a complex chemical process can be obtained that greatly facilitates the analysis of the whole network. We apply our protocol to the Schrock dinitrogen-fixation catalyst to study alternative pathways of catalytic ammonia production. PMID:26642988

  19. Heuristic Modeling for TRMM Lifetime Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, P. S.; Sharer, P. J.; DeFazio, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis time for computing the expected mission lifetimes of proposed frequently maneuvering, tightly altitude constrained, Earth orbiting spacecraft have been significantly reduced by means of a heuristic modeling method implemented in a commercial-off-the-shelf spreadsheet product (QuattroPro) running on a personal computer (PC). The method uses a look-up table to estimate the maneuver frequency per month as a function of the spacecraft ballistic coefficient and the solar flux index, then computes the associated fuel use by a simple engine model. Maneuver frequency data points are produced by means of a single 1-month run of traditional mission analysis software for each of the 12 to 25 data points required for the table. As the data point computations are required only a mission design start-up and on the occasion of significant mission redesigns, the dependence on time consuming traditional modeling methods is dramatically reduced. Results to date have agreed with traditional methods to within 1 to 1.5 percent. The spreadsheet approach is applicable to a wide variety of Earth orbiting spacecraft with tight altitude constraints. It will be particularly useful to such missions as the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission scheduled for launch in 1997, whose mission lifetime calculations are heavily dependent on frequently revised solar flux predictions.

  20. Heuristic Medicine: The Methodists and Metalepsis.

    PubMed

    Webster, Colin

    2015-09-01

    In the first century B.C.E., a group of Greek physicians called the Methodists denied that medicine could be based on such "hidden causes" as humors, atoms, or elements. They argued that the inner workings of the body were ultimately unknowable, existing beyond the limits of human knowledge and inference. Yet they insisted that medical certainty was still possible, claiming that every disease shared one of three directly apprehensible "manifest commonalities"--stricture, laxity, or some mixture of the two. Medicine could therefore be a science; it was simply noncausal in structure. This essay examines these medical theories in light of Herbert Simon's concept of "bounded rationality," suggesting that the Methodists were proposing a type of medical "heuristic" in response to the limitations of human knowledge and processing power. At the same time, the essay suggests that such an epistemology had its consequences, setting up an ontological crunch whereby the demands formerly placed on diseases and their causes transferred to "affections" and the commonalities, with successive generations of Methodists disagreeing about the status of symptoms, signs, and diseased states. Borrowing vocabulary from the Methodists themselves, the essay calls the consequent ontological slippage between causes and effects "metalepsis".

  1. Critics and advisors: Heuristic knowledge and manufacturability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J.J.; Stubblefield, W.A.; Ames, A.L.

    1996-06-01

    In recent years, much of the progress in Computer-Aided Manufacturing has emphasized the use of simulation, finite-element analysis, and other science-based techniques to plan and evaluate manufacturing processes. These approaches are all based on the idea that we can build sufficiently faithful models of complex manufacturing processes such as machining, welding, and casting. Although there has been considerable progress in this area, it continues to suffer from difficulties: the first of these is that the kind of highly accurate models that this approach requires may take many person months to construct, and the second is the large amount of computing resources needed to run these simulations. Two design advisors, Near Net-Shape Advisor and Design for Machinability Advisor, are being developed to explore the role of heuristic, knowledge-based systems for manufacturing processes, both as an alternative to more analytical techniques, and also in support of these techniques. Currently the advisors are both in the prototype stage. All indications lead to the conclusion that the advisors will be successful and lay the groundwork for additional systems such as these in the future.

  2. Neural Basis of Scientific Innovation Induced by Heuristic Prototype

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiang; Wei, Dongtao; Liu, Yijun; Zhang, Qinlin

    2013-01-01

    A number of major inventions in history have been based on bionic imitation. Heuristics, by applying biological systems to the creation of artificial devices and machines, might be one of the most critical processes in scientific innovation. In particular, prototype heuristics propositions that innovation may engage automatic activation of a prototype such as a biological system to form novel associations between a prototype's function and problem-solving. We speculated that the cortical dissociation between the automatic activation and forming novel associations in innovation is critical point to heuristic creativity. In the present study, novel and old scientific innovations (NSI and OSI) were selected as experimental materials in using learning-testing paradigm to explore the neural basis of scientific innovation induced by heuristic prototype. College students were required to resolve NSI problems (to which they did not know the answers) and OSI problems (to which they knew the answers). From two fMRI experiments, our results showed that the subjects could resolve NSI when provided with heuristic prototypes. In Experiment 1, it was found that the lingual gyrus (LG; BA18) might be related to prototype heuristics in college students resolving NSI after learning a relative prototype. In Experiment 2, the LG (BA18) and precuneus (BA31) were significantly activated for NSI compared to OSI when college students learned all prototypes one day before the test. In addition, the mean beta-values of these brain regions of NSI were all correlated with the behavior accuracy of NSI. As our hypothesis indicated, the findings suggested that the LG might be involved in forming novel associations using heuristic information, while the precuneus might be involved in the automatic activation of heuristic prototype during scientific innovation. PMID:23372641

  3. Neural basis of scientific innovation induced by heuristic prototype.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junlong; Li, Wenfu; Qiu, Jiang; Wei, Dongtao; Liu, Yijun; Zhang, Qinlin

    2013-01-01

    A number of major inventions in history have been based on bionic imitation. Heuristics, by applying biological systems to the creation of artificial devices and machines, might be one of the most critical processes in scientific innovation. In particular, prototype heuristics propositions that innovation may engage automatic activation of a prototype such as a biological system to form novel associations between a prototype's function and problem-solving. We speculated that the cortical dissociation between the automatic activation and forming novel associations in innovation is critical point to heuristic creativity. In the present study, novel and old scientific innovations (NSI and OSI) were selected as experimental materials in using learning-testing paradigm to explore the neural basis of scientific innovation induced by heuristic prototype. College students were required to resolve NSI problems (to which they did not know the answers) and OSI problems (to which they knew the answers). From two fMRI experiments, our results showed that the subjects could resolve NSI when provided with heuristic prototypes. In Experiment 1, it was found that the lingual gyrus (LG; BA18) might be related to prototype heuristics in college students resolving NSI after learning a relative prototype. In Experiment 2, the LG (BA18) and precuneus (BA31) were significantly activated for NSI compared to OSI when college students learned all prototypes one day before the test. In addition, the mean beta-values of these brain regions of NSI were all correlated with the behavior accuracy of NSI. As our hypothesis indicated, the findings suggested that the LG might be involved in forming novel associations using heuristic information, while the precuneus might be involved in the automatic activation of heuristic prototype during scientific innovation.

  4. Climate adaptation heuristics and the science/policy divide

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Mustelin, Johanna; Maloney, Megan C.

    2013-09-05

    The adaptation science enterprise has expanded rapidly in recent years, presumably in response to growth in demand for knowledge that can facilitate adaptation policy and practice. However, evidence suggests such investments in adaptation science have not necessarily translated into adaptation implementation. One potential constraint on adaptation may be the underlying heuristics that are used as the foundation for both adaptation research and practice. In this paper, we explore the adaptation academic literature with the objective of identifying adaptation heuristics, assessing the extent to which they have become entrenched within the adaptation discourse, and discussing potential weaknesses in their framing that could undermine adaptation efforts. This investigation is supported by a multi-method analysis that includes both a quantitative content analysis of the adaptation literature that evidences the use of adaptation heuristics and a qualitative analysis of the implications of such heuristics for enhancing or hindering the implementation of adaptation. Results demonstrate that a number of heuristic devices are commonly used in both the peer-reviewed adaptation literature as well as within grey literature designed to inform adaptation practitioners. Furthermore, the apparent lack of critical reflection upon the robustness of these heuristics for diverse contexts may contribute to potential cognitive bias with respect to the framing of adaptation by both researchers and practitioners. Finally, we discuss this phenomenon by drawing upon heuristic-analytic theory, which has explanatory utility in understanding both the origins of such heuristics as well as the measures that can be pursued toward the co-generation of more robust approaches to adaptation problem-solving.

  5. Climate adaptation heuristics and the science/policy divide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Mustelin, Johanna; Maloney, Megan C.

    2013-09-05

    The adaptation science enterprise has expanded rapidly in recent years, presumably in response to growth in demand for knowledge that can facilitate adaptation policy and practice. However, evidence suggests such investments in adaptation science have not necessarily translated into adaptation implementation. One potential constraint on adaptation may be the underlying heuristics that are used as the foundation for both adaptation research and practice. In this paper, we explore the adaptation academic literature with the objective of identifying adaptation heuristics, assessing the extent to which they have become entrenched within the adaptation discourse, and discussing potential weaknesses in their framing thatmore » could undermine adaptation efforts. This investigation is supported by a multi-method analysis that includes both a quantitative content analysis of the adaptation literature that evidences the use of adaptation heuristics and a qualitative analysis of the implications of such heuristics for enhancing or hindering the implementation of adaptation. Results demonstrate that a number of heuristic devices are commonly used in both the peer-reviewed adaptation literature as well as within grey literature designed to inform adaptation practitioners. Furthermore, the apparent lack of critical reflection upon the robustness of these heuristics for diverse contexts may contribute to potential cognitive bias with respect to the framing of adaptation by both researchers and practitioners. Finally, we discuss this phenomenon by drawing upon heuristic-analytic theory, which has explanatory utility in understanding both the origins of such heuristics as well as the measures that can be pursued toward the co-generation of more robust approaches to adaptation problem-solving.« less

  6. Inhibitory mechanism of the matching heuristic in syllogistic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ping Ping; Moreno Ríos, Sergio; García-Madruga, Juan Antonio; Bajo Molina, María Teresa

    2014-11-01

    A number of heuristic-based hypotheses have been proposed to explain how people solve syllogisms with automatic processes. In particular, the matching heuristic employs the congruency of the quantifiers in a syllogism—by matching the quantifier of the conclusion with those of the two premises. When the heuristic leads to an invalid conclusion, successful solving of these conflict problems requires the inhibition of automatic heuristic processing. Accordingly, if the automatic processing were based on processing the set of quantifiers, no semantic contents would be inhibited. The mental model theory, however, suggests that people reason using mental models, which always involves semantic processing. Therefore, whatever inhibition occurs in the processing implies the inhibition of the semantic contents. We manipulated the validity of the syllogism and the congruency of the quantifier of its conclusion with those of the two premises according to the matching heuristic. A subsequent lexical decision task (LDT) with related words in the conclusion was used to test any inhibition of the semantic contents after each syllogistic evaluation trial. In the LDT, the facilitation effect of semantic priming diminished after correctly solved conflict syllogisms (match-invalid or mismatch-valid), but was intact after no-conflict syllogisms. The results suggest the involvement of an inhibitory mechanism of semantic contents in syllogistic reasoning when there is a conflict between the output of the syntactic heuristic and actual validity. Our results do not support a uniquely syntactic process of syllogistic reasoning but fit with the predictions based on mental model theory.

  7. Generating effective project scheduling heuristics by abstraction and reconstitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janakiraman, Bhaskar; Prieditis, Armand

    1992-01-01

    A project scheduling problem consists of a finite set of jobs, each with fixed integer duration, requiring one or more resources such as personnel or equipment, and each subject to a set of precedence relations, which specify allowable job orderings, and a set of mutual exclusion relations, which specify jobs that cannot overlap. No job can be interrupted once started. The objective is to minimize project duration. This objective arises in nearly every large construction project--from software to hardware to buildings. Because such project scheduling problems are NP-hard, they are typically solved by branch-and-bound algorithms. In these algorithms, lower-bound duration estimates (admissible heuristics) are used to improve efficiency. One way to obtain an admissible heuristic is to remove (abstract) all resources and mutual exclusion constraints and then obtain the minimal project duration for the abstracted problem; this minimal duration is the admissible heuristic. Although such abstracted problems can be solved efficiently, they yield inaccurate admissible heuristics precisely because those constraints that are central to solving the original problem are abstracted. This paper describes a method to reconstitute the abstracted constraints back into the solution to the abstracted problem while maintaining efficiency, thereby generating better admissible heuristics. Our results suggest that reconstitution can make good admissible heuristics even better.

  8. An interdisciplinary heuristic evaluation method for universal building design.

    PubMed

    Afacan, Yasemin; Erbug, Cigdem

    2009-07-01

    This study highlights how heuristic evaluation as a usability evaluation method can feed into current building design practice to conform to universal design principles. It provides a definition of universal usability that is applicable to an architectural design context. It takes the seven universal design principles as a set of heuristics and applies an iterative sequence of heuristic evaluation in a shopping mall, aiming to achieve a cost-effective evaluation process. The evaluation was composed of three consecutive sessions. First, five evaluators from different professions were interviewed regarding the construction drawings in terms of universal design principles. Then, each evaluator was asked to perform the predefined task scenarios. In subsequent interviews, the evaluators were asked to re-analyze the construction drawings. The results showed that heuristic evaluation could successfully integrate universal usability into current building design practice in two ways: (i) it promoted an iterative evaluation process combined with multi-sessions rather than relying on one evaluator and on one evaluation session to find the maximum number of usability problems, and (ii) it highlighted the necessity of an interdisciplinary ad hoc committee regarding the heuristic abilities of each profession. A multi-session and interdisciplinary heuristic evaluation method can save both the project budget and the required time, while ensuring a reduced error rate for the universal usage of the built environments.

  9. Risky choice with heuristics: reply to Birnbaum (2008), Johnson, Schulte-Mecklenbeck, and Willemsen (2008), and Rieger and Wang (2008).

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Eduard; Gigerenzer, Gerd; Hertwig, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    E. Brandstätter, G. Gigerenzer, and R. Hertwig (2006) showed that the priority heuristic matches or outperforms modifications of expected utility theory in predicting choice in 4 diverse problem sets. M. H. Birnbaum (2008) argued that sets exist in which the opposite is true. The authors agree--but stress that all choice strategies have regions of good and bad performance. The accuracy of various strategies systematically depends on choice difficulty, which the authors consider a triggering variable underlying strategy selection. Agreeing with E. J. Johnson, M. Schulte-Mecklenbeck, and M. C. Willemsen (2008) that process (not "as-if") models need to be formulated, the authors show how quantitative predictions can be derived and test them. Finally, they demonstrate that many of Birnbaum's and M. O. Rieger and M. Wang's (2008) case studies championing their preferred models involved biased tests in which the priority heuristic predicted data, whereas the parameterized models were fitted to the same data. The authors propose an adaptive toolbox approach of risky choice, according to which people first seek a no-conflict solution before resorting to conflict-resolving strategies such as the priority heuristic.

  10. Post-game analysis: An initial experiment for heuristic-based resource management in concurrent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry C.

    1987-01-01

    In concurrent systems, a major responsibility of the resource management system is to decide how the application program is to be mapped onto the multi-processor. Instead of using abstract program and machine models, a generate-and-test framework known as 'post-game analysis' that is based on data gathered during program execution is proposed. Each iteration consists of (1) (a simulation of) an execution of the program; (2) analysis of the data gathered; and (3) the proposal of a new mapping that would have a smaller execution time. These heuristics are applied to predict execution time changes in response to small perturbations applied to the current mapping. An initial experiment was carried out using simple strategies on 'pipeline-like' applications. The results obtained from four simple strategies demonstrated that for this kind of application, even simple strategies can produce acceptable speed-up with a small number of iterations.

  11. Heuristic optimization of the scanning path of particle therapy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, J.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Ansarinejad, A.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; La Rosa, A.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R.

    2009-06-15

    Quasidiscrete scanning is a delivery strategy for proton and ion beam therapy in which the beam is turned off when a slice is finished and a new energy must be set but not during the scanning between consecutive spots. Different scanning paths lead to different dose distributions due to the contribution of the unintended transit dose between spots. In this work an algorithm to optimize the scanning path for quasidiscrete scanned beams is presented. The classical simulated annealing algorithm is used. It is a heuristic algorithm frequently used in combinatorial optimization problems, which allows us to obtain nearly optimal solutions in acceptable running times. A study focused on the best choice of operational parameters on which the algorithm performance depends is presented. The convergence properties of the algorithm have been further improved by using the next-neighbor algorithm to generate the starting paths. Scanning paths for two clinical treatments have been optimized. The optimized paths are found to be shorter than the back-and-forth, top-to-bottom (zigzag) paths generally provided by the treatment planning systems. The gamma method has been applied to quantify the improvement achieved on the dose distribution. Results show a reduction of the transit dose when the optimized paths are used. The benefit is clear especially when the fluence per spot is low, as in the case of repainting. The minimization of the transit dose can potentially allow the use of higher beam intensities, thus decreasing the treatment time. The algorithm implemented for this work can optimize efficiently the scanning path of quasidiscrete scanned particle beams. Optimized scanning paths decrease the transit dose and lead to better dose distributions.

  12. Strategy Notebook; Tools For Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEver, Catherine

    A detailed analysis of 76 major heuristic strategies or processes is provided in this supplementary text to the course, Tools for Change. Each strategy is conceptualized as a pair of active verbs which represent alternative, although not necessarily opposite, approaches to problem-solving. Some examples are: a) commit-defer; b) record-recall; c)…

  13. Meta-heuristic algorithms as tools for hydrological science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Do Guen; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, meta-heuristic optimization techniques are introduced and their applications to water resources engineering, particularly in hydrological science are introduced. In recent years, meta-heuristic optimization techniques have been introduced that can overcome the problems inherent in iterative simulations. These methods are able to find good solutions and require limited computation time and memory use without requiring complex derivatives. Simulation-based meta-heuristic methods such as Genetic algorithms (GAs) and Harmony Search (HS) have powerful searching abilities, which can occasionally overcome the several drawbacks of traditional mathematical methods. For example, HS algorithms can be conceptualized from a musical performance process and used to achieve better harmony; such optimization algorithms seek a near global optimum determined by the value of an objective function, providing a more robust determination of musical performance than can be achieved through typical aesthetic estimation. In this paper, meta-heuristic algorithms and their applications (focus on GAs and HS) in hydrological science are discussed by subject, including a review of existing literature in the field. Then, recent trends in optimization are presented and a relatively new technique such as Smallest Small World Cellular Harmony Search (SSWCHS) is briefly introduced, with a summary of promising results obtained in previous studies. As a result, previous studies have demonstrated that meta-heuristic algorithms are effective tools for the development of hydrological models and the management of water resources.

  14. Multicriteria meta-heuristics for AGV dispatching control based on computational intelligence.

    PubMed

    Naso, David; Turchiano, Biagio

    2005-04-01

    In many manufacturing environments, automated guided vehicles are used to move the processed materials between various pickup and delivery points. The assignment of vehicles to unit loads is a complex problem that is often solved in real-time with simple dispatching rules. This paper proposes an automated guided vehicles dispatching approach based on computational intelligence. We adopt a fuzzy multicriteria decision strategy to simultaneously take into account multiple aspects in every dispatching decision. Since the typical short-term view of dispatching rules is one of the main limitations of such real-time assignment heuristics, we also incorporate in the multicriteria algorithm a specific heuristic rule that takes into account the empty-vehicle travel on a longer time-horizon. Moreover, we also adopt a genetic algorithm to tune the weights associated to each decision criteria in the global decision algorithm. The proposed approach is validated by means of a comparison with other dispatching rules, and with other recently proposed multicriteria dispatching strategies also based on computational Intelligence. The analysis of the results obtained by the proposed dispatching approach in both nominal and perturbed operating conditions (congestions, faults) confirms its effectiveness.

  15. Multicriteria meta-heuristics for AGV dispatching control based on computational intelligence.

    PubMed

    Naso, David; Turchiano, Biagio

    2005-04-01

    In many manufacturing environments, automated guided vehicles are used to move the processed materials between various pickup and delivery points. The assignment of vehicles to unit loads is a complex problem that is often solved in real-time with simple dispatching rules. This paper proposes an automated guided vehicles dispatching approach based on computational intelligence. We adopt a fuzzy multicriteria decision strategy to simultaneously take into account multiple aspects in every dispatching decision. Since the typical short-term view of dispatching rules is one of the main limitations of such real-time assignment heuristics, we also incorporate in the multicriteria algorithm a specific heuristic rule that takes into account the empty-vehicle travel on a longer time-horizon. Moreover, we also adopt a genetic algorithm to tune the weights associated to each decision criteria in the global decision algorithm. The proposed approach is validated by means of a comparison with other dispatching rules, and with other recently proposed multicriteria dispatching strategies also based on computational Intelligence. The analysis of the results obtained by the proposed dispatching approach in both nominal and perturbed operating conditions (congestions, faults) confirms its effectiveness. PMID:15828651

  16. Plan-graph Based Heuristics for Conformant Probabilistic Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, Salesh; Pollack, Martha E.; Smith, David E.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce plan-graph based heuristics to solve a variation of the conformant probabilistic planning (CPP) problem. In many real-world problems, it is the case that the sensors are unreliable or take too many resources to provide knowledge about the environment. These domains are better modeled as conformant planning problems. POMDP based techniques are currently the most successful approach for solving CPP but have the limitation of state- space explosion. Recent advances in deterministic and conformant planning have shown that plan-graphs can be used to enhance the performance significantly. We show that this enhancement can also be translated to CPP. We describe our process for developing the plan-graph heuristics and estimating the probability of a partial plan. We compare the performance of our planner PVHPOP when used with different heuristics. We also perform a comparison with a POMDP solver to show over a order of magnitude improvement in performance.

  17. The min-conflicts heuristic: Experimental and theoretical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Steven; Philips, Andrew B.; Johnston, Mark D.; Laird, Philip

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a simple heuristic method for solving large-scale constraint satisfaction and scheduling problems. Given an initial assignment for the variables in a problem, the method operates by searching through the space of possible repairs. The search is guided by an ordering heuristic, the min-conflicts heuristic, that attempts to minimize the number of constraint violations after each step. We demonstrate empirically that the method performs orders of magnitude better than traditional backtracking techniques on certain standard problems. For example, the one million queens problem can be solved rapidly using our approach. We also describe practical scheduling applications where the method has been successfully applied. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain why the method works so well on certain types of problems and to predict when it is likely to be most effective.

  18. A Comparison of Genetic Programming Variants for Hyper-Heuristics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Sean

    2015-03-01

    Modern society is faced with ever more complex problems, many of which can be formulated as generate-and-test optimization problems. General-purpose optimization algorithms are not well suited for real-world scenarios where many instances of the same problem class need to be repeatedly and efficiently solved, such as routing vehicles over highways with constantly changing traffic flows, because they are not targeted to a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics automate the design of algorithms to create a custom algorithm for a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics typically employ Genetic Programming (GP) and this project has investigated the relationship between the choice of GP and performance in Hyper-heuristics. Results are presented demonstrating the existence of problems for which there is a statistically significant performance differential between the use of different types of GP.

  19. Discovery and problem solving: Triangulation as a weak heuristic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochowiak, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Recently the artificial intelligence community has turned its attention to the process of discovery and found that the history of science is a fertile source for what Darden has called compiled hindsight. Such hindsight generates weak heuristics for discovery that do not guarantee that discoveries will be made but do have proven worth in leading to discoveries. Triangulation is one such heuristic that is grounded in historical hindsight. This heuristic is explored within the general framework of the BACON, GLAUBER, STAHL, DALTON, and SUTTON programs. In triangulation different bases of information are compared in an effort to identify gaps between the bases. Thus, assuming that the bases of information are relevantly related, the gaps that are identified should be good locations for discovery and robust analysis.

  20. Petri nets SM-cover-based on heuristic coloring algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacz, Jacek; Doligalski, Michał

    2015-09-01

    In the paper, coloring heuristic algorithm of interpreted Petri nets is presented. Coloring is used to determine the State Machines (SM) subnets. The present algorithm reduces the Petri net in order to reduce the computational complexity and finds one of its possible State Machines cover. The proposed algorithm uses elements of interpretation of Petri nets. The obtained result may not be the best, but it is sufficient for use in rapid prototyping of logic controllers. Found SM-cover will be also used in the development of algorithms for decomposition, and modular synthesis and implementation of parallel logic controllers. Correctness developed heuristic algorithm was verified using Gentzen formal reasoning system.

  1. Reasoning by analogy as an aid to heuristic theorem proving.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kling, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    When heuristic problem-solving programs are faced with large data bases that contain numbers of facts far in excess of those needed to solve any particular problem, their performance rapidly deteriorates. In this paper, the correspondence between a new unsolved problem and a previously solved analogous problem is computed and invoked to tailor large data bases to manageable sizes. This paper outlines the design of an algorithm for generating and exploiting analogies between theorems posed to a resolution-logic system. These algorithms are believed to be the first computationally feasible development of reasoning by analogy to be applied to heuristic theorem proving.

  2. Automated unit-level testing with heuristic rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, W. Homer; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Cross, James H.; Keleher, William; Shackelford, Keith

    1990-01-01

    Software testing plays a significant role in the development of complex software systems. Current testing methods generally require significant effort to generate meaningful test cases. The QUEST/Ada system is a prototype system designed using CLIPS to experiment with expert system based test case generation. The prototype is designed to test for condition coverage, and attempts to generate test cases to cover all feasible branches contained in an Ada program. This paper reports on heuristics sued by the system. These heuristics vary according to the amount of knowledge obtained by preprocessing and execution of the boolean conditions in the program.

  3. Philosophic Heuristic Instruction (PHI)--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coole, Walter A.

    This publication contains a course outline and syllabus, self-study units, and testing materials finished and tested in the Open Classroom, an auto-tutorial learning laboratory at Skagit Valley College (Washington). This self-contained course in informal logic is organized around problem-solving strategy and a collection of modules for extensive…

  4. Heuristic Evaluation on Mobile Interfaces: A New Checklist

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez Gómez, Rosa; Cascado Caballero, Daniel; Sevillano, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution and adoption of mobile devices raise new usability challenges, given their limitations (in screen size, battery life, etc.) as well as the specific requirements of this new interaction. Traditional evaluation techniques need to be adapted in order for these requirements to be met. Heuristic evaluation (HE), an Inspection Method based on evaluation conducted by experts over a real system or prototype, is based on checklists which are desktop-centred and do not adequately detect mobile-specific usability issues. In this paper, we propose a compilation of heuristic evaluation checklists taken from the existing bibliography but readapted to new mobile interfaces. Selecting and rearranging these heuristic guidelines offer a tool which works well not just for evaluation but also as a best-practices checklist. The result is a comprehensive checklist which is experimentally evaluated as a design tool. This experimental evaluation involved two software engineers without any specific knowledge about usability, a group of ten users who compared the usability of a first prototype designed without our heuristics, and a second one after applying the proposed checklist. The results of this experiment show the usefulness of the proposed checklist for avoiding usability gaps even with nontrained developers. PMID:25295300

  5. Chain Gang: A Framegame for Teaching Algorithms and Heuristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiagarajan, Sivasailam; Pasigna, Aida L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes basic structure of a framegame, Chain Gang, in which self-instructional modules teach a cognitive skill. Procedures are presented for loading new content into the game's basic framework to teach algorithms or heuristics and for game modification to suit different situations. Handouts used in the basic game are appended. (MBR)

  6. Computer-Assisted Test Assembly Using Optimization Heuristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leucht, Richard M.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a variation of a "greedy" algorithm that can be used in test-assembly problems. The algorithm, the normalized weighted absolute-deviation heuristic, selects items to have a locally optimal fit to a moving set of average criterion values. Demonstrates application of the model. (SLD)

  7. A Heuristic for Disassembly Planning in Remanufacturing System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to improve the efficiency of disassembly planning in remanufacturing environment. Even though disassembly processes are considered as the reverse of the corresponding assembly processes, under some technological and management constraints the feasible and efficient disassembly planning can be achieved by only well-designed algorithms. In this paper, we propose a heuristic for disassembly planning with the existence of disassembled part/subassembly demands. A mathematical model is formulated for solving this problem to determine the sequence and quantity of disassembly operations to minimize the disassembly costs under sequence-dependent setup and capacity constraints. The disassembly costs consist of the setup cost, part inventory holding cost, disassembly processing cost, and purchasing cost that resulted from unsatisfied demand. A simple but efficient heuristic algorithm is proposed to improve the quality of solution and computational efficiency. The main idea of heuristic is to divide the planning horizon into the smaller planning windows and improve the computational efficiency without much loss of solution quality. Performances of the heuristic are investigated through the computational experiments. PMID:24895679

  8. Heuristics guide cooperative behaviors in public goods game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjie; Chen, Tong

    2015-12-01

    In public goods game (PGG), player's cooperative behavior is not pure economical rationality, but social preference and prosocial intuition play extremely important roles as well. Social preference and prosocial intuition can be guided by heuristics from one's neighbors in daily life. To better investigate the impacts of heuristics on the evolution of cooperation, four types of agents are introduced into our spatial PGG. Through numerical simulations, results show that the larger percentages of cooperators with independent thought, the easier emergence and maintenance of collective cooperative behaviors. Additionally, we find that differentia heuristic capability has great effect on the equilibrium of PGG. Cooperation can be obviously promoted, when heuristic capability of cooperators with independent thought is stronger than that of defectors with independent thought. Finally, we observe that cooperators with independent thought and defectors with independent thought are favorable for the formation of some high quality clusters, which can resist the invasion between each other. Our work may help us understand more clearly the mechanism of cooperation in real world.

  9. Divergence of Scientific Heuristic Method and Direct Algebraic Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calucag, Lina S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an experimental study, made used of the non-randomized experimental and control groups, pretest-posttest designs. The experimental and control groups were two separate intact classes in Algebra. For a period of twelve sessions, the experimental group was subjected to the scientific heuristic method, but the control group instead was given…

  10. Heuristics Applied in the Development of Advanced Space Mission Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, Erik N.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced mission studies are the first step in determining the feasibility of a given space exploration concept. A space scientist develops a science goal in the exploration of space. This may be a new observation method, a new instrument or a mission concept to explore a solar system body. In order to determine the feasibility of a deep space mission, a concept study is convened to determine the technology needs and estimated cost of performing that mission. Heuristics are one method of defining viable mission and systems architectures that can be assessed for technology readiness and cost. Developing a viable architecture depends to a large extent upon extending the existing body of knowledge, and applying it in new and novel ways. These heuristics have evolved over time to include methods for estimating technical complexity, technology development, cost modeling and mission risk in the unique context of deep space missions. This paper examines the processes involved in performing these advanced concepts studies, and analyzes the application of heuristics in the development of an advanced in-situ planetary mission. The Venus Surface Sample Return mission study provides a context for the examination of the heuristics applied in the development of the mission and systems architecture. This study is illustrative of the effort involved in the initial assessment of an advance mission concept, and the knowledge and tools that are applied.

  11. Development of Heuristic Bias Detection in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Neys, Wim; Feremans, Vicky

    2013-01-01

    Although human reasoning is often biased by intuitive heuristics, recent studies have shown that adults and adolescents detect the biased nature of their judgments. The present study focused on the development of this critical bias sensitivity by examining the detection skills of young children in elementary school. Third and 6th graders were…

  12. Resolution of seven-axis manipulator redundancy: A heuristic issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, I.

    1990-01-01

    An approach is presented for the resolution of the redundancy of a seven-axis manipulator arm from the AI and expert systems point of view. This approach is heuristic, analytical, and globally resolves the redundancy at the position level. When compared with other approaches, this approach has several improved performance capabilities, including singularity avoidance, repeatability, stability, and simplicity.

  13. How cognitive heuristics can explain social interactions in spatial movement.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Michael J; Bode, Nikolai W F; Köster, Gerta

    2016-08-01

    The movement of pedestrian crowds is a paradigmatic example of collective motion. The precise nature of individual-level behaviours underlying crowd movements has been subject to a lively debate. Here, we propose that pedestrians follow simple heuristics rooted in cognitive psychology, such as 'stop if another step would lead to a collision' or 'follow the person in front'. In other words, our paradigm explicitly models individual-level behaviour as a series of discrete decisions. We show that our cognitive heuristics produce realistic emergent crowd phenomena, such as lane formation and queuing behaviour. Based on our results, we suggest that pedestrians follow different cognitive heuristics that are selected depending on the context. This differs from the widely used approach of capturing changes in behaviour via model parameters and leads to testable hypotheses on changes in crowd behaviour for different motivation levels. For example, we expect that rushed individuals more often evade to the side and thus display distinct emergent queue formations in front of a bottleneck. Our heuristics can be ranked according to the cognitive effort that is required to follow them. Therefore, our model establishes a direct link between behavioural responses and cognitive effort and thus facilitates a novel perspective on collective behaviour. PMID:27581483

  14. Heuristics for multiextremal optimization on a hyperrectangle: Some experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, E.; Roosma, J.

    1994-12-31

    The problem of finding the best point of a multiextremal oracle function on a hyperrectangle given a budget of (relatively expensive) function evaluations, is considered. Global optimization can be seen as combining covering actions and local searches. The combination can be adapted during the search depending on the roughness, number of optima found. Various heuristics are formulated and outcomes of experiments are shown.

  15. The Electrophysiological Correlates of Scientific Innovation Induced by Heuristic Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Junlong; Du, Xiumin; Tang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Entao; Li, Haijiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, novel and old scientific innovations (NSI and OSI) were selected as materials to explore the electrophysiological correlates of scientific innovation induced by heuristic information. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to do so, college students solved NSI problems (for which they did not know the answers) and OSI problems…

  16. Implementing the Science Writing Heuristic in the Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, K. A.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Hand, Brian M.

    2006-01-01

    The Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) is an instructional technique that combines inquiry, collaborative learning, and writing to change the nature of the chemistry laboratory for students and instructors. The SWH provides a format for students to guide their discussions, their thinking, and writing about how science activities relate to their own…

  17. Prototypes Are Key Heuristic Information in Insight Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Wenjing; Dietrich, Arne; Liu, Peiduo; Ming, Dan; Jin, Yule; Nusbaum, Howard C.; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from a range of fields indicates that inventions are often inspired by drawing a parallel to solutions found in nature. However, the cognitive mechanism of this process is not well understood. The cognitive mechanism of heuristic prototype in scientific innovation was tested with 3 experiments. First, 84 historical accounts of important…

  18. Ethical Reasoning: A Heuristic Approach for Business Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molberg, Diane R.

    For the teaching of business report writing, ethical reasoning can be used as a heuristic for thinking that will encourage a more effective communication pattern for business students. Writing processes can be applied to thinking processes to help students approach theoretical concepts, make decisions, and write more effective business reports. A…

  19. Heuristic evaluation on mobile interfaces: a new checklist.

    PubMed

    Yáñez Gómez, Rosa; Cascado Caballero, Daniel; Sevillano, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution and adoption of mobile devices raise new usability challenges, given their limitations (in screen size, battery life, etc.) as well as the specific requirements of this new interaction. Traditional evaluation techniques need to be adapted in order for these requirements to be met. Heuristic evaluation (HE), an Inspection Method based on evaluation conducted by experts over a real system or prototype, is based on checklists which are desktop-centred and do not adequately detect mobile-specific usability issues. In this paper, we propose a compilation of heuristic evaluation checklists taken from the existing bibliography but readapted to new mobile interfaces. Selecting and rearranging these heuristic guidelines offer a tool which works well not just for evaluation but also as a best-practices checklist. The result is a comprehensive checklist which is experimentally evaluated as a design tool. This experimental evaluation involved two software engineers without any specific knowledge about usability, a group of ten users who compared the usability of a first prototype designed without our heuristics, and a second one after applying the proposed checklist. The results of this experiment show the usefulness of the proposed checklist for avoiding usability gaps even with nontrained developers.

  20. A Heuristic Study of Religious Spirituality and Meaningful Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Keight Tucker

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality in the workplace has received increased focus over the past two decades. This heuristic study examined how religious spirituality informs and/or influences individual perceptions of meaningful work experiences. A literature review on the subject found a dearth of research. The primary research question was the following: What is the…

  1. Fast and frugal food choices: uncovering individual decision heuristics.

    PubMed

    Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Miesler, Linda; Todd, Peter M

    2007-11-01

    Research on food decision making is often based on the assumption that people take many different aspects into account and weight and add them according to their personally assessed importance. Yet there is a growing body of research suggesting that people's decisions can often be better described by simple heuristics-rules of thumb that people use to make choices based on only a few important pieces of information. To test empirically whether a simple heuristic is able to account for individual food decisions, we ran a computerized experiment in which participants (N = 50) repeatedly chose between pairs of 20 lunch dishes that were sampled from a local food court. A questionnaire assessed individual importance weights as well as evaluation ratings of each lunch dish on nine different factors. Our results show that a simple lexicographic heuristic that only considers each participant's most important factors is as good at predicting participants' food choices as a weighted additive model that takes all factors into account. This result questions the adequacy of weighted additive models as sole descriptions of human decision making in the food domain and provides evidence that food choices may instead be based on simple heuristics. PMID:17531348

  2. How cognitive heuristics can explain social interactions in spatial movement.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Michael J; Bode, Nikolai W F; Köster, Gerta

    2016-08-01

    The movement of pedestrian crowds is a paradigmatic example of collective motion. The precise nature of individual-level behaviours underlying crowd movements has been subject to a lively debate. Here, we propose that pedestrians follow simple heuristics rooted in cognitive psychology, such as 'stop if another step would lead to a collision' or 'follow the person in front'. In other words, our paradigm explicitly models individual-level behaviour as a series of discrete decisions. We show that our cognitive heuristics produce realistic emergent crowd phenomena, such as lane formation and queuing behaviour. Based on our results, we suggest that pedestrians follow different cognitive heuristics that are selected depending on the context. This differs from the widely used approach of capturing changes in behaviour via model parameters and leads to testable hypotheses on changes in crowd behaviour for different motivation levels. For example, we expect that rushed individuals more often evade to the side and thus display distinct emergent queue formations in front of a bottleneck. Our heuristics can be ranked according to the cognitive effort that is required to follow them. Therefore, our model establishes a direct link between behavioural responses and cognitive effort and thus facilitates a novel perspective on collective behaviour.

  3. Heuristics and NCLB Standardized Tests: A Convenient Lie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Arnold

    2009-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 requires public schools in the United States to test students in grades 3-8. The author argues that this mandate has been supported by the public, in part, because of the "availability heuristic," a phenomenon which occurs when people assess the probability of an event by the ease with which instances or…

  4. Making Predictions about Chemical Reactivity: Assumptions and Heuristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeyer, Jenine; Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Diverse implicit cognitive elements seem to support but also constrain reasoning in different domains. Many of these cognitive constraints can be thought of as either implicit assumptions about the nature of things or reasoning heuristics for decision-making. In this study we applied this framework to investigate college students'…

  5. The Priority Heuristic: Making Choices without Trade-Offs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandstatter, Eduard; Gigerenzer, Gerd; Hertwig, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Bernoulli's framework of expected utility serves as a model for various psychological processes, including motivation, moral sense, attitudes, and decision making. To account for evidence at variance with expected utility, the authors generalize the framework of fast and frugal heuristics from inferences to preferences. The priority heuristic…

  6. Algo-Heuristic Theory of Performance, Learning, and Instruction: Subject, Problems, Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landa, Lev N.

    1984-01-01

    The algo-heuristic theory is concerned with identifying unobservable cognitive processes and their unconscious component cognitive operations, including learning how to describe them algorithmically and heuristically, and how to devise specific instructional tools (algorithmic and heuristic) to develop cognitive processes much faster. (BW)

  7. Automated Detection of Heuristics and Biases among Pathologists in a Computer-Based System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Rebecca S.; Legowski, Elizabeth; Medvedeva, Olga; Reitmeyer, Kayse; Tseytlin, Eugene; Castine, Melissa; Jukic, Drazen; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is threefold: (1) to develop an automated, computer-based method to detect heuristics and biases as pathologists examine virtual slide cases, (2) to measure the frequency and distribution of heuristics and errors across three levels of training, and (3) to examine relationships of heuristics to biases, and biases to…

  8. Fluency Heuristic: A Model of How the Mind Exploits a By-Product of Information Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertwig, Ralph; Herzog, Stefan M.; Schooler, Lael J.; Reimer, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Boundedly rational heuristics for inference can be surprisingly accurate and frugal for several reasons. They can exploit environmental structures, co-opt complex capacities, and elude effortful search by exploiting information that automatically arrives on the mental stage. The fluency heuristic is a prime example of a heuristic that makes the…

  9. Heuristic Literacy Development and Its Relation to Mathematical Achievements of Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koichu, Boris; Berman, Abraham; Moore, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The relationships between heuristic literacy development and mathematical achievements of middle school students were explored during a 5-month classroom experiment in two 8th grade classes (N = 37). By heuristic literacy we refer to an individual's capacity to use heuristic vocabulary in problem-solving discourse and to approach scholastic…

  10. Investigating the Impacts of Design Heuristics on Idea Initiation and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Julia; Daly, Shanna R.; Yilmaz, Seda; Seifert, Colleen M.; Gonzalez, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of engineering students' use of Design Heuristics as part of a team project in an undergraduate engineering design course. Design Heuristics are an empirically derived set of cognitive "rules of thumb" for use in concept generation. We investigated heuristic use in the initial concept generation phase,…

  11. The role of heuristic appraisal in conflicting assessments of string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Kristian; Ritson, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    Over the last three decades, string theory has emerged as one of the leading hopes for a consistent theory of quantum gravity that unifies particle physics with general relativity. Despite the fact that string theory has been a thriving research program for the better part of three decades, it has been subjected to extensive criticism from a number of prominent physicists. The aim of this paper is to obtain a clearer picture of where the conflict lies in competing assessments of string theory, through a close reading of the argumentative strategies employed by protagonists on both sides. Although it has become commonplace to construe this debate as stemming from different attitudes to the absence of testable predictions, we argue that this presents an overly simplified view of the controversy, which ignores the critical role of heuristic appraisal. While string theorists and their defenders see the theoretical achievements of the string theory program as providing strong indication that it is 'on the right track', critics have challenged such claims, by calling into question the status of certain 'solved problems' and its purported 'explanatory coherence'. The debates over string theory are therefore particularly instructive from a philosophical point of view, not only because they offer important insights into the nature of heuristic appraisal and theoretical progress, but also because they raise deep questions about what constitutes a solved problem and an explanation in fundamental physics.

  12. Sequential Insertion Heuristic with Adaptive Bee Colony Optimisation Algorithm for Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows.

    PubMed

    Jawarneh, Sana; Abdullah, Salwani

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a bee colony optimisation (BCO) algorithm to tackle the vehicle routing problem with time window (VRPTW). The VRPTW involves recovering an ideal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles serving a defined number of customers. The BCO algorithm is a population-based algorithm that mimics the social communication patterns of honeybees in solving problems. The performance of the BCO algorithm is dependent on its parameters, so the online (self-adaptive) parameter tuning strategy is used to improve its effectiveness and robustness. Compared with the basic BCO, the adaptive BCO performs better. Diversification is crucial to the performance of the population-based algorithm, but the initial population in the BCO algorithm is generated using a greedy heuristic, which has insufficient diversification. Therefore the ways in which the sequential insertion heuristic (SIH) for the initial population drives the population toward improved solutions are examined. Experimental comparisons indicate that the proposed adaptive BCO-SIH algorithm works well across all instances and is able to obtain 11 best results in comparison with the best-known results in the literature when tested on Solomon's 56 VRPTW 100 customer instances. Also, a statistical test shows that there is a significant difference between the results.

  13. Sequential Insertion Heuristic with Adaptive Bee Colony Optimisation Algorithm for Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows.

    PubMed

    Jawarneh, Sana; Abdullah, Salwani

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a bee colony optimisation (BCO) algorithm to tackle the vehicle routing problem with time window (VRPTW). The VRPTW involves recovering an ideal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles serving a defined number of customers. The BCO algorithm is a population-based algorithm that mimics the social communication patterns of honeybees in solving problems. The performance of the BCO algorithm is dependent on its parameters, so the online (self-adaptive) parameter tuning strategy is used to improve its effectiveness and robustness. Compared with the basic BCO, the adaptive BCO performs better. Diversification is crucial to the performance of the population-based algorithm, but the initial population in the BCO algorithm is generated using a greedy heuristic, which has insufficient diversification. Therefore the ways in which the sequential insertion heuristic (SIH) for the initial population drives the population toward improved solutions are examined. Experimental comparisons indicate that the proposed adaptive BCO-SIH algorithm works well across all instances and is able to obtain 11 best results in comparison with the best-known results in the literature when tested on Solomon's 56 VRPTW 100 customer instances. Also, a statistical test shows that there is a significant difference between the results. PMID:26132158

  14. The Nature of Elementary Student Science Discourse in the Context of the Science Writing Heuristic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnetto, Andy; Hand, Brian M.; Norton-Meier, Lori

    2010-03-01

    This case study aimed to determine the nature of student interactions in small groups in an elementary classroom utilizing the Science Writing Heuristic approach. Fifth grade students were audio-recorded over four units of study while working in small groups to generate knowledge claims after conducting student-directed investigations. Analysis consisted of (1) identifying amount of on/off task talk, (2) categorizing on-task talk as generative (talk associated with generating an argument) or representational (talk associated with representing an argument in a final written form), (3) characterizing the generative components of argument, and (4) determining the functions of language used. Results indicate that students were on task 98% of the time. Students engaged in generative talk an average of 25% of the time and representational talk an average of 71% of the time. Students engaged in components of Toulmin's model of argument, but challenging of each other's ideas was not commonplace. Talk was dominated by the informative function (representing one's ideas) of language as it was found 78.3% of the time and to a lesser extent (11.7%) the heuristic function (inquiring through questions). These functions appear to be intimately tied to the task of generating knowledge claims in small groups. The results suggest that both talking and writing are critical to using science discourse as an embedded strategy to learning science. Further, nature and structure of the task are important pedagogical considerations when moving students toward participation in science discourse.

  15. Sequential Insertion Heuristic with Adaptive Bee Colony Optimisation Algorithm for Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    PubMed Central

    Jawarneh, Sana; Abdullah, Salwani

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a bee colony optimisation (BCO) algorithm to tackle the vehicle routing problem with time window (VRPTW). The VRPTW involves recovering an ideal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles serving a defined number of customers. The BCO algorithm is a population-based algorithm that mimics the social communication patterns of honeybees in solving problems. The performance of the BCO algorithm is dependent on its parameters, so the online (self-adaptive) parameter tuning strategy is used to improve its effectiveness and robustness. Compared with the basic BCO, the adaptive BCO performs better. Diversification is crucial to the performance of the population-based algorithm, but the initial population in the BCO algorithm is generated using a greedy heuristic, which has insufficient diversification. Therefore the ways in which the sequential insertion heuristic (SIH) for the initial population drives the population toward improved solutions are examined. Experimental comparisons indicate that the proposed adaptive BCO-SIH algorithm works well across all instances and is able to obtain 11 best results in comparison with the best-known results in the literature when tested on Solomon’s 56 VRPTW 100 customer instances. Also, a statistical test shows that there is a significant difference between the results. PMID:26132158

  16. Heuristic Identification of Biological Architectures for Simulating Complex Hierarchical Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason H; Amos, Ryan; Kiralis, Jeff; Andrews, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Simulation plays an essential role in the development of new computational and statistical methods for the genetic analysis of complex traits. Most simulations start with a statistical model using methods such as linear or logistic regression that specify the relationship between genotype and phenotype. This is appealing due to its simplicity and because these statistical methods are commonly used in genetic analysis. It is our working hypothesis that simulations need to move beyond simple statistical models to more realistically represent the biological complexity of genetic architecture. The goal of the present study was to develop a prototype genotype–phenotype simulation method and software that are capable of simulating complex genetic effects within the context of a hierarchical biology-based framework. Specifically, our goal is to simulate multilocus epistasis or gene–gene interaction where the genetic variants are organized within the framework of one or more genes, their regulatory regions and other regulatory loci. We introduce here the Heuristic Identification of Biological Architectures for simulating Complex Hierarchical Interactions (HIBACHI) method and prototype software for simulating data in this manner. This approach combines a biological hierarchy, a flexible mathematical framework, a liability threshold model for defining disease endpoints, and a heuristic search strategy for identifying high-order epistatic models of disease susceptibility. We provide several simulation examples using genetic models exhibiting independent main effects and three-way epistatic effects. PMID:25395175

  17. Interpreting Quantifier Scope Ambiguity: Evidence of Heuristic First, Algorithmic Second Processing

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Veena D.

    2013-01-01

    The present work suggests that sentence processing requires both heuristic and algorithmic processing streams, where the heuristic processing strategy precedes the algorithmic phase. This conclusion is based on three self-paced reading experiments in which the processing of two-sentence discourses was investigated, where context sentences exhibited quantifier scope ambiguity. Experiment 1 demonstrates that such sentences are processed in a shallow manner. Experiment 2 uses the same stimuli as Experiment 1 but adds questions to ensure deeper processing. Results indicate that reading times are consistent with a lexical-pragmatic interpretation of number associated with context sentences, but responses to questions are consistent with the algorithmic computation of quantifier scope. Experiment 3 shows the same pattern of results as Experiment 2, despite using stimuli with different lexical-pragmatic biases. These effects suggest that language processing can be superficial, and that deeper processing, which is sensitive to structure, only occurs if required. Implications for recent studies of quantifier scope ambiguity are discussed. PMID:24278439

  18. Strategy selection in cue-based decision making.

    PubMed

    Bryant, David J

    2014-06-01

    People can make use of a range of heuristic and rational, compensatory strategies to perform a multiple-cue judgment task. It has been proposed that people are sensitive to the amount of cognitive effort required to employ decision strategies. Experiment 1 employed a dual-task methodology to investigate whether participants' preference for heuristic versus compensatory decision strategies can be altered by increasing the cognitive demands of the task. As indicated by participants' decision times, a secondary task interfered more with the performance of a heuristic than compensatory decision strategy but did not affect the proportions of participants using either type of strategy. A stimulus set effect suggested that the conjunction of cue salience and cue validity might play a determining role in strategy selection. The results of Experiment 2 indicated that when a perceptually salient cue was also the most valid, the majority of participants preferred a single-cue heuristic strategy. Overall, the results contradict the view that heuristics are more likely to be adopted when a task is made more cognitively demanding. It is argued that people employ 2 learning processes during training, one an associative learning process in which cue-outcome associations are developed by sampling multiple cues, and another that involves the sequential examination of single cues to serve as a basis for a single-cue heuristic.

  19. Strategy selection in cue-based decision making.

    PubMed

    Bryant, David J

    2014-06-01

    People can make use of a range of heuristic and rational, compensatory strategies to perform a multiple-cue judgment task. It has been proposed that people are sensitive to the amount of cognitive effort required to employ decision strategies. Experiment 1 employed a dual-task methodology to investigate whether participants' preference for heuristic versus compensatory decision strategies can be altered by increasing the cognitive demands of the task. As indicated by participants' decision times, a secondary task interfered more with the performance of a heuristic than compensatory decision strategy but did not affect the proportions of participants using either type of strategy. A stimulus set effect suggested that the conjunction of cue salience and cue validity might play a determining role in strategy selection. The results of Experiment 2 indicated that when a perceptually salient cue was also the most valid, the majority of participants preferred a single-cue heuristic strategy. Overall, the results contradict the view that heuristics are more likely to be adopted when a task is made more cognitively demanding. It is argued that people employ 2 learning processes during training, one an associative learning process in which cue-outcome associations are developed by sampling multiple cues, and another that involves the sequential examination of single cues to serve as a basis for a single-cue heuristic. PMID:24884389

  20. Heuristics to Evaluate Interactive Systems for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Khowaja, Kamran; Salim, Siti Salwah

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we adapted and expanded a set of guidelines, also known as heuristics, to evaluate the usability of software to now be appropriate for software aimed at children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We started from the heuristics developed by Nielsen in 1990 and developed a modified set of 15 heuristics. The first 5 heuristics of this set are the same as those of the original Nielsen set, the next 5 heuristics are improved versions of Nielsen's, whereas the last 5 heuristics are new. We present two evaluation studies of our new heuristics. In the first, two groups compared Nielsen’s set with the modified set of heuristics, with each group evaluating two interactive systems. The Nielsen’s heuristics were assigned to the control group while the experimental group was given the modified set of heuristics, and a statistical analysis was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the modified set, the contribution of 5 new heuristics and the impact of 5 improved heuristics. The results show that the modified set is significantly more effective than the original, and we found a significant difference between the five improved heuristics and their corresponding heuristics in the original set. The five new heuristics are effective in problem identification using the modified set. The second study was conducted using a system which was developed to ascertain if the modified set was effective at identifying usability problems that could be fixed before the release of software. The post-study analysis revealed that the majority of the usability problems identified by the experts were fixed in the updated version of the system. PMID:26196385

  1. Worst-case analysis of self-organizing sequential search heuristics

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.L.; McGeoch, C.C.

    1983-03-01

    The performance of sequential search can be enhanced by the use of heuristics that move elements closer to the front of the list as they are found. Previous analyses have characterized the performance of such heuristics probabilitically. In this paper we show that the heuristics can also be analyzed in the worst-case sense, and that the relative merit of the heuristics under this analysis is different than in the probabilistic analyses. Simulations show that the relative merit of the heuristics on real data is closer to that of the new worst-case analyses rather than that of the previous probabilistic analyses.

  2. Maximal area and conformal welding heuristics for optimal slice selection in splenic volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Peng, Hao; Gu, Xianfeng; Barish, Mathew; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate estimation of splenic volume is crucial for the determination of disease progression and response to treatment for diseases that result in enlargement of the spleen. However, there is no consensus with respect to the use of single or multiple one-dimensional, or volumetric measurement. Existing methods for human reviewers focus on measurement of cross diameters on a representative axial slice and craniocaudal length of the organ. We propose two heuristics for the selection of the optimal axial plane for splenic volume estimation: the maximal area axial measurement heuristic and the novel conformal welding shape-based heuristic. We evaluate these heuristics on time-variant data derived from both healthy and sick subjects and contrast them to established heuristics. Under certain conditions our heuristics are superior to standard practice volumetric estimation methods. We conclude by providing guidance on selecting the optimal heuristic for splenic volume estimation.

  3. The warm glow heuristic: when liking leads to familiarity.

    PubMed

    Monin, Benoît

    2003-12-01

    Five studies demonstrate that the positive valence of a stimulus increases its perceived familiarity, even in the absence of prior exposure. For example, beautiful faces feel familiar. Two explanations for this effect stand out: (a). Stimulus prototypicality leads both to positivity and familiarity, and (b). positive affect is used to infer familiarity in a heuristic fashion. Studies 1 and 2 show that attractive faces feel more familiar than average ones and that prototypicality accounts for only part of this effect. In Study 3, the rated attractiveness of average faces was manipulated by contrast, and their perceived familiarity changed accordingly, although their inherent prototypicaliry remained the same. In Study 4, positive words felt more familiar to participants than neutral and negative words. Study 5 shows that the effect is strongest when recognition is difficult. The author concludes that both prototypicality and a warm glow heuristic are responsible for the "good-is-familiar" phenomenon. PMID:14674812

  4. A heuristic approach to incremental and reactive scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odubiyi, Jide B.; Zoch, David R.

    1989-01-01

    An heuristic approach to incremental and reactive scheduling is described. Incremental scheduling is the process of modifying an existing schedule if the initial schedule does not meet its stated initial goals. Reactive scheduling occurs in near real-time in response to changes in available resources or the occurrence of targets of opportunity. Only minor changes are made during both incremental and reactive scheduling because a goal of re-scheduling procedures is to minimally impact the schedule. The described heuristic search techniques, which are employed by the Request Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE), a prototype generic scheduler, efficiently approximate the cost of reaching a goal from a given state and effective mechanisms for controlling search.

  5. Task Assignment Heuristics for Parallel and Distributed CFD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Benitez, Noe; Djomehri, M. Jahed; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a task graph (TG) model to represent a single discrete step of multi-block overset grid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. The TG model is then used to not only balance the computational workload across the overset grids but also to reduce inter-grid communication costs. We have developed a set of task assignment heuristics based on the constraints inherent in this class of CFD problems. Two basic assignments, the smallest task first (STF) and the largest task first (LTF), are first presented. They are then systematically costs. To predict the performance of the proposed task assignment heuristics, extensive performance evaluations are conducted on a synthetic TG with tasks defined in terms of the number of grid points in predetermined overlapping grids. A TG derived from a realistic problem with eight million grid points is also used as a test case.

  6. Deterministic algorithm with agglomerative heuristic for location problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakovtsev, L.; Stupina, A.

    2015-10-01

    Authors consider the clustering problem solved with the k-means method and p-median problem with various distance metrics. The p-median problem and the k-means problem as its special case are most popular models of the location theory. They are implemented for solving problems of clustering and many practically important logistic problems such as optimal factory or warehouse location, oil or gas wells, optimal drilling for oil offshore, steam generators in heavy oil fields. Authors propose new deterministic heuristic algorithm based on ideas of the Information Bottleneck Clustering and genetic algorithms with greedy heuristic. In this paper, results of running new algorithm on various data sets are given in comparison with known deterministic and stochastic methods. New algorithm is shown to be significantly faster than the Information Bottleneck Clustering method having analogous preciseness.

  7. Unsafe sex: decision-making biases and heuristics.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, B J; Shayne, V T

    1993-01-01

    This paper suggests that continued high-risk behavior is the result of the heuristics used to make judgments under uncertainty, and that the same heuristics may be mobilized to increase the use of safer-sex practices. In order to explain why it is that individuals fail to make effective use of the information they may have concerning rates of infection, consequences of infection and their own at-risk status, theory and research in several areas will be considered. Developments in the breadth of areas to which basic research on decision-making has been applied continue to provide new approaches toward understanding and overcoming the processes by which we reason (Kahnemann, 1991). It is worth reminding ourselves that public health campaigns in other areas have led to changes in behavior. Reasoning, even with its biases, is still the route by which we make decisions, most of them effective and self-protective.

  8. The source of the truth bias: Heuristic processing?

    PubMed

    Street, Chris N H; Masip, Jaume

    2015-06-01

    People believe others are telling the truth more often than they actually are; this is called the truth bias. Surprisingly, when a speaker is judged at multiple points across their statement the truth bias declines. Previous claims argue this is evidence of a shift from (biased) heuristic processing to (reasoned) analytical processing. In four experiments we contrast the heuristic-analytic model (HAM) with alternative accounts. In Experiment 1, the decrease in truth responding was not the result of speakers appearing more deceptive, but was instead attributable to the rater's processing style. Yet contrary to HAMs, across three experiments we found the decline in bias was not related to the amount of processing time available (Experiments 1-3) or the communication channel (Experiment 2). In Experiment 4 we found support for a new account: that the bias reflects whether raters perceive the statement to be internally consistent.

  9. The source of the truth bias: Heuristic processing?

    PubMed

    Street, Chris N H; Masip, Jaume

    2015-06-01

    People believe others are telling the truth more often than they actually are; this is called the truth bias. Surprisingly, when a speaker is judged at multiple points across their statement the truth bias declines. Previous claims argue this is evidence of a shift from (biased) heuristic processing to (reasoned) analytical processing. In four experiments we contrast the heuristic-analytic model (HAM) with alternative accounts. In Experiment 1, the decrease in truth responding was not the result of speakers appearing more deceptive, but was instead attributable to the rater's processing style. Yet contrary to HAMs, across three experiments we found the decline in bias was not related to the amount of processing time available (Experiments 1-3) or the communication channel (Experiment 2). In Experiment 4 we found support for a new account: that the bias reflects whether raters perceive the statement to be internally consistent. PMID:25707774

  10. The warm glow heuristic: when liking leads to familiarity.

    PubMed

    Monin, Benoît

    2003-12-01

    Five studies demonstrate that the positive valence of a stimulus increases its perceived familiarity, even in the absence of prior exposure. For example, beautiful faces feel familiar. Two explanations for this effect stand out: (a). Stimulus prototypicality leads both to positivity and familiarity, and (b). positive affect is used to infer familiarity in a heuristic fashion. Studies 1 and 2 show that attractive faces feel more familiar than average ones and that prototypicality accounts for only part of this effect. In Study 3, the rated attractiveness of average faces was manipulated by contrast, and their perceived familiarity changed accordingly, although their inherent prototypicaliry remained the same. In Study 4, positive words felt more familiar to participants than neutral and negative words. Study 5 shows that the effect is strongest when recognition is difficult. The author concludes that both prototypicality and a warm glow heuristic are responsible for the "good-is-familiar" phenomenon.

  11. VHP - An environment for the remote visualization of heuristic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Stuart L.; Leiner, Barry M.

    1991-01-01

    A software system called VHP is introduced which permits the visualization of heuristic algorithms on both resident and remote hardware platforms. The VHP is based on the DCF tool for interprocess communication and is applicable to remote algorithms which can be on different types of hardware and in languages other than VHP. The VHP system is of particular interest to systems in which the visualization of remote processes is required such as robotics for telescience applications.

  12. Multiobjective hyper heuristic scheme for system design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Amer Farhan

    2012-11-01

    As system design is becoming more and more multifaceted, integrated, and complex, the traditional single objective optimization trends of optimal design are becoming less and less efficient and effective. Single objective optimization methods present a unique optimal solution whereas multiobjective methods present pareto front. The foremost intent is to predict a reasonable distributed pareto-optimal solution set independent of the problem instance through multiobjective scheme. Other objective of application of intended approach is to improve the worthiness of outputs of the complex engineering system design process at the conceptual design phase. The process is automated in order to provide the system designer with the leverage of the possibility of studying and analyzing a large multiple of possible solutions in a short time. This article presents Multiobjective Hyper Heuristic Optimization Scheme based on low level meta-heuristics developed for the application in engineering system design. Herein, we present a stochastic function to manage meta-heuristics (low-level) to augment surety of global optimum solution. Generic Algorithm, Simulated Annealing and Swarm Intelligence are used as low-level meta-heuristics in this study. Performance of the proposed scheme is investigated through a comprehensive empirical analysis yielding acceptable results. One of the primary motives for performing multiobjective optimization is that the current engineering systems require simultaneous optimization of conflicting and multiple. Random decision making makes the implementation of this scheme attractive and easy. Injecting feasible solutions significantly alters the search direction and also adds diversity of population resulting in accomplishment of pre-defined goals set in the proposed scheme.

  13. Symbolic Heuristic Search for Factored Markov Decision Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert (Technical Monitor); Feng, Zheng-Zhu; Hansen, Eric A.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a planning algorithm that integrates two approaches to solving Markov decision processes with large state spaces. State abstraction is used to avoid evaluating states individually. Forward search from a start state, guided by an admissible heuristic, is used to avoid evaluating all states. We combine these two approaches in a novel way that exploits symbolic model-checking techniques and demonstrates their usefulness for decision-theoretic planning.

  14. A simple heuristic for blindfolded record linkage

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Henry; Das, Amar; Ferris, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To address the challenge of balancing privacy with the need to create cross-site research registry records on individual patients, while matching the data for a given patient as he or she moves between participating sites. To evaluate the strategy of generating anonymous identifiers based on real identifiers in such a way that the chances of a shared patient being accurately identified were maximized, and the chances of incorrectly joining two records belonging to different people were minimized. Methods Our hypothesis was that most variation in names occurs after the first two letters, and that date of birth is highly reliable, so a single match variable consisting of a hashed string built from the first two letters of the patient's first and last names plus their date of birth would have the desired characteristics. We compared and contrasted the match algorithm characteristics (rate of false positive v. rate of false negative) for our chosen variable against both Social Security Numbers and full names. Results In a data set of 19 000 records, a derived match variable consisting of a 2-character prefix from both first and last names combined with date of birth has a 97% sensitivity; by contrast, an anonymized identifier based on the patient's full names and date of birth has a sensitivity of only 87% and SSN has sensitivity 86%. Conclusion The approach we describe is most useful in situations where privacy policies preclude the full exchange of the identifiers required by more sophisticated and sensitive linkage algorithms. For data sets of sufficiently high quality this effective approach, while producing a lower rate of matching than more complex algorithms, has the merit of being easy to explain to institutional review boards, adheres to the minimum necessary rule of the HIPAA privacy rule, and is faster and less cumbersome to implement than a full probabilistic linkage. PMID:22298567

  15. A heuristic finite-state model of the human driver in a car-following situation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnham, G. O.; Bekey, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    An approach to modeling human driver behavior in single-lane car following which is based on a finite-state decision structure is considered. The specific strategy at each point in the decision tree was obtained from observations of typical driver behavior. The synthesis of the decision logic is based on position and velocity thresholds and four states defined by regions in the phase plane. The performance of the resulting assumed intuitively logical model was compared with actual freeway data. The match of the model to the data was optimized by adapting the model parameters using a modified PARTAN algorithm. The results indicate that the heuristic model behavior matches actual car-following performance better during deceleration and constant velocity phases than during acceleration periods.

  16. Humans use compression heuristics to improve the recall of social networks.

    PubMed

    Brashears, Matthew E

    2013-01-01

    The ability of primates, including humans, to maintain large social networks appears to depend on the ratio of the neocortex to the rest of the brain. However, observed human network size frequently exceeds predictions based on this ratio (e.g., "Dunbar's Number"), implying that human networks are too large to be cognitively managed. Here I show that humans adaptively use compression heuristics to allow larger amounts of social information to be stored in the same brain volume. I find that human adults can remember larger numbers of relationships in greater detail when a network exhibits triadic closure and kin labels than when it does not. These findings help to explain how humans manage large and complex social networks with finite cognitive resources and suggest that many of the unusual properties of human social networks are rooted in the strategies necessary to cope with cognitive limitations.

  17. Heuristic optimization for the design of plasmonic nanowires with specific resonant and scattering properties.

    PubMed

    Macías, D; Adam, P-M; Ruíz-Cortés, V; Rodríguez-Oliveros, R; Sánchez-Gil, J A

    2012-06-01

    In this contribution, we propose a computational tool for the synthesis of metallic nanowires with optimized optical properties, e.g. maximal scattering cross-section at a given wavelength. For this, we employ a rigorous numerical method, based on the solution of surface integral equations, along with a heuristic optimization technique that belongs to the population-based set known as Evolutionary Algorithms. Also, we make use of a general representation scheme to model, in a more realistic manner, the arbitrary geometry of the nanowires. The performance of this approach is evaluated through some examples involving various wavelengths, materials, and optimization strategies. The results of our numerical experiments show that this hybrid technique is a suitable and versatile tool straightforwardly extensible for the design of different configurations of interest in Plasmonics.

  18. General heuristics algorithms for solving capacitated arc routing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadzli, Mohammad; Najwa, Nurul; Masran, Hafiz

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we try to determine the near-optimum solution for the capacitated arc routing problem (CARP). In general, NP-hard CARP is a special graph theory specifically arises from street services such as residential waste collection and road maintenance. By purpose, the design of the CARP model and its solution techniques is to find optimum (or near-optimum) routing cost for a fleet of vehicles involved in operation. In other words, finding minimum-cost routing is compulsory in order to reduce overall operation cost that related with vehicles. In this article, we provide a combination of various heuristics algorithm to solve a real case of CARP in waste collection and benchmark instances. These heuristics work as a central engine in finding initial solutions or near-optimum in search space without violating the pre-setting constraints. The results clearly show that these heuristics algorithms could provide good initial solutions in both real-life and benchmark instances.

  19. Heuristic and analytic processing in online sports betting.

    PubMed

    d'Astous, Alain; Di Gaspero, Marc

    2015-06-01

    This article presents the results of two studies that examine the occurrence of heuristic (i.e., intuitive and fast) and analytic (i.e., deliberate and slow) processes among people who engage in online sports betting on a regular basis. The first study was qualitative and was conducted with a convenience sample of 12 regular online sports gamblers who described the processes by which they arrive at a sports betting decision. The results of this study showed that betting online on sports events involves a mix of heuristic and analytic processes. The second study consisted in a survey of 161 online sports gamblers where performance in terms of monetary gains, experience in online sports betting, propensity to collect and analyze relevant information prior to betting, and use of bookmaker odds were measured. This study showed that heuristic and analytic processes act as mediators of the relationship between experience and performance. The findings stemming of these two studies give some insights into gamblers' modes of thinking and behaviors in an online sports betting context and show the value of the dual mediation process model for research that looks at gambling activities from a judgment and decision making perspective.

  20. Visualization for Hyper-Heuristics: Back-End Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Luke

    2015-03-01

    Modern society is faced with increasingly complex problems, many of which can be formulated as generate-and-test optimization problems. Yet, general-purpose optimization algorithms may sometimes require too much computational time. In these instances, hyperheuristics may be used. Hyper-heuristics automate the design of algorithms to create a custom algorithm for a particular scenario, finding the solution significantly faster than its predecessor. However, it may be difficult to understand exactly how a design was derived and why it should be trusted. This project aims to address these issues by creating an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) for hyper-heuristics and an easy-to-understand scientific visualization for the produced solutions. To support the development of this GUI, my portion of the research involved developing algorithms that would allow for parsing of the data produced by the hyper-heuristics. This data would then be sent to the front-end, where it would be displayed to the end user.

  1. Bflinks: Reliable Bugfix Links via Bidirectional References and Tuned Heuristics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. Data from software version archives and defect databases can be used for defect insertion circumstance analysis and defect prediction. The first step in such analyses is identifying defect-correcting changes in the version archive (bugfix commits) and enriching them with additional metadata by establishing bugfix links to corresponding entries in the defect database. Candidate bugfix commits are typically identified via heuristic string matching on the commit message. Research Questions. Which filters could be used to obtain a set of bugfix links? How to tune their parameters? What accuracy is achieved? Method. We analyze a modular set of seven independent filters, including new ones that make use of reverse links, and evaluate visual heuristics for setting cutoff parameters. For a commercial repository, a product expert manually verifies over 2500 links to validate the results with unprecedented accuracy. Results. The heuristics pick a very good parameter value for five filters and a reasonably good one for the sixth. The combined filtering, called bflinks, provides 93% precision and only 7% results loss. Conclusion. Bflinks can provide high-quality results and adapts to repositories with different properties. PMID:27433506

  2. Remotely sensed image processing service composition based on heuristic search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhu, Qing; Li, Hai-feng; Zhao, Wen-hao

    2008-12-01

    As remote sensing technology become ever more powerful with multi-platform and multi-sensor, it has been widely recognized for contributing to geospatial information efforts. Because the remotely sensed image processing demands large-scale, collaborative processing and massive storage capabilities to satisfy the increasing demands of various applications, the effect and efficiency of the remotely sensed image processing is far from the user's expectation. The emergence of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) may make this challenge manageable. It encapsulate all processing function into services and recombine them with service chain. The service composition on demand has become a hot topic. Aiming at the success rate, quality and efficiency of processing service composition for remote sensing application, a remote sensed image processing service composition method is proposed in this paper. It composes services for a user requirement through two steps: 1) dynamically constructs a complete service dependency graph for user requirement on-line; 2) AO* based heuristic searches for optimal valid path in service dependency graph. These services within the service dependency graph are considered relevant to the specific request, instead of overall registered services. The second step, heuristic search is a promising approach for automated planning. Starting with the initial state, AO* uses a heuristic function to select states until the user requirement is reached. Experimental results show that this method has a good performance even the repository has a large number of processing services.

  3. Heuristic approach to deriving models for gene finding.

    PubMed

    Besemer, J; Borodovsky, M

    1999-10-01

    Computer methods of accurate gene finding in DNA sequences require models of protein coding and non-coding regions derived either from experimentally validated training sets or from large amounts of anonymous DNA sequence. Here we propose a new, heuristic method producing fairly accurate inhomogeneous Markov models of protein coding regions. The new method needs such a small amount of DNA sequence data that the model can be built 'on the fly' by a web server for any DNA sequence >400 nt. Tests on 10 complete bacterial genomes performed with the GeneMark.hmm program demonstrated the ability of the new models to detect 93.1% of annotated genes on average, while models built by traditional training predict an average of 93.9% of genes. Models built by the heuristic approach could be used to find genes in small fragments of anonymous prokaryotic genomes and in genomes of organelles, viruses, phages and plasmids, as well as in highly inhomogeneous genomes where adjustment of models to local DNA composition is needed. The heuristic method also gives an insight into the mechanism of codon usage pattern evolution.

  4. Tuning Parameters in Heuristics by Using Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arin, Arif; Rabadi, Ghaith; Unal, Resit

    2010-01-01

    With the growing complexity of today's large scale problems, it has become more difficult to find optimal solutions by using exact mathematical methods. The need to find near-optimal solutions in an acceptable time frame requires heuristic approaches. In many cases, however, most heuristics have several parameters that need to be "tuned" before they can reach good results. The problem then turns into "finding best parameter setting" for the heuristics to solve the problems efficiently and timely. One-Factor-At-a-Time (OFAT) approach for parameter tuning neglects the interactions between parameters. Design of Experiments (DOE) tools can be instead employed to tune the parameters more effectively. In this paper, we seek the best parameter setting for a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to solve the single machine total weighted tardiness problem in which n jobs must be scheduled on a single machine without preemption, and the objective is to minimize the total weighted tardiness. Benchmark instances for the problem are available in the literature. To fine tune the GA parameters in the most efficient way, we compare multiple DOE models including 2-level (2k ) full factorial design, orthogonal array design, central composite design, D-optimal design and signal-to-noise (SIN) ratios. In each DOE method, a mathematical model is created using regression analysis, and solved to obtain the best parameter setting. After verification runs using the tuned parameter setting, the preliminary results for optimal solutions of multiple instances were found efficiently.

  5. Development of heuristic bias detection in elementary school.

    PubMed

    De Neys, Wim; Feremans, Vicky

    2013-02-01

    Although human reasoning is often biased by intuitive heuristics, recent studies have shown that adults and adolescents detect the biased nature of their judgments. The present study focused on the development of this critical bias sensitivity by examining the detection skills of young children in elementary school. Third and 6th graders were presented with child-friendly versions of classic base-rate problems in which a cued heuristic response could be inconsistent or consistent with the base rates. After each problem children were asked to indicate their subjective response confidence to assess their bias detection skills. Results indicated that 6th graders showed a clear confidence decrease when they gave a heuristic response that conflicted with the base rates. However, this confidence decrease was not observed for 3rd graders, suggesting that they did not yet acknowledge that their judgment was not fully warranted. Implications for the development of efficient training programs and the debate on human rationality are discussed. PMID:22545836

  6. Heuristic and analytic processing in online sports betting.

    PubMed

    d'Astous, Alain; Di Gaspero, Marc

    2015-06-01

    This article presents the results of two studies that examine the occurrence of heuristic (i.e., intuitive and fast) and analytic (i.e., deliberate and slow) processes among people who engage in online sports betting on a regular basis. The first study was qualitative and was conducted with a convenience sample of 12 regular online sports gamblers who described the processes by which they arrive at a sports betting decision. The results of this study showed that betting online on sports events involves a mix of heuristic and analytic processes. The second study consisted in a survey of 161 online sports gamblers where performance in terms of monetary gains, experience in online sports betting, propensity to collect and analyze relevant information prior to betting, and use of bookmaker odds were measured. This study showed that heuristic and analytic processes act as mediators of the relationship between experience and performance. The findings stemming of these two studies give some insights into gamblers' modes of thinking and behaviors in an online sports betting context and show the value of the dual mediation process model for research that looks at gambling activities from a judgment and decision making perspective. PMID:24390714

  7. Bose-Einstein condensates form in heuristics learned by ciliates deciding to signal 'social' commitments.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin B

    2010-03-01

    Fringe quantum biology theories often adopt the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation when explaining how consciousness, emotion, perception, learning, and reasoning emerge from operations of intact animal nervous systems and other computational media. However, controversial empirical evidence and mathematical formalism concerning decoherence rates of bioprocesses keep these frameworks from satisfactorily accounting for the physical nature of cognitive-like events. This study, inspired by the discovery that preferential attachment rules computed by complex technological networks obey Bose-Einstein statistics, is the first rigorous attempt to examine whether analogues of Bose-Einstein condensation precipitate learned decision making in live biological systems as bioenergetics optimization predicts. By exploiting the ciliate Spirostomum ambiguum's capacity to learn and store behavioral strategies advertising mating availability into heuristics of topologically invariant computational networks, three distinct phases of strategy use were found to map onto statistical distributions described by Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac, and classical Maxwell-Boltzmann behavior. Ciliates that sensitized or habituated signaling patterns to emit brief periods of either deceptive 'harder-to-get' or altruistic 'easier-to-get' serial escape reactions began testing condensed on initially perceived fittest 'courting' solutions. When these ciliates switched from their first strategy choices, Bose-Einstein condensation of strategy use abruptly dissipated into a Maxwell-Boltzmann computational phase no longer dominated by a single fittest strategy. Recursive trial-and-error strategy searches annealed strategy use back into a condensed phase consistent with performance optimization. 'Social' decisions performed by ciliates showing no nonassociative learning were largely governed by Fermi-Dirac statistics, resulting in degenerate distributions of strategy choices. These findings corroborate

  8. Bose-Einstein condensates form in heuristics learned by ciliates deciding to signal 'social' commitments.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin B

    2010-03-01

    Fringe quantum biology theories often adopt the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation when explaining how consciousness, emotion, perception, learning, and reasoning emerge from operations of intact animal nervous systems and other computational media. However, controversial empirical evidence and mathematical formalism concerning decoherence rates of bioprocesses keep these frameworks from satisfactorily accounting for the physical nature of cognitive-like events. This study, inspired by the discovery that preferential attachment rules computed by complex technological networks obey Bose-Einstein statistics, is the first rigorous attempt to examine whether analogues of Bose-Einstein condensation precipitate learned decision making in live biological systems as bioenergetics optimization predicts. By exploiting the ciliate Spirostomum ambiguum's capacity to learn and store behavioral strategies advertising mating availability into heuristics of topologically invariant computational networks, three distinct phases of strategy use were found to map onto statistical distributions described by Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac, and classical Maxwell-Boltzmann behavior. Ciliates that sensitized or habituated signaling patterns to emit brief periods of either deceptive 'harder-to-get' or altruistic 'easier-to-get' serial escape reactions began testing condensed on initially perceived fittest 'courting' solutions. When these ciliates switched from their first strategy choices, Bose-Einstein condensation of strategy use abruptly dissipated into a Maxwell-Boltzmann computational phase no longer dominated by a single fittest strategy. Recursive trial-and-error strategy searches annealed strategy use back into a condensed phase consistent with performance optimization. 'Social' decisions performed by ciliates showing no nonassociative learning were largely governed by Fermi-Dirac statistics, resulting in degenerate distributions of strategy choices. These findings corroborate

  9. Extending Students' Practice of Metacognitive Regulation Skills with the Science Writing Heuristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Opstal, Mary T.; Daubenmire, Patrick L.

    2015-05-01

    Metacognition can be described as an internal conversation that seeks to answer the questions, 'how much do I really know about what I am learning' and, 'how am I monitoring what I am learning?' Metacognitive regulation skills are critical to meaningful learning because they facilitate the abilities to recognize the times when one's current level of understanding is insufficient and to identify the needs for closing the gap in understanding. This research explored how using the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) as an instructional approach in a laboratory classroom affected students' practice of metacognitive skills while solving open-ended laboratory problems. Within our qualitative research design, results demonstrate that students in the SWH environment, compared to non-SWH students, used metacognitive strategies to a different degree and to a different depth when solving open-ended laboratory problems. As students engaged in higher levels of metacognitive regulation, peer collaboration became a prominent path for supporting the use of metacognitive strategies. Students claimed that the structure of the SWH weekly laboratory experiments improved their ability to solve open-ended lab problems. Results from this study suggest that using instruction that encourages practice of metacognitive strategies can improve students' use of these strategies.

  10. Planning collision free paths for two cooperating robots using a divide-and-conquer C-space traversal heuristic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Johnathan M.

    1993-01-01

    A method was developed to plan feasible and obstacle-avoiding paths for two spatial robots working cooperatively in a known static environment. Cooperating spatial robots as referred to herein are robots which work in 6D task space while simultaneously grasping and manipulating a common, rigid payload. The approach is configuration space (c-space) based and performs selective rather than exhaustive c-space mapping. No expensive precomputations are required. A novel, divide-and-conquer type of heuristic is used to guide the selective mapping process. The heuristic does not involve any robot, environment, or task specific assumptions. A technique was also developed which enables solution of the cooperating redundant robot path planning problem without requiring the use of inverse kinematics for a redundant robot. The path planning strategy involves first attempting to traverse along the configuration space vector from the start point towards the goal point. If an unsafe region is encountered, an intermediate via point is identified by conducting a systematic search in the hyperplane orthogonal to and bisecting the unsafe region of the vector. This process is repeatedly applied until a solution to the global path planning problem is obtained. The basic concept behind this strategy is that better local decisions at the beginning of the trouble region may be made if a possible way around the 'center' of the trouble region is known. Thus, rather than attempting paths which look promising locally (at the beginning of a trouble region) but which may not yield overall results, the heuristic attempts local strategies that appear promising for circumventing the unsafe region.

  11. Stick or Switch: A Selection Heuristic Predicts when People Take the Perspective of Others or Communicate Egocentrically

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Shane L.; Fay, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines a cognitive mechanism that drives perspective-taking and egocentrism in interpersonal communication. Using a conceptual referential communication task, in which participants describe a range of abstract geometric shapes, Experiment 1 shows that perspective-taking and egocentric communication are frequent communication strategies. Experiment 2 tests a selection heuristic account of perspective-taking and egocentric communication. It uses participants’ shape description ratings to predict their communication strategy. Participants’ communication strategy was predicted by how informative they perceived the different shape descriptions to be. When participants’ personal shape description was perceived to be more informative than their addressee’s shape description, there was a strong bias to communicate egocentrically. By contrast, when their addressee’s shape description was perceived to be more informative, there was a strong bias to take their addressee’s perspective. When the shape descriptions were perceived to be equally informative, there was a moderate bias to communicate egocentrically. This simple, but powerful, selection heuristic may be critical to the cumulative cultural evolution of human communication systems, and cumulative cultural evolution more generally. PMID:27437694

  12. Stick or Switch: A Selection Heuristic Predicts when People Take the Perspective of Others or Communicate Egocentrically.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Shane L; Fay, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines a cognitive mechanism that drives perspective-taking and egocentrism in interpersonal communication. Using a conceptual referential communication task, in which participants describe a range of abstract geometric shapes, Experiment 1 shows that perspective-taking and egocentric communication are frequent communication strategies. Experiment 2 tests a selection heuristic account of perspective-taking and egocentric communication. It uses participants' shape description ratings to predict their communication strategy. Participants' communication strategy was predicted by how informative they perceived the different shape descriptions to be. When participants' personal shape description was perceived to be more informative than their addressee's shape description, there was a strong bias to communicate egocentrically. By contrast, when their addressee's shape description was perceived to be more informative, there was a strong bias to take their addressee's perspective. When the shape descriptions were perceived to be equally informative, there was a moderate bias to communicate egocentrically. This simple, but powerful, selection heuristic may be critical to the cumulative cultural evolution of human communication systems, and cumulative cultural evolution more generally. PMID:27437694

  13. Heuristic thinking and human intelligence: a commentary on Marewski, Gaissmaier and Gigerenzer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jonathan St B T; Over, David E

    2010-05-01

    Marewski, Gaissmaier and Gigerenzer (2009) present a review of research on fast and frugal heuristics, arguing that complex problems are best solved by simple heuristics, rather than the application of knowledge and logical reasoning. We argue that the case for such heuristics is overrated. First, we point out that heuristics can often lead to biases as well as effective responding. Second, we show that the application of logical reasoning can be both necessary and relatively simple. Finally, we argue that the evidence for a logical reasoning system that co-exists with simpler heuristic forms of thinking is overwhelming. Not only is it implausible a priori that we would have evolved such a system that is of no use to us, but extensive evidence from the literature on dual processing in reasoning and judgement shows that many problems can only be solved when this form of reasoning is used to inhibit and override heuristic thinking.

  14. From Metaphors to Formalism: A Heuristic Approach to Holistic Assessments of Ecosystem Health.

    PubMed

    Fock, Heino O; Kraus, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental policies employ metaphoric objectives such as ecosystem health, resilience and sustainable provision of ecosystem services, which influence corresponding sustainability assessments by means of normative settings such as assumptions on system description, indicator selection, aggregation of information and target setting. A heuristic approach is developed for sustainability assessments to avoid ambiguity and applications to the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and OSPAR assessments are presented. For MSFD, nineteen different assessment procedures have been proposed, but at present no agreed assessment procedure is available. The heuristic assessment framework is a functional-holistic approach comprising an ex-ante/ex-post assessment framework with specifically defined normative and systemic dimensions (EAEPNS). The outer normative dimension defines the ex-ante/ex-post framework, of which the latter branch delivers one measure of ecosystem health based on indicators and the former allows to account for the multi-dimensional nature of sustainability (social, economic, ecological) in terms of modeling approaches. For MSFD, the ex-ante/ex-post framework replaces the current distinction between assessments based on pressure and state descriptors. The ex-ante and the ex-post branch each comprise an inner normative and a systemic dimension. The inner normative dimension in the ex-post branch considers additive utility models and likelihood functions to standardize variables normalized with Bayesian modeling. Likelihood functions allow precautionary target setting. The ex-post systemic dimension considers a posteriori indicator selection by means of analysis of indicator space to avoid redundant indicator information as opposed to a priori indicator selection in deconstructive-structural approaches. Indicator information is expressed in terms of ecosystem variability by means of multivariate analysis procedures. The application to the OSPAR

  15. From Metaphors to Formalism: A Heuristic Approach to Holistic Assessments of Ecosystem Health

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental policies employ metaphoric objectives such as ecosystem health, resilience and sustainable provision of ecosystem services, which influence corresponding sustainability assessments by means of normative settings such as assumptions on system description, indicator selection, aggregation of information and target setting. A heuristic approach is developed for sustainability assessments to avoid ambiguity and applications to the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and OSPAR assessments are presented. For MSFD, nineteen different assessment procedures have been proposed, but at present no agreed assessment procedure is available. The heuristic assessment framework is a functional-holistic approach comprising an ex-ante/ex-post assessment framework with specifically defined normative and systemic dimensions (EAEPNS). The outer normative dimension defines the ex-ante/ex-post framework, of which the latter branch delivers one measure of ecosystem health based on indicators and the former allows to account for the multi-dimensional nature of sustainability (social, economic, ecological) in terms of modeling approaches. For MSFD, the ex-ante/ex-post framework replaces the current distinction between assessments based on pressure and state descriptors. The ex-ante and the ex-post branch each comprise an inner normative and a systemic dimension. The inner normative dimension in the ex-post branch considers additive utility models and likelihood functions to standardize variables normalized with Bayesian modeling. Likelihood functions allow precautionary target setting. The ex-post systemic dimension considers a posteriori indicator selection by means of analysis of indicator space to avoid redundant indicator information as opposed to a priori indicator selection in deconstructive-structural approaches. Indicator information is expressed in terms of ecosystem variability by means of multivariate analysis procedures. The application to the OSPAR

  16. From Metaphors to Formalism: A Heuristic Approach to Holistic Assessments of Ecosystem Health.

    PubMed

    Fock, Heino O; Kraus, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental policies employ metaphoric objectives such as ecosystem health, resilience and sustainable provision of ecosystem services, which influence corresponding sustainability assessments by means of normative settings such as assumptions on system description, indicator selection, aggregation of information and target setting. A heuristic approach is developed for sustainability assessments to avoid ambiguity and applications to the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and OSPAR assessments are presented. For MSFD, nineteen different assessment procedures have been proposed, but at present no agreed assessment procedure is available. The heuristic assessment framework is a functional-holistic approach comprising an ex-ante/ex-post assessment framework with specifically defined normative and systemic dimensions (EAEPNS). The outer normative dimension defines the ex-ante/ex-post framework, of which the latter branch delivers one measure of ecosystem health based on indicators and the former allows to account for the multi-dimensional nature of sustainability (social, economic, ecological) in terms of modeling approaches. For MSFD, the ex-ante/ex-post framework replaces the current distinction between assessments based on pressure and state descriptors. The ex-ante and the ex-post branch each comprise an inner normative and a systemic dimension. The inner normative dimension in the ex-post branch considers additive utility models and likelihood functions to standardize variables normalized with Bayesian modeling. Likelihood functions allow precautionary target setting. The ex-post systemic dimension considers a posteriori indicator selection by means of analysis of indicator space to avoid redundant indicator information as opposed to a priori indicator selection in deconstructive-structural approaches. Indicator information is expressed in terms of ecosystem variability by means of multivariate analysis procedures. The application to the OSPAR

  17. Money earlier or later? Simple heuristics explain intertemporal choices better than delay discounting does.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Keith M Marzilli; White, John Myles; Laibson, David; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2015-06-01

    Heuristic models have been proposed for many domains involving choice. We conducted an out-of-sample, cross-validated comparison of heuristic models of intertemporal choice (which can account for many of the known intertemporal choice anomalies) and discounting models. Heuristic models outperformed traditional utility-discounting models, including models of exponential and hyperbolic discounting. The best-performing models predicted choices by using a weighted average of absolute differences and relative percentage differences of the attributes of the goods in a choice set. We concluded that heuristic models explain time-money trade-off choices in experiments better than do utility-discounting models. PMID:25911124

  18. Heuristic optimization in penumbral image for high resolution reconstructed image

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, R.; Nozaki, S.; Fujioka, S.; Chen, Y. W.; Namihira, Y.

    2010-10-15

    Penumbral imaging is a technique which uses the fact that spatial information can be recovered from the shadow or penumbra that an unknown source casts through a simple large circular aperture. The size of the penumbral image on the detector can be mathematically determined as its aperture size, object size, and magnification. Conventional reconstruction methods are very sensitive to noise. On the other hand, the heuristic reconstruction method is very tolerant of noise. However, the aperture size influences the accuracy and resolution of the reconstructed image. In this article, we propose the optimization of the aperture size for the neutron penumbral imaging.

  19. SMMH--A Parallel Heuristic for Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, Guilherme; Morie, Yoshiyuki; Gu, Feng Long; Nanri, Takeshi; Murakami, Kazuaki

    2007-12-26

    The process of finding one or more optimal solutions for answering combinatorial optimization problems bases itself on the use of algorithms instances. Those instances usually have to explore a very large search spaces. Heuristics search focusing on the use of High-Order Hopfield neural networks is a largely deployed technique for very large search space. It can be established a very powerful analogy towards the dynamics evolution of a physics spin-glass system while minimizing its own energy and the energy function of the network. This paper presents a new approach for solving combinatorial optimization problems through parallel simulations, based on a High-Order Hopfield neural network using MPI specification.

  20. SMMH - A Parallel Heuristic for Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, Guilherme; Morie, Yoshiyuki; Gu, Feng Long; Nanri, Takeshi; Murakami, Kazuaki

    2007-12-26

    The process of finding one or more optimal solutions for answering combinatorial optimization problems bases itself on the use of algorithms instances. Those instances usually have to explore a very large search spaces. Heuristics search focusing on the use of High-Order Hopfield neural networks is a largely deployed technique for very large search space. It can be established a very powerful analogy towards the dynamics evolution of a physics spin-glass system while minimizing its own energy and the energy function of the network. This paper presents a new approach for solving combinatorial optimization problems through parallel simulations, based on a High-Order Hopfield neural network using MPI specification.

  1. An architecture for heuristic control of real-time processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raulefs, P.; Thorndyke, P. W.

    1987-01-01

    Abstract Process management combines complementary approaches of heuristic reasoning and analytical process control. Management of a continuous process requires monitoring the environment and the controlled system, assessing the ongoing situation, developing and revising planned actions, and controlling the execution of the actions. For knowledge-intensive domains, process management entails the potentially time-stressed cooperation among a variety of expert systems. By redesigning a blackboard control architecture in an object-oriented framework, researchers obtain an approach to process management that considerably extends blackboard control mechanisms and overcomes limitations of blackboard systems.

  2. Heuristic-based scheduling algorithm for high level synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Gulam; Tan, Han-Ngee; Chng, Chew-Lye

    1992-01-01

    A new scheduling algorithm is proposed which uses a combination of a resource utilization chart, a heuristic algorithm to estimate the minimum number of hardware units based on operator mobilities, and a list-scheduling technique to achieve fast and near optimal schedules. The schedule time of this algorithm is almost independent of the length of mobilities of operators as can be seen from the benchmark example (fifth order digital elliptical wave filter) presented when the cycle time was increased from 17 to 18 and then to 21 cycles. It is implemented in C on a SUN3/60 workstation.

  3. Some heuristic procedures for analyzing random vibration of nonlinear oscillators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, S. H.

    1971-01-01

    The stationary response of a lightly damped nonlinear oscillator subjected to wideband random excitation can be examined as an example of thermal equilibrium. It may be assumed that the response consists of a series of free-vibration cycles with small random fluctuations in phase and amplitude. Certain statistical properties of the response can be estimated by averaging corresponding properties of the free vibration with respect to cycle amplitude distributions. Such heuristic procedures for determining the expected frequency and the autocorrelation function of the stationary response are outlined. Some additional results concerning first-passage problems for nonlinear oscillators are included.

  4. Mixed Integer Programming and Heuristic Scheduling for Space Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Charles H.; Cheung, Kar-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to solve the constrained optimization problem in two phases. The first phase uses heuristic methods such as the ant colony method, particle swarming optimization, and genetic algorithm to seek a near optimal solution among a list of feasible initial populations. The final optimal solution can be found by using the solution of the first phase as the initial condition to the SQP algorithm. We demonstrate the above problem formulation and optimization schemes with a large-scale network that includes the DSN ground stations and a number of spacecraft of deep space missions.

  5. Heuristic algorithm for optical character recognition of Arabic script

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarman-Vural, Fatos T.; Atici, A.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper, a heuristic method is developed for segmentation, feature extraction and recognition of the Arabic script. The study is part of a large project for the transcription of the documents in Ottoman Archives. A geometrical and topological feature analysis method is developed for segmentation and feature extraction stages. Chain code transformation is applied to main strokes of the characters which are then classified by the hidden Markov model (HMM) in the recognition stage. Experimental results indicate that the performance of the proposed method is impressive, provided that the thinning process does not yield spurious branches.

  6. Effects of meal variety on expected satiation: evidence for a 'perceived volume' heuristic.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Gregory S; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Ferriday, Danielle

    2015-06-01

    Meal variety has been shown to increase energy intake in humans by an average of 29%. Historically, research exploring the mechanism underlying this effect has focused on physiological and psychological processes that terminate a meal (e.g., sensory-specific satiety). We sought to explore whether meal variety stimulates intake by influencing pre-meal planning. We know that individuals use prior experience with a food to estimate the extent to which it will deliver fullness. These 'expected satiation' judgments may be straightforward when only one meal component needs to be considered, but it remains unclear how prospective satiation is estimated when a meal comprises multiple items. We hypothesised that people simplify the task by using a heuristic, or 'cognitive shortcut.' Specifically, as within-meal variety increases, expected satiation tends to be based on the perceived volume of food(s) rather than on prior experience. In each trial, participants (N = 68) were shown a plate of food with six buffet food items. Across trials the number of different foods varied in the range one to six. In separate tasks, the participants provided an estimate of their combined expected satiation and volume. When meal variety was high, judgments of perceived volume and expected satiation 'converged.' This is consistent with a common underlying response strategy. By contrast, the low variety meals produced dissociable responses, suggesting that judgments of expected satiation were not governed solely by perceived volume. This evidence for a 'volume heuristic' was especially clear in people who were less familiar with the meal items. Together, these results are important because they expose a novel process by which meal variety might increase food intake in humans.

  7. A heuristic re-mapping algorithm reducing inter-level communication in SAMR applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

    2003-07-01

    This paper aims at decreasing execution time for large-scale structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) applications by proposing a new heuristic re-mapping algorithm and experimentally showing its effectiveness in reducing inter-level communication. Tests were done for five different SAMR applications. The overall goal is to engineer a dynamically adaptive meta-partitioner capable of selecting and configuring the most appropriate partitioning strategy at run-time based on current system and application state. Such a metapartitioner can significantly reduce execution times for general SAMR applications. Computer simulations of physical phenomena are becoming increasingly popular as they constitute an important complement to real-life testing. In many cases, such simulations are based on solving partial differential equations by numerical methods. Adaptive methods are crucial to efficiently utilize computer resources such as memory and CPU. But even with adaption, the simulations are computationally demanding and yield huge data sets. Thus parallelization and the efficient partitioning of data become issues of utmost importance. Adaption causes the workload to change dynamically, calling for dynamic (re-) partitioning to maintain efficient resource utilization. The proposed heuristic algorithm reduced inter-level communication substantially. Since the complexity of the proposed algorithm is low, this decrease comes at a relatively low cost. As a consequence, we draw the conclusion that the proposed re-mapping algorithm would be useful to lower overall execution times for many large SAMR applications. Due to its usefulness and its parameterization, the proposed algorithm would constitute a natural and important component of the meta-partitioner.

  8. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan B; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury.

  9. Heuristic theory of nonlocally broken gyro-Bohm scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R.E.; Candy, J.

    2005-07-15

    Global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport with piecewise-flat profiles are given to illustrate the breaking of gyro-Bohm scaling by a nonlocal mechanism. The nonlocal drainage of the turbulence from unstable regions spreading into stable (or less unstable) regions breaks the gyro-Bohm scaling toward Bohm in unstable regions and toward super-gyro-Bohm in stable (or less unstable) regions. A heuristic model for this nonlocal process is formulated in terms of a nonlocal growth rate resulting from a locally weighted radial average of the local linear ballooning mode growth rate. A nonlocality length L measured in ion gyroradii provides the exponential scale for the local weighting. The nonlocal growth rate can be incorporated into a local gyro-Bohm-scaled transport model in place of the local growth rate. The resulting nonlocal transport model will provide some transport in stable regions. A heuristic theory of this nonlocal transport mechanism based on the partial formation of global modes in toroidal geometry is detailed. The theory argues that the nonlocality length L increases with relative gyroradius and decreases with the linear growth rate.

  10. Goal representation heuristic dynamic programming on maze navigation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhen; He, Haibo; Wen, Jinyu; Xu, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Goal representation heuristic dynamic programming (GrHDP) is proposed in this paper to demonstrate online learning in the Markov decision process. In addition to the (external) reinforcement signal in literature, we develop an adaptively internal goal/reward representation for the agent with the proposed goal network. Specifically, we keep the actor-critic design in heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) and include a goal network to represent the internal goal signal, to further help the value function approximation. We evaluate our proposed GrHDP algorithm on two 2-D maze navigation problems, and later on one 3-D maze navigation problem. Compared to the traditional HDP approach, the learning performance of the agent is improved with our proposed GrHDP approach. In addition, we also include the learning performance with two other reinforcement learning algorithms, namely Sarsa(λ) and Q-learning, on the same benchmarks for comparison. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the theoretical guarantee of our proposed method, we provide the characteristics analysis toward the convergence of weights in neural networks in our GrHDP approach. PMID:24805221

  11. A manpower scheduling heuristic for aircraft maintenance application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, San-Nah; Sze, Jeeu-Fong; Chiew, Kang-Leng

    2012-09-01

    This research studies a manpower scheduling for aircraft maintenance, focusing on in-flight food loading operation. A group of loading teams with flexible shifts is required to deliver and upload packaged meals from the ground kitchen to aircrafts in multiple trips. All aircrafts must be served within predefined time windows. The scheduling process takes into account of various constraints such as meal break allocation, multi-trip traveling and food exposure time limit. Considering the aircrafts movement and predefined maximum working hours for each loading team, the main objective of this study is to form an efficient roster by assigning a minimum number of loading teams to the aircrafts. We proposed an insertion based heuristic to generate the solutions in a short period of time for large instances. This proposed algorithm is implemented in various stages for constructing trips due to the presence of numerous constraints. The robustness and efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated in computational results. The results show that the insertion heuristic more efficiently outperforms the company's current practice.

  12. Facing the grand challenges through heuristics and mindfulness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powietrzynska, Malgorzata; Tobin, Kenneth; Alexakos, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    We address the nature of mindfulness and its salience to education generally and to science education specifically. In a context of the historical embeddedness of mindfulness in Buddhism we discuss research in social neuroscience, presenting evidence for neuronal plasticity of the brain and six emotional styles, which are not biologically predetermined, but are responsive to adaptation through life experiences. We raise questions about the role of science education in mediating the structure and function of the brain. Also, we discuss interventions to increase Mindfulness in Education, including meditation and heuristics, that act as reflexive objects to heighten awareness of characteristics of mindfulness and increase the likelihood of changes in the conduct of social life—increasing the mindfulness of those who engage the characteristics included in the heuristic. We present mindfulness and the development of a toolkit for ameliorating emotions when and as necessary as a component of a science curriculum that orientates toward wellness and sustainability. We advocate for changes in the nature of science education to reflect the priorities of the twenty first century that relate to sustainability of the living and nonliving universe and wellness of sentient beings.

  13. Goal representation heuristic dynamic programming on maze navigation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhen; He, Haibo; Wen, Jinyu; Xu, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Goal representation heuristic dynamic programming (GrHDP) is proposed in this paper to demonstrate online learning in the Markov decision process. In addition to the (external) reinforcement signal in literature, we develop an adaptively internal goal/reward representation for the agent with the proposed goal network. Specifically, we keep the actor-critic design in heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) and include a goal network to represent the internal goal signal, to further help the value function approximation. We evaluate our proposed GrHDP algorithm on two 2-D maze navigation problems, and later on one 3-D maze navigation problem. Compared to the traditional HDP approach, the learning performance of the agent is improved with our proposed GrHDP approach. In addition, we also include the learning performance with two other reinforcement learning algorithms, namely Sarsa(λ) and Q-learning, on the same benchmarks for comparison. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the theoretical guarantee of our proposed method, we provide the characteristics analysis toward the convergence of weights in neural networks in our GrHDP approach.

  14. A heuristic approach to automated nipple detection in digital mammograms.

    PubMed

    Jas, Mainak; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Jayasree; Sadhu, Anup; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, a heuristic approach to automated nipple detection in digital mammograms is presented. A multithresholding algorithm is first applied to segment the mammogram and separate the breast region from the background region. Next, the problem is considered separately for craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) views. In the simplified algorithm, a search is performed on the segmented image along a band around the centroid and in a direction perpendicular to the pectoral muscle edge in the MLO view image. The direction defaults to the horizontal (perpendicular to the thoracic wall) in case of CC view images. The farthest pixel from the base found in this direction can be approximated as the nipple point. Further, an improved version of the simplified algorithm is proposed which can be considered as a subclass of the Branch and Bound algorithms. The mean Euclidean distance between the ground truth and calculated nipple position for 500 mammograms from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM) database was found to be 11.03 mm and the average total time taken by the algorithm was 0.79 s. Results of the proposed algorithm demonstrate that even simple heuristics can achieve the desired result in nipple detection thus reducing the time and computational complexity.

  15. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan B.; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury. PMID:23927195

  16. Automatic Overset Grid Generation with Heuristic Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Peter I.

    2001-01-01

    An advancing front grid generation system for structured Overset grids is presented which automatically modifies Overset structured surface grids and control lines until user-specified grid qualities are achieved. The system is demonstrated on two examples: the first refines a space shuttle fuselage control line until global truncation error is achieved; the second advances, from control lines, the space shuttle orbiter fuselage top and fuselage side surface grids until proper overlap is achieved. Surface grids are generated in minutes for complex geometries. The system is implemented as a heuristic feedback control (HFC) expert system which iteratively modifies the input specifications for Overset control line and surface grids. It is developed as an extension of modern control theory, production rules systems and subsumption architectures. The methodology provides benefits over the full knowledge lifecycle of an expert system for knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, and knowledge execution. The vector/matrix framework of modern control theory systematically acquires and represents expert system knowledge. Missing matrix elements imply missing expert knowledge. The execution of the expert system knowledge is performed through symbolic execution of the matrix algebra equations of modern control theory. The dot product operation of matrix algebra is generalized for heuristic symbolic terms. Constant time execution is guaranteed.

  17. GYutsis: heuristic based calculation of general recoupling coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyck, D.; Fack, V.

    2003-08-01

    General angular momentum recoupling coefficients can be expressed as a summation formula over products of 6- j coefficients. Yutsis, Levinson and Vanagas developed graphical techniques for representing the general recoupling coefficient as a cubic graph and they describe a set of reduction rules allowing a stepwise generation of the corresponding summation formula. This paper is a follow up to [Van Dyck and Fack, Comput. Phys. Comm. 151 (2003) 353-368] where we described a heuristic algorithm based on these techniques. In this article we separate the heuristic from the algorithm and describe some new heuristic approaches which can be plugged into the generic algorithm. We show that these new heuristics lead to good results: in many cases we get a more efficient summation formula than our previous approach, in particular for problems of higher order. In addition the new features and the use of our program GYutsis, which implements these techniques, is described both for end users and application programmers. Program summaryTitle of program: CycleCostAlgorithm, GYutsis Catalogue number: ADSA Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSA Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Users may obtain the program also by downloading either the compressed tar file gyutsis.tgz (for Unix and Linux) or the zip file gyutsis.zip (for Windows) from our website ( http://caagt.rug.ac.be/yutsis/). An applet version of the program is also available on our website and can be run in a web browser from the URL http://caagt.rug.ac.be/yutsis/GYutsisApplet.html. Licensing provisions: none Computers for which the program is designed: any computer with Sun's Java Runtime Environment 1.4 or higher installed. Programming language used: Java 1.2 (Compiler: Sun's SDK 1.4.0) No. of lines in program: approximately 9400 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 544 117 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of

  18. Avoiding reification. Heuristic effectiveness of mathematics and the prediction of the Ω- particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginammi, Michele

    2016-02-01

    According to Steiner (1998), in contemporary physics new important discoveries are often obtained by means of strategies which rely on purely formal mathematical considerations. In such discoveries, mathematics seems to have a peculiar and controversial role, which apparently cannot be accounted for by means of standard methodological criteria. M. Gell-Mann and Y. Ne'eman's prediction of the Ω- particle is usually considered a typical example of application of this kind of strategy. According to Bangu (2008), this prediction is apparently based on the employment of a highly controversial principle-what he calls the "reification principle". Bangu himself takes this principle to be methodologically unjustifiable, but still indispensable to make the prediction logically sound. In the present paper I will offer a new reconstruction of the reasoning that led to this prediction. By means of this reconstruction, I will show that we do not need to postulate any "reificatory" role of mathematics in contemporary physics and I will contextually clarify the representative and heuristic role of mathematics in science.

  19. An Action Dependent Heuristic Dynamic Programming-controlled Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage for Transient Stability Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinpu; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yu, Xiaopeng

    To enhance the stability of power system, the active power and reactive power can be absorbed from or released to Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit according to system power requirements. This paper proposes a control strategy based on action dependent heuristic dynamic programing (ADHDP) which can control SMES to improve the stability of electric power system with on-line learning ability. Based on back propagation (BP) neural network, ADHDP approximates the optimal control solution of nonlinear system through iteration step by step. This on-line learning ability improves its performance by learning from its own mistakes through reinforcement signal from external environment, so that it can adjust the neural network weights according to the back propagation error to achieve optimal control performance. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, simulation tests are carried out in Matlab/Simulink. And a conventional Proportional-Integral (PI) controlled method is used to compare the performance of ADHDP. Simulation results show that the proposed controller demonstrates superior damping performance on power system oscillation caused by three-phase fault and wind power fluctuation over the PI controller.

  20. Heuristic-based energy landscape paving for the circular packing problem with performance constraints of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Jiang, Yucong; Li, Gang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    The optimal layout problem of circle group in a circular container with performance constraints of equilibrium belongs to a class of NP-hard problem. The key obstacle of solving this problem is the lack of an effective global optimization method. We convert the circular packing problem with performance constraints of equilibrium into the unconstrained optimization problem by using quasi-physical strategy and penalty function method. By putting forward a new updating mechanism of the histogram function in energy landscape paving (ELP) method and incorporating heuristic conformation update strategies into the ELP method, we obtain an improved ELP (IELP) method. Subsequently, by combining the IELP method and the local search (LS) procedure, we put forward a hybrid algorithm, denoted by IELP-LS, for the circular packing problem with performance constraints of equilibrium. We test three sets of benchmarks consisting of 21 representative instances from the current literature. The proposed algorithm breaks the records of all 10 instances in the first set, and achieves the same or even better results than other methods in literature for 10 out of 11 instances in the second and third sets. The computational results show that the proposed algorithm is an effective method for solving the circular packing problem with performance constraints of equilibrium.

  1. A Model and Heuristic for Solving Very Large Item Selection Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Len; Stocking, Martha L.

    1993-01-01

    A model for solving very large item selection problems is presented. The model builds on binary programming applied to test construction. A heuristic for selecting items that satisfy the constraints in the model is also presented, and various problems are solved using the model and heuristic. (SLD)

  2. Using Heuristic Task Analysis to Create Web-Based Instructional Design Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiester, Herbert R.

    2010-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to identify procedural and heuristic knowledge used when creating web-based instruction. The second purpose of this study was to develop suggestions for improving the Heuristic Task Analysis process, a technique for eliciting, analyzing, and representing expertise in cognitively complex tasks. Three expert…

  3. Heuristic Reasoning and Beliefs on Immigration: An Approach to an Intercultural Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Santiago Palacios; Lopez de Arechavaleta, Blanca Olalde

    2010-01-01

    People use mental shortcuts to simplify the amount of information they receive from the environment. Heuristic reasoning can be included among these mental shortcuts. In general, heuristics is useful for making fast decisions and judgements, but in certain cases, it may lead to systematic errors because some relevant aspects presented in the given…

  4. Effects of Narrated Heuristic Feedback and Gender on College Students' Calculus Problem Solving Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Ying; Coffland, David; Yang, Fangyun

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal feedback could promote college students' conceptual, procedural and heuristic knowledge learning. This study used an experimental design to investigate the interaction effects of instructor's narrated feedback (with procedural feedback delivered visually and heuristic feedback auditorily) and gender on their post-test performance of a…

  5. Towards an Understanding of Instructional Design Heuristics: An Exploratory Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Cindy S.; Ertmer, Peggy A.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that experienced instructional designers often use heuristics and adapted models when engaged in the instructional design problem-solving process. This study used the Delphi technique to identify a core set of heuristics designers reported as being important to the success of the design process. The overarching purpose of the…

  6. Heuristic-Leadership Model: Adapting to Current Training and Changing Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Mary Ann

    A model was developed for training individuals to adapt better to the changing work environment by focusing on the subordinate to supervisor relationship and providing a heuristic approach to leadership. The model emphasizes a heuristic approach to decision-making through the active participation of both members of the dyad. The demand among…

  7. Estimation of Post-Test Probabilities by Residents: Bayesian Reasoning versus Heuristics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Stacey; Phang, Sen Han; Schaefer, Jeffrey P.; Ghali, William; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Although the process of diagnosing invariably begins with a heuristic, we encourage our learners to support their diagnoses by analytical cognitive processes, such as Bayesian reasoning, in an attempt to mitigate the effects of heuristics on diagnosing. There are, however, limited data on the use ± impact of Bayesian reasoning on the accuracy of…

  8. A Behavior Analysis of Individuals' Use of the Fairness Heuristic when Interacting with Groups and Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goltz, Sonia M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present analysis the author utilizes the groups as patches model (Goltz, 2009, 2010) to extend fairness heuristic theory (Lind, 2001) in which the concept of fairness is thought to be a heuristic that allows individuals to match responses to consequences they receive from groups. In this model, individuals who are reviewing possible groups…

  9. Social Outcomes in Childhood Brain Disorder: A Heuristic Integration of Social Neuroscience and Developmental Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Keith Owen; Bigler, Erin D.; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose a heuristic model of the social outcomes of childhood brain disorder that draws on models and methods from both the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience and the study of social competence in developmental psychology/psychopathology. The heuristic model characterizes the relationships between social adjustment, peer…

  10. Managing Heuristics as a Method of Inquiry in Autobiographical Graphic Design Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ings, Welby

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on case studies undertaken in postgraduate research at AUT University, Auckland. It seeks to address a number of issues related to heuristic inquiries employed by graphic design students who use autobiographical approaches when developing research-based theses. For this type of thesis, heuristics as a system of inquiry may…

  11. Automated detection of heuristics and biases among pathologists in a computer-based system.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Rebecca S; Legowski, Elizabeth; Medvedeva, Olga; Reitmeyer, Kayse; Tseytlin, Eugene; Castine, Melissa; Jukic, Drazen; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is threefold: (1) to develop an automated, computer-based method to detect heuristics and biases as pathologists examine virtual slide cases, (2) to measure the frequency and distribution of heuristics and errors across three levels of training, and (3) to examine relationships of heuristics to biases, and biases to diagnostic errors. The authors conducted the study using a computer-based system to view and diagnose virtual slide cases. The software recorded participant responses throughout the diagnostic process, and automatically classified participant actions based on definitions of eight common heuristics and/or biases. The authors measured frequency of heuristic use and bias across three levels of training. Biases studied were detected at varying frequencies, with availability and search satisficing observed most frequently. There were few significant differences by level of training. For representativeness and anchoring, the heuristic was used appropriately as often or more often than it was used in biased judgment. Approximately half of the diagnostic errors were associated with one or more biases. We conclude that heuristic use and biases were observed among physicians at all levels of training using the virtual slide system, although their frequencies varied. The system can be employed to detect heuristic use and to test methods for decreasing diagnostic errors resulting from cognitive biases. PMID:22618855

  12. Answer first: Applying the heuristic-analytic theory of reasoning to examine student intuitive thinking in the context of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryjevskaia, Mila; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; Grosz, Nathaniel

    2014-12-01

    We have applied the heuristic-analytic theory of reasoning to interpret inconsistencies in student reasoning approaches to physics problems. This study was motivated by an emerging body of evidence that suggests that student conceptual and reasoning competence demonstrated on one task often fails to be exhibited on another. Indeed, even after instruction specifically designed to address student conceptual and reasoning difficulties identified by rigorous research, many undergraduate physics students fail to build reasoning chains from fundamental principles even though they possess the required knowledge and skills to do so. Instead, they often rely on a variety of intuitive reasoning strategies. In this study, we developed and employed a methodology that allowed for the disentanglement of student conceptual understanding and reasoning approaches through the use of sequences of related questions. We have shown that the heuristic-analytic theory of reasoning can be used to account for, in a mechanistic fashion, the observed inconsistencies in student responses. In particular, we found that students tended to apply their correct ideas in a selective manner that supported a specific and likely anticipated conclusion while neglecting to employ the same ideas to refute an erroneous intuitive conclusion. The observed reasoning patterns were consistent with the heuristic-analytic theory, according to which reasoners develop a "first-impression" mental model and then construct an argument in support of the answer suggested by this model. We discuss implications for instruction and argue that efforts to improve student metacognition, which serves to regulate the interaction between intuitive and analytical reasoning, is likely to lead to improved student reasoning.

  13. The power of simplicity: a fast-and-frugal heuristics approach to performance science.

    PubMed

    Raab, Markus; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Performance science is a fairly new multidisciplinary field that integrates performance domains such as sports, medicine, business, and the arts. To give its many branches a structure and its research a direction, it requires a theoretical framework. We demonstrate the applications of this framework with examples from sport and medicine. Because performance science deals mainly with situations of uncertainty rather than known risks, the needed framework can be provided by the fast-and-frugal heuristics approach. According to this approach, experts learn to rely on heuristics in an adaptive way in order to make accurate decisions. We investigate the adaptive use of heuristics in three ways: the descriptive study of the heuristics in the cognitive "adaptive toolbox;" the prescriptive study of their "ecological rationality," that is, the characterization of the situations in which a given heuristic works; and the engineering study of "intuitive design," that is, the design of transparent aids for making better decisions. PMID:26579051

  14. Combination of graph heuristics in producing initial solution of curriculum based course timetabling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Juliana; Hussin, Naimah Mohd

    2016-08-01

    The construction of population of initial solution is a crucial task in population-based metaheuristic approach for solving curriculum-based university course timetabling problem because it can affect the convergence speed and also the quality of the final solution. This paper presents an exploration on combination of graph heuristics in construction approach in curriculum based course timetabling problem to produce a population of initial solutions. The graph heuristics were set as single and combination of two heuristics. In addition, several ways of assigning courses into room and timeslot are implemented. All settings of heuristics are then tested on the same curriculum based course timetabling problem instances and are compared with each other in terms of number of population produced. The result shows that combination of saturation degree followed by largest degree heuristic produce the highest number of population of initial solutions. The results from this study can be used in the improvement phase of algorithm that uses population of initial solutions.

  15. A boundedness result for the direct heuristic dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Jian; Si, Jennie; Guo, Wentao; Mei, Shengwei

    2012-08-01

    Approximate/adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) has been studied extensively in recent years for its potential scalability to solve large state and control space problems, including those involving continuous states and continuous controls. The applicability of ADP algorithms, especially the adaptive critic designs has been demonstrated in several case studies. Direct heuristic dynamic programming (direct HDP) is one of the ADP algorithms inspired by the adaptive critic designs. It has been shown applicable to industrial scale, realistic and complex control problems. In this paper, we provide a uniformly ultimately boundedness (UUB) result for the direct HDP learning controller under mild and intuitive conditions. By using a Lyapunov approach we show that the estimation errors of the learning parameters or the weights in the action and critic networks remain UUB. This result provides a useful controller convergence guarantee for the first time for the direct HDP design. PMID:22397949

  16. Combining factual and heuristic knowledge in knowledge acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Fernando; Hull, Richard; Karr, Clark; Hosken, Bruce; Verhagen, William

    1992-01-01

    A knowledge acquisition technique that combines heuristic and factual knowledge represented as two hierarchies is described. These ideas were applied to the construction of a knowledge acquisition interface to the Expert System Analyst (OPERA). The goal of OPERA is to improve the operations support of the computer network in the space shuttle launch processing system. The knowledge acquisition bottleneck lies in gathering knowledge from human experts and transferring it to OPERA. OPERA's knowledge acquisition problem is approached as a classification problem-solving task, combining this approach with the use of factual knowledge about the domain. The interface was implemented in a Symbolics workstation making heavy use of windows, pull-down menus, and other user-friendly devices.

  17. Heuristic control of kinetic energy in dynamic reaction coordinate calculations.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Arnim

    2013-08-01

    For the understanding and prediction of chemical reactions, detailed knowledge of the minimum energy path between reactants and transition state is of utmost importance. Stewart et al. (J. Comput. Chem. 1987, 8, 1117) proposed the usage of molecular trajectories calculated from Newton's equations of motion for an efficient reaction path following. Two operational modes are possible thereby: intrinsic (IRC) and dynamic reaction coordinate calculations (DRC). The technical difference between these modes is that in an IRC calculation the kinetic energy of the nuclei is quenched while the total energy is conserved in DRC calculations. In this work, a heuristic control methodology of atomic kinetic energies in DRC calculations using fuzzy logic is proposed. A diversified test set of 10 reactions has been collected to examine the performance of this approach. Fuzzy rule-based models are found to be a convenient way to make the determination of accessible paths of chemical reactions computationally efficient.

  18. A boundedness result for the direct heuristic dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Jian; Si, Jennie; Guo, Wentao; Mei, Shengwei

    2012-08-01

    Approximate/adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) has been studied extensively in recent years for its potential scalability to solve large state and control space problems, including those involving continuous states and continuous controls. The applicability of ADP algorithms, especially the adaptive critic designs has been demonstrated in several case studies. Direct heuristic dynamic programming (direct HDP) is one of the ADP algorithms inspired by the adaptive critic designs. It has been shown applicable to industrial scale, realistic and complex control problems. In this paper, we provide a uniformly ultimately boundedness (UUB) result for the direct HDP learning controller under mild and intuitive conditions. By using a Lyapunov approach we show that the estimation errors of the learning parameters or the weights in the action and critic networks remain UUB. This result provides a useful controller convergence guarantee for the first time for the direct HDP design.

  19. Revisiting heuristic evaluation methods to improve the reliability of findings.

    PubMed

    Georgsson, Mattias; Weir, Charlene R; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The heuristic evaluation (HE) method is one of the most common in the suite of tools for usability evaluations because it is a fast, inexpensive and resource-efficient process in relation to the many usability issues it generates. The method emphasizes completely independent initial expert evaluations. Inter-rater reliability and agreement coefficients are not calculated. The variability across evaluators, even dual domain experts, can be significant as is seen in the case study here. The implications of this wide variability mean that results are unique to each HE, results are not readily reproducible and HE research on usability is not yet creating a uniform body of knowledge. We offer recommendations to improve the science by incorporating selected techniques from qualitative research: calculating inter-rater reliability and agreement scores, creating a codebook to define concepts/categories and offering crucial information about raters' backgrounds, agreement techniques and the evaluation setting.

  20. A highly accurate heuristic algorithm for the haplotype assembly problem

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common form of genetic variation in human DNA. The sequence of SNPs in each of the two copies of a given chromosome in a diploid organism is referred to as a haplotype. Haplotype information has many applications such as gene disease diagnoses, drug design, etc. The haplotype assembly problem is defined as follows: Given a set of fragments sequenced from the two copies of a chromosome of a single individual, and their locations in the chromosome, which can be pre-determined by aligning the fragments to a reference DNA sequence, the goal here is to reconstruct two haplotypes (h1, h2) from the input fragments. Existing algorithms do not work well when the error rate of fragments is high. Here we design an algorithm that can give accurate solutions, even if the error rate of fragments is high. Results We first give a dynamic programming algorithm that can give exact solutions to the haplotype assembly problem. The time complexity of the algorithm is O(n × 2t × t), where n is the number of SNPs, and t is the maximum coverage of a SNP site. The algorithm is slow when t is large. To solve the problem when t is large, we further propose a heuristic algorithm on the basis of the dynamic programming algorithm. Experiments show that our heuristic algorithm can give very accurate solutions. Conclusions We have tested our algorithm on a set of benchmark datasets. Experiments show that our algorithm can give very accurate solutions. It outperforms most of the existing programs when the error rate of the input fragments is high. PMID:23445458

  1. Heuristic modeling of macromolecule release from PLGA microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Szlęk, Jakub; Pacławski, Adam; Lau, Raymond; Jachowicz, Renata; Mendyk, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    Dissolution of protein macromolecules from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles is a complex process and still not fully understood. As such, there are difficulties in obtaining a predictive model that could be of fundamental significance in design, development, and optimization for medical applications and toxicity evaluation of PLGA-based multiparticulate dosage form. In the present study, two models with comparable goodness of fit were proposed for the prediction of the macromolecule dissolution profile from PLGA micro- and nanoparticles. In both cases, heuristic techniques, such as artificial neural networks (ANNs), feature selection, and genetic programming were employed. Feature selection provided by fscaret package and sensitivity analysis performed by ANNs reduced the original input vector from a total of 300 input variables to 21, 17, 16, and eleven; to achieve a better insight into generalization error, two cut-off points for every method was proposed. The best ANNs model results were obtained by monotone multi-layer perceptron neural network (MON-MLP) networks with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 15.4, and the input vector consisted of eleven inputs. The complicated classical equation derived from a database consisting of 17 inputs was able to yield a better generalization error (RMSE) of 14.3. The equation was characterized by four parameters, thus feasible (applicable) to standard nonlinear regression techniques. Heuristic modeling led to the ANN model describing macromolecules release profiles from PLGA microspheres with good predictive efficiency. Moreover genetic programming technique resulted in classical equation with comparable predictability to the ANN model. PMID:24348037

  2. Heuristic modeling of macromolecule release from PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Szlęk, Jakub; Pacławski, Adam; Lau, Raymond; Jachowicz, Renata; Mendyk, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    Dissolution of protein macromolecules from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles is a complex process and still not fully understood. As such, there are difficulties in obtaining a predictive model that could be of fundamental significance in design, development, and optimization for medical applications and toxicity evaluation of PLGA-based multiparticulate dosage form. In the present study, two models with comparable goodness of fit were proposed for the prediction of the macromolecule dissolution profile from PLGA micro- and nanoparticles. In both cases, heuristic techniques, such as artificial neural networks (ANNs), feature selection, and genetic programming were employed. Feature selection provided by fscaret package and sensitivity analysis performed by ANNs reduced the original input vector from a total of 300 input variables to 21, 17, 16, and eleven; to achieve a better insight into generalization error, two cut-off points for every method was proposed. The best ANNs model results were obtained by monotone multi-layer perceptron neural network (MON-MLP) networks with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 15.4, and the input vector consisted of eleven inputs. The complicated classical equation derived from a database consisting of 17 inputs was able to yield a better generalization error (RMSE) of 14.3. The equation was characterized by four parameters, thus feasible (applicable) to standard nonlinear regression techniques. Heuristic modeling led to the ANN model describing macromolecules release profiles from PLGA microspheres with good predictive efficiency. Moreover genetic programming technique resulted in classical equation with comparable predictability to the ANN model.

  3. Use of Heuristics to Facilitate Scientific Discovery Learning in a Simulation Learning Environment in a Physics Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veermans, Koen; van Joolingen, Wouter; de Jong, Ton

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a study into the role of heuristic support in facilitating discovery learning through simulation-based learning. The study compares the use of two such learning environments in the physics domain of collisions. In one learning environment (implicit heuristics) heuristics are only used to provide the learner with guidance…

  4. Communication patterns and allocation strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Mache, Jens Wolfgang; Bunde, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by observations about job runtimes on the CPlant system, we use a trace-driven microsimulator to begin characterizing the performance of different classes of allocation algorithms on jobs with different communication patterns in space-shared parallel systems with mesh topology. We show that relative performance varies considerably with communication pattern. The Paging strategy using the Hilbert space-filling curve and the Best Fit heuristic performed best across several communication patterns.

  5. Heuristics guide the implementation of social preferences in one-shot Prisoner's Dilemma experiments

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Valerio; Jordan, Jillian J.; Rand, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperation in one-shot anonymous interactions is a widely documented aspect of human behaviour. Here we shed light on the motivations behind this behaviour by experimentally exploring cooperation in a one-shot continuous-strategy Prisoner's Dilemma (i.e. one-shot two-player Public Goods Game). We examine the distribution of cooperation amounts, and how that distribution varies based on the benefit-to-cost ratio of cooperation (b/c). Interestingly, we find a trimodal distribution at all b/c values investigated. Increasing b/c decreases the fraction of participants engaging in zero cooperation and increases the fraction engaging in maximal cooperation, suggesting a role for efficiency concerns. However, a substantial fraction of participants consistently engage in 50% cooperation regardless of b/c. The presence of these persistent 50% cooperators is surprising, and not easily explained by standard models of social preferences. We present evidence that this behaviour is a result of social preferences guided by simple decision heuristics, rather than the rational examination of payoffs assumed by most social preference models. We also find a strong correlation between play in the Prisoner's Dilemma and in a subsequent Dictator Game, confirming previous findings suggesting a common prosocial motivation underlying altruism and cooperation. PMID:25348470

  6. Parameter identification of robot manipulators: a heuristic particle swarm search approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Levy, David

    2015-01-01

    Parameter identification of robot manipulators is an indispensable pivotal process of achieving accurate dynamic robot models. Since these kinetic models are highly nonlinear, it is not easy to tackle the matter of identifying their parameters. To solve the difficulty effectively, we herewith present an intelligent approach, namely, a heuristic particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, which we call the elitist learning strategy (ELS) and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller hybridized PSO approach (ELPIDSO). A specified PID controller is designed to improve particles' local and global positions information together with ELS. Parameter identification of robot manipulators is conducted for performance evaluation of our proposed approach. Experimental results clearly indicate the following findings: Compared with standard PSO (SPSO) algorithm, ELPIDSO has improved a lot. It not only enhances the diversity of the swarm, but also features better search effectiveness and efficiency in solving practical optimization problems. Accordingly, ELPIDSO is superior to least squares (LS) method, genetic algorithm (GA), and SPSO algorithm in estimating the parameters of the kinetic models of robot manipulators. PMID:26039090

  7. Parameter Identification of Robot Manipulators: A Heuristic Particle Swarm Search Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Levy, David

    2015-01-01

    Parameter identification of robot manipulators is an indispensable pivotal process of achieving accurate dynamic robot models. Since these kinetic models are highly nonlinear, it is not easy to tackle the matter of identifying their parameters. To solve the difficulty effectively, we herewith present an intelligent approach, namely, a heuristic particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, which we call the elitist learning strategy (ELS) and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller hybridized PSO approach (ELPIDSO). A specified PID controller is designed to improve particles’ local and global positions information together with ELS. Parameter identification of robot manipulators is conducted for performance evaluation of our proposed approach. Experimental results clearly indicate the following findings: Compared with standard PSO (SPSO) algorithm, ELPIDSO has improved a lot. It not only enhances the diversity of the swarm, but also features better search effectiveness and efficiency in solving practical optimization problems. Accordingly, ELPIDSO is superior to least squares (LS) method, genetic algorithm (GA), and SPSO algorithm in estimating the parameters of the kinetic models of robot manipulators. PMID:26039090

  8. Parameter identification of robot manipulators: a heuristic particle swarm search approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Danping; Lu, Yongzhong; Levy, David

    2015-01-01

    Parameter identification of robot manipulators is an indispensable pivotal process of achieving accurate dynamic robot models. Since these kinetic models are highly nonlinear, it is not easy to tackle the matter of identifying their parameters. To solve the difficulty effectively, we herewith present an intelligent approach, namely, a heuristic particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, which we call the elitist learning strategy (ELS) and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller hybridized PSO approach (ELPIDSO). A specified PID controller is designed to improve particles' local and global positions information together with ELS. Parameter identification of robot manipulators is conducted for performance evaluation of our proposed approach. Experimental results clearly indicate the following findings: Compared with standard PSO (SPSO) algorithm, ELPIDSO has improved a lot. It not only enhances the diversity of the swarm, but also features better search effectiveness and efficiency in solving practical optimization problems. Accordingly, ELPIDSO is superior to least squares (LS) method, genetic algorithm (GA), and SPSO algorithm in estimating the parameters of the kinetic models of robot manipulators.

  9. Scalable Heuristics for Planning, Placement and Sizing of Flexible AC Transmission System Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Vladmir; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-07-02

    Aiming to relieve transmission grid congestion and improve or extend feasibility domain of the operations, we build optimization heuristics, generalizing standard AC Optimal Power Flow (OPF), for placement and sizing of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices of the Series Compensation (SC) and Static VAR Compensation (SVC) type. One use of these devices is in resolving the case when the AC OPF solution does not exist because of congestion. Another application is developing a long-term investment strategy for placement and sizing of the SC and SVC devices to reduce operational cost and improve power system operation. SC and SVC devices are represented by modification of the transmission line inductances and reactive power nodal corrections respectively. We find one placement and sizing of FACTs devices for multiple scenarios and optimal settings for each scenario simultaneously. Our solution of the nonlinear and nonconvex generalized AC-OPF consists of building a convergent sequence of convex optimizations containing only linear constraints and shows good computational scaling to larger systems. The approach is illustrated on single- and multi-scenario examples of the Matpower case-30 model.

  10. Decision precision or holistic heuristic?: Insights on on-site selection of student nurses and midwives.

    PubMed

    Macduff, Colin; Stephen, Audrey; Taylor, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about quality of care delivery in the UK have led to more scrutiny of criteria and methods for the selection of student nurses. However few substantive research studies of on-site selection processes exist. This study elicited and interpreted perspectives on interviewing processes and related decision making involved in on-site selection of student nurses and midwives. Individual and focus group interviews were undertaken with 36 lecturers, 5 clinical staff and 72 students from seven Scottish universities. Enquiry focused primarily on interviewing of candidates on-site. Qualitative content analysis was used as a primary strategy, followed by in-depth thematic analysis. Students had very mixed experiences of interview processes. Staff typically took into account a range of candidate attributes that they valued in order to achieve holistic assessments. These included: interpersonal skills, team working, confidence, problem-solving, aptitude for caring, motivations, and commitment. Staff had mixed views of the validity and reliability of interview processes. A holistic heuristic for overall decision making predominated over belief in the precision of, and evidence base for, particular attribute measurement processes. While the development of measurement tools for particular attributes continues apace, tension between holism and precision is likely to persist within on-site selection procedures.

  11. Heuristics and biases: interactions among numeracy, ability, and reflectiveness predict normative responding

    PubMed Central

    Klaczynski, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    In Stanovich's (2009a, 2011) dual-process theory, analytic processing occurs in the algorithmic and reflective minds. Thinking dispositions, indexes of reflective mind functioning, are believed to regulate operations at the algorithmic level, indexed by general cognitive ability. General limitations at the algorithmic level impose constraints on, and affect the adequacy of, specific strategies and abilities (e.g., numeracy). In a study of 216 undergraduates, the hypothesis that thinking dispositions and general ability moderate the relationship between numeracy (understanding of mathematical concepts and attention to numerical information) and normative responses on probabilistic heuristics and biases (HB) problems was tested. Although all three individual difference measures predicted normative responses, the numeracy-normative response association depended on thinking dispositions and general ability. Specifically, numeracy directly affected normative responding only at relatively high levels of thinking dispositions and general ability. At low levels of thinking dispositions, neither general ability nor numeric skills related to normative responses. Discussion focuses on the consistency of these findings with the hypothesis that the implementation of specific skills is constrained by limitations at both the reflective level and the algorithmic level, methodological limitations that prohibit definitive conclusions, and alternative explanations. PMID:25071639

  12. Decision precision or holistic heuristic?: Insights on on-site selection of student nurses and midwives.

    PubMed

    Macduff, Colin; Stephen, Audrey; Taylor, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about quality of care delivery in the UK have led to more scrutiny of criteria and methods for the selection of student nurses. However few substantive research studies of on-site selection processes exist. This study elicited and interpreted perspectives on interviewing processes and related decision making involved in on-site selection of student nurses and midwives. Individual and focus group interviews were undertaken with 36 lecturers, 5 clinical staff and 72 students from seven Scottish universities. Enquiry focused primarily on interviewing of candidates on-site. Qualitative content analysis was used as a primary strategy, followed by in-depth thematic analysis. Students had very mixed experiences of interview processes. Staff typically took into account a range of candidate attributes that they valued in order to achieve holistic assessments. These included: interpersonal skills, team working, confidence, problem-solving, aptitude for caring, motivations, and commitment. Staff had mixed views of the validity and reliability of interview processes. A holistic heuristic for overall decision making predominated over belief in the precision of, and evidence base for, particular attribute measurement processes. While the development of measurement tools for particular attributes continues apace, tension between holism and precision is likely to persist within on-site selection procedures. PMID:26213147

  13. Heuristics guide the implementation of social preferences in one-shot Prisoner's Dilemma experiments.

    PubMed

    Capraro, Valerio; Jordan, Jillian J; Rand, David G

    2014-01-01

    Cooperation in one-shot anonymous interactions is a widely documented aspect of human behaviour. Here we shed light on the motivations behind this behaviour by experimentally exploring cooperation in a one-shot continuous-strategy Prisoner's Dilemma (i.e. one-shot two-player Public Goods Game). We examine the distribution of cooperation amounts, and how that distribution varies based on the benefit-to-cost ratio of cooperation (b/c). Interestingly, we find a trimodal distribution at all b/c values investigated. Increasing b/c decreases the fraction of participants engaging in zero cooperation and increases the fraction engaging in maximal cooperation, suggesting a role for efficiency concerns. However, a substantial fraction of participants consistently engage in 50% cooperation regardless of b/c. The presence of these persistent 50% cooperators is surprising, and not easily explained by standard models of social preferences. We present evidence that this behaviour is a result of social preferences guided by simple decision heuristics, rather than the rational examination of payoffs assumed by most social preference models. We also find a strong correlation between play in the Prisoner's Dilemma and in a subsequent Dictator Game, confirming previous findings suggesting a common prosocial motivation underlying altruism and cooperation. PMID:25348470

  14. Making decisions at the end of life when caring for a person with dementia: a literature review to explore the potential use of heuristics in difficult decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, R; Davies, N; Manthorpe, J; Iliffe, S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Decision-making, when providing care and treatment for a person with dementia at the end of life, can be complex and challenging. There is a lack of guidance available to support practitioners and family carers, and even those experienced in end of life dementia care report a lack of confidence in decision-making. It is thought that the use of heuristics (rules of thumb) may aid decision-making. The aim of this study is to identify whether heuristics are used in end of life dementia care, and if so, to identify the context in which they are being used. Design A narrative literature review was conducted taking a systematic approach to the search strategy, using the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidelines. Rapid appraisal methodology was used in order to source specific and relevant literature regarding the use of heuristics in end of life dementia care. Data sources A search using terms related to dementia, palliative care and decision-making was conducted across 4 English language electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL) in 2015. Results The search identified 12 papers that contained an algorithm, guideline, decision tool or set of principles that we considered compatible with heuristic decision-making. The papers addressed swallowing and feeding difficulties, the treatment of pneumonia, management of pain and agitation, rationalising medication, ending life-sustaining treatment, and ensuring a good death. Conclusions The use of heuristics in palliative or end of life dementia care is not described in the research literature. However, this review identified important decision-making principles, which are largely a reflection of expert opinion. These principles may have the potential to be developed into simple heuristics that could be used in practice. PMID:27436665

  15. A heuristic expert system for forest fire guidance in Greece.

    PubMed

    Iliadis, Lazaros S; Papastavrou, Anastasios K; Lefakis, Panagiotis D

    2002-07-01

    Forests and forestlands are common inheritance for all Greeks and a piece of the national wealth that must be handed over to the next generations in the best possible condition. After 1974, Greece faces a severe forest fire problem and forest fire forecasting is the process that will enable the Greek ministry of Agriculture to reduce the destruction. This paper describes the basic design principles of an Expert System that performs forest fire forecasting (for the following fire season) and classification of the prefectures of Greece into forest fire risk zones. The Expert system handles uncertainty and uses heuristics in order to produce scenarios based on the presence or absence of various qualitative factors. The initial research focused on the construction of a mathematical model which attempted to describe the annual number of forest fires and burnt area in Greece based on historical data. However this has proven to be impossible using regression analysis and time series. A closer analysis of the fire data revealed that two qualitative factors dramatically affect the number of forest fires and the hectares of burnt areas annually. The first is political stability and national elections and the other is drought cycles. Heuristics were constructed that use political stability and drought cycles, to provide forest fire guidance. Fuzzy logic was applied to produce a fuzzy expected interval for each prefecture of Greece. A fuzzy expected interval is a narrow interval of values that best describes the situation in the country or a part of the country for a certain time period. A successful classification of the prefectures of Greece in forest fire risk zones was done by the system, by comparing the fuzzy expected intervals to each other. The system was tested for the years 1994 and 1995. The testing has clearly shown that the system can predict accurately, the number of forest fires for each prefecture for the following year. The average accuracy was as high as 85

  16. A multi-stage heuristic algorithm for matching problem in the modified miniload automated storage and retrieval system of e-commerce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenrui; Wu, Yaohua; Wu, Yingying

    2016-05-01

    E-commerce, as an emerging marketing mode, has attracted more and more attention and gradually changed the way of our life. However, the existing layout of distribution centers can't fulfill the storage and picking demands of e-commerce sufficiently. In this paper, a modified miniload automated storage/retrieval system is designed to fit these new characteristics of e-commerce in logistics. Meanwhile, a matching problem, concerning with the improvement of picking efficiency in new system, is studied in this paper. The problem is how to reduce the travelling distance of totes between aisles and picking stations. A multi-stage heuristic algorithm is proposed based on statement and model of this problem. The main idea of this algorithm is, with some heuristic strategies based on similarity coefficients, minimizing the transportations of items which can not arrive in the destination picking stations just through direct conveyors. The experimental results based on the cases generated by computers show that the average reduced rate of indirect transport times can reach 14.36% with the application of multi-stage heuristic algorithm. For the cases from a real e-commerce distribution center, the order processing time can be reduced from 11.20 h to 10.06 h with the help of the modified system and the proposed algorithm. In summary, this research proposed a modified system and a multi-stage heuristic algorithm that can reduce the travelling distance of totes effectively and improve the whole performance of e-commerce distribution center.

  17. Social welfare as small-scale help: evolutionary psychology and the deservingness heuristic.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Michael Bang

    2012-01-01

    Public opinion concerning social welfare is largely driven by perceptions of recipient deservingness. Extant research has argued that this heuristic is learned from a variety of cultural, institutional, and ideological sources. The present article provides evidence supporting a different view: that the deservingness heuristic is rooted in psychological categories that evolved over the course of human evolution to regulate small-scale exchanges of help. To test predictions made on the basis of this view, a method designed to measure social categorization is embedded in nationally representative surveys conducted in different countries. Across the national- and individual-level differences that extant research has used to explain the heuristic, people categorize welfare recipients on the basis of whether they are lazy or unlucky. This mode of categorization furthermore induces people to think about large-scale welfare politics as its presumed ancestral equivalent: small-scale help giving. The general implications for research on heuristics are discussed.

  18. Exemplars in the mist: the cognitive substrate of the representativeness heuristic.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Håkan; Juslin, Peter; Olsson, Henrik

    2008-06-01

    The idea that people often make probability judgments by a heuristic short-cut, the representativeness heuristic, has been widely influential, but also criticized for being vague. The empirical trademark of the heuristic is characteristic deviations between normative probabilities and judgments (e.g., the conjunction fallacy, base-rate neglect). In this article the authors contrast two hypotheses concerning the cognitive substrate of the representativeness heuristic, the prototype hypothesis (Kahneman & Frederick, 2002) and the exemplar hypothesis (Juslin & Persson, 2002), in a task especially designed to elicit representativeness effects. Computational modelling and an experiment reveal that representativeness effects are evident early in training and persist longer in a more complex task environment and that the data are best accounted for by a model implementing the exemplar hypothesis. PMID:18419587

  19. Optimization of pressurized water reactor shuffling by simulated annealing with heuristics

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.G.; Smith, K.S.; Rempe, K.R.; Downar, T.J.

    1995-09-01

    Simulated-annealing optimization of reactor core loading patterns is implemented with support for design heuristics during candidate pattern generation. The SIMAN optimization module uses the advanced nodal method of SIMULATE-3 and the full cross-section detail of CASMO-3 to evaluate accurately the neutronic performance of each candidate, resulting in high-quality patterns. The use of heuristics within simulated annealing is explored. Heuristics improve the consistency of optimization results for both fast- and slow-annealing runs with no penalty from the exclusion of unusual candidates. Thus, the heuristic application of designer judgment during automated pattern generation is shown to be effective. The capability of the SIMAN module to find and evaluate families of loading patterns that satisfy design constraints and have good objective performance within practical run times is demonstrated. The use of automated evaluations of successive cycles to explore multicycle effects of design decisions is discussed.

  20. The White Ceiling Heuristic and the Underestimation of Asian-American Income

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Chris C.; Nezlek, John B.

    2014-01-01

    The belief that ethnic majorities dominate ethnic minorities informs research on intergroup processes. This belief can lead to the social heuristic that the ethnic majority sets an upper limit that minority groups cannot surpass, but this possibility has not received much attention. In three studies of perceived income, we examined how this heuristic, which we term the White ceiling heuristic leads people to inaccurately estimate the income of a minority group that surpasses the majority. We found that Asian Americans, whose median income has surpassed White median income for nearly three decades, are still perceived as making less than Whites, with the least accurate estimations being made by people who strongly believe that Whites are privileged. In contrast, income estimates for other minorities were fairly accurate. Thus, perceptions of minorities are shaped both by stereotype content and a heuristic. PMID:25268366

  1. Does interaction matter? Testing whether a confidence heuristic can replace interaction in collective decision-making.

    PubMed

    Bang, Dan; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian; Olsen, Karsten; Latham, Peter E; Lau, Jennifer Y F; Roepstorff, Andreas; Rees, Geraint; Frith, Chris D; Bahrami, Bahador

    2014-05-01

    In a range of contexts, individuals arrive at collective decisions by sharing confidence in their judgements. This tendency to evaluate the reliability of information by the confidence with which it is expressed has been termed the 'confidence heuristic'. We tested two ways of implementing the confidence heuristic in the context of a collective perceptual decision-making task: either directly, by opting for the judgement made with higher confidence, or indirectly, by opting for the faster judgement, exploiting an inverse correlation between confidence and reaction time. We found that the success of these heuristics depends on how similar individuals are in terms of the reliability of their judgements and, more importantly, that for dissimilar individuals such heuristics are dramatically inferior to interaction. Interaction allows individuals to alleviate, but not fully resolve, differences in the reliability of their judgements. We discuss the implications of these findings for models of confidence and collective decision-making.

  2. A health literacy and usability heuristic evaluation of a mobile consumer health application.

    PubMed

    Monkman, Helen; Kushniruk, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Usability and health literacy are two critical factors in the design and evaluation of consumer health information systems. However, methods for evaluating these two factors in conjunction remain limited. This study adapted a set of existing guidelines for the design of consumer health Web sites into evidence-based evaluation heuristics tailored specifically for mobile consumer health applications. In order to test the approach, a mobile consumer health application (app) was then evaluated using these heuristics. In addition to revealing ways to improve the usability of the system, this analysis identified opportunities to augment the content to make it more understandable by users with limited health literacy. This study successfully demonstrated the utility of converting existing design guidelines into heuristics for the evaluation of usability and health literacy. The heuristics generated could be applied for assessing and revising other existing consumer health information systems.

  3. Unified heuristics to solve routing problem of reverse logistics in sustainable supply chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbuudayasankar, S. P.; Ganesh, K.; Lenny Koh, S. C.; Mohandas, K.

    2010-03-01

    A reverse logistics problem, motivated by many real-life applications, is examined where bottles/cans in which products are delivered from a processing depot to customers in one period are available for return to the depot in the following period. The picked-up bottles/cans need to be adjusted in the place of delivery load. This problem is termed as simultaneous delivery and pick-up problem with constrained capacity (SDPC). We develop three unified heuristics based on extended branch and bound heuristic, genetic algorithm and simulated annealing to solve SDPC. These heuristics are also designed to solve standard travelling salesman problem (TSP) and TSP with simultaneous delivery and pick-up (TSDP). We tested the heuristics on standard, derived and randomly generated datasets of TSP, TSDP and SDPC and obtained satisfying results with high convergence in reasonable time.

  4. Parameter estimation using meta-heuristics in systems biology: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianyong; Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Hodgman, Charlie

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives a comprehensive review of the application of meta-heuristics to optimization problems in systems biology, mainly focussing on the parameter estimation problem (also called the inverse problem or model calibration). It is intended for either the system biologist who wishes to learn more about the various optimization techniques available and/or the meta-heuristic optimizer who is interested in applying such techniques to problems in systems biology. First, the parameter estimation problems emerging from different areas of systems biology are described from the point of view of machine learning. Brief descriptions of various meta-heuristics developed for these problems follow, along with outlines of their advantages and disadvantages. Several important issues in applying meta-heuristics to the systems biology modelling problem are addressed, including the reliability and identifiability of model parameters, optimal design of experiments, and so on. Finally, we highlight some possible future research directions in this field.

  5. Social welfare as small-scale help: evolutionary psychology and the deservingness heuristic.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Michael Bang

    2012-01-01

    Public opinion concerning social welfare is largely driven by perceptions of recipient deservingness. Extant research has argued that this heuristic is learned from a variety of cultural, institutional, and ideological sources. The present article provides evidence supporting a different view: that the deservingness heuristic is rooted in psychological categories that evolved over the course of human evolution to regulate small-scale exchanges of help. To test predictions made on the basis of this view, a method designed to measure social categorization is embedded in nationally representative surveys conducted in different countries. Across the national- and individual-level differences that extant research has used to explain the heuristic, people categorize welfare recipients on the basis of whether they are lazy or unlucky. This mode of categorization furthermore induces people to think about large-scale welfare politics as its presumed ancestral equivalent: small-scale help giving. The general implications for research on heuristics are discussed. PMID:22375300

  6. Using the Science Writing Heuristic in the General Chemistry Laboratory to Improve Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poock, Jason R.; Burke, K. A.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Hand, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis describes the effects of using the science writing heuristic (SWH) in the general chemistry laboratory on the students' academic performance. The technique has found to be extremely important factor in a student's learning process and achievement in science.

  7. Does interaction matter? Testing whether a confidence heuristic can replace interaction in collective decision-making.

    PubMed

    Bang, Dan; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian; Olsen, Karsten; Latham, Peter E; Lau, Jennifer Y F; Roepstorff, Andreas; Rees, Geraint; Frith, Chris D; Bahrami, Bahador

    2014-05-01

    In a range of contexts, individuals arrive at collective decisions by sharing confidence in their judgements. This tendency to evaluate the reliability of information by the confidence with which it is expressed has been termed the 'confidence heuristic'. We tested two ways of implementing the confidence heuristic in the context of a collective perceptual decision-making task: either directly, by opting for the judgement made with higher confidence, or indirectly, by opting for the faster judgement, exploiting an inverse correlation between confidence and reaction time. We found that the success of these heuristics depends on how similar individuals are in terms of the reliability of their judgements and, more importantly, that for dissimilar individuals such heuristics are dramatically inferior to interaction. Interaction allows individuals to alleviate, but not fully resolve, differences in the reliability of their judgements. We discuss the implications of these findings for models of confidence and collective decision-making. PMID:24650632

  8. Design of high-performing hybrid meta-heuristics for unrelated parallel machine scheduling with machine eligibility and precedence constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzalirad, Mojtaba; Rezaeian, Javad

    2016-04-01

    This study involves an unrelated parallel machine scheduling problem in which sequence-dependent set-up times, different release dates, machine eligibility and precedence constraints are considered to minimize total late works. A new mixed-integer programming model is presented and two efficient hybrid meta-heuristics, genetic algorithm and ant colony optimization, combined with the acceptance strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm (Metropolis acceptance rule), are proposed to solve this problem. Manifestly, the precedence constraints greatly increase the complexity of the scheduling problem to generate feasible solutions, especially in a parallel machine environment. In this research, a new corrective algorithm is proposed to obtain the feasibility in all stages of the algorithms. The performance of the proposed algorithms is evaluated in numerical examples. The results indicate that the suggested hybrid ant colony optimization statistically outperformed the proposed hybrid genetic algorithm in solving large-size test problems.

  9. Runway Operations Planning: A Two-Stage Heuristic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostakis, Ioannis; Clarke, John-Paul

    2003-01-01

    The airport runway is a scarce resource that must be shared by different runway operations (arrivals, departures and runway crossings). Given the possible sequences of runway events, careful Runway Operations Planning (ROP) is required if runway utilization is to be maximized. From the perspective of departures, ROP solutions are aircraft departure schedules developed by optimally allocating runway time for departures given the time required for arrivals and crossings. In addition to the obvious objective of maximizing throughput, other objectives, such as guaranteeing fairness and minimizing environmental impact, can also be incorporated into the ROP solution subject to constraints introduced by Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures. This paper introduces a two stage heuristic algorithm for solving the Runway Operations Planning (ROP) problem. In the first stage, sequences of departure class slots and runway crossings slots are generated and ranked based on departure runway throughput under stochastic conditions. In the second stage, the departure class slots are populated with specific flights from the pool of available aircraft, by solving an integer program with a Branch & Bound algorithm implementation. Preliminary results from this implementation of the two-stage algorithm on real-world traffic data are presented.

  10. Probabilistic dual heuristic programming-based adaptive critic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzallah, Randa

    2010-02-01

    Adaptive critic (AC) methods have common roots as generalisations of dynamic programming for neural reinforcement learning approaches. Since they approximate the dynamic programming solutions, they are potentially suitable for learning in noisy, non-linear and non-stationary environments. In this study, a novel probabilistic dual heuristic programming (DHP)-based AC controller is proposed. Distinct to current approaches, the proposed probabilistic (DHP) AC method takes uncertainties of forward model and inverse controller into consideration. Therefore, it is suitable for deterministic and stochastic control problems characterised by functional uncertainty. Theoretical development of the proposed method is validated by analytically evaluating the correct value of the cost function which satisfies the Bellman equation in a linear quadratic control problem. The target value of the probabilistic critic network is then calculated and shown to be equal to the analytically derived correct value. Full derivation of the Riccati solution for this non-standard stochastic linear quadratic control problem is also provided. Moreover, the performance of the proposed probabilistic controller is demonstrated on linear and non-linear control examples.

  11. High throughput heuristics for prioritizing human exposure to environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wambaugh, John F; Wang, Anran; Dionisio, Kathie L; Frame, Alicia; Egeghy, Peter; Judson, Richard; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2014-11-01

    The risk posed to human health by any of the thousands of untested anthropogenic chemicals in our environment is a function of both the hazard presented by the chemical and the extent of exposure. However, many chemicals lack estimates of exposure intake, limiting the understanding of health risks. We aim to develop a rapid heuristic method to determine potential human exposure to chemicals for application to the thousands of chemicals with little or no exposure data. We used Bayesian methodology to infer ranges of exposure consistent with biomarkers identified in urine samples from the U.S. population by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). We performed linear regression on inferred exposure for demographic subsets of NHANES demarked by age, gender, and weight using chemical descriptors and use information from multiple databases and structure-based calculators. Five descriptors are capable of explaining roughly 50% of the variability in geometric means across 106 NHANES chemicals for all the demographic groups, including children aged 6-11. We use these descriptors to estimate human exposure to 7968 chemicals, the majority of which have no other quantitative exposure prediction. For thousands of chemicals with no other information, this approach allows forecasting of average exposure intake of environmental chemicals.

  12. A Heuristic Approach to Examining Volatile Equilibrium at Titan's Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    R. D. Lorenz, J. I. Lunine, and C. P. McKay have shown in a manuscript accepted for publication that, for a given ethane abundance and surface temperature, the nitrogen and methane abundances in Titan's atmosphere can be calculated, yielding a surface pressure that can be compared with the observed value. This is potentially a very valuable tool for examining the evolution of Titan's climatology. Its validity does depend on two important assumptions, however: 1) that the atmosphere of Titan is in global radiative equilibrium, and 2) that volatiles present are in vapor equilibrium with the surface. The former assumption has been shown to be likely, but the latter has not. Water vapor in the Earth's atmosphere, in fact, is generally not very close to equilibrium in a global sense. In the present work a heuristic approach is used to examine the likelihood that methane vapor is in equilibrium with Titan's surface. Plausible climate scenerios are examined that are consistent with methane vapor abundances derived from Voyager IRIS data. Simple precipitation and surface diffusion models are incorporated into the analysis. It is tentatively inferred that methane may be in surface equilibrium near the poles, but that equilibrium at low latitudes is more difficult to establish.

  13. Cardiac Arrest and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case of Medical Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Tokunbo; Okudo, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient clinical data from patients is a major cause of errors in medical diagnostics. In an attempt to make a diagnosis, initial clinical information provided to the physician may be overly relied on as the only information required in making diagnosis leading to anchoring. Failure to rely on differential diagnoses in spite of new signs and symptoms or rethinking of initial hypothesis may lead to fixation on a certain diagnosis, which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. In the event that there is an anchoring heuristic, like in our patient, it is important to consider differential diagnoses; however, it is not wrong to rely on some form of anchor. We report a case of a 62-year-old male with a history of multiple medical conditions and a history of acetaminophen overdose who presented to the hospital with large amounts of coffee ground emesis. He was subsequently transferred to the liver transplant center on discovery that he was in fulminant hepatic failure and died two days later in spite of aggressive medical treatment. PMID:27366152

  14. A Hierarchy of Heuristic-Based Models of Crowd Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, P.; Appert-Rolland, C.; Moussaïd, M.; Pettré, J.; Theraulaz, G.

    2013-09-01

    We derive a hierarchy of kinetic and macroscopic models from a noisy variant of the heuristic behavioral Individual-Based Model of Ngai et al. (Disaster Med. Public Health Prep. 3:191-195, 2009) where pedestrians are supposed to have constant speeds. This IBM supposes that pedestrians seek the best compromise between navigation towards their target and collisions avoidance. We first propose a kinetic model for the probability distribution function of pedestrians. Then, we derive fluid models and propose three different closure relations. The first two closures assume that the velocity distribution function is either a Dirac delta or a von Mises-Fisher distribution respectively. The third closure results from a hydrodynamic limit associated to a Local Thermodynamical Equilibrium. We develop an analogy between this equilibrium and Nash equilibria in a game theoretic framework. In each case, we discuss the features of the models and their suitability for practical use.

  15. Farley Buneman wave heating: Confirming heuristics with radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Combined observations from the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR) and a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar in Homer, Alaska were made during geomagnetic storms in November 2012 and March 2013. Enhanced electron temperature and density in the E region were measured by the PFISR and strong echoes from field aligned irregularities were measured by the coherent scatter radar. We compare these observations with a heuristic model of Farley Buneman waves based on the formulations of Milikh and Dimant (2002) and the SAMI2 global model of the ionosphere. The model predicts phase speed and magnetic aspect width profiles, as well as profiles of ionospheric state variables as functions of the convective electric field. By accounting for the thickness of the region where Farley Buneman waves exist and weighting the profiles accordingly, the model is capable of estimating the phase velocity and magnetic aspect width that would be observed by a coherent scatter radar. We then use the comparison to assess the empirical relationships of coherent scatter radar observations of Farley Buneman waves.

  16. Formal versus heuristic modeling for multitarget Bayes filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Ronald P. S.

    2004-08-01

    The multisensor-multitarget Bayes filter is the foundation for multi-sensor-multitarget detection, tracking, and identification. This paper addresses the question of principled implementation of this filter. Algorithms can always be cobbled together using catch-as-catch-can heuristic techniques. In formal Bayes modeling one instead derives statistically precise, implementation-independent equations from which principle approximations can then be derived. Indeed, this has become the accepted methodology for single-sensor, single-target tracking R&D. In the case of the multitarget filter, however, partisans of a so-called "plain-vanilla Bayesian approach" have disparaged formal Bayes modelling, and have protrayed specific, ad hoc implementations as completely general, "powerful and robust computational methods." In this and a companion paper I expose the speciousness of such claims. This paper reviews the elements of formal Bayes modeling and approximation, describes what they must look like in the multitarget case, and contrasts them with the "plain-vanilla Bayesian approach."

  17. Heuristic Scheduling in Grid Environments: Reducing the Operational Energy Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, Christian

    In a world where more and more businesses seem to trade in an online market, the supply of online services to the ever-growing demand could quickly reach its capacity limits. Online service providers may find themselves maxed out at peak operation levels during high-traffic timeslots but too little demand during low-traffic timeslots, although the latter is becoming less frequent. At this point deciding which user is allocated what level of service becomes essential. The concept of Grid computing could offer a meaningful alternative to conventional super-computing centres. Not only can Grids reach the same computing speeds as some of the fastest supercomputers, but distributed computing harbors a great energy-saving potential. When scheduling projects in such a Grid environment however, simply assigning one process to a system becomes so complex in calculation that schedules are often too late to execute, rendering their optimizations useless. Current schedulers attempt to maximize the utility, given some sort of constraint, often reverting to heuristics. This optimization often comes at the cost of environmental impact, in this case CO 2 emissions. This work proposes an alternate model of energy efficient scheduling while keeping a respectable amount of economic incentives untouched. Using this model, it is possible to reduce the total energy consumed by a Grid environment using 'just-in-time' flowtime management, paired with ranking nodes by efficiency.

  18. Mixed Integer Programming and Heuristic Scheduling for Space Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Kar-Ming; Lee, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    We developed framework and the mathematical formulation for optimizing communication network using mixed integer programming. The design yields a system that is much smaller, in search space size, when compared to the earlier approach. Our constrained network optimization takes into account the dynamics of link performance within the network along with mission and operation requirements. A unique penalty function is introduced to transform the mixed integer programming into the more manageable problem of searching in a continuous space. The constrained optimization problem was proposed to solve in two stages: first using the heuristic Particle Swarming Optimization algorithm to get a good initial starting point, and then feeding the result into the Sequential Quadratic Programming algorithm to achieve the final optimal schedule. We demonstrate the above planning and scheduling methodology with a scenario of 20 spacecraft and 3 ground stations of a Deep Space Network site. Our approach and framework have been simple and flexible so that problems with larger number of constraints and network can be easily adapted and solved.

  19. Cardiac Arrest and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case of Medical Heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Tokunbo; Okudo, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient clinical data from patients is a major cause of errors in medical diagnostics. In an attempt to make a diagnosis, initial clinical information provided to the physician may be overly relied on as the only information required in making diagnosis leading to anchoring. Failure to rely on differential diagnoses in spite of new signs and symptoms or rethinking of initial hypothesis may lead to fixation on a certain diagnosis, which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. In the event that there is an anchoring heuristic, like in our patient, it is important to consider differential diagnoses; however, it is not wrong to rely on some form of anchor. We report a case of a 62-year-old male with a history of multiple medical conditions and a history of acetaminophen overdose who presented to the hospital with large amounts of coffee ground emesis. He was subsequently transferred to the liver transplant center on discovery that he was in fulminant hepatic failure and died two days later in spite of aggressive medical treatment. PMID:27366152

  20. A heuristic criterion for instability to fragmentation in rotating, interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    A heuristic criterion, based on linear perturbation analysis, is applied to the initial growth of density perturbations in isothermal or adiabatic gas clouds, with initially uniform density and uniform rotation. The heuristic criterion is shown to be consistent with the available results from numerical calculations of cloud collapse. The criterion predicts that perturbations varying as cos(m-phi) will be most likely to grow when m is small, unless the cloud is nearly pressureless.

  1. A Heuristic Criterion for Instability to Fragmentation in Rotating, Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan Paul

    1982-01-01

    A heuristic criterion, based on linear perturbation analysis, is applied to the initial growth of density perturbations in isothermal or adiabatic gas clouds, with initially uniform density and uniform rotation. The heuristic criterion is shown to be consistent with the available results from numerical calculations of cloud collapse. The criterion predicts that perturbations varying as cos (m(phi)) will be most likely to grow when )pi is small, unless the cloud is nearly pressureless.

  2. A heuristic for the distribution of point counts for random curves over a finite field

    PubMed Central

    Achter, Jeffrey D.; Erman, Daniel; Kedlaya, Kiran S.; Wood, Melanie Matchett; Zureick-Brown, David

    2015-01-01

    How many rational points are there on a random algebraic curve of large genus g over a given finite field ? We propose a heuristic for this question motivated by a (now proven) conjecture of Mumford on the cohomology of moduli spaces of curves; this heuristic suggests a Poisson distribution with mean q+1+1/(q−1). We prove a weaker version of this statement in which g and q tend to infinity, with q much larger than g. PMID:25802415

  3. Modern meta-heuristics based on nonlinear physics processes: A review of models and design procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo-Sanz, S.

    2016-10-01

    Meta-heuristic algorithms are problem-solving methods which try to find good-enough solutions to very hard optimization problems, at a reasonable computation time, where classical approaches fail, or cannot even been applied. Many existing meta-heuristics approaches are nature-inspired techniques, which work by simulating or modeling different natural processes in a computer. Historically, many of the most successful meta-heuristic approaches have had a biological inspiration, such as evolutionary computation or swarm intelligence paradigms, but in the last few years new approaches based on nonlinear physics processes modeling have been proposed and applied with success. Non-linear physics processes, modeled as optimization algorithms, are able to produce completely new search procedures, with extremely effective exploration capabilities in many cases, which are able to outperform existing optimization approaches. In this paper we review the most important optimization algorithms based on nonlinear physics, how they have been constructed from specific modeling of a real phenomena, and also their novelty in terms of comparison with alternative existing algorithms for optimization. We first review important concepts on optimization problems, search spaces and problems' difficulty. Then, the usefulness of heuristics and meta-heuristics approaches to face hard optimization problems is introduced, and some of the main existing classical versions of these algorithms are reviewed. The mathematical framework of different nonlinear physics processes is then introduced as a preparatory step to review in detail the most important meta-heuristics based on them. A discussion on the novelty of these approaches, their main computational implementation and design issues, and the evaluation of a novel meta-heuristic based on Strange Attractors mutation will be carried out to complete the review of these techniques. We also describe some of the most important application areas, in

  4. The inherence heuristic across development: systematic differences between children's and adults' explanations for everyday facts.

    PubMed

    Cimpian, Andrei; Steinberg, Olivia D

    2014-12-01

    The inherence heuristic is a basic cognitive process that supplies quick-and-easy answers to what are, in reality, incredibly complex questions about why the broad patterns of the world are as they are (Cimpian & Salomon, 2014-a, 2014-b). This explanatory heuristic satisfies the human need to understand, but it is also a source of bias because the heuristic relies too often on the (easily accessible) inherent features of the entities in the patterns being explained. Here, we investigated the developmental trajectory of this heuristic. Given that the cognitive resources that help override the typical output of the inherence heuristic are scarce in childhood, we hypothesized that the heuristic's output would be more broadly endorsed by children than by adults. Five experiments involving young children and adults (N=480) provided consistent support for this hypothesis. The first three experiments (Part I) investigated participants' explanations for broad patterns (e.g., fire trucks are red) and suggested that, consistent with our predictions, children were particularly likely to endorse inherence-based explanations. The last two experiments (Part II) investigated two intuitions that accompany the output of the inherence heuristic: namely, that the patterns being explained cannot be changed and are temporally stable. As predicted, participants' judgments on these dimensions showed the same developmental differences as the explanations investigated in Part I, with children being particularly likely to see patterns as inalterable and temporally stable. The developmental differences found across these five experiments suggest that children start out with a broad reliance on the explanatory output of the inherence heuristic, a reliance that narrows in scope to some extent as children develop. PMID:25291062

  5. Analytic and heuristic processes in the detection and resolution of conflict.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mário B; Mata, André; Donkin, Christopher; Sherman, Steven J; Ihmels, Max

    2016-10-01

    Previous research with the ratio-bias task found larger response latencies for conflict trials where the heuristic- and analytic-based responses are assumed to be in opposition (e.g., choosing between 1/10 and 9/100 ratios of success) when compared to no-conflict trials where both processes converge on the same response (e.g., choosing between 1/10 and 11/100). This pattern is consistent with parallel dual-process models, which assume that there is effective, rather than lax, monitoring of the output of heuristic processing. It is, however, unclear why conflict resolution sometimes fails. Ratio-biased choices may increase because of a decline in analytical reasoning (leaving heuristic-based responses unopposed) or to a rise in heuristic processing (making it more difficult for analytic processes to override the heuristic preferences). Using the process-dissociation procedure, we found that instructions to respond logically and response speed affected analytic (controlled) processing (C), leaving heuristic processing (H) unchanged, whereas the intuitive preference for large nominators (as assessed by responses to equal ratio trials) affected H but not C. These findings create new challenges to the debate between dual-process and single-process accounts, which are discussed.

  6. The heuristic value of redundancy models of aging.

    PubMed

    Boonekamp, Jelle J; Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Molecular studies of aging aim to unravel the cause(s) of aging bottom-up, but linking these mechanisms to organismal level processes remains a challenge. We propose that complementary top-down data-directed modelling of organismal level empirical findings may contribute to developing these links. To this end, we explore the heuristic value of redundancy models of aging to develop a deeper insight into the mechanisms causing variation in senescence and lifespan. We start by showing (i) how different redundancy model parameters affect projected aging and mortality, and (ii) how variation in redundancy model parameters relates to variation in parameters of the Gompertz equation. Lifestyle changes or medical interventions during life can modify mortality rate, and we investigate (iii) how interventions that change specific redundancy parameters within the model affect subsequent mortality and actuarial senescence. Lastly, as an example of data-directed modelling and the insights that can be gained from this, (iv) we fit a redundancy model to mortality patterns observed by Mair et al. (2003; Science 301: 1731-1733) in Drosophila that were subjected to dietary restriction and temperature manipulations. Mair et al. found that dietary restriction instantaneously reduced mortality rate without affecting aging, while temperature manipulations had more transient effects on mortality rate and did affect aging. We show that after adjusting model parameters the redundancy model describes both effects well, and a comparison of the parameter values yields a deeper insight in the mechanisms causing these contrasting effects. We see replacement of the redundancy model parameters by more detailed sub-models of these parameters as a next step in linking demographic patterns to underlying molecular mechanisms.

  7. On two heuristic viewpoints concerning the study of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen

    2015-02-01

    It has been a debatable problem that what the essence of light is, and how it is produced. Since the modern times, as James Clerk Maxwell setting the theory of electromagnetic up, the mainstream consciousness was occupied gradually by the wave theory of light. But at the end of 19th century, a series experimental phenomenon weren't precisely explained by the wave theory of light such as photoelectric effect experiment. Then Albert Einstein published his famous paper "On a Heuristic Viewpoint Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light", which laid the foundation of light quantum hypothesis. While solving these problems perfectly, a new problem was caused that because the wave theory and the quantum theory are both applicable to interpret some of the experiment of light, what is the essence of light. This paper first outlines the history of optical development and current status, and states the difficulties and deficiencies of the study of light. Then we put forward the key concept of the paper called lightstring which consults some points of the theory of modern optics and physics which called the optical frequency comb and the string theory, then presents the essence of light based on the light string concept in order to make the concept of photons specific. And then we put forward the production mechanism of light ---- the String-Light effect based on the concept of light string. In this paper, we attempt to put forward a new idea of the study of the essence of light and the production mechanism of it.

  8. Mixed Integer Programming and Heuristic Scheduling for Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Charles H.; Cheung, Kar-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Optimal planning and scheduling for a communication network was created where the nodes within the network are communicating at the highest possible rates while meeting the mission requirements and operational constraints. The planning and scheduling problem was formulated in the framework of Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) to introduce a special penalty function to convert the MIP problem into a continuous optimization problem, and to solve the constrained optimization problem using heuristic optimization. The communication network consists of space and ground assets with the link dynamics between any two assets varying with respect to time, distance, and telecom configurations. One asset could be communicating with another at very high data rates at one time, and at other times, communication is impossible, as the asset could be inaccessible from the network due to planetary occultation. Based on the network's geometric dynamics and link capabilities, the start time, end time, and link configuration of each view period are selected to maximize the communication efficiency within the network. Mathematical formulations for the constrained mixed integer optimization problem were derived, and efficient analytical and numerical techniques were developed to find the optimal solution. By setting up the problem using MIP, the search space for the optimization problem is reduced significantly, thereby speeding up the solution process. The ratio of the dimension of the traditional method over the proposed formulation is approximately an order N (single) to 2*N (arraying), where N is the number of receiving antennas of a node. By introducing a special penalty function, the MIP problem with non-differentiable cost function and nonlinear constraints can be converted into a continuous variable problem, whose solution is possible.

  9. Using an Enhanced Conflict Map in the Classroom (Photoelectric Effect) Based on Lakatosian Heuristic Principle Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Jun-Young

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have shown that most students resist changes to their core beliefs by offering auxiliary hypotheses at the first sign of the development of conceptual change. Studies have viewed student reaction to discrepant events as an important clue in helping researchers understand not only the structure of alternative concepts (Niaz, "Science &…

  10. Usability of a Patient Education and Motivation Tool Using Heuristic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mohit; Dai, Liwei; Price, Kathleen; Vizer, Lisa; Sears, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background Computer-mediated educational applications can provide a self-paced, interactive environment to deliver educational content to individuals about their health condition. These programs have been used to deliver health-related information about a variety of topics, including breast cancer screening, asthma management, and injury prevention. We have designed the Patient Education and Motivation Tool (PEMT), an interactive computer-based educational program based on behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic learning theories. The tool is designed to educate users and has three key components: screening, learning, and evaluation. Objective The objective of this tutorial is to illustrate a heuristic evaluation using a computer-based patient education program (PEMT) as a case study. The aims were to improve the usability of PEMT through heuristic evaluation of the interface; to report the results of these usability evaluations; to make changes based on the findings of the usability experts; and to describe the benefits and limitations of applying usability evaluations to PEMT. Methods PEMT was evaluated by three usability experts using Nielsen’s usability heuristics while reviewing the interface to produce a list of heuristic violations with severity ratings. The violations were sorted by heuristic and ordered from most to least severe within each heuristic. Results A total of 127 violations were identified with a median severity of 3 (range 0 to 4 with 0 = no problem to 4 = catastrophic problem). Results showed 13 violations for visibility (median severity = 2), 38 violations for match between system and real world (median severity = 2), 6 violations for user control and freedom (median severity = 3), 34 violations for consistency and standards (median severity = 2), 11 violations for error severity (median severity = 3), 1 violation for recognition and control (median severity = 3), 7 violations for flexibility and efficiency (median severity = 2), 9 violations

  11. The power of simplicity: a fast-and-frugal heuristics approach to performance science

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Markus; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Performance science is a fairly new multidisciplinary field that integrates performance domains such as sports, medicine, business, and the arts. To give its many branches a structure and its research a direction, it requires a theoretical framework. We demonstrate the applications of this framework with examples from sport and medicine. Because performance science deals mainly with situations of uncertainty rather than known risks, the needed framework can be provided by the fast-and-frugal heuristics approach. According to this approach, experts learn to rely on heuristics in an adaptive way in order to make accurate decisions. We investigate the adaptive use of heuristics in three ways: the descriptive study of the heuristics in the cognitive “adaptive toolbox;” the prescriptive study of their “ecological rationality,” that is, the characterization of the situations in which a given heuristic works; and the engineering study of “intuitive design,” that is, the design of transparent aids for making better decisions. PMID:26579051

  12. Social Outcomes in Childhood Brain Disorder: A Heuristic Integration of Social Neuroscience and Developmental Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Yeates, Keith Owen; Bigler, Erin D.; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    The authors propose a heuristic model of the social outcomes of childhood brain disorder that draws on models and methods from both the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience and the study of social competence in developmental psychology/psychopathology. The heuristic model characterizes the relationships between social adjustment, peer interactions and relationships, social problem solving and communication, social-affective and cognitive-executive processes, and their neural substrates. The model is illustrated by research on a specific form of childhood brain disorder, traumatic brain injury. The heuristic model may promote research regarding the neural and cognitive-affective substrates of children’s social development. It also may engender more precise methods of measuring impairments and disabilities in children with brain disorder and suggest ways to promote their social adaptation. PMID:17469991

  13. Biases and Heuristics in Decision Making and Their Impact on Autonomy.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal-Barby, J S

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive scientists have identified a wide range of biases and heuristics in human decision making over the past few decades. Only recently have bioethicists begun to think seriously about the implications of these findings for topics such as agency, autonomy, and consent. This article aims to provide an overview of biases and heuristics that have been identified and a framework in which to think comprehensively about the impact of them on the exercise of autonomous decision making. I analyze the impact that these biases and heuristics have on the following dimensions of autonomy: understanding, intentionality, absence of alienating or controlling influence, and match between formally autonomous preferences or decisions and actual choices or actions. PMID:27111357

  14. A hop count based heuristic routing protocol for mobile delay tolerant networks.

    PubMed

    You, Lei; Li, Jianbo; Wei, Changjiang; Dai, Chenqu; Xu, Jixing; Hu, Lejuan

    2014-01-01

    Routing in delay tolerant networks (DTNs) is a challenge since it must handle network partitioning, long delays, and dynamic topology. Meanwhile, routing protocols of the traditional mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) cannot work well due to the failure of its assumption that most network connections are available. In this paper, we propose a hop count based heuristic routing protocol by utilizing the information carried by the peripatetic packets in the network. A heuristic function is defined to help in making the routing decision. We formally define a custom operation for square matrices so as to transform the heuristic value calculation into matrix manipulation. Finally, the performance of our proposed algorithm is evaluated by the simulation results, which show the advantage of such self-adaptive routing protocol in the diverse circumstance of DTNs.

  15. A practical implementation science heuristic for organizational readiness: R = MC2

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Brittany S.; Lamont, Andrea; Wandersman, Abraham; Castellow, Jennifer; Katz, Jason; Beidas, Rinad S.

    2015-01-01

    There are many challenges when an innovation (i.e., a program, process, or policy that is new to an organization) is actively introduced into an organization. One critical component for successful implementation is the organization’s readiness for the innovation. In this article, we propose a practical implementation science heuristic, abbreviated as R= MC2. We propose that organizational readiness involves: 1) the motivation to implement an innovation, 2) the general capacities of an organization, and 3) the innovation-specific capacities needed for a particular innovation. Each of these components can be assessed independently and be used formatively. The heuristic can be used by organizations to assess readiness to implement and by training and technical assistance providers to help build organizational readiness. We present an illustration of the heuristic by showing how behavioral health organizations differ in readiness to implement a peer specialist initiative. Implications for research and practice of organizational readiness are discussed. PMID:26668443

  16. Application of heuristic satellite plan synthesis algorithms to requirements of the WARC-88 allotment plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Reilly, Charles H.; Walton, Eric K.; Mata, Fernando; Olen, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Creation of an Allotment Plan for the Fixed Satellite Service at the 1988 Space World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) represented a complex satellite plan synthesis problem, involving a large number of planned and existing systems. Solutions to this problem at WARC-88 required the use of both automated and manual procedures to develop an acceptable set of system positions. Development of an Allotment Plan may also be attempted through solution of an optimization problem, known as the Satellite Location Problem (SLP). Three automated heuristic procedures, developed specifically to solve SLP, are presented. The heuristics are then applied to two specific WARC-88 scenarios. Solutions resulting from the fully automated heuristics are then compared with solutions obtained at WARC-88 through a combination of both automated and manual planning efforts.

  17. Monolingual, bilingual, trilingual: infants' language experience influences the development of a word-learning heuristic.

    PubMed

    Byers-Heinlein, Krista; Werker, Janet F

    2009-09-01

    How infants learn new words is a fundamental puzzle in language acquisition. To guide their word learning, infants exploit systematic word-learning heuristics that allow them to link new words to likely referents. By 17 months, infants show a tendency to associate a novel noun with a novel object rather than a familiar one, a heuristic known as disambiguation. Yet, the developmental origins of this heuristic remain unknown. We compared disambiguation in 17- to 18-month-old infants from different language backgrounds to determine whether language experience influences its development, or whether disambiguation instead emerges as a result of maturation or social experience. Monolinguals showed strong use of disambiguation, bilinguals showed marginal use, and trilinguals showed no disambiguation. The number of languages being learned, but not vocabulary size, predicted performance. The results point to a key role for language experience in the development of disambiguation, and help to distinguish among theoretical accounts of its emergence. PMID:19702772

  18. Knee model: Comparison between heuristic and rigorous solutions for the Schumann resonance problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galuk, Yu. P.; Nickolaenko, A. P.; Hayakawa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of computers allows for application of the direct numerical solution of the global electromagnetic resonance problem in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. Direct numerical solutions exploit the cavity models with the given conductivity profile of atmosphere such as exponential or the knee profiles. These profiles are usually derived from the knee model by Mushtak and Williams (2002) developed for obtaining the realistic ELF propagation constant. It is usually forgotten that profiles of the knee model are only a convenient approximate interpretation for the heuristic relations used in computations. We demonstrate that the rigorous full wave solution of the electromagnetic problem for such profiles deviates from that obtained in the knee model. Therefore the direct numerical solutions must also depart from the heuristic one. We evaluate deviations of the heuristic knee model data from those pertinent to equivalent profile of atmospheric conductivity.

  19. Mood and heuristics: the influence of happy and sad states on sensitivity and bias in stereotyping.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Banaji, M R

    2000-06-01

    The influence of mood states on the propensity to use heuristics as expressed in stereotypes was examined using signal detection statistics. Participants experienced happy, neutral, or sad moods and "remembered" whether names connoting race (African American, European American) belonged to social categories (criminal, politician, basketball player). Positive mood increased reliance on heuristics, indexed by higher false identification of members of stereotyped groups. Positive mood lowered sensitivity (d'), even among relative experts, and shifted bias (beta) or criterion to be more lenient for stereotypical names. In contrast, sad mood did not disrupt sensitivity and, in fact, revealed the use of a stricter criterion compared with baseline mood. Results support theories that characterize happy mood as a mental state that predisposes reliance on heuristics and sad mood as dampening such reliance.

  20. Parental Explicit Heuristics in Decision-making for Children With Life-threatening Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Renjilian, Chris B.; Womer, James W.; Carroll, Karen W.; Kang, Tammy I.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and illustrate common explicit heuristics (decision-making aids or shortcuts expressed verbally as terse rules of thumb, aphorisms, maxims, or mantras and intended to convey a compelling truth or guiding principle) used by parents of children with life-threatening illnesses when confronting and making medical decisions. METHODS: Prospective cross-sectional observational study of 69 parents of 46 children who participated in the Decision-making in Pediatric Palliative Care Study between 2006 and 2008 at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Parents were guided individually through a semistructured in-depth interview about their experiences and thoughts regarding making medical decisions on behalf of their ill children, and the transcribed interviews were qualitatively analyzed. RESULTS: All parents in our study employed explicit heuristics in interviews about decision-making for their children, with the number of identified explicit heuristics used by an individual parent ranging from tens to hundreds. The heuristics served 5 general functions: (1) to depict or facilitate understanding of a complex situation; (2) to clarify, organize, and focus pertinent information and values; (3) to serve as a decision-making compass; (4) to communicate with others about a complex topic; and (5) to justify a choice. CONCLUSIONS: Explicit heuristics played an important role in decision-making and communication about decision-making in our population of parents. Recognizing explicit heuristics in parent interactions and understanding their content and functions can aid clinicians in their efforts to partner with parents in the decision-making process. PMID:23319524

  1. Heuristic Evaluation of Online COPD Respiratory Therapy and Education Video Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Because of limited accessibility to pulmonary rehabilitation programs, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are infrequently provided with patient education resources. To help educate patients with COPD on how to live a better life with diminished breathing capacity, we developed a novel social media resource center containing COPD respiratory therapy and education videos called “COPDFlix.” Methodology: A heuristic evaluation of COPDFlix was conducted as part of a larger study to determine whether the prototype was successful in adhering to formal Web site usability guidelines for older adults. A purposive sample of three experts, with expertise in Web design and health communications technology, was recruited (a) to identify usability violations and (b) to propose solutions to improve the functionality of the COPDFlix prototype. Each expert evaluated 18 heuristics in four categories of task-based criteria (i.e., interaction and navigation, information architecture, presentation design, and information design). Seventy-six subcriteria across these four categories were assessed. Quantitative ratings and qualitative comments from each expert were compiled into a single master list, noting the violated heuristic and type/location of problem(s). Results: Sixty-one usability violations were identified across the 18 heuristics. Evaluators rated the majority of heuristic subcriteria as either a “minor hindrance” (n=32) or “no problem” (n=132). Moreover, only 2 of the 18 heuristic categories were noted as “major” violations, with mean severity scores of ≥3. Conclusions: Mixed-methods data analysis helped the multidisciplinary research team to categorize and prioritize usability problems and solutions, leading to 26 discrete design modifications within the COPDFlix prototype. PMID:24650318

  2. Application of a hybrid generation/utility assessment heuristic to a class of scheduling problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.

    1989-01-01

    A two-stage heuristic solution approach for a class of multiobjective, n-job, 1-machine scheduling problems is described. Minimization of job-to-job interference for n jobs is sought. The first stage generates alternative schedule sequences by interchanging pairs of schedule elements. The set of alternative sequences can represent nodes of a decision tree; each node is reached via decision to interchange job elements. The second stage selects the parent node for the next generation of alternative sequences through automated paired comparison of objective performance for all current nodes. An application of the heuristic approach to communications satellite systems planning is presented.

  3. Optimization of clinical teaching unit call schedules at the Ottawa hospital through tabu search heuristics.

    PubMed

    White, Christine A; White, George M

    2002-01-01

    The task of scheduling medical staff for evening rounds in the Clinical Teaching Unit of the Ottawa Hospital is a long complicated task due to its complexity. Three main classifications of staff, combined with various rotations, skill sets, clinical teams and vacation periods have combined to create a difficult scheduling problem. As there were no commercial packages available to solve this particular task, a study was made of heuristic scheduling and optimization techniques and a program based on a variation of the tabu search heuristic was written and tested. This system is being used to schedule medical staff at the Ottawa Hospital.

  4. Rising above My Raisin'?: Using Heuristic Inquiry to Explore the Effects of the Lumbee Dialect on Ethnic Identity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Chris; Brown, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Using heuristic inquiry, this study investigates how dialect affects the ethnic identity development of the first author as well as fellow Lumbee students attending a predominantly white university. Heuristic inquiry is a process that begins with a question or problem that the researcher seeks to illuminate or answer. Findings from this study…

  5. Evaluation of the Priority Heuristic as a Descriptive Model of Risky Decision Making: Comment on Brandstatter, Gigerenzer, and Hertwig (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    E. Brandstatter, G. Gigerenzer, and R. Hertwig (2006) contended that their priority heuristic, a type of lexicographic semiorder model, is more accurate than cumulative prospect theory (CPT) or transfer of attention exchange (TAX) models in describing risky decisions. However, there are 4 problems with their argument. First, their heuristic is not…

  6. Fast and Frugal Heuristics Are Plausible Models of Cognition: Reply to Dougherty, Franco-Watkins, and Thomas (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gigerenzer, Gerd; Hoffrage, Ulrich; Goldstein, Daniel G.

    2008-01-01

    M. R. Dougherty, A. M. Franco-Watkins, and R. Thomas (2008) conjectured that fast and frugal heuristics need an automatic frequency counter for ordering cues. In fact, only a few heuristics order cues, and these orderings can arise from evolutionary, social, or individual learning, none of which requires automatic frequency counting. The idea that…

  7. Evaluating the usability of an interactive, bi-lingual, touchscreen-enabled breastfeeding educational programme: application of Nielson's heuristics.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ashish; Perin, Douglas M Puricelli; Amadi, Chioma; Trout, Kate

    2015-01-01

    The study purpose was to conduct heuristic evaluation of an interactive, bilingual touchscreen-enabled breastfeeding educational programme for Hispanic women living in rural settings in Nebraska. Three raters conducted the evaluation during May 2013 using principles of Nielson's heuristics. A total of 271 screens were evaluated and included: interface (n = 5), programme sections (n = 223) and educational content (n = 43). A total of 97 heuristic violations were identified and were mostly related to interface (8 violations/5 screens) and programme components (89 violations/266 screens). The most common heuristic violations reported were recognition rather than recall (62%, n = 60), consistency and standards (14%, n = 14) and match between the system and real world (9%, n = 9). Majority of the heuristic violations had minor usability issues (73%, n = 71). The only grade 4 heuristic violation reported was due to the visibility of system status in the assessment modules. The results demonstrated that the system was more consistent with Nielsen's usability heuristics. With Nielsen's usability heuristics, it is possible to identify problems in a timely manner, and help facilitate the identification and prioritisation of problems needing urgent attention at an earlier stage before the final deployment of the system. PMID:26245240

  8. The Effectiveness of Local Culture-Based Mathematical Heuristic-KR Learning towards Enhancing Student's Creative Thinking Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandiseru, Selvi Rajuaty

    2015-01-01

    The problem in this research is the lack of creative thinking skills of students. One of the learning models that is expected to enhance student's creative thinking skill is the local culture-based mathematical heuristic-KR learning model (LC-BMHLM). Heuristic-KR is a learning model which was introduced by Krulik and Rudnick (1995) that is the…

  9. The high performing backtracking algorithm and heuristic for the sequence-dependent setup times flowshop problem with total weighted tardiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun-Xi; Zhang, Ping; Li, Fang; Du, Guang-Long

    2016-09-01

    Although the sequence-dependent setup times flowshop problem with the total weighted tardiness minimization objective exists widely in industry, work on the problem has been scant in the existing literature. To the authors' best knowledge, the NEH?EWDD heuristic and the Iterated Greedy (IG) algorithm with descent local search have been regarded as the high performing heuristic and the state-of-the-art algorithm for the problem, which are both based on insertion search. In this article firstly, an efficient backtracking algorithm and a novel heuristic (HPIS) are presented for insertion search. Accordingly, two heuristics are introduced, one is NEH?EWDD with HPIS for insertion search, and the other is the combination of NEH?EWDD and both the two methods. Furthermore, the authors improve the IG algorithm with the proposed methods. Finally, experimental results show that both the proposed heuristics and the improved IG (IG*) significantly outperform the original ones.

  10. A Comparison of Heuristic and Human Performance on Open Versions of the Traveling Salesperson Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, James N.; Chronicle, Edward P.; Ormerod, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    We compared the performance of three heuristics with that of subjects on variants of a well-known combinatorial optimization task, the Traveling Salesperson Problem (TSP). The present task consisted of finding the shortest path through an array of points from one side of the array to the other. Like the standard TSP, the task is computationally…

  11. The Effect of General Versus Specific Heuristics in Mathematical Problem-Solving Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James Philip

    This study investigated differences in problem-solving performance following instruction varying in the type of heuristic advice given. The subjects, 176 college students with two years of high school mathematics experience, were provided programed instruction over a three-week period in three topic areas: finite geometry, Boolean algebra, and…

  12. Approach to design neural cryptography: a generalized architecture and a heuristic rule.

    PubMed

    Mu, Nankun; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-06-01

    Neural cryptography, a type of public key exchange protocol, is widely considered as an effective method for sharing a common secret key between two neural networks on public channels. How to design neural cryptography remains a great challenge. In this paper, in order to provide an approach to solve this challenge, a generalized network architecture and a significant heuristic rule are designed. The proposed generic framework is named as tree state classification machine (TSCM), which extends and unifies the existing structures, i.e., tree parity machine (TPM) and tree committee machine (TCM). Furthermore, we carefully study and find that the heuristic rule can improve the security of TSCM-based neural cryptography. Therefore, TSCM and the heuristic rule can guide us to designing a great deal of effective neural cryptography candidates, in which it is possible to achieve the more secure instances. Significantly, in the light of TSCM and the heuristic rule, we further expound that our designed neural cryptography outperforms TPM (the most secure model at present) on security. Finally, a series of numerical simulation experiments are provided to verify validity and applicability of our results.

  13. Getting Smart with Computers: Computer-Aided Heuristics for Student Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Fred

    1987-01-01

    Evaluates several views of the relationship between computers and education, and criticizes the use of artificial intelligence and natural language processing software for evaluating student writing. Recommends utilizing programs that use heuristic methods to ask students a series of questions to help them organize and compose papers. (SKC)

  14. Ignorance- versus Evidence-Based Decision Making: A Decision Time Analysis of the Recognition Heuristic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbig, Benjamin E.; Pohl, Rudiger F.

    2009-01-01

    According to part of the adaptive toolbox notion of decision making known as the recognition heuristic (RH), the decision process in comparative judgments--and its duration--is determined by whether recognition discriminates between objects. By contrast, some recently proposed alternative models predict that choices largely depend on the amount of…

  15. One-Reason Decision Making Unveiled: A Measurement Model of the Recognition Heuristic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbig, Benjamin E.; Erdfelder, Edgar; Pohl, Rudiger F.

    2010-01-01

    The fast-and-frugal recognition heuristic (RH) theory provides a precise process description of comparative judgments. It claims that, in suitable domains, judgments between pairs of objects are based on recognition alone, whereas further knowledge is ignored. However, due to the confound between recognition and further knowledge, previous…

  16. The Effects of Polya's Heuristic and Diary Writing on Children's Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Jacobbe, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that aimed at increasing students' problem-solving skills. Polya's (1985) heuristic for problem solving was used and students were required to articulate their thought processes through the use of a structured diary. The diary prompted students to answer questions designed to engage them in the phases of…

  17. Transformative Learning and Spirituality: A Heuristic Inquiry into the Experience of Spiritual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Karen P.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this heuristic study was to explore the ways in which spirituality informed and impacted educators' own experience of learning as a transformative inner encounter. It inquired into the experience of learning from a spiritual perspective in order to determine the extent to which transformative learning could be described as a…

  18. Compound Cue Processing within the Fast and Frugal Heuristics Approach in Nonlinearly Separable Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Hoffrage, Ulrich; Dieckmann, Anja; Ramos, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether participants used Take The Best (TTB) Configural, a fast and frugal heuristic that processes configurations of cues when making inferences concerning which of two alternatives has a higher criterion value. Participants were presented with a compound cue that was nonlinearly separable from its elements. The…

  19. The inherence heuristic: a key theoretical addition to understanding social stereotyping and prejudice.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Rebecca S; Clark, Caitlin

    2014-10-01

    Prior work has detailed the constructivist processes that lead individuals to categorize others along particular dimensions (e.g., gender) and generate the content (e.g., stereotypes) and affect (e.g., prejudices) associated with social groups. The inherence heuristic is a novel mechanism that appears to shape the content and rigidity of children's social stereotypes and prejudices. PMID:25388029

  20. Twilight of the Slogans: A Heuristic Investigation of Linguistic Memes Using Mixed Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Curt Paul

    2013-01-01

    Slogans, or linguistic memes, are short, memorable phrases that are present in commercial, political, and everyday discourse. Slogans propagate similarly to other memes, or cultural units, through an evolutionary mechanism first proposed by Dawkins (1976). Heuristic inquiry, as presented by Moustakas (1990), provided a template from which to…

  1. Introducing Heuristics of Cultural Dimensions into the Service-Level Technical Communication Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A significant problem for practitioners of technical communication is to gain the skills to compete in a global, multicultural work environment. Instructors of technical communication can provide future practitioners with the tools to compete and excel in this global environment by introducing heuristics of cultural dimensions into the…

  2. Lagrange Multipliers, Adjoint Equations, the Pontryagin Maximum Principle and Heuristic Proofs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Deeper understanding of important mathematical concepts by students may be promoted through the (initial) use of heuristic proofs, especially when the concepts are also related back to previously encountered mathematical ideas or tools. The approach is illustrated by use of the Pontryagin maximum principle which is then illuminated by reference to…

  3. Psychological Plausibility of the Theory of Probabilistic Mental Models and the Fast and Frugal Heuristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Michael R.; Franco-Watkins, Ana M.; Thomas, Rick

    2008-01-01

    The theory of probabilistic mental models (PMM; G. Gigerenzer, U. Hoffrage, & H. Kleinbolting, 1991) has had a major influence on the field of judgment and decision making, with the most recent important modifications to PMM theory being the identification of several fast and frugal heuristics (G. Gigerenzer & D. G. Goldstein, 1996). These…

  4. Experimental studies of access graph based heuristics: Beating the LRU standard?

    SciTech Connect

    Fiat, A.; Rosen, Z.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper we devise new paging heuristics motivated by the access graph model of paging. Unlike the access graph model and the related Markov paging model our heuristics are truly on-line in that we do not assume any prior knowledge of the program just about to be executed. The Least Recently Used heuristic for paging is remarkably good, and is known experimentally to be superior to many of the suggested alternatives on real program traces. Experiments we`ve performed suggest that our heuristics beat LRU fairly consistently, over a wide range of cache sizes and programs. The number of page faults can be as low as {1/2} the number of page faults for LRU and is on average 7 to 9 percent less than the number of faults for LRU. (Depending on how this average is computed.) We have built a program tracer that gives the page access sequence for real program executions of 200 - 3,300 thousand page access requests, and our simulations are based on 25 of these program traces. Overall, we have performed several thousand such simulations. While we have no real evidence to suggest that the programs we`ve traced are typical in any sense, we have made use of an experimental {open_quotes}protocol{close_quotes} designed to avoid experimenter bias. We strongly emphasize that our results are only preliminary and that much further work needs to be done.

  5. Design Heuristics in Academic, Corporate, and Military Instruction: More Similar than Different

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Cindy S.; Ertmer, Peggy A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that the practice of instructional design (ID) began in the U. S. military (Branson et al., 1975; Jeffrey & Bratton-Jeffrey, 2004; Reiser, 2102), there is little known regarding which design and development heuristics military instructional designers deem important to the ID process. The study reported in this article was…

  6. Developing Biology Lessons Aimed at Teaching for Understanding: A Domain-Specific Heuristic for Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Fred J. J. M.; Tigelaar, Dineke E. H.; Verloop, Nico

    2009-01-01

    Teaching for understanding requires teachers to organize thought-demanding activities which continually challenge students to apply and extend their prior knowledge. Research shows that student teachers often are unable to develop lessons in teaching for understanding. We explored how a domain-specific heuristic can assist student biology teachers…

  7. Multi-objective Decision Based Available Transfer Capability in Deregulated Power System Using Heuristic Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasam, Gopi Krishna; Manohar, T. Gowri

    2015-07-01

    Determination of available transfer capability (ATC) requires the use of experience, intuition and exact judgment in order to meet several significant aspects in the deregulated environment. Based on these points, this paper proposes two heuristic approaches to compute ATC. The first proposed heuristic algorithm integrates the five methods known as continuation repeated power flow, repeated optimal power flow, radial basis function neural network, back propagation neural network and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system to obtain ATC. The second proposed heuristic model is used to obtain multiple ATC values. Out of these, a specific ATC value will be selected based on a number of social, economic, deregulated environmental constraints and related to specific applications like optimization, on-line monitoring, and ATC forecasting known as multi-objective decision based optimal ATC. The validity of results obtained through these proposed methods are scrupulously verified on various buses of the IEEE 24-bus reliable test system. The results presented and derived conclusions in this paper are very useful for planning, operation, maintaining of reliable power in any power system and its monitoring in an on-line environment of deregulated power system. In this way, the proposed heuristic methods would contribute the best possible approach to assess multiple objective ATC using integrated methods.

  8. An Exploration of Administrative Heuristics in the United States and the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fenwick W.; Bolton, Cheryl L.

    2008-01-01

    This article is a report on a study of the use of heuristics, shortcuts, and rules of thumb by middle-line managers in institutions of higher education in the United States and the United Kingdom. Using a nonprobability convenience sample, the coinvestigators interviewed 13 middle-line managers over 5 months from eight institutions. The results…

  9. The Historical Ideal-Type as a Heuristic Device for Academic Storytelling by Sport Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutka, Patrick; Seifried, Chad

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this research endeavor is to take the previous calls of sport scholars to expand into alternative research approaches (e.g., history, case study, law reviews, philosophy, etc.) and to show how storytelling can be an effective tool through the use of a heuristic device. The present analysis attempts to focus on the usage of the…

  10. Displacements Of Brownian Particles In Terms Of Marian Von Smoluchowski's Heuristic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Hermann; Woermann, Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    Albert Einstein's theory of the Brownian motion, Marian von Smoluchowski's heuristic model, and Perrin's experimental results helped to bring the concept of molecules from a state of being a useful hypothesis in chemistry to objects existing in reality. Central to the theory of Brownian motion is the relation between mean particle displacement and…

  11. A Heuristic Tool for Teaching Business Writing: Self-Assessment, Knowledge Transfer, and Writing Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Lorelei A.

    2013-01-01

    To teach effective business communication, instructors must target students’ current weaknesses in writing. One method for doing so is by assigning writing exercises. When used heuristically, writing exercises encourage students to practice self-assessment, self-evaluation, active learning, and knowledge transfer, all while reinforcing the basics…

  12. Balancing Self-Directed Learning with Expert Mentoring: The Science Writing Heuristic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, Mack; Fostvedt, Luke; Gonwa-Reeves, Christopher; Baenziger, Joan; McGill, Michael; Seefeld, Ashley; Hand, Brian; Therrien, William; Taylor, Jonte; Villanueva, Mary Grace

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the implementation of the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) curriculum (Hand, 2007), which combines current understandings of learning as a cognitive and negotiated process with the techniques of argument-based inquiry, critical thinking skills, and writing to strengthen student outcomes. Success of SWH is dependent on the…

  13. Heuristics for Understanding the Concepts of Interaction, Polynomial Trend, and the General Linear Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    The relationship between analysis of variance (ANOVA) methods and their analogs (analysis of covariance and multiple analyses of variance and covariance--collectively referred to as OVA methods) and the more general analytic case is explored. A small heuristic data set is used, with a hypothetical sample of 20 subjects, randomly assigned to five…

  14. A Scrabble Heuristic Based on Probability That Performs at Championship Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Arturo; Acuña, Francisco González; Romero, Alejandro González; Alquézar, René; Hernández, Enric; Aguilar, Amador Roldán; Olmedo, Ian García

    The game of Scrabble, in its competitive form (one vs. one), has been tackled mostly by using Monte Carlo simulation. Recently [1], Probability Theory (Bayes’ theorem) was used to gain knowledge about the opponents’ tiles; this proved to be a good approach to improve even more Computer Scrabble. We used probability to evaluate Scrabble leaves (rack residues); then using this evaluation, a heuristic function that dictates a move can be constructed. To calculate these probabilities it is necessary to have a lexicon, in our case a Spanish lexicon. To make proper investigations in the domain of Scrabble it is important to have the same lexicon as the one used by humans in official tournaments. We did a huge amount of work to build this free lexicon. In this paper a heuristic function that involves leaves probabilities is given. We have now an engine, Heuri, that uses this heuristic, and we have been able to perform some experiments to test it. The tests include matches against highly expert players; the games played so far give us promising results. For instance, recently a match between the current World Scrabble Champion (in Spanish) and Heuri was played. Heuri defeated the World Champion 6-0 ! Heuri includes a move generator which, using a lot of memory, is faster than using DAWG [2] or GADDAG [3]. Another plan to build a stronger Heuri that combines heuristics using probabilities, opponent modeling and Monte Carlo simulation is also proposed.

  15. The Measurement of Creativity: From Definitional Consensus to the Introduction of a New Heuristic Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batey, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The scientific study of creativity has proven a difficult undertaking. Researchers have employed a diversity of definitions and measurement methods. As a result, creativity research is underrepresented in the literature and the findings of different studies often prove difficult to draw into a coherent body of understanding. A heuristic framework…

  16. Using the Science Writing Heuristic to Improve Students' Understanding of General Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, James A., II; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Hand, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the performance of students using the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach and students using a standard or traditional laboratory curriculum on lecture exams and a laboratory practical exam on a specific topic, chemical equilibrium. The SWH helps students do inquiry science laboratory work by structuring the laboratory…

  17. New search method based on hash table and heuristic search method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He-Chen; Xian, Wu; Luo, Da L.; Song, Xiang

    1991-02-01

    The article ut forword a new method of dynamic search based on hash tabIeand heuristic search method. The method can inQrove the speed of search oijeration when ful control knowledge about the solution space to objects is known. An example about using the search method to decode the Haffman code is discussed in detai I.

  18. Approach to design neural cryptography: A generalized architecture and a heuristic rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nankun; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-06-01

    Neural cryptography, a type of public key exchange protocol, is widely considered as an effective method for sharing a common secret key between two neural networks on public channels. How to design neural cryptography remains a great challenge. In this paper, in order to provide an approach to solve this challenge, a generalized network architecture and a significant heuristic rule are designed. The proposed generic framework is named as tree state classification machine (TSCM), which extends and unifies the existing structures, i.e., tree parity machine (TPM) and tree committee machine (TCM). Furthermore, we carefully study and find that the heuristic rule can improve the security of TSCM-based neural cryptography. Therefore, TSCM and the heuristic rule can guide us to designing a great deal of effective neural cryptography candidates, in which it is possible to achieve the more secure instances. Significantly, in the light of TSCM and the heuristic rule, we further expound that our designed neural cryptography outperforms TPM (the most secure model at present) on security. Finally, a series of numerical simulation experiments are provided to verify validity and applicability of our results.

  19. The non-intuitive \\case{1}{2} Thomas factor: a heuristic argument with classical electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysos, M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a heuristic argument to deduce the non-intuitive \\frac{1}{2} Thomas factor for an atomic electron revolving in its orbit about the nucleus. The argument, which is simple, pedagogical and accessible to physics beginners, uses elementary notions of classical electromagnetism rather than the advanced relativity concepts which are needed in any standard textbook derivation.

  20. Literary Criticism and Composition Theory: Heuristics and Models for Teaching Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mailloux, Steven

    This paper shows how the heuristics (organized questioning techniques) of contemporary literary criticism in the United States can be used to teach composition. Contemporary criticism emphasizes that literature should be viewed as a process of communication, not as a mere artifact or product of discourse. Teachers can apply this view of literature…

  1. Improving Critical Thinking Skills Using Learning Model Logan Avenue Problem Solving (LAPS)-Heuristic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anggrianto, Desi; Churiyah, Madziatul; Arief, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted in order to know the effect of Logan Avenue Problem Solving (LAPS)-Heuristic learning model towards critical thinking skills of students of class X Office Administration (APK) in SMK Negeri 1 Ngawi, East Java, Indonesia on material curve and equilibrium of demand and supply, subject Introduction to Economics and…

  2. Investigating the Decision Heuristics of Candidate Teachers Who Are Different in Their Responsibility Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özen, Yener

    2016-01-01

    In this study, decision heuristics used by individuals with different responsibility controls were investigated. In the research, 370 final grade university students studying at Erzincan University Faculty of Education were included. In order to collect data, Internally Controlled Responsibility-Externally Controlled Responsibility Scale of Özen…

  3. A Comparison of Heuristic Procedures for Minimum within-Cluster Sums of Squares Partitioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Steinley, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Perhaps the most common criterion for partitioning a data set is the minimization of the within-cluster sums of squared deviation from cluster centroids. Although optimal solution procedures for within-cluster sums of squares (WCSS) partitioning are computationally feasible for small data sets, heuristic procedures are required for most practical…

  4. Autobiographical Elaboration Reduces Memory Distortion: Cognitive Operations and the Distinctiveness Heuristic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Ian M.; Gallo, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Retrieval monitoring enhances episodic memory accuracy. For instance, false recognition is reduced when participants base their decisions on more distinctive recollections, a retrieval monitoring process called the distinctiveness heuristic. The experiments reported here tested the hypothesis that autobiographical elaboration during study (i.e.,…

  5. Developing Critical Thinking Skills Using the Science Writing Heuristic in the Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, N. S.; Sadler-McKnight, N. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) laboratory approach is a teaching and learning tool which combines writing, inquiry, collaboration and reflection, and provides scaffolding for the development of critical thinking skills. In this study, the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) was used to measure the critical thinking skills of…

  6. Academic Freedom in Classroom Speech: A Heuristic Model for U.S. Catholic Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    As the nation's Catholic universities and colleges continually clarify their identity, this article examines academic freedom in classroom speech, offering a heuristic model for use as board members, academic administrators, and faculty leaders discuss, evaluate, and judge allegations of misconduct in classroom speech. Focusing upon the practice…

  7. Learning and Motivation in Multiple Contexts: The Development of a Heuristic Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wosnitza, Marold; Beltman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a heuristic framework that integrates three aspects of context (perspective, content and level) from a number of established theoretical approaches. In this framework, context is viewed from different perspectives (subjective and objective), it comprises different contents (physical, social and formal) and it…

  8. Multi-objective Decision Based Available Transfer Capability in Deregulated Power System Using Heuristic Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasam, Gopi Krishna; Manohar, T. Gowri

    2016-09-01

    Determination of available transfer capability (ATC) requires the use of experience, intuition and exact judgment in order to meet several significant aspects in the deregulated environment. Based on these points, this paper proposes two heuristic approaches to compute ATC. The first proposed heuristic algorithm integrates the five methods known as continuation repeated power flow, repeated optimal power flow, radial basis function neural network, back propagation neural network and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system to obtain ATC. The second proposed heuristic model is used to obtain multiple ATC values. Out of these, a specific ATC value will be selected based on a number of social, economic, deregulated environmental constraints and related to specific applications like optimization, on-line monitoring, and ATC forecasting known as multi-objective decision based optimal ATC. The validity of results obtained through these proposed methods are scrupulously verified on various buses of the IEEE 24-bus reliable test system. The results presented and derived conclusions in this paper are very useful for planning, operation, maintaining of reliable power in any power system and its monitoring in an on-line environment of deregulated power system. In this way, the proposed heuristic methods would contribute the best possible approach to assess multiple objective ATC using integrated methods.

  9. Non-Intentional Invention: The Promethean, Trickster, and Improvisational Invention Heuristics of Academic Writers and Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirtz, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This essay introduces a novel way to conceptualize writerly invention -- invention as adopting a non-intentional intellectual stance wherein heuristics are experienced as acting upon the writer as opposed to being enacted by the writer. This view of invention complicates and extends the traditional, Aristotelian view of invention as discreet…

  10. Testing Bayesian and heuristic predictions of mass judgments of colliding objects.

    PubMed

    Sanborn, Adam N

    2014-01-01

    Mass judgments of colliding objects have been used to explore people's understanding of the physical world because they are ecologically relevant, yet people display biases that are most easily explained by a small set of heuristics. Recent work has challenged the heuristic explanation, by producing the same biases from a model that copes with perceptual uncertainty by using Bayesian inference with a prior based on the correct combination rules from Newtonian mechanics (noisy Newton). Here I test the predictions of the leading heuristic model (Gilden and Proffitt, 1989) against the noisy Newton model using a novel manipulation of the standard mass judgment task: making one of the objects invisible post-collision. The noisy Newton model uses the remaining information to predict above-chance performance, while the leading heuristic model predicts chance performance when one or the other final velocity is occluded. An experiment using two different types of occlusion showed better-than-chance performance and response patterns that followed the predictions of the noisy Newton model. The results demonstrate that people can make sensible physical judgments even when information critical for the judgment is missing, and that a Bayesian model can serve as a guide in these situations. Possible algorithmic-level accounts of this task that more closely correspond to the noisy Newton model are explored.

  11. The inherence heuristic: a key theoretical addition to understanding social stereotyping and prejudice.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Rebecca S; Clark, Caitlin

    2014-10-01

    Prior work has detailed the constructivist processes that lead individuals to categorize others along particular dimensions (e.g., gender) and generate the content (e.g., stereotypes) and affect (e.g., prejudices) associated with social groups. The inherence heuristic is a novel mechanism that appears to shape the content and rigidity of children's social stereotypes and prejudices.

  12. Heuristic Social Information Processing and Its Implications for Behavioral Measurement: An Example Based on Leadership Categorization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Robert G.

    Behavioral measurement using untrained organizational members as raters is highly dependent on heuristic or automatic processes. Such processes direct attention, simplify encoding and storage, and guide recall of behavioral information by using pre-existing schema to simplify processing; however, such processing results in systematic rather than…

  13. A New Heuristic Algorithm for Protein Folding in the HP Model.

    PubMed

    Traykov, Metodi; Angelov, Slav; Yanev, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    This article presents an efficient heuristic for protein folding. The protein folding problem is to predict the compact three-dimensional structure of a protein based on its amino acid sequence. The focus is on an original integer programming model derived from a platform used for Contact Map Overlap problem.

  14. Information Processing and Risk Perception: An Adaptation of the Heuristic-Systematic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumbo, Craig W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes heuristic-systematic information-processing model and risk perception--the two major conceptual areas of the analysis. Discusses the proposed model, describing the context of the data collections (public health communication involving cancer epidemiology) and providing the results of a set of three replications using the proposed model.…

  15. Beyond National States, Markets, and Systems of Higher Education: A Glonacal Agency Heuristic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon; Rhoades, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Critiques the prevailing liberal-theory framework in cross-national higher education research. Offers a "glonacal agency heuristic" to move beyond this current research anchored in conceptions of national states, markets, and systems of higher education, and to instead incorporate globalization by emphasizing the simultaneous significance of…

  16. Learning to Prove in Geometry: Learning from Heuristic Examples and How It Can Be Supported

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Tatjana S.; Renkl, Alexander; Kessler, Stephan; Reiss, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    This field experiment tested whether a special type of worked-out examples (i.e., heuristic examples) helps learners develop better conceptual knowledge about mathematical proving and proving skills than a control condition focussing on mathematical contents. Additionally, we analysed the benefits of self-explanation prompts and completion…

  17. Example-Based Learning in Heuristic Domains: A Cognitive Load Theory Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renkl, Alexander; Hilbert, Tatjana; Schworm, Silke

    2009-01-01

    One classical instructional effect of cognitive load theory (CLT) is the worked-example effect. Although the vast majority of studies have focused on well-structured and algorithmic sub-domains of mathematics or physics, more recent studies have also analyzed learning with examples from complex domains in which only heuristic solution strategies…

  18. Take the First Heuristic, Self-Efficacy, and Decision-Making in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepler, Teri J.; Feltz, Deborah L.

    2012-01-01

    Can taking the first (TTF) option in decision-making lead to the best decisions in sports contexts? And, is one's decision-making self-efficacy in that context linked to TTF decisions? The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the TTF heuristic and self-efficacy in decision-making on a simulated sports task. Undergraduate and graduate…

  19. Relating Local to Global Spatial Knowledge: Heuristic Influence of Local Features on Direction Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Daniel W.; Montello, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has examined heuristics--simplified decision-making rules-of-thumb--for geospatial reasoning. This study examined at two locations the influence of beliefs about local coastline orientation on estimated directions to local and distant places; estimates were made immediately or after fifteen seconds. This study goes beyond…

  20. Video-Sharing Website Writing as Identity Performance: Heuristic Inquiry into Experiencing Personally Meaningful Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Enacting heuristic phenomenological inquiry, this article explores the experience of watching a video of a live show of what was personally meaningful music for the researcher. In this study, personally meaningful music, defined as music integral to adolescent identity construction, was sung by and conveyed through the online "discoursal…

  1. Simple Heuristic Approach to Introduction of the Black-Scholes Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalamova, Rossitsa

    2010-01-01

    A heuristic approach to explaining of the Black-Scholes option pricing model in undergraduate classes is described. The approach draws upon the method of protocol analysis to encourage students to "think aloud" so that their mental models can be surfaced. It also relies upon extensive visualizations to communicate relationships that are…

  2. Using the Science Writing Heuristic Approach to Enhance Student Understanding in Chemical Change and Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingir, Sevgi; Geban, Omer; Gunel, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach on grade 9 students' understanding of chemical change and mixture concepts. Four intact classes taught by two chemistry teachers from a Turkish public high school were selected for the study; one class was assigned as the treatment group, and the other class…

  3. Testing Bayesian and heuristic predictions of mass judgments of colliding objects.

    PubMed

    Sanborn, Adam N

    2014-01-01

    Mass judgments of colliding objects have been used to explore people's understanding of the physical world because they are ecologically relevant, yet people display biases that are most easily explained by a small set of heuristics. Recent work has challenged the heuristic explanation, by producing the same biases from a model that copes with perceptual uncertainty by using Bayesian inference with a prior based on the correct combination rules from Newtonian mechanics (noisy Newton). Here I test the predictions of the leading heuristic model (Gilden and Proffitt, 1989) against the noisy Newton model using a novel manipulation of the standard mass judgment task: making one of the objects invisible post-collision. The noisy Newton model uses the remaining information to predict above-chance performance, while the leading heuristic model predicts chance performance when one or the other final velocity is occluded. An experiment using two different types of occlusion showed better-than-chance performance and response patterns that followed the predictions of the noisy Newton model. The results demonstrate that people can make sensible physical judgments even when information critical for the judgment is missing, and that a Bayesian model can serve as a guide in these situations. Possible algorithmic-level accounts of this task that more closely correspond to the noisy Newton model are explored. PMID:25206345

  4. Take the first heuristic, self-efficacy, and decision-making in sport.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Teri J; Feltz, Deborah L

    2012-06-01

    Can taking the first (TTF) option in decision-making lead to the best decisions in sports contexts? And, is one's decision-making self-efficacy in that context linked to TTF decisions? The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the TTF heuristic and self-efficacy in decision-making on a simulated sports task. Undergraduate and graduate students (N = 72) participated in the study and performed 13 trials in each of two video-based basketball decision tasks. One task required participants to verbally generate options before making a final decision on what to do next, while the other task simply asked participants to make a decision regarding the next move as quickly as possible. Decision-making self-efficacy was assessed using a 10-item questionnaire comprising various aspects of decision-making in basketball. Participants also rated their confidence in the final decision. Results supported many of the tenets of the TTF heuristic, such that people used the heuristic on a majority of the trials (70%), earlier generated options were better than later ones, first options were meaningfully generated, and final options were meaningfully selected. Results did not support differences in dynamic inconsistency or decision confidence based on the number of options. Findings also supported the link between self-efficacy and the TTF heuristic. Participants with higher self-efficacy beliefs used TTF more frequently and generated fewer options than those with low self-efficacy. Thus, not only is TTF an important heuristic when making decisions in dynamic, time-pressure situations, but self-efficacy plays an influential role in TTF.

  5. Acquisition of strategies depending on the opponents' competence level.

    PubMed

    Wontorra, H; Krems, J

    1989-01-01

    The development of problem-solving skills from novices to advanced subjects in dependence of the competence level of the opponent is examined in a two-person zero-sum game (Othello). In a repeated-measurement design 18 Ss. (6 Ss in 3 groups) played 10 games against one of three opponent-strategies (implemented on a computer): one "expertlike" strategy, which uses domain specific knowledge and local heuristics (minimax-algorithm with alpha-beta pruning); one "novicelike" strategy, in which global, domain independent problem solving strategies (means-ends analysis, goal-reduction) are implemented; and one strategy, which contradicts the supposed heuristics of the novices, but which results in a "weak" performance (minimization in move-selection). Contrary to our assumptions no significant effects of experience could be verified (win versus loss during single runs). An experience dependent differentiation of global problem solving strategies could not be shown for any of the groups. Neither could a general improving effect of the model for acquiring local, task specific heuristics be proved. PMID:2624531

  6. Parameter estimation with bio-inspired meta-heuristic optimization: modeling the dynamics of endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We address the task of parameter estimation in models of the dynamics of biological systems based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) from measured data, where the models are typically non-linear and have many parameters, the measurements are imperfect due to noise, and the studied system can often be only partially observed. A representative task is to estimate the parameters in a model of the dynamics of endocytosis, i.e., endosome maturation, reflected in a cut-out switch transition between the Rab5 and Rab7 domain protein concentrations, from experimental measurements of these concentrations. The general parameter estimation task and the specific instance considered here are challenging optimization problems, calling for the use of advanced meta-heuristic optimization methods, such as evolutionary or swarm-based methods. Results We apply three global-search meta-heuristic algorithms for numerical optimization, i.e., differential ant-stigmergy algorithm (DASA), particle-swarm optimization (PSO), and differential evolution (DE), as well as a local-search derivative-based algorithm 717 (A717) to the task of estimating parameters in ODEs. We evaluate their performance on the considered representative task along a number of metrics, including the quality of reconstructing the system output and the complete dynamics, as well as the speed of convergence, both on real-experimental data and on artificial pseudo-experimental data with varying amounts of noise. We compare the four optimization methods under a range of observation scenarios, where data of different completeness and accuracy of interpretation are given as input. Conclusions Overall, the global meta-heuristic methods (DASA, PSO, and DE) clearly and significantly outperform the local derivative-based method (A717). Among the three meta-heuristics, differential evolution (DE) performs best in terms of the objective function, i.e., reconstructing the output, and in terms of convergence. These

  7. Ontology Alignment Repair through Modularization and Confidence-Based Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Santos, Emanuel; Faria, Daniel; Pesquita, Catia; Couto, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Ontology Matching aims at identifying a set of semantic correspondences, called an alignment, between related ontologies. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in efficient and effective matching methods for large ontologies. However, alignments produced for large ontologies are often logically incoherent. It was only recently that the use of repair techniques to improve the coherence of ontology alignments began to be explored. This paper presents a novel modularization technique for ontology alignment repair which extracts fragments of the input ontologies that only contain the necessary classes and relations to resolve all detectable incoherences. The paper presents also an alignment repair algorithm that uses a global repair strategy to minimize both the degree of incoherence and the number of mappings removed from the alignment, while overcoming the scalability problem by employing the proposed modularization technique. Our evaluation shows that our modularization technique produces significantly small fragments of the ontologies and that our repair algorithm produces more complete alignments than other current alignment repair systems, while obtaining an equivalent degree of incoherence. Additionally, we also present a variant of our repair algorithm that makes use of the confidence values of the mappings to improve alignment repair. Our repair algorithm was implemented as part of AgreementMakerLight, a free and open-source ontology matching system. PMID:26710335

  8. Ontology Alignment Repair through Modularization and Confidence-Based Heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Emanuel; Faria, Daniel; Pesquita, Catia; Couto, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    Ontology Matching aims at identifying a set of semantic correspondences, called an alignment, between related ontologies. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in efficient and effective matching methods for large ontologies. However, alignments produced for large ontologies are often logically incoherent. It was only recently that the use of repair techniques to improve the coherence of ontology alignments began to be explored. This paper presents a novel modularization technique for ontology alignment repair which extracts fragments of the input ontologies that only contain the necessary classes and relations to resolve all detectable incoherences. The paper presents also an alignment repair algorithm that uses a global repair strategy to minimize both the degree of incoherence and the number of mappings removed from the alignment, while overcoming the scalability problem by employing the proposed modularization technique. Our evaluation shows that our modularization technique produces significantly small fragments of the ontologies and that our repair algorithm produces more complete alignments than other current alignment repair systems, while obtaining an equivalent degree of incoherence. Additionally, we also present a variant of our repair algorithm that makes use of the confidence values of the mappings to improve alignment repair. Our repair algorithm was implemented as part of AgreementMakerLight, a free and open-source ontology matching system. PMID:26710335

  9. Neural substrates of similarity and rule-based strategies in judgment

    PubMed Central

    von Helversen, Bettina; Karlsson, Linnea; Rasch, Björn; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Making accurate judgments is a core human competence and a prerequisite for success in many areas of life. Plenty of evidence exists that people can employ different judgment strategies to solve identical judgment problems. In categorization, it has been demonstrated that similarity-based and rule-based strategies are associated with activity in different brain regions. Building on this research, the present work tests whether solving two identical judgment problems recruits different neural substrates depending on people's judgment strategies. Combining cognitive modeling of judgment strategies at the behavioral level with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we compare brain activity when using two archetypal judgment strategies: a similarity-based exemplar strategy and a rule-based heuristic strategy. Using an exemplar-based strategy should recruit areas involved in long-term memory processes to a larger extent than a heuristic strategy. In contrast, using a heuristic strategy should recruit areas involved in the application of rules to a larger extent than an exemplar-based strategy. Largely consistent with our hypotheses, we found that using an exemplar-based strategy led to relatively higher BOLD activity in the anterior prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, presumably related to retrieval and selective attention processes. In contrast, using a heuristic strategy led to relatively higher activity in areas in the dorsolateral prefrontal and the temporal-parietal cortex associated with cognitive control and information integration. Thus, even when people solve identical judgment problems, different neural substrates can be recruited depending on the judgment strategy involved. PMID:25360099

  10. Neural substrates of similarity and rule-based strategies in judgment.

    PubMed

    von Helversen, Bettina; Karlsson, Linnea; Rasch, Björn; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Making accurate judgments is a core human competence and a prerequisite for success in many areas of life. Plenty of evidence exists that people can employ different judgment strategies to solve identical judgment problems. In categorization, it has been demonstrated that similarity-based and rule-based strategies are associated with activity in different brain regions. Building on this research, the present work tests whether solving two identical judgment problems recruits different neural substrates depending on people's judgment strategies. Combining cognitive modeling of judgment strategies at the behavioral level with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we compare brain activity when using two archetypal judgment strategies: a similarity-based exemplar strategy and a rule-based heuristic strategy. Using an exemplar-based strategy should recruit areas involved in long-term memory processes to a larger extent than a heuristic strategy. In contrast, using a heuristic strategy should recruit areas involved in the application of rules to a larger extent than an exemplar-based strategy. Largely consistent with our hypotheses, we found that using an exemplar-based strategy led to relatively higher BOLD activity in the anterior prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, presumably related to retrieval and selective attention processes. In contrast, using a heuristic strategy led to relatively higher activity in areas in the dorsolateral prefrontal and the temporal-parietal cortex associated with cognitive control and information integration. Thus, even when people solve identical judgment problems, different neural substrates can be recruited depending on the judgment strategy involved. PMID:25360099

  11. PROOF OF CONCEPT FOR A HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS METHOD FOR HEURISTIC USABILITY EVALUATION OF SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Jeffrey C. Joe; Julie L. Marble

    2005-09-01

    An ongoing issue within human-computer interaction (HCI) is the need for simplified or “discount” methods. The current economic slowdown has necessitated innovative methods that are results driven and cost effective. The myriad methods of design and usability are currently being cost-justified, and new techniques are actively being explored that meet current budgets and needs. Recent efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) are highlighted by the ten-year development of the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk HRA (SPAR-H) method. The SPAR-H method has been used primarily for determining humancentered risk at nuclear power plants. The SPAR-H method, however, shares task analysis underpinnings with HCI. Despite this methodological overlap, there is currently no HRA approach deployed in heuristic usability evaluation. This paper presents an extension of the existing SPAR-H method to be used as part of heuristic usability evaluation in HCI.

  12. Heuristic and analytic processes in reasoning: an event-related potential study of belief bias.

    PubMed

    Banks, Adrian P; Hope, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Human reasoning involves both heuristic and analytic processes. This study of belief bias in relational reasoning investigated whether the two processes occur serially or in parallel. Participants evaluated the validity of problems in which the conclusions were either logically valid or invalid and either believable or unbelievable. Problems in which the conclusions presented a conflict between the logically valid response and the believable response elicited a more positive P3 than problems in which there was no conflict. This shows that P3 is influenced by the interaction of belief and logic rather than either of these factors on its own. These findings indicate that belief and logic influence reasoning at the same time, supporting models in which belief-based and logical evaluations occur in parallel but not theories in which belief-based heuristic evaluations precede logical analysis.

  13. Greedy heuristic algorithm for solving series of eee components classification problems*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakovtsev, A. L.; Antamoshkin, A. N.; Fedosov, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    Algorithms based on using the agglomerative greedy heuristics demonstrate precise and stable results for clustering problems based on k- means and p-median models. Such algorithms are successfully implemented in the processes of production of specialized EEE components for using in space systems which include testing each EEE device and detection of homogeneous production batches of the EEE components based on results of the tests using p-median models. In this paper, authors propose a new version of the genetic algorithm with the greedy agglomerative heuristic which allows solving series of problems. Such algorithm is useful for solving the k-means and p-median clustering problems when the number of clusters is unknown. Computational experiments on real data show that the preciseness of the result decreases insignificantly in comparison with the initial genetic algorithm for solving a single problem.

  14. RSQRT: AN HEURISTIC FOR ESTIMATING THE NUMBER OF CLUSTERS TO REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Bruso, Kelsey

    2012-01-01

    Clustering can be a valuable tool for analyzing large datasets, such as in e-commerce applications. Anyone who clusters must choose how many item clusters, K, to report. Unfortunately, one must guess at K or some related parameter. Elsewhere we introduced a strongly-supported heuristic, RSQRT, which predicts K as a function of the attribute or item count, depending on attribute scales. We conducted a second analysis where we sought confirmation of the heuristic, analyzing data sets from theUCImachine learning benchmark repository. For the 25 studies where sufficient detail was available, we again found strong support. Also, in a side-by-side comparison of 28 studies, RSQRT best-predicted K and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) predicted K are the same. RSQRT has a lower cost of O(log log n) versus O(n2) for BIC, and is more widely applicable. Using RSQRT prospectively could be much better than merely guessing. PMID:22773923

  15. A Library of Local Search Heuristics for the Vehicle Routing Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, Christopher S; Golden, Bruce; Edward, Wasil

    2010-01-01

    The vehicle routing problem (VRP) is a difficult and well-studied combinatorial optimization problem. Real-world instances of the VRP can contain hundreds and even thousands of customer locations and can involve many complicating constraints, necessitating the use of heuristic methods. We present a software library of local search heuristics that allow one to quickly generate good solutions to VRP instances. The code has a logical, object-oriented design and uses efficient data structures to store and modify solutions. The core of the library is the implementation of seven local search operators that share a similar interface and are designed to be extended to handle additional options with minimal code change. The code is well-documented, is straightforward to compile, and is freely available for download at http://sites.google.com/site/vrphlibrary/ . The distribution of the code contains several applications that can be used to generate solutions to instances of the capacitated VRP.

  16. Participatory Heuristic Evaluation of the Second Iteration of the eWALL Interface Application.

    PubMed

    Hangaard, Stine; Schaarup, Clara; Hejlesen, Ole K

    2016-01-01

    The number of people having a chronic disease is increasing. Telehealth may provide an alternative to traditional medicine as telehealth solutions have shown to have a positive influence on quality of live and to decrease the number of hospital visits. A new telehealth solution is the eWALL system. Previously, the eWALL interface application has been evaluated using participatory heuristic evaluation (PHE). The previous round of PHE lead to drastic changes of the eWALL interface application. Consequently, a second round of PHE was performed. Five usability experts and two work-domain professionals inspected the eWALL interface application and identified usability problems (n = 384). The work domain professionals had a tendency to use other heuristics than the usability experts highlighting the relevance of using PHE in an interface development process. PMID:27577454

  17. The early stop heuristic: A new convergence criterion for K-means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mexicano, A.; Rodríguez, R.; Cervantes, S.; Montes, P.; Jiménez, M.; Almanza, N.; Abrego, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an enhanced version of the K-Means algorithm that incorporates a new convergence criterion is presented. The largest centroid displacement at each iteration was used as mean to define whether the algorithm stops or not its execution. Computational experiments showed that in general, the Early Stop Heuristic is able to reduce the execution time of the standard version without a significant quality reduction. According to the experimentation, the Early Stop Heuristic reached a time reduction up to 87.06% only a quality reduction of 2.46% for the Transactions dataset, the worst case occurred when the Skin instance was grouped into 200 clusters obtaining a 79.04% in reduction time, and a 4.27% in quality reduction.

  18. RSQRT: AN HEURISTIC FOR ESTIMATING THE NUMBER OF CLUSTERS TO REPORT.

    PubMed

    Carlis, John; Bruso, Kelsey

    2012-03-01

    Clustering can be a valuable tool for analyzing large datasets, such as in e-commerce applications. Anyone who clusters must choose how many item clusters, K, to report. Unfortunately, one must guess at K or some related parameter. Elsewhere we introduced a strongly-supported heuristic, RSQRT, which predicts K as a function of the attribute or item count, depending on attribute scales. We conducted a second analysis where we sought confirmation of the heuristic, analyzing data sets from theUCImachine learning benchmark repository. For the 25 studies where sufficient detail was available, we again found strong support. Also, in a side-by-side comparison of 28 studies, RSQRT best-predicted K and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) predicted K are the same. RSQRT has a lower cost of O(log log n) versus O(n(2)) for BIC, and is more widely applicable. Using RSQRT prospectively could be much better than merely guessing. PMID:22773923

  19. An Empirical Comparison of Seven Iterative and Evolutionary Function Optimization Heuristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baluja, Shumeet

    1995-01-01

    This report is a repository of the results obtained from a large scale empirical comparison of seven iterative and evolution-based optimization heuristics. Twenty-seven static optimization problems, spanning six sets of problem classes which are commonly explored in genetic algorithm literature, are examined. The problem sets include job-shop scheduling, traveling salesman, knapsack, binpacking, neural network weight optimization, and standard numerical optimization. The search spaces in these problems range from 2368 to 22040. The results indicate that using genetic algorithms for the optimization of static functions does not yield a benefit, in terms of the final answer obtained, over simpler optimization heuristics. Descriptions of the algorithms tested and the encodings of the problems are described in detail for reproducibility.

  20. A novel hybrid meta-heuristic technique applied to the well-known benchmark optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abtahi, Amir-Reza; Bijari, Afsane

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a hybrid meta-heuristic algorithm, based on imperialistic competition algorithm (ICA), harmony search (HS), and simulated annealing (SA) is presented. The body of the proposed hybrid algorithm is based on ICA. The proposed hybrid algorithm inherits the advantages of the process of harmony creation in HS algorithm to improve the exploitation phase of the ICA algorithm. In addition, the proposed hybrid algorithm uses SA to make a balance between exploration and exploitation phases. The proposed hybrid algorithm is compared with several meta-heuristic methods, including genetic algorithm (GA), HS, and ICA on several well-known benchmark instances. The comprehensive experiments and statistical analysis on standard benchmark functions certify the superiority of the proposed method over the other algorithms. The efficacy of the proposed hybrid algorithm is promising and can be used in several real-life engineering and management problems.

  1. Visual analytics for spatial clustering: using a heuristic approach for guided exploration.

    PubMed

    Packer, Eli; Bak, Peter; Nikkilä, Mikko; Polishchuk, Valentin; Ship, Harold J

    2013-12-01

    We propose a novel approach of distance-based spatial clustering and contribute a heuristic computation of input parameters for guiding users in the search of interesting cluster constellations. We thereby combine computational geometry with interactive visualization into one coherent framework. Our approach entails displaying the results of the heuristics to users, as shown in Figure 1, providing a setting from which to start the exploration and data analysis. Addition interaction capabilities are available containing visual feedback for exploring further clustering options and is able to cope with noise in the data. We evaluate, and show the benefits of our approach on a sophisticated artificial dataset and demonstrate its usefulness on real-world data.

  2. Judgement heuristics and bias in evidence interpretation: The effects of computer generated exhibits.

    PubMed

    Norris, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of multi-media applications, trial presentation software and computer generated exhibits (CGE) has raised questions as to the potential impact of the use of presentation technology on juror decision making. A significant amount of the commentary on the manner in which CGE exerts legal influence is largely anecdotal; empirical examinations too are often devoid of established theoretical rationalisations. This paper will examine a range of established judgement heuristics (for example, the attribution error, representativeness, simulation), in order to establish their appropriate application for comprehending legal decisions. Analysis of both past cases and empirical studies will highlight the potential for heuristics and biases to be restricted or confounded by the use of CGE. The paper will conclude with some wider discussion on admissibility, access to justice, and emerging issues in the use of multi-media in court. PMID:26341308

  3. Judgement heuristics and bias in evidence interpretation: The effects of computer generated exhibits.

    PubMed

    Norris, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of multi-media applications, trial presentation software and computer generated exhibits (CGE) has raised questions as to the potential impact of the use of presentation technology on juror decision making. A significant amount of the commentary on the manner in which CGE exerts legal influence is largely anecdotal; empirical examinations too are often devoid of established theoretical rationalisations. This paper will examine a range of established judgement heuristics (for example, the attribution error, representativeness, simulation), in order to establish their appropriate application for comprehending legal decisions. Analysis of both past cases and empirical studies will highlight the potential for heuristics and biases to be restricted or confounded by the use of CGE. The paper will conclude with some wider discussion on admissibility, access to justice, and emerging issues in the use of multi-media in court.

  4. Best Possible Strategy for Finding Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Astrid; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz; Salamon, Peter

    2001-06-01

    Finding the ground state of a system with a complex energy landscape is important for many physical problems including protein folding, spin glasses, chemical clusters, and neural networks. Such problems are usually solved by heuristic search methods whose efficacy is judged by empirical performance on selected examples. We present a proof that, within the large class of algorithms that simulate a random walk on the landscape, threshold accepting is the best possible strategy. In particular, it can perform better than simulated annealing and Tsallis statistics. Our proof is the first example of a provably optimal strategy in this area.

  5. A simple, heuristic derivation of our ‘no backreaction’ results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-06-01

    We provide a simple discussion of our results on the backreaction effects of density inhomogeneities in cosmology without mentioning one-parameter families or weak limits. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which ‘averaging’ is done and the fact that one is solving Einstein’s equation. The key assumptions and results that we rigorously derived within our original mathematical framework are thereby explained in a heuristic way.

  6. An approach to combining heuristic and qualitative reasoning in an expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Wei-Si; Han, Chia Yung; Tsai, Lian Cheng; Wee, William G.

    1988-01-01

    An approach to combining the heuristic reasoning from shallow knowledge and the qualitative reasoning from deep knowledge is described. The shallow knowledge is represented in production rules and under the direct control of the inference engine. The deep knowledge is represented in frames, which may be put in a relational DataBase Management System. This approach takes advantage of both reasoning schemes and results in improved efficiency as well as expanded problem solving ability.

  7. A heuristic method for finding the optimal number of clusters with application in medical data.

    PubMed

    Bayati, Hamidreza; Davoudi, Heydar; Fatemizadeh, Emad

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a heuristic method for determining the optimal number of clusters is proposed. Four clustering algorithms, namely K-means, Growing Neural Gas, Simulated Annealing based technique, and Fuzzy C-means in conjunction with three well known cluster validity indices, namely Davies-Bouldin index, Calinski-Harabasz index, Maulik-Bandyopadhyay index, in addition to the proposed index are used. Our simulations evaluate capability of mentioned indices in some artificial and medical datasets. PMID:19163761

  8. A Heuristic Approach to Intra-Brain Communications Using Chaos in a Recurrent Neural Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, Ken-ichiro; Mori, Ryota; Sato, Ryuichi; Nara, Shigetoshi

    2011-09-01

    To approach functional roles of chaos in brain, a heuristic model to consider mechanisms of intra-brain communications is proposed. The key idea is to use chaos in firing pattern dynamics of a recurrent neural network consisting of birary state neurons, as propagation medium of pulse signals. Computer experiments and numerical methods are introduced to evaluate signal transport characteristics by calculating correlation functions between sending neurons and receiving neurons of pulse signals.

  9. SPARSE: quadratic time simultaneous alignment and folding of RNAs without sequence-based heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Will, Sebastian; Otto, Christina; Miladi, Milad; Möhl, Mathias; Backofen, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: RNA-Seq experiments have revealed a multitude of novel ncRNAs. The gold standard for their analysis based on simultaneous alignment and folding suffers from extreme time complexity of O(n6). Subsequently, numerous faster ‘Sankoff-style’ approaches have been suggested. Commonly, the performance of such methods relies on sequence-based heuristics that restrict the search space to optimal or near-optimal sequence alignments; however, the accuracy of sequence-based methods breaks down for RNAs with sequence identities below 60%. Alignment approaches like LocARNA that do not require sequence-based heuristics, have been limited to high complexity (≥ quartic time). Results: Breaking this barrier, we introduce the novel Sankoff-style algorithm ‘sparsified prediction and alignment of RNAs based on their structure ensembles (SPARSE)’, which runs in quadratic time without sequence-based heuristics. To achieve this low complexity, on par with sequence alignment algorithms, SPARSE features strong sparsification based on structural properties of the RNA ensembles. Following PMcomp, SPARSE gains further speed-up from lightweight energy computation. Although all existing lightweight Sankoff-style methods restrict Sankoff’s original model by disallowing loop deletions and insertions, SPARSE transfers the Sankoff algorithm to the lightweight energy model completely for the first time. Compared with LocARNA, SPARSE achieves similar alignment and better folding quality in significantly less time (speedup: 3.7). At similar run-time, it aligns low sequence identity instances substantially more accurate than RAF, which uses sequence-based heuristics. Availability and implementation: SPARSE is freely available at http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SPARSE. Contact: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25838465

  10. A comparative analysis of static and dynamic load balancing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. Ashraf; Bokhari, Shahid H.; Saltz, Joel H.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uniformly distributing the load of a parallel program over a multiprocessor system was considered. A program was analyzed whose structure permits the computation of the optimal static solution. Then four strategies for load balancing were described and their performance compared. The strategies are: (1) the optimal static assignment algorithm which is guaranteed to yield the best static solution, (2) the static binary dissection method which is very fast but suboptimal, (3) the greedy algorithm, a static fully polynomial time approximation scheme, which estimates the optimal solution to arbitrary accuracy, and (4) the predictive dynamic load balancing heuristic which uses information on the precedence relationships within the program and outperforms any of the static methods. It is also shown that the overhead incurred by the dynamic heuristic is reduced considerably if it is started off with a static assignment provided by either of the three strategies.

  11. Performance tradeoffs in static and dynamic load balancing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. A.; Saltz, J. H.; Bokhart, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uniformly distributing the load of a parallel program over a multiprocessor system was considered. A program was analyzed whose structure permits the computation of the optimal static solution. Then four strategies for load balancing were described and their performance compared. The strategies are: (1) the optimal static assignment algorithm which is guaranteed to yield the best static solution, (2) the static binary dissection method which is very fast but sub-optimal, (3) the greedy algorithm, a static fully polynomial time approximation scheme, which estimates the optimal solution to arbitrary accuracy, and (4) the predictive dynamic load balancing heuristic which uses information on the precedence relationships within the program and outperforms any of the static methods. It is also shown that the overhead incurred by the dynamic heuristic is reduced considerably if it is started off with a static assignment provided by either of the other three strategies.

  12. The impact of subjective recognition experiences on recognition heuristic use: a multinomial processing tree approach.

    PubMed

    Castela, Marta; Kellen, David; Erdfelder, Edgar; Hilbig, Benjamin E

    2014-10-01

    The recognition heuristic (RH) theory states that, in comparative judgments (e.g., Which of two cities has more inhabitants?), individuals infer that recognized objects score higher on the criterion (e.g., population) than unrecognized objects. Indeed, it has often been shown that recognized options are judged to outscore unrecognized ones (e.g., recognized cities are judged as larger than unrecognized ones), although different accounts of this general finding have been proposed. According to the RH theory, this pattern occurs because the binary recognition judgment determines the inference and no other information will reverse this. An alternative account posits that recognized objects are chosen because knowledge beyond mere recognition typically points to the recognized object. A third account can be derived from the memory-state heuristic framework. According to this framework, underlying memory states of objects (rather than recognition judgments) determine the extent of RH use: When two objects are compared, the one associated with a "higher" memory state is preferred, and reliance on recognition increases with the "distance" between their memory states. The three accounts make different predictions about the impact of subjective recognition experiences-whether an object is merely recognized or recognized with further knowledge-on RH use. We estimated RH use for different recognition experiences across 16 published data sets, using a multinomial processing tree model. Results supported the memory-state heuristic in showing that RH use increases when recognition is accompanied by further knowledge. PMID:24638825

  13. Anticipation and Choice Heuristics in the Dynamic Consumption of Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Story, Giles W.; Vlaev, Ivo; Dayan, Peter; Seymour, Ben; Darzi, Ara; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Humans frequently need to allocate resources across multiple time-steps. Economic theory proposes that subjects do so according to a stable set of intertemporal preferences, but the computational demands of such decisions encourage the use of formally less competent heuristics. Few empirical studies have examined dynamic resource allocation decisions systematically. Here we conducted an experiment involving the dynamic consumption over approximately 15 minutes of a limited budget of relief from moderately painful stimuli. We had previously elicited the participants’ time preferences for the same painful stimuli in one-off choices, allowing us to assess self-consistency. Participants exhibited three characteristic behaviors: saving relief until the end, spreading relief across time, and early spending, of which the last was markedly less prominent. The likelihood that behavior was heuristic rather than normative is suggested by the weak correspondence between one-off and dynamic choices. We show that the consumption choices are consistent with a combination of simple heuristics involving early-spending, spreading or saving of relief until the end, with subjects predominantly exhibiting the last two. PMID:25793302

  14. Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations.

    PubMed

    Kushnick, Geoff; Hanowell, Ben; Kim, Jun-Hong; Langstieh, Banrida; Magnano, Vittorio; Oláh, Katalin

    2015-06-01

    Maternal care decision rules should evolve responsiveness to factors impinging on the fitness pay-offs of care. Because the caretaking environments common in industrialized and small-scale societies vary in predictable ways, we hypothesize that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour will also differ between these two types of populations. We used a factorial vignette experiment to elicit third-party judgements about likely caretaking decisions of a hypothetical mother and her child when various fitness-relevant factors (maternal age and access to resources, and offspring age, sex and quality) were varied systematically in seven populations-three industrialized and four small-scale. Despite considerable variation in responses, we found that three of five main effects, and the two severity effects, exhibited statistically significant industrialized/ small-scale population differences. All differences could be explained as adaptive solutions to industrialized versus small-scale caretaking environments. Further, we found gradients in the relationship between the population-specific estimates and national-level socio-economic indicators, further implicating important aspects of the variation in industrialized and small-scale caretaking environments in shaping heuristics. Although there is mounting evidence for a genetic component to human maternal behaviour, there is no current evidence for interpopulation variation in candidate genes. We nonetheless suggest that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour in diverse societies emerge via convergent evolution in response to similar selective pressures. PMID:26543577

  15. Neural model of gene regulatory network: a survey on supportive meta-heuristics.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Surama; Acharyya, Sriyankar

    2016-06-01

    Gene regulatory network (GRN) is produced as a result of regulatory interactions between different genes through their coded proteins in cellular context. Having immense importance in disease detection and drug finding, GRN has been modelled through various mathematical and computational schemes and reported in survey articles. Neural and neuro-fuzzy models have been the focus of attraction in bioinformatics. Predominant use of meta-heuristic algorithms in training neural models has proved its excellence. Considering these facts, this paper is organized to survey neural modelling schemes of GRN and the efficacy of meta-heuristic algorithms towards parameter learning (i.e. weighting connections) within the model. This survey paper renders two different structure-related approaches to infer GRN which are global structure approach and substructure approach. It also describes two neural modelling schemes, such as artificial neural network/recurrent neural network based modelling and neuro-fuzzy modelling. The meta-heuristic algorithms applied so far to learn the structure and parameters of neutrally modelled GRN have been reviewed here. PMID:27048512

  16. Bothe's 1925 heuristic assumption in the dawn of quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fick, D.

    2013-01-01

    In an unpublished manuscript filed at the Archive of the Max-Planck Society in Berlin, Walther Bothe (1891-1957) put, with one heuristic assumption, the spontaneous and induced transitions of light quanta, on an equal footing, probably as early as 1925. In modern terms, he assumed that the probability for the creation of a light quantum in a phase space cell already containing s light quanta is proportional to s + 1 and not, as assumed at that time, proportional to s; that is proportional to the fraction of the total radiation density which belongs to s light quanta. For Bothe, the added +1 somehow replaced the spontaneous decay and allowed him to treat empty phase space cells in a black body as thermodynamically consistent. We describe in some detail Bothe's route to this heuristic trick. Finally we discuss why, both Bose's and Bothe's heuristic assumptions lead to an identical distribution law for light quanta in a black body and thus to Planck's law and Einstein's fluctuation formula.

  17. Reconciliation of Decision-Making Heuristics Based on Decision Trees Topologies and Incomplete Fuzzy Probabilities Sets

    PubMed Central

    Doubravsky, Karel; Dohnal, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Complex decision making tasks of different natures, e.g. economics, safety engineering, ecology and biology, are based on vague, sparse, partially inconsistent and subjective knowledge. Moreover, decision making economists / engineers are usually not willing to invest too much time into study of complex formal theories. They require such decisions which can be (re)checked by human like common sense reasoning. One important problem related to realistic decision making tasks are incomplete data sets required by the chosen decision making algorithm. This paper presents a relatively simple algorithm how some missing III (input information items) can be generated using mainly decision tree topologies and integrated into incomplete data sets. The algorithm is based on an easy to understand heuristics, e.g. a longer decision tree sub-path is less probable. This heuristic can solve decision problems under total ignorance, i.e. the decision tree topology is the only information available. But in a practice, isolated information items e.g. some vaguely known probabilities (e.g. fuzzy probabilities) are usually available. It means that a realistic problem is analysed under partial ignorance. The proposed algorithm reconciles topology related heuristics and additional fuzzy sets using fuzzy linear programming. The case study, represented by a tree with six lotteries and one fuzzy probability, is presented in details. PMID:26158662

  18. Applied tagmemics: A heuristic approach to the use of graphic aids in technical writing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, P. P.; Kirtz, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    In technical report writing, two needs which must be met if reports are to be useable by an audience are the language needs and the technical needs of that particular audience. A heuristic analysis helps to decide the most suitable format for information; that is, whether the information should be presented verbally or visually. The report writing process should be seen as an organic whole which can be divided and subdivided according to the writer's purpose, but which always functions as a totality. The tagmemic heuristic, because it itself follows a process of deconstructing and reconstructing information, lends itself to being a useful approach to the teaching of technical writing. By applying the abstract questions this heuristic asks to specific parts of the report. The language and technical needs of the audience are analyzed by examining the viability of the solution within the givens of the corporate structure, and by deciding which graphic or verbal format will best suit the writer's purpose. By following such a method, answers which are both specific and thorough in their range of application are found.

  19. A Tabu-Search Heuristic for Deterministic Two-Mode Blockmodeling of Binary Network Matrices.

    PubMed

    Brusco, Michael; Steinley, Douglas

    2011-10-01

    Two-mode binary data matrices arise in a variety of social network contexts, such as the attendance or non-attendance of individuals at events, the participation or lack of participation of groups in projects, and the votes of judges on cases. A popular method for analyzing such data is two-mode blockmodeling based on structural equivalence, where the goal is to identify partitions for the row and column objects such that the clusters of the row and column objects form blocks that are either complete (all 1s) or null (all 0s) to the greatest extent possible. Multiple restarts of an object relocation heuristic that seeks to minimize the number of inconsistencies (i.e., 1s in null blocks and 0s in complete blocks) with ideal block structure is the predominant approach for tackling this problem. As an alternative, we propose a fast and effective implementation of tabu search. Computational comparisons across a set of 48 large network matrices revealed that the new tabu-search heuristic always provided objective function values that were better than those of the relocation heuristic when the two methods were constrained to the same amount of computation time. PMID:27519683

  20. Ancestral population genomics using coalescence hidden Markov models and heuristic optimisation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jade Yu; Mailund, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    With full genome data from several closely related species now readily available, we have the ultimate data for demographic inference. Exploiting these full genomes, however, requires models that can explicitly model recombination along alignments of full chromosomal length. Over the last decade a class of models, based on the sequential Markov coalescence model combined with hidden Markov models, has been developed and used to make inference in simple demographic scenarios. To move forward to more complex demographic modelling we need better and more automated ways of specifying these models and efficient optimisation algorithms for inferring the parameters in complex and often high-dimensional models. In this paper we present a framework for building such coalescence hidden Markov models for pairwise alignments and present results for using heuristic optimisation algorithms for parameter estimation. We show that we can build more complex demographic models than our previous frameworks and that we obtain more accurate parameter estimates using heuristic optimisation algorithms than when using our previous gradient based approaches. Our new framework provides a flexible way of constructing coalescence hidden Markov models almost automatically. While estimating parameters in more complex models is still challenging we show that using heuristic optimisation algorithms we still get a fairly good accuracy.

  1. A Dominant Social Comparison Heuristic Unites Alternative Mechanisms for the Evolution of Indirect Reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Roger M; Colombo, Gualtiero B; Allen, Stuart M; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation is a fundamental human trait but our understanding of how it functions remains incomplete. Indirect reciprocity is a particular case in point, where one-shot donations are made to unrelated beneficiaries without any guarantee of payback. Existing insights are largely from two independent perspectives: i) individual-level cognitive behaviour in decision making, and ii) identification of conditions that favour evolution of cooperation. We identify a fundamental connection between these two areas by examining social comparison as a means through which indirect reciprocity can evolve. Social comparison is well established as an inherent human disposition through which humans navigate the social world by self-referential evaluation of others. Donating to those that are at least as reputable as oneself emerges as a dominant heuristic, which represents aspirational homophily. This heuristic is found to be implicitly present in the current knowledge of conditions that favour indirect reciprocity. The effective social norms for updating reputation are also observed to support this heuristic. We hypothesise that the cognitive challenge associated with social comparison has contributed to cerebral expansion and the disproportionate human brain size, consistent with the social complexity hypothesis. The findings have relevance for the evolution of autonomous systems that are characterised by one-shot interactions. PMID:27515119

  2. A Dominant Social Comparison Heuristic Unites Alternative Mechanisms for the Evolution of Indirect Reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Roger M.; Colombo, Gualtiero B.; Allen, Stuart M.; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2016-08-01

    Cooperation is a fundamental human trait but our understanding of how it functions remains incomplete. Indirect reciprocity is a particular case in point, where one-shot donations are made to unrelated beneficiaries without any guarantee of payback. Existing insights are largely from two independent perspectives: i) individual-level cognitive behaviour in decision making, and ii) identification of conditions that favour evolution of cooperation. We identify a fundamental connection between these two areas by examining social comparison as a means through which indirect reciprocity can evolve. Social comparison is well established as an inherent human disposition through which humans navigate the social world by self-referential evaluation of others. Donating to those that are at least as reputable as oneself emerges as a dominant heuristic, which represents aspirational homophily. This heuristic is found to be implicitly present in the current knowledge of conditions that favour indirect reciprocity. The effective social norms for updating reputation are also observed to support this heuristic. We hypothesise that the cognitive challenge associated with social comparison has contributed to cerebral expansion and the disproportionate human brain size, consistent with the social complexity hypothesis. The findings have relevance for the evolution of autonomous systems that are characterised by one-shot interactions.

  3. Anticipation and choice heuristics in the dynamic consumption of pain relief.

    PubMed

    Story, Giles W; Vlaev, Ivo; Dayan, Peter; Seymour, Ben; Darzi, Ara; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-03-01

    Humans frequently need to allocate resources across multiple time-steps. Economic theory proposes that subjects do so according to a stable set of intertemporal preferences, but the computational demands of such decisions encourage the use of formally less competent heuristics. Few empirical studies have examined dynamic resource allocation decisions systematically. Here we conducted an experiment involving the dynamic consumption over approximately 15 minutes of a limited budget of relief from moderately painful stimuli. We had previously elicited the participants' time preferences for the same painful stimuli in one-off choices, allowing us to assess self-consistency. Participants exhibited three characteristic behaviors: saving relief until the end, spreading relief across time, and early spending, of which the last was markedly less prominent. The likelihood that behavior was heuristic rather than normative is suggested by the weak correspondence between one-off and dynamic choices. We show that the consumption choices are consistent with a combination of simple heuristics involving early-spending, spreading or saving of relief until the end, with subjects predominantly exhibiting the last two. PMID:25793302

  4. Slime moulds use heuristics based on within-patch experience to decide when to leave.

    PubMed

    Latty, Tanya; Beekman, Madeleine

    2015-04-15

    Animals foraging in patchy, non-renewing or slowly renewing environments must make decisions about how long to remain within a patch. Organisms can use heuristics ('rules of thumb') based on available information to decide when to leave the patch. Here, we investigated proximate patch-departure heuristics in two species of giant, brainless amoeba: the slime moulds Didymium bahiense and Physarum polycephalum. We explicitly tested the importance of information obtained through experience by eliminating chemosensory cues of patch quality. In P. polycephalum, patch departure was influenced by the consumption of high, and to a much lesser extent low, quality food items such that engulfing a food item increased patch-residency time. Physarum polycephalum also tended to forage for longer in darkened, 'safe' patches. In D. bahiense, engulfment of any food item increased patch residency irrespective of that food item's quality. Exposure to light had no effect on the patch-residency time of D. bahiense. Given that these organisms lack a brain, our results illustrate how the use of simple heuristics can give the impression that individuals make sophisticated foraging decisions.

  5. A new heuristic method for approximating the number of local minima in partial RNA energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Andreas A; Day, Luke; Abdelhadi Ep Souki, Ouala; Steinhöfel, Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of energy landscapes plays an important role in mathematical modelling, simulation and optimisation. Among the main features of interest are the number and distribution of local minima within the energy landscape. Granier and Kallel proposed in 2002 a new sampling procedure for estimating the number of local minima. In the present paper, we focus on improved heuristic implementations of the general framework devised by Granier and Kallel with regard to run-time behaviour and accuracy of predictions. The new heuristic method is demonstrated for the case of partial energy landscapes induced by RNA secondary structures. While the computation of minimum free energy RNA secondary structures has been studied for a long time, the analysis of folding landscapes has gained momentum over the past years in the context of co-transcriptional folding and deeper insights into cell processes. The new approach has been applied to ten RNA instances of length between 99 nt and 504 nt and their respective partial energy landscapes defined by secondary structures within an energy offset ΔE above the minimum free energy conformation. The number of local minima within the partial energy landscapes ranges from 1440 to 3441. Our heuristic method produces for the best approximations on average a deviation below 3.0% from the true number of local minima.

  6. Neural model of gene regulatory network: a survey on supportive meta-heuristics.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Surama; Acharyya, Sriyankar

    2016-06-01

    Gene regulatory network (GRN) is produced as a result of regulatory interactions between different genes through their coded proteins in cellular context. Having immense importance in disease detection and drug finding, GRN has been modelled through various mathematical and computational schemes and reported in survey articles. Neural and neuro-fuzzy models have been the focus of attraction in bioinformatics. Predominant use of meta-heuristic algorithms in training neural models has proved its excellence. Considering these facts, this paper is organized to survey neural modelling schemes of GRN and the efficacy of meta-heuristic algorithms towards parameter learning (i.e. weighting connections) within the model. This survey paper renders two different structure-related approaches to infer GRN which are global structure approach and substructure approach. It also describes two neural modelling schemes, such as artificial neural network/recurrent neural network based modelling and neuro-fuzzy modelling. The meta-heuristic algorithms applied so far to learn the structure and parameters of neutrally modelled GRN have been reviewed here.

  7. Anticipation and choice heuristics in the dynamic consumption of pain relief.

    PubMed

    Story, Giles W; Vlaev, Ivo; Dayan, Peter; Seymour, Ben; Darzi, Ara; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-03-01

    Humans frequently need to allocate resources across multiple time-steps. Economic theory proposes that subjects do so according to a stable set of intertemporal preferences, but the computational demands of such decisions encourage the use of formally less competent heuristics. Few empirical studies have examined dynamic resource allocation decisions systematically. Here we conducted an experiment involving the dynamic consumption over approximately 15 minutes of a limited budget of relief from moderately painful stimuli. We had previously elicited the participants' time preferences for the same painful stimuli in one-off choices, allowing us to assess self-consistency. Participants exhibited three characteristic behaviors: saving relief until the end, spreading relief across time, and early spending, of which the last was markedly less prominent. The likelihood that behavior was heuristic rather than normative is suggested by the weak correspondence between one-off and dynamic choices. We show that the consumption choices are consistent with a combination of simple heuristics involving early-spending, spreading or saving of relief until the end, with subjects predominantly exhibiting the last two.

  8. A Dominant Social Comparison Heuristic Unites Alternative Mechanisms for the Evolution of Indirect Reciprocity

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Roger M.; Colombo, Gualtiero B.; Allen, Stuart M.; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation is a fundamental human trait but our understanding of how it functions remains incomplete. Indirect reciprocity is a particular case in point, where one-shot donations are made to unrelated beneficiaries without any guarantee of payback. Existing insights are largely from two independent perspectives: i) individual-level cognitive behaviour in decision making, and ii) identification of conditions that favour evolution of cooperation. We identify a fundamental connection between these two areas by examining social comparison as a means through which indirect reciprocity can evolve. Social comparison is well established as an inherent human disposition through which humans navigate the social world by self-referential evaluation of others. Donating to those that are at least as reputable as oneself emerges as a dominant heuristic, which represents aspirational homophily. This heuristic is found to be implicitly present in the current knowledge of conditions that favour indirect reciprocity. The effective social norms for updating reputation are also observed to support this heuristic. We hypothesise that the cognitive challenge associated with social comparison has contributed to cerebral expansion and the disproportionate human brain size, consistent with the social complexity hypothesis. The findings have relevance for the evolution of autonomous systems that are characterised by one-shot interactions. PMID:27515119

  9. Comparing the performance of expert user heuristics and an integer linear program in aircraft carrier deck operations.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jason C; Banerjee, Ashis Gopal; Cummings, Mary L; Roy, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    Planning operations across a number of domains can be considered as resource allocation problems with timing constraints. An unexplored instance of such a problem domain is the aircraft carrier flight deck, where, in current operations, replanning is done without the aid of any computerized decision support. Rather, veteran operators employ a set of experience-based heuristics to quickly generate new operating schedules. These expert user heuristics are neither codified nor evaluated by the United States Navy; they have grown solely from the convergent experiences of supervisory staff. As unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are introduced in the aircraft carrier domain, these heuristics may require alterations due to differing capabilities. The inclusion of UAVs also allows for new opportunities for on-line planning and control, providing an alternative to the current heuristic-based replanning methodology. To investigate these issues formally, we have developed a decision support system for flight deck operations that utilizes a conventional integer linear program-based planning algorithm. In this system, a human operator sets both the goals and constraints for the algorithm, which then returns a proposed schedule for operator approval. As a part of validating this system, the performance of this collaborative human-automation planner was compared with that of the expert user heuristics over a set of test scenarios. The resulting analysis shows that human heuristics often outperform the plans produced by an optimization algorithm, but are also often more conservative.

  10. Ernst Rüdin: Hitler's Racial Hygiene Mastermind.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jay; Wetzel, Norbert A

    2013-01-01

    Ernst Rüdin (1874-1952) was the founder of psychiatric genetics and was also a founder of the German racial hygiene movement. Throughout his long career he played a major role in promoting eugenic ideas and policies in Germany, including helping formulate the 1933 Nazi eugenic sterilization law and other governmental policies directed against the alleged carriers of genetic defects. In the 1940s Rüdin supported the killing of children and mental patients under a Nazi program euphemistically called "Euthanasia." The authors document these crimes and discuss their implications, and also present translations of two publications Rüdin co-authored in 1938 showing his strong support for Hitler and his policies. The authors also document what they see as revisionist historical accounts by leading psychiatric genetic authors. They outline three categories of contemporary psychiatric genetic accounts of Rüdin and his work: (A) those who write about German psychiatric genetics in the Nazi period, but either fail to mention Rüdin at all, or cast him in a favorable light; (B) those who acknowledge that Rüdin helped promote eugenic sterilization and/or may have worked with the Nazis, but generally paint a positive picture of Rüdin's research and fail to mention his participation in the "euthanasia" killing program; and (C) those who have written that Rüdin committed and supported unspeakable atrocities. The authors conclude by calling on the leaders of psychiatric genetics to produce a detailed and complete account of their field's history, including all of the documented crimes committed by Rüdin and his associates. PMID:23180223

  11. The cellular mastermind(?) – Mechanotransduction and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Ashley; Fedorchak, Gregory R.; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimulation by activation of specific signaling pathways and genes that allow the cell to adapt to its dynamic physical environment. How cells sense the various mechanical inputs and translate them into biochemical signals remains an area of active investigation. Recent reports suggest that the cell nucleus may be directly implicated in this cellular mechanotransduction process. In this chapter, we discuss how forces applied to the cell surface and cytoplasm induce changes in nuclear structure and organization, which could directly affect gene expression, while also highlighting the complex interplay between nuclear structural proteins and transcriptional regulators that may further modulate mechanotransduction signaling. Taken together, these findings paint a picture of the nucleus as a central hub in cellular mechanotransduction—both structurally and biochemically—with important implications in physiology and disease. PMID:25081618

  12. Interplay of approximate planning strategies.

    PubMed

    Huys, Quentin J M; Lally, Níall; Faulkner, Paul; Eshel, Neir; Seifritz, Erich; Gershman, Samuel J; Dayan, Peter; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2015-03-10

    Humans routinely formulate plans in domains so complex that even the most powerful computers are taxed. To do so, they seem to avail themselves of many strategies and heuristics that efficiently simplify, approximate, and hierarchically decompose hard tasks into simpler subtasks. Theoretical and cognitive research has revealed several such strategies; however, little is known about their establishment, interaction, and efficiency. Here, we use model-based behavioral analysis to provide a detailed examination of the performance of human subjects in a moderately deep planning task. We find that subjects exploit the structure of the domain to establish subgoals in a way that achieves a nearly maximal reduction in the cost of computing values of choices, but then combine partial searches with greedy local steps to solve subtasks, and maladaptively prune the decision trees of subtasks in a reflexive manner upon encountering salient losses. Subjects come idiosyncratically to favor particular sequences of actions to achieve subgoals, creating novel complex actions or "options." PMID:25675480

  13. Walking tree heuristics for biological string alignment, gene location, and phylogenies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, P.; Holloway, J. L.; Cavener, J. D.

    1999-03-01

    Basic biological information is stored in strings of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) or amino acids (proteins). Teasing out the meaning of these strings is a central problem of modern biology. Matching and aligning strings brings out their shared characteristics. Although string matching is well-understood in the edit-distance model, biological strings with transpositions and inversions violate this model's assumptions. We propose a family of heuristics called walking trees to align biologically reasonable strings. Both edit-distance and walking tree methods can locate specific genes within a large string when the genes' sequences are given. When we attempt to match whole strings, the walking tree matches most genes, while the edit-distance method fails. We also give examples in which the walking tree matches substrings even if they have been moved or inverted. The edit-distance method was not designed to handle these problems. We include an example in which the walking tree "discovered" a gene. Calculating scores for whole genome matches gives a method for approximating evolutionary distance. We show two evolutionary trees for the picornaviruses which were computed by the walking tree heuristic. Both of these trees show great similarity to previously constructed trees. The point of this demonstration is that WHOLE genomes can be matched and distances calculated. The first tree was created on a Sequent parallel computer and demonstrates that the walking tree heuristic can be efficiently parallelized. The second tree was created using a network of work stations and demonstrates that there is suffient parallelism in the phylogenetic tree calculation that the sequential walking tree can be used effectively on a network.

  14. Heuristic Evaluation of Ehealth Interventions: Establishing Standards That Relate to the Therapeutic Process Perspective.

    PubMed

    Baumel, Amit; Muench, Fred

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the number of available eHealth interventions aimed at treating behavioral and mental health challenges has been growing. From the perspective of health care providers, there is a need for eHealth interventions to be evaluated prior to clinical trials and for the limited resources allocated to empirical research to be invested in the most promising products. Following a literature review, a gap was found in the availability of eHealth interventions evaluation principles related to the patient experience of the therapeutic process. This paper introduces principles and concepts for the evaluation of eHealth interventions developed as a first step in a process to outline general evaluation guidelines that relate to the clinical context from health care providers' perspective. Our approach was to conduct a review of literature that relates to the examination of eHealth interventions. We identified the literature that was most relevant to our study and used it to define guidelines that relate to the clinical context. We then compiled a list of heuristics we found to be useful for the evaluation of eHealth intervention products' suitability for empirical examination. Four heuristics were identified with respect to the therapeutic process: (1) the product's ease of use (ie, usability), (2) the eHealth intervention's compatibility with the clinical setting, (3) the presence of tools that make it easier for the user to engage in therapeutic activities, and (4) the provision of a feasible therapeutic pathway to growth. We then used this set of heuristics to conduct a detailed examination of MyFitnessPal. This line of work could help to set the bar higher for product developers and to inform health care providers about preferred eHealth intervention designs. PMID:26764209

  15. A machine learning heuristic to identify biologically relevant and minimal biomarker panels from omics data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Investigations into novel biomarkers using omics techniques generate large amounts of data. Due to their size and numbers of attributes, these data are suitable for analysis with machine learning methods. A key component of typical machine learning pipelines for omics data is feature selection, which is used to reduce the raw high-dimensional data into a tractable number of features. Feature selection needs to balance the objective of using as few features as possible, while maintaining high predictive power. This balance is crucial when the goal of data analysis is the identification of highly accurate but small panels of biomarkers with potential clinical utility. In this paper we propose a heuristic for the selection of very small feature subsets, via an iterative feature elimination process that is guided by rule-based machine learning, called RGIFE (Rule-guided Iterative Feature Elimination). We use this heuristic to identify putative biomarkers of osteoarthritis (OA), articular cartilage degradation and synovial inflammation, using both proteomic and transcriptomic datasets. Results and discussion Our RGIFE heuristic increased the classification accuracies achieved for all datasets when no feature selection is used, and performed well in a comparison with other feature selection methods. Using this method the datasets were reduced to a smaller number of genes or proteins, including those known to be relevant to OA, cartilage degradation and joint inflammation. The results have shown the RGIFE feature reduction method to be suitable for analysing both proteomic and transcriptomics data. Methods that generate large ‘omics’ datasets are increasingly being used in the area of rheumatology. Conclusions Feature reduction methods are advantageous for the analysis of omics data in the field of rheumatology, as the applications of such techniques are likely to result in improvements in diagnosis, treatment and drug discovery. PMID:25923811

  16. Heuristic Evaluation of Ehealth Interventions: Establishing Standards That Relate to the Therapeutic Process Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Muench, Fred

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the number of available eHealth interventions aimed at treating behavioral and mental health challenges has been growing. From the perspective of health care providers, there is a need for eHealth interventions to be evaluated prior to clinical trials and for the limited resources allocated to empirical research to be invested in the most promising products. Following a literature review, a gap was found in the availability of eHealth interventions evaluation principles related to the patient experience of the therapeutic process. This paper introduces principles and concepts for the evaluation of eHealth interventions developed as a first step in a process to outline general evaluation guidelines that relate to the clinical context from health care providers’ perspective. Our approach was to conduct a review of literature that relates to the examination of eHealth interventions. We identified the literature that was most relevant to our study and used it to define guidelines that relate to the clinical context. We then compiled a list of heuristics we found to be useful for the evaluation of eHealth intervention products’ suitability for empirical examination. Four heuristics were identified with respect to the therapeutic process: (1) the product’s ease of use (ie, usability), (2) the eHealth intervention’s compatibility with the clinical setting, (3) the presence of tools that make it easier for the user to engage in therapeutic activities, and (4) the provision of a feasible therapeutic pathway to growth. We then used this set of heuristics to conduct a detailed examination of MyFitnessPal. This line of work could help to set the bar higher for product developers and to inform health care providers about preferred eHealth intervention designs. PMID:26764209

  17. Localized heuristic inverse quantitative structure activity relationship with bulk descriptors using numerical gradients.

    PubMed

    Stålring, Jonna; Almeida, Pedro R; Carlsson, Lars; Helgee Ahlberg, Ernst; Hasselgren, Catrin; Boyer, Scott

    2013-08-26

    State-of-the-art quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are often based on nonlinear machine learning algorithms, which are difficult to interpret. From a pharmaceutical perspective, QSARs are used to enhance the chemical design process. Ultimately, they should not only provide a prediction but also contribute to a mechanistic understanding and guide modifications to the chemical structure, promoting compounds with desirable biological activity profiles. Global ranking of descriptor importance and inverse QSAR have been used for these purposes. This paper introduces localized heuristic inverse QSAR, which provides an assessment of the relative ability of the descriptors to influence the biological response in an area localized around the predicted compound. The method is based on numerical gradients with parameters optimized using data sets sampled from analytical functions. The heuristic character of the method reduces the computational requirements and makes it applicable not only to fragment based methods but also to QSARs based on bulk descriptors. The application of the method is illustrated on congeneric QSAR data sets, and it is shown that the predicted influential descriptors can be used to guide structural modifications that affect the biological response in the desired direction. The method is implemented into the AZOrange Open Source QSAR package. The current implementation of localized heuristic inverse QSAR is a step toward a generally applicable method for elucidating the structure activity relationship specifically for a congeneric region of chemical space when using QSARs based on bulk properties. Consequently, this method could contribute to accelerating the chemical design process in pharmaceutical projects, as well as provide information that could enhance the mechanistic understanding for individual scaffolds.

  18. Pain as a fact and heuristic: how pain neuroimaging illuminates moral dimensions of law.

    PubMed

    Pustilnik, Amanda C

    2012-05-01

    In legal domains ranging from tort to torture, pain and its degree do important definitional work by delimiting boundaries of lawfulness and of entitlements. Yet, for all the work done by pain as a term in legal texts and practice, it has a confounding lack of external verifiability. Now, neuroimaging is rendering pain and myriad other subjective states at least partly ascertainable. This emerging ability to ascertain and quantify subjective states is prompting a "hedonic" or a "subjectivist" turn in legal scholarship, which has sparked a vigorous debate as to whether the quantification of subjective states might affect legal theory and practice. Subjectivists contend that much values-talk in law has been a necessary but poor substitute for quantitative determinations of subjective states--determinations that will be possible in the law's "experiential future." This Article argues the converse: that pain discourse in law frequently is a heuristic for values. Drawing on interviews and laboratory visits with neuroimaging researchers, this Article shows current and in-principle limitations of pain quantification through neuroimaging. It then presents case studies on torture-murder, torture, the death penalty, and abortion to show the largely heuristic role of pain discourse in law. Introducing the theory of "embodied morality," the Article describes how moral conceptions of rights and duties are informed by human physicality and constrained by the limits of empathic identification. Pain neuroimaging helps reveal this dual factual and heuristic nature of pain in the law, and thus itself points to the translational work required for neuroimaging to influence, much less transform, legal practice and doctrine.

  19. Pain as a fact and heuristic: how pain neuroimaging illuminates moral dimensions of law.

    PubMed

    Pustilnik, Amanda C

    2012-05-01

    In legal domains ranging from tort to torture, pain and its degree do important definitional work by delimiting boundaries of lawfulness and of entitlements. Yet, for all the work done by pain as a term in legal texts and practice, it has a confounding lack of external verifiability. Now, neuroimaging is rendering pain and myriad other subjective states at least partly ascertainable. This emerging ability to ascertain and quantify subjective states is prompting a "hedonic" or a "subjectivist" turn in legal scholarship, which has sparked a vigorous debate as to whether the quantification of subjective states might affect legal theory and practice. Subjectivists contend that much values-talk in law has been a necessary but poor substitute for quantitative determinations of subjective states--determinations that will be possible in the law's "experiential future." This Article argues the converse: that pain discourse in law frequently is a heuristic for values. Drawing on interviews and laboratory visits with neuroimaging researchers, this Article shows current and in-principle limitations of pain quantification through neuroimaging. It then presents case studies on torture-murder, torture, the death penalty, and abortion to show the largely heuristic role of pain discourse in law. Introducing the theory of "embodied morality," the Article describes how moral conceptions of rights and duties are informed by human physicality and constrained by the limits of empathic identification. Pain neuroimaging helps reveal this dual factual and heuristic nature of pain in the law, and thus itself points to the translational work required for neuroimaging to influence, much less transform, legal practice and doctrine. PMID:22754972

  20. Hanke-Raus heuristic rule for variational regularization in Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qinian

    2016-08-01

    We generalize the heuristic parameter choice rule of Hanke-Raus for quadratic regularization to general variational regularization for solving linear as well as nonlinear ill-posed inverse problems in Banach spaces. Under source conditions formulated as variational inequalities, we obtain a posteriori error estimates in term of the Bregman distance. By imposing certain conditions on the random noise, we establish four convergence results; one relies on the source conditions and the other three do not depend on any source conditions. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the performance.

  1. A heuristic for gene selection and visual prediction of sample type.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianping; Grinstein, Georges; Marx, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a heuristic method for gene selection. We target this method, coupled with RadViz visualisation, to the visual prediction of tissue samples which may exist in normal and disease states. As a result of this coupling, the gene selection process, predictive model training and evaluation as well as the model's application for tissue sample prediction can all be intuitively visualised. Such integrated visual analytics enhance the insight provided by classical statistics and machine learning methods. The case study shows our proposed method is cost effective and achieves competitive performance when compared with several widely used techniques.

  2. Knowledge-based control of grasping in robot hands using heuristics from human motor skills

    SciTech Connect

    Bekey, G.A. . Computer Science Dept.); Liu, H. . Artificial Intelligence Systems Section); Tomovic, R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Karplus, W.J. . Computer Science Dept.)

    1993-12-01

    The development of a grasp planner for multifingered robot hands is described. The planner is knowledge-based, selecting grasp postures by reasoning from symbolic information on target object geometry and the nature of the task. The ability of the planner to utilize task information is based on an attempt to mimic human grasping behavior. Several task attributes and a set of heuristics derived from observation of human motor skills are included in the system. The paper gives several examples of the reasoning of the system in selecting the appropriate grasp mode for spherical and cylindrical objects for different tasks.

  3. Radial distribution function for hard spheres in fractal dimensions: A heuristic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andrés; de Haro, Mariano López

    2016-06-01

    Analytic approximations for the radial distribution function, the structure factor, and the equation of state of hard-core fluids in fractal dimension d (1 ≤d ≤3 ) are developed as heuristic interpolations from the knowledge of the exact and Percus-Yevick results for the hard-rod and hard-sphere fluids, respectively. In order to assess their value, such approximate results are compared with those of recent Monte Carlo simulations and numerical solutions of the Percus-Yevick equation for a fractal dimension [M. Heinen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 097801 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.097801], a good agreement being observed.

  4. On a heuristic point of view concerning the citation distribution: introducing the Wakeby distribution.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Yurij L; Markova, Yulia V

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a heuristic approach to modeling the cumulative distribution of citations of papers in scientific journals by means of the Wakeby distribution. The Markov process of citation leading to the Wakeby distribution is analyzed using the terminal time formalism. The Wakeby distribution is derived in the paper from the simple and general inhomogeneous Choquet-Deny convolution equation for a non-probability measure. We give statistical evidence that the Wakeby distribution is a reasonable approximation of the empirical citation distributions. AMS Subject Classification: 91D30; 91D99. PMID:25763305

  5. A heuristic approach based on Clarke-Wright algorithm for open vehicle routing problem.

    PubMed

    Pichpibul, Tantikorn; Kawtummachai, Ruengsak

    2013-01-01

    We propose a heuristic approach based on the Clarke-Wright algorithm (CW) to solve the open version of the well-known capacitated vehicle routing problem in which vehicles are not required to return to the depot after completing service. The proposed CW has been presented in four procedures composed of Clarke-Wright formula modification, open-route construction, two-phase selection, and route postimprovement. Computational results show that the proposed CW is competitive and outperforms classical CW in all directions. Moreover, the best known solution is also obtained in 97% of tested instances (60 out of 62).

  6. Developing and Validating Personas in e-Commerce: A Heuristic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Volker; Williams, Bryn

    A multi-method persona development process in a large e-commerce business is described. Personas are fictional representations of customers that describe typical user attributes to facilitate a user-centered approach in interaction design. In the current project persona attributes were derived from various data sources, such as stakeholder interviews, user tests and interviews, data mining, customer surveys, and ethnographic (direct observation, diary studies) research. The heuristic approach of using these data sources conjointly allowed for an early validation of relevant persona dimensions.

  7. A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support

    PubMed Central

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy; Weir, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients’ self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists’ toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation. PMID:26657618

  8. A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support.

    PubMed

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy; Weir, Charlene

    2016-02-01

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients' self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists' toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation. PMID:26657618

  9. Meta-heuristic algorithms for parallel identical machines scheduling problem with weighted late work criterion and common due date.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenzhen; Zou, Yongxing; Kong, Xiangjie

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this paper investigates the first application of meta-heuristic algorithms to tackle the parallel machines scheduling problem with weighted late work criterion and common due date ([Formula: see text]). Late work criterion is one of the performance measures of scheduling problems which considers the length of late parts of particular jobs when evaluating the quality of scheduling. Since this problem is known to be NP-hard, three meta-heuristic algorithms, namely ant colony system, genetic algorithm, and simulated annealing are designed and implemented, respectively. We also propose a novel algorithm named LDF (largest density first) which is improved from LPT (longest processing time first). The computational experiments compared these meta-heuristic algorithms with LDF, LPT and LS (list scheduling), and the experimental results show that SA performs the best in most cases. However, LDF is better than SA in some conditions, moreover, the running time of LDF is much shorter than SA. PMID:26702371

  10. Development of a core set from a large rice collection using a modified heuristic algorithm to retain maximum diversity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hun-Ki; Kim, Kyu-Won; Chung, Jong-Wook; Lee, Jung-Ro; Lee, Sok-Young; Dixit, Anupam; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Zhao, Weiguo; McNally, Kenneth L; Hamilton, Ruraidh S; Gwag, Jae-Gyun; Park, Yong-Jin

    2009-12-01

    A new heuristic approach was undertaken for the establishment of a core set for the diversity research of rice. As a result, 107 entries were selected from the 10 368 characterized accessions. The core set derived using this new approach provided a good representation of the characterized accessions present in the entire collection. No significant differences for the mean, range, standard deviation and coefficient of variation of each trait were observed between the core and existing collections. We also compared the diversity of core sets established using this Heuristic Core Collection (HCC) approach with those of core sets established using the conventional clustering methods. This modified heuristic algorithm can also be used to select genotype data with allelic richness and reduced redundancy, and to facilitate management and use of large collections of plant genetic resources in a more efficient way.

  11. Minimizing impacts of land use change on ecosystem services using multi-criteria heuristic analysis.

    PubMed

    Keller, Arturo A; Fournier, Eric; Fox, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Development of natural landscapes to support human activities impacts the capacity of the landscape to provide ecosystem services. Typically, several ecosystem services are impacted at a single development site and various footprint scenarios are possible, thus a multi-criteria analysis is needed. Restoration potential should also be considered for the area surrounding the permanent impact site. The primary objective of this research was to develop a heuristic approach to analyze multiple criteria (e.g. impacts to various ecosystem services) in a spatial configuration with many potential development sites. The approach was to: (1) quantify the magnitude of terrestrial ecosystem service (biodiversity, carbon sequestration, nutrient and sediment retention, and pollination) impacts associated with a suite of land use change scenarios using the InVEST model; (2) normalize results across categories of ecosystem services to allow cross-service comparison; (3) apply the multi-criteria heuristic algorithm to select sites with the least impact to ecosystem services, including a spatial criterion (separation between sites). As a case study, the multi-criteria impact minimization algorithm was applied to InVEST output to select 25 potential development sites out of 204 possible locations (selected by other criteria) within a 24,000 ha property. This study advanced a generally applicable spatial multi-criteria approach for 1) considering many land use footprint scenarios, 2) balancing impact decisions across a suite of ecosystem services, and 3) determining the restoration potential of ecosystem services after impacts.

  12. Non-uniform cosine modulated filter banks using meta-heuristic algorithms in CSD space.

    PubMed

    Kalathil, Shaeen; Elias, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an efficient design of non-uniform cosine modulated filter banks (CMFB) using canonic signed digit (CSD) coefficients. CMFB has got an easy and efficient design approach. Non-uniform decomposition can be easily obtained by merging the appropriate filters of a uniform filter bank. Only the prototype filter needs to be designed and optimized. In this paper, the prototype filter is designed using window method, weighted Chebyshev approximation and weighted constrained least square approximation. The coefficients are quantized into CSD, using a look-up-table. The finite precision CSD rounding, deteriorates the filter bank performances. The performances of the filter bank are improved using suitably modified meta-heuristic algorithms. The different meta-heuristic algorithms which are modified and used in this paper are Artificial Bee Colony algorithm, Gravitational Search algorithm, Harmony Search algorithm and Genetic algorithm and they result in filter banks with less implementation complexity, power consumption and area requirements when compared with those of the conventional continuous coefficient non-uniform CMFB. PMID:26644921

  13. Minimizing impacts of land use change on ecosystem services using multi-criteria heuristic analysis.

    PubMed

    Keller, Arturo A; Fournier, Eric; Fox, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Development of natural landscapes to support human activities impacts the capacity of the landscape to provide ecosystem services. Typically, several ecosystem services are impacted at a single development site and various footprint scenarios are possible, thus a multi-criteria analysis is needed. Restoration potential should also be considered for the area surrounding the permanent impact site. The primary objective of this research was to develop a heuristic approach to analyze multiple criteria (e.g. impacts to various ecosystem services) in a spatial configuration with many potential development sites. The approach was to: (1) quantify the magnitude of terrestrial ecosystem service (biodiversity, carbon sequestration, nutrient and sediment retention, and pollination) impacts associated with a suite of land use change scenarios using the InVEST model; (2) normalize results across categories of ecosystem services to allow cross-service comparison; (3) apply the multi-criteria heuristic algorithm to select sites with the least impact to ecosystem services, including a spatial criterion (separation between sites). As a case study, the multi-criteria impact minimization algorithm was applied to InVEST output to select 25 potential development sites out of 204 possible locations (selected by other criteria) within a 24,000 ha property. This study advanced a generally applicable spatial multi-criteria approach for 1) considering many land use footprint scenarios, 2) balancing impact decisions across a suite of ecosystem services, and 3) determining the restoration potential of ecosystem services after impacts. PMID:25794964

  14. North is up(hill): route planning heuristics in real-world environments.

    PubMed

    Brunyé, Tad T; Mahoney, Caroline R; Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A

    2010-09-01

    Navigators use both external cues and internal heuristics to help them plan efficient routes through environments. In six experiments, we discover and seek the origin of a novel heuristic that causes participants to preferentially choose southern rather than northern routes during map-based route planning. Experiment 1 demonstrates that participants who are tasked to choose between two equal-length routes, one going generally north and one south, show reliable decision preferences toward the southern option. Experiment 2 demonstrates that participants produce a southern preference only when instructed to adopt egocentric rather than allocentric perspectives during route planning. In Experiments 3-5, we examined participants' judgments of route characteristics and found that judgments of route length and preferences for upper relative to lower path options do not contribute to the southern route preference. Rather, the southern route preference appears to be a result of misperceptions of increased elevation to the north (i.e., north is up). Experiment 6 further supports this finding by demonstrating that participants provide greater time estimates for north- than for equivalent south-going routes when planning travel between U.S. cities. Results are discussed with regard to predicting wayfinding behavior, the mental simulation of action, and theories of spatial cognition and navigation.

  15. Job-shop scheduling with a combination of evolutionary and heuristic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patkai, Bela; Torvinen, Seppo

    1999-08-01

    Since almost all of the scheduling problems are NP-hard-- cannot be solved in polynomial time--those companies that need a realistic scheduling system face serious limitations of available methods for finding an optimal schedule, especially if the given environment requires adaptation to dynamic variations. Exact methods do find an optimal schedule, but the size of the problem they can solve is very limited, excluding this way the required scalability. The solution presented in this paper is a simple, multi-pass heuristic method, which aims to avoid the limitations of other well-known formulations. Even though the dispatching rules are fast and provide near-optimal solutions in most cases, they are severely limited in efficiency--especially in case the schedule builder satisfies a significant number of constraints. That is the main motivation for adding a simplified genetic algorithm to the dispatching rules, which--due to its stochastic nature--belongs to heuristic, too. The scheduling problem is of a middle size Finnish factory, throughout the investigations their up-to-date manufacturing data has been used for the sake of realistic calculations.

  16. Social heuristics and social roles: Intuition favors altruism for women but not for men.

    PubMed

    Rand, David G; Brescoll, Victoria L; Everett, Jim A C; Capraro, Valerio; Barcelo, Hélène

    2016-04-01

    Are humans intuitively altruistic, or does altruism require self-control? A theory of social heuristics, whereby intuitive responses favor typically successful behaviors, suggests that the answer may depend on who you are. In particular, evidence suggests that women are expected to behave altruistically, and are punished for failing to be altruistic, to a much greater extent than men. Thus, women (but not men) may internalize altruism as their intuitive response. Indeed, a meta-analysis of 13 new experiments and 9 experiments from other groups found that promoting intuition relative to deliberation increased giving in a Dictator Game among women, but not among men (Study 1, N = 4,366). Furthermore, this effect was shown to be moderated by explicit sex role identification (Study 2, N = 1,831): the more women described themselves using traditionally masculine attributes (e.g., dominance, independence) relative to traditionally feminine attributes (e.g., warmth, tenderness), the more deliberation reduced their altruism. Our findings shed light on the connection between gender and altruism, and highlight the importance of social heuristics in human prosociality. PMID:26913619

  17. Heuristics can produce surprisingly rational probability estimates: Comment on Costello and Watts (2014).

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Håkan; Juslin, Peter; Winman, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Costello and Watts (2014) present a model assuming that people's knowledge of probabilities adheres to probability theory, but that their probability judgments are perturbed by a random noise in the retrieval from memory. Predictions for the relationships between probability judgments for constituent events and their disjunctions and conjunctions, as well as for sums of such judgments were derived from probability theory. Costello and Watts (2014) report behavioral data showing that subjective probability judgments accord with these predictions. Based on the finding that subjective probability judgments follow probability theory, Costello and Watts (2014) conclude that the results imply that people's probability judgments embody the rules of probability theory and thereby refute theories of heuristic processing. Here, we demonstrate the invalidity of this conclusion by showing that all of the tested predictions follow straightforwardly from an account assuming heuristic probability integration (Nilsson, Winman, Juslin, & Hansson, 2009). We end with a discussion of a number of previous findings that harmonize very poorly with the predictions by the model suggested by Costello and Watts (2014). PMID:26709414

  18. Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment for irregularly shaped food product volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Siswantoro, Joko; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Abdullah, Azizi; Idrus, Bahari

    2014-01-01

    Volume measurement plays an important role in the production and processing of food products. Various methods have been proposed to measure the volume of food products with irregular shapes based on 3D reconstruction. However, 3D reconstruction comes with a high-priced computational cost. Furthermore, some of the volume measurement methods based on 3D reconstruction have a low accuracy. Another method for measuring volume of objects uses Monte Carlo method. Monte Carlo method performs volume measurements using random points. Monte Carlo method only requires information regarding whether random points fall inside or outside an object and does not require a 3D reconstruction. This paper proposes volume measurement using a computer vision system for irregularly shaped food products without 3D reconstruction based on Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment. Five images of food product were captured using five cameras and processed to produce binary images. Monte Carlo integration with heuristic adjustment was performed to measure the volume based on the information extracted from binary images. The experimental results show that the proposed method provided high accuracy and precision compared to the water displacement method. In addition, the proposed method is more accurate and faster than the space carving method.

  19. Robot navigation in unknown terrains: Introductory survey of non-heuristic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N.S.V.; Kareti, S.; Shi, Weimin; Iyengar, S.S.

    1993-07-01

    A formal framework for navigating a robot in a geometric terrain by an unknown set of obstacles is considered. Here the terrain model is not a priori known, but the robot is equipped with a sensor system (vision or touch) employed for the purpose of navigation. The focus is restricted to the non-heuristic algorithms which can be theoretically shown to be correct within a given framework of models for the robot, terrain and sensor system. These formulations, although abstract and simplified compared to real-life scenarios, provide foundations for practical systems by highlighting the underlying critical issues. First, the authors consider the algorithms that are shown to navigate correctly without much consideration given to the performance parameters such as distance traversed, etc. Second, they consider non-heuristic algorithms that guarantee bounds on the distance traversed or the ratio of the distance traversed to the shortest path length (computed if the terrain model is known). Then they consider the navigation of robots with very limited computational capabilities such as finite automata, etc.

  20. Visualization for Hyper-Heuristics. Front-End Graphical User Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kroenung, Lauren

    2015-03-01

    Modern society is faced with ever more complex problems, many of which can be formulated as generate-and-test optimization problems. General-purpose optimization algorithms are not well suited for real-world scenarios where many instances of the same problem class need to be repeatedly and efficiently solved because they are not targeted to a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics automate the design of algorithms to create a custom algorithm for a particular scenario. While such automated design has great advantages, it can often be difficult to understand exactly how a design was derived and why it should be trusted. This project aims to address these issues of usability by creating an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) for hyper-heuristics to support practitioners, as well as scientific visualization of the produced automated designs. My contributions to this project are exhibited in the user-facing portion of the developed system and the detailed scientific visualizations created from back-end data.

  1. Pharmaceutical information systems and possible implementations of informed consent - developing an heuristic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Denmark has implemented a comprehensive, nationwide pharmaceutical information system, and this system has been evaluated by the Danish Council of Ethics. The system can be seen as an exemplar of a comprehensive health information system for clinical use. Analysis The paper analyses 1) how informed consent can be implemented in the system and how different implementations create different impacts on autonomy and control of information, and 2) arguments directed towards justifying not seeking informed consent in this context. Results and Conclusion Based on the analysis a heuristic is provided which enables a ranking and estimation of the impact on autonomy and control of information of different options for consent to entry of data into the system and use of data from the system. The danger of routinisation of consent is identified. The Danish pharmaceutical information system raises issues in relation to autonomy and control of information, issues that will also occur in relation to other similar comprehensive health information systems. Some of these issues are well understood and their impact can be judged using the heuristic which is provided. More research is, however needed in relation to routinisation of consent. PMID:23157854

  2. Maximizing the nurses' preferences in nurse scheduling problem: mathematical modeling and a meta-heuristic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Hamed; Salmasi, Nasser

    2015-04-01

    The nurse scheduling problem (NSP) has received a great amount of attention in recent years. In the NSP, the goal is to assign shifts to the nurses in order to satisfy the hospital's demand during the planning horizon by considering different objective functions. In this research, we focus on maximizing the nurses' preferences for working shifts and weekends off by considering several important factors such as hospital's policies, labor laws, governmental regulations, and the status of nurses at the end of the previous planning horizon in one of the largest hospitals in Iran i.e., Milad Hospital. Due to the shortage of available nurses, at first, the minimum total number of required nurses is determined. Then, a mathematical programming model is proposed to solve the problem optimally. Since the proposed research problem is NP-hard, a meta-heuristic algorithm based on simulated annealing (SA) is applied to heuristically solve the problem in a reasonable time. An initial feasible solution generator and several novel neighborhood structures are applied to enhance performance of the SA algorithm. Inspired from our observations in Milad hospital, random test problems are generated to evaluate the performance of the SA algorithm. The results of computational experiments indicate that the applied SA algorithm provides solutions with average percentage gap of 5.49 % compared to the upper bounds obtained from the mathematical model. Moreover, the applied SA algorithm provides significantly better solutions in a reasonable time than the schedules provided by the head nurses.

  3. Heuristics for Multiobjective Optimization of Two-Sided Assembly Line Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jawahar, N.; Ponnambalam, S. G.; Sivakumar, K.; Thangadurai, V.

    2014-01-01

    Products such as cars, trucks, and heavy machinery are assembled by two-sided assembly line. Assembly line balancing has significant impacts on the performance and productivity of flow line manufacturing systems and is an active research area for several decades. This paper addresses the line balancing problem of a two-sided assembly line in which the tasks are to be assigned at L side or R side or any one side (addressed as E). Two objectives, minimum number of workstations and minimum unbalance time among workstations, have been considered for balancing the assembly line. There are two approaches to solve multiobjective optimization problem: first approach combines all the objectives into a single composite function or moves all but one objective to the constraint set; second approach determines the Pareto optimal solution set. This paper proposes two heuristics to evolve optimal Pareto front for the TALBP under consideration: Enumerative Heuristic Algorithm (EHA) to handle problems of small and medium size and Simulated Annealing Algorithm (SAA) for large-sized problems. The proposed approaches are illustrated with example problems and their performances are compared with a set of test problems. PMID:24790568

  4. A heuristic two-dimensional presentation of microsatellite-based data applied to dogs and wolves

    PubMed Central

    Veit-Kensch, Claudia E; Medugorac, Ivica; Jedrzejewski, Włodzimierz; Bunevich, Aleksei N; Foerster, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Methods based on genetic distance matrices usually lose information during the process of tree-building by converting a multi-dimensional matrix into a phylogenetic tree. We applied a heuristic method of two-dimensional presentation to achieve a better resolution of the relationship between breeds and individuals investigated. Four hundred and nine individuals from nine German dog breed populations and one free-living wolf population were analysed with a marker set of 23 microsatellites. The result of the two-dimensional presentation was partly comparable with and complemented a model-based analysis that uses genotype patterns. The assignment test and the neighbour-joining tree based on allele sharing estimate allocated 99% and 97% of the individuals according to their breed, respectively. The application of the two-dimensional presentation to distances on the basis of the proportion of shared alleles resulted in comparable and further complementary insight into inferred population structure by multilocus genotype data. We expect that the inference of population structure in domesticated species with complex breeding histories can be strongly supported by the two-dimensional presentation based on the described heuristic method. PMID:17612483

  5. Heuristics for multiobjective optimization of two-sided assembly line systems.

    PubMed

    Jawahar, N; Ponnambalam, S G; Sivakumar, K; Thangadurai, V

    2014-01-01

    Products such as cars, trucks, and heavy machinery are assembled by two-sided assembly line. Assembly line balancing has significant impacts on the performance and productivity of flow line manufacturing systems and is an active research area for several decades. This paper addresses the line balancing problem of a two-sided assembly line in which the tasks are to be assigned at L side or R side or any one side (addressed as E). Two objectives, minimum number of workstations and minimum unbalance time among workstations, have been considered for balancing the assembly line. There are two approaches to solve multiobjective optimization problem: first approach combines all the objectives into a single composite function or moves all but one objective to the constraint set; second approach determines the Pareto optimal solution set. This paper proposes two heuristics to evolve optimal Pareto front for the TALBP under consideration: Enumerative Heuristic Algorithm (EHA) to handle problems of small and medium size and Simulated Annealing Algorithm (SAA) for large-sized problems. The proposed approaches are illustrated with example problems and their performances are compared with a set of test problems. PMID:24790568

  6. The compatibility heuristic in non-categorical hypothetical reasoning: inferences between conditionals and disjunctions.

    PubMed

    Espino, Orlando; Byrne, Ruth M J

    2013-11-01

    A new theory explains how people make hypothetical inferences from a premise consistent with several alternatives to a conclusion consistent with several alternatives. The key proposal is that people rely on a heuristic that identifies compatible possibilities. It is tested in 7 experiments that examine inferences between conditionals and disjunctions. Participants accepted inferences between conditionals and inclusive disjunctions when a compatible possibility was immediately available, in their binary judgments that a conclusion followed or not (Experiment 1a) and ternary judgments that included it was not possible to know (Experiment 1b). The compatibility effect was amplified when compatible possibilities were more readily available, e.g., for 'A only if B' conditionals (Experiment 2). It was eliminated when compatible possibilities were not available, e.g., for 'if and only if A B' bi-conditionals and exclusive disjunctions (Experiment 3). The compatibility heuristic occurs even for inferences based on implicit negation e.g., 'A or B, therefore if C D' (Experiment 4), and between universals 'All A's are B's' and disjunctions (Experiment 5a) and universals and conditionals (Experiment 5b). The implications of the results for alternative theories of the cognitive processes underlying hypothetical deductions are discussed. PMID:23968595

  7. The inherence heuristic: an intuitive means of making sense of the world, and a potential precursor to psychological essentialism.

    PubMed

    Cimpian, Andrei; Salomon, Erika

    2014-10-01

    We propose that human reasoning relies on an inherence heuristic, an implicit cognitive process that leads people to explain observed patterns (e.g., girls wear pink) predominantly in terms of the inherent features of their constituents (e.g., pink is a delicate color). We then demonstrate how this proposed heuristic can provide a unified account for a broad set of findings spanning areas of research that might at first appear unrelated (e.g., system justification, nominal realism, is-ought errors in moral reasoning). By revealing the deep commonalities among the diverse phenomena that fall under its scope, our account is able to generate new insights into these phenomena, as well as new empirical predictions. A second main goal of this article, aside from introducing the inherence heuristic, is to articulate the proposal that the heuristic serves as a foundation for the development of psychological essentialism. More specifically, we propose that essentialism - which is the common belief that natural and social categories are underlain by hidden, causally powerful essences - emerges over the first few years of life as an elaboration of the earlier, and more open-ended, intuitions supplied by the inherence heuristic. In the final part of the report, we distinguish our proposal from competing accounts (e.g., Strevens's K-laws) and clarify the relationship between the inherence heuristic and related cognitive tendencies (e.g., the correspondence bias). In sum, this article illuminates a basic cognitive process that emerges early in life and is likely to have profound effects on many aspects of human psychology.

  8. An efficient approach to improve the usability of e-learning resources: the role of heuristic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Davids, Mogamat Razeen; Chikte, Usuf M E; Halperin, Mitchell L

    2013-09-01

    Optimizing the usability of e-learning materials is necessary to maximize their potential educational impact, but this is often neglected when time and other resources are limited, leading to the release of materials that cannot deliver the desired learning outcomes. As clinician-teachers in a resource-constrained environment, we investigated whether heuristic evaluation of our multimedia e-learning resource by a panel of experts would be an effective and efficient alternative to testing with end users. We engaged six inspectors, whose expertise included usability, e-learning, instructional design, medical informatics, and the content area of nephrology. They applied a set of commonly used heuristics to identify usability problems, assigning severity scores to each problem. The identification of serious problems was compared with problems previously found by user testing. The panel completed their evaluations within 1 wk and identified a total of 22 distinct usability problems, 11 of which were considered serious. The problems violated the heuristics of visibility of system status, user control and freedom, match with the real world, intuitive visual layout, consistency and conformity to standards, aesthetic and minimalist design, error prevention and tolerance, and help and documentation. Compared with user testing, heuristic evaluation found most, but not all, of the serious problems. Combining heuristic evaluation and user testing, with each involving a small number of participants, may be an effective and efficient way of improving the usability of e-learning materials. Heuristic evaluation should ideally be used first to identify the most obvious problems and, once these are fixed, should be followed by testing with typical end users.

  9. The inherence heuristic: an intuitive means of making sense of the world, and a potential precursor to psychological essentialism.

    PubMed

    Cimpian, Andrei; Salomon, Erika

    2014-10-01

    We propose that human reasoning relies on an inherence heuristic, an implicit cognitive process that leads people to explain observed patterns (e.g., girls wear pink) predominantly in terms of the inherent features of their constituents (e.g., pink is a delicate color). We then demonstrate how this proposed heuristic can provide a unified account for a broad set of findings spanning areas of research that might at first appear unrelated (e.g., system justification, nominal realism, is-ought errors in moral reasoning). By revealing the deep commonalities among the diverse phenomena that fall under its scope, our account is able to generate new insights into these phenomena, as well as new empirical predictions. A second main goal of this article, aside from introducing the inherence heuristic, is to articulate the proposal that the heuristic serves as a foundation for the development of psychological essentialism. More specifically, we propose that essentialism - which is the common belief that natural and social categories are underlain by hidden, causally powerful essences - emerges over the first few years of life as an elaboration of the earlier, and more open-ended, intuitions supplied by the inherence heuristic. In the final part of the report, we distinguish our proposal from competing accounts (e.g., Strevens's K-laws) and clarify the relationship between the inherence heuristic and related cognitive tendencies (e.g., the correspondence bias). In sum, this article illuminates a basic cognitive process that emerges early in life and is likely to have profound effects on many aspects of human psychology. PMID:24826999

  10. Midlife Women’s Symptom Cluster Heuristics: Evaluation of An iPad Application for Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Nancy Fugate; Ismail, Rita; Linder, Lauri A.; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona

    2015-01-01

    their symptoms (“really annoying”), the time of occurrence (“night problem”), and symptoms in the cluster (“hot flash”). They attributed their clusters to menopause, life demands, and other symptoms, among other causes. Management strategies that women used included: over the counter preparations, sleep, rest, and other lifestyle changes. Some women requested a copy of their final symptom cluster diagram to discuss with their health care providers. Conclusion Using the C-SCAT M afforded women an opportunity to depict their symptoms and clusters and relationships between them, as well as to provide narrative data about their heuristics. Women’s unsolicited comments about using the cluster diagram to facilitate conversation about their symptoms with their health care providers suggest the potential value of modifying the C-SCAT M and evaluating its use in a health care setting. PMID:25803668

  11. Methodological Drawbacks of Current Educational Software and Suggestions for Radical Improvement Based on Algo-Heuristic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landa, Lev N.

    1998-01-01

    After reviewing 50 educational software titles produced by 21 companies to assess how thinking and thinking skills were developed, the author found most had similar methodological drawbacks. Describes the algo-heuristic methodological position and outlines drawbacks of current software. (PEN)

  12. Teaching Problem Solving; the Effect of Algorithmic and Heuristic Problem Solving Training in Relation to Task Complexity and Relevant Aptitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Leeuw, L.

    Sixty-four fifth and sixth-grade pupils were taught number series extrapolation by either an algorithm, fully prescribed problem-solving method or a heuristic, less prescribed method. The trained problems were within categories of two degrees of complexity. There were 16 subjects in each cell of the 2 by 2 design used. Aptitude Treatment…

  13. The Tip-of-the-Tongue Heuristic: How Tip-of-the-Tongue States Confer Perceptibility on Inaccessible Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Anne M.; Claxton, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that the presence of a tip-of-the-tongue (TOT) state--the sense that a word is in memory when its retrieval fails--is used as a heuristic for inferring that an inaccessible word has characteristics that are consistent with greater word perceptibility. When reporting a TOT state, people judged an unretrieved word as more likely to…

  14. SHRIF, a General-Purpose System for Heuristic Retrieval of Information and Facts, Applied to Medical Knowledge Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findler, Nicholas V.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes SHRIF, a System for Heuristic Retrieval of Information and Facts, and the medical knowledge base that was used in its development. Highlights include design decisions; the user-machine interface, including the language processor; and the organization of the knowledge base in an artificial intelligence (AI) project like this one. (57…

  15. High School Students' Attitudes and Beliefs on Using the Science Writing Heuristic in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putti, Alice

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses student attitudes and beliefs on using the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) in an advanced placement (AP) chemistry classroom. During the 2007 school year, the SWH was used in a class of 24 AP chemistry students. Using a Likert-type survey, student attitudes and beliefs on the process were determined. Methods for the study are…

  16. Sophisticated Approval Voting, Ignorance Priors, and Plurality Heuristics: A Behavioral Social Choice Analysis in a Thurstonian Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Ho, Moon-Ho R.; Tsetlin, Ilia

    2007-01-01

    This project reconciles historically distinct paradigms at the interface between individual and social choice theory, as well as between rational and behavioral decision theory. The authors combine a utility-maximizing prescriptive rule for sophisticated approval voting with the ignorance prior heuristic from behavioral decision research and two…

  17. What Makes an Insight Problem? The Roles of Heuristics, Goal Conception, and Solution Recoding in Knowledge-Lean Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle, Edward P.; MacGregor, James N.; Ormerod, Thomas C.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments investigated transformation problems with insight characteristics. In Experiment 1, performance on a version of the 6-coin problem that had a concrete and visualizable solution followed a hill-climbing heuristic. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the difficulty of a version of the problem that potentially required insight for…

  18. The Shift from "Learner/Doer of Mathematics" to "Teacher of Mathematics": A Heuristic for Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meagher, Michael; Edwards, Michael Todd; Ozgun-Koca, S. Asli

    2013-01-01

    Successful teacher preparation programs provide learning experiences that help teacher candidates make the shift from "student" to "teacher." In this paper we present research on the implementation of a process for providing candidates such experiences. Utilizing the Mathematics as Teacher Heuristic (MATH) process, prospective…

  19. Answer First: Applying the Heuristic-Analytic Theory of Reasoning to Examine Student Intuitive Thinking in the Context of Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryjevskaia, Mila; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; Grosz, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    We have applied the heuristic-analytic theory of reasoning to interpret inconsistencies in student reasoning approaches to physics problems. This study was motivated by an emerging body of evidence that suggests that student conceptual and reasoning competence demonstrated on one task often fails to be exhibited on another. Indeed, even after…

  20. What Is behind the Priority Heuristic? A Mathematical Analysis and Comment on Brandstatter, Gigerenzer, and Hertwig (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Marc Oliver; Wang, Mei

    2008-01-01

    Comments on the article by E. Brandstatter, G. Gigerenzer, and R. Hertwig (2006). The authors discuss the priority heuristic, a recent model for decisions under risk. They reanalyze the experimental validity of this approach and discuss how these results compare with cumulative prospect theory, the currently most established model in behavioral…