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Sample records for hiatal hernia results

  1. Hiatal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your stomach into your esophagus is called GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). GERD may cause symptoms such as Heartburn Problems swallowing ... hiatal hernia when they are getting tests for GERD, heartburn, chest pain, or abdominal pain. The tests ...

  2. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with it (congenital). It often occurs with gastroesophageal reflux in infants . ... chap 138. Yates RB, Oelschlager BK, Pellegrini CA. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia. In: Townsend CM Jr, ...

  3. Hiatal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. But a hiatal hernia might be caused by: Age-related changes in your diaphragm Injury to the area, for example, after trauma or certain types of surgery Being born with an unusually large hiatus Persistent and intense pressure on the surrounding muscles, such as while coughing , ...

  4. Do large hiatal hernias affect esophageal peristalsis?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J; Kia, Leila; Luger, Daniel; Soper, Nathaniel; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aim Large hiatal hernias can be associated with a shortened or tortuous esophagus. We hypothesized that these anatomic changes may alter esophageal pressure topography (EPT) measurements made during high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to compare EPT measures of esophageal motility in patients with large hiatal hernias to those of patients without hernia. Methods Among 2000 consecutive clinical EPT, we identified 90 patients with large (>5 cm) hiatal hernias on endoscopy and at least 7 evaluable swallows on EPT. Within the same database a control group without hernia was selected. EPT was analyzed for lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, Distal Contractile Integral (DCI), contraction amplitude, Contractile Front Velocity (CFV) and Distal Latency time (DL). Esophageal length was measured on EPT from the distal border of upper esophageal sphincter to the proximal border of the LES. EPT diagnosis was based on the Chicago Classification. Results The manometry catheter was coiled in the hernia and did not traverse the crural diaphragm in 44 patients (49%) with large hernia. Patients with large hernias had lower average LES pressures, lower DCI, slower CFV and shorter DL than patients without hernia. They also exhibited a shorter mean esophageal length. However, the distribution of peristaltic abnormalities was not different in patients with and without large hernia. Conclusions Patients with large hernias had an alteration of EPT measurements as a consequence of the associated shortened esophagus. However, the distribution of peristaltic disorders was unaffected by the presence of hernia. PMID:22508779

  5. Pledgeted repair of giant hiatal hernia provides excellent long-term results.

    PubMed

    Kang, Thomas; Urrego, Hernan; Gridley, Asahel; Richardson, William S

    2014-10-01

    Use of mesh in hiatal hernia repairs is a topic of debate. We present our experience in laparoscopic primary (nonmesh) repair of giant hiatal hernia. All laparoscopic antireflux procedures done by a single surgeon from November 1997 to October 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were primary crural closure with pledgets and giant hiatal hernia (greater than one-third of the stomach in the chest by esophagram, greater than 5 cm in length endoscopically, or greater than one-third of the stomach in the chest operatively). We attempted to reach all patients who met inclusion criteria and administered the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) and Quality of Life Scale for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (QLSGR) questionnaires. In total, 89 patients met inclusion criteria. The male-to-female ratio was 32:57. Average age was 62.7 years. Average body mass index was 29.3 kg/m(2). Average length of stay was 2 days, and mean clinic follow-up was 161 days. At the most recent follow-up, 62% of patients were asymptomatic. The most common postoperative symptoms were dysphagia (16%), reflux/emesis (5%), bloating (5%), nausea (4%), epigastric pain (4%), and heartburn (3%). There were six (6.7%) recurrences on esophagogastroduodenoscopy or upper gastrointestinal examination. Five patients with recurrence were symptomatic. Of the 89 patients, 29 (33%) completed the questionnaire, with a mean follow-up of 69.7 months. Average RSI score was 12 (maximum possible score, 45). In six of nine categories, the average score was less than 1 (possible score, 0-5). Average QLSGR score was 12 (maximum possible score, 45). For satisfaction with the present condition, the average score was 4.34 (maximum score, 5), and 82.7% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their present condition. Laparoscopic primary repair of giant hiatal hernia provides excellent long-term results. We found that 62% of patients were asymptomatic at the last follow-up and that 82% of respondents were

  6. Surgical Management of Hiatal Hernia in Children with Asplenia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hiromu; Fukumoto, Koji; Yamoto, Masaya; Nouso, Hiroshi; Kaneshiro, Masakatsu; Koyama, Mariko; Urushihara, Naoto

    2017-06-01

    Purpose  Patients with asplenia syndrome (AS) are likely to have upper gastrointestinal tract malformations such as hiatal hernia. This report discusses the treatment of such conditions. Methods  Seventy-five patients with AS underwent initial palliation in our institution between 1997 and 2013. Of these, 10 patients had hiatal hernia. Of the patients with hiatal hernia, 6 had brachyesophagus and 7 had microgastria. Results  Of the 10 patients with hiatal hernia, 9 underwent surgery in infancy (7 before Glenn operation, 2 after Glenn operation). Two underwent typical Toupet fundoplication, and the other 7 underwent atypical repair including reduction of the stomach. Two patients with atypical repair showed recurrence of hernia and required reoperation. Three patients required reoperation due to duodenal obstruction. Duodenal obstruction occurred due to preduodenal portal vein or abnormal vessels compressing the duodenum. Obstructive symptoms were not seen in any cases preoperatively. Conclusions  In patients with hiatal hernia, typical fundoplication is often difficult because most have concomitant brachyesophagus, microgastria, and hypoplasia of the esophageal hiatus. However, we should at least reduce the stomach to the abdominal cavity as early as possible to increase thoracic cavity volume and allow good feeding. Increasing the volume of the thoracic cavity thus makes Glenn and Fontan circulations more stable. Duodenal obstruction secondary to vascular anomalies is also common, so the anatomy in the area near the duodenum should be evaluated pre- and intraoperatively. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The History of Hiatal Hernia Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Rattner, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This review addresses the historical evolution of hiatal hernia (HH) repair and reports in a chronological fashion the major milestones in HH surgery before the laparoscopic era. Methods: The medical literature and the collections of the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine were searched. Secondary references from all sources were studied. The senior author's experience and personal communications are also reported. Results: The first report of HH was published in 1853 by Bowditch. Rokitansky in 1855 demonstrated that esophagitis was due to gastroesophageal reflux, and Hirsch in 1900 diagnosed an HH using x-rays. Eppinger diagnosed an HH in a live patient, and Friedenwald and Feldman related the symptoms to the presence of an HH. In 1926, Akerlund proposed the term hiatus hernia and classified HH into the 3 types that we use today. The first elective surgical repair was reported in 1919 by Soresi. The physiologic link between HH and gastroesophageal reflux was made at the second half of the 20th century by Allison and Barrett. In the midst of a physiologic revolution, Nissen and Belsey developed their famous operations. In 1957, Collis published his innovative operation. Thal described his technique in 1965, and in 1967, Hill published his procedure. Many modifications of these procedures were published by Pearson and Henderson, Orringer and Sloan, Rossetti, Dor, and Toupet. Donahue and Demeester significantly improved Nissen's operation, and they were the first to truly understand its physiologic mechanism. Conclusion: Hiatal hernia surgery has evolved from anatomic repair to physiological restoration. PMID:15622007

  8. Large Hiatal Hernia Compressing the Heart.

    PubMed

    Matar, Andrew; Mroue, Jad; Camporesi, Enrico; Mangar, Devanand; Albrink, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We describe a 41-year-old man with De Mosier's syndrome who presented with exercise intolerance and dyspnea on exertion caused by a giant hiatal hernia compressing the heart with relief by surgical treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Laparoscopic approach in large hiatal hernia--particular considerations].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, R; Copăescu, C; Iosifescu, R; Timişescu, Lucia; Dragomirescu, C

    2003-01-01

    Large hiatal hernia are associated with permanent or intermittent protrusion of more than 1/3 of the stomach into the chest, single or in associated with other organs, a hiatal defect greater than 5 cm and various complications related to the morphological and physiological modifications. While the laparoscopic approach in small hiatal hernia and gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a standard procedure in large hiatal hernia persists a number of questions and controversies. Between 1995 and 2002 a number of 23 patients with large hiatal hernia (9 men, 14 women), mean age 65.8 years (range 49 to 77) underwent laparoscopic surgery. The majority of the patients had complications of the disease (dysphagia, severe esophagitis, anemia, respiratory and cardiac failure). In 16 cases was a sliding hernia (one recurrent after open procedure), in 2 paraesophageal and in 5 a mixed hernia (two "upside-down" type). In 7 cases we perform, in the same operation, cholecystectomy for gallbladder stones and in one cases Heller myotomy for achalasia. In all cases the repairs was performed by using interrupted stitches to approximate the crurae, but in three of them (recurrent and upside down hernia) we consider necessary to repair with a polypropylene mesh (10 x 5 cm) with a "keyhole" for the esophagus. In these particular cases we do not perform a antireflux procedure, in others 20 cases a short floppy Nissen was done. During the operation one patient developed a left pneumothorax and required pleural drainage. Postoperatively one patient had dysphagia treated by pneumatic dilatation and another die 3 weeks after the surgery because severe respiratory and cardiac failure. Laparoscopic approach is a feasible and effective procedure with good postoperatively results, but required good skills in mininvasive technique.

  10. Evaluation of the Splash Time Test as a Bedside Test for Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lindow, Thomas Akesson; Franzen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Hiatal hernias may present with heartburn, acid regurgitation, dysphagia, chest pain, pulmonary symptoms and globus jugularis. Due to the heterogeneous presentation, there is a need for a simple diagnostic instrument when hiatal hernia is suspected. Hiatal hernia may impair esophageal bolus transportation. The splash time test is a rough measurement of esophageal bolus transportation, where time is measured from the start of swallowing a liquid bolus to the appearance of a “splashing” sound at xiphoid level. We aimed to test the hypothesis that the splash time test is prolonged in patients with hiatal hernia compared to normal subjects. Methods In 30 patients with hiatal hernia, time was measured from swallow to splash using audiosignal recording. Thirty healthy subjects were used as controls. Results Median time from swallow to splash was 4.9 seconds in the patient group and 4.4 seconds in the control group. Five patients, but none of the controls, performed swallows with absence of splash. Using only absence of splash as a pathological result, sensitivity was 23% and specificity was 100%. Conclusion The splash time test is not a sensitive instrument in diagnosing hiatal hernias. The absence of splash, however, seems to be a specific marker of hiatal hernia. Further research is needed regarding which other conditions besides hiatal hernia may cause absence of splash. The splash time test can be replaced by the even simpler “splash test”. PMID:27785281

  11. [Hiatal hernias: why and how should they be surgically treated].

    PubMed

    Braghetto, Italo; Csendes, Attila; Korn, Owen; Musleh, Maher; Lanzarini, Enrique; Saure, Alex; Hananias, Baydir; Valladares, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    There is controversy in the literature about the choice of expectant medical treatment versus surgical treatment of hiatal hernias, depending on the presence or absence of symptoms. This study presents the results obtained by our group, considering disease duration and postoperative results. A total of 121 patients were included and divided by age, disease duration, type of hiatal hernia and postoperative outcome. In 32% of the patients younger than 70 years, symptom duration was longer than 11 years and 68% of those aged more than 71 years had long-term symptoms (p<.05). Type iv hernias (complex) and those with diameters measuring more than 16 cm were observed in the group with longer symptom duration. Complications were more frequent in the older age group, in those with longer symptom duration and in those with type iv complex hernias. There was no postoperative mortality and only one patient (0.8%) with a type iii hernia and severe oesophagitis required reoperation. We recommend that patients with hiatal hernia undergo surgery at diagnosis to avoid complications and risks. Older patients should not be excluded from surgical indication but should undergo a complete multidisciplinary evaluation to avoid complications and postoperative mortality. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Hiatal Hernia as a Total Gastrectomy Complication

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna do Nascimento; de Oliveira, Marcos Belotto; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, gastric cancer is the third leading cause of death among men and the fifth among women in Brazil. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment. The most serious complications associated with surgery are fistulas and dehiscence of the jejunal-esophageal anastomosis. Hiatal hernia refers to herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm, though this occurrence is rarely reported as a complication in gastrectomy. Case Report A 76-year-old man was diagnosed with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. He underwent a total laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy on May 19, 2015. The pathology revealed a pT4pN3 gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient became clinically stable and was discharged 10 days after surgery. He was subsequently started on adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy; however, 9 days after the second cycle, he was brought to the emergency room with nausea and severe epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed a hiatal hernia with signs of strangulation. The patient underwent emergent repair of the hernia and suffered no postoperative complications. He was discharged from the hospital 9 days after surgery. Conclusion Hiatal hernia is not well documented, and its occurrence in the context of gastrectomy is an infrequent complication. PMID:27293395

  13. Evaluation of the Splash Time Test as a Bedside Test for Hiatal Hernia.

    PubMed

    Lindow, Thomas Akesson; Franzen, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Hiatal hernias may present with heartburn, acid regurgitation, dysphagia, chest pain, pulmonary symptoms and globus jugularis. Due to the heterogeneous presentation, there is a need for a simple diagnostic instrument when hiatal hernia is suspected. Hiatal hernia may impair esophageal bolus transportation. The splash time test is a rough measurement of esophageal bolus transportation, where time is measured from the start of swallowing a liquid bolus to the appearance of a "splashing" sound at xiphoid level. We aimed to test the hypothesis that the splash time test is prolonged in patients with hiatal hernia compared to normal subjects. In 30 patients with hiatal hernia, time was measured from swallow to splash using audiosignal recording. Thirty healthy subjects were used as controls. Median time from swallow to splash was 4.9 seconds in the patient group and 4.4 seconds in the control group. Five patients, but none of the controls, performed swallows with absence of splash. Using only absence of splash as a pathological result, sensitivity was 23% and specificity was 100%. The splash time test is not a sensitive instrument in diagnosing hiatal hernias. The absence of splash, however, seems to be a specific marker of hiatal hernia. Further research is needed regarding which other conditions besides hiatal hernia may cause absence of splash. The splash time test can be replaced by the even simpler "splash test".

  14. Hiatal hernia predisposes to nocturnal gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Karamanolis, Georgios; Polymeros, Dimitrios; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Adamopoulos, Adam; Barbatzas, Charalampos; Vafiadis, Irini; Ladas, Spiros D

    2013-06-01

    Nocturnal reflux has been associated with severe complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and a poorer quality of life. Hiatal hernia predisposes to increased oesophageal acid exposure, but the effect on night reflux symptoms has never been investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate if hiatal hernia is associated with more frequent and severe night reflux symptoms. A total of 215 consecutive patients (110 male, mean age 52.6 ± 14.7 years) answered a detailed questionnaire on frequency and severity of specific day and night reflux symptoms. Subsequently, all patients underwent upper endoscopy and were categorized in two groups based on the endoscopic presence of hiatal hernia. Patients with hiatal hernia were more likely to have nocturnal symptoms compared to those without hiatal hernia (78.6 vs. 51.8%, p = 0.0001); 59.2% of patients with hiatal hernia reported heartburn and 60.2% regurgitation compared to 43.8 and 39.3% of those without hiatal hernia, respectively (p = 0.033 and p = 0.003). The proportions of patients with day heartburn or regurgitation were not significantly different between the two groups. Night heartburn and regurgitation were graded as significantly more severe by patients with hiatal hernia (4.9 ± 4.2 vs. 3.2 ± 3.7, p = 0.002, and 3.8 ± 4.2 vs. 2.2 ± 3.5, p = 0.001, respectively). Patients with hiatal hernia had more frequent weekly night heartburn and regurgitation compared to those without hiatal hernia (p = 0.004 and p = 0.008, respectively). More patients with hiatal hernia reported nocturnal reflux symptoms compared to those without hiatal hernia. Furthermore, nocturnal reflux symptoms were significantly more frequent and graded as significantly more severe in patients with presence of hiatal hernia rather than in those without hiatal hernia.

  15. Bronchopulmonary Actinomycosis Associated With Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Alessandro; Cavazza, Alberto; Marchioni, Alessandro; Richeldi, Luca; Paci, Massimiliano; Rossi, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe clinicoradiologic and histopathologic features of bronchopulmonary actinomycosis and to determine whether hiatal hernia (HH) is a potential predisposing factor for bronchopulmonary actinomycosis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed the medical charts of 10 patients who had bronchopulmonary actinomycosis between November 1, 2002, and January 31, 2008. Complete clinical data, radiologic studies (chest radiographs and computed tomographic scans), and histopathologic features were assessed to investigate clinical manifestations and predisposing factors related to bronchopulmonary actinomycosis. RESULTS: The series consisted of 6 men and 4 women, with a mean age of 63.5 years; 8 of the patients were smokers. Cough and fever were the most common symptoms. Chest imaging showed mass-like consolidation in 4 patients, bronchial thickening or lung atelectasis with pleural thickening in 2 patients each, and perihilar irregular mass or multiple bilateral nodules in 1 patient each. Primary or metastatic lung cancer was suspected clinically in 8 of the 10 patients. Foreign body-related endobronchial actinomycosis was diagnosed in 6 patients, 5 of whom had HH; only 1 had gastroesophageal reflux-related symptoms. Because of bronchial obstruction, rigid bronchoscopy was performed in 3 patients, lobectomy in 2, and atypical resection in 1. Antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin was given to all patients, with resolution of actinomycosis. CONCLUSION: Bronchopulmonary actinomycosis is a rare condition that mimics pulmonary malignancy on clinical and radiologic grounds. Diagnosis relies on an accurate patient history and histopathologic examination. Although further confirmation is required, esophageal HH appears to be a potential predisposing factor. PMID:19181645

  16. Assessment and reduction of diaphragmatic tension during hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Daniel Davila; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Wilshire, Candice L; Baik, Peter U; Aye, Ralph W

    2015-04-01

    During hiatal hernia repair there are two vectors of tension: axial and radial. An optimal repair minimizes the tension along these vectors. Radial tension is not easily recognized. There are no simple maneuvers like measuring length that facilitate assessment of radial tension. The aims of this project were to: (1) establish a simple intraoperative method to evaluate baseline tension of the diaphragmatic hiatal muscle closure; and, (2) assess if tension is reduced by relaxing maneuvers and if so, to what degree. Diaphragmatic characteristics and tension were assessed during hiatal hernia repair with a tension gage. We compared tension measured after hiatal dissection and after relaxing maneuvers were performed. Sixty-four patients (29 M:35F) underwent laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair. Baseline hiatal width was 2.84 cm and tension 13.6 dag. There was a positive correlation between hiatal width and tension (r = 0.55) but the strength of association was low (r (2) = 0.31). Four different hiatal shapes (slit, teardrop, "D", and oval) were identified and appear to influence tension and the need for relaxing incision. Tension was reduced by 35.8 % after a left pleurotomy (12 patients); by 46.2 % after a right crural relaxing incision (15 patients); and by 56.1 % if both maneuvers were performed (6 patients). Tension on the diaphragmatic hiatus can be measured with a novel device. There was a limited correlation with width of the hiatal opening. Relaxing maneuvers such as a left pleurotomy or a right crural relaxing incision reduced tension. Longer term follow-up will determine whether outcomes are improved by quantifying and reducing radial tension.

  17. Gastric necrosis secondary to strangulated giant paraesophic hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Díez Ares, José Ángel; Peris Tomás, Nuria; Estellés Vidagany, Nuria; Periáñez Gómez, Dolores

    2016-08-01

    Asymptomatic giant hiatal hernia comprises a relatively common disease, mostly presented in women with 50 years onwards. The therapeutic approach remains controversial in recent years. Under the latest SAGES`revision, all the symptomatic hernias must be repaired, but the symptomatic hiatal hernia definition isn`t even now established. We present the case os a A 67 - year old woman with an asymptomatic hiatal hernia, that is admitted to our hospital owing to toracic and abdominal pain. This pain was related with food intake for 6 months. The patient presents a clear worsening in the last 24 hours, with no other asociated symptomatology. Suspecting an incarcerated hiatal hernia with stomach perforation, the patient is taken to theatre for a laparotomy during the early hours. An atypic gastrectomy of the greater curvature with a gastropexy is performed with fixation to the anterior abdominal wall. The surgery is completed with a feeding jejunostomy. The Manegement of giant paraesophagic hernias, still remains as one of the challenge of the esophageal surgeons.

  18. SSAT maintenance of certification: literature review on gastroesophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Soper, Nathaniel J

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia. GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in the USA. For effective management, a conclusive diagnosis must be made. Most patients are effectively managed by acid suppression therapy, whereas others require procedural treatment. Endoluminal treatment of GERD is an option, but long-term results of this therapy are unknown. The "gold standard" surgical treatment of GERD is laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Large hiatal hernias are difficult to manage with a relatively high rate of recurrent hiatal hernia. Whether or not to use mesh at the hiatus to decrease this occurrence is currently debatable.

  19. Effect of acellular human dermis buttress on laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kyle C; Costello, Kevin P; Baalman, Sara; Pierce, Richard A; Deeken, Corey R; Frisella, Margaret M; Michael Brunt, L; Matthews, Brent D

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of acellular human dermis reinforcement during laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair. A prospective non-randomized, single institution study enrolled patients undergoing laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair. Acellular human dermis, FlexHD (Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation, Edison, NJ) or AlloDerm (LifeCell Inc., Branchburg, NJ) were used to buttress the repair after primary closure. A protocol barium swallow (BAS) was performed at 6 months and then as needed due to clinical indications. Primary outcome measure was recurrence. Patients completed preoperative and postoperative GERD symptom questionnaires and quality of life surveys (SF-36). Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA, Student's t test, Fisher's exact test, or Wilcoxon signed-rank test were utilized as appropriate (p < 0.05 considered statistically significant). Fifty-four patients (10 men and 44 women) with a mean age of 62 ± 10 years underwent laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using Flex HD (n = 37) or AlloDerm (n = 17). Both groups were similar with respect to gender, age, hiatus size, hernia type [sliding/Type I (n = 14) or paraesophageal/Type III/IV (n = 40)], esophageal motor function (manometry), preoperative SF-36 quality of life surveys, and GERD symptom questionnaires. Forty-seven patients (87 %) completed the BAS at 6 months; each group had two recurrences (p = 0.597). At median follow-up of 33 months, there were 3 recurrences (18 %) in the AlloDerm group and 5 recurrences (14 %) in the Flex HD group (p = 0.365). Minimal differences in GERD symptoms or SF-36 scores were detected between groups. However, anti-reflux medication usage, GERD symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved for both groups after laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair. Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair with acellular human dermis reinforcement results in improvement of GERD-related symptoms and quality of life without mesh-associated complications. The type of acellular human

  20. Preliminary Study of Hiatal Hernia Repair Using Polyglycolic Acid: Trimethylene Carbonate Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tejinder P.; Dunnican, Ward J.; Binetti, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Repairing large hiatal hernias using mesh has been shown to reduce recurrence. Drawbacks to mesh include added time to place and secure the prosthesis as well as complications such as esophageal erosion. We used a laparoscopic technique for repair of hiatal hernias (HH) >5cm, incorporating primary crural repair with onlay fixation of a synthetic polyglycolicacid:trimethylene carbonate (PGA:TMC) absorbable tissue reinforcement. The purpose of this report is to present short-term follow-up data. Methods: Patients with hiatal hernia types I-III and defects >5cm were included. Primary closure of the hernia defect was performed using interrupted nonpledgeted sutures, followed by PGA:TMC mesh onlay fixed with absorbable tacks. A fundoplication was then performed. Evaluation of patients was carried out at routine follow-up visits. Outcomes measured were symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or other symptoms suspicious for recurrence. Patients exhibiting these complaints underwent further evaluation including radiographic imaging and endoscopy. Results: Follow-up data were analyzed on 11 patients. Two patients were male; 9 were female. The mean age was 60 years. The mean length of follow-up was 13 months. There were no complications related to the mesh. One patient suffered from respiratory failure, one from gas bloat syndrome, and another had a superficial port-site infection. One patient developed a recurrent hiatal hernia. Conclusions: In this small series, laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernias >5cm with onlay fixation of PGA:TMC tissue reinforcement has short-term outcomes with a reasonably low recurrence rate. However, due to the preliminary and nonrandomized nature of the data, no strong comparison can be made with other types of mesh repairs. Additional data collection is warranted. PMID:22906331

  1. Hiatal hernia repair with gore bio-a tissue reinforcement: our experience.

    PubMed

    Antonino, Agrusa; Giorgio, Romano; Giuseppe, Frazzetta; Giovanni, De Vita; Silvia, Di Giovanni; Daniela, Chianetta; Giuseppe, Di Buono; Vincenzo, Sorce; Gaspare, Gulotta

    2014-01-01

    Type I hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 50-90% of cases. Several trials strongly support surgery as an effective alternative to medical therapy. Today, laparoscopic fundoplication is considered as the procedure of choice. However, primary laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair is associated with upto 42% recurrence rate. Mesh reinforcement of the crural closure decreases the recurrence but can lead to complications, above all nonabsorbable ones. We experiment a new totally absorbable mesh by Gore. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female patient with a 6-year classic history of GERD. Endoscopy revealed a large hiatal hernia and esophagitis. pH study was positive for acid reflux; esophageal manometry revealed LES intrathoracic dislocation. With laparoscopic approach, the hiatal hernia defect was identified and primarily repaired, by crural closure. Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement was trimmed to fit the defect accommodating the esophagus. Nissen fundoplication was performed. Result. Bio-A mesh was easily placed laparoscopically. It has good handling and could be cut and tailored intraoperatively for optimal adaptation. There were no short-term complications. Conclusion. Crural closure reinforcement can be done readily with this new totally absorbable mesh replaced by soft tissue over six months. However, further data and studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes.

  2. Hiatal Hernia Repair with Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Antonino, Agrusa; Giorgio, Romano; Giuseppe, Frazzetta; Giovanni, De Vita; Silvia, Di Giovanni; Daniela, Chianetta; Giuseppe, Di Buono; Vincenzo, Sorce; Gaspare, Gulotta

    2014-01-01

    Type I hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 50–90% of cases. Several trials strongly support surgery as an effective alternative to medical therapy. Today, laparoscopic fundoplication is considered as the procedure of choice. However, primary laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair is associated with upto 42% recurrence rate. Mesh reinforcement of the crural closure decreases the recurrence but can lead to complications, above all nonabsorbable ones. We experiment a new totally absorbable mesh by Gore. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female patient with a 6-year classic history of GERD. Endoscopy revealed a large hiatal hernia and esophagitis. pH study was positive for acid reflux; esophageal manometry revealed LES intrathoracic dislocation. With laparoscopic approach, the hiatal hernia defect was identified and primarily repaired, by crural closure. Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement was trimmed to fit the defect accommodating the esophagus. Nissen fundoplication was performed. Result. Bio-A mesh was easily placed laparoscopically. It has good handling and could be cut and tailored intraoperatively for optimal adaptation. There were no short-term complications. Conclusion. Crural closure reinforcement can be done readily with this new totally absorbable mesh replaced by soft tissue over six months. However, further data and studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. PMID:24864221

  3. Umbilical hernia with cholelithiasis and hiatal hernia: a clinical entity similar to Saint's triad.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Kumakura, Yuji; Honjo, Hiroaki; Hara, Keigo; Yokobori, Takehiko; Sakai, Makoto; Sohda, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We experienced two cases involving the simultaneous presence of cholelithiasis, hiatal hernia, and umbilical hernia. Both patients were female and overweight (body mass index of 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) and had a history of pregnancy and surgical treatment of cholelithiasis. Additionally, both patients had two of the three conditions of Saint's triad. Based on analysis of the pathogenesis of these two cases, we consider that these four diseases (Saint's triad and umbilical hernia) are associated with one another. Obesity is a common risk factor for both umbilical hernia and Saint's triad. Female sex, older age, and a history of pregnancy are common risk factors for umbilical hernia and two of the three conditions of Saint's triad. Thus, umbilical hernia may readily develop with Saint's triad. Knowledge of this coincidence is important in the clinical setting. The concomitant occurrence of Saint's triad and umbilical hernia may be another clinical "tetralogy."

  4. The history of hiatal hernia surgery: from Bowditch to laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Rattner, David W

    2005-01-01

    This review addresses the historical evolution of hiatal hernia (HH) repair and reports in a chronological fashion the major milestones in HH surgery before the laparoscopic era. The medical literature and the collections of the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine were searched. Secondary references from all sources were studied. The senior author's experience and personal communications are also reported. The first report of HH was published in 1853 by Bowditch. Rokitansky in 1855 demonstrated that esophagitis was due to gastroesophageal reflux, and Hirsch in 1900 diagnosed an HH using x-rays. Eppinger diagnosed an HH in a live patient, and Friedenwald and Feldman related the symptoms to the presence of an HH. In 1926, Akerlund proposed the term hiatus hernia and classified HH into the 3 types that we use today. The first elective surgical repair was reported in 1919 by Soresi. The physiologic link between HH and gastroesophageal reflux was made at the second half of the 20 century by Allison and Barrett. In the midst of a physiologic revolution, Nissen and Belsey developed their famous operations. In 1957, Collis published his innovative operation. Thal described his technique in 1965, and in 1967, Hill published his procedure. Many modifications of these procedures were published by Pearson and Henderson, Orringer and Sloan, Rossetti, Dor, and Toupet. Donahue and Demeester significantly improved Nissen's operation, and they were the first to truly understand its physiologic mechanism. Hiatal hernia surgery has evolved from anatomic repair to physiological restoration.

  5. Hiatal hernia and diaphragmatic eventration in a leopard (Panthera pardus).

    PubMed

    Kearns, K S; Jones, M P; Bright, R M; Toal, R; DeNovo, R; Orosz, S

    2000-09-01

    A 1-yr-old male leopard (Panthera pardus) presented for intermittent anorexia, emaciation, and generalized muscle wasting. Plain radiographs, ultrasonography, and esophageal endoscopy led to a diagnosis of diaphragmatic eventration with probable concurrent hiatal hernia. An exploratory laparotomy confirmed both diagnoses, and surgical repair and stabilization were performed. After surgery, the leopard was maintained on small liquid meals for 4 days, with a gradual return to normal diet over 2 wk. By 4 wk after surgery, the leopard was eating well and gaining weight, and it showed no recurrence of clinical signs for 2 yr subsequently, becoming mildly obese.

  6. Hiatal hernia uptake of iodine-131 mimicking mediastinal metastasis of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Khajehrahimi, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    There are a few case reports of hiatal hernia demonstrating thoracic uptake on I-131 scintigraphy. In this case, high thyroglobulin levels in combination with misinterpretation of I-131 uptake in the mediastinum, leaded to mismanagement of the patient. Here we present a case of focal I-131 uptake within a hiatal hernia initially mimicking an isolated mediastinal metastasis. There are many potential causes of false-positive I-131 scan result. In this case, adjunctive chest computed tomography and gastroesophageal barium study helped to elucidate the true nature of this I-131 uptake. False-positive findings may be caused by a wide variety of nonthyroidal carcinomas, which can concentrate radioiodine or from skin contamination. Several organs, such as the gastric, salivary glands, renal cyst, pericardial effusion, and ovarian can accumulate I-131. It should be borne in mind as a potential source of false-positive whole-body I-131 imaging.

  7. [Life with hiatal hernias and reflux disease. An historical synthesis and an update].

    PubMed

    Rossetti, M

    1993-01-01

    By long experience with the problems on hiatal hernias and reflux the author summarizes and analyzes errors and progress in development, interpretation, diagnostic methods and treatment. After the pioneer work done by Akerlund 1926 the hiatal hernia was a sometimes dangerous surgical target. It remained for a long time a gastroenterological prima donna, responsible of all sorts of symptoms. Thoracal or abdominal approach and repair were high risk procedures with logically bad results. After a long way of mistakes and researches hiatal hernias remain a concomitant factor of reflux disease and an important cause of mechanical complications and anemia by para-oesophageal and mixed forms. The studies about pathogenesis and consequences of the reflux are extensive and important in the second half of our century. The treatment of reflux disease was for a long time preponderantly surgical, since 1970 increasingly pharmacological. By critical review of many methods and technics the author describes the birth of fundoplication 1955, the standard procedure with the anterior wall, and analyzes the actual indications despite the long list of efficient drugs. The mixed or para-oesophageal forms of hiatal hernia remain always a surgical problem. The method of choice is here a double gastropexy with fundoplication after regulated partial closure of the big hiatus communis by abdominal approach. The choice of the surgical procedure and the quality of results depend of the school and competence of the surgeon. The rarity of the indication to surgery (nowadays between conventional and, perhaps, mini invasive possibilities) is a problem for the training-program of the young surgeons of the new generation.

  8. Influence of hiatal hernia and male sex on the relationship between alcohol intake and occurrence of Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Manabu; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Kobayashi, Masao; Terao, Shuichi; Sanuki, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Akihiko; Adachi, Masayasu; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Arisaka, Yoshifumi; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Umegaki, Eiji; Azuma, Takeshi

    2018-01-01

    Background The association of alcohol intake with the incidence of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) has been inconsistent. Although hiatal hernia and male sex are well-known risk factors of BE, its effect on the association of alcohol intake with the incidence of BE remains unknown. Aim To investigate whether the influence of alcohol intake on the occurrence of BE might differ depending on male sex and presence of hiatal hernia. Methods We utilized a database of 8031 patients that underwent upper endoscopy for health screening in a prospective, multicenter, cohort study (the Upper Gastro Intestinal Disease study). The incidence of endoscopic columnar-lined esophagus (eCLE; endoscopically diagnosed BE) was the outcome variable. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association between alcohol intake and eCLE stratified by male sex and hiatal hernia, adjusting for clinical features and other potential confounders. Results Alcohol intake (≥20 g/day) showed a marginally significant association with the incidence of eCLE in participants without hiatal hernia (0 vs. ≥20 g/day; odds ratio [OR], 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92–2.85, P = 0.09) but not in participants with hiatal hernia (0 vs. ≥20/day; OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.59–1.65; P = 0.95). Furthermore, alcohol intake (≥20 g/day) was significantly associated with the incidence of eCLE in male participants without hiatal hernia (0 vs. ≥20 g/day; OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.04–4.03; P = 0.04) but not in female participants without hiatal hernia (0 vs. ≥20 g/day; OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.03–2.37; P = 0.42). Conclusions The effect of alcohol intake on the incidence of eCLE might be associated with hiatal hernia status and male sex. PMID:29447244

  9. Gasless laparoscopic surgery plus abdominal wall lifting for giant hiatal hernia-our single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang-Hong; Wu, Ji-Xiang; Yu, Lei; Li, Jian-Ye

    2016-12-01

    Giant hiatal hernia (GHH) comprises 5% of hiatal hernia and is associated with significant complications. The traditional operative procedure, no matter transthoracic or transabdomen repair of giant hiatal hernia, is characteristic of more invasion and more complications. Although laparoscopic repair as a minimally invasive surgery is accepted, a part of patients can not tolerate pneumoperitoneum because of combination with cardiopulmonary diseases or severe posterior mediastinal and neck emphesema during operation. The aim of this article was to analyze our experience in gasless laparoscopic repair with abdominal wall lifting to treat the giant hiatal hernia. We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting from 2012 to 2015 at our institution. The GHH was defined as greater than one-third of the stomach in the chest. Gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting was attempted in 27 patients. Mean age was 67 years. The results showed that there were no conversions to open surgery and no intraoperative deaths. The mean duration of operation was 100 min (range: 90-130 min). One-side pleura was injured in 4 cases (14.8%). The mean postoperative length of stay was 4 days (range: 3-7 days). Median follow- up was 26 months (range: 6-38 months). Transient dysphagia for solid food occurred in three patients (11.1%), and this symptom disappeared within three months. There was one patient with recurrent hiatal hernia who was reoperated on. Two patients still complained of heartburn three months after surgery. Neither reoperation nor endoscopic treatment due to signs of postoperative esophageal stenosis was required in any patient. Totally, satisfactory outcome was reported in 88.9% patients. It was concluded that the gasless laparoscopic approach with abdominal wall lifting to the repair of GHH is feasible, safe, and effective for the patients who cannot tolerate the pneumoperitoneum.

  10. Nasopharyngeal stenosis with concurrent hiatal hernia and megaesophagus in an 8-year-old cat.

    PubMed

    DeSandre-Robinson, Dana M; Madden, Stacey N; Walker, Jackson T

    2011-06-01

    A case of nasopharyngeal stenosis with secondary hiatal hernia is described. An 8-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was referred for a chronic upper respiratory problem and presumptive vomiting. Despite conservative management by the primary care veterinarian, the cat's condition progressed. The cat was presented to an emergency facility prior to referral to a specialty hospital. On presentation, inspiratory stridor was evident. Thoracic radiography revealed a hiatal hernia. Computed tomography indicated pharyngeal edema and probable nasopharyngeal stenosis. Endoscopy confirmed the presence of nasopharyngeal stenosis consistent with either stricture or choanal atresia. Balloon dilation of the choana was performed. The hiatal hernia regressed spontaneously post-resolution of the nasopharyngeal stenosis. The cat remained asymptomatic at recheck 3 months later. Copyright © 2011 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of alginate in patients with GERD hiatal hernia matters.

    PubMed

    Vardar, R; Keskin, M; Valitova, E; Bayrakci, B; Yildirim, E; Bor, S

    2017-10-01

    Alginate-based formulations are frequently used as add-on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy to help control of heartburn and regurgitation. There are limited data regarding the mechanisms and effects of alginate-based formulations. We aimed to evaluate the effects of the sodium alginate intake and its likely temporal relations on intraesophageal reflux events by MII-pH in patients with and without hiatal hernia (HH). Fifty GERD patients (18 with HH, 32 without HH) with heartburn or regurgitation once a week or more common were included. After combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH-metry (MII-pH) had been performed, all patients were asked to eat the same standard meal (double cheeseburger, 1 banana, 100 g regular yoghurt, and 200 mL water with total energy value of 744 kcal: 37.6% of carbohydrates, 21.2% of proteins, and 41.2% of lipids) during two consecutive days. On separate random two consecutive days, all patients took 10 mL of sodium alginate (GA; Gaviscon Advance; Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare, Hull, UK) or 10 mL of water, 30 minutes after the refluxogenic meal. After eating refluxogenic meal, patients were examined ½ hour for basal conditions, 1 hour in upright, and 1 hour in supine positions. Alginate significantly decreased acid reflux after intake at the first hour in comparison to water in patients with HH (6.1 vs. 13.7, P = 0.004) and without HH (3.5 vs. 5.5, P = 0.001). Weakly acid reflux were increased at the first hour in patients with HH (3.4 vs. 1.3, P = 0.019) and without HH (1.7 vs. 5, P = 0.02) compared to water. There was no distinctive effect of alginate on the height of proximal migration of reflux events in patients with HH and without HH. Alginate decreases acid reflux events within a limited time period, especially at the first hour both in patients with and without HH. Alginate has no effect on the height of reflux events along the esophagus both in patients with and without HH. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford

  12. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a brachycephalic dog with hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, M E; Sharp, C R; Garneau, M S

    2014-10-01

    A brachycephalic dog was presented with an acute onset of retching and abdominal discomfort. The dog had a chronic history of stertor and exercise intolerance suggestive of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Radiographs were consistent with a Type II hiatal hernia. The dog was referred and within hours of admission became acutely painful and developed tympanic abdominal distension. A right lateral abdominal radiograph confirmed gastric dilatation and volvulus with herniation of the pylorus through the hiatus. An emergency exploratory coeliotomy was performed, during which the stomach was derotated, and an incisional gastropexy, herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed. A staphylectomy was performed immediately following the exploratory coeliotomy. The dog recovered uneventfully. Gastric dilatation and volvulus is a potentially life-threatening complication that can occur in dogs with Type II hiatal hernia and should be considered a surgical emergency. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  13. Barium swallow for hiatal hernia detection is unnecessary prior to primary sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Goitein, David; Sakran, Nasser; Rayman, Shlomi; Szold, Amir; Goitein, Orly; Raziel, Asnat

    2017-02-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is common in the bariatric population. Its presence imposes various degrees of difficulty in performing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Preoperative upper gastrointestinal evaluation consists of fluoroscopic and or endoscopic studies OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of routine, preoperative barium swallow in identifying HH in patients undergoing LSG, and determine if such foreknowledge changes operative and immediate postoperative course regarding operative time, intraoperative adverse events, and length of hospital stay (LOS). In addition, to quantify HH prevalence in these patients and correlate preoperative patient characteristics with its presence. High-volume bariatric practice in a private hospital in Israel METHODS: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data between October 2010 and March 2015: anthropometrics, co-morbidities, previous barium swallow, preoperative HH workup (type and result), operative and immediate postoperative course. Primary LSG was performed in 2417 patients. The overall prevalence of HH was 7.3%. Preoperative diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease and female gender were independent risk factors for HH presence. Operative times were significantly longer when HH was concomitantly repaired but "foreknowledge" thereof did not assist in shortening this time. Looking for an HH that was suggested in preoperative upper gastrointestinal evaluation slightly prolonged surgery. LOS was not changed in a significant fashion by HH presence and repair, whether suspected or incidentally found. Routine, pre-LSG barium swallow does not seem to offer an advantage over selective intraoperative hiatal exploration, in the discovery and management of HH. Conversely, when preoperative workup yields a false-positive result, surgery is slightly prolonged. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Results of left thoracoscopic Collis gastroplasty with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for the surgical treatment of true short oesophagus in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Type III-IV hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Lugaresi, Marialuisa; Mattioli, Benedetta; Perrone, Ottorino; Daddi, Niccolò; Di Simone, Massimo Pierluigi; Mattioli, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding surgery for true short oesophagus (TSOE). We compared the results of thoracoscopic Collis gastroplasty-laparoscopic Nissen procedure for the treatment of TSOE with the results of standard laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Between 1995 and 2013, the Collis-Nissen procedure was performed in 65 patients who underwent minimally invasive surgery when the length of the abdominal oesophagus, measured intraoperatively after maximal oesophageal mediastinal mobilization, was ≤1.5 cm. The results of the Collis-Nissen procedure were frequency-matched according to age, sex and period of surgical treatment with those of 65 standard Nissen fundoplication procedures in patients with a length of the abdominal oesophagus >1.5 cm. Postoperative mortality and morbidity were evaluated according to the Accordion classification. The patients underwent a timed clinical-instrumental follow-up that included symptoms assessment, barium swallow and endoscopy. Symptoms, oesophagitis and global results were graded according to semi-quantitative scales. The results were considered to be excellent in the absence of symptoms and oesophagitis, good if symptoms occurred two to four times a month in the absence of oesophagitis, fair if symptoms occurred two to four times a week in the presence of hyperaemia, oedema and/or microscopic oesophagitis and poor if symptoms occurred on a daily basis in the presence of any grade of endoscopic oesophagitis, hiatal hernia of any size or type, or the need for antireflux medical therapy. The follow-up time was calculated from the time of surgery to the last complete follow-up. The postoperative mortality rate was 1.5% for the Collis-Nissen and 0 for the Nissen procedure. The postoperative complication rate was 24% for the Collis-Nissen and 7% for Nissen (P = 0.001) procedure. The complication rate for the Collis-Nissen procedure was 43% in the first 32 cases and 6% in the last 33 cases (P < 0.0001). The median follow-up period

  15. Prospective evaluation of surgical management of sliding hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Philipp D; Marks, Stanley L; Pollard, Rachel; Culp, William T N; Kass, Philip H

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate response to surgical management of sliding hiatal hernia (SHH) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in dogs using standardized clinical scoring, videofluoroscopic swallow studies, and impedance planimetry. Prospective clinical trial. A total of 17 client-owned dogs. Dogs were included if they had clinical signs and videofluoroscopic evidence of SHH and/or GER. Owners were asked to complete a standardized canine dysphagia assessment tool (CDAT) preoperatively and postoperatively. Conscious videofluoroscopic swallowing studies and impedance planimetry (IP) were used to evaluate esophageal function and lower esophageal sphincter location and geometry preoperatively and in a subsection of dogs postoperatively. Preoperatively, 13/17 dogs included in the study had a history of regurgitation, and 4/17 had radiographic evidence of aspiration pneumonia. Postprandial regurgitation improved in 8/10 dogs with preoperative regurgitation, and for which completed preoperative and postoperative CDAT questionnaires were available (P < .01). The hiatal hernia severity score improved postoperatively (P = .046) in dogs with preoperative and postoperative videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (n = 12). However, hernia frequency score (P = .2) and IP parameters did not differ significantly between time points. Clinical signs of SHH generally improved with surgery but did not consistently resolve. Videofluoroscopic studies provide evidence that GER and SHH can persist postoperatively in some patients. Based on IP findings, clinical improvement may be attributed to a mechanism independent of lower esophageal sphincter attenuation. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy with Concomitant Hiatal Hernia Repair: an Unresolved Question.

    PubMed

    Dakour Aridi, Hanaa; Asali, Mohammad; Fouani, Tarek; Alami, Ramzi S; Safadi, Bassem Y

    2017-11-01

    The effectiveness of the concomitant repair of hiatal hernia (HHR) during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in reducing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms is still unclear. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of concomitant HHR on postoperative GERD symptoms in our patient population. A retrospective review of patients who underwent LSG with or without HHR between 2011and 2014 was performed. Pre- and postoperative GERD symptoms were assessed at different time intervals until a maximum of 2 years after the surgery. The study included 165 patients; 76 (46%) underwent LSG with concomitant HHR (group A) while the rest underwent only LSG (group B). Baseline GERD complaints were more prevalent in group A (61.8 vs 41.6%, p = 0.04), in which 44 patients (57.9%) had evidence of hiatal hernia on preoperative EGD. In the remaining 32 patients, it was diagnosed intraoperatively. GERD symptoms did not significantly differ between the two groups after years 1 and 2. GERD remission was observed in 21.3% of the 76 patients who underwent concomitant HHR (group A) and in 29.7% of those who did not (group B) while new-onset GERD symptoms were reported in 12 patients (41.4%) in group A and in 24 patients (46.2%) in group B. Routine HHR at the time of LSG does not show an improvement in GERD symptoms. More prospective studies are needed to clarify the role of the routine dissection, identification, and repair of concomitant hiatal hernia during LSG.

  17. [Evaluating an effectiveness of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Mozharovskiy, V V; Tsyganov, A A; Mozharovskiy, K V; Tarasov, A A

    To assess an effectiveness of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) combined with hiatal hernia (HH). The trial included 96 patients with GERD and HH who were divided into 2 groups. The principal difference between groups was the use of surgery in the main group and therapeutic treatment in the comparison group. The effectiveness of surgical treatment is superior to therapeutic treatment of GERD by more than 2.5 times. HH combined with GERD is an indication for surgical treatment. Fundoplication cuff should not lead to angular and rotational esophageal deformation. Nissen procedure in Donahue modification (Short Floppy Nissen) simulates optimally the geometry of esophago-gastric junction and His angle.

  18. Incidental physiological sliding hiatal hernia: a single center comparison study between CT with water enema and CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Revelli, Matteo; Furnari, Manuele; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Paparo, Francesco; Astengo, Davide; Savarino, Edoardo; Rollandi, Gian Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Hiatal hernia is a well-known factor impacting on most mechanisms underlying gastroesophageal reflux, related with the risk of developing complications such as erosive esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus and ultimately, esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is our firm opinion that an erroneous reporting of hiatal hernia in CT exams performed with colonic distention may trigger a consecutive diagnostic process that is not only unnecessary, inducing a unmotivated anxiety in the patient, but also expensive and time-consuming for both the patient and the healthcare system. The purposes of our study were to determine whether colonic distention at CT with water enema and CT colonography can induce small sliding hiatal hernias and to detect whether hiatal hernias size modifications could be considered significant for both water and gas distention techniques. We retrospectively evaluated 400 consecutive patients, 200 undergoing CT-WE and 200 undergoing CTC, including 59 subjects who also underwent a routine abdominal CT evaluation on a different time, used as internal control, while a separate group of 200 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal CT evaluation was used as external control. Two abdominal radiologists assessed the CT exams for the presence of a sliding hiatal hernia, grading the size as small, moderate, or large; the internal control groups were directly compared with the corresponding CT-WE or CTC study looking for a change in hernia size. We used the Student's t test applying a size-specific correction factor, in order to account for the effect of colonic distention: these "corrected" values were then individually compared with the external control group. A sliding hiatal hernia was present in 51 % (102/200) of the CT-WE patients and in 48.5 % (97/200) of the CTC patients. Internal control CT of the 31 patients with a hernia at CT-WE showed resolution of the hernia in 58.1 % (18/31) of patients, including 76.5 % (13/17) and 45.5 % (5/11) of small and moderate

  19. [The association of diffuse pulmonary fibrosis and hiatal hernia: a simple coincidence? (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sauret, J; Casán, P

    1980-03-25

    Gastroesophageal diseases with reflux can cause numerous pulmonary complications (bronchospasm crisis, bronchitis, pneumonias, lung abscesses). These manifestations are very frequent in the hiatal hernias and in some series have reached up to 46 percent of the cases studied. Recently it has been suggested that microaspirations, repeated over a long period of time, may cause an alteration of the pulmonary interstitium and the consecutive development of a clinical and roentgenologic picture similar to pulmonary fibrosis. The aspirations are produced more frequently at night, favoured by the lying down position and because of it the patients present attacks of nocturnal cough. In this paper, two patients who presented the association of pulmonary fibrosis and hiatal hernia with esophageal relux are described. The first case was diagnosed early; he had minimal radiographic anomalies and the disappearance of the respiratory symptomatology was achieved by means of the medical treatment of the esophageal reflux. The second case was in a very advanced stage with severe respiratory insufficiency and gastrointestinal manifestations of many years' evolution. Both patients had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Although there is no experimental proof of the "reflux-fibrosis" theory, we think that this possibility should be kept in mind before diagnosing the interstitial pulmonary pattern as idiopathic, especially in the cases of only slight radiographic and functional involvement susceptible to improvement with correction of the esophageal reflux.

  20. Contribution of hiatal hernia to asthma in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Tong; Ji, Feng; Han, Xin-Wei; Gu, Lin-Xia; Wang, Li; Yue, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Zhong-Gao

    2018-05-01

    To determine the correlation between asthma and hiatal hernia (HH) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related asthma requiring laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery. One hundred and thirty-six GERD patients with medically refractory asthma with (80 patients) or without HH (56 patients) were enrolled. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was assessed by endoscopy, esophageal manometry, reflux monitoring and symptom questionnaires, and treated with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) or LNF with concomitant hiatal hernia repair (LNF-HHR). The outcome measures included patients' satisfaction and drug independence. The patients with HH had lower esophageal sphincters (P = .005) and higher DeMeester scores (P = .014) than those without HH. After an average follow-up of 24 months, symptom scores were significantly decreased from the preoperative values (P < .05). Compared to LNF, LNF-HHR showed a better improvement in both esophageal and asthmatic symptoms (P < .0001 and P = .016, respectively). The patients with GERD with asthma have a high prevalence of HH. The presence of HH maybe correlated with asthma and severe GERD. Actively treating HH not only improved reflux, but also controlled asthma symptoms. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effect of perfusion of bile salts solutions into the oesophagus of hiatal hernia patients and controls.

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, G S; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    Tests of the response to perfusion of the oesophagus were made in 54 patients divided into three groups. Group I consisted of patients with symptomatic hiatal hernia, group II hiatal hernia patients with peptic stricture, and group III normal individuals. Each individual oesophagus was perfused at a rate of 45-65 drops per minute over 25 minutes with six solutions: normal saline, N/10 HCl, taurine conjugates of bile salts in normal saline, taurine conjugates of bile salts in N/10 HCl, glycine conjugates of bile salts in normal saline, and taurine and glycine conjugates in a ratio of 1 to 2 in normal saline. It was found that acidified taurine solutions were more irritating than acid alone. With a 2mM/l solution of taurine in acid, symptoms are produced even in controls. With a 1 mM/l solution of the same conjugates, the majority of normal people feel slight heartburn or nothing, and therefore perfusion into the oesophagus of such a solution could be used as a test for oesophagitis. PMID:941112

  2. Swallow-induced esophageal shortening in patients without hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Masuda, T; Singhal, S; Akimoto, S; Bremner, R M; Mittal, S K

    2018-05-01

    Longitudinal esophageal body shortening with swallow-induced peristalsis has been reported in healthy individuals. Esophageal shortening is immediately followed by esophageal re-elongation, and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) returns to the baseline position. High-resolution manometry (HRM) allows for objective assessment of extent of shortening and duration of shortening. In patients without hiatal hernia at rest, swallow-induced esophageal shortening can lead to transient hiatal hernia (tHH) which at times may persist after the completion of swallow. This manometric finding has not been investigated in the literature, but a question arises whether this swallow-induced transient herniation can effect on the likelihood of gastroesophageal reflux. This study aims to assess the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and the subtypes of swallow-induced esophageal shortening, i.e. tHH and non-tHH, in patients without hiatal hernia at rest. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, we queried a prospectively maintained database to identify patients who underwent HRM evaluation and 24-hour pH study between January to December 2015. Patients with type-I esophagogastric junction (EGJ) morphology (i.e. no hiatal hernia) according to the Chicago classification v3.0 were included. The patterns of the esophageal shortening with swallows were divided into two subtypes, i.e. tHH and non-tHH. tHH was defined as an EGJ double high-pressure zones (≥1 cm) at the second inspiration after the termination of swallow-induced esophageal body contraction. The number of episodes of tHH was counted per 10 swallows and tHH size was measured for each patient. In total, 41 patients with EGJ morphology Type-I met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 47.2 years, 35 patients (85.4%) were women, and the mean body mass index was 33.9 kg/m2. The mean number of tHH episodes was 3 out of 10 swallows; mean maximal tHH size was 1.3 cm. Patients who had tHH in ≥3 out of 10

  3. Severe Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage from Linear Gastric Ulcers in Large Hiatal Hernias: a Large Prospective Case Series of Cameron Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M.; Ohning, Gordon V.; Kovacs, Thomas O.; Ghassemi, Kevin A.; Jutabha, Rome; Machicado, Gustavo A.; Dulai, Gareth S.; Hines, Joel O.

    2013-01-01

    Background and study aims Cameron ulcers are a rare but clinically significant cause of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (SUGIH). Our aims were to describe (1) the diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of patients with Cameron ulcers causing hospitalization for SUGIH, (2) the differences between patients with occult vs. overt bleeding and (3) between patients treated surgically and medically. Patients and methods Over the past 17 years, all consecutive patients hospitalized in our two tertiary referral medical centers for severe UGIH or severe obscure GIH and entered into our large prospective databasis were screened for Cameron ulcer diagnosis. Results Cameron ulcers were diagnosed in 25 patients of 3960 patients with SUGIH (0.6%). 21 patients had follow-up (median [IQR] time of 20.4 months [8.5–31.8]). Patients were more often elderly females with chronic anemia, always had large hiatal hernias, and were usually referred for obscure SUGIH. Twelve (57.2%) patients were referred to surgery for rebleeding and recurrent blood loss while treated with high dose of proton pump inhibitors (PPI). 9 (42.8%) other patients continued PPI without any rebleeding during the follow-up. Patients with overt bleeding had significantly more prior hospitalizations for SUGIH, more often stigmata of hemorrhage on ulcers, and more red blood cell transfusions than patients with occult bleeding. However, there was no difference in rebleeding and mortality rates between the two groups. Conclusions Cameron ulcers in large hiatal hernias are an uncommon cause of SUGIH. Most of patients are referred for obscure GIH. The choice of medical vs. surgical therapy should be individualized. PMID:23616128

  4. Gangrene of the oesophago-gastric junction caused by strangulated hiatal hernia: operative challenge or surgical dead end.

    PubMed

    Schweigert, M; Dubecz, A; Ofner, D; Stein, H J

    2014-06-01

    Gangrene of the oesophago-gastric junction due to incarcerated hiatal hernia is an extremely uncommon emergency situation which was first recognized in the late nineteenth century. Early symptoms are mainly unspecific and so diagnosis is often considerably delayed. Aim of the study is to share experience in dealing with this devastating condition. We encountered three male patients with gangrene of the oesophago-gastric junction caused by strangulated hiatal hernia within the last years. Clinical symptoms, surgical procedures and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Furthermore, we provide a history outline on the evolving surgical management from the preliminary reports of the nineteenth century up to modern times. Early symptoms were massive vomiting accompanied by retrosternal and epigastric pain. Hiatal hernia was already known in all patients. Nevertheless, clinical presentation was initially misdiagnosed as cardiovascular disorders. Upon emergency laparotomy gangrene of the oesophago-gastric junction was obvious while in one case even necrosis of the whole stomach occurred after considerable delayed diagnosis. Transmediastinal esophagectomy with resection of the proximal stomach and gastric pull up with cervical anastomosis was performed in two cases. Oesophago-gastrectomy with delayed reconstruction by retrosternal colonic interposition was mandatory in the case of complete gastric gangrene. Finally all sufferers recuperated well. Strangulation of hiatal hernia with subsequent gangrene of the oesophago-gastric junction is a life-threatening condition. Straight diagnosis is mandatory to avoid further necrosis of the proximal gastrointestinal tract as well as severe septic disease. Surgical strategies have considerably varied throughout the last 100 years. In our opinion transmediastinal oesophagectomy with interposition of a gastric tube and cervical anastomosis should be the procedure of choice if the distal stomach is still viable. Otherwise oesophago

  5. Impact of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia repair on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Garg, Harshit; Vigneshwaran, Balasubiramaniyan; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Ahuja, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of hiatal hernia repair (HHR) on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in morbidly obese patients with hiatus hernia undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). It is a retrospective study involving ten morbidly obese patients with large hiatus hernia diagnosed on pre-operative endoscopy who underwent LSG and simultaneous HHR. The patients were assessed for symptoms of GERD using a Severity symptom score (SS) questionnaire and anti-reflux medications. Of the ten patients, five patients had GERD preoperatively. At the mean follow-up of 11.70 ± 6.07 months after surgery, four patients (80%) showed complete resolution while one patient complained of persistence of symptoms. Endoscopy in this patient revealed resolution of esophagitis indicating that the persistent symptoms were not attributable to reflux. The other five patients without GERD remained free of any symptom attributable to GERD. Thus, in all ten patients, repair of hiatal hernia (HH) during LSG led to either resolution of GERD or prevented any new onset symptom related to GER. In morbidly obese patients with HH with or without GERD undergoing LSG, repair of the hiatus hernia helps in amelioration of GERD and prevents any new onset GER. Thus, the presence of HH should not be considered as a contraindication for LSG.

  6. Changes in lung volumes and gas trapping in patients with large hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Naoum, Christopher; Kritharides, Leonard; Ing, Alvin; Falk, Gregory L; Yiannikas, John

    2017-03-01

    Studies assessing hiatal hernia (HH)-related effects on lung volumes derived by body plethysmography are limited. We aimed to evaluate the effect of hernia size on lung volumes (including assessment by body plethysmography) and the relationship to functional capacity, as well as the impact of corrective surgery. Seventy-three patients (70 ± 10 years; 54 female) with large HH [mean ± standard deviation, intra-thoracic stomach (ITS) (%): 63 ± 20%; type III in 65/73] had respiratory function data (spirometry, 73/73; body plethysmography, 64/73; diffusing capacity, 71/73) and underwent HH surgery. Respiratory function was analysed in relation to hernia size (groups I, II and III: ≤50, 50%-75% and ≥75% ITS, respectively) and functional capacity. Post-operative changes were quantified in a subgroup. Total lung capacity (TLC) and vital capacity (VC) correlated inversely with hernia size (TLC: 97 ± 11%, 96 ± 13%, 88 ± 10% predicted in groups I, II and III, respectively, P = 0.01; VC: 110 ± 17%, 111 ± 14%, 98 ± 14% predicted, P = 0.02); however, mean values were normal and only 14% had abnormal lung volumes. Surgery increased TLC (93 ± 11% vs 97 ± 10% predicted) and VC (105 ± 15% vs 116 ± 18%), and decreased residual volume/total lung capacity (RV/TLC) ratio (39 ± 7% vs 37 ± 6%) (P < 0.01 for all). Respiratory changes were modest relative to the marked functional class improvement. Among parameters that improved following HH surgery, decreased TLC and forced expiratory volume in 1 s and increased RV/TLC ratio correlated with poorer functional class pre-operatively. Increasing HH size correlates with reduced TLC and VC. Surgery improves lung volumes and gas trapping; however, the changes are mild and within the normal range. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Efficacy comparison of laparoscopic Nissen, Toupet and Dor fundoplication in the treatment of hiatal hernia complicated with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Su, Fuzeng; Zhang, Cheng; Ke, Limu; Wang, Zhi; Li, Yiliang; Li, Huiling; Du, Zhi

    2016-09-25

    .25±2.04](both P<0.05), while such results of Dor group were similar to Nissen group[(19.87±10.40) mmHg, 6.15±2.95, all P>0.05]. The GERD Q scores were significantly decreased after operation in 3 groups(Nissen group:10.94±2.20 vs.7.41±1.43, t=11.667, P=0.001; Toupet group: 10.91±2.02 vs.7.18±1.33, t=5.109, P=0.005; Dor group: 10.69±1.69 vs. 7.10±1.30, t=7.610, P=0.002). There was no significant difference in GERD Q scores among three groups (F=1.465, P=0.207). The operative time, blood loss, hospital stay and complications were not significantly different among 3 groups (all P>0.05). Follow-up period was 12-51 months (median 19 months), and no significant difference in recurrence was found [Nissen group: 2 cases (1.3%), Toupet group: 1 case (2.4%), Dor group: 1 case (1.2%), χ 2 =0.363, P=0.834]. It is safe and feasible for these three laparoscopic fundoplications to the treatment of hiatal hernia complicated with GERD. But laparoscopic Nissen and Dor fundoplication are better than Toupet fundoplication in reducing the number of reflux episodes, suppressing long reflux, increasing lower esophageal sphincter pressure (mean resting respiration) and decreasing the incidence of postoperative dysphagia.

  8. Incidence and Risk Factors of Symptomatic Hiatal Hernia Following Resection for Gastric and Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Andreas; Pesthy, Sina; Struecker, Benjamin; Dadras, Mehran; Raakow, Jonas; Knitter, Sebastian; Duwe, Gregor; Sauer, Igor M; Beierle, Anika Sophie; Denecke, Christian; Chopra, Sascha; Pratschke, Johann; Biebl, Matthias

    2017-12-01

    Symptomatic hiatal hernia (HH) following resection for gastric or esophageal cancer is a potentially life-threatening event that may lead to emergent surgery. However, the incidence and risk factors of this complication remain unclear. Data of patients who underwent resection for gastric or esophageal cancer between 2005 and 2012 were assessed and the incidence of symptomatic HH was evaluated. Factors associated with an increased risk for HH were investigated. Resection of gastric or esophageal cancer was performed in 471 patients. The primary tumor was located in the stomach, cardia and esophagus in 36%, 24%, and 40% of patients, respectively. The incidence of symptomatic HH was 2.8% (n=13). All patients underwent surgical hernia repair, 8 patients (61.5%) required emergent procedure, and 3 patients (23%) underwent bowel resection. Morbidity and mortality after HH repair was 38% and 8%, respectively. Factors associated with increased risk for symptomatic HH included Body-Mass-Index (median BMI with HH 27 (23-35) vs. BMI without HH 25 (15-51), p=0.043), diabetes (HH rate: with diabetes, 6.3% vs. without diabetes, 2%, p=0.034), tumor location (HH rate: stomach, 1.2% vs. esophagus, 1.1% vs. cardia, 7.9%, p=0.001), and resection type (HH rate: total/subtotal gastrectomy, 0.7% vs. transthoracic esophagectomy, 2.7% vs. extended gastrectomy, 6.1%, p=0.038). HH is a major adverse event after resection for gastric or esophageal cancer especially among patients undergoing extended gastrectomy for cardia cancer requiring a high rate of repeat surgery. Therefore, intensive follow-up examinations for high-risk patients and early diagnosis of asymptomatic patients are essential for selecting patients for elective surgery to avoid unpredictable emergent events with high morbidity and mortality. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. A systematic review and meta-analysis of mesh versus suture cruroplasty in laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Vernissia; Winger, Daniel G.; Nason, Katie S.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background Equipoise exists regarding whether mesh cruroplasty during laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair improves symptomatic outcomes compared to suture repair. Data Source Systematic literature review (MEDLINE and EMBASE) identified 13 studies (1194 patients; 521 suture and 673 mesh) comparing mesh versus suture cruroplasty during laparoscopic repair of large hiatal hernia. We abstracted data regarding symptom assessment, objective recurrence, and reoperation and performed meta-analysis. Conclusions The majority of studies reported significant symptom improvement. Data were insufficient to evaluate symptomatic versus asymptomatic recurrence. Time to evaluation was skewed toward longer follow-up after suture cruroplasty. Odds of recurrence (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.30–0.87; overall p=0.014) but not need for reoperation (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.13–1.37; overall p=0.149) were less after mesh cruroplasty. Quality of evidence supporting routine use of mesh cruroplasty is low. Mesh should be used at surgeon discretion until additional studies evaluating symptomatic outcomes, quality of life and long-term recurrence are available. PMID:26520872

  10. The Effect of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy with Concomitant Hiatal Hernia Repair on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Morbidly Obese.

    PubMed

    Samakar, Kamran; McKenzie, Travis J; Tavakkoli, Ali; Vernon, Ashley H; Robinson, Malcolm K; Shikora, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is controversial. Although concomitant hiatal hernia repair (HHR) at the time of LSG is common and advocated by many, there are few data on the outcomes of GERD symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of concomitant HHR on GERD symptoms in morbidly obese patients undergoing LSG. A single institution, multi-surgeon, prospectively maintained database was examined to identify patients who underwent LSG and concomitant HHR from December 2010 to October 2013. Patient characteristics, operative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. Standardized patient questionnaires administered both pre- and postoperatively were utilized. Primary endpoints included subjective reflux symptoms and the need for antisecretory therapy. Weight loss was considered a secondary endpoint. Fifty-eight patients were identified meeting inclusion criteria (LSG + HHR), with a mean follow-up of 97.5 weeks (range 44-172 weeks). The mean age of the cohort was 49.5 ± 11.2 years, with 74.1 % being female. Mean preoperative BMI was 44.2 ± 6.6 kg/m(2). Preoperative upper gastrointestinal contrast series was performed in all patients and demonstrated a hiatal hernia in 34.5 % of patients and reflux in 15.5 % of patients. Preoperatively, 44.8 % (n = 26) of patients reported subjective symptoms of reflux and/or required daily antisecretory therapy [Corrected]. After LSG + HHR, 34.6 % of symptomatic patients had resolution of their symptoms off therapy while the rest remained symptomatic and required daily antisecretory therapy; 84.4 % of patients that were asymptomatic preoperatively remained asymptomatic after surgery. New onset reflux symptoms requiring daily antisecretory therapy was seen in 15.6 % of patients who were previously asymptomatic. Post surgical weight loss did not correlate with the presence or resolution of reflux symptoms. Based

  11. Reversibility of cardiopulmonary impairment after laparoscopic repair of large hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonavina, Luigi; Lombardi, Massimo; Bandera, Francesco; Secchi, Francesco; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Giant hiatus hernia with or without intrathoracic gastric volvulus often presents with symptoms suggestive of both cardiac and pulmonary compression. Cardiopulmonary impairment may be reversible in these patients by laparoscopic crural repair and fundoplication as shown in this case report. Cardiac magnetic resonance and the cardiopulmonary exercise test may help selecting patients for surgery. These preliminary findings led us to start a prospective study using this multimodality diagnostic approach. PMID:26210719

  12. Mechanisms of Barrett’s esophagus (clinical): LES dysfunction, hiatal hernia, peristaltic defects

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Barrett’s esophagus, with the potential to develop into esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), is a major complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, about 50% of patients developing EAC had no known GERD beforehand. Hence, while GERD symptoms, esophagitis, and Barrett’s have a number of common determinants (esophagogastric junction (EGJ) incompetence, impaired esophageal clearance mechanisms, hiatus hernia) they also have some independent determinants. Further, although excess esophageal acid exposure plays a major role in the genesis of long-segment Barrett’s esophagus there is minimal evidence supporting this for short-segment Barrett’s. Hence, these may have unique pathophysiological features as well. Long-segment Barrett’s seems to share most, if not all, of the risk factors for esophagitis, particularly high-grade esophagitis. However, it is uncertain if EGJ function and acid clearance are more severely impaired in patients with long-segment Barrett’s compared to patients with high-grade esophagitis. With respect to short-segment Barrett’s, the acid pocket may play an important pathogenic role. Conceptually, extension of the acid pocket into the distal esophagus, also known as intra-sphincteric reflux, provides a mechanism or acid exposure of the distal esophageal mucosa without the occurrence of discrete reflux events, which are more likely to prompt reflux symptoms and lead to the development of esophagitis. Hence, intra-sphincteric reflux related to extension of the acid/no acid interface at the proximal margin of the acid pocket may be key in the development of short segment Barrett’s. However, currently this is still somewhat speculative and further studies are required to confirm this. PMID:25743453

  13. Mechanisms of Barrett's oesophagus (clinical): LOS dysfunction, hiatal hernia, peristaltic defects.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Barrett's oesophagus, with the potential to develop into oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), is a major complication of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD). However, about 50% of patients developing OAC had no known GORD beforehand. Hence, while GORD symptoms, oesophagitis, and Barrett's have a number of common determinants (oesophagogastric junction (OGJ) incompetence, impaired oesophageal clearance mechanisms, hiatus hernia) they also have some independent determinants. Further, although excess oesophageal acid exposure plays a major role in the genesis of long-segment Barrett's oesophagus there is minimal evidence supporting this for short-segment Barrett's. Hence, these may have unique pathophysiological features as well. Long-segment Barrett's seems to share most, if not all, of the risk factors for oesophagitis, particularly high-grade oesophagitis. However, it is uncertain if OGJ function and acid clearance are more severely impaired in patients with long-segment Barrett's compared to patients with high-grade oesophagitis. With respect to short-segment Barrett's, the acid pocket may play an important pathogenic role. Conceptually, extension of the acid pocket into the distal oesophagus, also known as intra-sphincteric reflux, provides a mechanism or acid exposure of the distal osophageal mucosa without the occurrence of discrete reflux events, which are more likely to prompt reflux symptoms and lead to the development of oesophagitis. Hence, intra-sphincteric reflux related to extension of the acid/no acid interface at the proximal margin of the acid pocket may be key in the development of short segment Barrett's. However, currently this is still somewhat speculative and further studies are required to confirm this. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gastroesophageal pressure gradients in gastroesophageal reflux disease: relations with hiatal hernia, body mass index, and esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Durk R; van Herwaarden, Margot A; Smout, André J P M; Samsom, Melvin

    2008-06-01

    The roles of intragastric pressure (IGP), intraesophageal pressure (IEP), gastroesophageal pressure gradient (GEPG), and body mass index (BMI) in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia (HH) are only partly understood. In total, 149 GERD patients underwent stationary esophageal manometry, 24-h pH-metry, and endoscopy. One hundred three patients had HH. Linear regression analysis showed that each kilogram per square meter of BMI caused a 0.047-kPa increase in inspiratory IGP (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.026-0.067) and a 0.031-kPa increase in inspiratory GEPG (95% CI 0.007-0.055). Each kilogram per square meter of BMI caused expiratory IGP to increase with 0.043 kPa (95% CI 0.025-0.060) and expiratory IEP with 0.052 kPa (95% CI 0.027-0.077). Each added year of age caused inspiratory IEP to decrease by 0.008 kPa (95% CI -0.015-0.001) and inspiratory GEPG to increase by 0.008 kPa (95% CI 0.000-0.015). In binary logistic regression analysis, HH was predicted by inspiratory and expiratory IGP (odds ratio [OR] 2.93 and 2.62, respectively), inspiratory and expiratory GEPG (OR 3.19 and 2.68, respectively), and BMI (OR 1.72/5 kg/m(2)). In linear regression analysis, HH caused an average 5.09% increase in supine acid exposure (95% CI 0.96-9.22) and an average 3.46% increase in total acid exposure (95% CI 0.82-6.09). Each added year of age caused an average 0.10% increase in upright acid exposure and a 0.09% increase in total acid exposure (95% CI 0.00-0.20 and 0.00-0.18). BMI predicts IGP, inspiratory GEPG, and expiratory IEP. Age predicts inspiratory IEP and GEPG. Presence of HH is predicted by IGP, GEPG, and BMI. GEPG is not associated with acid exposure.

  15. Small volume acid reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with hiatal hernia is only detectable by pH-metry but not by multichannel intraluminal impedance.

    PubMed

    Weigt, J; Malfertheiner, P

    2013-07-01

    Until now, it is uncertain if the so-called pH-only reflux episodes that consist of a pH drop without evidence of retrograde bolus movement in multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) represent reflux episodes or artifacts. Hiatal hernia (HH) may allow reflux of small volumes to occur that can be detected by pH-metry but not by MII. The aim was to search for a mechanism that can explain pH-only reflux, 20 patients (12 females and 8 males, median age 52 years, interquartile range [IQR]: 40.5-60.75 years) were investigated with MII-pH off PPI. Impedance and pH-metry data were analyzed separately. The differences in detection rate of acid reflux between pH-metry and MII were correlated with the presence of HH. In an in vitro experiment, MII-pH probes were flushed with citric acid in plastic tubes of different size with capillary diameter and diameters of 2.5 mm and 4.5 mm, while recording pH values and impedance. HH was present in six patients and absent in 14 patients. In patients with HH in comparison with patients with absent HH, the difference of acid reflux detection between pH-metry and MII is significantly higher (70%, IQR: 15-88% and 3.6%, IQR: 0-31%, respectively). In vitro all simulated reflux lead to a fall in pH whereas a corresponding decrease in impedance was only recognizable in the 4.5-mm plastic tubes. Acid reflux episodes in patients with HH are more frequently detected by pH-metry than by MII. Small volume reflux that does not lead to a decrease in impedance is the likely explanation for this phenomenon. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. Laparoscopic surgery of esophageal hiatus hernia – single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Piątkowski, Jacek; Jackowski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal hiatal hernias are the most frequent types of internal hernias. This condition involves disturbance of normal functioning of the stomach cardiac mechanism and reflux of the gastric contents to the esophagus. Aim: To evaluate postoperative results in our Clinic and the comparison of these results to data from the literature. Material and methods One hundred and seventy-eight patients underwent surgery due to esophageal hiatal hernia at the Clinic of General, Gastroenterological and Oncological Surgery, Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland, from 2006 to 2011. All operations were performed using laparoscopy. Fundoplication by means of the Nissen-Rossetti method was carried out in 172 patients while Toupet's and Dor's methods were applied in 4 and 2 patients, respectively. Results Average time of the surgery was 82 min (55–140 min). Conversion was performed in 4 cases. No serious intraoperative complications were noted. In the postoperative period, dysphagia was reported in 20 patients (11.2%). Postoperative wound infection was observed in 1 patient (0.56%). Hernias in the trocar insertion area were reported in 3 patients (1.68%). Ailments recurred in 6 patients. The recurrence of esophageal hiatal hernia was confirmed in 2 patients. Patients with recurrent hernia were re-operated using a laparoscopic approach. Conclusions Laparoscopic surgery is a simple and effective approach for patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms due to diaphragmatic esophageal hiatus hernia. The number of complications is lower after laparoscopic procedures than after “open” operations. PMID:24729804

  17. [The systematization and the etiopathogenicity of diaphragmatic hernias].

    PubMed

    Alecu, L

    2001-01-01

    The author, based on up to date published dates, intends to present the classification and ethiopathogeny of the diaphragmatic hernias, except the aesophagic hiatus oms. This is an interesting chapter of the borderline surgery (abdominal and thorax). They are placed on the second position in frequency (after the hiatal hernias) in the diaphragmatic pathology; they are internal hernias, through congenital or obtained holes which allow to abdominal viscera to pass into thorax. They are--in the most cases, even elderly ones-congenital, result of the abnormalities in the embrionary growth of the diaphragm. A special place' is represented by the traumatic hernias.

  18. Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... induce hernias: obesity or sudden weight gain lifting heavy objects diarrhea or constipation persistent coughing or sneezing ... might include pain when you cough, lift something heavy, or bend over. These types of hernias require ...

  19. Hiatal hernia repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest cavity. This can cause heartburn (gastro-esophageal reflux: GER) as gastric acid backflows from the stomach ... the esophagus from the backflow of gastric fluid (reflux) Narrowing of the opening (hiatus) through the diaphragm ( ...

  20. [Diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Alecu, L

    2002-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias (congenital and traumatic) belongs to thoracoabdominal surgery which is a borderline chapter. Considering frequency, they are on the second place in the diaphragmatic pathology, after hiatal hernias. The author presents the criterias of the clinical examination, based on the bibliographic datas: also by presents the imagistic investigations used for identification of the diaphragmatic hernias, excepting the oesophageal hiatus hernias. There are some particular features appearing in the diagnostical algorithm, too.

  1. Limited Hiatal Dissection Without Fundoplication Results in Comparable Symptomatic Outcomes to Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy with Anterior Fundoplication.

    PubMed

    DeHaan, Reece K; Frelich, Matthew J; Gould, Jon C

    2016-07-01

    Previous randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that partial fundoplication following Heller myotomy results in less pathologic acid exposure to the esophagus when compared to myotomy without fundoplication. Recent studies have questioned the necessity of a fundoplication, especially when a limited hiatal dissection (LHD) is performed and the angle of His is preserved. This is a retrospective review of prospectively maintained data. All patients underwent primary Heller myotomy for achalasia over a 30-month period. In select patients, an LHD was performed anteriorly. Symptomatic outcomes were assessed up to 2 years postoperation using the Achalasia Severity Questionnaire (ASQ), Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI), and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Health-Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQL). A total of 31 patients underwent Heller myotomy during the study interval. The majority of patients underwent Heller myotomy with full hiatal dissection (FHD) (21, 68%). Intraoperative mucosal perforations occurred in 3 (14%) patients undergoing FHD. Patient demographics, surgery details, and baseline symptomatic outcomes did not differ significantly preoperatively. At greater than 1 year postoperation, there was no significant difference between the groups for ASQ, GERD-HRQL, and GIGLI (P = .76, .78, and .33, respectively). Heller myotomy with LHD and no fundoplication and Heller myotomy with FHD and partial fundoplication result in similar GERD-related quality of life outcomes. Further studies (including pH studies) are necessary to determine if fundoplication is a necessary step in selected patients in whom an LHD is possible.

  2. [Hiatal hernia and reflux disease--long-term results following fundoplication and consequences in therapeutic failures].

    PubMed

    Ackermann, C; Margreth, L; Muller, C; Harder, F

    1987-01-01

    10 to 20 years (median 15.1 years) after fundoplication for primary reflux disease 257 patients were questioned about their symptoms. Data of 163 patients could be analyzed. 21.4% of the patients have persistent or recurrent reflux symptoms, about half of them (9.8%) need medical treatment. Adverse side-effects of the fundoplication are frequent: dysphagia in 28.2%, gas-bloat in 50.3%. Using the Visick criteria for classification we found Visick grade I and II for 75.5%, grade III for 17.2%, and IV for 7.4%. Diagnostic and therapeutic concepts in case of failed reflux control are discussed.

  3. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: gold standard in bilateral hernia repair? Results of more than 2800 patients in comparison to literature.

    PubMed

    Wauschkuhn, Constantin Aurel; Schwarz, Jochen; Boekeler, Ulf; Bittner, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of open and endoscopic hernia surgery are still being discussed. Until now there has been no study that evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of bilateral hernia repair in a large number of patients. Our prospectively collected database was analyzed to compare the results of laparoscopic bilateral with laparoscopic unilateral hernia repair. We then compared these results with the results of a literature review regarding open and laparoscopic bilateral hernia repair. From April 1993 to December 2007 there were 7240 patients with unilateral primary hernia (PH) and 2880 patients with bilateral hernia (5760 hernias) who underwent laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal patch plastic (TAPP). Of the 10,120 patients, 28.5% had bilateral hernias. Adjusted for the number of patients operated on, the mean duration of surgery for unilateral hernia repair was shorter than that for bilateral repair (45 vs. 70 min), but period of disability (14 vs. 14 days) was the same. Adjusted for the number of hernias repaired, morbidity (1.9 vs. 1.4%), reoperation (0.5 vs. 0.43%), and recurrence rate (0.63 vs. 0.42%) were similar for unilateral versus bilateral repair, respectively. The review of the literature shows a significantly shorter time out of work after laparoscopic bilateral repair than after the bilateral open approach. Simultaneous laparoscopic repair of bilateral inguinal hernias does not increase the risk for the patient and has an equal length of down time compared with unilateral repair. According to literature, recovery after laparoscopic repair is faster than after open simultaneous repair. Laparoscopic/endoscopic inguinal hernia repair of bilateral hernias should be recommended as the gold standard.

  4. Inguinal hernia repair: are the results from a general hospital comparable to those from dedicated hernia centres?

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Kai Xiong; Lo, Hong Yee; Neo, Jun Xiang Andy; Appasamy, Vijayan; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We aimed to report the outcomes of inguinal hernia repair performed at Tan Tock Seng Hospital and compare them with those performed at dedicated hernia centres. METHODS We retrospectively analysed the medical records and telephone interviews of 520 patients who underwent inguinal hernia repair in 2010. RESULTS The majority of the patients were male (498 [95.8%] men vs. 22 [4.2%] women). The mean age was 59.9 ± 15.7 years. Most patients (n = 445, 85.6%) had unilateral hernias (25.8% direct, 64.3% indirect, 9.9% pantaloon). The overall recurrence rate was 3.8%, with a mean time to recurrence of 12.0 ± 8.6 months. Risk factors for recurrence included contaminated wounds (odds ratio [OR] 50.325; p = 0.004), female gender (OR 8.757; p = 0.003) and pantaloon hernias (OR 5.059; p = 0.013). Complication rates were as follows: chronic pain syndrome (1.2%), hypoaesthesia (5.2%), wound dehiscence (0.4%), infection (0.6%), haematoma/seroma (4.8%), urinary retention (1.3%) and intraoperative visceral injury (0.6%). Most procedures were open repairs (67.7%), and laparoscopic repair constituted 32.3% of all the inguinal hernia repairs. Open repairs resulted in longer operating times than laparoscopic repairs (86.6 mins vs. 71.6 mins; p < 0.001), longer hospital stays (2.7 days vs. 0.7 days; p = 0.020) and a higher incidence of post-repair hypoaesthesia (6.8% vs. 1.8%; p = 0.018). However, there were no significant differences in recurrence or other complications between open and laparoscopic repair. CONCLUSION A general hospital with strict protocols and teaching methodologies can achieve inguinal hernia repair outcomes comparable to those of dedicated hernia centres. PMID:24763834

  5. Inguinal hernia repair: are the results from a general hospital comparable to those from dedicated hernia centres?

    PubMed

    Cheong, Kai Xiong; Lo, Hong Yee; Neo, Jun Xiang Andy; Appasamy, Vijayan; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2014-04-01

    We aimed to report the outcomes of inguinal hernia repair performed at Tan Tock Seng Hospital and compare them with those performed at dedicated hernia centres. We retrospectively analysed the medical records and telephone interviews of 520 patients who underwent inguinal hernia repair in 2010. The majority of the patients were male (498 [95.8%] men vs. 22 [4.2%] women). The mean age was 59.9 ± 15.7 years. Most patients (n = 445, 85.6%) had unilateral hernias (25.8% direct, 64.3% indirect, 9.9% pantaloon). The overall recurrence rate was 3.8%, with a mean time to recurrence of 12.0 ± 8.6 months. Risk factors for recurrence included contaminated wounds (odds ratio [OR] 50.325; p = 0.004), female gender (OR 8.757; p = 0.003) and pantaloon hernias (OR 5.059; p = 0.013). Complication rates were as follows: chronic pain syndrome (1.2%), hypoaesthesia (5.2%), wound dehiscence (0.4%), infection (0.6%), haematoma/seroma (4.8%), urinary retention (1.3%) and intraoperative visceral injury (0.6%). Most procedures were open repairs (67.7%), and laparoscopic repair constituted 32.3% of all the inguinal hernia repairs. Open repairs resulted in longer operating times than laparoscopic repairs (86.6 mins vs. 71.6 mins; p < 0.001), longer hospital stays (2.7 days vs. 0.7 days; p = 0.020) and a higher incidence of post-repair hypoaesthesia (6.8% vs. 1.8%; p = 0.018). However, there were no significant differences in recurrence or other complications between open and laparoscopic repair. A general hospital with strict protocols and teaching methodologies can achieve inguinal hernia repair outcomes comparable to those of dedicated hernia centres.

  6. Hernia repair in the Lombardy region in 2000: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, F; Rusconi, A; Galimberti, A; Grassi, M

    2004-08-01

    Hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure in general surgery in Italy and in the Lombardy region. In the last decade, the use of mesh, the concept of a tension-free technique, and the postoperative rate of recurrences after Bassini or Shouldice operations have completely changed the surgical approach to hernia repair. For this reason, we sent a questionnaire to 148 surgical departments in the Lombardy region to investigate about total hernia operations performed in 2000 in Lombardy, the surgical approach, the surgical techniques used, the type of anesthesia and the hospital stay. One hundred five out of 148 surgical departments returned the questionnaire, and we collected information on a total of 16,935 surgical operations for hernia: 16,494 were performed using tension-free techniques. The inguinal anterior approach is the one of choice for primary and recurrent inguinal hernia, whereas the open preperitoneal and laparoscopic approaches are limited to bilateral and recurrent hernias. The majority of cases were treated under locoregional anesthesia and with a hospital stay of two nights.

  7. Long-term follow-up results of umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Venclauskas, Linas; Zilinskas, Justas; Zviniene, Kristina; Kiudelis, Mindaugas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Multiple suture techniques and various mesh repairs are used in open or laparoscopic umbilical hernia (UH) surgery. Aim To compare long-term follow-up results of UH repair in different hernia surgery groups and to identify risk factors for UH recurrence. Material and methods A retrospective analysis of 216 patients who underwent elective surgery for UH during a 10-year period was performed. The patients were divided into three groups according to surgery technique (suture, mesh and laparoscopic repair). Early and long-term follow-up results including hospital stay, postoperative general and wound complications, recurrence rate and postoperative patient complaints were reviewed. Risk factors for recurrence were also analyzed. Results One hundred and forty-six patients were operated on using suture repair, 52 using open mesh and 18 using laparoscopic repair technique. 77.8% of patients underwent long-term follow-up. The postoperative wound complication rate and long-term postoperative complaints were significantly higher in the open mesh repair group. The overall hernia recurrence rate was 13.1%. Only 2 (1.7%) patients with small hernias (< 2 cm) had a recurrence in the suture repair group. Logistic regression analysis showed that body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m2, diabetes and wound infection were independent risk factors for umbilical hernia recurrence. Conclusions The overall umbilical hernia recurrence rate was 13.1%. Body mass index > 30 kg/m2, diabetes and wound infection were independent risk factors for UH recurrence. According to our study results, laparoscopic medium and large umbilical hernia repair has slight advantages over open mesh repair concerning early postoperative complications, long-term postoperative pain and recurrence. PMID:29362649

  8. Long-term follow-up results of umbilical hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Venclauskas, Linas; Jokubauskas, Mantas; Zilinskas, Justas; Zviniene, Kristina; Kiudelis, Mindaugas

    2017-12-01

    Multiple suture techniques and various mesh repairs are used in open or laparoscopic umbilical hernia (UH) surgery. To compare long-term follow-up results of UH repair in different hernia surgery groups and to identify risk factors for UH recurrence. A retrospective analysis of 216 patients who underwent elective surgery for UH during a 10-year period was performed. The patients were divided into three groups according to surgery technique (suture, mesh and laparoscopic repair). Early and long-term follow-up results including hospital stay, postoperative general and wound complications, recurrence rate and postoperative patient complaints were reviewed. Risk factors for recurrence were also analyzed. One hundred and forty-six patients were operated on using suture repair, 52 using open mesh and 18 using laparoscopic repair technique. 77.8% of patients underwent long-term follow-up. The postoperative wound complication rate and long-term postoperative complaints were significantly higher in the open mesh repair group. The overall hernia recurrence rate was 13.1%. Only 2 (1.7%) patients with small hernias (< 2 cm) had a recurrence in the suture repair group. Logistic regression analysis showed that body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m 2 , diabetes and wound infection were independent risk factors for umbilical hernia recurrence. The overall umbilical hernia recurrence rate was 13.1%. Body mass index > 30 kg/m 2 , diabetes and wound infection were independent risk factors for UH recurrence. According to our study results, laparoscopic medium and large umbilical hernia repair has slight advantages over open mesh repair concerning early postoperative complications, long-term postoperative pain and recurrence.

  9. Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias If you play ice hockey, tennis or ... for the most commonly misdiagnosed groin pain—a sports hernia. A sports hernia often results from overuse ...

  10. Sphingolipids in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia; Results from an International Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, Kitty G.; Reiss, Irwin K. M.; Tibboel, Jeroen; van Rosmalen, Joost; Capolupo, Irma; van Heijst, Arno; Schaible, Thomas; Post, Martin; Tibboel, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a severe congenital anomaly with significant mortality and morbidity, for instance chronic lung disease. Sphingolipids have shown to be involved in lung injury, but their role in the pathophysiology of chronic lung disease has not been explored. We hypothesized that sphingolipid profiles in tracheal aspirates could play a role in predicting the mortality/ development of chronic lung disease in congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients. Furthermore, we hypothesized that sphingolipid profiles differ between ventilation modes; conventional mechanical ventilation versus high-frequency oscillation. Methods Sphingolipid levels in tracheal aspirates were determined at days 1, 3, 7 and 14 in 72 neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, born after > 34 weeks gestation at four high-volume congenital diaphragmatic hernia centers. Data were collected within a multicenter trial of initial ventilation strategy (NTR 1310). Results 36 patients (50.0%) died or developed chronic lung disease, 34 patients (47.2%) by stratification were initially ventilated by conventional mechanical ventilation and 38 patients (52.8%) by high-frequency oscillation. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with correction for side of the defect, liver position and observed-to-expected lung-to-head ratio, showed that none of the changes in sphingolipid levels were significantly associated with mortality /development of chronic lung disease. At day 14, long-chain ceramides 18:1 and 24:0 were significantly elevated in patients initially ventilated by conventional mechanical ventilation compared to high-frequency oscillation. Conclusions We could not detect significant differences in temporal sphingolipid levels in congenital diaphragmatic hernia infants with mortality/development of chronic lung disease versus survivors without development of CLD. Elevated levels of ceramides 18:1 and 24:0 in the conventional mechanical ventilation group when compared

  11. Long-term results of a non-ramdomized prospective mono-centre study of 1000 laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Thill, V; Simoens, C; Smets, D; Ngongang, C; da Costa, P Mendes

    2008-01-01

    Information concerning short-term results for laparoscopic extraperitoneal hernia repair is available, but long-term results remain poorly documented. The purpose of this non-randomized prospective study was to evaluate recurrence and chronic pain after hernia repair over a period longer than 10 years. From 1995 to 2004, all patients aged 30 years or more, manifesting with inguinal hernia, were included in our study. Patients aged 20 to 30 years presenting with bilateral hernia, recurrent hernia, or who were heavy workers were also included. Patients who had pelvic irradiation, strangulated hernia, prostatic cancer resection, or a contra-indication to general anaesthesia were excluded. Of 1096 hernia repairs performed, 248 patients were excluded and underwent open repair and 848 patients (77.4%) were included in our prospective study, which corresponded to 1000 laparoscopic hernia repairs. The sex ratio (male : female) was 5:8, and the average age was 56 years. Seven hundred and fifty-three hernias (75.3%) were first repairs, 247 (24.7%) were recurrent hernias, and 161 were bilateral hernias. There were no mortalities. The conversion rate was 1.1%, and the global postoperative morbidity rate was 10.3%. Average follow-up was 39 months in 92.2% of the patients. Hernia recurrence rate was 1.5%. Chronic pain occurred in 2.9%. During this follow-up, 22 contra-lateral hernias appeared in those patients who initially had unilateral hernia repair (3.2%). All of these contra-lateral hernias could be successfully treated using a laparoscopic total extraperitoneal approach. The long-term results of this study demonstrate that preperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair is a safe technique with a very low recurrence rate and low prevalence of chronic pain.

  12. Twenty-year experience with laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in infants and children: considerations and results on 1833 hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Ciro; Escolino, Maria; Cortese, Giuseppe; Aprea, Gianfranco; Turrà, Francesco; Farina, Alessandra; Roberti, Agnese; Cerulo, Mariapina; Settimi, Alessandro

    2017-03-01

    The role of laparoscopy in pediatric inguinal hernia (IH) is still controversial. The authors reported their twenty-year experience in laparoscopic IH repair in children. In a twenty-year period (1995-2015), we operated 1300 infants and children (935 boys-365 girls) with IH using laparoscopy. The average age at surgery was 18 months (range 7 days-14 years). Body weight ranged between 1.9 and 50 kg (average 9.3). Preoperatively all patients presented a monolateral IH, right-sided in 781 cases (60.1 %) and left-sided in 519 (39.9 %). We excluded patients with bilateral IH and unstable patients in which laparoscopy was contraindicated. If the inguinal orifice diameter was ≥10 mm, we performed a modified purse string suture on peri-orificial peritoneum, in orifices ≤5 mm, we performed a N-shaped suture. No conversion to open surgery was reported. In 533 cases (41 %), we found a contralateral patency of internal inguinal ring that was always closed in laparoscopy. In 1273 cases (97.9 %), we found an oblique external hernia; in 21 cases (1.6 %), a direct hernia; and in 6 cases (0.5 %), a double hernia on the same side (hernia en pantaloon). We found an incarcerated hernia in 27 patients (2 %). Average operative time was 18 min (range 7-65). We recorded 5/1300 recurrences (0.3 %), but in the last 950 patients, we had no recurrence (0 %). We recorded 20 complications (1.5 %): 18 umbilical granulomas and two trocars scar infections, treated in outpatient setting. On the basis of our twenty-year experience, we prefer to perform IH repair in children using laparoscopy rather than inguinal approach. Laparoscopy is as fast as inguinal approach, and it has the advantage to treat during the same anesthesia a contralateral patency occured in about 40 % of our cases and to treat also rare hernias in about 3 % of cases.

  13. Effect of azithromycin on acid reflux, hiatus hernia and proximal acid pocket in the postprandial period.

    PubMed

    Rohof, W O; Bennink, R J; de Ruigh, A A; Hirsch, D P; Zwinderman, A H; Boeckxstaens, G E

    2012-12-01

    The risk for acidic reflux is mainly determined by the position of the gastric acid pocket. It was hypothesised that compounds affecting proximal stomach tone might reduce gastro-oesophageal reflux by changing the acid pocket position. To study the effect of azithromycin (Azi) on acid pocket position and acid exposure in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Nineteen patients with GORD were included, of whom seven had a large hiatal hernia (≥3 cm) (L-HH) and 12 had a small or no hiatal hernia (S-HH). Patients were randomised to Azi 250 mg/day or placebo during 3 days in a crossover manner. On each study day, reflux episodes were detected using concurrent high-resolution manometry and pH-impedance monitoring after a standardised meal. The acid pocket was visualised using scintigraphy, and its position was determined relative to the diaphragm. Azi reduced the number of acid reflux events (placebo 8.0±2.2 vs Azi 5.6±1.8, p<0.01) and postprandial acid exposure (placebo 10.5±3.8% vs Azi 5.9±2.5%, p<0.05) in all patients without affecting the total number of reflux episodes. Acid reflux occurred mainly when the acid pocket was located above, or at the level of, the diaphragm, rather than below the diaphragm. Treatment with Azi reduced hiatal hernia size and resulted in a more distal position of the acid pocket compared with placebo (below the diaphragm 39% vs 29%, p=0.03). Azi reduced the rate of acid reflux episodes in patients with S-HH (38% to 17%) to a greater extent than in patients with L-HH (69% to 62%, p=0.04). Azi reduces acid reflux episodes and oesophageal acid exposure. This effect was associated with a smaller hiatal hernia size and a more distal position of the acid pocket, further indicating the importance of the acid pocket in the pathogenesis of GORD. http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=1970 NTR1970.

  14. Complex inguinal hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Beitler, J C; Gomes, S M; Coelho, A C J; Manso, J E F

    2009-02-01

    Complex inguinal hernia treatment is a challenge for general surgeons. The gold standard for the repair of inguinal hernias is the Lichtenstein repair (anterior approach). However, when multiple recurrent hernias or giant hernias are present, it is necessary to choose different approaches because the incidence of poor results increases. There are many preperitoneal approaches described in the literature. For example: (a) open procedure-Nyhus and Stoppa (b) laparoscopic technique-transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) and totally extraperitoneal (TEP). In this study, we show how we repair complicated cases using open access in huge unilateral or bilateral, recurrent, or multiple recurrent inguinal hernias. The present study includes the period from November 1993 through December 2007. One hundred and eighty-eight patients, divided into 121 with unilateral hernias and 67 with bilateral hernias, totaling 255 inguinal hernia repairs, were treated by the Nyhus or Stoppa preperitoneal approach, depending on whether they were unilateral or bilateral. We used progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum for oversize inguinal hernias in all patients. Orchiectomy was necessary on only two occasions. Despite the repair complexity involved, we had only two known recurrences. The mortality was zero and the morbidity was acceptable. We conclude that an accurate open preperitoneal approach using mesh prosthesis for complex inguinal hernias is safe, with very low recurrent rates and low morbidity. Progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum for giant hernias was shown to be an important factor in accomplishing good intraoperative and immediate postoperative results.

  15. Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair: current controversies.

    PubMed

    Soper, Nathaniel J; Teitelbaum, Ezra N

    2013-10-01

    The advent of laparoscopy has significantly improved postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgical repair of a paraesophageal hernia. Although this minimally invasive approach considerably reduces postoperative pain and recovery times, and may improve physiologic outcomes, laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair remains a complex operation requiring advanced laparoscopic skills and experience with the anatomy of the gastroesophageal junction and diaphragmatic hiatus. In this article, we describe our approach to patient selection, preoperative evaluation, operative technique, and postoperative management. Specific attention is paid to performing an adequate hiatal dissection and esophageal mobilization, the decision of whether to use a mesh to reinforce the crural repair, and construction of an adequate antireflux barrier (ie, fundoplication).

  16. Dynamic self-regulating prosthesis (protesi autoregolantesi dinamica): the long-term results in the treatment of primary inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Gabriele; Baldassarre, Emanuele; Testa, Alessandro; Arturi, Alessandro; Torino, Giovanni; Campisi, Costantino; Capuano, Giorgio

    2006-03-01

    The dynamic self-regulating prosthesis (protesi autoregolantesi dinamica, PAD) is a double-layered prosthesi, in use since 1992 in inguinal hernia repair. In 1999, we published the short-term results on 500 patients and herein we report the long-term follow-up. Five hundred eighty-five PAD procedures were performed on 500 adult male, unselected patients. Hernias were unilateral in 415 patients, were bilateral in 85 patients, were direct in 197 patients (33.7%), were indirect in 269 patients (46.0%), and were combined in 119 patients (20.3%). Four hundred sixty-four patients were alive at the follow-up period of minimum 5 years, whereas 36 died (7.2%) of causes unrelated to the hernia. No information was available on 73 patients (14.6%). Therefore, the follow-up was consisted of 391 patients (78.2%) with 469 hernias. The recurrence and testicular atrophy rates were nil. Three patients (0.77%) presented chronic pain and 18 (4.6%) suffered persistent discomfort or paresthesia. A hydrocoele was observed in one patient (0.2%). The long-term data confirm the efficacy of the dynamic self-regulating posthesis hernioplasty. We propose it as a standard of care in all cases of primary inguinal hernia in adult males, retaining it as a definitive and comfortable solution.

  17. [Inguinal hernia repair: results of randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses].

    PubMed

    Slim, K; Vons, C

    2008-01-01

    This evidence-based review of the literature aims to answer two questions regarding inguinal hernia repair: 1. should a prosthetic patch be used routinely? 2. Which approach is better - laparoscopic or open surgery? After a comprehensive search of electronic databases we retained only meta-analyses (n=14) and/or randomised clinical trials (n=4). Review of this literature suggests with a good level of evidence that prosthetic hernia repair is the gold standard; the laparoscopic approach has very few proven benefits and may involve more serious complications when performed outside expert centers. The role of laparoscopy for the repair of bilateral or recurrent hernias needs better evaluation.

  18. Orchiectomy as a result of ischemic orchitis after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: case report of a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Moore, John B; Hasenboehler, Erik A

    2007-11-07

    Ischemic orchitis is an established complication after open inguinal hernia repair, but ischemic orchitis resulting in orchiectomy after the laparoscopic approach has not been reported. The patient was a thirty-three year-old man who presented with bilateral direct inguinal hernias, right larger than left. He was a thin, muscular male with a narrow pelvis who underwent bilateral extraperitoneal mesh laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. The case was complicated by pneumoperitoneum which limited the visibility of the pelvic anatomy; however, the mesh was successfully deployed bilaterally. Cautery was used to resect the direct sac on the right. The patient was discharged the same day and doing well with minimal pain and swelling until the fourth day after surgery. That night he presented with sudden-onset pain and swelling of his right testicle and denied both trauma to the area and any sexual activity. Ultrasound of the testicle revealed no blood flow to the testicle which required exploration and subsequent orchiectomy. Ischemic orchitis typically presents 2-3 days after inguinal hernia surgery and can progress to infarction. This ischemic injury is likely due to thrombosis of the venous plexus, rather than iatrogenic arterial injury or inappropriate closure of the inguinal canal. Ultrasound/duplex scanning of the postoperative acute scrotum can help differentiate ischemic orchitis from infarction. Unfortunately, testicular torsion cannot be ruled out and scrotal exploration may be necessary. Although ischemic orchitis, atrophy, and orhiectomy are uncommon complications, all patients should be warned of these potential complications and operative consent should include these risks irrespective of the type of hernia or the surgical approach.

  19. [Long-term follow-up results after open small umbilical hernia repairs].

    PubMed

    Malý, O; Sotona, O

    2014-04-01

    Adult umbilical hernia is a common surgical condition in the fifth and sixth decade of life. Despite the high frequency of umbilical hernia repairs, disappointingly high recurrence rates after simple suture repairs are reported, amounting to 54%. In addition, it is reported that with the rising frequency of recurrences, the size of the hernial sac and gate gradually increases. Therefore we decided to find out the incidence of recurrences after operative repair of an umbilical hernia at our department. Patient data for this retrospective study focusing on the period between 2006 and 2010 were obtained from the electronic hospital database. Patients with umbilical hernia and the abdominal wall defect up to 3 cm who underwent primary elective procedure were included in the study. Patients with incisional hernias were excluded. All patients were contacted at least 3 years after operation to confirm the accuracy of data. A total of 127 patients were included in this study. In the abovementioned period, no mesh was used during primary surgery in any of the patients. Recurrence occurred in a total of 13.4% of patients. Approximately 40% of patients with the first recurrence were re-operated at our department, 30% of patients were re-operated in other hospitals and the rest have not sought medical attention in respect of the recurrence. Patients with recurrence did not differ from the others as regards age, body mass index or surgical site infection development. Due to the high recurrence rates after operative sutures of the umbilical hernias there is a need to thoroughly consider the potential risk factors such as the body mass index and the abdominal wall defect size. Therefore, it is recommended to use the mesh more widely during primary surgery, especially in obese patients with BMI over 30 and the wall defect size exceeding 3 cm. The question remains whether to use the mesh in all overweight patients and with wall defect smaller than 3 cm.

  20. Left Paraduodenal Hernia.

    PubMed

    Martins, Aires; Gonçalves, Álvaro; Almeida, Teresa; Gomes, Rui; Lomba, João; Midões, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    Left paraduodenal hernia is an entrapment of the small bowel into the Landzert fossa, an unusual congenital peritoneal defect behind the descending mesocolon that results from failure of part of the descending mesocolon to fuse with the posterior parietal peritoneum (Doishita et al. in Radiographics, 36(1): 88-106, 2016). This fossa is reported to be present in approximately 2% of autopsy bodies. The authors present a case of a left paraduodenal hernia in a young woman.

  1. Minimally Invasive Component Separation Results in Fewer Wound-Healing Complications than Open Component Separation for Large Ventral Hernia Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Shadi; Turza, Kristin C; Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Minimally invasive component separation (CS) with inlay bioprosthetic mesh (MICSIB) is a recently developed technique for abdominal wall reconstruction that preserves the rectus abdominis perforators and minimizes subcutaneous dead space using limited-access tunneled incisions. We hypothesized that MICSIB would result in better surgical outcomes than would conventional open CS. STUDY DESIGN All consecutive patients who underwent CS (open or minimally invasive) with inlay bioprosthetic mesh for ventral hernia repair from 2005 to 2010 were included in a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Surgical outcomes including wound-healing complications, hernia recurrences, and abdominal bulge/laxity rates were compared between patient groups based on the type of CS repair: MICSIB or open. RESULTS Fifty-seven patients who underwent MICSIB and 50 who underwent open CS were included. The mean follow-ups were 15.2±7.7 months and 20.7±14.3 months, respectively. The mean fascial defect size was significantly larger in the MICSIB group (405.4±193.6 cm2 vs. 273.8±186.8 cm2; p =0.002). The incidences of skin dehiscence (11% vs. 28%; p=0.011), all wound-healing complications (14% vs. 32%; p=0.026), abdominal wall laxity/bulge (4% vs. 14%; p=0.056), and hernia recurrence (4% vs. 8%; p=0.3) were lower in the MICSIB group than in the open CS group. CONCLUSIONS MICSIB resulted in fewer wound-healing complications than did open CS used for complex abdominal wall reconstructions. These findings are likely attributable to the preservation of paramedian skin vascularity and reduction in subcutaneous dead space with MICSIB. MICSIB should be considered for complex abdominal wall reconstructions, particularly in patients at increased risk of wound-healing complications. PMID:22521439

  2. Experimental results of mesh fixation by a manual manipulator in a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair model.

    PubMed

    Inaki, N; Waseda, M; Schurr, M O; Braun, M; Buess, G F

    2007-02-01

    Laparoscopic mesh fixation using a stapler can lead to complications such as nerve injury and bowel injury. However, mesh fixation by suturing with conventional laparoscopic instruments (CLI) is difficult because of limited degrees of freedom. A manual manipulator--Radius Surgical System (Radius)--whose tip can deflect and rotate, gives the surgeon two additional degrees of freedom. The aim of this study is to evaluate the introduction of Radius to mesh fixation in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. A model for inguinal hernia repair was prepared using animal organs in a trainer. Mesh fixation was performed using Radius, stapler, and CLI. Tensile strength during extraction of mesh toward the vertical direction, and execution time, were measured. The mean number of fixation points of Radius, stapler, and CLI was 9.3 +/- 1.5, 8.5 +/- 1.4, and 9.0 +/- 1.0, respectively. The mean tensile strength of fixation of mesh of Radius, stapler, and CLI was 140.7 +/- 48.9, 73.1 +/- 23.4, and 53.6 +/- 31.5 (N), respectively. The mean tensile strength per one fixation point by Radius, stapler, and CLI was 16.5 +/- 5.3, 8.7 +/- 2.8, and 6.3 +/- 3.6 (N), respectively. The mean execution time of Radius, stapler, and CLI was 479 +/- 108, 54 +/- 31, and 431 +/- 77 (sec), respectively. The mesh fixation by Radius was stronger than that by staples and CLI. Two additional degrees of freedom were useful in difficult angles. The introduction of Radius is feasible and facilitates the fixation of mesh with sutures in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

  3. Femoral hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or abdominal pain. Your hernia becomes red, purple, dark, or discolored. Call your provider if you ... to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein ...

  4. Umbilical Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prompt diagnosis and treatment can help prevent complications. Causes During pregnancy, the umbilical cord passes through a small opening ... abdominal pressure can cause an umbilical hernia. Possible causes in adults include: ... pregnancies Fluid in the abdominal cavity (ascites) Previous abdominal ...

  5. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias using an intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique and a Parietex composite mesh fixed with fibrin glue (Tissucol). Personal technique and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Stefano; Scaini, Alberto; Erba, Luigi; Bertolini, Aimone; Croce, Enrico

    2007-11-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias is usually achieved by totally extraperitoneal (TEP) or transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) techniques. The intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) could be an interesting alternative as it is much easier to perform and faster to execute. This technique is subject to correct selection of indications and to demonstration of its safety. From January 2003 to January 2006 we performed 61 laparoscopic hernia procedures on 60 selected patients (60 males with a mean age of 60 and mean weight of 76 kg) with an IPOM technique combining the Parietex composite mesh (12 cm circular model) and a fibrin glue (Tissucol) for its fixation. The glue was diluted to increase fixation time and applied to the mesh prior to positioning on the hernia defect. Mean operative time was 10 minutes. Mean hernia diameter was 2.5 cm (+/- 0.8 cm). 10 hernias were direct, 51 were indirect and 10 out of 61 were recurrent. We did not convert any of the laparoscopic procedures. Mean hospital stay was one day; mean recovery time for working and general physical activities was five days. Patients were checked after one week, 1-3-6 months and 1-2 years. Average follow up time was 23.7 months. 1.6 % of patients showed short-term complications: one trocar site haematoma. No additional complications were reported; particularly, we had no recurrence, no seroma, no mesh migration, and no bowel obstruction or fistula. Results of this study show intraperitoneal (IP) tolerance to this kind of mesh and the safety of its fixation with Tissucol. The absence of recurrence and complications could be a good reason to extend the indication of IPOM hernia repair. However, these preliminary results should be confirmed by longer follow-up.

  6. Umbilical hernia repair in the presence of cirrhosis and ascites: results of a survey and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    McKay, A; Dixon, E; Bathe, O; Sutherland, F

    2009-10-01

    Umbilical hernias are common in cirrhotics, yet, their management poses several challenges. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the indications, selection criteria, and technical aspects of umbilical hernia repair in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. An extensive review of the literature since 1980 was performed. A survey was also conducted to obtain expert consensus to supplement any available conclusions from the literature. Nineteen surgeons (45%) responded to the survey. For asymptomatic hernias, all would consider hernia repair in Child's A cirrhosis, but not in more advanced disease, whereas the vast majority would consider the repair of complicated hernias. This seems to reflect the respondents' higher estimates of morbidity and mortality with more advanced liver disease. However, because the recent literature demonstrates much lower morbidity and mortality than in the past, many authors now advocate early elective repair. In addition, uncontrolled ascites appear to be strongly predictive of hernia recurrence (relative risk [RR] 8.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.7-26.9). While acknowledging the limitations of this study, it appears that the early repair of umbilical hernias in patients with cirrhosis and ascites is safer than it was in the past and can be considered for selected patients. This may avoid increased morbidity and mortality associated with urgent repair later on. The control of ascites is critical to a successful outcome. Urgent repair of umbilical hernia in cirrhotic patients is indicated when complications develop.

  7. Diagnosing the occult contralateral inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Koehler, R H

    2002-03-01

    The incidence of bilateral inguinal hernias reported for total extra peritoneal (TEP) laparoscopic hernia repair, which reaches 45%, appears to be higher than that seen in studies of transabdominal laparoscopic and open repair. Given the unique ability of diagnostic laparoscopy to diagnose occult contralateral hernias (OCH) accurately, this study looked at how concurrent transabdominal diagnostic laparoscopy (TADL) would influence planned TEP repairs. A prospective study oF 100 consecutive TEP cases was conducted. All patients had diagnostic laparoscopy via a 5-mm 45 degrees scope through an umbilical incision with 15 mmHg of pneumoperitoneum, followed by laparoscopic TEPrepair. A contralateral occult hernia was diagnosed and repaired if a true peritoneal eventration through the inguinal region was observed. Among the 100 patients, preoperative diagnosis suggested 31 bilateral hernias (31%), whereas TADL confirmed 25 bilateral hernias (25%). Of these 25 bilateral hernias, TADL confirmed 16 that had been diagnosed preoperatively (64%), but excluded 15 contralateral hernias that were incorrectly diagnosed (37%). Transabdominal diagnostic laparoscopy found nine OCHs, representing 36% of all bilateral hernias and 13% of the 69 preoperatively determined unilateral hernias. The preoperative physician examination false-negative rate for contralateral hernias was 36%, and the false-positive rate was 37%. In 26 cases (26%), TADL changed the operative approach. In this study, patients believed to have unilateral inguinal hernias had OCHs in 13% of cases when examined by TADL. The actual bilateral hernia incidence was 25%, with a 37% false-positive rate for preoperatively diagnosed bilateral hernias. The high rate of bilateral hernias reported by the TEP approach alone suggests that some OCH findings may be an artifact of the TEP dissection. However, failure to search for an OCH could result in up to 13% of patients subsequently requiring a second repair. Because some

  8. Building a model for day case hiatal surgery - Lessons learnt over a 10 year period in a high volume unit: A case series.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Pritesh; Zaman, Shafquat; Shapey, Iestyn; Daskalakis, Markos; Nijjar, Rajwinder; Richardson, Martin; Super, Paul; Singhal, Rishi

    2018-06-01

    Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery has become the standard treatment for symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease refractory to medical therapy. Successful anti-reflux surgery involves safe, minimally invasive surgery, resulting in symptom resolution with minimal side effects. This study aims to assess the feasibility and safety of day case anti-reflux surgery focussing on peri- and post-operative outcomes as a measure of success. Data was collected from the hospital database from 2003 to 2012. Data collection included demographics, surgeon, mode of admission, length of stay and complications. Electronic records were independently scrutinised for all patients with a length of stay of more than two nights. 723 patients underwent laparoscopic fundoplication ± small hiatus hernia repair (<5 cm) with a day case rate of 67.1%. The 30 day readmission rate in these patients was 2.9% (21/723 patients). Nine patients had a failure of their initial laparoscopic fundoplication (defined as recurrence of symptoms). Three patients required a re-operation within 12 months of their initial procedure (re-operation rate = 0.41% (3/723 patients)). Laparoscopic hiatal surgery can be performed safely as a day case in high volume specialist centres with good outcomes. Raising the national standard for day case fundoplication promotes good practice and should be the model for future commissioning. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ascending aortic aneurysm and diaphragmatic hernia in a case of Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Jignesh; Hinduja, Manish; Baria, Kinnaresh; Pandya, Himani

    2017-06-01

    Marfan syndrome commonly affects the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. Involvement of the gastrointestinal system is known but uncommon. Intervention depends upon the system involved and the severity of symptoms. Special awareness is required for the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal involvement in these patients. We report a rare case of simultaneous surgical repair of an ascending aortic aneurysm and a type IV hiatal hernia in a 35-year-old man with Marfan syndrome.

  10. Fibrin sealant for mesh fixation in laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair: 1-year results of a randomized controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, J R; Bisgaard, T; Assaadzadeh, S; Jorgensen, L N; Rosenberg, J

    2013-08-01

    Fibrin sealant for mesh fixation has significant positive effects on early outcome after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) compared with titanium tacks. Whether fibrin sealant fixation also results in better long-term outcome is unknown. We performed a randomized controlled trial including patients with umbilical hernia defects from 1.5 to 5 cm at three Danish hernia centres. We used a 12 cm circular mesh. Participants were randomized to fibrin sealant or titanium tack fixation. Patients were seen in the outpatient clinic at 1 and 12 months follow-up. Forty patients were included of whom 34 were available for intention to treat analysis after 1 year. There were no significant differences in pain, discomfort, fatigue, satisfaction or quality of life between the two groups at the 1-year follow-up. Five patients (26 %) in the fibrin sealant group and one (6 %) in the tack group were diagnosed with a recurrence at the 1-year follow-up (p = 0.182) (overall recurrence rate 17 %). Hernia defects in patients with recurrence were significantly larger than in those without recurrence (median 4.0 vs. 2.8 cm, p = 0.009). Patients with larger hernia defects and fibrin sealant mesh fixation had higher recurrence rates than expected, although the study was not powered for assessment of recurrence. There was no significant difference between groups in any parameters after the 1-year follow-up. The beneficial effects of mesh fixation with fibrin sealant on early outcome warrant further studies on optimization of the surgical technique to prevent recurrence.

  11. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jonathan; Duh, Quan-Yang

    2011-07-01

    For patients with recurrent inguinal hernia, or bilateral inguinal hernia, or for women, laparoscopic repair offers significant advantages over open techniques with regard to recurrence risk, pain, and recovery. For unilateral first-time hernias, either laparoscopic or open repair with mesh can offer excellent results. The major drawback of laparoscopy is that the technique requires a significant number of cases to master. For surgeons in group practice, it makes sense to have one surgeon in the group perform laparoscopic repairs so that experience can be concentrated. For others, the best technique remains the approach that the surgeon is most comfortable and experienced performing.

  12. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Hussein, M K; Khoury, G S; Taha, A M

    1998-01-01

    Open hernia repair is associated with significant postoperative pain and disability resulting in delayed return to full activity. Laparoscopic hernia repair has been advocated as the procedure that combines the benefit of tension-free repair with the preservation of the basic anatomy of the inguinal area. We present our experience with 803 laparoscopic hernia repairs in 517 patients over a period of 66 months (August 92 to February 98). The effects of the learning curve and the refinement of the technique had their impact on earlier results and complications. However, with more experience we found that the laparoscopic preperitoneal approach is safe and efficacious. There was no mortality. Most patients (85%) were discharged home within 24 h of the procedure and returned to full activity within 10 days. Patient satisfaction was excellent. The complication rate decreased and operative time was reduced with experience. This procedure is clearly indicated in patients who have recurrent or bilateral hernias. It is associated with shorter convalescence and a quick return to work.

  13. Medical malpractice and hernia repair: an analysis of case law.

    PubMed

    Walters, Amanda L; Dacey, Kristian T; Zemlyak, Alla Y; Lincourt, Amy E; Heniford, B Todd

    2013-04-01

    Litigation analysis and clinician education are essential to reduce the number and cost of malpractice claims. This study evaluates the clinical characteristics and legal outcomes of medical malpractice litigation initiated by patients having undergone a hernia repair operation. Published civil suits were obtained from a legal database for state and federal decisions constituting case law. The published material includes information on defendants, plaintiffs, allegations, outcomes, and a variety of legal issues. A retrospective review of 44 published cases from 25 states was performed. Complications were present in 20 of 44 (45%) suits, four (9%) of which were because of infection. Death occurred in five (11%) cases, and failure to obtain informed consent was alleged in seven (16%) of the suits. Retained foreign bodies were present in 7 of the 44 (16%) suits. Other allegations included incorrect surgical technique, insufficient need for surgery, and emotional distress. Most (64%) patients initiating malpractice litigation were male, and inguinal, hiatal, and ventral hernia repairs account for 39%, 27%, and 14% of cases, respectively. Most suits (40%) were initiated in Southern states. Surgical mesh was indicated in 5 of 44 (11%) suits but four of five were unrelated to the suit. One patient initiated litigation because of the fact that the surgeon did not use mesh during surgery, which was discussed preoperatively during the informed consent. The court ruled in favor of the plaintiff in 12 of 44 (27%) suits, with compensation ranging from roughly $19,000 to $8,000,000. Louisiana and New York had six and seven suits each, which appears disproportionate given their respective populations. Complications and death resulting from alleged clinical negligence play a significant role in both the initiation and the outcome of malpractice litigation. Retained foreign bodies and lack of informed consent account for roughly one-third of malpractice litigation associated with

  14. Sports Hernia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

  15. Incarcerated Pediatric Hernias.

    PubMed

    Abdulhai, Sophia A; Glenn, Ian C; Ponsky, Todd A

    2017-02-01

    Indirect inguinal hernias are the most commonly incarcerated hernias in children, with a higher incidence in low birth weight and premature infants. Contralateral groin exploration to evaluate for a patent processus vaginalis or subclinical hernia is controversial, given that most never progress to clinical hernias. Most indirect inguinal hernias can be reduced nonoperatively. It is recommended to repair them in a timely fashion, even in premature infants. Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated inguinal hernia repair is considered a safe and effective alternative to conventional open herniorrhaphy. Other incarcerated pediatric hernias are extremely rare and may be managed effectively with laparoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Video-assisted repair of cervical lung hernia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Jiang, G; Xie, B; Ding, J

    2010-04-01

    Lung hernia is an extremely rare condition and the treatments vary. We report a case of cervical lung hernia without any trauma. The patient underwent video-assisted repair with a satisfactory result. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  17. Predictors of inguinal hernia after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Farhang; Yunis, Luis Herran; Touijer, Karim; Brady, Mary S

    2011-02-01

    To determine the significant independent predictors of inguinal hernia development after radical prostatectomy (RP) so that prophylactic measures can be undertaken in those at increased risk. Although inguinal hernia is a recognized complication after RP, the risk factors have not been well elucidated. From January 1999 to June 2007, 4592 consecutive patients underwent open retropubic RP or laparoscopic RP without previous radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 36.9 months (interquartile range 20.3, 60.6). Comorbidities were recorded, as well as the occurrence of inguinal hernia, wound infection, and bladder neck contracture. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for the predictors of inguinal hernia after RP on multivariate analysis. Inguinal hernia developed after RP in 68 men (1.5%) men at a median follow-up of 7.9 months (interquartile range 4.3, 18.1). The laterality was bilateral in 7, right in 27, left in 24, and not documented in 10 patients. The significant independent predictors of inguinal hernia included age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.09, P = .016), body mass index (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.85-0.98, P = .011), history of inguinal hernia repair (HR 3.9, 95% CI 1.8-8.2, P <.001), and bladder neck contracture (HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-5.9, P = .007) but not the RP approach (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.60-1.96, P = .80 for laparoscopic RP vs retropubic RP). The results of our study have indicated that older patients, thinner patients, those with previous inguinal hernia repair, and those developing bladder neck contracture are at increased risk of developing an inguinal hernia. These factors might identify a subset for whom evaluation for subclinical hernia might allow prophylactic inguinal hernia repair at RP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lateral repair of parastomal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Amin, S. N.; Armitage, N. C.; Abercrombie, J. F.; Scholefield, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parastomal hernia is a common complication of stoma construction. Although the majority of patients are asymptomatic, about 10% require surgical correction. AIMS: We describe a new surgical approach for the repair of parastomal hernias, which avoids both the need for laparotomy and stoma mobilization. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nine patients (4 female) with parastomal hernia underwent surgical repair. Median age was 55 years (range 38-73 years). There were 8 para-ileostomy herniae and one paracolostomy hernia. A lateral incision was made approximately 10 cm from the stoma, and carried down to the rectus sheath. The dissection was carried medially towards the stoma, and around the defect in the abdominal musculature. The hernia sac was excised when possible and the fascial defect closed with non-absorbable, monofilament suture. A polyprolene mesh was placed round the stoma by making a slit in the mesh. The skin was closed with subcuticular monofilament absorbable suture. RESULTS: All patients returned to normal diet on the first postoperative day, and were discharged from hospital within 72 h. There were no wound infections, and no recurrences after a median follow up of 6 months (range 3-12 months). DISCUSSION: The technique we describe is simple and avoids the need of laparotomy. The mucocutaneous junction of the stoma is not disturbed, reducing the risk of contamination of the mesh, stenosis or retraction of the stoma. Grooving of the stoma and difficulty in fitting appliances is avoided because the wound is not placed near the mucocutaneous junction. This approach may be superior to other mesh repairs for parastomal hernia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:11432142

  19. Ventral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... incarcerated) in the hernia and become impossible to push back in. This is usually painful. The blood supply ... you are lying down or that you cannot push back in. Risks The risks of ventral hernia repair ...

  20. Hernias (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... look like inguinal hernias, but are not: A communicating hydrocele is similar to a hernia, except that ... reviewed: September 2016 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Medical Care and Your Newborn Undescended ...

  1. Preperitoneal approach to parastomal hernia with coexistent large incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Egun, A; Hill, J; MacLennan, I; Pearson, R. C

    2002-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the outcome of preperitoneal mesh repair of complex incisional herniae incorporating a stoma and large parastomal hernia. METHODS: From 1994 to 1998, symptomatic patients who had repair of combined incisional hernia and parastomal hernia were reviewed. Body mass index, co-morbidity, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction and outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: Ten patients (seven females and three males), mean age 62 (range 48-80) years underwent primary repair. All had significant comorbidities (ASA grade 3) and mean body mass index was 31.1 (range 20-49). Median hospital stay was 15 (range 8-150) days. Complications were of varying clinical significance (seroma, superficial infection, major respiratory tract infection and stomal necrosis). There were no recurrences after a mean follow up of 54 (range 22-69) months. CONCLUSION: The combination of a parastomal hernia and generalised wound dehiscence is an uncommon but difficult problem. The application of the principles of low-tension mesh repair can provide a satisfactory outcome and low recurrence rate. This must be tempered by recognition of the potential for significant major postoperative complication.

  2. [The Open Retromuscular Preperitoneal Mesh Repair of the Incisional Lateral Hernia - Technique and Results of a Prospective Cohort Study].

    PubMed

    Isemer, Friedrich-Eckart; Dietz, Ulrich; Ackermann, Maximilian

    2018-05-18

    Surgical approaches to flank hernias have been poorly standardised. The most demanding issues in intermuscular net insertion are the limited area in the dorsal direction and the difficulties in fixing the net to the costal arch or the iliac crest. This is why many different surgical procedures have been published. From August 2015 to October 2016, nine patients with a primary incisional lateral hernia received open retromuscular preperitoneal mesh repair. In intermuscular mesh placement, the mesh size must be smaller at smaller values of the CPA (costopelvic angle). On the dorsal side of the reference stretch RS of 10 cm between costal arch and iliac crest, fixations are necessary to achieve stability. Retroperitoneal preperitoneal net implantation is unrestricted by the patient's anatomy. The placement of the mesh is similar to the Stoppa procedure and almost any size can be used with little fixation. Remodeling of the abdominal wall can be comfortably achieved. All 9 patients underwent retromuscular preperitoneal mesh repair. The hernia size was 92.85 cm 2 with a corresponding mesh size of 426.22 cm 2 . No adverse side effects or surgical complications were observed; the length of hospital stay was between 3 to 7 days; the follow up was 3 to 18 months, with a mean follow-up of 9.1 months. In a follow-up questionnaire, the patients reported a high satisfaction rate with a grade of 1,2 (school mark); there was no recurrence. The pain level decreased from VAS grade 4 preoperatively to 1.2 postoperatively. 7 patients had no pain at all. In conclusion, adequate overlap of the implanted mesh can be achieved in the preperitoneal retromuscular space even in large hernias. Fixation of the mesh to the costal arch or the iliac crest is not necessary and would only induce postoperative pain. Long-term stability depends on the size of the mesh. Remodeling of the abdominal wall with closure of the fascia above the mesh can be easily achieved. Georg Thieme Verlag KG

  3. Double half-cone flap umbilicoplasty for proboscoid umbilical hernia in a 2 years old child with satisfactory results 2 years later.

    PubMed

    Ashu, Eseme Ebai; Leroy, Guifo Marc; Aristide, Bang Guy; Joss, Bitang Mafok Louis; Bonaventure, Jemea; Patrick, Savom Eric; Myriam, Fotso Guegne

    2015-01-01

    Surgical repair of large umbilical hernias may present a challenging surgical problem; standard surgical techniques have proven to be inadequate for both closing the fascial defect of the umbilicus and providing a satisfactory cosmetic result. We describe here a case of double half-cone flap umbilicoplasty that was performed in a 2 years old boy. The case of a 2 years old child with proboscoid umbilical hernia. The protruding umbilical skin was excised sharply by two V-shaped cuts leaving two half cones, a short cephalic (0.5cm) and a long caudal (1cm). A classic herniotomy was carried out, with repair of the facial defect. The caudal half cone was sutured from its apex till half it's length upon itself with interrupted sutures and it was anchored deeply to the fascia. Then we inverted the cephalic half cone which was sutured to the caudal cone to form the new umbilicus. The early result was excellent with no complications and the result after 2years revealed a cosmetically satisfactory shape of the umbilicus. this technique provides a good solution for reconstruction of the protruding umbilical skin and it is easy to learn, easy to be taught and perform in surgical environments and may be applicable for any kind of umbilical reconstruction.

  4. Double half-cone flap umbilicoplasty for proboscoid umbilical hernia in a 2 years old child with satisfactory results 2 years later

    PubMed Central

    Ashu, Eseme Ebai; Leroy, Guifo Marc; Aristide, Bang Guy; Joss, Bitang Mafok Louis; Bonaventure, Jemea; Patrick, Savom Eric; Myriam, Fotso Guegne

    2015-01-01

    Surgical repair of large umbilical hernias may present a challenging surgical problem; standard surgical techniques have proven to be inadequate for both closing the fascial defect of the umbilicus and providing a satisfactory cosmetic result. We describe here a case of double half-cone flap umbilicoplasty that was performed in a 2 years old boy. The case of a 2 years old child with proboscoid umbilical hernia. The protruding umbilical skin was excised sharply by two V-shaped cuts leaving two half cones, a short cephalic (0.5cm) and a long caudal (1cm). A classic herniotomy was carried out, with repair of the facial defect. The caudal half cone was sutured from its apex till half it's length upon itself with interrupted sutures and it was anchored deeply to the fascia. Then we inverted the cephalic half cone which was sutured to the caudal cone to form the new umbilicus. The early result was excellent with no complications and the result after 2years revealed a cosmetically satisfactory shape of the umbilicus. this technique provides a good solution for reconstruction of the protruding umbilical skin and it is easy to learn, easy to be taught and perform in surgical environments and may be applicable for any kind of umbilical reconstruction. PMID:26664545

  5. Comparison of translabial three-dimensional ultrasound with magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of levator hiatal biometry at rest.

    PubMed

    Vergeldt, T F M; Notten, K J B; Stoker, J; Fütterer, J J; Beets-Tan, R G; Vliegen, R F A; Schweitzer, K J; Mulder, F E M; van Kuijk, S M J; Roovers, J P W R; Kluivers, K B; Weemhoff, M

    2016-05-01

    To compare translabial three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the measurement of levator hiatal biometry at rest in women with pelvic organ prolapse, and to determine the interobserver reliability between two independent observers for ultrasound and MRI measurements. Data were derived from a multicenter prospective cohort study in which women scheduled for conventional anterior colporrhaphy underwent translabial 3D ultrasound and MRI prior to surgery. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to estimate interobserver reliability between two independent observers and determine the agreement between ultrasound and MRI measurements. Bland-Altman plots were created to assess the agreement between ultrasound and MRI measurements. Data from 139 women from nine hospitals were included in the study. The interobserver reliability of ultrasound assessment at rest, during Valsalva maneuver and during contraction and of MRI assessment at rest were moderate or good. The agreement between ultrasound and MRI for the measurement of levator hiatal biometry at rest was moderate, with ICCs of 0.52 (95%CI, 0.32-0.66) for levator hiatal area, 0.44 (95%CI, 0.21-0.60) for anteroposterior diameter and 0.44 (95%CI, 0.22-0.60) for transverse diameter. Levator hiatal biometry measurements were statistically significantly larger on MRI than on translabial 3D ultrasound. The agreement between translabial 3D ultrasound and MRI for measurement of the levator hiatus at rest in women with pelvic organ prolapse was only moderate. The results of translabial 3D ultrasound and MRI should therefore not be used interchangeably in daily practice or in clinical research. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Repair of Spigelian Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernias represent only 1% to 2% of all abdominal wall hernias. The treatment, however, remains controversial but depends on institutional expertise. This case series reports the first experience with single-incision laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (SILTEP) repair of Spigelian hernias with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection in combination with inguinal hernia repair. Methods: From February 2013 to April 2014, all patients referred with inguinal or Spigelian hernias, without histories of extraperitoneal intervention, underwent SILTEP repair with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection. A single-port device, 5.5 mm/52 cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments were used for all cases. Extraperitoneal dissection was performed under direct vision with preservation of preperitoneal fascia overlying retroperitoneal nerves. Inguinal herniorrhaphy was performed with lightweight mesh that covered low-lying Spigelian defects. High-lying Spigelian defects were repaired with additional mesh. Results: There were 131 patients with 186 (92 direct) inguinal hernias and 7 patients with 8 Spigelian hernias (6 incidental, including 1 bilateral and 2 preoperatively diagnosed), with a mean age of 51.3 years and a mean body mass index of 25.1 kg/m2. An additional piece of mesh was used for 3 hernias. All Spigelian hernias were associated with direct inguinal hernias, and 8 combined inguinal and Spigelian hernias were successfully repaired with SILTEP repair with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection as day cases. There were no clinical recurrences during a mean follow-up period of 6 months (range, 1–15 months). Conclusions: Combined Spigelian and inguinal hernias can be successfully treated with SILTEP herniorrhaphy with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection. The high incidence of Spigelian hernias associated with direct inguinal hernias suggests a high index of suspicion for Spigelian hernias during laparoscopic inguinal

  7. Satisfaction and perceived quality of life results in patients operated on for primary hernia of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    de Miguel-Ibáñez, Ricardo; Nahban-Al Saied, Saif Adeen; Alonso-Vallejo, Javier; Escribano Sotos, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Outpatient surgery is currently the standard procedure in 60-70% of the most prevalent surgical procedures. Minimally invasive models in health care have improved basic aspects such as postoperative pain and hospital stay, but there are few publications related to perceived quality shown by patients, such as the need for informal care at home or delay before surgery. The aim of the study was to determine the global satisfaction perceived by patients undergoing abdominal wall hernia repair. An ad hoc split questionnaire has been completed on satisfaction after a week and postoperative quality a month after intervention by 203 patients operated on for abdominal hernia in a year. Variables included postoperative pain, need for informal care, surgical delay, information supplied, professional management and overall satisfaction. A total of 48.28% of patients needed informal care at home. They were largely attended by women, wives or daughters, for a few days. In 45.81% they were discharged on the same day, and 53.2% in less than 72 h. Overall satisfaction in the program of day surgery and short hospital stay was 94.6%. The overall process of satisfaction was not related to age, sex or educational level of patients, while there was an inverse relationship between satisfaction and days of hospitalization and days of pain that required analgesia at home. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Hernia of the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryoukichi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Katori, Yukio; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2017-02-01

    Although tympanic bulging is commonly encountered, tympanic herniation occupying the external auditory canal is extremely rare. A 66-year-old man was presented to our hospital with left aural fullness, bilateral hearing loss and otorrhea. Preoperative findings suggested tympanic membrane (TM) hernia located in the left external auditory canal. We performed total resection of the soft mass by a transcanal approach using endoscopy. Ventilation tubes were inserted into bilateral ears. Histopathological findings confirmed diagnosis of TM hernia. Passive opening pressure of this patient was higher than normal condition of the Eustachian tube, where active opening was not observed. Hernia of the TM most likely resulted from long-term excessive Valsalva maneuver. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgery for diverticular disease results in a higher hernia rate compared to colorectal cancer: a population-based study from Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Tang, E S; Robertson, D I; Whitehead, M; Xu, J; Hall, S F

    2017-11-16

    Incisional hernias are a well described complication of abdominal surgery. Previous studies identified malignancy and diverticular disease as risk factors. We compared incisional hernia rates between colon resection for colorectal cancer (CRC) and diverticular disease (DD). We performed a retrospective, population-based, matched cohort study. Provincial databases were linked through the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. These databases include all patients registered under the universal Ontario Health Insurance Plan. Patients aged 18-105 undergoing open colon resection, without ostomy formation between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2009, were included. We excluded those with previous surgery, hernia, obstruction, and perforation. The primary outcomes were surgery for hernia repair, or diagnosis of hernia in clinic. We identified 4660 cases of DD. These were matched 2:1 by age and gender to 8933 patients with CRC for a total of 13,593. At 5 years, incisional hernias occurred in 8.3% of patients in the CRC cohort, versus 13.1% of those undergoing surgery for DD. After adjusting for important confounders (comorbidity score, wound infection, age, diabetes, prednisone and chemotherapy), hernias were still more likely in patients with DD [HR 1.58, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.43-1.76, P < 0.001]. The only significant covariate was wound infection (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.43-1.87, P < 0.001). Our study found that incisional hernias occur more commonly in patients with DD than CRC.

  10. Symposium on the management of inguinal hernias: 3. Laparoscopic groin hernia surgery: the TAPP procedure

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Demetrius E.M.; Pham, Quynh N.; Oleniuk, Fredrick H.; Kluftinger, Andreas M.; Rossi, Ljubomir

    1997-01-01

    Objective To describe the technique and results of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. Design A case series, with a detailed description of the operative technique. Setting A university affiliated hospital. Patients A consecutive series of 554 patients (494 male, 60 female) who underwent laparoscopic hernia repair in a single institution. The mean follow-up was 14 months. Interventions Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair was performed in almost all patients. Simple closure was performed in a patient with a strangulated hernia, and a mesh-based repair was used in a patient with bilateral obturator hernias. Main outcome measures Complications and recurrence. Results The laparoscopic TAPP repair was successful in 550 of the 554 patients who underwent 632 hernia repairs. Conversion was necessary in 4 patients. Complications were infrequent and there were no recurrences. Only 3.4% of patients were lost to follow-up. The most frequent complications were urinary retention (27) and hematoma and seroma (38) in the early postoperative period. Neuralgia (11) and hydrocele (10) also occurred. Mesh infection occurred in only 1 patient and port-site hernias in 3 patients. There was 1 death from an acute myocardial infarction. Conclusion Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair is associated with an exceedingly low recurrence rate and an acceptable complication rate. PMID:9194780

  11. Hiatus Hernia as a Cause of Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Hamish; Sweis, Rami

    2017-08-01

    This review aims to discuss the putative relationship between hiatus hernia and dysphagia. Proposed mechanisms of dysphagia in patients with hiatus hernia are usually difficult to identify, but recent advances in technology (high-resolution manometry with or without concomitant impedance, ambulatory pH with impedance, videofluoroscopy, and the endoluminal functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP)) and methodology (inclusion of swallows of various consistencies and volumes or shifting position during the manometry protocol) can help induce symptoms and identify the underlying disorder. Chronic reflux disease is often associated with hiatus hernia and is the most common underlying etiology. Dysmotility because of impaired contractility and vigor can occur as a consequence of repeated acid exposure from the acid pocket within the hernia, and the resultant poor clearance subsequently worsens this insult. As such, dysphagia appears to be more common with increasing hiatus hernia size. Furthermore, mucosal inflammation can lead to fibrotic stricture formation and in turn obstruction. On the other hand, there appears to be a difference in the pathophysiology of smaller sliding hernias, in that those with dysphagia are more likely to have extrinsic compression at the crural diaphragm as compared to those with reflux symptoms only. Sliding hiatus hernia, especially when small, does not commonly lead to dysmotility and dysphagia; however, in those patients with symptoms, the underlying etiology can be sought with new technologies and, in particular, the reproduction of normal eating and drinking during testing.

  12. Cervical lung hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lightwood, Robin G.; Cleland, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    Lightwood, R. G., and Cleland, W. P. (1974).Thorax, 29, 349-351. Cervical lung hernia. Lung hernias occur in the cervical position in about one third of cases. The remainder appear through the chest wall. Some lung hernias are congenital, but trauma is the most common cause. The indications for surgery depend upon the severity of symptoms. Repair by direct suture can be used for small tears in Sibson's (costovertebral) fascia while larger defects have been closed using prosthetic materials. Four patients with cervical lung hernia are described together with an account of their operations. PMID:4850946

  13. Conversion to Stoppa Procedure in Laparoscopic Totally Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Dirican, Abuzer; Ozgor, Dincer; Gonultas, Fatih; Isik, Burak

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Conversion to open surgery is an important problem, especially during the learning curve of laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair. Methods: Here, we discuss conversion to the Stoppa procedure during laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair. Outcomes of patients who underwent conversion to an open approach during laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair between September 2004 and May 2010 were evaluated. Results: In total, 259 consecutive patients with 281 inguinal hernias underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair. Thirty-one hernia repairs (11%) were converted to open conventional surgical procedures. Twenty-eight of 31 laparoscopic TEP hernia repairs were converted to modified Stoppa procedures, because of technical difficulties. Three of these patients underwent Lichtenstein hernia repairs, because they had undergone previous surgeries. Conclusion: Stoppa is an easy and successful procedure used to solve problems during TEP hernia repair. The Lichtenstein procedure may be a suitable option in patients who have undergone previous operations, such as a radical prostatectomy. PMID:23477173

  14. Inguinal-scrotal hernias in young patients: is laparoscopic repair a possible answer? Preliminary results of a single-institution experience with a transabdominal preperitoneal approach.

    PubMed

    Agresta, F; Mazzarolo, G; Balbi, P; Bedin, N

    2010-10-01

    The laparoscopic trans-abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach to inguinal hernia repair is well documented as an excellent choice in numerous studies, especially when conducted by an experienced surgeon. Its full list of specific indications is still under debate. Generally, the repair of scrotal hernias demands a higher level of experience on the part of the surgeon, irrespective of the applied surgical technique. In this report, we evaluate our preliminary experience of TAPP laparoscopic repair for inguinoscrotal hernias in young patients in a Community Hospital setting, focusing on the feasibility of the technique and the incidence of complications. Between January 2008 and January 2009 a total of ten consecutive young patients at the "Civil Hospital" in Vittorio Veneto (TV), underwent TAPP laparoscopic repair of bilateral inguinoscrotal hernias. The overall mean operative time was 65 (+/-15) min. All procedures were performed on a day surgery basis. There were no conversions to open repair, no mortality/morbidity or relapsing hernias. The mean follow-up was 14 (+/-2) months. No patients reported severe pain at 10 days, There were no reports of night pain at 30 days. All patients had a return to physical-work capacity within 14 days. All patients were completely satisfied at the 3-month follow up. Analysis of the short-term post-operative outcomes of our experience enabled us to conclude that, in the proper setting, TAPP can be performed for inguinoscrotal hernia repair with an efficiency comparable to that of normal inguinal hernia repair.

  15. Two ports laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in children.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Medhat M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Several laparoscopic treatment techniques were designed for improving the outcome over the last decade. The various techniques differ in their approach to the inguinal internal ring, suturing and knotting techniques, number of ports used in the procedures, and mode of dissection of the hernia sac. Patients and Surgical Technique. 90 children were subjected to surgery and they undergone two-port laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in children. Technique feasibility in relation to other modalities of repair was the aim of this work. 90 children including 75 males and 15 females underwent surgery. Hernia in 55 cases was right-sided and in 15 left-sided. Two patients had recurrent hernia following open hernia repair. 70 (77.7%) cases were suffering unilateral hernia and 20 (22.2%) patients had bilateral hernia. Out of the 20 cases 5 cases were diagnosed by laparoscope (25%). The patients' median age was 18 months. The mean operative time for unilateral repairs was 15 to 20 minutes and bilateral was 21 to 30 minutes. There was no conversion. The complications were as follows: one case was recurrent right inguinal hernia and the second was stitch sinus. Discussion. The results confirm the safety and efficacy of two ports laparoscopic hernia repair in congenital inguinal hernia in relation to other modalities of treatment.

  16. Robotic-assisted Laparoscopic Repair of Scrotal Inguinal Hernias.

    PubMed

    Yheulon, Christopher G; Maxwell, Daniel W; Balla, Fadi M; Patel, Ankit D; Lin, Edward; Stetler, Jamil L; Davis, Steven S

    2018-06-01

    Scrotal inguinal hernias represent a challenging surgical pathology. Although some advanced laparoscopists can repair these hernias through a minimally invasive approach, open repair is considered the technique of choice for most surgeons. The purpose of this study is to show our results of robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair of scrotal inguinal hernias. We reviewed the charts of 14 patients with inguinoscrotal hernias who underwent robotic-assisted transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. Mean follow-up was 7 months. The European Registry for Abdominal Wall Hernia Quality of Life score, a 90-point scale, was utilized to quantify patient reported outcomes. Robotic TAPP repair was successful in all 14 patients. Average case duration was 100 minutes (78 to 140 min) for unilateral hernias and 208 minutes (166 to 238 min) for bilateral hernias. Trainees were involved in 93% (13/14) of cases. There were no recurrences. Three patients developed postoperative seromas. The mean European Registry for Abdominal Wall Hernia Quality of Life score was 3.7 (0 to 10). Scrotal hernias can be safely repaired using robotic-assisted TAPP methods with low morbidity and favorable patient reported outcomes.

  17. The Hernia-Neck-Ratio (HNR), a Novel Predictive Factor for Complications of Umbilical Hernia.

    PubMed

    Fueter, T; Schäfer, M; Fournier, P; Bize, P; Demartines, N; Allemann, P

    2016-09-01

    Umbilical hernia is a common pathology and surgical repair is advised to prevent complications in symptomatic patients. However, risk factors that predict such advert events are unknown. The aim of the study was to determine whether morphological characteristics are associated with the occurrence of complications. Retrospective review of adult patients with elective and emergent umbilical hernia repair operated from January 2004 to December 2013. The size of the hernia and the size of the neck were measured based on operative reports, ultrasound, CT or MRI images. The Hernia-Neck-Ratio (HNR) was then calculated as novel risk indicator. 106 patients underwent umbilical hernia repair (70 for uncomplicated and 36 for complicated hernia) as single procedure. The median size of the hernia sac was statistically significantly smaller in the uncomplicated group (30 mm, interquartile range (IQR) 20-49 vs. 50 mm, IQR 40-71, p = 0.037). The median size of the neck was not different between both groups (15 mm, IQR 11-29 vs. 16 mm, IQR 12-21, p = 0.44). The median HNR was smaller in the uncomplicated group (1.76, IQR 1.45-2.18 vs. 3.33, IQR 2.97-3.91, p = 0.00026). Based on ROC curve analysis (area under the curve: 0.9038), a cut-off value of 2.5 was associated with 91 % sensitivity and 84 % specificity. A novel predictive factor for complications related to umbilical hernia is proposed. The Hernia-Neck Ratio can easily be calculated. These results suggest that umbilical hernia with HNR >2.5 should be operated, irrespective of the presence of symptoms.

  18. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent hernias.

    PubMed

    Memon, M A; Feliu, X; Sallent, E F; Camps, J; Fitzgibbons, R J

    1999-08-01

    Recurrence after primary conventional inguinal herniorrhaphy occurs in approximately 10% of patients depending on the type of repair and expertise of the surgeon. The repair of the resulting recurrent hernia is a daunting task because of already weakened tissues and obscured and distorted anatomy. The failure rate of these repairs using an open anterior approach may reach as high as 36%. Because of such a high failure rate, a number of investigators have focused on repairing these difficult recurrent hernias laparoscopically using a tension-free approach. Some of the earlier reports suggested a low recurrence rate of 0.5% to 5% when a laparoscopic approach was used to repair these hernias. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laparoscopic treatment for recurrent hernias in our institutions. Between February 1991 and February 1995, 96 recurrent hernias were repaired in 85 patients (78 men and 7 women). There were 48 right, 26 left, and 11 bilateral hernias. The mean age of the patients was 59 years (range, 18-86 years); the mean height was 69 in. (range, 54-77 in.); and the mean weight was 176 pounds (range, 109-280 pounds). A total of 68 herniorrhaphies were performed using the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) method: 19 using intraperitoneal on-lay mesh (IPOM) repair and 8 using the total extraperitoneal (TEP) method. The method of repair in one patient was not recorded. The mean operating time was 76 min (range, 47-172 min). Thirteen patients underwent additional procedures. Long-term follow-up was performed by questionnaire, examination, or both in 76 patients (85 hernias). Median follow-up time was 27 months (range, 2-56 months). There were four recurrences (2 in IPOM and 2 in TAPP). Three of these were repaired laparoscopically and one conventionally. There were 20 minor and 14 major complications and no mortality. One conversion occurred in the TAPP group. Mean postoperative stay was 1.4 days (range, 0-4 days). It was felt by 92% of

  19. Environmental factors in the etiology of esophageal atresia and congenital diaphragmatic hernia: results of a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Felix, Janine F; van Dooren, Marieke F; Klaassens, Merel; Hop, Wim C J; Torfs, Claudine P; Tibboel, Dick

    2008-02-01

    Esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) are severe congenital anomalies. Their etiologies are mostly unknown and are thought to be multifactorial. No specific environmental factors have consistently been described as risk factors. In a study conducted during the years 2000 to 2004 in a pediatric surgical referral center in the Netherlands, parents of children with EA/TEF or with CDH of the Bochdalek type and parents of a group of children without major birth defects filled out a questionnaire about possible exposure to environmental risk factors during the period from 1 month before conception to the end of the first trimester of pregnancy. Children with chromosomal anomalies were excluded. Questionnaires were returned for 47 out of 64 cases (73%) with EA/TEF, for 63 out of 77 cases (82%) with CDH, and for 202 out of 243 controls (83%). In EA/TEF, maternal age was borderline significantly higher than in controls (32.2 vs. 30.6 years, p = .05). Contact with herbicides or insecticides was associated with EA/TEF in univariate analysis (OR 2.0; 95% CI: 1.0-4.1) and in multivariate analysis, although of borderline significance. In univariate analysis, CDH was significantly associated with maternal use of alcohol (OR 2.9; 95% CI: 1.6-5.2). We found a significant association between maternal alcohol use around the time of conception and CDH. A possible explanation might be the effect of alcohol on the retinoic acid pathway. An association was found between contact with herbicides or insecticides and EA/TEF. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Reduction of chronic post-herniotomy pain and recurrence rate. Use of the anatomical self-gripping ProGrip laparoscopic mesh in TAPP hernia repair. Preliminary results of a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hoskovec, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The role of fixation of the mesh is especially important in the endoscopic technique. The fixation of mesh through penetrating techniques using staples, clips or screws is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing a post-herniotomy pain syndrome. Aim To demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the self-fixating anatomical Parietex ProGrip laparoscopic mesh (Sofradim Production, Trévoux France) used with laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair. The incidence of chronic post-herniotomy pain and recurrence rate in the follow-up after 12 months were evaluated. Material and methods Data analysis included all patients who underwent inguinal hernia surgery at our Surgical Department within the period from 1.05.2013 to 31.12.2014, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Standard surgical technique was used. Data were prospectively entered and subsequently analyzed on the Herniamed platform. Herniamed is an internet-based register in German and English language and includes all data of patients who underwent surgery for some types of hernia. Results There were 95 patients enrolled in the group and there were in total 156 inguinal hernias repaired. The mean follow-up was 15.52 months. At the assessment at 1 year mild discomfort in the groin was reported in 2 patients (3.51%) (1–3 VAS). No recurrence or chronic postoperative pain was reported. Conclusions Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using the transabdominal preperitoneal technique with implantation of the ProGrip laparoscopic mesh is a fast, effective and reliable method in experienced hands, which according to our results reduces the occurrence of chronic post-operative inguinal pain with simultaneously a low recurrence rate. PMID:26649083

  1. Incarceration of Meckel's diverticulum in a left paraduodenal Treitz' hernia.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Christoph; Akkermann, Oke; Krüger, Volker; Gerdes, Anna; Gerdes, Berthold

    2015-08-16

    Meckel's diverticula incarcerated in a hernia were first described anecdotally by Littré, a French surgeon, in 1700. Meckel, a German anatomist and surgeon, explained the pathophysiology of this disease 100 years later. In addition, a congenital paraduodenal mesocolic hernia, known as a Treitz hernia, is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. These hernias are caused by an abnormal rotation of the primitive midgut, resulting in a right or left paraduodenal hernia. We treated a patient presenting with pain and diagnosed extraluminal air in the abdomen after a computed tomography examination. We performed a laparotomy and found a combination of these two seldomly occurring congenital diseases, incarceration and perforation of Meckel's diverticulum in a left paraduodenal hernia. We performed a thorough review of the literature, and this report is the first to describe a patient with a combination of these two rare conditions. We considered the case regarding the variety of terminology as well as the treatment options of these conditions.

  2. Update on Bioactive Prosthetic Material for the Treatment of Hernias.

    PubMed

    Edelman, David S; Hodde, Jason P

    2011-12-01

    The use of mesh in the repair of hernias is commonplace. Synthetic mesh, like polypropylene, has been the workhorse for hernia repairs since the 1980s. Surgisis® mesh (Cook Surgical, Bloomington, IN), a biologic hernia graft material composed of purified porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS), was first introduced to the United States in 1998 as an alternative to synthetic mesh materials. This mesh, composed of extracellular matrix collagen, fibronectin and associated glycosaminoglycans and growth factors, has been extensively investigated in animal models and used clinically in many types of surgical procedures. SIS acts as a scaffold for natural growth and strength. We reported our initial results in this publication in July 2006. Since then, there have been many more reports and numerous other bioactive prosthetic materials (BPMs) released. The object of this article is to briefly review some of the current literature on the use of BPM for inguinal hernias, sports hernias, and umbilical hernias.

  3. Umbilical Hernia Repair: Analysis After 934 Procedures.

    PubMed

    Porrero, José L; Cano-Valderrama, Oscar; Marcos, Alberto; Bonachia, Oscar; Ramos, Beatriz; Alcaide, Benito; Villar, Sol; Sánchez-Cabezudo, Carlos; Quirós, Esther; Alonso, María T; Castillo, María J

    2015-09-01

    There is a lack of consensus about the surgical management of umbilical hernias. The aim of this study is to analyze the medium-term results of 934 umbilical hernia repairs. In this study, 934 patients with an umbilical hernia underwent surgery between 2004 and 2010, 599 (64.1%) of which were evaluated at least one year after the surgery. Complications, recurrence, and the reoperation rate were analyzed. Complications were observed in 5.7 per cent of the patients. With a mean follow-up time of 35.5 months, recurrence and reoperation rates were 3.8 per cent and 4.7 per cent, respectively. A higher percentage of female patients (60.9 % vs 29 %, P = 0.001) and a longer follow-up time (47.4 vs 35 months, P = 0.037) were observed in patients who developed a recurrence. No significant differences were observed between complications and the reoperation rate in patients who underwent Ventralex(®) preperitoneal mesh reinforcement and suture repair; however, a trend toward a higher recurrence rate was observed in patients with suture repair (6.5 % vs 3.2 %, P = 0.082). Suture repair had lower recurrence and reoperation rates in patients with umbilical hernias less than 1 cm. Suture repair is an appropriate procedure for small umbilical hernias; however, for larger umbilical hernias, mesh reinforcement should be considered.

  4. Hiatal Stenosis After Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Selima, Mohamed A.; Awad, Ziad T.

    2002-01-01

    Persistent postoperative dysphagia (PPD) is one of the most troublesome complications of laparoscopic antire-flux surgery. Hiatal stenosis, although rare, is a serious complication and is one of the causes of PPD after antire-flux procedures. In the 2 presented patients, progressive dysphagia started immediately after the antireflux procedure and did not respond to esophageal dilations. The cause of dysphagia in both patients was hiatal stenosis and was corrected laparoscopically. PMID:12500845

  5. Levator hiatal area as a risk factor for cystocele recurrence after surgery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vergeldt, T F M; Notten, K J B; Weemhoff, M; van Kuijk, S M J; Mulder, F E M; Beets-Tan, R G; Vliegen, R F A; Gondrie, E T C M; Bergmans, M G M; Roovers, J P W R; Kluivers, K B

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether increased levator hiatal area, measured preoperatively, was independently associated with anatom-ical cystocele recurrence 12 months after anterior colporrhaphy. Multicentre prospective cohort study. Nine teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Women planned for conventional anterior colporrhaphy without mesh. Women underwent physical examination, translabial three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery. At 12 months after surgery the physical examination was repeated. Women with and without anatomical cystocele recurrence were compared to assess the association with levator hiatal area on 3D ultrasound, levator hiatal area on MRI, and potential confounding factors. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was created to quantify the discriminative ability of using levator hiatal area to predict anatomical cystocele recurrence. Of 139 included women, 76 (54.7%) had anatomical cystocele recurrence. Preoperative stage 3 or 4 and increased levator hiatal area during Valsalva on ultrasound were significantly associated with cystocele recurrence, with odds ratios of 3.47 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI 1.66-7.28) and 1.06 (95% CI 1.01-1.11) respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.60 (95% CI 0.51-0.70) for levator hiatal area during Valsalva on ultrasound, and 0.65 (95% CI 0.55-0.71) for preoperative Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) stage. Increased levator hiatal area during Valsalva on ultrasound prior to surgery and preoperative stage 3 or 4 are independent risk factors for anatomical cystocele recurrence after anterior colporrhaphy; however, increased levator hiatal area as the sole factor for predicting anatomical cystocele recurrence after surgery shows poor test characteristics. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    PubMed

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Laparoscopic bridging vs. anatomic open reconstruction for midline abdominal hernia mesh repair [LABOR]: single-blinded, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial on long-term functional results.

    PubMed

    Stabilini, Cesare; Bracale, Umberto; Pignata, Giusto; Frascio, Marco; Casaccia, Marco; Pelosi, Paolo; Signori, Alessio; Testa, Tommaso; Rosa, Gian Marco; Morelli, Nicola; Fornaro, Rosario; Palombo, Denise; Perotti, Serena; Bruno, Maria Santina; Imperatore, Mikaela; Righetti, Carolina; Pezzato, Stefano; Lazzara, Fabrizio; Gianetta, Ezio

    2013-10-28

    Re-approximation of the rectal muscles along the midline is recommended by some groups as a rule for incisional and ventral hernia repairs. The introduction of laparoscopic repair has generated a debate because it is not aimed at restoring abdominal wall integrity but instead aims just to bridge the defect. Whether restoration of the abdominal integrity has a real impact on patient mobility is questionable, and the available literature provides no definitive answer. The present study aims to compare the functional results of laparoscopic bridging with those of re-approximation of the rectal muscle in the midline as a mesh repair for ventral and incisional abdominal defect through an "open" access. We hypothesized that, for the type of defect suitable for a laparoscopic bridging, the effect of an anatomical reconstruction is near negligible, thus not a fixed rule. The LABOR trial is a multicenter, prospective, two-arm, single-blinded, randomized trial. Patients of more than 60 years of age with a defect of less than 10 cm at its greatest diameter will be randomly submitted to open Rives or laparoscopic defect repair. All the participating patients will have a preoperative evaluation of their abdominal wall strength and mobility along with volumetry, respiratory function test, intraabdominal pressure and quality of life assessment.The primary outcome will be the difference in abdominal wall strength as measured by a double leg-lowering test performed at 12 months postoperatively. The secondary outcomes will be the rate of recurrence and changes in baseline abdominal mobility, respiratory function tests, intraabdominal pressure, CT volumetry and quality of life at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The study will help to define the most suitable treatment for small-medium incisional and primary hernias in patients older than 60 years. Given a similar mid-term recurrence rate in both groups, if the trial shows no differences among treatments (acceptance of the null

  8. Gallstone ileus obstructing within an incarcerated lumbar hernia: an unusual presentation of a rare diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ziesmann, Markus Tyler; Alotaiby, Nouf; Al Abbasi, Thamer; Rezende-Neto, Joao B

    2014-12-03

    We describe an unusual case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with signs and symptoms of small-bowel obstruction and a clinically appreciable, irreducible, left-sided lumbar hernia associated with previous iliac crest bone graft harvesting. Palpation of the hernia demonstrated a small, firm mass within the loops of herniated bowel. CT scanning recognised an intraluminal gallstone at the transition point, establishing the diagnosis of gallstone ileus within an incarcerated lumbar hernia. The proposed explanatory mechanism is that of a gallstone migrating into an easily reducible hernia containing small bowel causing obstruction at the hernia neck by a ball-valve mechanism, resulting in proximal bowel dilation and thus hernia incarceration; it remains unclear when the stone entered the hernia, and whether it enlarged in situ or prior to entering the enteral tract. This is only the second reported instance in the literature of an intraluminal gallstone causing hernia incarceration. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series SAGES Masters Program Facebook Collaboratives Acute Care Surgery Bariatric Biliary Colorectal Flexible Endoscopy (upper or lower) Foregut Hernia Robotics The SAGES HPB/Solid Organ Program The SAGES ...

  10. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series SAGES Masters Program Facebook Collaboratives Acute Care Surgery Bariatric Biliary Colorectal Flexible Endoscopy (upper or lower) Foregut Hernia Robotics The SAGES HPB/Solid Organ Program The SAGES ...

  11. Umbilical hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... painful and stuck in the bulging position. Blood supply to the intestine is affected. The hernia has ... in. This is usually painful. If the blood supply to this area is cut off (strangulation), urgent ...

  12. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Dunbar KB, Jeyarajah DR. Abdominal hernias and gastric volvulus. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  13. Giant left paraduodenal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cundy, Thomas P; Di Marco, Aimee N; Hamady, Mohamad; Darzi, Ara

    2014-01-01

    Left paraduodenal hernia (LPDH) is a retrocolic internal hernia of congenital origin that develops through the fossa of Landzert, and extends into the descending mesocolon and left portion of the transverse mesocolon. It carries significant overall risk of mortality, yet delay in diagnosis is not unusual due to subtle and elusive features. Familiarisation with the embryological and anatomical features of this rare hernia is essential for surgical management. This is especially important with respect to vascular anatomy as major mesenteric vessels form intimate relationships with the ventral rim and anterior portion of the hernia. As an illustrative case, we describe our experience with a striking example of LPDH, particularly focusing on the inherent diagnostic challenges and associated critical vascular anatomy. We advocate the role of diagnostic laparoscopy; however caution that decision to safely proceed with laparoscopic repair must occur only with confident identification of the vascular anatomy involved. PMID:24792018

  14. Parastomal Hernia Containing Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Millet, Sebastian; Pous, Salvador; Navarro, Vicente; Iserte, Jose; García-Granero, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is the most common late stomal complication. Its appearance is usually asymptomatic. We report a parastomal hernia containing stomach. A 69-year-old patient with end colostomy arrived at the emergency room presenting with abdominal pain associated with vomiting and functioning stoma. She had a distended and painful abdomen without signs of peritoneal irritation and pericolostomic eventration in the left iliac fossa. X-ray visualized gastric fornix dilatation without dilated intestine bowels, and computed tomography showed parastomal incarcerated gastric herniation. Gastrografin (Bayer Australia Limited, New South Wales, Australia) was administered, showing no passage to duodenum. She underwent surgery, with stomal transposition and placement of onlay polypropylene mesh around the new stoma. Parastomal hernias are a frequent late complication of colostomy. Only four gastric parastomal hernia cases are reported in the literature. Three of these four cases required surgery. The placement of prosthetic mesh in the moment of stoma elaboration should be considered as a potential preventive measure. PMID:25058773

  15. Lung volumes, ventricular function and pulmonary arterial flow in children operated on for left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Koch, Arne; Götzelt, Knut; Hahn, Gabriele; Fitze, Guido; Vogelberg, Christian

    2010-07-01

    To compare MRI-based functional pulmonary and cardiac measurements in the long-term follow-up of children operated on for left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) with age- and body size-matched healthy controls. Twelve children who received immediate postnatal surgery for closure of isolated left-sided CDH were included and received basic medical examinations, pulmonary function testing and echocardiography. MRI included measurement of lung volume, ventricular function assessment and velocity-encoded imaging of the pulmonary arteries and was compared with the data for 12 healthy children matched for age and body size. While patients' clinical test results were not suspicious, comparison between the MRI data for patients and those for healthy controls revealed significant differences. In patients, the volumes of the left lungs were increased and the tidal volume was larger on the right side. While the stroke volumes of both ventricles were reduced, heart rate and ejection fraction were increased. Flow, acceleration time and cross-sectional area of the left pulmonary artery were reduced. Functional MRI detected pulmonary and cardiac findings in the late follow-up of CDH children which may be missed by standard clinical methods and might be relevant for decisions regarding late outcome and treatment.

  16. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. RESULTS: FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. CONCLUSION: The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy. PMID:26380829

  17. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-09-16

    To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy.

  18. Type V Collagen is Persistently Altered after Inguinal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, L; Henriksen, N A; Juhl, P; Mortensen, J H; Ågren, M S; Karsdal, M A; Jorgensen, L N

    2018-04-01

    Hernia formation is associated with alterations of collagen metabolism. Collagen synthesis and degradation cause a systemic release of products, which are measurable in serum. Recently, we reported changes in type V and IV collagen metabolisms in patients with inguinal and incisional hernia. The aim of this study was to determine if the altered collagen metabolism was persistent after hernia repair. Patients who had undergone repairs for inguinal hernia (n = 11) or for incisional hernia (n = 17) were included in this study. Patients who had undergone elective cholecystectomy served as controls (n = 10). Whole venous blood was collected 35-55 months after operation. Biomarkers for type V collagen synthesis (Pro-C5) and degradation (C5M) and those for type IV collagen synthesis (P4NP) and degradation (C4M2) were measured by a solid-phase competitive assay. The turnover of type V collagen (Pro-C5/C5M) was slightly higher postoperatively when compared to preoperatively in the inguinal hernia group (P = 0.034). In addition, the results revealed a postoperatively lower type V collagen turnover level in the inguinal hernia group compared to controls (P = 0.012). In the incisional hernia group, the type V collagen turnover was higher after hernia repair (P = 0.004) and the postoperative turnover level was not different from the control group (P = 0.973). Patients with an inguinal hernia demonstrated a systemic and persistent type V collagen turnover alteration. This imbalance of the collagen metabolism may be involved in the development of inguinal hernias.

  19. International guidelines for groin hernia management.

    PubMed

    2018-02-01

    Worldwide, more than 20 million patients undergo groin hernia repair annually. The many different approaches, treatment indications and a significant array of techniques for groin hernia repair warrant guidelines to standardize care, minimize complications, and improve results. The main goal of these guidelines is to improve patient outcomes, specifically to decrease recurrence rates and reduce chronic pain, the most frequent problems following groin hernia repair. They have been endorsed by all five continental hernia societies, the International Endo Hernia Society and the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery. An expert group of international surgeons (the HerniaSurge Group) and one anesthesiologist pain expert was formed. The group consisted of members from all continents with specific experience in hernia-related research. Care was taken to include surgeons who perform different types of repair and had preferably performed research on groin hernia surgery. During the Group's first meeting, evidence-based medicine (EBM) training occurred and 166 key questions (KQ) were formulated. EBM rules were followed in complete literature searches (including a complete search by The Dutch Cochrane database) to January 1, 2015 and to July 1, 2015 for level 1 publications. The articles were scored by teams of two or three according to Oxford, SIGN and Grade methodologies. During five 2-day meetings, results were discussed with the working group members leading to 136 statements and 88 recommendations. Recommendations were graded as "strong" (recommendations) or "weak" (suggestions) and by consensus in some cases upgraded. In the Results and summary section below, the term "should" refers to a recommendation. The AGREE II instrument was used to validate the guidelines. An external review was performed by three international experts. They recommended the guidelines with high scores. The risk factors for inguinal hernia (IH) include: family history, previous contra

  20. Concomitant abdominoplasty and umbilical hernia repair using the Ventralex hernia patch.

    PubMed

    Neinstein, Ryan M; Matarasso, Alan; Abramson, David L

    2015-04-01

    Patients requesting abdominoplasty often have concomitant umbilical hernias and may request simultaneous treatment. The vascularity of the umbilicus is potentially at risk during these combined procedures. In this study, the authors present a technique for treating umbilical hernias at the time of abdominoplasty surgery using the Ventralex hernia patch. A total of 11 female patients with a mean age of 39.4 years (range, 28 to 51 years) undergoing abdominoplasty with umbilical hernia repair with the Ventralex patch were included. The mean body mass index was 27.6 kg/m (range, 20 to 34 kg/m). No vascular compromise of the umbilicus was seen. The hernia repair did not alter the abdominoplasty results. One patient had transient umbilical swelling postoperatively that resolved within 6 months postoperatively. The authors present a series of umbilical hernia repairs in abdominoplasty patients using a minimal access incision by means of the rectus fascia and the Ventralex patch that is fast and reliable and preserves the blood supply to the umbilicus.

  1. Laparoscopic versus hybrid approach for treatment of incisional ventral hernia: a prospective randomized multicenter study of 1-month follow-up results.

    PubMed

    Ahonen-Siirtola, M; Nevala, T; Vironen, J; Kössi, J; Pinta, T; Niemeläinen, S; Keränen, U; Ward, J; Vento, P; Karvonen, J; Ohtonen, P; Mäkelä, J; Rautio, T

    2018-06-07

    The seroma rate following laparoscopic incisional ventral hernia repair (LIVHR) is up to 78%. LIVHR is connected to a relatively rare but dangerous complication, enterotomy, especially in cases with complex adhesiolysis. Closure of the fascial defect and extirpation of the hernia sack may reduce the risk of seromas and other hernia-site events. Our aim was to evaluate whether hybrid operation has a lower rate of the early complications compared to the standard LIVHR. This is a multicenter randomized-controlled clinical trial. From November 2012 to May 2015, 193 patients undergoing LIVHR for primary incisional hernia with fascial defect size from 2 to 7 cm were recruited in 11 Finnish hospitals. Patients were randomized to either a laparoscopic (LG) or to a hybrid (HG) repair group. The outcome measures were the incidence of clinically and radiologically detected seromas and their extent 1 month after surgery, peri/postoperative complications, and pain. Bulging was observed by clinical evaluation in 46 (49%) LG patients and in 27 (31%) HG patients (p = 0.022). Ultrasound examination detected more seromas (67 vs. 45%, p = 0.004) and larger seromas (471 vs. 112 cm 3 , p = 0.025) after LG than after HG. In LG, there were 5 (5.3%) enterotomies compared to 1 (1.1%) in HG (p = 0.108). Adhesiolysis was more complex in LG than in HG (26.6 vs. 13.3%, p = 0.028). Patients in HG had higher pain scores on the first postoperative day (VAS 5.2 vs. 4.3, p = 0.019). Closure of the fascial defect and extirpation of the hernia sack reduce seroma formation. In hybrid operations, the risk of enterotomy seems to be lower than in laparoscopic repair, which should be considered in cases with complex adhesions. NCT02542085.

  2. Laparoscopic preperitoneal repair of recurrent inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Sayad, P; Ferzli, G

    1999-04-01

    Repair of recurrent inguinal hernias using the conventional open technique has been associated with high rates of recurrence and complications. Stoppa has reported a low recurrence rate using the open preperitoneal approach. Evolution of laparoscopic techniques has allowed the reproduction of the open preperitoneal repair via an endoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. This study reviewed all the recurrent inguinal hernias repaired laparoscopically and evaluated the complication and recurrence rate. A total of 512 inguinal hernias were treated laparoscopically using the TEP approach. Of these, 75 were recurrent. The ages of the 61 men ranged from 36 to 65 years. There were 41 direct and 34 indirect hernias. Fourteen were bilateral. None of the repairs was converted to an open procedure. The operating time ranged from 20 to 145 min (median 42 min). All patients were discharged home on the same day. There were no deaths. The complications consisted of two instances of urinary retention and one groin collection. Patient follow-up ranged from 6 to 72 (median 40) months, and there have been no recurrences to date. The TEP repair for recurrent inguinal hernias can produce results comparable to the open preperitoneal technique with low morbidity and recurrence rates.

  3. Sports Hernia: Diagnosis, Management and Operative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emblom, Benton A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Athletic Pubalgia, also known as sports hernia or core muscle injury, causes significant dysfunction in athletes. Increased recognition of this specific injury distinct from inguinal hernia pathology has led to better management of this debilitating condition. We hypothesize that patients who undergo our technique of athletic pubalgia repair will recover and return to high-level athletics. Methods: Using our billing and clinical database, patients who underwent sports hernia repair by single surgeon at a single institution were contacted for Harris hip score, functional outcome, and return to play data. Results: Of 101 patients who met criteria, 43 were contacted. 93% of patients were able to return to play at an average of 4.38 mo. Normal activities were rated at 95.5% and athletic function was rated at 88.9%. Negative predictors were female sex, multiple operations, and prior inguinal hernia repair. Overall complication rate was 4.6%, and reoperation rate was 4.6%. Conclusion: Our method of adductor to rectus abdominis turn up flap is a safe procedure with high return to play success. Patients who had previously undergone inguinal hernia repair or other hip/pelvic related surgery had a worse outcome.

  4. A very simple technique to repair Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia.

    PubMed

    Solaini, Leonardo; di Francesco, F; Gourgiotis, S; Solaini, Luciano

    2010-08-01

    A very simple technique to repair a superior lumbar hernia is described. The location of this type of hernia, also known as the Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia, is defined by a triangle placed in the lumbar region. An unusual case of a 67-year-old woman with a superior lumbar hernia is reported. The diagnosis was made by physical examination. The defect of the posterior abdominal wall was repaired with a polypropylene dart mesh. The patient had no evidence of recurrence at 11 months follow up. The surgical approach described in this paper is simple and easy to perform, and its result is comparable with other techniques that are much more sophisticated. No cases on the use of dart mesh to repair Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia have been reported by surgical journals indexed in PubMed.

  5. Comparison between the short-term results of onlay and sublay mesh placement in the management of uncomplicated para-umbilical hernia: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Bessa, S S; El-Gendi, A M; Ghazal, A H A; Al-Fayoumi, T A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare between the short-term results of onlay and sublay mesh placement in the prosthetic repair of uncomplicated para-umbilical hernia (PUH). Eighty patients with a defect size ranging from 4 to 10 cm were prospectively randomized to either the onlay group (40 patients) or the sublay group (40 patients). The operative time, postoperative complications and short-term recurrence were reported. There were no statistically significant differences between both study groups as regards the patients' demographics, associated co-morbidities and mean defect size. The median operative time was significantly shorter in the onlay group compared to that in the sublay group (52 vs. 91 min respectively, p < 0.001). No statistically significant difference was found in the daily median pain score throughout the first postoperative week. The time required to remove the suction drain was significantly shorter in the sublay group compared to that in the onlay group (3 vs. 7 days respectively, p < 0.001).Complications were encountered in 4 patients (10%) in the onlay group compared to 3 patients (7.5%) in the sublay group (p = 1.000). Superficial wound infection was encountered in 1 patient (2.5%) in the sublay group, Seroma was encountered in 2 patients (5%) in the onlay group, Deep vein thrombosis was encountered in 1 patient (2.5%) in the onlay group, Chest infection was encountered in 2 patients (5%) in the sublay group compared to 1 patient (2.5%) in the onlay group. Throughout the 22 months median follow-up duration (range 6-42 months), 2 recurrences (5%) were encountered in either study group. Both techniques are safe, efficient and are associated with comparable complication and recurrence rates.

  6. The Burnia: Laparoscopic Sutureless Inguinal Hernia Repair in Girls.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Nathan M; Puentes, Maria C; Leopold, Rodrigo; Ortega, Mabel; Godoy-Lenz, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    a single lateral port site hernia on a 2 kg, former 24 week postmenstrual age girl before adapting the technique to single-site surgery for all. Laparoscopic sutureless inguinal hernia repair is safe and effective in girls of all ages. The single-site modification allows for superior cosmetic result and lower complication profile. The Burnia allows for adequate treatment of unilateral and bilateral inguinal hernias with a single incision in the umbilicus.

  7. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  8. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged.

  9. [Calcifications after intra-disk injection of triamcinolone hexacetonide in lumbar disk hernia. Evaluation of therapeutical results in 3 years].

    PubMed

    Debiais, F; Bontoux, D; Alcalay, M; Vandermarcq, P; Azais, O; Denis, A; Azais, I; Gasquet, C

    1991-10-01

    The development of disk or epidural calcifications is a frequent possibility following intra-disk injection of triamcinolone hexacetonide. It was found 10 times in 26 follow-up CT scans obtained 2 to 3 years after the injection. These calcifications are often clinically silent, but they sometimes accompany a recurrence of the initial painful symptomatology. Furthermore, evaluation at 3 years of therapeutic results in a previously published series of patients who had received an intra-disk injection of triamcinolone hexacetonide showed a marked decrease in favourable results (30% vs 67% at 6 months). These two arguments: disappointing long term results and possibility of disk calcifications, are felt by the authors to justify abandoning the technique of triamcinolone hexacetonide by intra-disk injection in the treatment of lumbar disk prolapse.

  10. Sac ligation in inguinal hernia repair: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chun-Yu; Li, Ching-Li; Lin, Chao-Chun; Su, Chih-Ming; Chen, Chia-Che; Tam, Ka-Wai

    2015-07-01

    Traditionally, hernia sac ligation during inguinal hernia repair is considered mandatory to prevent postoperative development of hernia. However, ligation may induce postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of hernia sac ligation after inguinal hernia repair. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to investigate the outcomes of hernia sac ligation for open or laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Incidence of hernia recurrence was assessed following the surgery. The secondary outcomes included pain scores and postoperative complications. Five trials were selected and their results were summarized. These 5 trials were published between 1984 and 2014, and the sample sizes ranged from 50 to 467 patients. Four trials had recruited patients with inguinal hernia who underwent open repair, and one study enrolled patients who underwent laparoscopic procedures. We observed no difference in the incidence of hernia recurrence and postoperative complications between the sac ligation and nonligation groups. Postoperatively, the intensity of pain was significantly higher in the ligation group than in the nonligation group at Day 7 (Weight mean difference 1.46; 95% confident interval: 0.98-1.95). Hernia sac ligation was associated with higher postoperative pain, and did not show any benefit over sac nonligation regarding the incidence of recurrence and postoperative complications in patients undergoing open tension-free mesh repair or laparoscopic procedures. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in children with transperitoneal division of the hernia sac and proximal purse string closure of peritoneum: our modified new approach.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, A A; Matz, S T; Schmidt, S; Pimpalwar, A

    2011-12-01

    To describe our results of laparoscopic transperitoneal division of the hernia sac with purse string closure of the proximal peritoneum for inguinal hernia repair in children. A retrospective case review of all patients undergoing laparoscopic herniorrhaphy with herniotomy by a single surgeon between January and August 2007 was performed evaluating perioperative and postoperative outcomes. A complete intracorporeal laparoscopic technique was utilized to inspect bilateral inguinal canals followed by circumferential division of the peritoneum at the deep ring (patent processus vaginalis) followed by purse string closure of the proximal peritoneum. 31 inguinal hernias were repaired laparoscopically in 26 patients (23 boys, 3 girls). Median age was 36 months (range 1-168 months). 22 children had unilateral inguinal hernia repairs including 2 recurrent hernias; 4 children underwent repair of bilateral inguinal hernias. Mean operating time for unilateral and bilateral inguinal hernia repairs were 48.5 ± 14 min and 61 ± 13.8 min, respectively. 2 patients with a preoperative unilateral inguinal hernia were found to have bilateral inguinal hernias upon laparoscopic examination which were repaired. Postoperative pain was minimal in 20 (77%) patients at discharge. Mean telephone follow-up at 8 ± 9.6 months demonstrated no recurrences to date. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with transperitoneal division of the hernia sac and purse string closure of the proximal peritoneum allows for a minimally invasive option for pediatric inguinal hernia repair that mimics open inguinal hernia repair. At medium term follow-up there have been no recurrences to date, high parent satisfaction, minimal scarring and good cosmetic results. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Financial implications of ventral hernia repair: a hospital cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Drew; Davenport, Daniel L; Korosec, Ryan L; Roth, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    contribution margin for cases utilizing biologic mesh was -$4,560, and the median net financial loss was $8,370. Outpatient ventral hernia repairs, with and without synthetic mesh, resulted in median net losses of $1,560 and 230, respectively. Ventral hernia repair is associated with overall financial losses. Inpatient synthetic mesh repairs are essentially budget neutral. Outpatient and inpatient repairs without mesh result in net financial losses. Inpatient biologic mesh repairs result in a negative contribution margin and striking net financial losses. Cost-effective strategies for managing ventral hernias in a tertiary care environment need to be developed in light of the financial implications of this patient population.

  13. Bilateral totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair of the ultrasound-diagnosed asymptomatic contralateral inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Malouf, Phillip A; Descallar, Joseph; Berney, Christophe R

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this series is to determine the clinical utility of routine ultrasound (US) of the contralateral, clinically normal groin when a unilateral inguinal hernia is referred for hernia repair-specifically assessing the morbidity and short-term change in quality-of-life (QoL) due to repair of this occult contralateral hernia when also repairing the symptomatic side. TEP inguinal hernia repair affords the opportunity to repair any groin hernia through the same small incisions. US detects 96.6% of groin hernias with 84.4% specificity. 234 consecutive male patients with clinically unilateral and clinically bilateral hernia were enrolled; those with a clinically unilateral hernia were sent for groin US and if positive, a bilateral TEP groin hernia repair was performed (USBH). If negative, a unilateral TEP groin hernia repair was performed (UNIH). Carolina's comfort scales (CCS) and visual analogue scores (VAS) were recorded at 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively, while a modified CCS (MCCS) was recorded for all patients preoperatively. Bilateral TEP repair resulted in higher VAS scores than unilateral repair at 2 weeks but not 6 weeks. CCS were worse in the USBH group than UNIH group at 2 weeks but were similar by 6 weeks. Complications' rates were similar amongst all 3 groups. Factors contributing to worse scores were: smaller hernia, complications, worse preoperative MCCS results, recurrent hernia and bilateral rather than unilateral repair. Bilateral TEP for the clinically unilateral groin hernia with an occult contralateral groin hernia can be performed without increased morbidity, accepting a minor and very temporary impairment of QoL.

  14. [What is the value of the internet as a source of information for patients with inguinal hernias? First results of an observational study].

    PubMed

    Zieren, J; Neuss, H; Maecker, F; Müller, J M

    2002-05-01

    The increasing use of the internet has led to a variety of medical web pages and an increasing amount of information about hospitals. Little is known about the extent to which this new medium is already used by patients as a source of information. For patients with inguinal hernia, for example, a frequent surgical symptom with large method variety, the value of the internet as a source of information should be examined. One hundred patients facing an elective inguinal hernia repair at the Surgical Department Charité Berlin took part in a prospective observation study (a questionnaire with 10 questions) between July 1999 and March 2001. The questions referred to the possibility of PC/internet access, other sources of information (e.g., general practitioner, friends, internet) as well as the criteria by which the clinic was chosen. Patients were asked to answer basic questions about the development and treatment of inguinal hernia and to give a self-assessment of their knowledge of inguinal hernia (0 = no knowledge; 10 = maximum knowledge). The questionnaire revealed that 39% of the patients (average age 47 +/- 16 years) had a PC in their homes, 24% of those with internet access; 11% had internet access at other places. It also showed that 53% of the patients sought medical information from their general practitioner, 29% from friends, and 18% from the internet. Young patients (median age 29 years), employees and patients with private internet access use the internet with significantly more frequency. Their medical knowledge as well as their self-assessment of medical knowledge was significantly higher (median 19 versus 7 points and median 8.6 versus 5.7, respectively) and they chose the clinic because of the information from their research on the internet. At present, the internet still plays a subordinate role as a source of information for patients with an inguinal hernia. The increasing presence of this medium as well as the higher internet acceptance of future

  15. Inguinal hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... through this weakened area. Description During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. Your abdominal wall is strengthened and supported with sutures (stitches), and sometimes mesh. This repair can be done with open or laparoscopic surgery. ...

  16. Intrascrotal hernia of the ureter and fatty hernia.

    PubMed

    Giuly, J; François, G F; Giuly, D; Leroux, C; Nguyen-Cat, R R

    2003-03-01

    Intrascrotal hernia of the ureter is a rare event. We describe here one such case. There are two anatomic types of such ureteral hernias. The paraperitoneal type has a peritoneal indirect sac, which pulls the ureter with it. The extraperitoneal ureteral hernia is without a peritoneal sac. In such cases, which are almost always indirect hernias, there is usually a large amount of fat. It is, in fact, retroperitoneal fat, which slides, and pulls the ureter with it by gravity. Such a case is a genuine prolapse of the retroperitoneal structures. This anomaly, which has been rarely studied, is worth knowing about, because the ureter may be damaged during hernia dissection. The surgeon should be cautious when discovering huge fatty hernias, and should avoid the excision of fat and simply return the fatty mass to its normal place after its separation from the cord.

  17. Mesh abdominal wall hernia surgery is safe and effective-the harm New Zealand media has done.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Steven

    2017-10-06

    Patients in New Zealand have now developed a fear of mesh abdominal wall hernia repair due to inaccurate media reporting. This article outlines the extensive literature that confirms abdominal wall mesh hernia repair is safe and effective. The worsening confidence in the transvaginal mesh prolapse repair should not adversely affect the good results of mesh abdominal wall hernia repair. New Zealand general surgeons are well trained in providing modern hernia surgery.

  18. The feasibility of laparoscopic extraperitoneal hernia repair under local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ferzli, G; Sayad, P; Vasisht, B

    1999-06-01

    Laparoscopic preperitoneal herniorrhaphy has the advantage of being a minimally invasive procedure with a recurrence rate comparable to open preperitoneal repair. However, surgeons have been reluctant to adopt this procedure because it requires general anesthesia. In this report, we describe the technique used in the laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias under local anesthesia using the preperitoneal approach. We also report our results with 10 inguinal hernias repaired using the same technique. Ten patients underwent their primary inguinal hernia repairs under local anesthesia. None were converted to general anesthesia. Four patients received a small amount of intravenous sedation. Three patients had bilateral hernias. There were five direct and eight indirect hernias. The average operative time was 47 min. The average lidocaine usage was 28 cc. All patients were discharged within a few hours of the surgery. There were no complications. Follow-up has ranged from 1 to 6 months. There has been no recurrences to date. The extraperitoneal laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is feasible under local anesthesia. This technique adds a new treatment option in the management of bilateral inguinal hernias, particularly in the population where general anesthesia is contraindicated or even for patients who are reluctant to receive general or epidural anesthesia.

  19. Mesh hernia repair and male infertility: a retrospective register study.

    PubMed

    Hallén, Magnus; Westerdahl, Johan; Nordin, Pär; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Sandblom, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the use of mesh in groin hernia repair may be associated with an increased risk for male infertility as a result of inflammatory obliteration of structures in the spermatic cord. In a recent study, we could not find an increased incidence of involuntary childlessness. The aim of this study was to evaluate this issue further. Men born between 1950 and 1989, with a hernia repair registered in the Swedish Hernia Register between 1992 and 2007 were cross-linked with all men in the same age group with the diagnosis of male infertility according to the Swedish National Patient Register. The cumulative and expected incidences of infertility were analyzed. Separate multivariate logistic analyses, adjusted for age and years elapsed since the first repair, were performed for men with unilateral and bilateral repair, respectively. Overall, 34,267 men were identified with a history of at least 1 inguinal hernia repair. A total of 233 (0.7%) of these had been given the diagnosis of male infertility after their first operation. We did not find any differences between expected and observed cumulative incidences of infertility in men operated with hernia repair. Men with bilateral hernia repair had a slightly increased risk for infertility when mesh was used on either side. However, the cumulative incidence was less than 1%. Inguinal hernia repair with mesh is not associated with an increased incidence of, or clinically important risk for, male infertility. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  1. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature.

  2. Hernia Sac Presence Portends Better Survivability of Isolated Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia with "Liver-Up".

    PubMed

    Grizelj, Ruža; Bojanić, Katarina; Vuković, Jurica; Novak, Milivoj; Weingarten, Toby N; Schroeder, Darrell R; Sprung, Juraj

    2017-04-01

    Objective  The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of a hernia sac in isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) with intrathoracic liver herniation ("liver-up"). Study Design  A retrospective study from the single tertiary center. Isolated "liver-up" CDH neonates referred to our institution between 2000 and 2015 were reviewed for the presence or absence of a hernia sac. Association between the presence of a hernia sac and survival was assessed. Results  Over the study period, there were 29 isolated CDH patients with "liver-up" who were treated, 7 (24%) had a sac, and 22 (76%) did not. Demographics were similar between groups. However, disease acuity, assessed from lower Apgar scores ( p  = 0.044), lower probability of survival ( p  = 0.037), and lower admission oxygenation ( p  = 0.027), was higher in neonates without a sac. Hospital survival was significantly higher for those with sac compared with those without (7/7, 100 vs. 7/22, 32%, p  = 0.002). Conclusion  The presence of a hernia sac may be associated with better survival for isolated "liver-up" CDH. As the presence of sac can be prenatally detected, it may be a useful marker to aid perinatal decision making. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Laparoscopic hernia surgery: an overview.

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, L; Schäfer, M; Feodorovici, M A; Büchler, M W

    1998-01-01

    Despite the fact that laparoscopic hernia repair was already described in 1979, its value has still not been well defined. The standard treatment for uncomplicated primary hernia repair in Europe is an open anterior approach (i.e. Shouldice), and 'tension-free' mesh plug repair in the USA. At present, posterior mesh insertion is used to repair so-called complicated hernias with a complete myopectineal defect, and recurrent and bilateral hernias. Laparoscopic hernia repair (transabdominally and extraperitoneally) mimics this posterior mesh insertion and is therefore mostly used for treating complicated hernias. Whether or not a transabdominal or extraperitoneal approach is used depends on the type and size of the hernia, the risk to the patient, previous abdominal operations and the surgeon's experience. However, the extraperitoneal approach is now recommended because of its lower complication rate compared to the transabdominal approach. Compared to open surgical procedures the laparoscopic approach shows significant advantages in terms of less postoperative pain, decreased time off work and decreased overall costs. The disadvantages are increased operating time as well as difficulty in performing the procedure itself. A recent large randomized series has for the first time been able to demonstrate the advantages of the laparoscopic approach in a long-term follow-up. However, further studies are needed to define the exact place of laparoscopic hernia repair in the treatment of groin hernias.

  4. Flank and Lumbar Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Beffa, Lucas R; Margiotta, Alyssa L; Carbonell, Alfredo M

    2018-06-01

    Flank and lumbar hernias are challenging because of their rarity and anatomic location. Several challenges exist when approaching these specific abdominal wall defects, including location, innervation of the lateral abdominal wall musculature, and their proximity to bony landmarks. These hernias are confined by the costal margin, spine, and pelvic brim, which makes closure of the defect, including mesh placement, difficult. This article discusses the anatomy of lumbar and flank hernias, the various etiologies for these hernias, and the procedural steps for open and robotic preperitoneal approaches. The available clinical evidence regarding outcomes for various repair techniques is also reviewed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF 2.0) with EsophyX for gastroesophageal reflux disease: long-term results and findings affecting outcome.

    PubMed

    Testoni, Pier Alberto; Vailati, Cristian; Testoni, Sabrina; Corsetti, Maura

    2012-05-01

    Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) with the EsophyX(™) device is reported to be effective for creating a continent gastroesophageal valve and for good functional results, as measured by pH impedance in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study is to assess the long-term effect of TIF in patients with symptomatic GERD. TIF 2.0 fundoplication was done in 42 consecutive patients. All were studied with GERD-HRQL and GERD-QUAL questionnaires, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and 24 h pH impedance before and at 6, 12, and 24 months after TIF. In all, 35 patients completed 6-month follow-up; 21 (60.0%) completely stopped proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, 6 (17.1%) more than halved it, and 8 (22.9%) continued with the same dose as before the procedure. There were 26 patients with complete 24-month follow-up; 11 (42.3%) completely stopped PPI therapy, 7 (26.9%) more than halved it, and 8 (30.8%) were taking the same dose as before the procedure. Hiatal hernia and ineffective esophageal motility seemed to raise the risk of recurrence of symptoms (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively). The number of fasteners deployed during TIF was the only factor predictive of successful outcome (p = 0.018). TIF using the EsophyX device allowed withdrawal or reduction of PPI in about 77% of patients at 6-month follow-up and about 69% at 24 months. Larger number of fasteners deployed during TIF was predictive of positive outcome; pre-TIF ineffective esophageal motility and hiatal hernia raised the risk of recurrence of GERD symptoms, but were not significant from a prospective point of view.

  6. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various surgical approaches have return-to–athletic activity rates of >80% regardless of the approach. The variety of procedures and lack of outcomes measures in these studies make it difficult to compare one surgical approach to another. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between range of motion–limiting hip disorders (femoroacetabular impingement) and sports hernia/athletic pubalgia in a subset of athletes. This has added increased complexity to the decision-making process regarding treatment. Conclusion: An association between femoroacetabular impingement and athletic pubalgia has been recognized, with better outcomes reported when both are managed concurrently or in a staged manner. PMID:24587864

  7. Congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Woolley, M M

    1976-04-01

    The infant who is born with a posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia who becomes symptomatic at or soon after birth requires urgent care. Surgical reduction of the diaphragmatic hernia must be accomplished quickly. Respiratory and metabolic acidosis must be treated appropriately. The parents should be informed of the gravity of their infant's problem and reassurred by appropriate explanation of the nature of the defect and the therapeutic requirements. If the infant dies, the parents are in need of empathy, reassurance, and adequate explanation so that they do not have lingering doubts regarding the etiology of the anomaly and the adequacy of the therapy. If the infant lives, the medical team can share the feeling of a job well done.

  8. Terminal ileum gangrene secondary to a type IV paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching Tsai; Hsiao, Po Jen; Chiu, Chih Chien; Chan, Jenq Shyong; Lin, Yee Fung; Lo, Yuan Hung; Hsiao, Chia Jen

    2016-02-28

    Type IV paraesophageal hernia (PEH) is very rare, and is characterized by the intrathoracic herniation of the abdominal viscera other than the stomach into the chest. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented at our emergency department because of epigastric pain that she had experienced over the past 24 h. On the day after admission, her pain became severe and was accompanied by right chest pain and dyspnea. Chest radiography revealed an intrathoracic intestinal gas bubble occupying the right lower lung field. Emergency explorative laparotomy identified a type IV PEH with herniation of only the terminal ileum through a hiatal defect into the right thoracic cavity. In this report, we also present a review of similar cases in the literature published between 1980 and 2015 in PubMed. There were four published cases of small bowel herniation into the thoracic cavity during this period. Our patient represents a rare case of an individual diagnosed with type IV PEH with incarceration of only the terminal ileum.

  9. Ventral incisional hernia recurrence.

    PubMed

    Clark, J L

    2001-07-01

    During the period October 1993 to December 1996, 31 patients were operated on by the author for primary or recurrent ventral incisional hernia (VIH). Three patients were excluded from analysis because their records were unavailable for review. The median age of the 28 remaining patients at their initial procedure was 57.5 years (range, 37-78 years). The repair was performed with interrupted O-Ethibond sutures in all but 3 cases where Prolene suture was used secondary to noniatrogenic contamination or recurrent hernia. There were no unplanned enterotomies in the entire series and prophylactic intravenous antibiotics were used in all cases. The only significant complications were skin hyperemia after five repairs in 3 patients who were treated empirically with intravenous antibiotics, and 1 patient who had an antibiotic-associated rash. There were no 30-day mortalities. Prolene mesh was used exclusively in all repairs performed with mesh. Seven of these repairs (25%) were for recurrent VIH. Three of these seven patients had previous mesh repairs. Six of these seven patients who presented with recurrent VIH had a mesh repair and four developed a recurrence. Five of seven were active smokers, with one having severe obstructive lung disease. Four of seven related significant occupational lifting. Of the 21 patients having initial repair of VIH, mesh was used in 8 (38%). After a median follow-up of 13 months, there were 2 recurrent hernias (25%). The remaining 13 patients had primary closure of their hernias. After median follow-up of 25 months, there were 5 recurrences (38%). A total of 34 VIH repairs were performed on these 28 patients, of which 13 were for recurrent hernias. Five of thirteen (38%) of the mesh repairs for recurrent VIH failed. The median body mass index (BMI) for the 13 patients having primary repair was 26.4, and that for all 21 cases having mesh repair was 28.8. Patients with recurrent VIH frequently recur despite use of mesh, avoidance of

  10. Segmental liver incarceration through a recurrent incisional lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S; Nisotakis, Konstantinos; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Tsohataridis, Efstathios

    2007-08-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare congenital or acquired defect of the posterior abdominal wall. The acquired type is more common and occurs mainly as an incisional defect after flank surgery. Incarceration or strangulation of hernia contents is uncommon. Segmental liver incarceration through a recurrent incisional lumbar defect was diagnosed in a 58 years old woman by magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent an open repair of the complicated hernia. An expanded polytetraflouoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh was fashioned as a sublay prosthesis. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Follow-up examinations revealed no evidence of recurrence. Although lumbar hernia rarely results in incarceration or strangulation, early repair is necessary because of the risks of complications and the increasing difficulty in repairment as it enlarges. Surgical repair is often difficult and challenging.

  11. [Fetal magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Sebastià, C; Garcia, R; Gomez, O; Paño, B; Nicolau, C

    2014-01-01

    A diaphragmatic hernia is defined as the protrusion of abdominal viscera into the thoracic cavity through a normal or pathological orifice. The herniated viscera compress the lungs, resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension, which are the leading causes of neonatal death in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is diagnosed by sonography in routine prenatal screening. Although magnetic resonance imaging is fundamentally used to determine whether the liver is located within the abdomen or has herniated into the thorax, it also can provide useful information about other herniated structures and the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia. The aim of this article is to review the fetal magnetic resonance findings for congenital diaphragmatic hernia and the signs that enable us to establish the neonatal prognosis when evaluating pulmonary hypoplasia. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. [Treatment of postoperative abdominal hernias with polypropylene endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Chakhvadze, B Iu; Nakashidze, D Kh

    2009-06-01

    The results of the surgical treatment of 82 patients with postoperative abdominal hernias were analysed. All of the patients underwent surgery with polypropylene endoprosthesis. The choice of a hernioplasty method depended on relative volume of postoperative hernia. Middle-sized hernias were indications for reconstructive surgery (complete adaptation of muscular and aponeurotic layers was maintained). The large and gigantic hernias were indications for correcting surgery (specified diastasis of muscular and aponeurotic layers was maintained). In case of lacking of peritoneum (30 patients) greater omentum was used for isolation of the net from intestinal loops. It is concluded that greater omentum provides good extraperitonisation of transplant from intestinal loop and prevents complications due to contact of net with abdominal organs. Postoperative complications mainly were local and seen in 29% cases. There were no lethal outcomes.

  13. Mesh Displacement After Bilateral Inguinal Hernia Repair With No Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Gabriela Moreira; Campos, Antonio Carlos Ligocki; Paulin, João Augusto Nocera; Coelho, Julio Cesar Uili

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: About 20% of patients with inguinal hernia present bilateral hernias in the diagnosis. In these cases, laparoscopic procedure is considered gold standard approach. Mesh fixation is considered important step toward avoiding recurrence. However, because of cost and risk of pain, real need for mesh fixation has been debated. For bilateral inguinal hernias, there are few specific data about non fixation and mesh displacement. We assessed mesh movement in patients who had undergone laparoscopic bilateral inguinal hernia repair without mesh fixation and compared the results with those obtained in patients with unilateral hernia. Methods: From January 2012 through May 2014, 20 consecutive patients with bilateral inguinal hernia underwent TEP repair with no mesh fixation. Results were compared with 50 consecutive patients with unilateral inguinal hernia surgically repaired with similar technique. Mesh was marked with 3 clips. Mesh movements were measured by comparing initial radiography performed at the end of surgery, with a second radiographic scan performed 30 days later. Results: Mean movements of all 3 clips in bilateral nonfixation (NF) group were 0.15–0.4 cm compared with 0.1–0.3 cm in unilateral NF group. Overall displacement of bilateral and unilateral NF groups did not show significant difference. Mean overall displacement was 1.9 cm versus 1.8 cm in the bilateral and unilateral NF groups, respectively (P = .78). Conclusions: TEP with no mesh fixation is safe in bilateral inguinal repairs. Early mesh displacement is minimal. This technique can be safely used in most patients with inguinal hernia. PMID:28904521

  14. Changes in the frequencies of abdominal wall hernias and the preferences for their repair: a multicenter national study from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Seker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, Ibrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%. As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world. Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic), the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional), and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).

  15. Follow-up period of 13 years after endoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernias: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Brandt-Kerkhof, Alexandra; van Mierlo, Marjolein; Schep, Niels; Renken, Nondo; Stassen, Laurents

    2011-05-01

    Endoscopic inguinal hernia repair was introduced in the Netherlands in the early 1990s. The authors' institution was among the first to adopt this technique. In this study, long-term hernia recurrence among patients treated by the total extraperitoneal (TEP) approach for an inguinal hernia is described. A cohort study was conducted. Between January 1993 and December 1997, 346 TEP hernia repairs were performed for 318 patients. After a mean follow-up period of 13-years, a senior resident examined each patient. An experienced surgeon subsequently examined the patients with a diagnosis of recurrent hernia. Data were collected on an intention-to-treat basis, meaning that conversions were included in the analysis. Univariant tests were used to analyze age older than 50 years, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, body mass index, smoking habit, hernia type, history of open hernia repair, conversion, and surgeon as potential risk factors. The analysis included 191 patients (62%) with 213 hernias. Of the original 318 patients, 59 patients died, and 68 were lost to follow-up evaluation. Perioperatively, 105 lateral, 55 medial, and 53 pantalon hernias were observed. Of the 213 hernias, 176 were primary and 37 were recurrent. The overall recurrence rate was 8.9% (8.5% for primary and 10.8% for recurrent hernias). Of the total study group, 48% of the patients experienced a bilateral inguinal hernia during their lifetime. No predicting factor for recurrent hernia could be identified. The current long-term results for TEP repair of primary and secondary inguinal hernia show an overall recurrence rate of 8.9%, which is slightly higher than in previous studies. The thorough examination at follow-up assessment, the learning curve effect, and the intention-to-treat-analysis may have influenced the observed recurrence rate. Also, the percentage of bilateral hernias was higher than known to date. Therefore, examination of the contralateral side should be standard procedure.

  16. Mesh materials and hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Elango, Santhini; Perumalsamy, Sakthivel; Ramachandran, Krishnakumar; Vadodaria, Ketankumar

    2017-01-01

    Hernia incidence has been observed since ancient time. Advancement in the medical textile industry came up with the variety of mesh materials to repair hernia, but none of them are without complications including recurrence of hernia. Therefore individuals once developed with the hernia could not lead a healthy and comfortable life. This drawn attention of surgeons, patients, researchers and industry to know the exact mechanism behind its development, complications and recurrence. Recent investigations highlighted the role of genetic factors and connective tissue disorders being the reason for the development of hernia apart from the abnormal pressure that is known to develop during other disease conditions. This review discusses different mesh materials, their advantages and disadvantages and their biological response after its implantation. PMID:28840830

  17. [Cases of strangulated obturator hernia].

    PubMed

    Chakhvadze, B; Nakashidze, D; Kashibadze, K; Beridze, A

    2010-02-01

    Obturator hernias are extremely rare in surgical practice. Only about 600 cases are described in the world medical literature. To diagnose obturator hernia is very complicated. Hernial protrusion is not often observed. The strangulation of obturator hernia is accompanied by rapidly developing symptoms of intestinal obstruction, which is usually an indication for emergency surgery. The article analyzes two clinical cases of strangulated obturator hernia and one traumatic eventration and strangulation of small intestine in the obturator ring ruined by trauma. In all cases the indication of surgery was clinical picture of a growing intestinal obstruction or acute abdomen. Only in one case, despite the prevailing clinical picture of acute intestinal obstruction in the light of anamnesis and the accompanying neurological symptoms before the operation could be suspected strangulated obturator hernia, which was confirmed during surgery. As it was mentioned above, in doubtful cases to clarify the diagnosis should be applied other methods of examination of patients, including computed tomography.

  18. Laparoscopic Repair of Ileal Conduit Parastomal Hernia Using the Sling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Bipan

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair has become a viable option to overcome the challenges that face the hernia surgeon. Multiple techniques have been described over the last 5 years, one of which is the lateralizing “sling” technique, first described by Sugarbaker in1980. In this study, we report the technique and our early results with the laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker repair of parastomal hernias after ileal conduit. PMID:18435893

  19. Contraction of Abdominal Wall Muscles Influences Incisional Hernia Occurrence and Size

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Samuel C.; Hu, Yaxi; Wollstein, Adi; Franz, Michael G.; Patel, Shaun P.; Kuzon, William M.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Incisional hernias are a complication in 10% of all open abdominal operations and can result in significant morbidity. The purpose of this study is to determine if inhibiting abdominal muscle contraction influences incisional hernia formation during laparotomy healing. We hypothesize that reducing abdominal musculature deformation reduces incisional hernia occurrence and size. Study Design Using an established rat model for incisional hernia, a laparotomy through the linea alba was closed with one mid-incision, fast-absorbing suture. Three groups were compared: a SHAM group (SHAM; n = 6) received no laparotomies while the Saline Hernia (SH; n = 6) and Botox Hernia (BH; n = 6) groups were treated once with equal volume saline or Botulinum Toxin (Botox®, Allergan) before the incomplete laparotomy closure. On post-operative day 14, the abdominal wall was examined for herniation and adhesions and contractile forces were measured for abdominal wall muscles. Results No hernias developed in SHAM rats. Rostral hernias developed in all SH and BH rats. Caudal hernias developed in all SH rats, but in only 50% of the BH rats. Rostral hernias in the BH group were 35% shorter and 43% narrower compared to those in the SH group (p < 0.05). The BH group had weaker abdominal muscles compared to the SHAM and SH groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions In our rat model, partial paralysis of abdominal muscles reduces the number and size of incisional hernias. These results confirm abdominal wall muscle contractions play a significant role in the pathophysiology of incisional hernia formation. PMID:25817097

  20. Umbilical hernia: Influence of adhesive strapping on outcome.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Makoto; Shimozono, Takashi; Meiri, Satoru; Kurogi, Jun; Yamashita, Naoto; Ifuku, Toshinobu; Yamamura, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Etsuko; Ishii, Shigeki; Shimonodan, Hidemi; Mihara, Yuka; Kono, Keiichiro; Nakatani, Keigo; Nishiguchi, Toshihiro

    2017-12-01

    Adhesive strapping for umbilical hernia has been re-evaluated as a promising treatment. We evaluated the influence of adhesive strapping on the outcome of umbilical hernia. We retrospectively evaluated patients with umbilical hernia referred to the present institution from April 2011 to December 2015. Patients who were treated with adhesive strapping were compared with an observation alone group. The adhesive strapping group was also subdivided into two groups: the cure group and the treatment failure group. A total of 212 patients with umbilical hernia were referred to the present institution. Eighty-nine patients were treated with adhesive strapping, while 27 had observation only. The cure rate in the adhesive strapping group was significantly higher than that in the observation group. The duration of treatment of the adhesive strapping group was significantly shorter than that of the observation group. In the adhesive strapping group, the patients in the cure group were treated significantly earlier than those in the treatment failure group (P < 0.001). Furthermore, even in cases of umbilical hernia non-closure, surgical repair was easier after adhesive strapping. Adhesive strapping represents a promising treatment for umbilical hernia. To achieve the best results, adhesive strapping should be initiated as early as possible. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. The Danish Inguinal Hernia database.

    PubMed

    Friis-Andersen, Hans; Bisgaard, Thue

    2016-01-01

    To monitor and improve nation-wide surgical outcome after groin hernia repair based on scientific evidence-based surgical strategies for the national and international surgical community. Patients ≥18 years operated for groin hernia. Type and size of hernia, primary or recurrent, type of surgical repair procedure, mesh and mesh fixation methods. According to the Danish National Health Act, surgeons are obliged to register all hernia repairs immediately after surgery (3 minute registration time). All institutions have continuous access to their own data stratified on individual surgeons. Registrations are based on a closed, protected Internet system requiring personal codes also identifying the operating institution. A national steering committee consisting of 13 voluntary and dedicated surgeons, 11 of whom are unpaid, handles the medical management of the database. The Danish Inguinal Hernia Database comprises intraoperative data from >130,000 repairs (May 2015). A total of 49 peer-reviewed national and international publications have been published from the database (June 2015). The Danish Inguinal Hernia Database is fully active monitoring surgical quality and contributes to the national and international surgical society to improve outcome after groin hernia repair.

  2. Obturator hernia: A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sanjeev R; Punamiya, Aditya R; Naniwadekar, Ramchandra G; Janugade, Hemant B; Chotai, Tejas D; Vimal Singh, T; Natchair, Arafath

    2013-01-01

    Obturator hernia is an extremely rare type of hernia with relatively high mortality and morbidity. Its early diagnosis is challenging since the signs and symptoms are non specific. Here in we present a case of 70 years old women who presented with complaints of intermittent colicky abdominal pain and vomiting. Plain radiograph of abdomen showed acute dilatation of stomach. Ultrasonography showed small bowel obstruction at the mid ileal level with evidence of coiled loops of ileum in pelvis. On exploration, Right Obstructed Obturator hernia was found. The obstructed Intestine was reduced and resected and the obturator foramen was closed with simple sutures. Postoperative period was uneventful. Obturator hernia is a rare pelvic hernia and poses a diagnostic challenge. Obturator hernia occurs when there is protrusion of intra-abdominal contents through the obturator foramen in the pelvis. The signs and symptoms are non specific and generally the diagnosis is made during exploration for the intestinal obstruction, one of the four cardinal features. Others are pain on the medial aspect of thigh called as Howship Rombergs sign, repeated attacks of Intestinal Obstruction and palpable mass on the medial aspect of thigh. Obturator hernia is a rare but significant cause of intestinal obstruction especially in emaciated elderly woman and a diagnostic challenge for the Doctors. CT scan is valuable to establish preoperative diagnosis. Surgery either open or laproscopic, is the only treatment. The need for the awareness is stressed and CT scan can be helpful. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Does hiatal repair affect gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy?

    PubMed

    Page, Philip Le; Martin, David; Taylor, Craig; Wang, Jennifer; Wadhawan, Himanshu; Falk, Gregory; Gibson, Simon C

    2018-05-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained popularity as a treatment of choice for morbid obesity and associated comorbidities. There has been a concern about new onset or worsening of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) following LSG. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of surgically treating hiatal weakness on GERD symptoms in patients undergoing LSG. Single tertiary referral institution, Sydney, Australia. A prospective observational cohort study was conducted with consecutive patients undergoing LSG. Hiatal findings, patient demographics, medications and reflux score were recorded prospectively. Patients were followed up post-operatively for a minimum of 12 months and assessed using GERD-HRQL score to quantify reflux symptoms. Data from 100 patients with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were analysed. Mean follow-up was 18.9 months. Overall, GERD-HRQL improved from mean 4.5 ± 5.8 pre-operatively to 0.76 ± 1.5 after 18.9 months (p = 0.0001). For those with pre-operative reflux, GERD-HRQL improved from mean (SD) 8.43 ± 6.26 pre-operatively to 0.94 ± 1.55 (p = 0.0001). All the nine patients with troublesome daily reflux significantly improved. For those without pre-operative reflux, GERD-HRQL improved from 0.88 ± 1.37 to 0.47 ± 1.25 (p-ns) post-operatively. On multivariate analysis, higher pre-operative reflux and dysphagia/bloat scores, younger age and lower percentage excess weight loss after 18.9 months were associated with GERD-HRQL improvement. In the medium term, GERD-HRQL improves following sleeve gastrectomy with meticulous hiatal assessment and repair of hiatal laxity and herniation.

  4. Incarcerated umbilical hernia in children.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, L B; Uba, A F; Kidmas, A T

    2006-02-01

    Umbilical hernia is common in children. Complications from umbilical hernias are thought to be rare and the natural history is spontaneous closure within 5 years. A retrospective analysis was performed of the medical records of a series of 23 children who presented with incarcerated umbilical hernias at our institution over an 8-year period. Fifty-two children with umbilical hernias were seen in the hospital over the period. Twenty-three (44.2%) had incarceration. Seventeen (32.7%) had acute incarceration while 6 (11.5%) had recurrent incarceration. There were 16 girls and 7 boys. The ages of the children with acute incarceration ranged from 3 weeks to 12 years (median 4 years), while the ages of those with recurrent incarceration ranged from 3-15 years (median 8.5 years). Incarceration occurred in hernias of more than 1.5 cm in diameter (in those whose defect size was measured). Twenty-one children (15 with acute and all six with recurrent incarceration) underwent repair of the umbilical hernia using standard methods. The parents of two children with acute incarceration declined surgery after spontaneous reduction of the hernia in one and taxis in the other. One boy had gangrenous bowel containing Meckel's diverticulum inside the sac, for which bowel resection with end-to-end anastomosis was done. Operation led to disappearance of pain in all 6 children with recurrent incarceration. Superficial wound infection occurred in one child. There was no mortality. Incarcerated umbilical hernia is not as uncommon as thought. Active observation of children with umbilical hernia is necessary to prevent morbidity from incarceration.

  5. Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernia using two-hand approach--a gold standard alternative to open repair.

    PubMed

    Rajapandian, S; Senthilnathan, P; Gupta, Atul; Gupta, Pinak Das; Praveenraj, P; Vaitheeswaran, V; Palanivelu, C

    2010-10-01

    As laparoscopy gained popularity, minimal invasive approach was also applied for hernia surgery. Unfortunately the initial efforts were disappointing due to high early recurrence rate. Experience led to refinement of technique, with acceptable recurrence rates. This combined with the advantages of minimal invasive surgery resulted in a gradual rise in worldwide acceptance of this technique. Our preferred approach for inguinal hernia repair is laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP); only in complicated hernias (sliding or incarcerated inguinal hernias) we use the transabdominal preperitoneal repair (TAPP) technique. Records of all patients who underwent TEP repair for inguinal hernia at our centre in last 15 years were retrospectively analysed. We have done 8659 hernias in 7023 patients by TEP approach. We have developed minor modifications for the TEP repair over the years. Out of total 8659 hernias 5262 was right sided and 3397 left sided. Of these, 5387 hernias were unilateral and the remainder were bilateral; 324 cases of recurrent hernias following open repair underwent TEP. Most of the patients were males with a mean age of 46 years. Indirect hernias were most common, followed by direct hernias. Right-sided hernias were more common than left-sided hernias. In 39 cases conversion to TAPP was needed. There were intra-operative problems in 250 patients (3.56%).Postoperative complications were seen in 192 patients (2.73%), majority of which were minor complications. There was no mortality. Recurrence rate was 0.39%. The TEP technique is comfortable and highly effective. Our port placement maintains triangular orientation that is considered vital to the ergonomics of laparoscopy. Nearly 98-99% of inguinal hernias can be treated by TEP approach with excellent results.

  6. Laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; He, Kai; Hua, Rong; Shen, Qiwei

    2017-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common long-term complications after abdominal ostomy. Surgical treatment for parastomal hernia is the only cure but a fairly difficult field because of the problems of infection, effects, complications and recurrence. Laparoscopic repair operations are good choices for Parastomal hernia because of their mini-invasive nature and confirmed effects. There are several major laparoscopic procedures for parastomal hernioplasty. The indications, technical details and complications of them will be introduced and discussed in this article. PMID:28251124

  7. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  8. Hernia sac of indirect inguinal hernia: invagination, excision, or ligation?

    PubMed

    Othman, I; Hady, H A

    2014-04-01

    This study compares the effect of invaginating excision of hernia sac without ligation with the traditional method of high ligation of the hernia sac on postoperative pain and recurrence. This multicenter prospective randomized study included 152 patients with 167 primary indirect inguinal hernias. In group I (54 hernias), the sac was not opened and was inverted with the finger into the peritoneal cavity. In group E (56 hernias), the sac was excised at the neck without ligation. In group L (57 hernias), the sac was transfixed at the neck and excised in the traditional manner. The repair of the posterior wall of the inguinal canal was done according to Lichtenstein tension-free technique. Mean length of follow-up was 81.50 ± 22.34, 79.35 ± 26.76, and 77.83 ± 21.26 months, respectively. Postoperative seroma occurred in 1 patient (0.60%) in group E and 1 patient (0.60%) in group L. Surgical site infection occurred in 2 patients (1.20%) in group I, 1 patient (0.60%) in group E, and 2 patients (1.20%) in group L. Mean postoperative pain score was 3.04 ± 2.11, 3.98 ± 2.33 and 4.06 ± 2.43, respectively (p: 0.049). Chronic pain occurred in 3 patients in group I (1.80%), 3 patients in group E (1.80%), and 5 patients in group L (3.00%) (p: 0.749). The difference between the complications in three groups was statistically insignificant (p: 0.887). Hernia recurrence occurred in 3 patients (1.80%) in group I, 1 patient (0.60%) in group E, and 1 patient (0.60%) in group L (p: 0.429). Invagination and excision of the hernia sac do not have adverse effects on repair integrity. They limit the dissection and reduce the morbidity and risk of injury to the spermatic cord and surrounded structures. They are safer and more appropriate for repair of sliding hernia. Ligation of the hernia sac in inguinal hernia surgery is not only unnecessary and time consuming but also leads to increased postoperative pain. Recurrence rates are statistically unaffected by not ligating the sac.

  9. [Amyand's hernia--a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Savlovschi, C; Brănescu, C; Serban, D; Tudor, C; Găvan, C; Shanabli, A; Comandaşu, M; Vasilescu, L; Borcan, R; Dumitrescu, D; Sandolache, B; Sajin, M; Grădinaru, S; Munteanu, R; Kraft, A; Oprescu, S

    2010-01-01

    Amyand's hernia, a rare entity in the surgical pathology, presupposes the presence of the vermiform appendix inside a inguinal hernia sac (1). The hernia sac peritonitis by appendix swelling is even more rare, very few cases being presented in the surgical literature (1). The preoperatory diagnosis of Amyand's hernia is therefore very difficult. We herein present the case of a 71-year old male patient, operated on an emergency basis for hernia, which eventually turned out to be Amyand's hernia, a case which determined us to research the literature dedicated to this topic.

  10. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become increasingly popular as an alternative to open surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal procedure with the use of staple fixation and polypropylene mesh. Methods: A retrospective chart review examined outcomes of 1240 laparoscopic hernia operations in 783 patients, focusing on intraoperative and early postoperative complications, pain, and time until return to work and normal physical activities. Results: There were no intraoperative complications in this series; 106 patients experienced early postoperative complications across 8 evaluated categories: urinary retention (4.1%), seroma (3.0%), testicular/hemiscrotal swelling (1.9%), testicular atrophy (0%), hydrocele (0.6%), mesh infection (0.1%), and neurological symptoms (transient, 1.0%; persistent, 0.2%). Patients used an average of 5.6 Percocet pills after the procedure, and mean times until return to work and normal activities, including their routine exercise regimen, were 3.0 and 3.8 days, respectively. Conclusion: Complication rates and convalescence times were considered equivalent or superior to those found in other studies assessing both laparoscopic and open techniques. The usage of multiple Endostaples did not result in increased neurologic complications in the early postoperative period when compared with findings in the literature. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, total extraperitoneal repair is a safe, effective alternative to open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27493471

  11. Laparoscopic repair of giant paraesophageal hernia: are there factors associated with anatomic recurrence?

    PubMed

    Antiporda, Michael; Veenstra, Benjamin; Jackson, Chloe; Kandel, Pujan; Daniel Smith, C; Bowers, Steven P

    2018-02-01

    Repair of giant paraesophageal hernia (PEH) is associated with a favorably high rate of symptom improvement; however, rates of recurrence by objective measures remain high. Herein we analyze our experience with laparoscopic giant PEH repair to determine what factors if any can predict anatomic recurrence. We prospectively collected data on PEH characteristics, variations in operative techniques, and surgeon factors for 595 patients undergoing laparoscopic PEH repair from 2008 to 2015. Upper GI study was performed at 6 months postoperatively and selectively thereafter-any supra-diaphragmatic stomach was considered hiatal hernia recurrence. Exclusion criteria included revisional operation (22.4%), size <5 cm (17.6%), inadequate follow-up (17.8%), and confounding concurrent operations (6.9%). Inclusion criteria were met by 202 patients (31% male, median age 71 years, and median BMI 28.7). At a median follow-up of 6 months (IQR 6-12), overall anatomic recurrence rate was 34.2%. Symptom recurrence rate was 9.9% and revisional operation was required in ten patients (4.9%). Neither patient demographics nor PEH characteristics (size, presence of Cameron erosions, esophagitis, or Barrett's) correlated with anatomic recurrence. Technical factors at operation (mobilized intra-abdominal length of esophagus, Collis gastroplasty, number of anterior/posterior stitches, use of crural buttress, use of pledgeted or mattress sutures, or gastrostomy) were also not correlated with recurrence. Regarding surgeon factors, annual volume of fewer than ten cases per year was associated with increased risk of anatomic failure (54 vs 33%, P = 0.02). Multivariate analysis identified surgeon experience (<10 cases per year) as an independent factor associated with early hiatal hernia recurrence (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.34-10.9). Laparoscopic repair of giant PEH is associated with high anatomic recurrence rate but excellent symptom control. PEH characteristics and technical operative variables do

  12. The use of ultrasound in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Young, J; Gilbert, A I; Graham, M F

    2007-08-01

    The diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias is not always straightforward and may require additional investigative modalities. Real-time ultrasound is accurate, non-invasive, relatively inexpensive, and readily available. The value of ultrasound as an adjunctive tool in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias in both pre-operative and post-operative patients was studied. Retrospective analysis of 200 patients treated at the Hernia Institute of Florida was carried out. In these cases, ultrasound had been used to assist with case management. Patients without previous hernia surgery and those with early and late post-herniorrhaphy complaints were studied. Patients with obvious hernias were excluded. Indications for ultrasound examination included patients with abdominal pain without a palpable hernia, a palpable mass of questionable etiology, and patients with inordinate pain or excessive swelling during the early post-operative period. Patients were treated with surgery or conservative therapy depending on the results of the physical examination and ultrasound studies. Cases in which the ultrasound findings influenced the decision-making process by confirming clinical findings or altering the diagnosis and changing the treatment plan are discussed. Of the 200 patients, 144 complained of pain alone and on physical exam no hernia or mass was palpable. Of these 144 patients with pain alone, 21 had a hernia identified on the US examination and were referred for surgery. The 108 that had a negative ultrasound were treated conservatively with rest, heat, and anti-inflammatory drugs, most often with excellent results. Of the 56 remaining patients who had a mass, with or without pain, 22 had hernias identified by means of ultrasound examination. In the other 34, the etiology of the mass was not a hernia. Abdominal wall ultrasound is a valuable tool in the scheme of management of patients in whom the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernia is unclear. Therapeutic decisions can be

  13. "Amyand's Hernia" – Pathophysiology, Role of Investigations and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    SINGAL, Rikki; GUPTA, Samita

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: In the present era, appendicitis and hernia are common problems but their presentations in different positions are rare to be seen. It is difficult to make diagnose pre-operatively of contents as appendicitis in obstructed hernia. The term "Amyand's hernia" was lost in the literature and we are describing its pathophysiology and management. The aggravating factors are: complex injuries related to hernia (size, degree of sliding, multiplicity, etc.), patient characteristics (age, activity, respiratory disease, dysuria, obesity, constipation). If not treated in the earliest stages then it can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Existing literature describes almost exclusively its pathophysiology, investigations and treatment. Material and Methods: We have focused on clinical presentation, radiological investigations and management of "Amyand's hernia". In literature, there is still confusion regarding investigations and treatment. We are presenting such rare entity managed in time without encountering any post-operative complications. Results: Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography are useful tests but clinical correlation is necessary in incarcerated appendix. Regarding treatment, it is clear that if appendix is inflamed then it should be removed, but we concluded that if appendix is found to be normal in obstructed hernia then it should also be removed due to possible later inflammation. Conclusion: If the appendix found in the hernial sac is inflamed then chances of mortality increase. Although emergency surgery is indicated in all obstructed hernias, morbidity and mortality can be decreased if operated on time. Early recognition and its awareness, along with good surgical technique in such cases are keys to success when dealing with this problem. PMID:22879848

  14. Robotic-Assisted Simultaneous Repair of Paraesophageal Hernia and Morgagni Hernia: Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shawn S; Carton, Melissa M; Ghaderi, Iman; Galvani, Carlos A

    2017-12-13

    Morgagni hernias are a rare form of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, accounting for 2%-3% of cases. The presence of a simultaneous Morgagni hernia and paraesophageal hernia (PEH) is even more rare, with only a few reported cases in the surgical literature. Both open and laparoscopic surgical approaches have been previously described. Herein we discuss a robotic-assisted surgical approach to the repair of simultaneous Morgagni hernia and PEH in a 65-year-old woman. Simultaneous repair of Morgagni hernia and PEH is indicated mainly when symptoms are generally indistinctive. The use of robotic technology allowed for both hernias to be repaired both primarily and with mesh reinforcement.

  15. Repair of symptomatic paraesophageal hernias in elderly (>70 years) patients results in sustained quality of life at 5 years and beyond.

    PubMed

    Merzlikin, Oleg V; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Shultz, Dale; Aye, Ralph W

    2017-10-01

    Paraesophageal hernias (PEHs) involve herniation of stomach and/or other viscera into the mediastinum. These commonly occur in the elderly and can severely limit quality of life. Short term outcomes of repaired PEH demonstrated low morbidity and significant improvement in quality of life, but long-term data for all patients, especially the elderly, are lacking. Retrospective chart review of a prospectively collected database of patients aged 70 or greater with a symptomatic PEH repaired 5+ years ago. Quality of life data were assessed preoperatively, at 12-24 months, and at 5+ years using QOLRAD, GERD-HRQL, and DSS. We identified 137 patients who met the age criteria, with 69 patients undergoing surgery 5+ years ago. With ten patients were lost to follow-up, 59 patients were analyzed, including 24 males and 35 females. Median age at repair was 77 years. There were two 90-day mortalities, with one occurring within 30 days of surgery. Patients alive at evaluation had a median age of 74 years and were followed a median 7.4 years. From baseline, QOLRAD improved from 4 to 6.5, GERD-HRQL improved from 11 to 5, and swallowing improved from 11 to 38. During follow-up, 21 patients died. Deceased patients lived a median of 4 years after repair, with a median age at repair of 80 years. At a median time follow-up of 2 years, this group's QOLRAD improved from 5.1 to 7, GERD-HRQL improved from 16 to 4, and swallowing improved from 14.5 to 35. In elderly patients with symptomatic PEH undergoing surgical repair more than 5 years ago, there was sustained improvement in quality of life. This justifies surgical repair of symptomatic PEH in elderly patients.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tibboel D, de Klein A, Lee B, Scott DA. Genetic factors in congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Am J ... 2009.08.004. Review. Citation on PubMed Scott DA. Genetics of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Semin Pediatr Surg. ...

  17. Inguinal hernia repair in the Amsterdam region 1994-1996.

    PubMed

    Schoots, I G; van Dijkman, B; Butzelaar, R M; van Geldere, D; Simons, M P

    2001-03-01

    In the Netherlands, approximately 30,000 inguinal hernia repairs are performed yearly. At least 15% are for recurrence. New procedures are being introduced creating discussion on which technique is the best. Currently it is not possible to choose on evidence alone because of the long follow-up that is needed. In 1996 an inventory was taken of all inguinal hernia repairs that were performed in the Amsterdam region (9 hospitals). These results were compared with the results from a similar study performed in 1994. Major changes in treatment strategy were noted. The Bassini repair was replaced by Shouldice and Lichtenstein techniques. There was a significant increase in the use of prostheses for both primary and recurrent inguinal hernias. There was no significant decrease in the percentage of operations performed for recurrent hernia from 19.5% to 16.8%. However, there was a significant decrease in operations performed for early recurrences (5.1%-3.4%) (p = 0.05). These results suggest that the Shouldice and Lichtenstein repairs may be superior to the Bassini repair in terms of early hernia recurrence.

  18. Umbilical hernia repair in pregnant patients: review of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Haskins, I N; Rosen, M J; Prabhu, A S; Amdur, R L; Rosenblatt, S; Brody, F; Krpata, D M

    2017-10-01

    Umbilical hernias present commonly during pregnancy secondary to increased intra-abdominal pressure. As a result, umbilical hernia incarceration or strangulation may affect pregnant females. The purpose of this study is to detail the operative management and 30-day outcomes of umbilical hernias in pregnant patients using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). All female patients undergoing umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy were identified within the ACS-NSQIP. Preoperative patient variables, intraoperative variables, and 30-day patient morbidity and mortality outcomes were investigated using a variety of statistical tests. A total of 126 pregnant patients underwent umbilical hernia repair from 2005 to 2014; 73 (58%) had incarceration or strangulation at the time of surgical intervention. The majority of patients (95%) underwent open umbilical hernia repair. Superficial surgical site infection was the most common morbidity in patients undergoing open umbilical hernia repair. Based on review of the ACS-NSQIP database, the incidence of umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy is very low; however, the majority of patients required repair for incarceration of strangulation. When symptoms develop, these hernias can be repaired with minimal 30-day morbidity to the mother. Additional studies are needed to determine the long-term recurrence rate of umbilical hernia repairs performed in pregnant patients and the effects of surgical intervention and approach on the fetus.

  19. Sigmoid Volvulus Through a Transmesenteric Hernia.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Pedro Nuno; Martins, Vilma; Silva, Cristina; Davide, José

    2017-06-01

    Internal hernias are a rare pathology with very low incidence. Transmesenteric hernias represent less than 10% of all cases and may occur at any age. They involve more often the small bowel and, more rarely, the colon. We present a case of a sigmoid volvulus through a transmesenteric hernia in a 19-year-old patient.

  20. [Infantile Amyand's hernia presenting as acute scrotum].

    PubMed

    Armas Alvarez, A L; Taboada Santomil, P; Pradillos Serna, J M; Rivera Chávez, L L; Estévez Martínez, E; Méndez Gallart, R; Rodríguez Barca, P; López Carreira, M L; Bautista Casasnovas, A; Varela Cives, R

    2010-10-01

    Amyand's hernia is a condition of exceptional presentation in children and is defined by the presence of inflamed appendix inside a inguinal hernia. It may manifest clinically as acute scrotum, inguinal lymphadenitis or strangulated hernia. The treatment is surgical and although several approaches are described, appendectomy with herniotomy by inguinal approach is considered of choice.

  1. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia...

  2. Prospective evaluation of surgeon physical examination for detection of incisional hernias.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Beck, William C; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Nealon, William H; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2014-03-01

    Surgeon physical examination is often used to monitor for hernia recurrence in clinical and research settings, despite a lack of information on its effectiveness. This study aims to compare surgeon-reviewed CT with surgeon physical examination for the detection of incisional hernia. General surgery patients with an earlier abdominal operation and a recent viewable CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis were enrolled prospectively. Patients with a stoma, fistula, or soft-tissue infection were excluded. Surgeon-reviewed CT was treated as the gold standard. Patients were stratified by body mass index into nonobese (body mass index <30) and obese groups. Testing characteristics and real-world performance, including positive predictive value and negative predictive value, were calculated. One hundred and eighty-one patients (mean age 54 years, 68% female) were enrolled. Hernia prevalence was 55%. Mean area of hernias was 44.6 cm(2). Surgeon physical examination had a low sensitivity (77%) and negative predictive value (77%). This difference was more pronounced in obese patients, with sensitivity of 73% and negative predictive value 69%. Surgeon physical examination is inferior to CT for detection of incisional hernia, and fails to detect approximately 23% of hernias. In obese patients, 31% of hernias are missed by surgeon physical examination. This has important implications for clinical follow-up and design of studies evaluating hernia recurrence, as ascertainment of this result must be reliable and accurate. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Poorly understood and often miscategorized congenital umbilical cord hernia: an alternative repair method.

    PubMed

    İnce, E; Temiz, A; Ezer, S S; Gezer, H Ö; Hiçsönmez, A

    2017-06-01

    Umbilical cord hernia is poorly understood and often miscategorized as "omphalocele minor". Careless clamping of the cord leads to iatrogenic gut injury in the situation of umbilical cord hernia. This study aimed to determine the characteristics and outcomes of umbilical cord hernias. We also highlight an alternative repair method for umbilical cord hernias. We recorded 15 cases of umbilical cord hernias over 10 years. The patients' data were retrospectively reviewed, and preoperative preparation of the newborn, gestational age, birth weight, other associated malformations, surgical technique used, enteral nutrition, and length of hospitalization were recorded. This study included 15 neonates with umbilical cord hernias. The mean gestational age at the time of referral was 38.2 ± 2.1 hernia, the body folds develop normally and form the umbilical ring. The double purse-string technique is easy to apply and produces satisfactory cosmetic results in neonates with umbilical cord hernias.

  4. Definitive Surgical Treatment of Infected or Exposed Ventral Hernia Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Szczerba, Steven R.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To discuss the difficulties in dealing with infected or exposed ventral hernia mesh, and to illustrate one solution using an autogenous abdominal wall reconstruction technique. Summary Background Data The definitive treatment for any infected prosthetic material in the body is removal and substitution. When ventral hernia mesh becomes exposed or infected, its removal requires a solution to prevent a subsequent hernia or evisceration. Methods Eleven patients with ventral hernia mesh that was exposed, nonincorporated, with chronic drainage, or associated with a spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula were referred by their initial surgeons after failed local wound care for definitive management. The patients were treated with radical en bloc excision of mesh and scarred fascia followed by immediate abdominal wall reconstruction using bilateral sliding rectus abdominis myofascial advancement flaps. Results Four of the 11 patients treated for infected mesh additionally required a bowel resection. Transverse defect size ranged from 8 to 18 cm (average 13 cm). Average procedure duration was 3 hours without bowel repair and 5 hours with bowel repair. Postoperative length of stay was 5 to 7 days without bowel repair and 7 to 9 days with bowel repair. Complications included hernia recurrence in one case and stitch abscesses in two cases. Follow-up ranges from 6 to 54 months (average 24 months). Conclusions Removal of infected mesh and autogenous flap reconstruction is a safe, reliable, and one-step surgical solution to the problem of infected abdominal wall mesh. PMID:12616130

  5. Case of a strangulated right paraduodenal fossa hernia in a malrotated gut.

    PubMed

    Ong, Michelle; Roberts, Matthew; Perera, Marlon; Pretorius, Casper

    2017-07-24

    We report an unusual case of a strangulated internal hernia resulting from a right paraduodenal fossa hernia (PDH) in the context of bowel malrotation. There are few documented cases of PDHs associated with a concomitant gut malrotation. Emergency laparotomy was performed based on clinical and radiological. Intraoperatively, the proximal jejunum was seen to enter a hernia sac formed by an aberrant duodenojejunal flexure located to the right of the aorta. This was presumed to be a strangulated internal hernia of the paraduodenal recess in a malrotated gut. The hernia neck was widened and the sac obliterated to allow reduction of the contents. On reduction and warming, the insulted small bowel appeared viable and returned to the abdominal cavity without resection. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Comparison of Radiography and Ultrasonography for Diagnosis of Diaphragmatic Hernia in Bovines

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Hakim; Mohindroo, Jitender; Singh, Kiranjeet; Kumar, Ashwani; Raghunath, Mulinti

    2010-01-01

    The present study was conducted on 101 animals suffering from thoracoabdominal disorders; out of which twenty seven animals (twenty six buffaloes and one cow) were diagnosed with diaphragmatic hernia based on clinical signs, radiography, ultrasonography, and left flank laparorumenotomy. Radiography alone confirmed diaphragmatic hernia in 18 cases (66.67%) with a sac-like structure cranial to the diaphragm. In 15 animals the sac contained metallic densities while in three cases a sac-like structure with no metallic densities was present. Ultrasonography was helpful in confirming diaphragmatic hernia in 23 cases (85.18%) and ultrasonographically reticular motility was evident at the level of 4th/5th intercostal space in all the animals. B+M mode ultrasonography was used for the first time for diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia in bovines and the results suggested that ultrasonography was a reliable diagnostic modality for diaphragmatic hernia in bovines. PMID:20445795

  7. [Clinical research progress of mesenteric internal hernia after Roux-en-Y reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengrong; Guo, Wenjun

    2017-03-25

    Postoperative internal hernia is a rare clinical complication which often occurs after digestive tract reconstruction. Roux-en-Y anastomosis is a common type of digestive tract reconstruction. Internal hernia after Roux-en-Y reconstruction, which occurs mainly in the mesenteric defect caused by incomplete closure of mesenteric gaps in the process of digestive tract reconstruction, is systematically called, in our research, as mesenteric internal hernia after Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Such internal hernia can be divided, according to the different structures of mesentric defect, into 3 types: the type of mesenteric defect at the jejunojejunostomy (J type), the type of Petersen's defect (P type), and the type of mesenteric defect in the transverse mesocolon (M type). Because of huge differences in the number of cases and follow-up time among existing research reports, the morbidity of internal hernia after LRYGB fluctuates wildly between 0.2% and 9.0%. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of mesenteric internal hernia after Roux- en-Y reconstruction may result in disastrous consequences such as intestinal necrosis. Clinical manifestations of internal hernia vary from person to person: some, in mild cases, may have no symptoms at all while others in severe cases may experience acute intestinal obstruction. Despite the difference, one common manifestation of internal hernia is abdominal pain. Surgical treatment should be recommended for those diagnosed as internal hernia. A safer and more feasible way to conduct the manual reduction of the incarcerated hernia is to start from the distal normal empty bowel and trace back to the hernia ring mouth, enabling a faster identification of hernia ring and its track. The prevention of mesenteric internal hernia after Roux-en-Y reconstruction is related to the initial surgical approach and the technique of mesenteric closure. Significant controversy remains on whether or not the mesenteric defect should be closed in laparoscopic Roux

  8. Management of giant paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Awais, O; Luketich, J D

    2009-04-01

    Management of giant paraesophageal hernia remains one of the most difficult challenges faced by surgeons treating complex benign esophageal disorders. These large hernias are acquired disorders; therefore, they invariably present in elderly patients. The dilemma that surgeons faced in the open surgical era was the risk of open surgery in this elderly, sick patient population versus the life threatening catastrophic complications, nearly 30% in some series, observed with medical management. During the 1990s, it was clearly recognized that laparoscopic surgery led to decreased morbidity with a quicker recovery. This has lead to a 6-fold increase in the surgical management of giant paraesophageal hernias over the last decade compared to a period of five decades of open surgery; however, this has not necessarily translated into better outcomes. One of the major issues with giant paraesophageal hernias is recognizing short esophagus and performing a lengthening procedure, if needed. Open series which report liberal use of Collis gastroplasty leading to a tension-free intraabdominal fundoplication have shown the best anatomic and clinical outcomes. As we duplicate the open experience laparoscopically, the principle of identifying a shortened esophagus and constructing a neo-esophagus must be honored for the success of the operation. The benefits of laparoscopy are obvious but should not come at the cost of a lesser operation. This review will illustrate that laparoscopic repair of giant paraesophageal hernia at experienced centers can be performed safely with similar outcomes to open series when the fundamental principles of the operation are maintained.

  9. [Modern approaches for the choice of open-access method of plastic surgery for recurrent inguinal hernia].

    PubMed

    Belianskiĭ, L S; Todurov, I M; Pustovit, A A; Kucheruk, V V

    2010-03-01

    Retrospective analysis of the treatment results concerning 272 patients, who have suffered recurrent inguinal hernia and were operated on in the clinic for the period of 1999-2009 yrs, was done. The need for preperitoneal plasty of inguinal canal performance for recurrent inguinal hernia, using extrainguinial access to hernia defect, was noted. This procedure lowers therisk of iatrogenic injury occurrence of anatomic structures of inguinal canal.

  10. Laparoendoscopic single-site extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: initial experience in 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Do, Minh; Liatsikos, Evangelos; Beatty, John; Haefner, Tim; Dunn, Ian; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe

    2011-06-01

    Recent technical advances and a trend toward laparoscopic single incision surgery have led us to explore the feasibility of laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) hernia repair. We present our technique and initial experience with LESS extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair in 10 consecutive men with unilateral inguinal hernias. Age range was 43.7 (28-64) years. Mean body mass index was 28 (range 24-30). Six were left inguinal hernias. There were six indirect and four direct hernias. Three patients had undergone previous open appendectomy. Incarcerated or bilateral hernias were excluded from our initial series. All cases were performed by three surgeons who were experienced in conventional totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair as well as experienced in LESS. A literature review of current single-port inguinal hernia repair data is also presented. The mean operative time was 53 minutes (range 45-65  min). The average length of skin incision was 2.8  cm (range 2.3-3.2  cm). No drain was necessary in any of the patients, while no recordable bleeding was observed. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. Hospitalization period was 2 days for all patients. After a limited follow-up of 1 month, there have been no recurrences and no complaints of testicular pain. The results of the current series compare favorably with those found in a literature review. LESS extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair is both feasible and safe, although more technically demanding than its conventional laparoscopic counterpart. Although the cosmetic result with the former approach may prove superior, there are standing questions regarding the complications and long-term outcome. Randomized and if possible blinded trials that compare conventional and single-incision laparoscopic hernia repair may help to distinguish the most advantageous technique.

  11. Umbilical hernia management during liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    de Goede, B; van Kempen, B J H; Polak, W G; de Knegt, R J; Schouten, J N L; Lange, J F; Tilanus, H W; Metselaar, H J; Kazemier, G

    2013-08-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis scheduled for liver transplantation often present with a concurrent umbilical hernia. Optimal management of these patients is not clear. The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients who underwent umbilical hernia correction during liver transplantation through a separate infra-umbilical incision with those who underwent correction through the same incision used to perform the liver transplantation. In the period between 1990 and 2011, all 27 patients with umbilical hernia and liver cirrhosis who underwent hernia correction during liver transplantation were identified in our hospital database. In 17 cases, umbilical hernia repair was performed through a separate infra-umbilical incision (separate incision group) and 10 were corrected from within the abdominal cavity without a separate incision (same incision group). Six patients died during follow-up; no deaths were attributable to intraoperative umbilical hernia repair. All 21 patients who were alive visited the outpatient clinic to detect recurrent umbilical hernia. One recurrent umbilical hernia was diagnosed in the separate incision group (6 %) and four (40 %) in the same incision group (p = 0.047). Two patients in the same incision group required repair of the recurrent umbilical hernia; one of whom underwent emergency surgery for bowel incarceration. The one recurrent hernia in the separate incision group was corrected electively. In the event of liver transplantation, umbilical hernia repair through a separate infra-umbilical incision is preferred over correction through the same incision used to perform the transplantation.

  12. Testicular Ischemia Caused by Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia in Infants: Incidence, Conservative treatment procedure, and Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ozdamar, Mustafa Yasar; Karakus, Osman Zeki

    2017-07-02

    Testicular ischemia and necrosis, especially in the infant age, may result from incarcerated inguinal hernia. Duration of ischemia is a significant factor for the affected testicle. We aimed to present a case series on the conservative management in the testicular ischemia caused by incarcerated inguinal hernia. Inguinal hernia repairs performed in between March 2009 and December 2014 were investigated retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, hernia side, incarceration, testicular ischemia and complications were recorded. Color Doppler ultrasonography was performed in the incarcerated inguinal hernia patients preoperatively and was repeated on 3 and 7 days and then at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The testicle sizes, volumes, and arterial flow patterns of them were recorded at the same time. Total 785 inguinal hernias were treated in 738 male patients, ranging from 18 days to 16 years. From all male patients, 44 (5.9%) had the IIH. There were 16 (36.3%) irreducible hernias in 44 incarcerated hernia patients. Of these 16, testicular ischemia was determined in 9 (56.2%) infants with the irreducible incarcerated hernia. Orchidopexyprocedure was performed in these patients. Testicular atrophy was occurred in two patients (22.2%). In the others, testicular volumes and perfusions were normal during follow-up (mean 8.3 ± 2.2 months). Testicular ischemia resulting from incarcerated inguinal hernia may be treated conservatively without orchiectomy for the ischemic testicle and testicular ischemia may be followed with color Doppler ultrasound for atleast 6 months. The inguinal hernia repair in infants should be subject to urgent surgery rather than elective surgery. So, the testicular ischemia in infants with the inguinal hernia will be an avoidable complication.

  13. The feasibility of local anesthesia for the surgical treatment of umbilical hernia: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jairam, A P; Kaufmann, R; Muysoms, F; Jeekel, J; Lange, J F

    2017-04-01

    Yearly approximately 4500 umbilical hernias are repaired in The Netherlands, mostly under general anesthesia. The use of local anesthesia has shown several advantages in groin hernia surgery. Local anesthesia might be useful in the treatment of umbilical hernia as well. However, convincing evidence is lacking. We have conducted a systematic review on safety, feasibility, and advantages of local anesthesia for umbilical hernia repair. A systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. Outcome parameters were duration of surgery, surgical site infection, perioperative and postoperative complications, postoperative pain, hernia recurrence, time before discharge, and patient satisfaction. The systematic review resulted in nine included articles. Various anesthetic agents were used, varying from short acting to longer acting agents. There was no consensus regarding the injection technique and no conversions to general anesthesia were described. The most common postoperative complication was surgical site infection, with an overall percentage of 3.4%. There were no postoperative deaths and no allergic reactions described for local anesthesia. The hernia recurrence rate varied from 2 to 7.4%. Almost 90% of umbilical hernia patients treated with local anesthesia were discharged within 24 h, compared with 47% of patients treated with general anesthesia. The overall patient satisfaction rate varied from 89 to 97%. Local anesthesia for umbilical hernia seems safe and feasible. However, the advantages of local anesthesia are not sufficiently demonstrated, due to the heterogeneity of included studies. We, therefore, propose a randomized controlled trial comparing general versus local anesthesia for umbilical hernia repair.

  14. Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Concomitant Ostomy-Associated Hernia Repair: Outcomes and Propensity Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mericli, Alexander F; Garvey, Patrick B; Giordano, Salvatore; Liu, Jun; Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2017-03-01

    The optimal strategy for abdominal wall reconstruction in the presence of a stomal-site hernia is unclear. We hypothesized that the rate of ventral hernia recurrence in patients undergoing a combined ventral hernia repair and stomal-site herniorraphy would not differ clinically from the ventral hernia recurrence rate in patients undergoing an isolated ventral hernia repair. We also hypothesized that bridged ventral hernia repairs result in worse outcomes compared with reinforced repairs, regardless of stomal hernia. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from consecutive abdominal wall reconstructions performed with acellular dermal matrix (ADM) at a single center between 2000 and 2015. We compared patients who underwent a ventral hernia repair alone (AWR) and those who underwent both a ventral hernia repair and ostomy-associated herniorraphy (AWR+O). We conducted a propensity score matched analysis to compare the outcomes between the 2 groups. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression models were used to study associations between potential predictive or protective reconstructive strategies and surgical outcomes. We included 499 patients (median follow-up 27.2 months; interquartile range [IQR] 12.4 to 46.6 months), 118 AWR+O and 381 AWR. After propensity score matching, 91 pairs were obtained. Ventral hernia recurrence was not statistically associated with ostomy-associated herniorraphy (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.7; 95% CI 0.3 to 1.5; p = 0.34). However, the AWR+O group experienced a significantly higher percentage of surgical site occurrences (34.1%) than the AWR group (18.7%; adjusted odds ratio 2.3; 95% CI 1.4 to 3.7; p < 0.001). In the AWR group, there were significantly fewer ventral hernia recurrences when the repair was reinforced compared with bridged (5.3% vs 38.5%; p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in ventral hernia recurrence between the AWR and AWR+O groups. Bridging was associated

  15. Role of conventional radiology and MRi defecography of pelvic floor hernias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Purpose of the study is to define the role of conventional radiology and MRI in the evaluation of pelvic floor hernias in female pelvic floor disorders. Methods A MEDLINE and PubMed search was performed for journals before March 2013 with MeSH major terms 'MR Defecography' and 'pelvic floor hernias'. Results The prevalence of pelvic floor hernias at conventional radiology was higher if compared with that at MRI. Concerning the hernia content, there were significantly more enteroceles and sigmoidoceles on conventional radiology than on MRI, whereas, in relation to the hernia development modalities, the prevalence of elytroceles, edroceles, and Douglas' hernias at conventional radiology was significantly higher than that at MRI. Conclusions MRI shows lower sensitivity than conventional radiology in the detection of pelvic floor hernias development. The less-invasive MRI may have a role in a better evaluation of the entire pelvic anatomy and pelvic organ interaction especially in patients with multicompartmental defects, planned for surgery. PMID:24267789

  16. Advanced Age: Is It an Indication or Contraindication for Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Elgamal, Mohamed H.; Mancl, Tara B.; Norman, Earl; Boros, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Ventral hernias are common surgical problems in the geriatric population. Although ventral hernias are electively repaired in younger patients, the safety and efficacy of elective laparoscopic hernia repair in the geriatric age group is not well documented in the literature. Methods: A review of 155 patients undergoing laparoscopic ventral hernia repair was undertaken. The patients were classified according to their age into 2 groups, Group A (n=126) for those who are ≤65 years old and Group B (n=29) for those who are >65 years old. The patient demographics, comorbidities, hernia characteristics, and operative and postoperative data were compared. Results: Younger patients were found to have a significantly increased BMI, while the older group had an increased number of comorbidities. No difference was found in the complication or recurrence rates between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Elective laparoscopic ventral hernia repair in senior citizens is safe and feasible in our experience. We believe that the decision to perform an elective hernia repair in this patient population should be based on the general condition of the patient rather than the patient's chronological age. PMID:18402738

  17. The repair of umbilical hernia in cirrhotic patients: 18 consecutive case series in a single institute

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Byung Chul; Lee, Giljae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, the surgical repair of umbilical hernia in cirrhotic patients with ascites is avoided because of a significant recurrence rate and perioperative morbidity/mortality. However, recent reports recommend early elective surgery in these patients because surgery-related complications can be reduced with minimally invasive surgery and development of perioperative patient care. The current study was conducted to analyze safety and feasibility of umbilical hernia repairs performed in a single institute. Methods A single center retrospective analysis of patients' data was conducted. Eighteen patients with umbilical hernia accompanied by liver cirrhosis underwent hernia repair in the period between 2005 and 2012. The charts of these patients were reviewed and demographic data, postoperative complications, and recurrence were recorded. Results Eleven males and seven females with a mean age of 62.9 years were analyzed. Two of the patients were classified as Child's class A, 11 as Child's class B, and five as Child's class C. Four patients underwent emergency surgery because of perforations in the hernia sac in two cases and incarcerated hernias in the other two cases. Of the 18 patients who underwent surgery, four (22%) experienced a recurrence, three (17%) developed edema at the surgical sites, one (5%) experienced hepatic coma, and one (5%) showed postoperative variceal hemorrhage. All of these events occurred after emergency surgery. Conclusion In contrast to traditional concepts, early and elective repair of umbilical hernia can be performed easily and safely in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26236698

  18. Local or General Anesthesia for Open Hernia Repair: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    O’Dwyer, Patrick J.; Serpell, Michael G.; Millar, Keith; Paterson, Caron; Young, David; Hair, Alan; Courtney, Carol-Ann; Horgan, Paul; Kumar, Sudhir; Walker, Andrew; Ford, Ian

    2003-01-01

    Objective To compare patient outcome following repair of a primary groin hernia under local (LA) or general anesthesia (GA) in a randomized clinical trial. Summary Background Data LA hernia repair is thought to be safer for patients, causes less postoperative pain, cost less, and is associated with a more rapid recovery when compared with the same operation performed under GA. Methods All patients presenting to three surgeons during the study period with a primary groin hernia were considered eligible. Outcome parameters measured including tests of vigilance, divided attention, sustained attention, memory, cognitive function, pain, return to normal activity, and costs. Results Two hundred seventy-nine patients were randomized to LA or GA hernia repair; 276 of these had an operation, with 138 participants in each group. At 6, 24, and 72 hours postoperatively there were no differences in vigilance or divided attention between the groups. Similarly, memory, sustained attention, and cognitive function were not impaired in either group. Although physical activity was significantly impaired at 24 hours, this and return to usual social activities were similar in both groups. While patients in the LA group had significantly less pain on moving, at 6 hours they were less likely to recommend the same operation to someone else. GA hernia repair cost 4% more than the same operation under LA. Conclusions There are no major differences in patient recovery after LA or GA hernia repair. Patients should be offered a choice of anesthesia, LA or GA, for repair of their groin hernia. PMID:12677155

  19. The incidence of secondary hernias diagnosed during laparoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal herniorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Woodward, A M; Choe, E U; Flint, L M; Ferrara, J J

    1998-02-01

    During a 24-month period beginning in July of 1995, laparoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal herniorrhaphy was attempted in 53 patients. All procedures were performed at a single institution, by senior-level general surgery residents, with the same attending surgeon functioning as first assistant. Three patients required conversion to an "open" procedure (all had a prior history of herniorrhaphy or lower abdominal surgery), leaving 50 patients for analysis. Preoperatively, a unilateral hernia was evident on clinical grounds in 29 patients, the remaining 21 presenting with signs of a bilateral hernia; of the total, 11 had a history of prior hernia repair on the presently affected side. At surgery, a total of 115 hernia defects (indirect, direct, femoral) were identified, 38% of which were discovered only at the time of surgery. Sixty-four percent of patients were found to have at least one of these "secondary" hernias. After reduction of the hernia(s), all defects were covered with polypropylene mesh secured with spiral tacks. There were 10 perioperative complications, one of which required corrective surgical intervention. Over 70% of patients were discharged on the day of surgery; 92% returned home within 23 h of their operation. The most common reason for delay of hospital discharge was urinary retention. There have been no recurrences in short-term follow-up. Most patients were pleased with the recovery time from and the cosmetic results of their surgery. These results suggest that laparoscopic total extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy represents a safe, effective, cosmetically appealing alternative to open hernia repair. Moreover, this approach may provide an added advantage insofar as identifying additional hernia defects that, when repaired, may ultimately yield a lower recurrence rate than might otherwise have been expected.

  20. Preperitoneal Surgery Using a Self-Adhesive Mesh for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oguntodu, Olakunle F.; Rodriguez, Francisco; Rassadi, Roozbeh; Haley, Michael; Shively, Cynthia J.; Dzandu, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair with mesh has been reported to result in improved patient outcomes. However, there are few published data on the use of a totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and evaluate early outcomes of TEP inguinal hernia repair with self-adhesive mesh. Methods: This cohort study was a retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernial repair from April 4, 2010, through July 22, 2014. Data assessed were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hernia repair indications, hernia type, pain, paresthesia, occurrence (bilateral or unilateral), recurrence, and patient satisfaction. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: Six hundred forty patients underwent laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia surgery with self-adhesive mesh. The average age was 56 years, nearly all were men (95.8%), and the mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m2. Cases involved primary hernia more frequently than recurrent hernia (94% vs 6%; P < .05). After surgery, 92% of the patients reported no more than minimal pain, <1% reported paresthesia, and 0.2% had early recurrence. There were 7 conversions to an open procedure. The patients had no adverse reactions to anesthesia and no bladder injury. Postoperative acute pain or recurrence was not explained by demographics, BMI, or preoperative pain. There were significant associations of hernia side, recurrence, occurrence, and sex with composite end points. Nearly all patients (98%) were satisfied with the outcome. Conclusion: The use of self-adhesive, Velcro-type mesh in laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced pain; low rates of early recurrence, infection, and hematoma; and improved patient satisfaction. PMID:25587212

  1. Umbilical hernia alloplastic dual-mesh treatment in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Guriță, RE; Popa, F; Bălălău, C; Scăunașu, RV

    2013-01-01

    Rationale. Abdominal wall hernias represent a pathology with an impressive prevalence among the population of patients with cirrhosis complicated by ascites. The aggressive surgical approach of umbilical hernia for patients with cirrhotic background remains a controversial problem, accompanied by anesthetic and surgical risk. Its indication remains fully justified in case of severe symptoms or life threatening complications: strangulation, incarceration, evisceration. Objective. This article evaluates results obtained by using dual-mesh alloplastic materials for surgical treatment of umbilical hernias affecting cirrhotic patients with incipient liver injury. Methods and Results. Our lot consists of twelve patients with ages between 45 and 65 years, diagnosed with hepatic cirrhosis, without other associated comorbidities. All patients were admitted for strangulated umbilical hernia. Among the analyzed lot, no decease was encountered, the morbidity being limited to two cases of parietal suppuration, solved conservatively, without the mesh removal. There were no ascitic fistulas. No recurrences were registered for a 12 months tracking period. Discussion. The presence of cirrhosis implies a high anesthetic and surgical risk, the intervention being grafted by a substantial increase of mortality and morbidity in an emergency setting. The development of new alloplastic materials, together with the modern anesthetic techniques, allows superior results for patients with incipient hepatic injury. PMID:23599831

  2. Evidence supporting laparoscopic hernia repair in children.

    PubMed

    Jessula, Samuel; Davies, Dafydd A

    2018-06-01

    Pediatric inguinal hernias are a commonly performed surgical procedure. Currently, they can be approached via open or laparoscopic surgery. We summarize the current evidence for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs in children. Laparoscopic and open inguinal hernia repair in children are associated with similar operative times for unilateral hernia, as well as similar cosmesis, complication rates and recurrence rates. Bilateral hernia repair has been shown to be faster through a laparoscopic approach. The laparoscopic approach is associated with decreased pain scores and earlier recovery, although only in the initial postoperative period. Laparoscopy allows for easy evaluation of the patency of contralateral processus vaginalis, although the clinical significance of and need for repair of an identified defect is unclear. Laparoscopic surgery for pediatric inguinal hernias offers some advantages over open repair with most outcomes being equal. It should be considered a safe alternative to open repair to children and their caregivers.

  3. An Incidental Discovery of Morgagni Hernia in an Elderly Patient Presented with Chronic Dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Ki; Moon, Hee Seok; Jung, Hyeon Yong; Sung, Jae Kyu; Gang, Sun Hyeong; Kim, Myeong Hee

    2017-01-25

    A Morgagni hernia was first described in 1761 by Giovanni Morgagni. In adults, it is accompanied by gastrointestinal- or respiratory-type symptoms. Herein, we report an 84-year-old woman presented to our hospital with nausea and vomiting. After hospitalization, an X-ray revealed a right diaphragmatic hernia. Based on the results of abdominal computed tomography, duodenoscopy, and upper gastrointestinography (gastrografin), we concluded that her symptoms were caused by Morgagni hernia. Our patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, and shortly thereafter, her symptoms resolved.

  4. Preperitoneal surgery using a self-adhesive mesh for inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Mangram, Alicia; Oguntodu, Olakunle F; Rodriguez, Francisco; Rassadi, Roozbeh; Haley, Michael; Shively, Cynthia J; Dzandu, James K

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair with mesh has been reported to result in improved patient outcomes. However, there are few published data on the use of a totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and evaluate early outcomes of TEP inguinal hernia repair with self-adhesive mesh. This cohort study was a retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernial repair from April 4, 2010, through July 22, 2014. Data assessed were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hernia repair indications, hernia type, pain, paresthesia, occurrence (bilateral or unilateral), recurrence, and patient satisfaction. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Six hundred forty patients underwent laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia surgery with self-adhesive mesh. The average age was 56 years, nearly all were men (95.8%), and the mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m(2). Cases involved primary hernia more frequently than recurrent hernia (94% vs 6%; P < .05). After surgery, 92% of the patients reported no more than minimal pain, <1% reported paresthesia, and 0.2% had early recurrence. There were 7 conversions to an open procedure. The patients had no adverse reactions to anesthesia and no bladder injury. Postoperative acute pain or recurrence was not explained by demographics, BMI, or preoperative pain. There were significant associations of hernia side, recurrence, occurrence, and sex with composite end points. Nearly all patients (98%) were satisfied with the outcome. The use of self-adhesive, Velcro-type mesh in laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced pain; low rates of early recurrence, infection, and hematoma; and improved patient satisfaction.

  5. Low risk, but not no risk, of umbilical hernia complications requiring acute surgery in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Amanda; Gollow, Ian; Gera, Parshotam

    2014-04-01

    Umbilical hernias are a common finding in the paediatric community, with a preponderance to affect Afro-Caribbean and premature children. The rate of incarceration varies greatly between populations. Therefore, it is valuable to obtain some Australian data on this topic. We undertook a retrospective study of the records of all patients who underwent umbilical hernia repair over a 12-year period of between October 1999 and May 2012 at Princess Margaret Hospital. From this group, all patients that had an umbilical hernia repair for reason of acute complication were identified and analysed for age, ethnicity and co-morbidities. Between October 1999 and May 2012, 433 umbilical hernias were repaired at Princess Margaret Hospital, five of which were as the direct result of an acutely complicated umbilical hernia. The mean age of hernia repair was 5 years old, and the mean age of acute complication was 5 years old. Out of the patients with acutely complicated umbilical hernia, there were no Afro-Caribbean patients, and one was premature complicated by hyaline membrane disease and broncho-pulmonary dysplasia. Western Australia has an incidence of acutely complicated umbilical hernia requiring operative intervention of 1:3000 to 1:11,000. On an international scale, this is low, and studies with similar incidence do not advocate for immediate repair of all identified umbilical hernias. The authors believe repair should be guided by patient and guardian, but if there is an episode of incarceration, acute repair is advised. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  6. Umbilical hernia alloplastic dual-mesh treatment in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Guriță, R E; Popa, F; Bălălău, C; Scăunașu, R V

    2013-03-15

    Abdominal wall hernias represent a pathology with an impressive prevalence among the population of patients with cirrhosis complicated by ascites. The aggressive surgical approach of umbilical hernia for patients with cirrhotic background remains a controversial problem, accompanied by anesthetic and surgical risk. Its indication remains fully justified in case of severe symptoms or life threatening complications: strangulation, incarceration, evisceration. This article evaluates results obtained by using dual-mesh alloplastic materials for surgical treatment of umbilical hernias affecting cirrhotic patients with incipient liver injury. Our lot consists of twelve patients with ages between 45 and 65 years, diagnosed with hepatic cirrhosis, without other associated comorbidities. All patients were admitted for strangulated umbilical hernia. Among the analyzed lot, no decease was encountered, the morbidity being limited to two cases of parietal suppuration, solved conservatively, without the mesh removal. There were no ascitic fistulas. No recurrences were registered for a 12 months tracking period. The presence of cirrhosis implies a high anesthetic and surgical risk, the intervention being grafted by a substantial increase of mortality and morbidity in an emergency setting. The development of new alloplastic materials, together with the modern anesthetic techniques, allows superior results for patients with incipient hepatic injury.

  7. Repair of Large Sliding Inguinal Hernias.

    PubMed

    Samra, Navdeep S; Ballard, David H; Doumite, Darin F; Griffen, F Dean

    2015-12-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are often unexpected intra-operative findings, and repair of which can be technically challenging. A number of repair techniques have been described. The author modified a technique based on an approach described by Bevan. The purpose of our study is to describe this modified Bevan technique for repair of sliding inguinal hernias and report its efficacy in a series of patients. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with open inguinal hernia repairs performed by a single surgeon from August 2007 to April 2013 for sliding indirect hernias using the modified Bevan technique. Patient records were reviewed for demographics, hernia characteristics, complications, admission status, length of stay, and complications. There were 25 patients eligible for our review (male = 25, mean age = 49 years). All sliding hernias were indirect, none were bilateral, and two were incarcerated. The sliding component involved the bladder and perivesical fat (n = 12), sigmoid colon (n = 10), and the cecum and appendix (n = 3). Eighteen patients were treated as outpatients; seven patients were admitted with a mean stay of 2.2 days. Complications included intra-operative bleeding (n = 1), subcutaneous wound hematoma (n = 1), scrotal seroma (n = 1), transient orchialgia (n = 1), and ileus (n = 1). All patients were seen postoperatively for short-term follow-up with no hernia recurrences. Thirteen patients were available for long-term follow-up (mean = 13.6 months); all had no hernia recurrences. The modification of Bevan's technique for repair of large sliding hernias worked well in our series.

  8. Simultaneous repair of bilateral groin hernias: open or laparoscopic approach?

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, L; Schäfer, M; Schilling, M; Kuzinkovas, V; Büchler, M W

    1998-08-01

    A persistent problem in hernia surgery concerns the repair of bilateral inguinal hernias. A retrospective analysis of 78 patients with bilateral inguinal hernias was performed. Hernia repair was performed either by an open anterior access (modified Shouldice repair) or a laparoscopic posterior approach (TAPP repair). The two patient groups were similar with regard to ASA classification, age, and sex. The intraoperative complication rate was low (2.6% to 7.8%), whereas postoperative complications occurred more frequently (7.7% to 15.4%). The recurrence rate was low in both groups: 5.1% for the open group and 1.3% for the laparoscopic group. The mean hospital stay was 4 days for both groups, and the mean off-work times were 56.4 days and 17.9 days for the open and laparoscopic group, respectively (p < 0.05). Both procedures gave satisfactory results. The main advantages of the laparoscopic approach are the shorter convalescence time and quicker return to work.

  9. New injectable elastomeric biomaterials for hernia repair and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Skrobot, J; Zair, L; Ostrowski, M; El Fray, M

    2016-01-01

    Complications associated with implantation of polymeric hernia meshes remain a difficult surgical challenge. We report here on our work, developing for the first time, an injectable viscous material that can be converted to a solid and elastic implant in vivo, thus successfully closing herniated tissue. In this study, long-chain fatty acids were used for the preparation of telechelic macromonomers end-capped with methacrylic functionalities to provide UV curable systems possessing high biocompatibility, good mechanical strength and flexibility. Two different systems, comprising urethane and ester bonds, were synthesized from non-toxic raw materials and then subjected to UV curing after injection of viscous material into the cavity at the abdominal wall during hernioplasty in a rabbit hernia model. No additional fixation or sutures were required. The control group of animals was treated with commercially available polypropylene hernia mesh. The observation period lasted for 28 days. We show here that artificially fabricated defect was healed and no reherniation was observed in the case of the fatty acid derived materials. Importantly, the number of inflammatory cells found in the surrounding tissue was comparable to these found around the standard polypropylene mesh. No inflammatory cells were detected in connective tissues and no sign of necrosis has been observed. Collectively, our results demonstrated that new injectable and photocurable systems can be used for minimally invasive surgical protocols in repair of small hernia defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Intra-Umbilical Approach in Umbilical Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sukru; Korkut, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the “intra-umbilical incision”, a smaller incision compared to classic incisions, in cases of umbilical hernia, and which we believe will contribute to patient satisfaction in aesthetic terms, and also the practicability of such operations. Materials and Methods: The umbilical margins of eight patients with an umbilical hernia were marked between the levels of 6 and 12 o’clock, and a median intra-umbilical skin incision was performed between these two points. In some cases, where exploration could not be performed sufficiently, the incision was extended horizontally from 6 or 12 o’clock. Hernia repair and mesh placement was then performed using an intra-umbilical approach. Results: Patients were investigated according to the defect size and requirement for intra-umbilical incision extension. No requirement for intra-umbilical incision was encountered in six patients with a facial defect diameter smaller than 4 cm, while the incision had to be extended in two patients with defects greater than 4 cm. Conclusion: The intra-umbilical approach in umbilical hernia surgery is aesthetically superior to classical approaches and is a practicable technique. PMID:25610291

  11. Mesh repair of umbilical hernia without a visible abdominal scar.

    PubMed

    Kurpiewski, Waldemar; Kiliańczyk, Michał; Szynkarczuk, Rafał; Tenderenda, Michał

    2014-02-01

    Experience in the use of Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery procedures and the persistent urge to improve the cosmetic effect have contributed to the introduction of mesh repair of an umbilical hernia by means of a small incision in the natural position of the umbilicus. The aim of the study was to present the surgical technique and assess its postoperative results. During the period between 24.08.2011 and 01.01.2013, twenty-three umbilical hernia repair operations with the use of a polypropylene mesh by means of a small incision in the natural position of the umbilicus were performed. The synthetic material was placed in the preperitoneal space. The wound was closed and the umbilicus was reconstructed simultaneously, in order to make the scar invisible. Cutaneous stitches were not used. The average duration of the operation was 49 minutes. In one case of an obese patient with coexisting linea alba dehiscence, hernia recurrence was observed. All wounds healed without complications. The cosmetic effect was very good. Based on the presented experience mesh repair of the umbilical hernia by means of a small incision in the natural position of the umbilicus contributes essential benefits, such as a very good cosmetic effect without consecutive increasing costs, as compared to standard treatment by means of an infraumbilical incision.

  12. Computed tomography scan diagnosis of occult groin hernia.

    PubMed

    Garvey, J F W

    2012-06-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of clinically occult (hidden) groin hernia was assessed in a series of patients presenting with undiagnosed groin pain. A total of 158 consecutive patients presenting over a period of 5 years with undiagnosed groin pain or lower abdominal pain and negative or equivocal clinical findings were radiologically assessed with non-contrast CT. The decision to manage operatively or conservatively was then based on a combination of the clinical and CT findings. Outcomes were assessed at 10 years follow-up. The study cohort comprised 158 patients presenting with groin or lower abdominal pain and/or swelling, and was studied prospectively. Seven of these patients were re-investigated at a later date after developing new pain on either the ipsilateral or contralateral side, giving a total of 165 CT examinations. One-third of cases (54) had clinically occult groin hernias and most of the remaining cases had diagnoses that could be managed non-operatively. Of those who came to surgery, the pre-operative CT diagnosis of hernia had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 92% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 96% (overall accuracy 94%). Lipoma of the spermatic cord was responsible for three of five false-positive CT results. The concept of sports hernia/groin disruption injury (GDI) was encountered, and this entity is discussed in this paper. In the group of patients without hernia findings on CT, the most common diagnoses were rectus abdominis and/or pyramidalis muscle injury which could be treated by physiotherapy (22%), GDI (16%), post-surgical problems (14%), miscellaneous (20%) and 'no abnormality' was identified in 15%. Overall, there were 111 patients with a 'non-hernia' CT diagnosis, of which urological, gynaecological, gastrointestinal and neuralgia contributed to the non-musculoskeletal diagnosis. This prospective non-contrast CT study of patients with undiagnosed chronic groin pain detected the majority of

  13. Adult-onset Morgagni's hernia.

    PubMed

    Valdivielso Cortázar, Eduardo; Carral Martínez, David; Gómez Gutiérrez, Manuel; Bouzón Alejandro, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old male patient with Down's syndrome and a deep venous thrombosis on anticoagulation with acenocoumarol. The case presented due to nonspecific, predominantly postprandial epigastric discomfort, meteorism and aerophagia. A thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a Morgagni hernia with a cephalad migration of part of the stomach, ascending colon and transverse colon. After laparotomy, the defect was repaired using a titanium mesh and the patient had a favorable outcome.

  14. Abdominal lipectomy and mesh repair of midline periumbilical hernia after bariatric surgery: how to spare the umbilicus.

    PubMed

    Iannelli, Antonio; Bafghi, Abdi; Negri, Chiara; Gugenheim, J

    2007-09-01

    Abdominal lipectomy is becoming an increasingly common surgical procedure in patients with esthetic deformities resulting from massive weight loss induced by bariatric surgery. Sometimes a midline incisional hernia coexists with the pendulus abdomen. Herein presented is a technique to perform a retromuscular mesh repair of the incisional hernia while sparing the umbilicus. The abdominal lipectomy with concomitant retro-muscular mesh repair of a midline incisional hernia is done sparing the vascular supply of the umbilicus on one side only. 5 consecutive women with pendulus abdomen resulting from bariatric surgery-induced massive weight loss and concomitant midline incisional hernia underwent abdominal lipectomy and incisional hernia mesh repair. Mean BMI was 28.6 kg/m2 (range 26-35), one patient was a smoker, and another had type 2 diabetes requiring oral hypoglycemic agents. Two patients had had a previous incisional hernia repair with intraperitoneal mesh. One patient had partial necrosis of the umbilicus and another experienced necrosis of only the epidermis that recovered fully. The umbilicus can be safely spared during abdominal lipectomy with concomitant midline incisional hernia mesh repair. Recurrent incisional hernia and common risk factors for wound healing such as diabetes and obesity increase the risk of umbilical necrosis.

  15. ROBOTIC ASSISTED SINGLE SITE FOR BILATERAL INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Henrique Rasia; Guimarães, José Ricardo; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti

    2016-01-01

    The inguinal hernia is one of the most frequent surgical diseases, being frequent procedure and surgeon´s everyday practice. To present technical details in making hernioplasty using robotic equipment on bilateral inguinal hernia repair with single port and preliminary results with the method. The bilateral inguinal hernia repair was performed by using the Single-Site(c) Da Vinci Surgical Access Platform to the abdominal cavity and the placement of clamps. This technique proved to be effective for inguinal hernia and have more aesthetic result when compared to other techniques. Inguinal hernia repair robot-assisted with single-trocar is feasible and effective. However, still has higher costs needing surgical team special training. A hérnia inguinal é uma das doenças cirúrgicas mais frequentes, tornando-a procedimento frequente e do cotidiano do cirurgião. Apresentar detalhes da técnica da hernioplastia inguinal bilateral robótica por single-site e resultados preliminares com o método. Foi realizada hernioplastia inguinal bilateral assistida por robô, utilizando-se da Vinci Single-Site(c) Surgical Platform para acesso a cavidade abdominal e colocação das pinças. Esta técnica demonstrou-se efetiva para correção da hérnia inguinal, além de apresentar melhor resultado estético quando comparado às outras técnicas. A hernioplastia inguinal assistida por robô com trocarte único é viável e eficaz. Contudo, ainda apresenta custos mais elevados e necessidade de treinamento especial por parte da equipe cirúrgica.

  16. A new approach to umbilical hernia repair: the circular suture technique for defects less than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Ihsan; Koca, Yavuz Savas

    2017-01-01

    Umbilical hernia, unlike other abdominal wall hernias, occurs when the umbilical ring opens and expands. Its' symptoms and complications show similarities with other hernias. Although there are various repair techniques, there is not a standard technique yet. This paper investigated the outcomes of double layer circular suture technique as a new approach in the repair of umbilical hernia. A total number of 282 patients comprised of 102 males and 180 females with an age range of 18-89 whose umbilical hernias were repaired between 2002 and 2013, retrospectively studied in two groups group 1 (circular suture technique) and group 2 (open primary suture). The subjects were investigated with regards to age, sex, body mass index (BMI), accompanying disease, anesthesia method, surgical complications, hospital stay, total costs, mortality and recurrence. The study participants were 282 patients with an age average of 49, 09 ± 16, 62 including 182 patients in group 1 (male/female ratio 76/106) and 100 patients in group 2 (26/74). There was a significant difference between the groups in terms of time and recurrence. During the follow-up period, 9 patients in group 1 (4.94%) and 16 patients in group 2 (16%) had a recurrence. This result was statistically significant (p=0.014) CONCLUSION: We believe that the double layer circular suture technique is practical, inexpensive and effective in the repair of umbilical hernia defects, which are smaller than 2 cm diameter. Key words: Hernia, Repair, Umbilical hernia.

  17. Ventral hernia repair with poly-4-hydroxybutyrate mesh.

    PubMed

    Plymale, Margaret A; Davenport, Daniel L; Dugan, Adam; Zachem, Amanda; Roth, John Scott

    2018-04-01

    Biomaterial research has made available a biologically derived fully resorbable poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (P4HB) mesh for use in ventral and incisional hernia repair (VIHR). This study evaluates outcomes of patients undergoing VIHR with P4HB mesh. An IRB-approved prospective pilot study was conducted to assess clinical and quality of life (QOL) outcomes for patients undergoing VIHR with P4HB mesh. Perioperative characteristics were defined. Clinical outcomes, employment status, QOL using 12-item short form survey (SF-12), and pain assessments were followed for 24 months postoperatively. 31 patients underwent VIHR with bioresorbable mesh via a Rives-Stoppa approach with retrorectus mesh placement. The median patient age was 52 years, median body mass index was 33 kg/m 2 , and just over half of the patients were female. Surgical site occurrences occurred in 19% of patients, most of which were seroma. Hernia recurrence rate was 0% (median follow-up = 414 days). Patients had significantly improved QOL at 24 months compared to baseline for SF-12 physical component summary and role emotional (p < 0.05). Ventral hernia repair with P4HB bioresorbable mesh results in favorable outcomes. Early hernia recurrence was not identified among the patient cohort. Quality of life improvements were noted at 24 months versus baseline for this cohort of patients with bioresorbable mesh. Use of P4HB mesh for ventral hernia repair was found to be feasible in this patient population. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01863030).

  18. Cost of ventral hernia repair using biologic or synthetic mesh.

    PubMed

    Totten, Crystal F; Davenport, Daniel L; Ward, Nicholas D; Roth, J Scott

    2016-06-15

    Patients undergoing ventral hernia repair (VHR) with biologic mesh (BioM) have higher hospital costs compared with synthetic mesh (SynM). This study compares 90-d pre- and post-VHR hospital costs (180-d) among BioM and SynM based on infection risk. This retrospective National Surgical Quality Improvement Program study matched patient perioperative risk with resource utilization cost for a consecutive series of VHR repairs. Patient infection risks, clinical and financial outcomes were compared in unmatched SynM (n = 303) and BioM (n = 72) groups. Propensity scores were used to match 35 SynM and BioM pairs of cases with similar infection risk for outcomes analysis. BioM patients in the unmatched group were older with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and wound classification, and they more frequently underwent open repairs for recurrent hernias. Wound surgical site infections were more frequent in unmatched BioM patients (P = 0.001) as were 180-d costs ($43.8k versus $14.0k, P < 0.001). Propensity matching resulted in 31 clean cases. In these low-risk patients, wound occurrences and readmissions were identical, but 180-d costs remained higher ($31.8k versus $15.5k, P < 0.001). There were no differences in hospital 180-d diagnostic, emergency room, intensive care unit, floor, pharmacy, or therapeutic costs. However, 180-d operating room services and supply costs were higher in the BioM group ($21.1k versus $7.1k, P < 0.001). BioM is used more commonly in hernia repairs involving higher wound class and ASA scores and recurrent hernias. Clinical outcomes after low-risk VHRs are similar; SynM utilization in low-risk hernia repairs was more cost-effective. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Suture, synthetic, or biologic in contaminated ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Bondre, Ioana L; Holihan, Julie L; Askenasy, Erik P; Greenberg, Jacob A; Keith, Jerrod N; Martindale, Robert G; Roth, J Scott; Liang, Mike K

    2016-02-01

    Data are lacking to support the choice between suture, synthetic mesh, or biologic matrix in contaminated ventral hernia repair (VHR). We hypothesize that in contaminated VHR, suture repair is associated with the lowest rate of surgical site infection (SSI). A multicenter database of all open VHR performed at from 2010-2011 was reviewed. All patients with follow-up of 1 mo and longer were included. The primary outcome was SSI as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The secondary outcome was hernia recurrence (assessed clinically or radiographically). Multivariate analysis (stepwise regression for SSI and Cox proportional hazard model for recurrence) was performed. A total of 761 VHR were reviewed for a median (range) follow-up of 15 (1-50) mo: there were 291(38%) suture, 303 (40%) low-density and/or mid-density synthetic mesh, and 167(22%) biologic matrix repair. On univariate analysis, there were differences in the three groups including ethnicity, ASA, body mass index, institution, diabetes, primary versus incisional hernia, wound class, hernia size, prior VHR, fascial release, skin flaps, and acute repair. The unadjusted outcomes for SSI (15.1%; 17.8%; 21.0%; P = 0.280) and recurrence (17.8%; 13.5%; 21.5%; P = 0.074) were not statistically different between groups. On multivariate analysis, biologic matrix was associated with a nonsignificant reduction in both SSI and recurrences, whereas synthetic mesh associated with fewer recurrences compared to suture (hazard ratio = 0.60; P = 0.015) and nonsignificant increase in SSI. Interval estimates favored biologic matrix repair in contaminated VHR; however, these results were not statistically significant. In the absence of higher level evidence, surgeons should carefully balance risk, cost, and benefits in managing contaminated ventral hernia repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Changes in the Frequencies of Abdominal Wall Hernias and the Preferences for Their Repair: A Multicenter National Study From Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şeker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, İbrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%.1–3 As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world.4 Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic),5,6 the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional),7,8 and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).9,10 PMID:25216417

  1. Initial experience of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Razman, J; Shaharin, S; Lukman, M R; Sukumar, N; Jasmi, A Y

    2006-06-01

    Laparoscopic repair of ventral and incisional hernia has become increasingly popular as compared to open repair. The procedure has the advantages of minimal access surgery, reduction of post operative pain and the recurrence rate. A prospective study of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair was performed in our center from August 2002 to April 2004. Eighteen cases (n: 18) were performed during the study period. Fifteen cases (n: 15) had open hernia repair previously. Sixteen patients (n: 16) had successful repair of the hernia with the laparoscopic approach and two cases were converted to open repair. The mean hernia defect size was 156cm2. There was no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complication. The mean operating time was 100 +/- 34 minutes (75 - 180 minutes). The postoperative pain was graded as mild to moderate according to visual analogue score. The mean day of discharge after surgery was two days (1 - 3 days). During follow up, three patients (16.7%) developed seroma at the hernia sac which was resolved with conservative management after three weeks. One (5.6%) patient developed recurrence six months after surgery. In conclusion, laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia particularly recurrent hernia has been shown to be safe and effective in our centre. However, careful patient selection and acquiring the necessary advanced laparoscopic surgical skills coupled with the proper use of equipment are mandatory before embarking on this procedure.

  2. [Surgical treatment of recurrent inguinal hernia].

    PubMed

    Orokhovskiĭ, V I; Papazov, F K; Vasilćhenko, V G; Mezhakov, S V; Shvanits, Sh

    1993-01-01

    The experience with surgical treatment of 89 patients with recurrent inguinal hernia is presented. A method for hernioplasty with the use of the pyramidal muscle transferred for covering the inguinal space is described. In 37 patients, no hernia recurrence and injury to the femoral vessels were revealed. This was indicative of the effectiveness of the method suggested.

  3. [Clinical and economic evaluation of laparoscopic surgery for inguinal hernia. Return of a difficult clinical choice].

    PubMed

    Bataille, N

    2002-06-01

    In the year 2000, the ANAES (National Agency for Accreditation and Evaluation of Health Care) published a technological and economic evaluation of the laparascopic approach to the repair of inguinal hernias based principally on the analysis of randomized studies. This analysis was all the more difficult because of the heterogeneity of the studies for which end results had a very weak level of proof. Laparascopic surgical techniques for inguinal hernia repair require the systematic use of mesh prosthesis and also general anesthesia. Published results are insufficient to compare specific laparascopic techniques with each other. The efficacy of laparoscopic repair compared to open repair with regard to hernia recurrence (the principal criteria of efficacy) has not been demonstrated--mainly because longterm results are not yet available. The overall evaluation of complications is too heterogeneous to show a difference between laparascopic and open surgery. There are, however, certain complications specific to laparascopic repair which, though rare, are potentially very serious. Excellent results reported with laparascopic repair may be due more to the systematic placement of mesh than-to to the approach itself--as has been shown in studies of open repairs "with tension" and "tension free." Superiority of the laparoscopic approach for specific types of hernia (primary unilateral, bilateral, recurrent) has not been demonstrated. Open surgery costs less than laparascopic hernia repair. The evaluation to date for laparascopic inguinal hernia repair is insufficient. Controlled studies with rigorous longterm follow-up and analysis of economic impact must be performed in comparable populations of patients.

  4. MANAGEMENT OF OMPHALOPHLEBITIS AND UMBILICAL HERNIA IN THREE NEONATAL GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS).

    PubMed

    Selig, Michael; Lewandowski, Albert; Burton, Michael S; Ball, Ray L

    2015-12-01

    Umbilical disorders, including omphalophlebitis, omphaloarteritis, external umbilical abscesses, urachal abscesses, patent urachus, and umbilical hernias, represent a significant challenge to the health and well-being of a neonate. The three neonatal giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) in this report were evaluated for umbilical swellings. Two developed omphalophlebitis, and one had an uncomplicated umbilical hernia. Omphalophlebitis is an inflammation and/or infection of the umbilical vein. Giraffe calves with a failure of passive transfer may be predisposed and should be thoroughly evaluated for the condition. Umbilical hernias result from a failure of the umbilical ring to close after parturition or from malformation of the umbilical ring during embryogenesis. These problems were surgically corrected for all three individuals, although one died due to postsurgical complications. The risks involved include anesthetic complications, surgical dehiscence, and maternal rejection. Early detection and surgical intervention are recommended for the correction of omphalophlebitis and umbilical hernias in neonatal giraffe.

  5. Current trends in laparoscopic groin hernia repair: A review

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Kumar, Awanish; Agarwal, Prerit; Agarwal, Akshay Anand

    2015-01-01

    Hernia is a common problem of the modern world with its incidence more in developing countries. Inguinal hernia is the most common groin hernia repaired worldwide. With advancement in technology operative techniques of repair have also evolved. A PubMed and COCHRANE database search was accomplished in this regard to establish the current status of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in view of recent published literature. Published literature support that laparoscopic hernia repair is best suited for recurrent and bilateral inguinal hernia although it may be offered for primary inguinal hernia if expertise is available. PMID:26380826

  6. Spontaneous Endometriosis Within a Primary Umbilical Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yheulon, Christopher G

    2017-01-01

    Umbilical hernias are rather common in the General Surgery clinic; however, endometriosis of an umbilical hernia is rare. It is especially unusual to have endometriosis of an umbilical hernia spontaneously occur compared to occurring at a site of a prior surgery. We present a case of spontaneous endometriosis of an umbilical hernia without prior surgery to her umbilicus. She had not presented with the usual symptoms of endometriosis and it was not considered as a diagnosis prior to surgery. Umbilical endometriosis is rare but usually occurs after prior laparoscopic surgery. We believe this is the second reported case in the English literature and the first such case reported from North America of spontaneous endometriosis of an umbilical hernia. This case highlights the importance of a full review of systems and qualifying the type and occurrence of pain. Additionally, it is always important to analyze surgical specimens in pathology to avoid errors in diagnosis. PMID:29164008

  7. [Umbilical hernia repair in conjunction with abdominoplasty].

    PubMed

    Bai, Ming; Dai, Meng-Hua; Huang, Jiu-Zuo; Qi, Zheng; Lin, Chen; Ding, Wen-Yun; Zhao, Ru

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility and clinical benefits of umbilical hernia repair in conjunction with abdominoplasty. The incision was designed in accord with abdominoplasty. The skin and subcutaneous tissue was dissected toward the costal arch, and then the anterior sheath of rectus abdominus was exposed. After exposure and dissection of the sac of umbilical hernia, tension-free hernioplasty was performed with polypropylene mesh. After dissecting the redundant skin and subcutaneous tissue, the abdominal wall was tightened. Between May 2008 and May 2011, ten patients were treated in the way mentioned above. The repair of umbilical hernia and the correction of abdominal wall laxity were satisfactory. There was no recurrence of umbilical hernia, hematoma, seroma or fat liquefaction. Through careful selection of patients, repair of umbilical hernia and body contouring could be achieved simultaneously.

  8. Therapy of umbilical hernia during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Zoricić, Ivan; Vukusić, Darko; Rasić, Zarko; Schwarz, Dragan; Sever, Marko

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to show our experience with umbilical hernia herniorrhaphy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy, both in the same act. During last 10 years we operated 89 patients with cholecystitis and pre-existing umbilical hernia. In 61 of them we performed standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy and additional sutures of abdominal wall, and in 28 patients we performed in the same act laparoscopic cholecystectomy and herniorrhaphy of umbilical hernia. We observed incidence of postoperative herniation, and compared patients recovery after herniorrhaphy combined with laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the same act, and patients after standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy and additional sutures of abdominal wall. Patients, who had in the same time umbilical hernia herniorrhaphy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy, shown better postoperative recovery and lower incidence of postoperative umbilical hernias then patients with standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy and additional abdominal wall sutures.

  9. Spontaneous Endometriosis Within a Primary Umbilical Hernia.

    PubMed

    Laferriere, Nicole R; Yheulon, Christopher G

    2017-11-01

    Umbilical hernias are rather common in the General Surgery clinic; however, endometriosis of an umbilical hernia is rare. It is especially unusual to have endometriosis of an umbilical hernia spontaneously occur compared to occurring at a site of a prior surgery. We present a case of spontaneous endometriosis of an umbilical hernia without prior surgery to her umbilicus. She had not presented with the usual symptoms of endometriosis and it was not considered as a diagnosis prior to surgery. Umbilical endometriosis is rare but usually occurs after prior laparoscopic surgery. We believe this is the second reported case in the English literature and the first such case reported from North America of spontaneous endometriosis of an umbilical hernia. This case highlights the importance of a full review of systems and qualifying the type and occurrence of pain. Additionally, it is always important to analyze surgical specimens in pathology to avoid errors in diagnosis.

  10. Long-term outcome for open preperitoneal mesh repair of recurrent inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Jiang, Zhi-peng; Li, Ying-ru; Zong, Zhen; Chen, Shuang

    2015-07-01

    Recurrent inguinal hernia represents a major challenge for surgeons with high risks of re-recurrence and complications, especially when an anterior approach is adopted. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of the open preperitoneal mesh repair for recurrent inguinal hernia. We performed a prospective clinical study of 107 consecutive patients having recurrent inguinal hernias between April 2006 and November 2010. All patients were operated on using open preperitoneal mesh repair. The demographics, perioperative variables, complications and recurrences were evaluated with all patients. There were no major intraoperative complications. The average operative time was 42.1 min (range 28-83 min) for unilateral and 62.7 min (range 38-106 min) for bilateral hernias. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 1.6 days (range 1-9 days). The overall complication rate was 8.4%. There were two superficial wound infections, two groin seroma and three urinary retention. The mean follow-up time was 42.3 months (range 28-73 months), three patients developed hernia recurrence. No testicular, chronic pain or mesh-related complications were noted in these series. Open posterior preperitoneal mesh repair offers a viable option for recurrent inguinal hernias and achieves equally effective results to laparoscopic approaches with acceptable complication and recurrence rates. It is safer and easier to learn than laparoscopic repair and has become the preferred approach for treatment of the majority of recurrent inguinal hernias at our institution, especially useful for complex multirecurrent hernias and patients with cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Laparoscopic repair of bilateral and recurrent hernias.

    PubMed

    Frankum, C E; Ramshaw, B J; White, J; Duncan, T D; Wilson, R A; Mason, E M; Lucas, G; Promes, J

    1999-09-01

    The optimal inguinal hernia repair has been controversial for decades. Since the advent of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic techniques have added to the controversy. Laparoscopic hernia repair has been advocated by many experts for the repair of bilateral and recurrent inguinal hernias. This study reviews the experience of a single community-based teaching hospital using the total extraperitoneal (TEP)-approach laparoscopic hernia repair for treating patients with bilateral and/or recurrent inguinal hernias. Since the TEP approach was adopted in June 1993, a total of 457 patients were treated for bilateral (322 patients) and/or recurrent (175) inguinal hernias (40 patients had recurrent and bilateral hernias). A total of 779 hernias were repaired with this technique. The average age of this patient group was 47 years, and there were 413 males and 44 females. Operative time averaged 68.3 minutes per patient, and there were 26 (5.7%) minor complications. There were 2 (0.4%) major complications, an enterotomy and a cystotomy, both early in the series and both in patients with previous lower abdominal surgery. There have been no deaths. With an average follow-up of 30 months (range, 1-60 months), there have been three (0.2%) recurrences. These recurrences were due to technical problems (inadequate mesh coverage), and each was repaired with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach or an anterior open approach. The use of the TEP-approach laparoscopic hernia repair is safe and effective in patients with recurrent and/or bilateral inguinal hernias.

  12. An Evaluation of Parastomal Hernia Repair Using the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Fox, Sarah S; Janczyk, Randy; Warren, Jeremy A; Carbonell, Alfredo M; Poulose, Benjamin K; Rosen, Michael J; Hope, William W

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate outcomes relating to parastomal hernia repair. Data from the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative were used to identify patients undergoing parastomal hernia repair from 2013 to 2016. Parastomal hernia repairs were compared with other repairs using Pearson's test and Wilcoxon test with a P value <0.05 considered significant. Parastomal hernia repairs were performed in 311 patients. Techniques of repair include open in 85 per cent and laparoscopic in 15 per cent. Mesh was used in 92 per cent with keyhole in 34 per cent, flat mesh in 33 per cent, and Sugarbaker in 25 per cent. Mesh types were permanent synthetic in 79 per cent, biologic in 13 per cent, absorbable synthetic in 6 per cent, and hybrid synthetic/biologic in 2 per cent. Most common location for mesh was sublay in 84 per cent followed by onlay in 14 per cent and inlay in 2 per cent with 59 per cent of patients undergoing a myofascial release. Ostomy disposition included ostomy left in situ (47%), moved to a new site (18%), taken down (22%), and rematured in same location in (13%). Outcomes related to parastomal hernia repair included 10 per cent surgical site infection, 24 per cent surgical site occurrence, and 12 per cent surgical site occurrences requiring procedural interventions with a 13 per cent readmission rate and 6 per cent reoperation rate. When comparing parastomal hernias with other ventral hernia repairs, parastomal hernias had a significantly higher surgical site infection, surgical site occurrence, surgical site occurrences requiring procedural intervention, readmission, reoperation rate, and length of stay, and were less commonly performed laparoscopically (P < 0.05). Most parastomal hernias are being repaired open with synthetic mesh in the sublay position. Less favorable outcomes of parastomal hernia repair when compared with other ventral hernia repairs are likely related to the complexity of parastomal hernia repair.

  13. One trocar needlescopic assisted inguinal hernia repair in children: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Rafik; Elsayaad, Ibrahim; Alsamahy, Omar; Ibrahem, Refaat; El-Saied, Adham; Ismail, Maged; Shamseldin, Abdelmoniem; Shehata, Sameh; Magid, Mohamad

    2017-08-31

    Inguinal hernia repair using a percutaneous internal ring suturing technique is an effective alternative technique to conventional laparoscopic hernia repair. It is one of the most commonly used approaches for laparoscopic hernia repair in children. However, most percutaneous techniques have utilized extracorporeal knotting of the suture and burying the knot subcutaneously. This approach has several drawbacks. The aim of this study is to present a modified technique for single cannula needlescopic assisted hernia repair in children. Three-hundred and fifty-seven patients with 397 indirect inguinal hernias underwent a one port needlescopic assisted inguinal hernia repair. The open internal inguinal ring [IIR] was closed using an 18-gauge epidural needle [EN], a 14-gauge venous access cannula [VAC], and a homemade suture device. Saline was injected extraperitoneally around the IIR for hydrodissection. The main outcome measurements were: feasibility, safety of the technique, operative time, recurrence rate, and cosmetic results. This prospective study was conducted on 357 patients at Al-Azhar, Alexandria, and Mansoura University Hospitals during the period from June 2012 to October 2015. There were 286 males and 71 females. The mean age was 2.6±1.3years (range=4months to 6years). One-hundred and ninety-eight patients presented with a right-sided inguinal hernia, 119 patients with a left-sided hernia, and 40 patients with bilateral inguinal hernia. The mean operative time was 12.6±1.7min (range=8-15min) for unilateral cases and 18.6±1.7min (range=14-20min) for the bilateral repairs. No wound complications or umbilical hernias developed. The mean follow-up period was 18.6±1.2months (range=11-36months). During the follow-up period, no recurrence was detected, and the scars were nearly invisible. This preliminary study shows that a single port needlescopic assisted hernia repair in infants and children is a very promising technique to achieve nearly scarless surgery

  14. Richter’s Hernia and Sir Frederick Treves: An Original Clinical Experience, Review, and Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Wolfgang; Zellweger, René

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical recognition, pathology, and management of Richter’s hernia and to review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Summary Background Data The earliest known reported case of Richter’s hernia occurred in 1598 and was described by Fabricius Hildanus. The first scientific description of this particular hernia was given by August Gottlob Richter in 1778, who presented it as “the small rupture.” In 1887, Sir Frederick Treves gave an excellent overview on the topic and proposed the title “Richter’s hernia.” To his work—a cornerstone to modern understanding—hardly any new aspects can be added today. Since then, only occasional case reports or small series of retrospectively collected Richter’s hernias have been published. Methods The authors draw on their experience with 18 prospectively collected cases treated in the ICRC Lopiding Hospital for War Surgery in northern Kenya between February and December 1998 and review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Results The classic features of Richter’s hernia were confirmed in all case studies of patients: only part of the circumference of the bowel is entrapped and strangulated in the hernial orifice. The involved segment may rapidly pass into gangrene, yet signs of intestinal obstruction are often absent. The death rate in the authors’ collective was 17%. Conclusion Richter’s hernia is a deceptive entity whose high death rate can be reduced by accurate diagnosis and early surgery. Considering the increasing incidence at laparoscope insertion sites, awareness of this special type of hernia with its misleading clinical appearance is important and of general interest. PMID:11066144

  15. A case of splenic rupture within an umbilical hernia with loss of domain.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Emil J; Guerron, Alfredo D; Rosen, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    atypical hernias, posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release is a reproducible repair that can be performed with good result in a variety of circumstances.

  16. Epigastric hernia contiguous with the laparoscopic port site after endoscopic robotic total prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Otani, Jun; Okuda, Junzo; Maemoto, Ryo

    2018-03-23

    Both laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery are widely accepted for many abdominal surgeries. However, the port site for the laparoscope cannot be easily sutured without defect, particularly in the cranial end; this can result in a port-site incisional hernia and trigger the progressive thinning and stretching of the linea alba, leading to epigastric hernia. In the present case, we encountered an epigastric hernia contiguous with an incisional scar at the port site from a previous endoscopic robotic total prostatectomy. Abdominal ultrasound and CT revealed that the width of the linea alba was 30-48 mm. Previous CT images prepared before endoscopic robotic prostatectomy had shown a thinning of the linea alba. We should be aware of the possibility of epigastric hernia after laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery. In laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery for a high-risk patient for epigastric hernia, we should consider additional sutures cranial to the port-site incision to prevent of an epigastric hernia. © 2018 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Early laparotomy wound failure as the mechanism for incisional hernia formation

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Liyu; Culbertson, Eric J.; Wen, Yuan; Franz, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia is the most common complication of abdominal surgery leading to reoperation. In the United States, 200,000 incisional hernia repairs are performed annually, often with significant morbidity. Obesity is increasing the risk of laparotomy wound failure. Methods We used a validated animal model of incisional hernia formation. We intentionally induced laparotomy wound failure in otherwise normal adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Radio-opaque, metal surgical clips served as markers for the use of x-ray images to follow the progress of laparotomy wound failure. We confirmed radiographic findings of the time course for mechanical laparotomy wound failure by necropsy. Results Noninvasive radiographic imaging predicts early laparotomy wound failure and incisional hernia formation. We confirmed both transverse and craniocaudad migration of radio-opaque markers at necropsy after 28 d that was uniformly associated with the clinical development of incisional hernias. Conclusions Early laparotomy wound failure is a primary mechanism for incisional hernia formation. A noninvasive radiographic method for studying laparotomy wound healing may help design clinical trials to prevent and treat this common general surgical complication. PMID:23036516

  18. Sportsman's hernia? An ambiguous term.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption.

  19. Pediatric femoral hernia in the laparoscopic era.

    PubMed

    Aneiros Castro, Belén; Cano Novillo, Indalecio; García Vázquez, Araceli; López Díaz, María; Benavent Gordo, María Isabel; Gómez Fraile, Andrés

    2017-12-20

    Femoral hernia is a rare and often misdiagnosed condition in childhood. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that the laparoscopic approach improves diagnostic accuracy and offers a safe and effective treatment. A retrospective study of 687 pediatric patients who underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair from January 2000 to December 2015 was performed. Femoral hernias were identified in 16 patients (2.3%). The right side was affected in 10 cases (62.5%), the left side in 5 (31.2%), and 1 case was bilateral (6.2%). The mean age of patients was 8.00 ± 3.81 years, and there was a male predominance. Preoperative diagnosis was femoral hernia in eight cases (50%) and indirect inguinal hernia in the remaining eight (50%). Seven children (43.8%) presented with hernia recurrence after having undergone an open ipsilateral indirect hernia repair. A modified laparoscopic McVay technique was performed in 12 cases (70.6%). An epigastric artery injury by trocar occurred in one patient. All operations were completed laparoscopically. The mean surgical time was 45.6 ± 22.9 min for unilateral cases and 110 ± 10.0 min for bilateral cases. No immediate postoperative complications were noted. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 0.6 ± 0.4 days. No recurrence was observed after a median follow-up of 11 years (range, 4-16 years). Femoral hernia is a rare pathology in pediatric patients that is often difficult to diagnose. The laparoscopic approach is effective in the diagnosing and treating these hernias, and it allows for the simultaneous repair of multiple groin defects. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Trocar Port Hernias After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Coblijn, Usha K; de Raaff, Christel A L; van Wagensveld, Bart A; van Tets, Willem F; de Castro, Steve M M

    2016-03-01

    Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed worldwide. It is estimated that trocar port hernias occur more often in obese patients due to their obesity and because the ports are not closed routinely. The aim of the present study was to analyze the incidence, risk factors, and management of patients with trocar port hernias after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. All patients who were operated between 2006 and 2013 were included. During the study period, the trocar ports were not closed routinely. All patients who had any symptomatic abdominal wall hernia during follow-up were included. Overall, 1524 laparoscopic bariatric procedures were performed. There were 1249 female (82 %) and 275 male (18 %) patients. The mean age was 44 years, and median body mass index was 43 kg/m(2). Patients underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) (n = 859), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) (n = 364), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) (n = 68), revisional surgery (n = 226), and other procedures (n = 7). Three hundred and one patients (20 %) had one or more postoperative complications and the overall mortality was 0.3 % (four patients). There were 14 patients (0.9 %) with an abdominal wall hernia, of which eight (0.5 %) had a trocar port hernia, three (0.2 %) an incisional hernia from other previous surgery, and three (0.2 %) an umbilical hernia. Gender, age, BMI, smoking, type II diabetes, procedure type, complications, and weight loss were not associated with the occurrence of abdominal wall hernias. Trocar port hernias after bariatric surgery occur seldom if the trocar port is not routinely closed.

  1. Concomitant Abdominoplasty and Laparoscopic Umbilical Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, Constant P; Dusseldorp, Joseph R; Liang, Derek G; Keshava, Anil; Gilmore, Andrew J; Merten, Steve

    2018-04-20

    Umbilical hernia is a common finding in patients undergoing abdominoplasty, especially those who are post-partum with rectus divarication. Concurrent surgical treatment of the umbilical hernia at abdominoplasty presents a "vascular challenge" due to the disruption of dermal blood supply to the umbilicus, leaving the stalk as the sole axis of perfusion. To date, there have been no surgical techniques described to adequately address large umbilical herniae during abdominoplasty. To present an effective and safe technique that can address large umbilical herniae during abdominoplasty. A prospective series of 10 consecutive patients, undergoing concurrent abdominoplasty and laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair between 2014 and 2017 were included in the study. All procedures were performed by the same general surgeon and plastic surgeon at the Macquarie University Hospital in North Ryde, NSW, Australia. Data was collected with approval of our ethics committee. At 12-month follow-up there were no instances of umbilical necrosis, wound complications, seroma or recurrent hernia. The mean body mass index was 23.8 kg/m2 (range, 16.1-30.1 kg/m2). Rectus divarication ranged from 35-80 mm (mean, 53.5 mm). Umbilical hernia repair took a mean of 25.9 minutes to complete (range, 18-35 minutes). We present a technique that avoids incision of the rectus fascia minimizes dissection of the umbilical stalk and is able to provide a gold standard hernia repair with mesh. This procedure is particularly suited to post-partum patients with large herniae (>3-4 cm diameter) and wide rectus divarication, where mesh repair with adequate overlap is the recommended treatment.

  2. Paraesophageal Hernia Repair: Techniques for Success.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Tyler D; Soper, Nathaniel J

    2017-01-01

    With the introduction of laparoscopy, the outcomes of patients undergoing paraesophageal hernia repair have improved dramatically. When the fundamentals of a proper repair are followed, patients can expect to have improvement in gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, including heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Adhering to these principles will alleviate patients' symptoms and avoid reoperation. This article describes the approach to paraesophageal hernia repair, including patient evaluation, operative technique, and postoperative management. Esophageal lengthening and crural reinforcement with mesh are addressed as well. Adhering to the basic techniques outlined in this article should lead to successful and durable patient outcomes following a paraesophageal hernia repair.

  3. Is the advanced age a contraindication to GERD laparoscopic surgery? Results of a long term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this prospective non randomized observational cohort study we have evaluated the influence of age on outcome of laparoscopic total fundoplication for GERD. Methods Six hundred and twenty consecutive patients underwent total laparoscopic fundoplication for GERD. Five hundred and twenty-four patients were younger than 65 years (YG), and 96 patients were 65 years or older (EG). The following parameters were considered in the preoperative and postoperative evaluation: presence, duration, and severity of GERD symptoms, presence of a hiatal hernia, manometric and 24 hour pH-monitoring data, duration of operation, incidence of complications and length of hospital stay. Results Elderly patients more often had atypical symptoms of GERD and at manometric evaluation had a higher rate of impaired esophageal peristalsis in comparison with younger patients. The duration of the operation was similar between the two groups. The incidence of intraoperative and postoperative complications was low and the difference was not statistically significant between the two groups. An excellent outcome was observed in 93.0% of young patients and in 88.9% of elderly patients (p = NS). Conclusions Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is a safe and effective treatment for GERD even in elderly patients, warranting low morbidity and mortality rates and a significant improvement of symptoms comparable to younger patients. PMID:24267613

  4. [Hybrid repair of postoperative ventral hernia].

    PubMed

    Gogiya, B Sh; Alyautdinov, R R; Karmazanovsky, G G; Chekmareva, I A; Kopyltsov, A A

    2018-01-01

    To develop new technique of abdominal wall repair for postoperative ventral hernia without disadvantages which are intrinsic for open and laparoscopic surgery. Combined open and laparoscopic hernia repair was used in 18 patients with postoperative ventral hernia. Open stage provided safe dissection of abdominal adhesions and defect closure by autoplasty, laparoscopic procedure consisted of prosthesis deployment without separation of abdominal wall layers. Two types of composite endoprostheses with anti-adhesive coating were used for abdominal wall repair. There were no cases of recurrence or infectious complications in long-term period (from 3 to 106 months). Hybrid repair of postoperative ventral hernia is safe and effective procedure. Further studies are necessary to assess cost-effectiveness ratio of this method in view of expensive composite endoprostheses and laparoscopic supplies.

  5. Simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias: a prospective, randomized study of open, tension-free versus laparoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Iusco, D R; Sansebastiano, G; Costi, R

    2001-08-01

    No randomized trial exists that specifically addresses the issue of laparoscopic bilateral inguinal hernia repair. The purpose of the present prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical study was to assess short- and long-term results when comparing simultaneous bilateral hernia repair by an open, tension-free anterior approach with laparoscopic "bikini mesh" posterior repair. Forty-three low-risk male patients with bilateral primary inguinal hernia were randomly assigned to undergo either laparoscopic preperitoneal "bikini mesh" hernia repair (TAPP) or open Lichtenstein hernioplasty. There was no difference in operating time between the two groups. The mean cost of laparoscopic hernioplasty was higher (P < 0.001). The intensity of postoperative pain was greater in the open hernia repair group at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days after surgery (P < 0.001), with a greater consumption of pain medication among these patients (P < 0.05). The median time to return to work was 30 days for the open hernia repair group and 16 days for the laparoscopic "bikini mesh" repair group (P < 0.05). Only 1 asymptomatic recurrence (4.3%) was discovered in the open group. The laparoscopic approach to bilateral hernia with "bikini mesh" appears to be preferable to the open Lichtenstein tension-free hernioplasty in terms of the postoperative quality of life and interruption of occupational activity.

  6. Inguinal hernia repair: toward Asian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lomanto, Davide; Cheah, Wei-Keat; Faylona, Jose Macario; Huang, Ching Shui; Lohsiriwat, Darin; Maleachi, Andy; Yang, George Pei Cheung; Li, Michael Ka-Wai; Tumtavitikul, Sathien; Sharma, Anil; Hartung, Rolf Ulrich; Choi, Young Bai; Sutedja, Barlian

    2015-02-01

    Groin hernias are very common, and surgical treatment is usually recommended. In fact, hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure performed worldwide. In countries such as the USA, China, and India, there may easily be over 1 million repairs every year. The need for this surgery has become an important socioeconomic problem and may affect health-care providers, especially in aging societies. Surgical repair using mesh is recommended and widely employed in Western countries, but in many developing countries, tissue-to-tissue repair is still the preferred surgical procedure due to economic constraints. For these reason, the development and implementation of guidelines, consensus, or recommendations may aim to clarify issues related to best practices in inguinal hernia repair in Asia. A group of Asian experts in hernia repair gathered together to debate inguinal hernia treatments in Asia in an attempt to reach some consensus or develop recommendations on best practices in the region. The need for recommendations or guidelines was unanimously confirmed to help overcome the discrepancy in clinical practice between countries; the experts decided to focus mainly on the technical aspects of open repair, which is the most common surgery for hernia in our region. After the identification of 12 main topics for discussion (indication, age, and sex; symptomatic and asymptomatic hernia: type of hernia; type of treatment; hospital admission; preoperative care; anesthesia; surgical technique; perioperative care; postoperative care; early complications; and long-term complications), a search of the literature was carried out according to the five levels of the Oxford Classification of Evidence and the four grades of recommendation. © 2015 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Wandering Spleen and Organoaxial Gastric Volvulus after Morgagni Hernia Repair: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Caterina; Miele, Vittorio; Trinci, Margherita; Briganti, Vito

    2016-01-01

    Wandering spleen and gastric volvulus are two rare entities that have been described in association with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The diagnosis is difficult and any delay can result in ischemia and necrosis of both organs. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl, previously operated on for anterior diaphragmatic hernia and intrathoracic gastric volvulus, that presented to our service for a subdiaphragmatic gastric volvulus recurrence associated with a wandering spleen. In this report we reviewed the literature, analyzing the clinical presentation, diagnostic assessment, and treatment options of both conditions, in particular in the case associated with diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:27703832

  8. Combined open and laparoscopic approach to chronic pain following open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Rosen, M J; Novitsky, Y W; Cobb, W S; Kercher, K W; Heniford, B Todd

    2006-03-01

    Chronic groin pain is the most common long-term complication after open inguinal hernia repair. Traditional surgical management of the associated neuralgia consists of injection therapy followed by groin exploration, mesh removal, and nerve transection. The resultant hernia defect may be difficult to repair from an anterior approach. We evaluate the outcomes of a combined laparoscopic and open approach for the treatment of chronic groin pain following open inguinal herniorrhaphy. All patients who underwent groin exploration for chronic neuralgia after a prior open inguinal hernia repair were prospectively analyzed. Patient demographics, type of prior hernia repair, and prior nonoperative therapies were recorded. The operation consisted of a standard three trocar laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair, followed by groin exploration, mesh removal, and nerve transection. Outcome measures included recurrent groin pain, numbness, hernia recurrence, and complications. Twelve patients (11 male and 1 female) with a mean age of 41 years (range 29-51) underwent combined laparoscopic and open treatment for chronic groin pain. Ten patients complained of unilateral neuralgia, one patient had bilateral complaints, and one patient complained of orchalgia. All patients failed at least two attempted percutaneous nerve blocks. Prior repairs included Lichtenstein (n=9), McVay (n=1), plug and patch (n=1), and Shouldice (n=1). There were no intraoperative complications or wound infections. With a minimum of 6 weeks follow up, all patients were significantly improved. One patient complained of intermittent minor discomfort that required no further therapy. Two patients had persistent numbness in the ilioinguinal nerve distribution but remained satisfied with the procedure. A combined laparoscopic and open approach for postherniorrhaphy groin pain results in good to excellent patient satisfaction with no perioperative morbidity. It may be the preferred technique for the

  9. Bochdalek hernia and repetitive pancreatitis in a 33 year old woman

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Medina Andrade Luis; David, Coot Polanco Reyes; Laura, Medina Andrade; Abraham, Medina Andrade; Stephanie, Serrano Collazos; Grecia, Ortiz Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bochdalek hernia presentation in adulthood is rare. The presentation in newborns is the most common, manifesting with data from respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia, requiring urgent surgical intervention with high morbidity and mortality. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a 33 year old woman admitted in the emergency room with severe abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant and disnea. After physical examination and laboratory test we diagnose mild acute pancreatitis. The patient haven’t colelitiasis by ulstrasound or any risk factor for pancreatitis. Initially she received medical treatment and was discharged after one week. After four weeks she presented the same symptoms in two different occasions, with severe and mild pancreatitis respectively. A computed tomography report a left posterolateral diafragmatic hernia. In spite of the rare association of pancreatitis and Bochdalek hernia, we realized it as the etiology until the second event and planned his surgery. We made a posterolateral torachotomy and diafragmatic plasty with a politetrafluoroetileno mesh and after a 6 months follow up she has coursed asymptomatic. DISCUSSION The high rate of complications in this type of hernia requires us to perform surgical treatment as the hernia is detected. In this case it is prudent medical treatment prior to surgical correction despite this being the origin of the pancreatitis, because the systemic inflammatory response added by the surgical act could result in a higher rate of complications if not performed at the appropriate time. There is no precise rule to determine the type of approach of choice in this type of hernia which thoracotomy or laparotomy may be used. CONCLUSION Bochdalek hernia is a rare find in adults who require treatment immediately after diagnosis because of the high risk of complications. When presented with data from pancreatitis is recommended to complete the medical treatment of pancreatitis before

  10. Bochdalek hernia and repetitive pancreatitis in a 33 year old woman.

    PubMed

    Angel, Medina Andrade Luis; David, Coot Polanco Reyes; Laura, Medina Andrade; Abraham, Medina Andrade; Stephanie, Serrano Collazos; Grecia, Ortiz Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia presentation in adulthood is rare. The presentation in newborns is the most common, manifesting with data from respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia, requiring urgent surgical intervention with high morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 33 year old woman admitted in the emergency room with severe abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant and disnea. After physical examination and laboratory test we diagnose mild acute pancreatitis. The patient haven't colelitiasis by ulstrasound or any risk factor for pancreatitis. Initially she received medical treatment and was discharged after one week. After four weeks she presented the same symptoms in two different occasions, with severe and mild pancreatitis respectively. A computed tomography report a left posterolateral diafragmatic hernia. In spite of the rare association of pancreatitis and Bochdalek hernia, we realized it as the etiology until the second event and planned his surgery. We made a posterolateral torachotomy and diafragmatic plasty with a politetrafluoroetileno mesh and after a 6 months follow up she has coursed asymptomatic. The high rate of complications in this type of hernia requires us to perform surgical treatment as the hernia is detected. In this case it is prudent medical treatment prior to surgical correction despite this being the origin of the pancreatitis, because the systemic inflammatory response added by the surgical act could result in a higher rate of complications if not performed at the appropriate time. There is no precise rule to determine the type of approach of choice in this type of hernia which thoracotomy or laparotomy may be used. Bochdalek hernia is a rare find in adults who require treatment immediately after diagnosis because of the high risk of complications. When presented with data from pancreatitis is recommended to complete the medical treatment of pancreatitis before surgery to obtain the best results, unless it exist another

  11. Comparison between open and closed methods of herniorrhaphy in calves affected with umbilical hernia

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Farhad; Das, Bhajan Chandra; Kim, Gonhyung; Hossain, Mohammad Alamgir

    2009-01-01

    Umbilical hernias in calves commonly present to veterinary clinics, which are normally secondary to failure of the normal closure of the umbilical ring, and which result in the protrusion of abdominal contents into the overlying subcutis. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of commonly-used herniorrhaphies for the treatment of reducible umbilical hernia in calves. Thirty-four clinical cases presenting to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh from July 2004 to July 2007 were subjected to comprehensive study including history, classification of hernias, size of the hernial rings, presence of adhesion with the hernial sacs, postoperative care and follow-up. They were reducible, non-painful and had no evidence of infection present on palpation. The results revealed a gender influence, with the incidence of umbilical hernia being higher in female calves than in males. Out of the 34 clinical cases, 14 were treated by open method of herniorrhaphy and 20 were treated by closed method. Complications of hernia were higher (21%) in open method-treated cases than in closed method-treated cases (5%). Hernia recurred in three calves treated with open herniorrhaphy within 2 weeks of the procedure, with swelling in situ and muscular weakness at the site of operation. Shorter operation time and excellent healing rate (80%) were found in calves treated with closed herniorrhaphy. These findings suggest that the closed herniorrhaphy is better than the commonly-used open method for the correction of reducible umbilical hernia in calves. PMID:19934601

  12. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a prospective evaluation at Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra; Sood, Shasank; Bhattarai, Bal Krishna; Agrawal, Chandra Shekhar; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inguinal hernias have been treated traditionally with open methods of herniorrhaphy or hernioplasty. But the trends have changed in the last decade with the introduction of minimal access surgery. Methods This study was a prospective descriptive study in patients presenting to Surgery Department of B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal with reducible inguinal hernias from January 2011 to June 2012. All patients >18 years of age presenting with inguinal hernias were given the choice of laparoscopic repair or open repair. Those who opted for laparoscopic repair were included in the study. Results There were 50 patients, age ranged from 18 to 71 years with 34 being median age at presentation. In 41 patients, totally extraperitoneal repair was attempted. Of these, 2 (4%) repairs were converted to transabdominal repair and 2 to open mesh repair (4%). In 9 patients, transabdominal repair was done. The median total hospital stay was 4 days (range 3-32 days), the mean postoperative stay was 3.38±3.14 days (range 2-23 days), average time taken for full ambulation postoperatively was 2.05±1.39 days (range 1-10 days), and median time taken to return for normal activity was 5 days (range 2-50 days). One patient developed recurrence (2%). None of the patients who had laparoscopic repair completed complained of neuralgias in the follow-up. Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias could be contemplated safely both via totally extra peritoneal as well as transperitoneal route even in our setup of a developing country with modifications. PMID:25170385

  13. Quality of inguinal hernia operative reports: room for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Grace W.; Pooni, Amandeep; Forbes, Shawn S.; Eskicioglu, Cagla; Pearsall, Emily; Brenneman, Fred D.; McLeod, Robin S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Operative reports (ORs) serve as the official documentation of surgical procedures. They are essential for optimal patient care, physician accountability and billing, and direction for clinical research and auditing. Nonstandardized narrative reports are often of poor quality and lacking in detail. We sought to audit the completeness of narrative inguinal hernia ORs. Methods A standardized checklist for inguinal hernia repair (IHR) comprising 33 variables was developed by consensus of 4 surgeons. Five high-volume IHR surgeons categorized items as essential, preferable or nonessential. We audited ORs for open IHR at 6 academic hospitals. Results We audited 213 ORs, and we excluded 7 femoral hernia ORs. Tension-free repairs were the most common (82.5%), and the plug-and-patch technique was the most frequent (52.9%). Residents dictated 59% of ORs. Of 33 variables, 15 were considered essential and, on average, 10.8 ± 1.3 were included. Poorly reported elements included first occurrence versus recurrent repair (8.3%), small bowel viability in incarcerated hernias (10.7%) and occurrence of intraoperative complications (32.5%). Of 18 nonessential elements, deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis, preoperative antibiotics and urgency were reported in 1.9%, 11.7% and 24.3% of ORs, respectively. Repair-specific details were reported in 0 to 97.1% of ORs, including patch sutured to tubercle (55.1%) and location of plug (67.0%). Conclusion Completeness of IHR ORs varied with regards to essential and nonessential items but were generally incomplete, suggesting there is opportunity for improvement, including implementation of a standardized synoptic OR. PMID:24284146

  14. Male infertility after mesh hernia repair: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hallén, Magnus; Sandblom, Gabriel; Nordin, Pär; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Kvist, Ulrik; Westerdahl, Johan

    2011-02-01

    Several animal studies have raised concern about the risk for obstructive azoospermia owing to vasal fibrosis caused by the use of alloplastic mesh prosthesis in inguinal hernia repair. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of male infertility after bilateral mesh repair. In a prospective study, a questionnaire inquiring about involuntary childlessness, investigation for infertility and number of children was sent by mail to a group of 376 men aged 18-55 years, who had undergone bilateral mesh repair, identified in the Swedish Hernia Register (SHR). Questionnaires were also sent to 2 control groups, 1 consisting of 186 men from the SHR who had undergone bilateral repair without mesh, and 1 consisting of 383 men identified in the general population. The control group from the SHR was matched 2:1 for age and years elapsed since operation. The control group from the general population was matched 1:1 for age and marital status. The overall response rate was 525 of 945 (56%). Method of approach (anterior or posterior), type of mesh, and testicular status at the time of the repair had no significant impact on the answers to the questions. Nor did subgroup analysis of the men ≤40 years old reveal any significant differences. The results of this prospective study in men do not support the hypothesis that bilateral inguinal hernia repair with alloplastic mesh prosthesis causes male infertility at a significantly greater rate than those operated without mesh. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%–76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  16. Does topical rifampicin reduce the risk of surgical field infection in hernia repair?

    PubMed Central

    Kahramanca, Şahin; Kaya, Oskay; Azılı, Cem; Celep, Bahadır; Gökce, Emre; Küçükpınar, Tevfik

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Inguinal hernia operations are common procedures in general surgery. There have been many approaches in the historical development of hernia repair; tension free repair with mesh being the most commonly used technique today. Although it is a clean wound, antibiotic use is still controversial due to concerns about infection related to synthetic mesh. We aimed to determine the probable role of topical rifampicin in patients with tension-free hernia repair and mesh support. Material and Methods: The charts of patients who underwent tension-free inguinal hernia repair were retrospectively analyzed. Information and operative notes on patients, in whom synthetic materials were used, were identified. The patients were divided into two groups, placebo group (G1) and patients with application of topical rifampicin on the mesh (G2). Infection rates between the groups in the early postoperative period were compared. Results: The mean age of the 278 patients who were included in the study was 49.6±15.39 and the female/male ratio was 10/268. There were recurrent hernias in four patients and superficial wound infections in 22 patients in the early period. One patient had testicle torsion and underwent an orchiectomy. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age and gender. The types of hernia and body mass index were homogenous between the two groups. In the early postoperative period the infection rates were 16/144 (11.1%) and 6/134 (4.48%) in the groups, respectively, with the difference being statistically significant (p=0.041). Conclusion: We suggest that applying rifampicin locally can decrease surgical site infection in hernia operations where meshes are used. PMID:25931846

  17. European Hernia Society guidelines on prevention and treatment of parastomal hernias.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, S A; Agresta, F; Garcia Alamino, J M; Berger, D; Berrevoet, F; Brandsma, H-T; Bury, K; Conze, J; Cuccurullo, D; Dietz, U A; Fortelny, R H; Frei-Lanter, C; Hansson, B; Helgstrand, F; Hotouras, A; Jänes, A; Kroese, L F; Lambrecht, J R; Kyle-Leinhase, I; López-Cano, M; Maggiori, L; Mandalà, V; Miserez, M; Montgomery, A; Morales-Conde, S; Prudhomme, M; Rautio, T; Smart, N; Śmietański, M; Szczepkowski, M; Stabilini, C; Muysoms, F E

    2018-02-01

    International guidelines on the prevention and treatment of parastomal hernias are lacking. The European Hernia Society therefore implemented a Clinical Practice Guideline development project. The guidelines development group consisted of general, hernia and colorectal surgeons, a biostatistician and a biologist, from 14 European countries. These guidelines conformed to the AGREE II standards and the GRADE methodology. The databases of MEDLINE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and the gray literature through OpenGrey were searched. Quality assessment was performed using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network checklists. The guidelines were presented at the 38th European Hernia Society Congress and each key question was evaluated in a consensus voting of congress participants. End colostomy is associated with a higher incidence of parastomal hernia, compared to other types of stomas. Clinical examination is necessary for the diagnosis of parastomal hernia, whereas computed tomography scan or ultrasonography may be performed in cases of diagnostic uncertainty. Currently available classifications are not validated; however, we suggest the use of the European Hernia Society classification for uniform research reporting. There is insufficient evidence on the policy of watchful waiting, the route and location of stoma construction, and the size of the aperture. The use of a prophylactic synthetic non-absorbable mesh upon construction of an end colostomy is strongly recommended. No such recommendation can be made for other types of stomas at present. It is strongly recommended to avoid performing a suture repair for elective parastomal hernia. So far, there is no sufficient comparative evidence on specific techniques, open or laparoscopic surgery and specific mesh types. However, a mesh without a hole is suggested in preference to a keyhole mesh when laparoscopic repair is performed. An evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and management of parastomal hernias reveals the lack of

  18. Bilateral cervical lung hernia with T1 nerve compression.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mesbah; Buchan, Keith G; Mandana, Kyapanda M; Butchart, Eric G

    2006-02-01

    Lung hernia is a rare condition. Approximately one third of cases occur in the cervical position. We report a case of bilateral cervical lung hernia associated with neuralgic pain that was repaired using bovine pericardium and biological glue.

  19. The management of abdominal wall hernias – in search of consensus

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Kamil; Śmietański, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic repair is becoming an increasingly popular alternative in the treatment of abdominal wall hernias. In spite of numerous studies evaluating this technique, indications for laparoscopic surgery have not been established. Similarly, implant selection and fixation techniques have not been unified and are the subject of scientific discussion. Aim To assess whether there is a consensus on the management of the most common ventral abdominal wall hernias among recognised experts. Material and methods Fourteen specialists representing the boards of European surgical societies were surveyed to determine their choice of surgical technique for nine typical primary ventral and incisional hernias. The access method, type of operation, mesh prosthesis and fixation method were evaluated. In addition to the laparoscopic procedures, the number of tackers and their arrangement were assessed. Results In none of the cases presented was a consensus of experts obtained. Laparoscopic and open techniques were used equally often. Especially in the group of large hernias, decisions on repair methods were characterised by high variability. The technique of laparoscopic mesh fixation was a subject of great variability in terms of both method selection and the numbers of tackers and sutures used. Conclusions Recognised experts have not reached a consensus on the management of abdominal wall hernias. Our survey results indicate the need for further research and the inclusion of large cohorts of patients in the dedicated registries to evaluate the results of different surgical methods, which would help in the development of treatment algorithms for surgical education in the future. PMID:25960793

  20. An ovary as unusual contents of an incarcerated umbilical hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, R; Kamat, S; Elkholy, K

    2014-01-01

    We present the unusual case of a woman presenting with an incarcerated umbilical hernia. Intraoperatively, the contents of the hernia were found to be an ovary. We outline the clinical presentation of our patient, investigations and management as well as a discussion on unusual contents of umbilical hernias. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a non-malignant ovary incarcerated in an umbilical hernia. PMID:25198958

  1. An ovary as unusual contents of an incarcerated umbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, U; Ahmed, R; Kamat, S; Elkholy, K

    2014-09-01

    We present the unusual case of a woman presenting with an incarcerated umbilical hernia. Intraoperatively, the contents of the hernia were found to be an ovary. We outline the clinical presentation of our patient, investigations and management as well as a discussion on unusual contents of umbilical hernias. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a non-malignant ovary incarcerated in an umbilical hernia.

  2. Incarceration of a pedunculated uterine fibroid in an umbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ju; Cha, Hyun-Hwa; Seong, Won Joon

    2017-05-01

    Uterine fibroids are common benign tumors that may cause an umbilical hernia in patients with increased intra-abdominal pressure due to pregnancy, obesity, ascites, and intra-abdominal tumors. However, the simultaneous occurrence of uterine fibroids and umbilical hernias, or fibroids and an associated umbilical hernia, during pregnancy has rarely been reported. Here, we present the case of a fibroid presenting as an incarcerated umbilical hernia in a menopausal patient.

  3. Incarceration of a pedunculated uterine fibroid in an umbilical hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Ju; Seong, Won Joon

    2017-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are common benign tumors that may cause an umbilical hernia in patients with increased intra-abdominal pressure due to pregnancy, obesity, ascites, and intra-abdominal tumors. However, the simultaneous occurrence of uterine fibroids and umbilical hernias, or fibroids and an associated umbilical hernia, during pregnancy has rarely been reported. Here, we present the case of a fibroid presenting as an incarcerated umbilical hernia in a menopausal patient. PMID:28534020

  4. Simultaneous Prosthetic Mesh Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Abdominoplasty for Ventral Hernia and Severe Rectus Diastasis Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Standard abdominoplasty rectus plication techniques may not suffice for severe cases of rectus diastasis. In the authors’ experience, prosthetic mesh facilitates the repair of severe rectus diastasis with or without concomitant ventral hernias. Methods: A retrospective review of all abdominal wall surgery patients treated in the past 8 years by the senior author (G.A.D.) was performed. Patients with abdominoplasty and either rectus diastasis repair with mesh or a combined ventral hernia repair were analyzed. Results: Thirty-two patients, 29 women and three men, underwent mesh-reinforced midline repair with horizontal or vertical abdominoplasty. Patient characteristics included the following: mean age, 53 years; mean body mass index, 26 kg/m2; average width of diastasis or hernia, 6.7 cm; and average surgery time, 151 minutes. There were no surgical-site infections and two surgical-site occurrences—two seromas treated with drainage in the office. After an average of 471 days’ follow-up, none of the patients had recurrence of a bulge or a hernia. Conclusions: For patients with significant rectus diastasis, with or without concomitant hernias, the described mesh repair is both safe and durable. Although this operation requires additional dissection and placement of prosthetic mesh in the retrorectus plane, it may be safely combined with standard horizontal or vertical abdominoplasty skin excision techniques to provide an aesthetically pleasing overall result. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV. PMID:25539311

  5. A prospective study on elective umbilical hernia repair in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites.

    PubMed

    Eker, Hasan H; van Ramshorst, G H; de Goede, B; Tilanus, H W; Metselaar, H J; de Man, R A; Lange, J F; Kazemier, G

    2011-09-01

    Patients with both cirrhosis and ascites have a 20% risk of developing umbilical hernia. A retrospective study from our center comparing conservative management of umbilical hernia with elective repair in these patients showed a significant risk of mortality as a result of hernia incarceration in conservatively treated patients. The goal of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of elective umbilical hernia repair in these patients prospectively. Patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites presenting with an umbilical hernia were included in this study. For all patients, the expected time to liver transplantation was more than 3 months, and they did not have a patent umbilical vein in the hernia sac. The following data were collected prospectively for all patients: Child-Pugh-Turcotte (CPT) classification, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, kidney failure, cardiovascular comorbidity, operation-related complications, and duration of hospital stay. Mortality rates were registered in hospital records and verified in government records during follow-up. Mortality rates were registered in hospital records and verified in government records during follow-up. On completion of the study, a retrospective survey was performed to search for any patients who met the study inclusion criteria but were left out of the study cohort. In total, 30 patients (25 males) underwent operation at a mean age of 58 years (standard deviation [SD] ± 9 years). Of these 30 patients, 6 were classified as CPT grade A (20%), 19 (63%) as grade B, and 5 (17%) as grade C. The patients' median MELD score was 12 (interquartile range [IQR], 8-16). In 10 (33%) of the 30 patients hernia repair was performed with mesh. The median duration of hospital stay was 3 days (IQR, 2-4). None of the patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. Postoperative complications included pneumonia and decompensation of cirrhosis (1 case each,) resulting in prolonged hospital stay for those 2

  6. Obturator Hernia: A Rare Case of Acute Mechanical Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Pergel, Ahmet; Sahin, Dursun Ali

    2013-01-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare type of pelvic hernia which generally occurs in elderly patients with accompanying diseases. Because it is difficult to diagnose before surgery, the morbidity and mortality rates for obturator hernia are high. The most common symptom is strangulation combined with mechanical intestinal obstruction. PMID:23738179

  7. Obturator hernia: a rare case of acute mechanical intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ibrahim; Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Pergel, Ahmet; Sahin, Dursun Ali

    2013-01-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare type of pelvic hernia which generally occurs in elderly patients with accompanying diseases. Because it is difficult to diagnose before surgery, the morbidity and mortality rates for obturator hernia are high. The most common symptom is strangulation combined with mechanical intestinal obstruction.

  8. Observation or Operation for Patients With an Asymptomatic Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    O'Dwyer, Patrick J.; Norrie, John; Alani, Ahmed; Walker, Andrew; Duffy, Felix; Horgan, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with an inguinal hernia are asymptomatic or have little in the way of symptoms from their hernia. Repair is often associated with long-term chronic pain and has a recurrence rate of 5% to 10%. Our aim was to compare operation with a wait-and-see policy in patients with an asymptomatic hernia. Methods: A total of 160 male patients 55 years or older were randomly assigned to observation or operation. Patients were assessed clinically and sent questionnaires at 6 months and 1 year. The primary endpoint was pain and general health status at 12 months; other outcome measures included costs to the health service and the rate of operation for a new symptom or complication. Results: At 12 months, there were no significant differences between the randomized groups of observation or operation, in visual analogue pain scores at rest, 3.7 mm versus 5.2 mm (mean difference, −1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), −4.8 to 1.6, P = 0.34), or on moving, 7.6 mm versus 5.7 mm (mean difference, −1.9; 95% CI, −6.1 to 2.4, P = 0.39). Also, the number of patients 29 versus 24 (difference in proportion, 8%; 95% CI, −7% to 23%, P = 0.31), who recorded pain on moving and the number taking regular analgesia, 9 versus 17 (difference in proportion, −10%; 95% CI, −21% to 2%, P = 0.14) was similar. At 6 months, there were significant improvements in most of the dimensions of the SF-36 for the operation group, while at 12 months although the trend remained the same the differences were only significant for change in health (mean difference, 7.3; 95% CI, 0.4 to 14.3, P = 0.039). The rate of crossover from observation to operation 23 patients at a median follow-up of 574 days was higher than predicted. The observation group also suffered 3 serious hernia-related adverse events compared with none in the operation group. Conclusions: Repair of an asymptomatic inguinal hernia does not affect the rate of long-term chronic pain and may be beneficial to patients in

  9. The continuing challenge of parastomal hernia: failure of a novel polypropylene mesh repair.

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Stiff, G.; Hughes, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce the high recurrence rate after repair of parastomal hernia, a technique was devised in which non-absorbable mesh was used to provide a permanent closure of the gap between the emerging bowel and abdominal wall. Seven patients were treated during the period 1990-1992. Five-year follow-up has given disappointing results, with recurrent hernia in 29% of cases and serious complications, including obstruction and dense adhesions to the intra-abdominal mesh, in 57% and a mesh-related abscess in 15% of cases. This study highlights a dual problem--failure of a carefully sutured mesh to maintain an occlusive position, and complications of the mesh itself. The poor results obtained with this technique together with the disappointing results with other methods described in the literature confirms that parastomal hernia presents a continuing challenge. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9682640

  10. Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Inguinal Hernia Repair at the Time of Robotic Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Soto-Palou, Francois G; Sánchez-Ortiz, Ricardo F

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal straining associated with voiding dysfunction or constipation has traditionally been associated with the development of abdominal wall hernias. Thus, classic general surgery dictum recommends that any coexistent bladder outlet obstruction should be addressed by the urologist before patients undergo surgical repair of a hernia. While organ-confined prostate cancer is usually not associated with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms, a modest proportion of patients treated with radical prostatectomy may have coexisting benign prostatic hyperplasia with elevated symptom scores and hernias may be incidentally detected at the time of surgery. Furthermore, dissection of the space of Retzius during retropubic or minimally invasive prostatectomy may result exposure of abdominal wall defects which may have been present, but asymptomatic if plugged with preperitoneal fat. Herein we examine the literature regarding the incidence of postoperative inguinal hernias after prostatectomy, review potential risk factors which could aid in preoperative patient identification, and discuss the published experience regarding concurrent hernia repair at the time of open or minimally invasive radical prostatectomy.

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for Total Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Almost 20 years after the first laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair was performed, single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS™) is set to revolutionize minimally invasive surgery. However, the loss of triangulation must be overcome before the technique can be popularized. This study reports the first 100 laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repairs using a single incision. The study cohort comprised 68 patients with a mean age of 44 (range, 18 to 83): 36 unilateral and 32 bilateral hernias. Twelve patients also underwent umbilical hernia repair with the Ventralex patch requiring no additional incisions. A 2.5-cm to 3-cm crescentic incision within the confines of the umbilicus was performed. Standard dissecting instruments and 52-cm/5.5-mm/300 laparoscope were used. Operation times were 50 minutes for unilateral and 80 minutes for bilateral. There was one conversion to conventional 3-port laparoscopic repair and none to open surgery. Outpatient surgery was achieved in all (except one). Analgesic requirements were minimal: 8 Dextropropoxyphene tablets (range, 0 to 20). There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications with a high patient satisfaction score. Single-incision laparoscopic hernia repair is safe and efficient simply by modifying dissection techniques (so-called “inline” and “vertical”). Comparable success can be obtained while negating the risks of bowel and vascular injuries from sharp trocars and achieving improved cosmetic results. PMID:21902942

  12. Incidence of Port-Site Incisional Hernia After Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rainville, Harvey; Ikedilo, Ojinika; Vemulapali, Pratibha

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity among minimally invasive surgeons and is now being applied to a broad number of surgical procedures. Although this technique uses only 1 port, the diameter of the incision is larger than in standard laparoscopic surgery. The long-term incidence of port-site hernias after single-incision laparoscopic surgery has yet to be determined. Methods: All patients who underwent a single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedure from May 2008 through May 2009 were included in the study. Single-incision laparoscopic surgical operations were performed either by a multiport technique or with a 3-trocar single-incision laparoscopic surgery port. The patients were seen at 30 to 36 months' follow-up, at which time they were examined for any evidence of port-site incisional hernia. Patients found to have hernias on clinical examination underwent repairs with mesh. Results: A total of 211 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The types of operations included were cholecystectomy, appendectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric banding, Nissen fundoplication, colectomy, and gastrojejunostomy. We found a port-site hernia rate of 2.9% at 30 to 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Port-site incisional hernia after single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedures remains a major setback for patients. The true incidence remains largely unknown because most patients are asymptomatic and therefore do not seek surgical aid. PMID:24960483

  13. Critical overview of all available animal models for abdominal wall hernia research.

    PubMed

    Vogels, R R M; Kaufmann, R; van den Hil, L C L; van Steensel, S; Schreinemacher, M H F; Lange, J F; Bouvy, N D

    2017-10-01

    Since the introduction of the first prosthetic mesh for abdominal hernia repair, there has been a search for the "ideal mesh." The use of preclinical or animal models for assessment of necessary characteristics of new and existing meshes is an indispensable part of hernia research. Unfortunately, in our experience there is a lack of consensus among different research groups on which model to use. Therefore, we hypothesized that there is a lack of comparability within published animal research on hernia surgery due to wide range in experimental setup among different research groups. A systematic search of the literature was performed to provide a complete overview of all animal models published between 2000 and 2014. Relevant parameters on model characteristics and outcome measurement were scored on a standardized scoring sheet. Due to the wide range in different animals used, ranging from large animal models like pigs to rodents, we decided to limit the study to 168 articles concerning rat models. Within these rat models, we found wide range of baseline animal characteristics, operation techniques, and outcome measurements. Making reliable comparison of results among these studies is impossible. There is a lack of comparability among experimental hernia research, limiting the impact of this experimental research. We therefore propose the establishment of guidelines for experimental hernia research by the EHS.

  14. NiTiNol Hernia Device Stability in Inguinal Hernioplasty Without Fixation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective: To determine whether the NiTiNol frame of a novel hernia repair device utilizing polypropylene mesh for inguinal hernioplasty remains stable and intransient without fixation after a minimum of 6 months. Methods: Twenty patients had 27 inguinal hernias repaired using a novel hernia repair device that has a NiTiNol frame without any fixation. Initial single-view, postoperative X-rays were compared with a second X-ray obtained at least 6 months later. The NiTiNol frame, which can be easily visualized on a plain X-ray, was measured in 2 dimensions, as were anatomic landmarks. The measurements obtained and the appearances of the 2 X-rays were compared to determine the percentage of change in device size and device stability with regard to device location and shape. Results: There were minimal changes noted between the 2 sets of measurements obtained with an overall trend towards a slight increase in the size of the hernia repair device. The devices demonstrated intransience of position and stability of shape. Conclusions: The NiTiNol frame of a novel hernia repair device utilizing polypropylene mesh exhibits radiographic evidence of size and shape stability and intransience of position without fixation when used in inguinal hernioplasty after a minimum follow-up of 6 months. PMID:21902967

  15. Adherent umbilical hernia containing Meckel's diverticulum resected due to intraoperative injury.

    PubMed

    Kibil, Wojciech; Pach, Radosław; Szura, Mirosław; Matyja, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this report was to describe a rare case of a male patient with dry umbilical hernia with Meckel's diverticulum adherent to the neck of hernia sac. The patient's history, results of physical examination, laboratory testing, intraoperative findings, treatment method and postoperative course are summarized in details in this report. Follow-up visits were performed 14 days, one month and one year after the operation. A 35-year-old overweight Caucasian male patient (initials: D-B, body weight 90 kg, height 172 cm) was admitted to the hospital on 2nd April 2009 with reducible umbilical hernia for elective surgical treatment. The patient was operated on in the Specialist Diagnostic and Therapeutic Centre Medicina in Cracow and discharged from the hospital on fourth postoperative day. This case is compared with a few similar cases which have been described in the literature till now--all of these reports dealt with strangulated umbilical hernias but not reducible one. The patient underwent elective operation performed on the day of admission. Antibiotic prophylaxis included single dose of pefloxacine (400 mg intravenously) administered just before start of the operation. Subarachnoid anaesthesia was applied 15 minutes before start of the operation. The procedure lasted 75 minutes. Hernia sac was dissected and opened. In the hernia neck adherent Meckel's diverticulum was found. It was localised 80 cm from ileocecal valve and its length was 45 millimetres. During dissection process the diverticulum was injured in the apical region so cuneiform resection of the ileum with Meckel's diverticulum was performed. Ileum was sutured with two layers of absorbable sutures. The tissue defect in umbilical region was repaired primarily with onlay synthetic mesh prosthesis (polypropylene mesh, size 7 x 12 cm). 1) Adherent incidental Meckel's diverticulum in a sac of reducible umbilical hernia is a very rare finding. 2) During umbilical herniorrhaphy (elective or urgent) the

  16. Factors Associated With Long-term Outcomes of Umbilical Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Divya A.; Itani, Kamal M. F.; O’Brien, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Umbilical hernia repair is one of the most commonly performed general surgical procedures. However, there is little consensus about the factors that lead to umbilical hernia recurrence. Objective To better understand the factors associated with long-term umbilical hernia recurrence. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective cohort of 332 military veteran patients who underwent umbilical hernia repair was studied between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2008, at the VA Boston Healthcare System. Recurrence and mortality outcomes were tracked from that period until June 1, 2014. Data were collected on patient characteristics, operative, and postoperative factors and univariate and multivariable analyses were used to assess which factors were significantly associated with umbilical hernia recurrence and mortality. All patients with primary umbilical hernia repair, with or without a concurrent unrelated procedure, were included in the study. Patients excluded were those who underwent umbilical hernia repair as a part of another major planned procedure with abdominal incisions. Data were collected from June 1, 2014, to November 1, 2015. Statistical analysis was performed from November 2, 2015, to April 1, 2016. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary study outcomes were umbilical hernia recurrence and death. Results Of the 332 patients in this study, 321 (96.7%) were male, mean age was 58.4 years, and mean (SD) time of follow-up was 8.5 (4.1) years. The hernia recurrence rate was 6.0% (n = 20) at a mean 3.1 years after index repair (median, 1.0-year; range, 0.33-13 years). The primary suture repair recurrence rate was 9.8% (16 of 163 patients), and the mesh repair recurrence rate was 2.4% (4 of 169 patients). On univariate analysis, ascites (P = .02), liver disease (P = .02), diabetes (P = .04), and primary suture (nonmesh) repairs (P = .04) were significantly associated with increased recurrence rates. Patients who had a history of

  17. Adult right-sided Bochdalek hernia with ileo-cecal appendix: Almeida-Reis hernia.

    PubMed

    Costa Almeida, C E; Reis, Luis S; Almeida, Carlos M Costa

    2013-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia is one of the most common congenital abnormalities manifested in infants. In the adult is a rarity, with a prevalence of 0.17-6% of all diaphragmatic hernias. Right-sided Bochdalek hernias containing colon are even more rare, with no case described in the literature with ileo-cecal appendix. The authors present a case of a right-sided Bochdalek hernia in an adult female of 49 years old, presented with severe respiratory failure. During laparotomy for hernia correction, were found in an intrathoracic position the cecum and ileo-cecal appendix, the right colon and the transverse colon. Although useful in patient evaluation, clinical history and physical examination are not helpful in making diagnosis because of their nonspecific character. CT scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Most of the times there is no hernial sac. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and it is always indicated even if asymptomatic. In general suture of the defect is possible. Due to patient's weak respiratory function we chose laparotomy by Kocher incision. Being the first case of a right-sided Bochdalek hernia in the adult with a herniated ileo-cecal appendix, we name it Almeida-Reis hernia. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  19. Laparoscopic repair of non-complicated lumbar hernia secondary to a latissimus dorsi flap.

    PubMed

    Obregón, L; Ruiz-Castilla, M; Binimelis, M M; Guinot, A; García, V; Puig, O; Barret, J P

    2014-03-01

    Lumbar hernia is an unusual complication of the latissimus dorsi flap. Traditionally, it has always been repaired using open-surgery techniques. We present the first description of laparoscopic surgery to treat a non-complicated superior lumbar hernia resulting from the creation of an enlarged latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for breast reconstruction following left modified radical mastectomy. The laparoscopic approach substantially reduced the risks associated with open surgery, shortened length of hospital stay and time to recovery and obtained better cosmetic results. Laparoscopic surgery may be considered as a feasible therapeutic option for non-complicated superior lumbar hernias secondary to a latissimus dorsi muscle flap. Therapeutic, V. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sports hernias: experience in a sports medicine center.

    PubMed

    Santilli, O L; Nardelli, N; Santilli, H A; Tripoloni, D E

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain of the inguino-crural region or "pubalgia" explains the 0.5-6.2% of the consultations by athletes. Recently, areas of weakness in the posterior wall called "sports hernias," have been identified in some of these patients, capable of producing long-standing pain. Several authors use different image methods (CT, MRI, ultrasound) to identify the lesion and various techniques of repair, by open or laparoscopic approaches, have been proposed but there is no evidence about the superiority of one over others due to the difficulty for randomizing these patients. In our experience, diagnosis was based on clinical and ultrasound findings followed by laparoscopic exploration to confirm and repair the injury. The present study aims to assess the performance of our diagnostic and therapeutic management in a series of athletes affected by "pubalgia". 1450 athletes coming from the orthopedic office of a sport medicine center were evaluated. In 590 of them (414 amateur and 176 professionals) sports hernias were diagnosed through physical examination and ultrasound. We performed laparoscopic "TAPP" repair and, thirty days after, an assessment was performed to determine the evolution of pain and the degree of physical activity as a sign of the functional outcome. We used the U Mann-Whitney test for continuous scale variables and the chi-square test for dichotomous variables with p < 0.05 as a level of significance. In 573 patients ultrasound examination detected some protrusion of the posterior wall with normal or minimally dilated inguinal rings, which in 498 of them coincided with areas affected by pain. These findings were confirmed by laparoscopic exploration that also diagnosed associated contralateral (30.1%) and ipsilateral defects, resulting in a total of 1006 hernias. We found 84 "sport hernias" in 769 patients with previous diagnosis of adductor muscle strain (10.92%); on the other hand, in 127 (21.52%) of our patients with "sport hernias" US detected

  1. Amyand's hernia: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Youssef; Elkbuli, Adel; McKenney, Mark; Boneva, Dessy

    2018-05-07

    An Amyand hernia is a rare disease where the appendix is found within an inguinal hernia sac. This rare entity is named after the French born English surgeon, Dr. Claudius Amyand. Inguinal hernias are one of the most common surgeries that a general surgeon performs with more than 20 million inguinal hernia repairs performed yearly worldwide. The incidence of finding an appendix within the hernia sac is rare, occurring in less than 1% of inguinal hernia patients and when complications arise such as inflammation, perforation, or abscess formation it becomes exceptionally rare with an incidence of about 0.1%. A 59-year-old male with a history of a previously reducible right inguinal hernia presented to the Emergency Department with acute abdominal pain, right groin mass. Computed tomography (CT) confirmed a right incarcerated inguinal hernia with herniated loops of bowel within the right inguinal region. Patient was subsequently treated with an appendectomy and tension free hernia repair with mesh with a successful outcome. The current generally accepted treatment algorithm for Amyand's hernia is essentially contingent on the appendix's condition within the hernia sac. Controversy exists regarding the application of mesh in type 2 Amyand's hernia. More research is needed to provide surgeons with evidence-based standardized approaches for dealing with this unique situation. This case report reviews a rare entity known as an Amyand's hernia that presented as an incarcerated hernia that was diagnosed intraoperatively with an inflamed appendix, recognized as a type 2 Amyand's hernia. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Left paraduodenal hernia: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Gavin A; Yurcisin, Basil J; Sell, Harry S

    2010-01-01

    Paraduodenal hernias are congenital internal hernias that usually present with non-specific symptoms, and are therefore rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Left-sided paraduodenal hernias are three times more likely to occur than right-sided ones. Both hernias present similarly, but have a differing embryological basis. Here, the case of a 76-year-old woman with a left paraduodenal hernia presenting with small bowel obstruction is presented, and a brief discussion of the literature on its diagnosis and management given. PMID:22797200

  3. Umbilical Hernia Repair: Overview of Approaches and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Paul W; Martin, Tasha A; Hope, William W

    2018-06-01

    Umbilical hernias are ubiquitous, and surgery is indicated in symptomatic patients. Umbilical hernia defects can range from small (<1 cm) to very large/complex hernias, and treatment options should be tailored to the clinical situation. Open, laparoscopic, and robotic options exist for repair, with each having its advantages and disadvantages. In general, mesh should be used for repair, because it has been shown to decrease recurrence rates, even in small hernias. Although outcomes are generally favorable after umbilical hernia repairs, some patients have chronic complaints that are mostly related to recurrences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Single site and conventional totally extraperitoneal techniques for uncomplicated inguinal hernia repair: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Felipe Brandão Corrêa; Starling, Eduardo Simão; Maricevich, Marco; Tobias-Machado, Marcos

    2014-10-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of endoscopic extraperitoneal single site (EESS) inguinal hernia repair and compare it outcomes with the conventional totally extraperitoneal (TEP) technique. TEP inguinal hernia repair is a widely accepted alternative to conventional open technique with several perioperative advantages. Transumbilical laparoendoscopic singlesite surgery (LESS) is an emerging approach and has been reported for a number of surgical procedures with superior aesthetic results but other advantages need to be proven. Thirty-eight uncomplicated inguinal hernias were repaired by EESS approach between January 2010 and January 2011. All procedures were performed through a 25 cm infraumbilical incision using the Alexis wound retractor attached to a surgical glove and three trocars. Body mass index, age, operative time, blood loss, complications, conversion rate, analgesia requirement, hospital stay, return to normal activities and patient satisfaction with aesthetic results were analysed and compared with the last 38 matched-pair group of patients who underwent a conventional TEP inguinal hernia repair by the same surgeon. All procedures were performed successfully with no conversion. In both unilateral and bilateral EESS inguinal repairs, the mean operative time was longer than conventional TEP (55± 20 vs. 40± 15 min, P = 0.049 and 70± 15 vs. 55± 10 min, P = 0.014). Aesthetic result was superior in the EESS group (2.88± 0.43 vs. 2.79± 0.51, P = 0.042). There was no difference between the two approaches regarding blood loss, complications, hospital stay, time until returns to normal activities and analgesic requirement. EESS inguinal hernia repair is safe and effective, with superior cosmetic results in the treatment of uncomplicated inguinal hernias. Other advantages of this new technique still need to be proven.

  5. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair by the hook method in emergency setting in children presenting with incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kin Wai Edwin; Lee, Kim Hung; Tam, Yuk Him; Sihoe, Jennifer Dart Yin; Cheung, Sing Tak; Mou, Jennifer Wai Cheung

    2011-10-01

    The development of laparoscopic hernia repair has provided an alternative approach to the management of incarcerated inguinal hernia in children. Different laparoscopic techniques for hernia repair have been described. However, we hereby review the role of laparoscopic hernia repair using the hook method in the emergency setting for incarcerated inguinal hernias in children. A retrospective review was conducted of all children who presented with incarcerated inguinal hernia and underwent laparoscopic hernia repair using the hook method in emergency setting between 2004 and 2010. There were a total of 15 boys and 1 girl with a mean age of 30 ± 36 months (range, 4 months to 12 years). The hernia was successfully reduced after sedation in 7 children and after general anesthesia in 4 children. In 5 children, the hernia was reduced by a combined manual and laparoscopic-assisted approach. Emergency laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using the hook method was performed after reduction of the hernia. The presence of preperitoneal fluid secondary to recent incarceration facilitated the dissection of the preperitoneal space by the hernia hook. All children underwent successful reduction and hernia repair. The median operative time was 37 minutes. There was no postoperative complication. The median hospital stay was 3 days. At a median follow-up of 40 months, there was no recurrence of the hernia or testicular atrophy. Emergency laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair by the hook method is safe and feasible. Easier preperitoneal dissection was experienced, and repair of the contralateral patent processus vaginalis can be performed in the same setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical management of inguinal hernias at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania: our experiences in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Mabula, Joseph B; Chalya, Phillipo L

    2012-10-25

    Inguinal hernia repair remains the commonest operation performed by general surgeons all over the world. There is paucity of published data on surgical management of inguinal hernias in our environment. This study is intended to describe our own experiences in the surgical management of inguinal hernias and compare our results with that reported in literature. A descriptive prospective study was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authorities before the commencement of the study. Statistical data analysis was done using SPSS software version 17.0. A total of 452 patients with inguinal hernias were enrolled in the study. The median age of patients was 36 years (range 3 months to 78 years). Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 36.7:1. This gender deference was statistically significant (P=0.003). Most patients (44.7%) presented late (more than five years of onset of hernia). Inguinoscrotal hernia (66.8%) was the commonest presentation. At presentation, 208 (46.0%) patients had reducible hernia, 110 (24.3%) had irreducible hernia, 84 (18.6%) and 50(11.1%) patients had obstructed and strangulated hernias respectively. The majority of patients (53.1%) had right sided inguinal hernia with a right-to-left ratio of 2.1: 1. Ninety-two (20.4%) patients had bilateral inguinal hernias. 296 (65.5%) patients had indirect hernia, 102 (22.6%) had direct hernia and 54 (11.9%) had both indirect and direct types (pantaloon hernia). All patients in this study underwent open herniorrhaphy. The majority of patients (61.5%) underwent elective herniorrhaphy under spinal anaesthesia (69.2%). Local anaesthesia was used in only 1.1% of cases. Bowel resection was required in 15.9% of patients. Modified Bassini's repair (79.9%) was the most common technique of posterior wall repair of the inguinal canal. Lichtenstein mesh repair was used in only one (0.2%) patient. Complication rate was 12.4% and it

  7. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach for recurrent inguinal hernia: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly; Hokkam, Emad N.; Ellabban, Goda M.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The repair of the recurrent hernia is a daunting task because of already weakened tissues and distorted anatomy. Open posterior preperitoneal approach gives results far superior to those of the anterior approach. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair is an evolving technique associated with advantages of a minimally invasive approach. The present work aimed at comparing these three approaches for repair of recurrent inguinal hernia regarding complications and early recurrence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 180 patients were divided randomly into three equal groups: A, B, and C. Group A patients were subjected to open posterior preperitoneal approach , those of group B were subjected to transinguinal anterior tension-free repair and group C patients were subjected to TAPP. The primary end point was recurrence and the secondary end points were time off from work, postoperative pain, scrotal swelling, and wound infections. RESULTS: The mean hospital stay, the mean time to return to work and the mean time off from work were less in group C then A and B. Chronic postoperative pain was observed in eight patients in group A (13.33%), in 18 patients in group B (30%) and six patients in group C (10%). The overall complication rate was 19.7% in both groups A and C and 34.36% in group B. CONCLUSION: In recurrent inguinal hernia, the laparoscopic and open posterior approaches are equally effective in term of operative outcome. The open preperitoneal hernia repair is inexpensive, has a low recurrence rate. Postoperative recovery is short and postoperative pain is minimal. This approach gives results far superior to those of the commonly used anterior approach. However, while laparoscopic hernia repair requires a lengthy learning curve and is difficult to learn and perform, it has advantages of less post-operative pain, early recovery with minimal hospital stay, low post-operative complications and recurrence. Trial

  8. Strangulated inguinal hernia in adult males in Kumasi.

    PubMed

    Ohene-Yeboah, M; Dally, C K

    2014-06-01

    The complications of untreated inguinal hernias are common surgical emergencies in adult Ghanaian men. To describe the epidemiology of strangulated inguinal hernia in adult males in Kumasi. From the hospital records the age and sex of all male adult patients treated for strangulated inguinal hernia were recorded at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital(KATH), the University Hospital (UH), the Seventh Day Adventist Hospital (SDAH) and the Kumasi South Hospital (KSH) for the period January 2007 to December 2011 inclusive. The total number of inguinal hernia repairs from all four facilities was also recorded. The annual incidence of strangulated inguinal hernia and the hernia repair rates were estimated using the 2010 population data. Five-hundred and ninety-two cases of strangulated inguinal hernia were treated over the five years. The incidence of strangulated inguinal hernia was 0.26%. A total of 2243 inguinal hernia repairs were performed and 26.4 % of these repairs were for strangulation. The total number of inguinal hernia repairs averaged 77.3 repairs per 100 000 adult males per year and the elective repair rate was low at 0.9%. There is the need to increase the levels of elective repair of inguinal hernia in Kumasi.

  9. Feasibility and limits of inguinal hernia repair under local anaesthesia in a limited resource environment: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bourgouin, S; Goudard, Y; Montcriol, A; Bordes, J; Nau, A; Balandraud, P

    2017-10-01

    Local anaesthesia (LA) has proven effective for inguinal hernia repair in developed countries. Hernias in low to middle income countries represent a different issue. The aim of this study was to analyse the feasibility of LA for African hernia repairs in a limited resource environment. Data from patients who underwent herniorrhaphy under LA or spinal anaesthesia (SA) by the 6th and 7th Forward Surgical Team were prospectively collected. All of the patients benefited from a transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia. Primary endpoints concerned the pain response and conversion to general anaesthesia. Secondary endpoints concerned the complication and recurrence rates. Predictors of LA failure were then identified. In all, 189 inguinal hernias were operated during the study period, and 119 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 57 LA and 62 SA. Forty-eight percent of patients presented with inguinoscrotal hernias. Local anaesthesia led to more pain during surgery and necessitated more administration of analgesics but resulted in fewer micturition difficulties and better postoperative pain control. Conversion rates were not different. Inguinoscrotal hernia and a time interval <50 min between the TAP block and skin incision were predictors of LA failure. Forty-four patients were followed-up at one month. No recurrence was noted. Local anaesthesia is a safe alternative to SA. Small or medium hernias can easily be performed under LA in rural centres, but inguinoscrotal hernias required an ultrasound-guided TAP block performed 50 min before surgery to achieve optimal analgesia, and should be managed only in centres equipped with ultrasonography.

  10. Analgesia and sedation practices for incarcerated inguinal hernias in children.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansari, Khalid; Sulowski, Christopher; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the use of medications for analgesia and/or sedation for incarcerated inguinal hernia reductions in the emergency department was analyzed. A retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients presenting to a pediatric emergency department with incarcerated inguinal hernia from 2002 to 2005. A total of 99 children presented with incarcerated hernias during the study period. The median age was 11 months. Forty-four percent of children received medication for the procedure, of them 75% received parenteral and 25% oral or intranasal medications. Forty-five percent of children who received medication went through at least 1 hernia reduction attempt initially without medications. More than half the children with incarcerated inguinal hernias did not receive any medication for pain and/or sedation prior to hernia reduction. Guidelines for medication use for children with incarcerated inguinal hernias need to be developed.

  11. A case of De Garengeot hernia and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Chin Li

    2017-01-01

    Femoral hernia accounts for only 3% of all the hernias and in only 0.5%–5% of the events, the appendix can travel through the femoral hernia which is called De Garengeot hernia, and the incidence of appendicitis in this type of hernia is as low as 0.08%–0.13%. We present a case of a 69-year-old healthy woman who was referred to the emergency department by her general practitioner for CT-proven appendicitis in the femoral canal. On initial assessment, she was found to have a hard, tender lump in her right groin below the inguinal ligament, and open appendectomy and herniorrhaphy were performed. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment of this type of hernia but due to the rarity of this condition, there is no specific guideline as for the surgical procedure. This article demonstrated a case of De Garengeot hernia which was diagnosed preoperatively and managed surgically. PMID:28882935

  12. Prenatal surgery for congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Au-Yeung, Jeff Ying-Kit; Chan, Kwong-Leung

    2003-10-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) has a mortality rate of up to 77% despite optimal pre- and postnatal care. Fetuses with liver herniation, a low lung-to-head ratio, and an early diagnosis before 24 weeks have a particularly poor prognosis. In utero open repair of these fetuses does not improve patient survival. The PLUG (Plug the Lung Until it Grows) technique was reported to be able to reverse pulmonary hypoplasia in CDH. A foam plug or a titanium clip is used and the trachea can be unplugged using Ex Utero Intrapartum Tracheoplasty (EXIT) at birth. Since hysterotomy causes premature labour, a video-fetoscopic intrauterine technique of tracheal occlusion called Fetendo-PLUG was developed. Compared to those who receive standard postnatal care or fetal tracheal occlusion via open hysterotomy, patients who undergo Fetendo-PLUG are reported to have a higher survival rate of 75% and fewer fetal and maternal complications. A recent refinement is to use a detachable balloon for intratracheal occlusion through a single 5 mm port under real-time ultrasound guidance. Without the need for neck dissection, injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves and trachea and vocal cord paresis can be minimized. The result of this form of treatment for CDH is promising, but further refinement of fetal instrumentation and development of effective tocolytic drugs are still required.

  13. De Garengeot’s Hernia: Report of a Rare Surgical Emergency and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Misiakos, Evangelos P.; Paspala, Anna; Prodromidou, Anastasia; Machairas, Nikolaos; Domi, Vasileia; Koliakos, Nikolaos; Karatzas, Theodore; Zavras, Nick; Machairas, Anastasios

    2018-01-01

    This is a report of a case who was admitted and operated on for a strangulated femoral hernia. The hernia sac contained a gangrenous appendix, which was excised and the hernia was repaired with sutures without complication. De Garengeot's hernia, although very rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of cases with strangulated hernia and should receive the optimal treatment. PMID:29564329

  14. [Hernia surgery in urology: part 1: inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernias - fundamentals of clinical diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Franz, T; Schwalenberg, T; Dietrich, A; Müller, J; Stolzenburg, J-U

    2013-05-01

    Hernias are a common occurrence with correspondingly huge clinical and economic impacts on the healthcare system. The most common forms of hernia which need to be diagnosed and treated in routine urological work are inguinal and umbilical hernias. With the objective of reconstructing and stabilizing the inguinal canal there are the possibilities of open and minimally invasive surgery and both methods can be performed with suture or mesh repair. Indications for surgery of umbilical hernias are infrequent although this is possible with little effort under local anesthesia. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, diagnostics and therapy of inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernias.

  15. Current options in umbilical hernia repair in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Kulaçoğlu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical hernia is a rather common surgical problem. Elective repair after diagnosis is advised. Suture repairs have high recurrence rates; therefore, mesh reinforcement is recommended. Mesh can be placed through either an open or laparoscopic approach with good clinical results. Standard polypropylene mesh is suitable for the open onlay technique; however, composite meshes are required for laparoscopic repairs. Large seromas and surgical site infection are rather common complications that may result in recurrence. Obesity, ascites, and excessive weight gain following repair are obviously potential risk factors. Moreover, smoking may create a risk for recurrence. PMID:26504420

  16. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia as a part of Nance-Horan syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kammoun, Molka; Brady, Paul; De Catte, Luc; Deprest, Jan; Devriendt, Koenraad; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2018-03-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism, and intellectual disability. Here, we identify a patient with Nance-Horan syndrome caused by a new nonsense NHS variant. In addition, the patient presented congenital diaphragmatic hernia. NHS gene expression in murine fetal diaphragm was demonstrated, suggesting a possible involvement of NHS in diaphragm development. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia could result from NHS loss of function in pleuroperitoneal fold or in somites-derived muscle progenitor cells leading to an impairment of their cells migration.

  17. A preoperative hernia symptom score predicts inguinal hernia anatomy and outcomes after TEP repair.

    PubMed

    Knox, Robert D; Berney, Christophe R

    2015-02-01

    The Carolinas comfort scale (CCS) is an ideal tool for assessing patients’ quality-of-life post hernia repair, but its use has been barely investigated preoperatively. The aim was to quantify preoperative symptoms and assess their relevance in predicting postoperative clinical outcomes following totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair. The CCS was modified for preoperative use (modified or MCCS) by omitting mesh sensation questioning. Data collection was prospective over a 16 months period. (M)CCS questionnaires were completed preoperatively and at 2 then 6 weeks post repair. Intraoperative findings were also recorded. One hundred and four consecutive patients consented for TEP repair were included using a fibrin glue mesh fixation technique. All three questionnaires were completed by 88 patients (84.6 %). Preoperative MCCS scores did not differ with age, obesity, the presence of bilateral or recurrent inguinal herniae or hernia type. Higher MCCS grouping [OR 4.3 (95 % CI 1.5–12.6)] and the presence of bilateral herniae [OR 8.5 (1.2–61.8)] were predictors of persisting discomfort at 6 weeks, with lower scores on MCCS [OR 16.4 (3.9–67.6), obesity (OR 9.9 91.6–63.2)] and recurrent hernia repair [OR 11.4 (1.4–91.0)] predicting increased discomfort at 2 weeks versus preoperatively. MCCS scores were inversely correlated with the size of a direct defect (r −0.42, p = 0.011) but did not differ with the intraoperative finding of an incidental femoral and/or obturator hernia. Female sex was strongly associated with recognition of a synchronous incidental hernia (5 vs 57 %, p = 0.001). Pre- and post-operative scoring of hernia specific symptoms should be considered as part of routine surgical practice, to counsel patients on their expectations of pain and discomfort post repair and to select those who might be more appropriate for a watchful waiting approach. Females with inguinal hernia warrant complete assessment of their groin hernial orifices

  18. [Hernia surgery in urology. Part 2: parastomal, trocar and incisional hernias - fundamentals of clinical diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Franz, T; Schwalenberg, T; Dietrich, A; Müller, J; Stolzenburg, J-U

    2013-06-01

    Hernias are a common occurrence with a correspondingly huge clinical and economic impact on the healthcare system. Parastomal and trocar hernias are rare in routine urological work. The therapy of parastomal hernias remains problematic but basically the surgeon is able to use conventional techniques with suture repair or procedures with mesh implantation. The conventional parastomal hernia repair with mesh can be classified into sublay, onlay and intraperitoneal techniques. Furthermore, a relocation of the stoma is possible. Trocar hernias represent a rare but hazardous complication. Due to the increase in keyhole surgery there is also the danger of a rise in their occurrence. Incisional hernias occur frequently in patients who have undergone laparotomy and for repair different surgical techniques and types of meshes are available. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, diagnostic and therapy of parastomal, trocar and incisional hernias.

  19. Single-Port Onlay Mesh Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernias after Failed Anterior and Laparoscopic Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Despite the exponential increase in the use of laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, a growing number of patients are presenting with recurrent hernias after conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs have failed. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair of these hernias. Methods: Patients referred with two or more recurrences of inguinal hernia underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1, 2009, to June 24, 2014. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made, and an SIL port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques were used: chopstick and inline dissection, 5.5-mm/52-cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments. The peritoneum was incised above the pubic symphysis, and dissection was continued laterally and proximally, raising the inferior flap below the previous extraperitoneal mesh while reducing any direct, indirect, femoral, or cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh, which was fixed to the pubic ramus, as well as superiorly, with nonabsorbable tacks before the inferior border was fixed with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: Nine male patients underwent SIL-IPOM. Their mean age was 53 years and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes, with a hospital stay of 1 day. The umbilical scar length was 23 mm at the 6-week follow-up. There were no intra-/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence of the hernia during a mean follow-up of 24 months. Conclusion: Inguinal hernias recurring after two or more failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be safely and efficiently treated with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25848186

  20. Male infertility following inguinal hernia repair: a systematic review and pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Kordzadeh, A; Liu, M O; Jayanthi, N V

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to establish the clinical impact of open (mesh and/or without mesh) and laparoscopic hernia repair (transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAP) and/or totally extra-peritoneal (TEP)) on male fertility. The incidence of male infertility following various types of inguinal hernia repair is currently unknown. The lack of high-quality evidence has led to various speculations, suggestions and reliance on anecdotal experience in the clinical practice. An electronic search of the literature in Medline, Scopus, Embase and Cochrane library from 1966 to October 2015 according to PRISMA checklist was conducted. Quality assessment of articles was conducted using the Oxford Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) and their recommendation for practice was examined through National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). This resulted in ten studies (n = 10), comprising 35,740 patients. Sperm motility could be affected following any type and/or technique of inguinal hernia repair but this is limited to the immediate postoperative period (≤48 h). Obstructive azoospermia was noted in 0.03% of open and 2.5% of bilateral laparoscopic (TAP) hernia repair with mesh. Male infertility was detected in 0.8% of the open hernia repair (mesh) with no correlation to the type of mesh (lightweight vs. heavyweight). Inguinal hernia repair without mesh has no impact on male fertility and obstructive azoospermia. However, the use of mesh in bilateral open and/or laparoscopic repair may require the inclusion of male infertility as the part of informed consent in individuals that have not completed their family or currently under investigations.

  1. Transumbilical endoscopic surgery for incarcerated inguinal hernias in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuewu; Peng, Lei; Sha, Yongliang; Song, Daiqiang

    2014-01-01

    To describe transumbilical laparoscopic herniorrhaphy after unsuccessful attempted manual reduction of incarcerated inguinal hernias in infants and children. In our two hospitals, two-trocar transumbilical endoscopic surgery (TUES) is the standard technique used to repair incarcerated inguinal hernias in infants and children. Seventeen patients (aged 8months to 2.5years; median, 15months; 15 boys, 2 girls) with incarcerated inguinal hernias underwent urgent laparoscopy after unsuccessful attempted manual reduction. Two 3- or 5-mm trocars were inserted into the abdomen through two intraumbilical incisions, under laparoscopic guidance. The hernia was reduced by combined external manual pressure and internal pulling with bowel forceps. After inspection of the bowel, a round needle with a 2-0 nonabsorbable suture was introduced into the peritoneal cavity through the anterior abdominal wall near the internal inguinal ring. The hernial orifice was closed with an extraperitoneal purse-string suture around the internal inguinal ring, and tied with an intraperitoneal knot. A similar procedure was performed on the contralateral side if the processus vaginalis was patent. The TUES procedure was successful in all patients. No conversions to open surgery were required. The mean operating time was 30min (range, 25-40min). All patients were discharged on the second postoperative day. No complications such as postoperative bleeding, hydrocele, or scrotal edema were observed. The mean follow-up period was 15months. No cases of testicular atrophy, hypotrophy, or hernia recurrence were reported. Our preliminary experience with using TUES for the treatment of incarcerated inguinal hernias in infants and children had satisfactory outcomes. This technique appeared to be safe, effective, and reliable, and had excellent cosmetic results. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Serum MMP 2 and TIMP 2 in patients with inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Smigielski, Jacek; Brocki, Marian; Kuzdak, Krzysztof; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2011-06-01

      More than sixty thousand inguinal hernia operations are performed every year in Poland. Despite many years of related research, the exact pathologic mechanism of this condition is still not fully understood. Recent studies suggested a pronounced relationship between the molecular structure of collagen fibers and the activity of metalloproteinases, the enzymes taking part in the degradation of collagen, as well as their tissue inhibitors. A prospective study has been established to measure serum levels of the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and Matrix metalloproteinase tissue inhibitor 2 (TIMP-2) in 150 males between the ages of 26 and 70. The control group (CG) consisted of thirty healthy male volunteers of a similar age distribution. Our results indicate that MMP-2 was highest in the direct hernia group, a statistically very significant elevation (P<0(.) 05) of 1562ng mL(-1) against the CG 684ng mL(-1) . The highest level of TIMP, 78ng mL(-1) , was found in the group with recurrent hernia, against 49(.) 5ng mL(-1) of the CG (statistical significance of P<0(.) 05). The MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels were concurrently elevated only in the recurrent hernia group. The patients with inguinal hernia have a statistically significant increase in serum levels of MMP-2. Our finding of the MMP-2 and TIMP-2 distinctly higher in the patients suffering from recurrence of direct inguinal hernia (reflecting a previous surgical failure) may suggest the theory that the extracellular matrix defect lies at the basis of this disorder. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  3. Endoscopic repair of primary versus recurrent male unilateral inguinal hernias: Are there differences in the outcome?

    PubMed

    Köckerling, F; Jacob, D; Wiegank, W; Hukauf, M; Schug-Pass, C; Kuthe, A; Bittner, R

    2016-03-01

    To date, there are no prospective randomized studies that compare the outcome of endoscopic repair of primary versus recurrent inguinal hernias. It is therefore now attempted to answer that key question on the basis of registry data. In total, 20,624 patients were enrolled between September 1, 2009, and April 31, 2013. Of these patients, 18,142 (88.0%) had a primary and 2482 (12.0%) had a recurrent endoscopic repair. Only patients with male unilateral inguinal hernia and with a 1-year follow-up were included. The dependent variables were intra- and postoperative complications, reoperations, recurrence, and chronic pain rates. The results of unadjusted analyses were verified via multivariable analyses. Unadjusted analysis did not reveal any significant differences in the intraoperative complications (1.28 vs 1.33%; p = 0.849); however, there were significant differences in the postoperative complications (3.20 vs 4.03%; p = 0.036), the reoperation rate due to complications (0.84 vs 1.33%; p = 0.023), pain at rest (4.08 vs 6.16%; p < 0.001), pain on exertion (8.03 vs 11.44%; p < 0.001), chronic pain requiring treatment (2.31 vs 3.83%; p < 0.001), and the recurrence rates (0.94 vs 1.45%; p = 0.0023). Multivariable analysis confirmed the significant impact of endoscopic repair of recurrent hernia on the outcome. Comparison of perioperative and 1-year outcome for endoscopic repair of primary versus recurrent male unilateral inguinal hernia showed significant differences to the disadvantage of the recurrent operation. Therefore, endoscopic repair of recurrent inguinal hernias calls for particular competence on the part of the hernia surgeon.

  4. Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: lessons learned from 3,100 hernia repairs over 15 years.

    PubMed

    Dulucq, Jean-Louis; Wintringer, Pascal; Mahajna, Ahmad

    2009-03-01

    Two revolutions in inguinal hernia repair surgery have occurred during the last two decades. The first was the introduction of tension-free hernia repair by Liechtenstein in 1989 and the second was the application of laparoscopic surgery to the treatment of inguinal hernia in the early 1990s. The purposes of this study were to assess the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair and to discuss the technical changes that we faced on the basis of our accumulative experience. Patients who underwent an elective inguinal hernia repair at the Department of Abdominal Surgery at the Institute of Laparoscopic Surgery (ILS), Bordeaux, between June 1990 and May 2005 were enrolled retrospectively in this study. Patient demographic data, operative and postoperative course, and outpatient follow-up were studied. A total of 3,100 hernia repairs were included in the study. The majority of the hernias were repaired by TEP technique; the repair was done by transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair in only 3%. Eleven percent of the hernias were recurrences after conventional repair. Mean operative time was 17 min in unilateral hernia and 24 min in bilateral hernia. There were 36 hernias (1.2%) that required conversion: 12 hernias were converted to open anterior Liechtenstein and 24 to laparoscopic TAPP technique. The incidence of intraoperative complications was low. Most of the patients were discharged at the second day of the surgery. The overall postoperative morbidity rate was 2.2%. The incidence of recurrence rate was 0.35%. The recurrence rate for the first 200 repairs was 2.5%, but it decreased to 0.47% for the subsequent 1,254 hernia repairs According to our experience, in the hands of experienced laparoscopic surgeons, laparoscopic hernia repair seems to be the favored approach for most types of inguinal hernias. TEP is preferred over TAPP as the peritoneum is not violated and there are fewer intra-abdominal complications.

  5. Glue versus suture for mesh fixation in inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Shruthi; Jeyakumar, S; Ganapathy, Tharun

    2018-03-22

    Inguinal hernia is one of the most common surgical problem presenting to the surgical OPD. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for inguinal hernia today. Surgery for inguinal hernia has undergone a great evolution over a period of several centuries. Lichenstein's tension free hernioplasty is the one of the first surgeries taught to a surgical resident. The main aim of surgeries in this era is to give the best possible results with the least possible pain, scar and time. This has given rise to so many modifications to the classical Lichenstein's procedure and also to laparoscopic hernioplasty. Pain after inguinal hernia surgery is found to be debilitating and altering the quality of life in several patients, which has been attributed to the traumatic fixation of the mesh with sutures. This has paved way to the development of various atraumatic methods of fixation, tissue glue is one such development. Hence this study, to compare traumatic and atraumatic methods of mesh fixation in inguinal hernia repair. The aim of this study was to compare suture fixation versus tissue glue fixation of the mesh in inguinal hernia repair. Primary objective was to compare the immediate and chronic post-operative pain. Secondary objective was to compare the time taken for the procedure by the two methods in use and also to compare the presence of any complications. and methodology: This study was done in the General Surgery department of XXX hospital, medical college and research centre, kattangulathur after Ethics committee clearance. It is a single blinded study. The study was done on 51 patients consenting for the study and meeting the inclusion criterias from the period of March 2016 to August 2017 out of which 26 were selected for glue mesh fixation and 25 for suture mesh fixation according to simple randomization. The suture group patients underwent classical Lichenstein's tension free hernioplasty and the glue group underwent Lichenstein's hernioplasty with glue where dots of

  6. Sports hernias: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Caudill, P; Nyland, J; Smith, C; Yerasimides, J; Lach, J

    2008-12-01

    This review summarises the existing knowledge about pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, conservative treatment, surgery and post-surgical rehabilitation of sports hernias. Sports hernias occur more often in men, usually during athletic activities that involve cutting, pivoting, kicking and sharp turns, such as those that occur during soccer, ice hockey or football. Sports hernias generally present an insidious onset, but with focused questioning a specific inciting incident may be identified. The likely causative factor is posterior inguinal wall weakening from excessive or high repetition shear forces applied through the pelvic attachments of poorly balanced hip adductor and abdominal muscle activation. There is currently no consensus as to what specifically constitutes this diagnosis. As it can be difficult to make a definitive diagnosis based on conventional physical examination, other methods, such as MRI and diagnostic ultrasonography are often used, primarily to exclude other conditions. Surgery seems to be more effective than conservative treatment, and laparoscopic techniques generally enable a quicker recovery time than open repair. However, in addition to better descriptions of surgical anatomy and procedures and conservative and post-surgical rehabilitation, well-designed research studies are needed, which include more detailed serial patient outcome measurements in addition to basing success solely on return to sports activity timing. Only with this information will we better understand sports hernia pathogenesis, verify superior surgical approaches, develop evidence-based screening and prevention strategies, and more effectively direct both conservative and post-surgical rehabilitation.

  7. Retrofascial mesh repair of ventral incisional hernias.

    PubMed

    Le, Hamilton; Bender, Jeffrey S

    2005-03-01

    Recurrence rates after ventral incisional hernia repair are reported to be as high as 33% and are associated with considerable morbidity and lost time. The purpose of this study was to determine if retrofascial mesh placement reduces the incidence of recurrence as well as the severity of wound infections. A prospective database covering the period from January 1995 to June 2003 was maintained. All patients underwent a standardized technique by a single surgeon. Polypropylene mesh was placed between the fascia and the peritoneum with the fascia closed over the mesh. There were 150 patients (126 women, 24 men) with a mean age of 55 years. Their average weight was 88 kg, with an average body mass index of 32. Sixty-three (42%) of the hernias were recurrences of a previous repair. The average size of the hernia was 8 x 14 cm. There was 1 postoperative mortality. There was a 9% postoperative infection rate with 2 patients (1%) requiring mesh removal. Long-term follow-up evaluation has revealed 3 recurrences (2%) and 3 readmissions for bowel obstruction with 1 patient requiring surgical release. There were no fistulas noted. Incisional hernia repair with mesh placed in the retrofascial position decreases both the risk for recurrence and the severity of wound infection without significant problems from bowel obstruction or enteric fistula.

  8. Congenital Morgagni's hernia: a national multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Al-Salem, Ahmed H; Zamakhshary, Mohammed; Al Mohaidly, Mohammed; Al-Qahtani, Aayed; Abdulla, Mohamed Ramadan; Naga, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2014-04-01

    Congenital Morgagni's hernia (CMH) is rare and represents less than 5% of all congenital diaphragmatic hernias. This is a national review of our experience with CMH outlining clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, associated anomalies, treatment, and outcome. The medical records of all patients with the diagnosis of CMH treated at four pediatric surgery units in Saudi Arabia were retrospectively reviewed for age at diagnosis, sex, presenting symptoms, associated anomalies, diagnosis, operative findings, treatment, and outcome. During a 20-year period (January 1990-December 2010), 53 infants and children with CMH were treated. There were 38 males and 15 females. Their age at diagnosis ranged from 1 month to 9 years (mean 22.2 months). Forty-three (81%) presented with recurrent chest infection. Twenty-two (44.5%) had right CMH, 15 (28.3%) had left-sided hernia and 16 (30.2%) had bilateral hernia. In 7, the diagnosis of bilaterality was made at the time of surgery. Associated anomalies were seen in 38 (71.7%). Twenty-one (39.6%) had congenital heart disease, 8 (15%) had malrotation, and 15 (28.3%) had Down syndrome. All were operated on. Twenty-nine (54.7%) underwent repair via an open approach. The remaining 24 (45.3%) underwent repair using minimal invasive surgery, laparoscopic-assisted hernia repair (19 patients) or totally laparoscopic approach (5 patients). At the time of surgery, the hernia sac content included the colon in 33 (62.3%), part of the left lobe of the liver in 13 (24.5%), the small intestines in 11 (20.75%), the omentum in 5 (9.4%), and the stomach in 4 (7.5%). In 12 (22.6%), the hernia sac was empty. When compared to the open repair, the laparoscopic-assisted approach was associated with a shorter operative time, an earlier commencement of feeds, less requirement for postoperative analgesia, a shorter hospital stay, and better cosmetic appearance. There was no mortality. On follow-up, 2 (7%) of the open surgical group developed recurrence

  9. Inguinal Hernia in Athletes: Role of Dynamic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Vasileff, William Kelton; Nekhline, Mikhail; Kolowich, Patricia A; Talpos, Gary B; Eyler, Willam R; van Holsbeeck, Marnix

    Inguinal hernia is a commonly encountered cause of pain in athletes. Because of the anatomic complexity, lack of standard imaging, and the dynamic condition, there is no unified opinion explaining its underlying pathology. Athletes with persistent groin pain would have a high prevalence of inguinal hernia with dynamic ultrasound, and herniorrhaphy would successfully return athletes to activity. Case-control study. Level 3. Forty-seven amateur and professional athletes with sports-related groin pain who underwent ultrasound were selected based on history and examination. Patients with prior groin surgery or hip pathology were excluded. Clinical and surgical documentation were correlated with imaging. The study group was compared with 41 age-matched asymptomatic athletes. Ultrasound was positive for hernia with movement of bowel, bladder, or omental tissue anterior to the inferior epigastric vessels during Valsalva maneuver. The 47-patient symptomatic study group included 41 patients with direct inguinal hernias, 1 with indirect inguinal hernia, and 5 with negative ultrasound. Of 42 patients with hernia, 39 significantly improved with herniorrhaphy, 2 failed to improve after surgery and were diagnosed with adductor longus tears, and 1 improved with physical therapy. Five patients with negative ultrasound underwent magnetic resonance imaging and were diagnosed with hip labral tear or osteitis pubis. The 41-patient asymptomatic control group included 3 patients with direct inguinal hernias, 2 with indirect inguinal hernias, and 3 with femoral hernias. Inguinal hernias are a major component of groin pain in athletes. Prevalence of direct inguinal hernia in symptomatic athletes was greater than that for controls ( P < 0.001). Surgery was successful in returning these athletes to sport: 39 of 42 (93%) athletes with groin pain and inguinal hernia became asymptomatic. Persistent groin pain in the athlete may relate to inguinal hernia, which can be diagnosed with dynamic

  10. Prevention of parastomal hernia with a preperitoneal polypropelene mesh.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Hernández, Javier; Díaz Milanés, Juan Antonio; Capitán Morales, Luis Cristóbal; Del Río la Fuente, Francisco Javier; Torres Arcos, Cristina; Cañete Gómez, Jesús; Oliva Mompeán, Fernando; Padillo Ruiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    To show our results with the use of a polypropylene mesh at the stoma site, as prophylaxis of parastomal hernias in patients with rectal cancer when a terminal colostomy is performed. From January 2010 until March 2014, 45 consecutive patients with rectal cancer, underwent surgical treatment with the need of a terminal colostomy. A prophylactic mesh was placed in a sublay position at the stoma site in all cases. We analyze Demographics, technical issues and effectiveness of the procedure, as well as subsequent complications. A prophylactic mesh was placed in 45 patients, 35 male and 10 females, mean age of 66.2 (47-88) and Body Mass Index 29.19 (20.4-40.6). A total of 7 middle rectal carcinoma, 36 low rectal carcinoma, one rectal melanoma and one squamous cell anal carcinoma were electively treated with identical protocol. Abdominoperineal resection was performed in 38 patients, and low anterior resection with terminal colostomy in 7. An open approach was elected in 39 patients and laparoscopy in 6, with 2 conversions to open surgery. Medium follow up was 22 months (2.1-53). Overall, 3 parastomal hernias (6.66%) were found, one of which was a radiological finding with no clinical significance. No complications related to the mesh or the colostomy were found. The use of a prophylactic polypropylene mesh placed in a sublay position at the stoma site is a safe and feasible technique. It lowers the incidence of parastomal hernias with no increased morbidity. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Congenital cranial ventral abdominal hernia, peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia and sternal cleft in a 4-year-old multiparous pregnant queen

    PubMed Central

    Bismuth, Camille; Deroy, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Case summary Cranial ventral midline hernias, most often congenital, can be associated with other congenital abnormalities, such as sternal, diaphragmatic or cardiac malformations. A 4-year-old multiparous queen with a substernal hernia was admitted for evaluation of a mammary mass. During CT examination, a bifid sternum, the abdominal hernia containing the intestines, spleen, omentum, three fetuses, a mammary mass and an incidental peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia were identified. Surgery consisted of a standard ovariohysterectomy and repair of the peritoneopericardial hernia. Primary closure of the abdominal hernia was attempted but deemed impossible even after the ovariohysterectomy, splenectomy and a partial omentectomy. An external abdominal oblique muscle flap was used to close with no tension on the cranial part of the hernia. One month postoperatively, the queen had no respiratory abnormalities and the herniorrhaphy was fully healed. Relevance and novel information This case is the first description of a 4-year-old multiparous pregnant queen with complex congenital malformations and surgical correction of a peritoneopericardial hernia and a 6 × 8 cmsubsternal hernia with an external abdominal oblique muscle flap. Life-threatening sequelae associated with large abdominal hernias can be attributed to space-occupying effects known as loss of domain and compartment syndrome, which is why a muscle flap was used in this case. The sternal cleft was not repaired because of the size of the cleft and the age of the cat. PMID:29318024

  12. Analysis of model development strategies: predicting ventral hernia recurrence.

    PubMed

    Holihan, Julie L; Li, Linda T; Askenasy, Erik P; Greenberg, Jacob A; Keith, Jerrod N; Martindale, Robert G; Roth, J Scott; Liang, Mike K

    2016-11-01

    There have been many attempts to identify variables associated with ventral hernia recurrence; however, it is unclear which statistical modeling approach results in models with greatest internal and external validity. We aim to assess the predictive accuracy of models developed using five common variable selection strategies to determine variables associated with hernia recurrence. Two multicenter ventral hernia databases were used. Database 1 was randomly split into "development" and "internal validation" cohorts. Database 2 was designated "external validation". The dependent variable for model development was hernia recurrence. Five variable selection strategies were used: (1) "clinical"-variables considered clinically relevant, (2) "selective stepwise"-all variables with a P value <0.20 were assessed in a step-backward model, (3) "liberal stepwise"-all variables were included and step-backward regression was performed, (4) "restrictive internal resampling," and (5) "liberal internal resampling." Variables were included with P < 0.05 for the Restrictive model and P < 0.10 for the Liberal model. A time-to-event analysis using Cox regression was performed using these strategies. The predictive accuracy of the developed models was tested on the internal and external validation cohorts using Harrell's C-statistic where C > 0.70 was considered "reasonable". The recurrence rate was 32.9% (n = 173/526; median/range follow-up, 20/1-58 mo) for the development cohort, 36.0% (n = 95/264, median/range follow-up 20/1-61 mo) for the internal validation cohort, and 12.7% (n = 155/1224, median/range follow-up 9/1-50 mo) for the external validation cohort. Internal validation demonstrated reasonable predictive accuracy (C-statistics = 0.772, 0.760, 0.767, 0.757, 0.763), while on external validation, predictive accuracy dipped precipitously (C-statistic = 0.561, 0.557, 0.562, 0.553, 0.560). Predictive accuracy was equally adequate on internal validation among

  13. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a case of patau syndrome: a rare association.

    PubMed

    A, Jain; P, Kumar; A, Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions.. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  14. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Case of Patau Syndrome: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    A, Jain; P, Kumar; A, Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions.. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities. PMID:26034714

  15. A GIANT RETROPERITONEAL LIPOMA PRESENTING AS A SCIATIC HERNIA: MRI FINDINGS.

    PubMed

    Duran, S; Cavusoglu, M; Elverici, E; Unal, T D

    2015-01-01

    Sciatic hernia is a rare condition and its clinical diagnosis is uneasy. Herniation of pelvic organs as well as of retroperitoneal neoplasm has been reported in the literature. Sciatica occurs as a result of compression of the sciatic nerve by the herniated sac. We present a case of retroperitoneal lipoma in a patient who had lower leg complaint and describe the imaging findings.

  16. Local anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair step-by-step procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Amid, P K; Shulman, A G; Lichtenstein, I L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors introduce a simple six-step infiltration technique that results in satisfactory local anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia, requiring a maximum of 30 to 40 mL of local anesthetic solution. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA. For the last 20 years, more than 12,000 groin hernia repairs have been performed under local anesthesia at the Lichtenstein Hernia Institute. Initially, field block was the mean of achieving local anesthesia. During the last 5 years, a simple infiltration technique has been used because the field block was more time consuming and required larger volume of the local anesthetic solution. Furthermore, because of the blind nature of the procedure, it did not always result in satisfactory anesthesia and, at times, accidental needle puncture of the ilioinguinal nerve resulted in prolonged postoperative pain, burning, or electric shock sensation within the field of the ilioinguinal nerve innervation. METHODS. More than 12,000 patients underwent operations in a private practice setting in general hospitals. RESULTS. For 2 decades, more than 12,000 adult patients with reducible groin hernias satisfactorily underwent operations under local anesthesia without complications. CONCLUSIONS. The preferred choice of anesthesia for all reducible adult inguinal hernia repair is local. It is safe, simple, effective, and economical, without postanesthesia side effects. Furthermore, local anesthesia administered before the incision produces longer postoperative analgesia because local infiltration, theoretically, inhibits build-up of local nociceptive molecules and, therefore, there is better pain control in the postoperative period. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:7986138

  17. Treatment of umbilical hernia and recti muscles diastasis without a periumbilical incision.

    PubMed

    Kulhanek, J; Mestak, O

    2013-08-01

    Postpartum rectus diastasis eventually combined with umbilical hernia is a condition that is frequently treated by plastic surgeons and general surgeons. Standard treatment of this condition is abdominoplasty with a periumbilical incision, which often results in an umbilical incision or an inverted-T scar. Limited incision abdominoplasty differs from traditional abdominoplasty by disconnecting the umbilical stalk from the abdominal wall during flap dissection, thus allowing the resection of excess skin above and under the umbilicus without causing periumbilical scarring. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women undergoing a limited scar abdominoplasty without a periumbilical incision for the treatment of a separation of the recti muscles and/or an umbilical hernia. We recorded the postoperative complications and patient satisfaction with the results of the treatment. We operated on 50 patients from 2002 to 2010. We followed the patients for 2-8 years. The most common complication, as with other abdominoplasty procedures, was minor dehiscention in the middle part of the wound, which occurred in 16 % (n = 8) of the patients. All of these complications were treated conservatively. No recurrence of diastasis or umbilical hernia was observed. Extended miniabdominoplasty with a low suprapubic incision and umbilical caudalization for treating the diastasis of the abdominal rectus muscles and/or an umbilical hernia is an excellent method that results in a small, hidden scar. This method is especially beneficial for young, slim women with an abdominal wall deformity after pregnancy.

  18. A Ureteral Inguinoscrotal Hernia from a Pelvic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Dikmen, Ayse V.; Guneri, Cagri; Yalcin, Serdar; Acikgoz, Onur; Ak, Esat; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2017-01-01

    A 74-year-old male patient with prostate cancer under remission was admitted with left inguinoscrotal swelling. He underwent scrotal ultrasound demonstrating a giant in-guinoscrotal hernia. Contrast-enhanced computerized tomography of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a left pelvic kidney associated with severe hydroureteronephrosis secondary to a ureteral inguinoscrotal hernia. Upon exploration with left inguinal incision, a paraperitoneal ureteral in-guinoscrotal hernia and a hypertrophic left spermatic cord were observed. The elongated and tortuous left ureter, being pulled down to the scrotum by the hernia, was released from the herniating tissues fullfilling left hemiscrotum. The ureter was tapered followed by ureteroureterostomy. The accompanying left spermatic cord was excessively elongated and curled, necessitating cordectomy. The hernia was repaired with prolene mesh after removal of herniating peritoneal tissue. This is a rare case of a paraperitoneal ureteral inguinoscrotal hernia of the left pelvic kidney. PMID:29463977

  19. A case of De Garengeot hernia requiring early surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chao-Wen; Tsao, Min-Jen; Su, Ming-Shan

    2015-01-01

    De Garengeot hernia is a rare clinical entity defined as the presence of a vermiform appendix within a femoral hernia sac. A 50-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a painful lump over her right groin region. A bedside ultrasound was performed and soft tissue lesion was suspected. CT was performed and revealed a swollen tubular structure with fat stranding within the mass. De Garengeot hernia with acute appendicitis was diagnosed preoperatively, and an emergency appendectomy and hernioplasty were performed. Although it is usually an incidental finding during hernioplasty, De Garengeot hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with an incarcerated femoral hernia. Mesh repair can be performed depending on the clinical situation. We report a rare case of incarcerated femoral hernia with acute appendicitis that required early surgical management to avoid associated complications. PMID:26199302

  20. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a modern day approach.

    PubMed

    Waag, Karl-Ludwig; Loff, Steffan; Zahn, Katrin; Ali, Mansour; Hien, Steffen; Kratz, Markus; Neff, Wolfgang; Schaffelder, Regine; Schaible, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Centralization of all complicated congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH) was organized in Germany from 1998, collecting 325 consecutive patients with striking increasing survival rates. This series report 244 patients from 2002 to 2007. Today, large defects are detected early in pregnancy by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) patients, prenatal lung head ratio (LHR) was 1.2 (median) at the 34th week of gestation or less than 25 ml lung tissue in MRI. This means that all patients below LHR of 1.4 should be transferred prenatally in a tertiary center. High risk group for survival was defined as LHR below 0.9, ie, 10 ml in MRI planimetry. Inborn patients show better results than outborns. In algorithm therapy, gentle ventilation plays an important role in preventing damage to the lung tissue and avoiding long term ventilation. When PaCO(2) was more than 75 mmHg, ventilation was changed to high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Indication for ECMO was seen in preductal PaO(2) less than 50 mmHg over 2-4 h or less than 40 mmHg over 2 h. ECMO related risks included intracerebral bleeding (9%), intrapulmonary bleeding (14%), and convulsions (16%). Surgically, a longitudinal midline incision for exposure of the defect, the duodenal kinking, and probably for abdominal patching was perfect. A cone formed goretex patch provided more abdominal space and reduced abundant intrathoracical cavity. No drain was used. Postoperative complications were described. Overall survival in 244 consecutive patients was 86.5% for all patients born alive. All those who needed ECMO survived in 71%, underlining ECMO as a treatment of last choice. Follow-up for quality of life after CDH is described.

  1. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernia with Biomimetic Matrix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Materials utilized for the repair of hernias fall into 2 broad categories, synthetics and biologics. Each has its merits and drawbacks. The synthetics have a permanent, inherent strength but are associated with some incidence of chronic pain. The biologics rely on variable tissue regeneration to give strength to the repair, limiting their use to specific situations. However, thanks to their transient presence and tissue ingrowth, the biologics do not result in a significant incidence of chronic pain. We studied the use of a biomimetic (REVIVE, Biomerix Corporation, Fremont, CA) in this setting in an attempt to obviate the disadvantages of each material. Methods: Fourteen patients underwent laparoscopic repair by totally extraperitoneal and transabdominal preperitoneal techniques of 16 inguinal hernias. Follow-up was as long as 19 mo, and 8 patients were followed for > 12 mo. There were no recurrences and a 5% incidence of functionally insignificant discomfort. Results: REVIVE is shown in histology and in vivo to demonstrate regeneration and tissue ingrowth into the polycarbonate/polyuria matrix similar to that in the biologics rather than scarring or encapsulation. There were no recurrences, indicating its strength and resilience as a permanent repair similar to that in the synthetics. Conclusion: This is proof of the concept that a biomimetic may bridge the gap between the biologics and synthetics and may be able to be utilized on a regular basis with the benefits of both materials and without their drawbacks. PMID:23484565

  2. Parastomal hernia mesh repair, variant of surgical technique without stoma relocation

    PubMed Central

    Guriţă, P; Popa, R; Bălălău, B; Scăunaşu, R

    2012-01-01

    Rationale:Due to the improvement of prognosis through adjuvant therapy, the life expectancy of neoplasia patients is continuously increasing, which, in conjunction with the progressive occurrence of parastomal hernias during the disease evolution, explains the growing number of reported parastomal hernias affecting patients with permanent colostomy. Conventional techniques of local repair are inappropriate considering the high recurrence rate, and the decision of stoma relocation depends on the associated pathology, which may counter-indicate general anesthesia, and on previous surgical interventions that are usually followed by a dense peritoneal adhesion syndrome . Objective:The purpose of this article is to make known a variant of alloplastic technique, without translocation, with a low degree of invasiveness, which can be performed successfully under spinal anesthesia, followed by a reduced period of hospitalization. Methods and Results:The study group consisted of 6 patients with permanent left iliac anus who underwent these interventions one to three years prior to the occurrence of parastomal hernia. Patients were followed at 1 year and 2 years postoperatively and the results were favorable, with no recurrence and improved quality of life through proper prosthesis of the stoma Discussion:We suggest that this technique variation is applied to small and medium parastomal hernias, in case of patients with permanent left iliac anus, with the declared intent of minimal invasiveness. PMID:22802882

  3. Meta-analysis of Prolene Hernia System mesh versus Lichtenstein mesh in open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, Pandanaboyana; Watt, David G; Ogston, Simon A; Alijani, Afshin; Windsor, John A

    2012-10-01

    This study was designed to systematically analyse all published randomized clinical trials comparing the Prolene Hernia System (PHS) mesh and Lichtenstein mesh for open inguinal hernia repair. A literature search was performed using the Cochrane Colorectal Cancer Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index Expanded. Randomized trials comparing the Lichtenstein Mesh repair (LMR) with the Prolene Hernia System were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager Version 5.1 software. The primary outcome measures were hernia recurrence and chronic pain after operation. Secondary outcome measures included surgical time, peri-operative complications, time to return to work, early and long-term postoperative complications. Six randomized clinical trials were identified as suitable, containing 1313 patients. There was no statistical difference between the two types of repair in operation time, time to return to work, incidence of chronic groin pain, hernia recurrence or long-term complications. The PHS group had a higher rate of peri-operative complications, compared to Lichtenstein mesh repair (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.93, P=0.01). The use of PHS mesh was associated with an increased risk of peri-operative complications compared to LMR. Both mesh repair techniques have comparable short- and long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Made in Italy for hernia: the Italian history of groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Negro, Paolo; Gossetti, Francesco; Ceci, Francesca; D'Amore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The history of groin hernia surgery is as long as the history of surgery. For many centuries doctors, anatomists and surgeons have been devoted to this pathology, afflicting the mankind throughout its evolution. Since ancient times the Italian contribution has been very important with many representative personalities. Authors, investigators and pioneers are really well represented. Every period (the classic period, the Middle Age, the Renaissance and the post-Renaissance) opened new perspectives for a better understanding. During the 18th century, more information about groin anatomy, mainly due to Antonio Scarpa, prepared the Bassini revolution. Edoardo Bassini developed the first modern anatomically based hernia repair. This procedure spread worldwide becoming the most performed surgical technique. After World War II synthetic meshes were introduced and a new era has begun for hernia repair, once again with the support of Italian surgeons, first of all Ermanno Trabucco. But Italian contribution extends also to educational, with the first national school for abdominal wall surgery starting in Rome, and to Italian participation and support in international scientific societies. Authors hereby wish to resume this long history highlighting the "made in Italy" for groin hernia surgery. Bassini, Groin hernia, History, Prosthetic repair.

  5. [Valenti method (PAD) as an assesment of polypropylene mesh fixing standarization in inguinal hernia repair].

    PubMed

    Mitura, Kryspin; Romańczuk, Mikołaj

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of synthetic materials in hernia surgery allowed accomplishing of the improved results. Modern procedures are based on tension-free technique. This rule has been entirely applied in the innovative Valenti hernia repair method--PAD (dynamic self-adapting prosthesis). To evaluate the initial results of performed treatment after Valenti inguinal hernia repair. Valenti hernia repair has been performed in 78 patients with inguinal hernia at Surgery Department in Siedlce Hospital between September 2006 and October 2007. The study consisted 73 male patients (93.6%) and 5 female patients (6.4%) aged between 27 and 82 years (average 56.3). Two complementary elements of mesh graft were applied at the surgery. Appropriate shape of polypropylene mesh has being acquired with the use of a special mold. We have analyzed the duration of the surgery and hospitalization, the occurrence of complications during and after the surgery, patients subjective evaluation of the surgery regarding pain and time of returning to normal physical activity, as well as hernia recurrence. Average duration time of surgery was 58 minutes (ranging from 35 to 110; median 50). The spinal anesthesia was a predominant type of anesthesia (71 patients: 91%), in remaining patients a general or local anesthesia has been performed. Mean hospitalization time reached 3.6 days (ranging from 2 to 6: median 4). One patient had a wound hematoma, in one case a scrotal edema was found in early postoperative period. No other typical local complications have developed. One week after the surgery patients described the pain intensification in ten-points scale VAS (0--no pain, 10--maximum pain). Most of the patients had no pain complaints (48 patients), VAS 1--23 patients. VAS 2--6 patients. VAS 3--1 patient. At this point 63 patients described the surgery results as very good. 15 patients--as good. The return to full daily activity has been achieved in 2.7 day after the surgery. Totally tension-free method

  6. Low Level Laser Therapy for Patients with Cervical Disk Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Okuni, Ikuko; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Harada, Takashi; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Ohshiro, Toshio; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Musya, Yoshiro

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic shoulder joint pain, elbow, hand and finger pain, and low back pain. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic neck pain. Materials and Methods: Over a 3 year period, 26 rehabilitation department outpatients with chronic neck pain, diagnosed as being caused by cervical disk hernia, underwent treatment applied to the painful area with a 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device delivering at 830 nm in continuous wave, 20.1 J/cm2/point, and three shots were given per session (1 treatment) with twice a week for 4 weeks. Results: 1. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (p<0.001). 2. After treatment, no significant differences in cervical spine range of motion were observed. 3. Discussions with the patients revealed that in order to receive continued benefits from treatment, it was important for them to be taught how to avoid postures that would cause them neck pain in everyday life. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that LLLT was an effective form of treatment for neck and back pain caused by cervical disk hernia, reinforced by postural training. PMID:24511189

  7. The economic burden of incisional ventral hernia repair: a multicentric cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Gillion, J-F; Sanders, D; Miserez, M; Muysoms, F

    2016-12-01

    A systematic review of literature led us to take note that little was known about the costs of incisional ventral hernia repair (IVHR). Therefore we wanted to assess the actual costs of IVHR. The total costs are the sum of direct (hospital costs) and indirect (sick leave) costs. The direct costs were retrieved from a multi-centric cost analysis done among a large panel of 51 French public hospitals, involving 3239 IVHR. One hundred and thirty-two unitary expenditure items were thoroughly evaluated by the accountants of a specialized public agency (ATIH) dedicated to investigate the costs of the French Health Care system. The indirect costs (costs of the post-operative inability to work and loss of profit due to the disruption in the ongoing work) were estimated from the data the Hernia Club registry, involving 790 patients, and over a large panel of different Collective Agreements. The mean total cost for an IVHR in France in 2011 was estimated to be 6451€, ranging from 4731€ for unemployed patients to 10,107€ for employed patients whose indirect costs (5376€) were slightly higher than the direct costs. Reducing the incidence of incisional hernia after abdominal surgery with 5 % for instance by implementation of the European Hernia Society Guidelines on closure of abdominal wall incisions, or maybe even by use of prophylactic mesh augmentation in high risk patients could result in a national cost savings of 4 million Euros.

  8. A Review of the Surgical Management of Perineal Hernias in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sukhjit Singh; Barstad, Robert D

    2018-05-14

    Perineal hernia refers to the failure of the muscular pelvic diaphragm to support the rectal wall, resulting in herniation of pelvic and, occasionally, abdominal viscera into the subcutaneous perineal region. The proposed causes of pelvic diaphragm weakness include tenesmus associated with chronic prostatic disease or constipation, myopathy, rectal abnormalities, and gonadal hormonal imbalances. The most common presentation of perineal hernia in dogs is a unilateral or bilateral nonpainful swelling of the perineum. Clinical signs do occur, but not always. Clinical signs may include constipation, obstipation, dyschezia, tenesmus, rectal prolapse, stranguria, or anuria. The definitive diagnosis of perineal hernia is based on clinical signs and findings of weak pelvic diaphragm musculature during a digital rectal examination. In dogs, perineal hernias are mostly treated by surgical intervention. Appositional herniorrhaphy is sometimes difficult to perform as the levator ani and coccygeus muscles are atrophied and unsuitable for use. Internal obturator muscle transposition is the most commonly used technique. Additional techniques include superficial gluteal and semitendinosus muscle transposition, in addition to the use of synthetic implants and biomaterials. Pexy techniques may be used to prevent rectal prolapse and bladder and prostate gland displacement. Postoperative care involves analgesics, antibiotics, a low-residue diet, and stool softeners.

  9. A prospective randomized study comparing laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) versus Lichtenstein repair for bilateral inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Ielpo, Benedetto; Duran, Hipolito; Diaz, Eduardo; Fabra, Isabel; Caruso, Riccardo; Malavé, Luis; Ferri, Valentina; Lazzaro, Sara; Kalivaci, Denis; Quijano, Yolanda; Vicente, Emilio

    2017-07-19

    In literature, only a few studies have prospectively compared the results of laparoscopic with open inguinal hernia repair yet none have compared bilateral inguinal hernia repair. The aim of this study is to compare the open Lichtenstein repair (OLR) with laparoscopic trans-abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair in patients undergoing surgery for bilateral inguinal hernia. Patients were prospectively randomized between March 2013 and March 2015. Outcome parameters included hospital stay, operation time, postoperative complications, immediate postoperative pain and chronic pain, recurrence and quality of life. Sixty-one patients underwent TAPP repair and 73 underwent OLR. TAPP procedure had less early post-operative pain up to 7 days from surgery (p = 0.003), a shorter length of hospital stay (p = 0.001), less postoperative complications (p = 0.012) and less chronic pain (0.04) when compared with the OLR approach. TAPP procedure for bilateral inguinal hernia effectively reduces early postoperative pain, hospital stay and postoperative complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Parastomal hernia mesh repair, variant of surgical technique without stoma relocation.

    PubMed

    Guriţă, P; Popa, R; Bălălău, B; Scăunaşu, R

    2012-06-12

    Due to the improvement of prognosis through adjuvant therapy, the life expectancy of neoplasia patients is continuously increasing, which, in conjunction with the progressive occurrence of parastomal hernias during the disease evolution, explains the growing number of reported parastomal hernias affecting patients with permanent colostomy. Conventional techniques of local repair are inappropriate considering the high recurrence rate, and the decision of stoma relocation depends on the associated pathology, which may counter-indicate general anesthesia, and on previous surgical interventions that are usually followed by a dense peritoneal adhesion syndrome. The purpose of this article is to make known a variant of alloplastic technique, without translocation, with a low degree of invasiveness, which can be performed successfully under spinal anesthesia, followed by a reduced period of hospitalization. The study group consisted of 6 patients with permanent left iliac anus who underwent these interventions one to three years prior to the occurrence of parastomal hernia. Patients were followed at 1 year and 2 years postoperatively and the results were favorable, with no recurrence and improved quality of life through proper prosthesis of the stoma. We suggest that this technique variation is applied to small and medium parastomal hernias, in case of patients with permanent left iliac anus, with the declared intent of minimal invasiveness.

  11. Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix presenting as an umbilical hernia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bingbing; Meng, Xiangchao; Cao, Z I; Guo, Chunli; Zhang, Zili

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix is a rare condition that develops as a result of proliferation of mucin-secreting cells in an occluded appendix. Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix presenting as an umbilical hernia is a rare clinical entity. The most common causes of this condition are known to be ascites, hepatitis and cirrhosis; however, the patient in the present study, was diagnosed as hepatitis- and cirrhosis-negative, with no history of chronic coughing or constipation. The aim of the present study was to report a rare case of mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix presenting as an umbilical hernia in a 66-year-old female patient. The patient had a 6-month history of a reducible mass in the umbilical region and was diagnosed with umbilical hernia. Computed tomography and ultrasonography were performed and revealed massive ascites. Ultimately, a laparoscopic appendectomy was performed and borderline mucinous appendiceal cystadenoma of low malignant potential was confirmed. In addition, the present study discussed the association between mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix and umbilical hernia, as well as the diagnostic process and treatment strategies.

  12. [Without Net and Double Floor: Comparison of Umbilical Hernia Repair by Spitzy in Children and Adults].

    PubMed

    Kuck, Laura; Seitz, Florian; Wiegering, Armin; Dietz, Ulrich; Meyer, Thomas

    2017-11-22

    Summary Umbilical hernia occur in both adults and children. For over 100 years, umbilical hernia in children has been treated surgically by the Spitzy method. With adult patients, meshes are being increasingly used. The purpose of our study was to analyse Spitzy herniotomy with respect to the recurrence rate in children and adults. Material and Methods Over a period of 7 years, 383 children (age < 16 years) with umbilical hernia were treated surgically; after applying the exclusion criteria, 370 patients were evaluated. At the same time, 106 adult patients (age > 16 years) were operated for an umbilical hernia: 31 patients were treated with direct suture and thus are included in our study as comparison group. Results The young patients had an average age of 33.81 months and were 44% female and 56% male. After direct Spitzy suture, a low recurrence rate of 1.1% (n = 4) in infancy could be achieved. The average age of the adult patients was 54.55 years; 32% were female, 68% male. In comparison to the group of children, the recurrence rate in adult surgery was 12.9% (n = 4) after direct suture. Conclusion As confirmed in our study, umbilical herniotomy by direct suture in childhood has been the method of choice and gold standard for more than 100 years. Mesh implantation is still not necessary in childhood. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix presenting as an umbilical hernia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    REN, BINGBING; MENG, XIANGCHAO; CAO, ZI; GUO, CHUNLI; ZHANG, ZILI

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix is a rare condition that develops as a result of proliferation of mucin-secreting cells in an occluded appendix. Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix presenting as an umbilical hernia is a rare clinical entity. The most common causes of this condition are known to be ascites, hepatitis and cirrhosis; however, the patient in the present study, was diagnosed as hepatitis- and cirrhosis-negative, with no history of chronic coughing or constipation. The aim of the present study was to report a rare case of mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix presenting as an umbilical hernia in a 66-year-old female patient. The patient had a 6-month history of a reducible mass in the umbilical region and was diagnosed with umbilical hernia. Computed tomography and ultrasonography were performed and revealed massive ascites. Ultimately, a laparoscopic appendectomy was performed and borderline mucinous appendiceal cystadenoma of low malignant potential was confirmed. In addition, the present study discussed the association between mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix and umbilical hernia, as well as the diagnostic process and treatment strategies. PMID:27313766

  14. Concurrent Umbilical Hernia Repair at the Time of Liver Transplantation: A Six-Year Experience from a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Perez, A. J.; Haskins, I. N.; Prabhu, A. S.; Krpata, D. M.; Tu, C.; Rosenblatt, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Diago, T.; Eghtesad, B.; Rosen, M. l. J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Umbilical hernias are common in patients with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. Management of those persisting at the time of liver transplantation is important to define. Objective: To evaluate the long-term results of patients undergoing simultaneous primary umbilical hernia repair (UHR) at the time of liver transplantation at a single institution. Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed on patients undergoing simultaneous UHR and liver transplantation from 2010 through 2016. 30-day morbidity and mortality outcomes and long-term hernia recurrence were investigated. Results: 59 patients had primary UHR at the time of liver transplantation. All hernias were reducible with no overlying skin breakdown or leakage of ascites. 30-day morbidity and mortality included 5 (8%) superficial surgical site infections, 1 (2%) deep surgical site infection, and 7 (12%) organ space infections. Unrelated to the UHR, 10 (17%) patients had an unplanned return to the operating room, 16 (27%) were readmitted within 30 days of their index operation, and 1 (2%) patient died. With a mean follow-up of 21.8 months, 7 (18%) patients experienced an umbilical hernia recurrence. Conclusion: Despite the high perioperative morbidity associated with the transplant procedure, concurrent primary UHR resulted in an acceptable long-term recurrence rate with minimal associated morbidity. PMID:29531643

  15. Port-site incisional hernia - A case series of 54 patients.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, A; Stüben, B O; Bock, B; Eickhoff, R; Kroh, A; Klink, C D; Neumann, U P; Krones, C J

    2017-02-01

    The increased use of laparoscopy has resulted in certain complications specifically associated with the laparoscopic approach, such as port-site incisional hernia (PIH). Until today, it is not finally clarified if port-site closure should be performed by fascia suture or not. Furthermore, the optimal treatment strategy in PIH (suture vs. mesh) is still widely unclear. The aim of this study was to present our experience with PIH in two independent departments and to derive possible treatment strategies from these results. Between 2003 and 2013, 54 patients were operated due to port-site incisional hernia in two surgical centres. Their data were collected and retrospectively analyzed depending on surgical technique of port-site hernia repair (Mesh repair group, n = 13 vs. Suture only group, n = 41). Port site incisional hernia occurred in 96% (52 patients) after the use of trocars with 10 mm or larger diameter. Patients treated with mesh repair had significantly higher body mass index (BMI) (32 ± 9 vs. 27 ± 4; p = 0.023) and significantly higher rates of cardiac diseases (77% vs. 39%; p = 0.026) than patients in the suture only group. Mean fascial defect size was significantly larger in the Mesh repair group than in the Suture only group (31 ± 24 mm vs. 24 ± 32 mm; p = 0.007) and mean time of operation was significantly longer in patients operated with mesh repair (83 ± 47 min vs. 40 ± 28 min; p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in mean hospital stay (3 ± 4 days; p = 0.057) and hernia recurrence rates (9%; p = 0.653) between study groups. Mean time of follow up was 32 ± 35 months. In Port sites of 10 mm and larger diameter fascia should be closed by suture, whereas the risk of hernia development in 5 mm trocar placements seems to be a rare complication. Port-site incisional hernia should be treated by suture or mesh repair depending on fascial defect size and the patients' risk factors regarding preexisting

  16. Parastomal hernia – current knowledge and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Styliński, Roman; Rudzki, Sławomir

    2018-01-01

    Intestinal stoma creation is one of the most common surgical procedures. The most common long-term complication following stoma creation is parastomal hernia, which according to some authors is practically unavoidable. Statistical differences of its occurrence are mainly due to patient observation time and evaluation criteria. Consequently, primary prevention methods such as placement of prosthetic mesh and newly developed minimally invasive methods of stoma creation are used. It seems that in the light of evidence-based medicine, the best way to treat parastomal hernia is the one that the surgeon undertaking therapy is the most experienced in and is suited to the individuality of each patient, his condition and comorbidities. As a general rule, reinforcing the abdominal wall with a prosthetic mesh is the treatment of choice, with a low rate of complications and relapses over a long period of time. The current trend is to use lightweight, large pore meshes. PMID:29643952

  17. Surgical treatment of GERD. Comperative study of WTP vs. Toupet fundoplication - results of 151 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Kobryn, Konrad; Nowosad, Małgorzata; Krawczyk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is recognized as one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The best choice of management for advanced GERD is laparoscopic surgery. To compare and evaluate the results of surgical treatment of GERD patients operated on using two different techniques. Between 2001 and 2012, 353 patients (211 female and 142 male), aged 17-76 years (mean 44), underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery. The study included patients who underwent a Toupet fundoplication or Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure (WTP). The mean age of the group was 47.77 years (17-80 years). Forty-nine (32.45%) patients had severe symptoms, 93 (61.58%) had mild symptoms and 9 (5.96%) had a single mild but intolerable sign of GERD. Eighty-six (56.95%) patients had a Toupet fundoplication and 65 (43.04%) had a WTP. The follow-up period was 18-144 months. The average operating time for Toupet fundoplication and the WTP procedure was 164 min (90-300 min) and 147 min (90-210 min), respectively. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.66%. The average post-operative hospitalization period was 5.4 days (2-16 post-operative days (POD) = Toupet) vs. 4.7 days (2-9 POD = WTP). No reoperations were performed. No major surgical complications were identified. Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure due to a low percentage of post-operative complications, good quality of life of patients and a zero recurrence rate of hiatal hernia should be a method of choice.

  18. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. The procedures include intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair, transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair and total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair. These procedures have totally different anatomic point of view, process and technical key points from open operations. The technical details of these operations are discussed in this article, also the strategies of treatment for some special conditions. PMID:27867954

  19. Aligning incentives in the management of inguinal hernia: the impact of the payment model.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Karthik; Rogers, Loni; Smith, Paul; Schwaitzberg, Steven D

    2012-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act has stimulated discussion to find feasible, alternate payment models. Adopting a global payment (GP) mechanism may dampen the high number of procedures incentivized by the fee-for-service (FFS) system. The evolving payment mechanism should reflect collaboration between surgeon and system goals. Our aim was to model and perform simulation of a GP system for hernia care and its impact on cost, revenue, and physician reimbursement in an integrated health care system. The results of the 2006 Watchful Waiting (WW) vs Repair of Inguinal Hernia in Minimally Symptomatic Men trial was used as a clinical model for the natural history and progression of inguinal hernia disease Simulations were built using 2009 financial and clinical data from the Cambridge Health Alliance to model costs and revenues in managing care for a 4-year cohort of inguinal hernia patients; FFS, FFS-WW, and the GP-WW were modeled. To build this GP model, surgeons were paid a constant $500 per patient whether herniorrhaphy was performed or not. Compared with the actual combined physician and hospital revenue under the current FFS model ($308,820), implementing the FFS-WW system for 4 years for 139 hernia patients decreased hospital and physician revenues by $93,846 and $19,308, respectively. This resulted in a total savings of $113,154 for the payors only. In contrast, when using WW methodology within a GP model, system savings of $69,174 were observed after 4 years, with preservation of physician and hospital income. Collaboration to achieve shared savings can be accomplished by pooling physician and hospital revenue in order to meet the goals of all parties. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Surgical outcome of mesh and suture repair in primary umbilical hernia: postoperative complications and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, A; Haapamäki, M M; Gunnarsson, U; Strigård, K

    2016-08-01

    To compare recurrence and surgical complications following two dominating techniques: the use of suture and mesh in umbilical hernia repair. 379 consecutive umbilical hernia repair procedures performed between 1 January 2005 and 14 March 2014 in a university setting were included. Gathering was made using International Classification of Diseases codes for both procedure and diagnosis. Each patient record was scrutinized with respect to 45 variables, and the results entered in a database. Exclusion <18 years-of-age (32), non-primary umbilical hernia (25), wrong diagnosis (7), concomitant major abdominal surgery (5), double registration (3) and pregnancy (1) left 306 patients eligible for analysis. Gender distribution was 97 women and 209 men. There was no difference between mesh and suture with regard to the primary outcome variable, cumulative recurrence rate, 8.4 %. Recurrence was both self-reported and found on clinical revisit and defined as recurrence when verified by a clinician and/or radiologist. Results presented as odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI) show a significantly higher risk for recurrence in patients with a coexisting hernia OR 2.84, 95 % CI 1.24-6.48. Secondary outcome, postoperative surgical complication (n = 51 occurrences), included an array of postoperative surgical events commencing within 30 days after surgery. Complication rate was significantly higher in patients receiving mesh repair OR 6.63, 95 % CI 2.29-20.38. Suture repair decreases the risk for surgical complications, especially infection without an increase in recurrence rate. The risk for recurrence is increased in patients with a history of another hernia.

  1. Concurrent Umbilical Hernia Repair at the Time of Liver Transplantation: A Six-Year Experience from a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Perez, A J; Haskins, I N; Prabhu, A S; Krpata, D M; Tu, C; Rosenblatt, S; Hashimoto, K; Diago, T; Eghtesad, B; Rosen, M L J

    2018-01-01

    Umbilical hernias are common in patients with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. Management of those persisting at the time of liver transplantation is important to define. To evaluate the long-term results of patients undergoing simultaneous primary umbilical hernia repair (UHR) at the time of liver transplantation at a single institution. Retrospective chart review was performed on patients undergoing simultaneous UHR and liver transplantation from 2010 through 2016. 30-day morbidity and mortality outcomes and long-term hernia recurrence were investigated. 59 patients had primary UHR at the time of liver transplantation. All hernias were reducible with no overlying skin breakdown or leakage of ascites. 30-day morbidity and mortality included 5 (8%) superficial surgical site infections, 1 (2%) deep surgical site infection, and 7 (12%) organ space infections. Unrelated to the UHR, 10 (17%) patients had an unplanned return to the operating room, 16 (27%) were readmitted within 30 days of their index operation, and 1 (2%) patient died. With a mean follow-up of 21.8 months, 7 (18%) patients experienced an umbilical hernia recurrence. Despite the high perioperative morbidity associated with the transplant procedure, concurrent primary UHR resulted in an acceptable long-term recurrence rate with minimal associated morbidity.

  2. Sports hernia repair with adductor tenotomy.

    PubMed

    Harr, J N; Brody, F

    2017-02-01

    Sports hernias, or athletic pubalgia, is common in athletes, and primarily involves injury to the fascia, muscles, and tendons of the inguinal region near their insertion onto the pubic bone. However, management varies widely, and rectus and adductor tenotomies have not been adequately described. The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate a suture repair and a rectus and adductor longus tenotomy technique for sports hernias. After magnetic-resonance-imaging confirmation of sports hernias with rectus and adductor tendonitis, 22 patients underwent a suture herniorrhaphy with adductor tenotomy. The procedure is performed through a 4-cm incision, and a fascial release of the rectus abdominis and adductor tenotomy is performed to relieve the opposing vector forces on the pubic bone. All 22 patients returned to their respective sports and regained their ability to perform at a high level, including professional status. No further surgery was required. In athletes with MRI confirmation of rectus and adductor longus injuries, tenotomies along with a herniorraphy may improve outcomes. A suture repair to reinforce the inguinal floor prevents mesh-related complications, especially in young athletes.

  3. Laparoscopic hernia repair and bladder injury.

    PubMed

    Dalessandri, K M; Bhoyrul, S; Mulvihill, S J

    2001-01-01

    Bladder injury is a complication of laparoscopic surgery with a reported incidence in the general surgery literature of 0.5% and in the gynecology literature of 2%. We describe how to recognize and treat the injury and how to avoid the problem. We report two cases of bladder injury repaired with a General Surgical Interventions (GSI) trocar and a balloon device used for laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. One patient had a prior appendectomy; the other had a prior midline incision from a suprapubic prostatectomy. We repaired the bladder injury, and the patients made a good recovery. When using the obturator and balloon device, it is important to stay anterior to the preperitoneal space and bladder. Prior lower abdominal surgery can be considered a relative contraindication to extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair. Signs of gas in the Foley bag or hematuria should alert the surgeon to a bladder injury. A one- or two-layer repair of the bladder injury can be performed either laparoscopically or openly and is recommended for a visible injury. Mesh repair of the hernia can be completed provided no evidence exists of urinary tract infection. A Foley catheter is placed until healing occurs.

  4. Reappraisal of adhesive strapping as treatment for infantile umbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Satohiko; Kato, Mototoshi; Oshio, Takehito; Morikawa, Yasuhide

    2016-05-01

    Most umbilical hernias spontaneously close by 3-5 years of age; therefore, surgical repair is considered only in children whose hernias have not closed by this point. At present, adhesive strapping is not the preferred treatment for umbilical hernias because of the lack of supporting evidence regarding its efficacy, and its association with skin complications. This aim of this study was to examine umbilical hernia closure on ultrasonography, and reassess the merits of adhesive strapping. Between January 2013 and December 2014, 89 infants underwent adhesive strapping for umbilical hernia. The strapping was changed once a week. The diameter of the hernia orifice was measured on ultrasonography every 2 weeks until closure. The closure speed (CS) of the hernia orifice was compared between the infants treated with adhesive strapping and those undergoing observation alone. The association between CS and birthweight, gestational age, diameter of the hernia orifice, and timing of treatment (before 12 weeks of age vs between 12 and 26 weeks of age) was also analyzed. Closure was achieved after 2-13 weeks of strapping in 81 infants (91%), and the likelihood of closure was not affected by the diameter of the hernia orifice, gestational age, or the timing of treatment. The mean CS of the infants treated with adhesive strapping was significantly faster than that of the infants undergoing observation alone (2.59 vs 0.37 mm/week, P < 0.05). Adhesive strapping was discontinued in five of the 89 infants (5.6%) due to severe skin complications. Adhesive strapping promoted early spontaneous umbilical hernia closure compared with observation alone, regardless of the diameter of the hernia orifice. Adhesive strapping is an effective alternative to surgery and observation. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Open versus laparoscopic unilateral inguinal hernia repairs: defining the ideal BMI to reduce complications.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Ashley D; Lim, Robert B; Lustik, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    Open inguinal hernia repair is felt to be a less expensive operation than a laparoscopic one. Performing open repair on patients with an obese body mass index (BMI) results in longer operative times, longer hospital stay, and complications that will potentially impose higher cost to the facility and patient. This study aims to define the ideal BMI at which a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be advantageous over open inguinal hernia repair. The NSQIP database was analyzed for (n = 64,501) complications, mortality, and operating time for open and laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs during the time period from 2005 to 2012. Bilateral and recurrent hernias were excluded. Chi-square tests and Fisher's exact tests were used to assess associations between type of surgery and categorical variables including demographics, risk factors, and 30-day outcomes. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine whether odds ratios differed by level of BMI. The HCUP database was used for determining difference in cost and length of stay between open and laparoscopic procedures. There were 17,919 laparoscopic repairs and 46,582 open repairs in the study period. The overall morbidity (across all BMI categories) is statistically greater in the open repair group when compared to the laparoscopic group (p = 0.03). Postoperative complications (including wound disruption, failure to wean from the ventilator, and UTI) were greater in the open repair group across all BMI categories. Deep incisional surgical site infections (SSI) were more common in the overweight open repair group (p = 0.026). The return to the operating room across all BMI categories was statistically significant for the open repair group (n = 269) compared to the laparoscopic repair group (n = 70) with p = 0.003. There was no difference in the return to operating room between the BMI categories. The odds ratio (OR) was found to be statistically significant when comparing the obese

  6. Fixation free femoral hernia repair with a 3D dynamic responsive implant. A case series report.

    PubMed

    Amato, G; Romano, G; Agrusa, A; Gordini, L; Gulotta, E; Erdas, E; Calò, P G

    2018-04-23

    To date, no gold standard for the surgical treatment of femoral hernia exists. Pure tissue repair as well as mesh/plug implantation, open or laparoscopic, are the most performed methods. Nevertheless, all these techniques need sutures or mesh fixation. This implies the risk of damaging sensitive structures of the femoral area, along with complications related to tissue tear and postoperative discomfort consequent to poor quality mesh incorporation. The present retrospective multicenter case series highlights the results of femoral hernia repair procedures performed with a 3D dynamic responsive implant in a cohort of 32 patients during a mean follow up of 27 months. Aiming to simplify the surgical procedure and reduce complications, a 3D dynamic responsive implant was delivered for femoral hernia repair, in a patient cohort. After returning the hernia sack to the abdominal cavity, the implant was simply delivered into the hernia defect where it remained, thanks to its inherent centrifugal expansion, obliterating the hernia opening without need of fixation. Postoperative pain assessment was determined using the VAS score system. The use of the 3D prosthetic device allowed for easier and faster surgical repair in a fixation free fashion. None of the typical fixation related complications occurred in the examined patients. Postoperative pain assessment with VAS score showed a very low level of pain, allowing the return of patients to normal activities in extremely reduced times. In the late postoperative period, no discomfort or chronic pain was reported. Femoral hernia repair with the 3D dynamic revealed a quick and safe placement procedure. The reduced pain intensity, as well as the absence of adverse events consequent to sutures or mesh fixation, seems to be a significant benefit of the motile compliance of the device. Furthermore, this 3D prosthesis has already proven to induce an enhanced probiotic response showing ingrowth in the implant of the typical tissue

  7. Biomimetic collagen/elastin meshes for ventral hernia repair in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Wang, Xin; Cabrera, Fernando J; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Robbins, Andrew B; Sandri, Monica; Moreno, Michael R; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-01

    E Sheets and Scaffolds) not only showed promising mechanical performance, but also allowed for an efficient neovascularization, resulting in new adipose and muscle tissue formation within the implant, in only 6weeks. In addition, our meshes allowed for the use of the same surgical procedure utilized in clinical practice, with the commercially available grafts. This study represents a significant step in the design of bioactive acellular off-the-shelf biomimetic meshes for ventral hernia repair. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lumbar hernia in South Korea: different from that in foreign literature?

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Chung, H S; Song, S H

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the clinical features of lumbar hernia reported in South Korea and compare these features with those reported in foreign literature. From January 1968 through December 2013, 13 cases reported in South Korea were included in the study. The variables compared were age, sex, main symptoms at hospital visit, etiology, location, herniated contents, lateralization, defect size, diagnostic methods, surgical methods, surgical opinions, and recurrence. In the South Korean cases, women outnumbered men (3.3:1) and no significant differences were found in the herniated side (left:right, 1.1:1). In contrast, in the foreign cases, men outnumbered women (3:1) and left-sided hernia was dominant (2:1). Moreover, in most of the foreign cases, patients were aged 50-70 years, whereas in the South Korean cases, none of the patients were in their 50 s. However, no substantial differences were found in etiology, anatomical locations, symptoms, and herniated contents. This research revealed that few clinical features of lumbar hernias in South Korea differ from those reported in foreign literature. Thirteen cases were analyzed in the present study, and results obtained from such a small sample size cannot be generalized with certainty. Therefore, more cases should be collected for a definitive analysis. Despite this limitation, this study is important because it is the first attempt to collect and analyze the clinical features of lumbar hernia in South Korea. This study will serve as a basis for future studies investigating the clinical features of lumbar hernia cases in South Korea.

  9. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh Repair for the Treatment of Multiple Recurrent Inguinal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an exponential rise in laparoscopic surgery for inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, an increasing number of patients present with recurrent hernias after having failed anterior and laparoscopic repairs. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair for these hernias. Materials and methods: All patients referred with multiply recurrent inguinal hernias underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1 2009 to October 30 2013. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made and a SIL surgical port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques, namely, “chopsticks” and “inline” dissection, 5.5 mm/52 cm/30° angled laparoscope and conventional straight dissecting instruments were used. The peritoneum was incised above the symphysis pubis and dissection continued laterally and proximally raising an inferior flap, below a previous extraperitoneal mesh, while reducing any direct/indirect/femoral/cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh that was fixed into the pubic ramus as well as superiorly with nonabsorbable tacks before fixing its inferior border with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: There were 9 male patients who underwent SIL-IPOM. Mean age was 55 years old and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes with hospital stay of 1 day and umbilical scar length of 21 mm at 4 weeks' follow-up. There were no intraoperative/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence with mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: Multiply recurrent inguinal hernias after failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be treated safely and efficiently with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25392643

  10. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in the Armed Forces: A 5-year single centre study

    PubMed Central

    Jakhmola, C.K.; Kumar, Ameet

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgery for inguinal hernia continues to evolve. The most recent development in the field of surgery for inguinal hernia is the emergence of laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery (LIHS) which is challenging the gold standard Lichtenstein's tension free mesh repair. Our centre has the largest series of LIHS from any Armed Forces hospital. The aim of this study was to analyze the short and long term outcomes at our center since its inception. Methods Retrospective review of prospectively maintained data base of 501 LIHS done in 434 patients by a single surgeon between April 2008 and October 2013. Preoperative, intraoperative, postoperative and follow-up data was analyzed with emphasis on the recurrence rates and the incidence of inguinodynia. Results 402 (92.6%) patients had primary hernias and 367 (84.6%) patients had unilateral hernias. Of the 501 repairs, 453 (90.4 %) were done totally extraperitoneal approach and 48 (9.6 %) were done by the transabdominal preperitoneal approach. The mean operative time for unilateral and bilateral repairs was 40.9 ± 11.2 and 76.2 ± 15.0 minutes, respectively. The conversion rate to open surgery was 0.6%. The intraoperative, and early and late postoperative complication rates were 1.7%, 6.2% and 3%, respectively. The incidence of chronic groin pain was 0.7% and the recurrence rate was 1.6%. The median hospital stay was 1 day (1–5 days). Conclusion We, in this series of over 500 repairs have demonstrated that feasibility as well as safety of LIHS at our centre with good short and long term outcomes. PMID:26663957

  11. Suture repair of umbilical hernia during caesarean section: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, D C; Limani, P; Ochsenbein, N; Krähenmann, F; Clavien, P-A; Zimmermann, R; Hahnloser, D

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the additional burdens in terms of pain, prolongation of surgery and morbidity which is added to elective caesarean section if umbilical hernia suture repair is performed simultaneously. Secondly, patient's satisfaction and hernia recurrence rate were assessed. Consecutive women with symptomatic umbilical hernia undergoing internal or external suture repair during elective caesarean were included in this retrospective cohort-control study. Data on post-operative pain, duration of surgery and morbidity of a combined procedure were collected. These patients were matched 1:10 to women undergoing caesarean section only. Additionally, two subgroups were assessed separately: external and internal suture hernia repair. These subgroups were compared for patient's satisfaction, cosmesis, body image and recurrence rate. Fourteen patients with a mean age of 37 years were analysed. Internal suture repair (n = 7) prolonged caesarean section by 20 min (p = 0.001) and external suture repair (n = 7) by 34 min (p < 0.0001). Suture repair did not increase morphine use (0.38 ± 0.2 vs. 0.4 ± 02 mg/kg body weight), had no procedure-related morbidity and prolonged hospitalization by 0.5 days (p = 0.01). At a median follow-up of 37 (5-125) months, two recurrences in each surgical technique, internal and external suture repair, occurred (28 %). Body image and cosmesis score showed a higher level of functioning in internal suture repair (p = 0.02; p = 0.04). Despite a high recurrence rate, internal suture repair of a symptomatic umbilical hernia during elective caesarean section should be offered to women if requested. No additional morbidity or scar is added to caesarean section. Internal repair is faster, and cosmetic results are better, additional skin or fascia dissection is avoided, and it seems to be as effective as an external approach. Yet, women must be informed on the high recurrence rate.

  12. Local anesthetic infusion pump for pain management following open inguinal hernia repair: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Chih; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Huang, Ming-Te; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Tam, Ka-Wai

    2014-01-01

    Open inguinal hernia repair is one of the most painful procedures in day surgery. A continuous ambulatory analgesic is thought to reduce postoperative pain when it is applied to the surgical site. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of local anesthetic infusion pump following open inguinal hernia repair for the reduction of postoperative pain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have investigated the outcomes of using an infusion pump for delivering a local anesthetic contrasted to a control group for open inguinal hernia repair. Pain was assessed from Day 1 to Day 5 following the surgery. The secondary outcomes included analgesia use and postoperative complications. We reviewed 5 trials that totaled 288 patients. The analgesic effects of bupivacaine (4 trials) and ropivacaine (one trial) were compared with a placebo group. The pooled mean difference in the score measuring the degree of pain diminished significantly at Day 1 to Day 4 in the experimental group. Two studies have reported that the number of analgesics required also decreased in the experimental group. No bupivacaine-related complication was reported. Our results revealed that applying a local anesthetic infusion pump following inguinal hernia repairs was more efficacious for reducing postoperative pain than a placebo. However, the findings were based on a small body of evidence in which methodological quality was not high. The potential benefits of applying a local anesthetic infusion pump to hernia repair must still be adequately investigated using further RCTs. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acquired umbilical hernias in four captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Velguth, Karen E; Rochat, Mark C; Langan, Jennifer N; Backues, Kay

    2009-12-01

    Umbilical hernias are a common occurrence in domestic animals and humans but have not been well documented in polar bears. Surgical reduction and herniorrhaphies were performed to correct acquired hernias in the region of the umbilicus in four adult captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) housed in North American zoos. Two of the four bears were clinically unaffected by their hernias prior to surgery. One bear showed signs of severe discomfort following acute enlargement of the hernia. In another bear, re-herniation led to acute abdominal pain due to gastric entrapment and strangulation. The hernias in three bears were surgically repaired by debridement of the hernia ring and direct apposition of the abdominal wall, while the large defect in the most severely affected bear was closed using polypropylene mesh to prevent excessive tension. The cases in this series demonstrate that while small hernias may remain clinically inconsequential for long periods of time, enlargement or recurrence of the defect can lead to incarceration and acute abdominal crisis. Umbilical herniation has not been reported in free-ranging polar bears, and it is suspected that factors such as body condition, limited exercise, or enclosure design potentially contribute to the development of umbilical hernias in captive polar bears.

  14. Eviscerated urinary bladder via ruptured umbilical hernia: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Kumar, V; Gangopadhyay, A N; Upadhyaya, V D

    2008-06-01

    Umbilical hernia is a common problem encountered in children. Rupture and evisceration are very rare phenomena, and the usual content that is eviscerated is the bowel. We present an infant who had a ruptured umbilical hernia with eviscerated urinary bladder dome. As this is the first case of its kind, it is being reported with a brief review of literature.

  15. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia: imaging aspects in three cases*

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Aranha, André Galante Alencar; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2013-01-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia is uncommon and mostly related to blunt or penetrating trauma. We report three similar cases of cough-induced transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia, highlighting the anatomic findings obtained with different imaging modalities (radiography, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance) in each of the cases. PMID:24068274

  16. Umbilical hernia following gastroschisis closure: a common event?

    PubMed

    Tullie, L G C; Bough, G M; Shalaby, A; Kiely, E M; Curry, J I; Pierro, A; De Coppi, P; Cross, K M K

    2016-08-01

    To assess incidence and natural history of umbilical hernia following sutured and sutureless gastroschisis closure. With audit approval, we undertook a retrospective clinical record review of all gastroschisis closures in our institution (2007-2013). Patient demographics, gastroschisis closure method and umbilical hernia occurrence were recorded. Data, presented as median (range), underwent appropriate statistical analysis. Fifty-three patients were identified, gestation 36 weeks (31-38), birth weight 2.39 kg (1-3.52) and 23 (43 %) were male. Fourteen patients (26 %) underwent sutureless closure: 12 primary, 2 staged; and 39 (74 %) sutured closure: 19 primary, 20 staged. Sutured closure was interrupted sutures in 24 patients, 11 pursestring and 4 not specified. Fifty patients were followed-up over 53 months (10-101) and 22 (44 %) developed umbilical hernias. There was a significantly greater hernia incidence following sutureless closure (p = 0.0002). In sutured closure, pursestring technique had the highest hernia rate (64 %). Seven patients underwent operative hernia closure; three secondary to another procedure. Seven patients had their hernias resolve. One patient was lost to follow-up and seven remain under observation with no reported complications. There is a significant umbilical hernia incidence following sutureless and pursestring sutured gastroschisis closure. This has not led to complications and the majority have not undergone repair.

  17. Umbilical hernias and anterior fontanelle size in Jamaican children.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I P

    1989-06-01

    This cross-sectional study documents the frequent occurrence of umbilical hernias among Jamaican children and suggests, for the first time, that the presence of an umbilical hernia may be associated with larger anterior fontanelle dimensions. It also demonstrates that data about the people a community health officer serves can be recorded during a busy clinic schedule.

  18. Giant spigelian hernia due to abdominal wall injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Topal, Ersun; Kaya, Ekrem; Topal, Naile Bolca; Sahin, Ilker

    2007-02-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare clinical entity. It is difficult to diagnose due to its location. In this article we report the case of a giant spigelian hernia consequent to abdominal wall injury. The neck of the hernia was 10 cm in diameter. We repaired this hernia with a polypropylene mesh.

  19. De Garengeot's hernia: our experience of three cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Khalid; Wood, Claire; Hammad, Ahmed; Middleton, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Groin hernia is a common surgical presentation and nearly half of the femoral hernias present acutely with strangulation. The hernia sac usually contains omentum or small bowel. Rarely, the appendix can herniate into the femoral canal. De Garengeot's hernia is the term used to describe the presence of appendicitis in the femoral hernia. Hernia explorations are performed by surgical trainees and encountering a De Garengeot's hernia can be challenging to manage. We report our experience of three cases of this rare entity and a literature review to improve our understanding for optimum management. PMID:25080546

  20. Perforated appendix and periappendicular abscess within an inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Salemis, N S; Nisotakis, K; Nazos, K; Stavrinou, P; Tsohataridis, E

    2006-12-01

    We report an extremely rare case of complicated Amyand's hernia. A 61-year-old male patient was admitted with clinical signs of incarcerated right inguinal hernia and localised tenderness in the right iliac fossa. He underwent emergency surgery and the operative findings included perforated appendix and periappendicular abscess within a right inguinal hernia sac. Appendectomy and Shouldice's herniorrhaphy without prosthetic mesh placement were performed. Histology revealed the presence of a villous adenoma near the base of the appendix. We point out that although Amyand's hernia is a very rare clinical entity, it should always be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases with clinical signs of incarcerated right inguinal hernia, especially when there are no pathological findings on the abdominal X-rays.

  1. Spontaneous Rupture of Umbilical Hernia in Pregnancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Adamu; Stephen, Garba; Ukwenya, Yahaya

    2011-01-01

    A 28 year old woman presented with a spontaneous rupture of an umbilical hernia in her seventh month of pregnancy. She had four previous unsupervised normal deliveries. There was no history of trauma or application of herbal medicine on the hernia. The hernia sac ruptured at the inferior surface where it was attached to the ulcerated and damaged overlying skin. There was a gangrenous eviscerated small bowel. The patient was resuscitated and the gangrenous small bowel was resected and end to end anastomosis done. The hernia sac was excised and the 12 cm defect repaired. Six weeks later, she had spontaneous vaginal delivery of a live baby. We advocate that large umbilical hernias should be routinely repaired when seen in women of child bearing age. PMID:22043438

  2. Surgical treatment of GERD. Comperative study of WTP vs. Toupet fundoplication – results of 151 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Nowosad, Małgorzata; Krawczyk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is recognized as one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The best choice of management for advanced GERD is laparoscopic surgery. Aim To compare and evaluate the results of surgical treatment of GERD patients operated on using two different techniques. Material and methods Between 2001 and 2012, 353 patients (211 female and 142 male), aged 17–76 years (mean 44), underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery. The study included patients who underwent a Toupet fundoplication or Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure (WTP). Results The mean age of the group was 47.77 years (17–80 years). Forty-nine (32.45%) patients had severe symptoms, 93 (61.58%) had mild symptoms and 9 (5.96%) had a single mild but intolerable sign of GERD. Eighty-six (56.95%) patients had a Toupet fundoplication and 65 (43.04%) had a WTP. The follow-up period was 18–144 months. The average operating time for Toupet fundoplication and the WTP procedure was 164 min (90–300 min) and 147 min (90–210 min), respectively. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.66%. The average post-operative hospitalization period was 5.4 days (2–16 post-operative days (POD) = Toupet) vs. 4.7 days (2–9 POD = WTP). No reoperations were performed. No major surgical complications were identified. Conclusions Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure due to a low percentage of post-operative complications, good quality of life of patients and a zero recurrence rate of hiatal hernia should be a method of choice. PMID:27458484

  3. Importance of mesh overlap on hernia recurrence after open umbilical hernia repair with bilayer prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Porrero, Jose L; Cano-Valderrama, Oscar; Castillo, María J; Marcos, Alberto; Tejerina, Gabriel; Cendrero, Manuel; Porrero, Belén; Alonso, María T; Torres, Antonio J

    2018-02-02

    importance of mesh overlap on recurrence after open umbilical hernia repair has been poorly studied. a retrospective cohort study was performed with patients who underwent open umbilical hernia repair with bilayer prosthesis between 2004 and 2015. 1538 patients were included. Fifty patients (3.3%) had a mesh overlap lower than 1 cm. After a mean follow-up of 4.1 years 53 patients (3.5%) developed a recurrence. Recurrence was associated with a mesh overlap smaller than 1 cm (10.2% vs. 3.3%, p = 0.010, OR = 3.3). In the logistic regression model an overlap smaller than 1 cm was not statistically associated with recurrence (OR = 2.5, p = 0.123). Female gender, postoperative complications and prosthesis size were associated with hernia recurrence. mesh overlap seems to be an important factor for hernia recurrence. A mesh overlap of at least 1 cm should be used until more studies are performed about this issue. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Irreducible inguinal hernia in children: how serious is it?

    PubMed

    Houben, Christoph Heinrich; Chan, Kin Wai Edwin; Mou, Jennifer Wai Cheung; Tam, Yuk Huk; Lee, Kim Hung

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the experience with irreducible inguinal hernias at our institution. We reviewed patients with an inguinal hernia operation at our institution between 1st January 2004 and 31st December 2013. Individuals with a failed manual reduction of an incarcerated hernia under sedation by the attending surgeon were included into the study group as irreducible hernia. Overall 2184 individuals (426 females) had an inguinal herniotomy with the following distribution: right 1116 (51.1%), left 795 (36.4%) and bilateral 273 (12.5%) cases. A laparoscopic herniotomy was done in 1882 (86.4%). 34 patients (3 females) - just 1.6% of the total - presented at a median age (corrected for gestation) of 12 months (range 2 weeks to 16 years) with an irreducible hernia, of which 24 individuals (70%) were right sided. A laparoscopic approach was attempted in 21 (62%), two required a conversion. The open technique was chosen in 13 (38%) individuals. The content of the hernia sac was distal small bowel in 21 (62%), omentum in four (12%) and an ovary in three (9%) cases. Four patients (12%) required laparoscopic assisted bowel resection and two partial omentectomy (6%). Two gonads (6%) were lost: one intraoperative necrotic ovary and one testis atrophied over time. There was no recurrent hernia. Irreducible inguinal hernias constitute 1.6% of the workload on inguinal hernia repair. The hernia sac contains in males most frequently small bowel and in females exclusively a prolapsed ovary. Significant comorbidity is present in 18%. Laparoscopic and open techniques complement each other in addressing the issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. One-stop endoscopic hernia surgery: efficient and satisfactory.

    PubMed

    Voorbrood, C E H; Burgmans, J P J; Clevers, G J; Davids, P H P; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Schouten, N; van Dalen, T

    2015-06-01

    One-stop surgery offers patients diagnostic work-up and subsequent surgical treatment on the same day. In the present study, patient satisfaction and efficiency from an institutional perspective were evaluated in patients who were referred for one-stop endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. In a high-volume inguinal hernia clinic, all consecutive patients referred for one-stop surgical treatment, were registered prospectively. An instructed secretary screened patients for eligibility for the one-stop option when the appointment was made. Totally extraperitoneal hernia repair under general anaesthesia was the preferred operative technique. Patient's satisfaction, successful day surgery and institutional efficiency were evaluated. Between January 2010 and January 2012 a total of 349 patients (17 % of all patients in the hernia clinic) were referred for one-stop hernia repair. Mean age was 47.5 years and 96.3 % were males. Three hundred thirty-six patients underwent hernia surgery on the same day (96.3 %). In thirteen patients (3.7 %) no operative repair was done on the day of presentation due to an incorrect diagnosis (n = 7), a watchful waiting policy for asymptomatic hernia (n = 3), rescheduling due to a large scrotal hernia, and there were two "no shows". Following hernia repair 97 % of the patients were discharged on the same day, while ten patients required hospitalization. Based on the questionnaires the main satisfaction score among patients was 9.0 (8.89-9.17 95 % CI) on a scale ranging from 0 to 10. One-stop hernia surgery is feasible and satisfactory from an institutional as well as from a patient's perspective.

  6. Association between thoracic aortic disease and inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Christian; Eriksson, Per; Franco-Cereceda, Anders

    2014-08-21

    The study hypothesis was that thoracic aortic disease (TAD) is associated with a higher-than-expected prevalence of inguinal hernia. Such an association has been reported for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and hernia. Unlike AAA, TAD is not necessarily detectable with clinical examination or ultrasound, and there are no population-based screening programs for TAD. Therefore, conditions associated with TAD, such as inguinal hernia, are of particular clinical relevance. The prevalence of inguinal hernia in subjects with TAD was determined from nation-wide register data and compared to a non-TAD group (patients with isolated aortic stenosis). Groups were balanced using propensity score matching. Multivariable statistical analysis (logistic regression) was performed to identify variables independently associated with hernia. Hernia prevalence was 110 of 750 (15%) in subjects with TAD versus 29 of 301 (9.6%) in non-TAD, P=0.03. This statistically significant difference remained after propensity score matching: 21 of 159 (13%) in TAD versus 14 of 159 (8.9%) in non-TAD, P<0.001. Variables independently associated with hernia in multivariable analysis were male sex (odds ratio [OR] with 95% confidence interval [95% CI]) 3.4 (2.1 to 5.4), P<0.001; increased age, OR 1.02/year (1.004 to 1.04), P=0.014; and TAD, OR 1.8 (1.1 to 2.8), P=0.015. The prevalence of inguinal hernia (15%) in TAD is higher than expected in a general population and higher in TAD, compared to non-TAD. TAD is independently associated with hernia in multivariable analysis. Presence or history of hernia may be of importance in detecting TAD, and the association warrants further study. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Umbilical Hernia Repair and Pregnancy: Before, during, after…

    PubMed Central

    Kulacoglu, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    Umbilical hernias are most common in women than men. Pregnancy may cause herniation or render a preexisting one apparent, because of progressively raised intra-abdominal pressure. The incidence of umbilical hernia among pregnancies is 0.08%. Surgical algorithm for a pregnant woman with a hernia is not thoroughly clear. There is no consensus about the timing of surgery for an umbilical hernia in a woman either who is already pregnant or planning a pregnancy. If the hernia is incarcerated or strangulated at the time of diagnosis, an emergency repair is inevitable. If the hernia is not complicated, but symptomatic an elective repair should be proposed. When the patient has a small and asymptomatic hernia it may be better to postpone the repair until she gives birth. If the hernia is repaired by suture alone, a high risk of recurrence exists during pregnancy. Umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy can be performed with minimal morbidity to the mother and baby. Second trimester is a proper timing for surgery. Asymptomatic hernias can be repaired, following childbirth or at the time of cesarean section (C-section). Elective repair after childbirth is possible as early as postpartum of eighth week. A 1-year interval can give the patient a very smooth convalescence, including hormonal stabilization and return to normal body weight. Moreover, surgery can be postponed for a longer time even after another pregnancy, if the patients would like to have more children. Diastasis recti are very frequent in pregnancy. It may persist in postpartum period. A high recurrence risk is expected in patients with rectus diastasis. This risk is especially high after suture repairs. Mesh repairs should be considered in this situation. PMID:29435451

  8. Umbilical Hernia Repair and Pregnancy: Before, during, after….

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    Umbilical hernias are most common in women than men. Pregnancy may cause herniation or render a preexisting one apparent, because of progressively raised intra-abdominal pressure. The incidence of umbilical hernia among pregnancies is 0.08%. Surgical algorithm for a pregnant woman with a hernia is not thoroughly clear. There is no consensus about the timing of surgery for an umbilical hernia in a woman either who is already pregnant or planning a pregnancy. If the hernia is incarcerated or strangulated at the time of diagnosis, an emergency repair is inevitable. If the hernia is not complicated, but symptomatic an elective repair should be proposed. When the patient has a small and asymptomatic hernia it may be better to postpone the repair until she gives birth. If the hernia is repaired by suture alone, a high risk of recurrence exists during pregnancy. Umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy can be performed with minimal morbidity to the mother and baby. Second trimester is a proper timing for surgery. Asymptomatic hernias can be repaired, following childbirth or at the time of cesarean section (C-section). Elective repair after childbirth is possible as early as postpartum of eighth week. A 1-year interval can give the patient a very smooth convalescence, including hormonal stabilization and return to normal body weight. Moreover, surgery can be postponed for a longer time even after another pregnancy, if the patients would like to have more children. Diastasis recti are very frequent in pregnancy. It may persist in postpartum period. A high recurrence risk is expected in patients with rectus diastasis. This risk is especially high after suture repairs. Mesh repairs should be considered in this situation.

  9. Large dermoid cyst of the spermatic cord presenting as an incarcerated hernia: a rare presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Salemis, N S; Karagkiouzis, G; Sambaziotis, D; Tsiambas, E

    2010-06-01

    Dermoid cyst of the spermatic cord is a very rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported in the literature so far. We herein describe an extremely rare case of a large dermoid cyst of the spermatic cord measuring 8.5 x 5 x 5 cm in a young patient who presented with clinical manifestations of an incarcerated inguinal hernia. After the cyst excision, a diffuse direct hernia became apparent and a Lichtenstein polypropylene mesh repair was performed. Direct hernia was likely the result of chronic pressure on the inguinal floor maintained by the large cyst. We conclude that although very rare, dermoid cyst of the spermatic cord should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with an irreducible inguinal mass of a long course.

  10. Anaesthetic Management of Laparoscopic Morgagni Hernia Repair in a Patient with Coexisting Down Syndrome, Patent Foramen Ovale and Pectus Carinatum.

    PubMed

    Kozanhan, Betül; Başaran, Betül; Aygın, Feride; Akkoyun, İbrahim; Özmen, Sadık

    2016-02-01

    Laparoscopic repair has several advantages with a minimally invasive surgical option for children with Morgagni hernias; however, a number of physiological sequelae results from pneumoperitoneum and insufflation. These physiological changes may be more significant in patients with a congenital heart disease. Perioperative detailed evaluation, meticulous monitorization and cooperation with a surgical team are important in cases with patent foramen ovale for the possible risk of the paradoxical gas embolism. We present the anaesthetic management of a patient with patent foramen ovale, Down syndrome and pectus carinatus who successfully underwent laparoscopic Morgagni hernia repair. Under a well-managed anaesthesia that prevented complications because of pneumoperitoneum, laparoscopic surgery would be safe enough for patients with Morgagni hernia having an associated congenital heart disease.

  11. A systematic review of the association between a single strenuous event and the development of an inguinal hernia: A medicolegal grey area.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Timothy; Currie, Peter; Spence, Robert; McNally, Sinead; Spence, Gary

    2018-03-10

    Inguinal hernia is a common surgical presentation. Evidence for its causation regarding occupational and recreational physical exposures is limited. The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review objectively evaluating the evidence for a causal link between a single strenuous event and the development of an inguinal hernia. A systematic review was carried out in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Ovid Embase, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Library were searched. In addition, the ISRCTN register, ClinicalTrials.gov, ICTR Platform, and EU Clinical Trials Register were searched. Identified publications were collated and both reviewers independently reviewed their contents. 5508 records were identified, resulting in 5 studies being selected. These 5 studies were all case series. Of 957 patients identified, 1003 hernias were described, of which 983 were inguinal hernias which 255 (26%) were attributed by patients to a single strenuous event. Only two of these studies applied Smith's Criteria (causation of a hernia from a single strenuous event): officially reported, severe pain at the time of the event, no prior history of inguinal hernia, and the diagnosis was made by a doctor within 30 days (preferably 3 days). Only 2 of 54 patients (4%) met all four criteria and so could be considered as having an inguinal hernia relating to a single strenuous event. Many patients associate hernias to a single episode, however upon application of more stringent criteria such as Smith's, a much smaller proportion are deemed to be actually attributable to a single strenuous event. Copyright © 2018 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mini- or Less-open Sublay Operation (MILOS): A New Minimally Invasive Technique for the Extraperitoneal Mesh Repair of Incisional Hernias.

    PubMed

    Reinpold, Wolfgang; Schröder, Michael; Berger, Cigdem; Nehls, Jennifer; Schröder, Alexander; Hukauf, Martin; Köckerling, Ferdinand; Bittner, Reinhard

    2018-01-16

    Improvement of ventral hernia repair. Despite the use of mesh and other recent improvements, the currently popular techniques of ventral hernia repair have specific disadvantages and risks. We developed the endoscopically assisted mini- or less-open sublay (MILOS) concept. The operation is performed transhernially via a small incision with light-holding laparoscopic instruments either under direct, or endoscopic visualization. An endoscopic light tube was developed to facilitate this approach (EndotorchTM Wolf Company). Each MILOS operation can be converted to standard total extraperitoneal gas endoscopy once an extraperitoneal space of at least 8 cm has been created. All MILOS operations were prospectively documented in the German Hernia registry with 1 year questionnaire follow-up. Propensity score matching of incisional hernia operations comparing the results of the MILOS operation with the laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh operation (IPOM) and open sublay repair from other German Hernia registry institutions was performed. Six hundred fifteen MILOS incisional hernia operations were included. Compared with laparoscopic IPOM incisional hernia operation, the MILOS repair is associated with significantly a fewer postoperative surgical complications (P < 0.001) general complications (P < 0.004), recurrences (P < 0.001), and less chronic pain (P < 0.001). Matched pair analysis with open sublay repair revealed significantly a fewer postoperative complications (P < 0.001), reoperations (P < 0.001), infections (P = 0.007), general complications (P < 0.001), recurrences (P = 0.017), and less chronic pain (P < 0.001). The MILOS technique allows minimally invasive transhernial repair of incisional hernias using large retromuscular/preperitoneal meshes with low morbidity. The technique combines the advantages of open sublay and the laparoscopic IPOM repair.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT03133000.

  13. Multiple concurrent bilateral groin hernias in a single patient; a case report and a review of uncommon groin hernias: A possible source of persistent pain after successful repair.

    PubMed

    Matsevych, O Y; Koto, M Z; Becker, J H R

    2016-01-01

    The wide use of laparoscopy for groin hernia repair has unveiled "hidden hernias" silently residing in this area. During the open repair of the presenting hernia, the surgeon was often unaware of these occult hernias. These patients postoperatively may present with unexplained chronic groin or pelvic pain. Rare groin hernias are defined according to their anatomical position. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of occult rare groin hernias are discussed. These problems are illustrated by a unique case report of multiple (six) coexisting groin hernias, whereof five were occult and two were rare. Rare groin hernias are uncommon because they are difficult to diagnose clinically and are not routinely looked for. They are often occult and may coexist with other inguinal hernias, thus posing a diagnostic and treatment challenge to the surgeon, especially if there is persistent groin pain after "successful" repair. MRI is the most accurate preoperative and postoperative diagnostic tool, if there is a clinical suspicion that the patient might have an occult hernia. Preperitoneal endoscopic approach is the recommended method in confirming the diagnosis and management of occult groin hernias. A sound knowledge of groin anatomy and a thorough preperitoneal inspection of all possible sites for rare groin hernias are needed to diagnose and repair all defects. The preperitoneal mesh repair with adequate overlap of all hernia orifices is the recommended treatment of choice. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Laparoscopic approach for the treatment of chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair : Laparoscopic approach for inguinodynia.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, Bruce; Vetrano, Vincent; Jagadish, Mayuri; Forman, Brandie; Heidel, Eric; Mancini, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    Traditional methods of clinical research may not be adequate to improve the value of care for patients with complex medical problems such as chronic pain after inguinal hernia repair. This problem is very complex with many potential factors contributing to the development of this complication. We have implemented a clinical quality improvement (CQI) effort in an attempt to better measure and improve outcomes for patients suffering with chronic groin pain (inguinodynia) after inguinal hernia repair. Between April 2011 and June 2016, there were 93 patients who underwent 94 operations in an attempt to relieve pain (1 patient had two separate unilateral procedures). Patients who had prior laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (26) had their procedure completed laparoscopically. Patients who had open inguinal hernia repair (68) had a combination of a laparoscopic and open procedure in an attempt to relieve pain. Initiatives to attempt to improve measurement and outcomes during this period included the administration of pre-operative bilateral transversus abdominis plane and intra-operative inguinal nerve blocks using long-acting local anesthetic as a part of a multimodal regimen, the introduction of a low pressure pneumoperitoneum system, and the expansion of a pre-operative questionnaire to assess emotional health pre-operatively. The results included the assessment of how much improvement was achieved after recovery from the operation. Forty-five patients (48%) reported significant improvement, 39 patients (41%) reported moderate improvement, and 10 patients (11%) reported little or no improvement. There were 3 (3%) complications, 13 (11%) hernia recurrences, and 15 patients (13%) developed a new pain in the inguinal region after the initial pain had resolved. The principles of CQI can be applied to a group of patients suffering from chronic pain after inguinal hernia repair. Based on these results additional process improvement ideas will be implemented in an attempt

  15. Evaluation of the Contralateral Inguinal Ring in Clinically Unilateral Inguinal Hernia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kokorowski, Paul J; Wang, Hsin-Hsiao Scott; Routh, Jonathan C; Hubert, Katherine C; Nelson, Caleb P

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The management of the contralateral inguinal canal in children with clinical unilateral inguinal hernia is controversial. Our objective was to systematically review the literature regarding management of the contralateral inguinal canal. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases (1940–2011) using ‘hernia’ and ‘inguinal’ and either ‘pediatric,’ ‘infant,’ or ‘child,’ to identify studies of pediatric (age≤21 yrs) patients with inguinal hernia. Among clinical unilateral hernia patients, we assessed the number of cases with contralateral patent processus (CPP) and incidence of subsequent clinical metachronous contralateral hernia (MCH). We evaluated three strategies for contralateral management: expectant management, laparoscopic evaluation or pre-operative ultrasound. Pooled estimates of MCH or CPP were generated with random effects by study when heterogeneity was found (I2>50%, or Cochrane’s Q p≥0.10). Results We identified 2,477 non-duplicated studies, 129 of which met our inclusion criteria and had sufficient information for quantitative analysis. The pooled incidence of MCH after open unilateral repair was 7.3% (95% CI 6.5%–8.1%). Laparoscopic examination identified CPP in 30% (95% CI 26%–34%). Lower age was associated with higher incidence of CPP (p<0.01). The incidence of MCH after a negative laparoscopic evaluation was 0.9% (95% CI 0.5%–1.3%). Significant heterogeneity was found in studies and pooled estimates should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions The literature suggests that laparoscopically identified CPP is a poor indicator of future contralateral hernia. Almost a third of patients will have a CPP, while less than one in 10 will develop MCH when managed expectantly. Performing contralateral hernia repair in patients with CPP results in overtreatment in roughly 2 out of 3 patients. PMID:23963735

  16. A complicated case of amyand's hernia involving a perforated appendix and its management using minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Ramli, Wisam; Khodear, Yahya; Aremu, Muyiwa; El-Sayed, Abdel Basset

    2016-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is a rare condition of inguinal hernia in which the appendix is incarcerated within the hernia sac through the internal ring. Complications include acute appendicitis and perforated appendicitis, which are rare in incidence, accounting for about 0.1% of cases. 1 These complications prove a diagnostic challenge due to their vague clinical presentation and atypical laboratory and radiological findings. Until recently, open appendectomy was the mainstay of treatment. Laparoscopic surgery offers a less invasive approach to confirming a diagnosis and serving as a therapeutic tool in equivocal cases. We report a case of a previously healthy 20-year-old male presenting with atypical signs and symptoms, as well as blood investigation results, and radiological findings of a perforated appendix within an Amyand's hernia. The patient was successfully managed using a minimally invasive laparoscopic appendectomy approach. Until recently, open appendectomy was considered the mainstay in the management of complicated Amyand's hernia. Laparoscopic surgery provides a new avenue for dealing with diagnostic uncertainty with advantages including faster recovery time, reduced hospital stay, and better quality of life. This case report highlights the concealing effects of an Amyand's hernia on a perforated appendix, the considerations required when an equivocal diagnosis present and the safe use of the minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of this rare condition. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Umbilical hernias: the cost of waiting.

    PubMed

    Strosberg, David S; Pittman, Matthew; Mikami, Dean

    2017-02-01

    Umbilical hernias are well described in the literature, but its impact on health care is less understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of non-operative management of umbilical hernias on cost, work absenteeism, and resource utilization. The Truven Health Database, consisting of 279 employers and over 3000 hospitals, was reviewed for all umbilical hernia patients, aged 18-64 who were enrolled in health plans for 12 months prior to surgery and 12 months after surgery. Patients were excluded if they had a recurrence or had been offered a "no surgery" approach within 1 year of the index date. The remaining patients were separated into surgery (open or laparoscopic repair) or no surgery (NS). Post-cost analysis at 90 and 365 days and estimated days off from work were reviewed for each group. The non-surgery cohort had a higher proportion of females and comorbidity index. Adjusted analysis showed significantly higher 90 and 365 costs for the surgery group (p < 0.0001), though the cost difference did decrease over time. NS group had significantly higher estimated days of health-care utilization at both the 90 (1.99 vs. 3.58 p < 0.0001) and 365 (8.69 vs. 11.04 p < 0.0001) day post-index mark. A subgroup analysis demonstrated laparoscopic repair had higher costs compared to open primarily due to higher index procedure costs (p < 0.05). Though the financial costs were found to be higher in the surgery group, the majority of these were due to the surgery itself. Significantly higher days of health-care utilization and estimated days off work were experienced in the NS group. It is our belief that early operative intervention will lead to decreased costs and resource utilization.

  18. Sportsman’s hernia? An ambiguous term

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption. PMID:27026822

  19. High-resolution manometry findings in patients with an intrathoracic stomach.

    PubMed

    Martinelo, Vanderlei; Mardiros Herbella, Fernando Augusto; Patti, Marco G

    2015-04-01

    Intrathoracic stomach is a rare finding. The real value of the high-resolution manometry (HRM) in the preoperative evaluation of these patients has not yet being fully tested. This study aims to evaluate: 1) the HRM pattern of patients with an intrathoracic stomach; and 2) HRM findings as predictors for prosthetic reinforcement of the hiatus. We reviewed 33 patients (27 women, mean age 66 years) with an intrathoracic stomach who underwent HRM. Fifteen patients did the HRM as part of preoperative workup and were operated on in our institution. All patients were submitted to a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. HRM results show that the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) was transposed in all patients. Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in 21 (63%) patients. The length of the hernia was 4 ± 2 cm (range, 1 to 9 cm). LES oscillation was observed in 23 (69%) patients with a mean of 1 ± 0.4 cm (range, 0.4 to 2 cm). Hiatal mesh reinforcement was necessary in five (33%) of the operated patients. HRM findings did not predict hiatal mesh reinforcement. Our results show that: 1) HRM has a poor sensibility for hiatal hernia diagnosis; 2) half of the patients with an intrathoracic stomach have a normal HRM; and 3) HRM does not predict mesh hiatal hernia repair.

  20. Academic performance in adolescence after inguinal hernia repair in infancy: a nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tom G; Pedersen, Jacob K; Henneberg, Steen W; Pedersen, Dorthe A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Morton, Neil S; Christensen, Kaare

    2011-05-01

    Although animal studies have indicated that general anesthetics may result in widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurocognitive impairment in the developing brain, results from human studies are scarce. We investigated the association between exposure to surgery and anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair in infancy and subsequent academic performance. Using Danish birth cohorts from 1986-1990, we compared the academic performance of all children who had undergone inguinal hernia repair in infancy to a randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample. Primary analysis compared average test scores at ninth grade adjusting for sex, birth weight, and paternal and maternal age and education. Secondary analysis compared the proportions of children not attaining test scores between the two groups. From 1986-1990 in Denmark, 2,689 children underwent inguinal hernia repair in infancy. A randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample consists of 14,575 individuals. Although the exposure group performed worse than the control group (average score 0.26 lower; 95% CI, 0.21-0.31), after adjusting for known confounders, no statistically significant difference (-0.04; 95% CI, -0.09 to 0.01) between the exposure and control groups could be demonstrated. However, the odds ratio for test score nonattainment associated with inguinal hernia repair was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04-1.35). Excluding from analyses children with other congenital malformations, the difference in mean test scores remained nearly unchanged (0.05; 95% CI, 0.00-0.11). In addition, the increased proportion of test score nonattainment within the exposure group was attenuated (odds ratio = 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.31). In the ethnically and socioeconomically homogeneous Danish population, we found no evidence that a single, relatively brief anesthetic exposure in connection with hernia repair in infancy reduced academic performance at age 15 or 16 yr after adjusting for known confounding factors. However, the

  1. Robotic Inguinal Hernia Repair: Technique and Early Experience.

    PubMed

    Arcerito, Massimo; Changchien, Eric; Bernal, Oscar; Konkoly-Thege, Adam; Moon, John

    2016-10-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has been shown to have multiple advantages compared with open repair such as less postoperative pain and earlier resume of daily activities with a comparable recurrence rate. We speculate robotic inguinal hernia repair may yield equivalent benefits, while providing the surgeon added dexterity. One hundred consecutive robotic inguinal hernia repairs with mesh were performed with a mean age of 56 years (25-96). Fifty-six unilateral hernias and 22 bilateral hernias were repaired amongst 62 males and 16 females. Polypropylene mesh was used for reconstruction. All but, two patients were completed robotically. Mean operative time was 52 minutes per hernia repair (45-67). Five patients were admitted overnight based on their advanced age. Regular diet was resumed immediately. Postoperative pain was minimal and regular activity was achieved after an average of four days. One patient recurred after three months in our earlier experience and he was repaired robotically. Mean follow-up time was 12 months. These data, compared with laparoscopic approach, suggest similar recurrence rates and postoperative pain. We believe comparative studies with laparoscopic approach need to be performed to assess the role robotic surgery has in the treatment of inguinal hernia repair.

  2. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  3. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-07-27

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment.

  4. A French hernia in Dubai: A case report.

    PubMed

    Al Abboudi, Yousif H; Busharar, Hajer A; Alozaibi, Labib S; Shah, Asnin; Ahmed, Rafya

    2018-05-31

    De Garengeot hernia was first described in 1731. It is rare type of hernia and there is no established mode of treatment for it to date. This work has been reported in line with the SCARE criteria (Agha et al., 2016). We present a case of a 72 years old male with a non-reducible right inguinal swelling diagnosed to be a femoral hernia with congested appendix within. There are less than 100 cases like this reported to date in the literature. Acute appendicitis within the femoral hernia is not a common problem to cross paths with. Prompt early treatment is recommended and directed at repairing the hernia after appendectomy. The method of treatment is controversial and not well established due to the scarcity of cases but open repair without mesh is the preferred approach. De Garengeot hernia is a rare hernia to encounter. Imaging modalities are a major tool in early diagnosis and early prompt surgery is crucial in preventing major complications that may lead to unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Inguinal hernia repair in women: is the laparoscopic approach superior?

    PubMed

    Ashfaq, A; McGhan, L J; Chapital, A B; Harold, K L; Johnson, D J

    2014-06-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced post-operative pain and earlier return to work in men. However, the role of laparoscopic hernia repair in women is not well reported. The aim of this study was to review the outcomes of the laparoscopic versus open repair of inguinal hernias in women and to discuss patients' considerations when choosing the approach. A retrospective chart review of all consecutive patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair from January 2005 to December 2009 at a single institution was conducted. Presentation characteristics and outcome measures including recurrence rates, post-operative pain and complications were compared in women undergoing laparoscopic versus open hernia repair. A total of 1,133 patients had an inguinal herniorrhaphy. Of these, 101 patients were female (9 %), with a total of 111 hernias. A laparoscopic approach was chosen in 44 % of patients. The majority of women (56 %) presented with groin pain as the primary symptom. Neither the mode of presentation nor the presenting symptoms significantly influenced the surgical approach. There were no statistically significant differences in hernia recurrence, post-operative neuralgia, seroma/hematoma formation or urinary retention between the two approaches (p < 0.05). A greater proportion of patients with bilateral hernias had a laparoscopic approach rather than an open technique (12 vs. 2 %, p = 0.042). Laparoscopic herniorrhaphy is as safe and efficacious as open repair in women, and should be considered when the diagnosis is in question, for management of bilateral hernias or when concomitant abdominal pathology is being addressed.

  6. A randomised controlled trial of ablation of Barrett's oesophagus with multipolar electrocoagulation versus argon plasma coagulation in combination with acid suppression: long term results

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P; Wani, S; Weston, A P; Bansal, A; Hall, M; Mathur, S; Prasad, A; Sampliner, R E

    2006-01-01

    Background Many modalities have been used to ablate Barrett's oesophagus (BO). However, long term results and comparative effectiveness are unknown. Aims Our aim was to compare the long term efficacy of achieving complete reversal (endoscopic and histological) between multipolar electrocoagulation (MPEC) and argon plasma coagulation (APC) in BO patients and assess factors influencing successful ablation. Methods Patients with BO, 2–6 cm long, underwent 24 hour pH testing on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Patients were then randomised by BO length to undergo ablation with MPEC or APC every 4–8 weeks until endoscopic reversal or maximal of six treatment sessions. Results Thirty five BO patients have been followed for at least two years following endoscopic ablation, 16 treated with MPEC and 19 with APC. There was complete reversal of BO in 24 patients (69%); 75% with MPEC and 63% with APC (p = 0.49). There was no difference in the number of sessions required in the two groups. There was no difference in age, pH results, BO length, PPI dose, or hiatal hernia size between patients with and without complete reversal. One patient developed an oesophageal stricture but there were no major complications such as bleeding or perforation. Conclusions In BO patients treated with MPEC or APC in combination with acid suppression, at long term follow up, complete reversal of BO can be maintained in approximately 70% of patients, irrespective of the technique. There are no predictors associated with achieving complete reversal of BO. Continued surveillance is still indicated in the post ablative setting. As yet, these techniques are not ready for clinical application (other than for high grade dysplasia or early oesophageal adenocarcinoma) and cannot be offered outside the research arena. PMID:16905695

  7. Obstructed Umbilical Hernia: A Normal Presentation with Abnormal Contents

    PubMed Central

    P Agrawal, Vijay; Narasimhaprasad, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical hernia is a common problem encountered in children. The rarity of finding cecum and appendix is probably due to the fact that the appendix is seldom found in the proximity of the umbilicus. It would, therefore, appear worthwhile to report the occurrence of cecum and an inflamed appendix with Ladd’s bands in an umbilical hernia of a child. The last case with similar presentation was presented in 1950s. How to cite this article Agrawal VP, Shetty NS, Narasimhaprasad A. Obstructed Umbilical Hernia: A Normal Presentation with Abnormal Contents. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2015;5(2):110-111. PMID:29201704

  8. Obstructed Umbilical Hernia: A Normal Presentation with Abnormal Contents.

    PubMed

    P Agrawal, Vijay; S Shetty, Nikhil; Narasimhaprasad, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical hernia is a common problem encountered in children. The rarity of finding cecum and appendix is probably due to the fact that the appendix is seldom found in the proximity of the umbilicus. It would, therefore, appear worthwhile to report the occurrence of cecum and an inflamed appendix with Ladd's bands in an umbilical hernia of a child. The last case with similar presentation was presented in 1950s. Agrawal VP, Shetty NS, Narasimhaprasad A. Obstructed Umbilical Hernia: A Normal Presentation with Abnormal Contents. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2015;5(2):110-111.

  9. Methodical endoscopic repair of congenital indirect inguinoscrotal hernia in adult male patients with completely patent processus vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Berney, C R

    2017-10-01

    Indirect inguinal hernia related to the presence of a patent processus vaginalis (PPV) in adult is estimated to be around 15%. Most surgeons would favor a standard anterior hernioplasty to minimize the potential risk of damaging the spermatic cord structures that are always intimately fused to the congenital peritoneal sac. This also means overlooking the potential benefit of alternative posterior techniques such as endoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair that is known to offer faster recovery with reduced risk of developing chronic groin pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of TEP approach for repair of adult inguinoscrotal hernias associated with completely PPV and to compare those results with a corresponding group of male patients undergoing an identical procedure, but with no demonstrated PPV. This is a prospective study of consecutive male patients diagnosed with inguinal hernia during a 10-year period and eligible for endoscopic TEP repair. Every recognized completely PPV were systematically divided taking care not to damage the attached cord structures and the proximal end closed with a pre-tied Endoloop of PDS. In both groups, all meshes were secured with fibrin sealant only. Patients were reviewed in clinic 2 and 6 weeks after the operation. Further follow-up was scheduled if deemed necessary. The primary post-operative outcome parameter was spermatic cord injury; secondary outcome parameters included groin pain, surgical complications, and recurrence. Nine hundred and thirty-nine hernia repairs were prospectively recorded during this period. All procedures were carried out endoscopically. A total of 41 patients with a median age of 27 years presented with 43 inguinoscrotal hernias (two bilateral) related to the presence of a congenital completely PPV. 72% of them were right-sided. No injury to the cord structures was recorded and only one complication (2.4%) occurred at 1 week post-operatively that was unrelated to the PPV

  10. Transcutaneous laparoscopic hernia repair in children: a prospective review of 275 hernia repairs with minimum 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sanjeev; Albanese, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Inguinal hernia in children is traditionally repaired through a groin incision by dissecting the hernia sac from the spermatic cord and suture ligating its base. A laparoscopic modification of this procedure involves placement of a transcutaneous suture around the neck of the sac through a 2-mm stab incision under visualization with an umbilically placed 2.7-mm 30 degrees lens. We reviewed the clinical outcome of this novel procedure at our institution. Prospective review of 275 hernias in 187 children (144 male, 43 female) performed laparoscopically by a single surgeon between September, 2002 and June, 2005. Data analyzed included side of hernia, incarceration, prematurity, recurrence rate, and complications. 30 left, 69 right, and 25 bilateral hernias were repaired. Sixty-three unilateral hernias had a contralateral patent processus vaginalis that was repaired. Mean operative time for a bilateral repair was 17 min. Two procedures were for recurrence after open repair. Forty-nine patients were ex-premature infants, accounting for 79 repairs. Fifteen cases followed reduction of incarcerated hernias, nine of whom were in preterm infants. Four out of 275 hernias (1.5%) recurred in four patients (mean age 4.5 years; 3 male, 1 female). There were four superficial wound infections, two umbilical granulomas, two hydroceles, and six self-resolving hematomas. There were no spermatic cord injuries, testicular atrophy, or symptoms of ilioinguinal nerve injuries. This novel laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is an effective method in children, with recurrence rates comparable to the traditional approach. Advantages of the laparoscopic operation include a "no-touch" approach to the spermatic cord structures, a virtually virgin operative field in cases of recurrence, and excellent cosmesis. Disadvantages include peritoneal access and nonhermetic seal in males.

  11. [Autodermal plastics and transposition of musculus rectus abdominus for giant postoperative hernias].

    PubMed

    Ianov, V N

    2000-01-01

    For reduction of postoperative hernia relapses rate the technique of the autodermal plastics and transposition of musculus rectus abdominalis (MRA) was developed. This technique consists of two-sided transection of the lateral abdominal muscles (oblique and transverse) on the pararectal line, transposition of MRA together with their sheaths medially by autodermal continuous lacing to complete adaptation of the edges. Closing of the lateral muscle-aponeurotic defects was carried out with use of the double autodermal grafts which were prepared by Yanov's technique. This technique is indicated for giant postoperative hernias and pronounced diastase of the MRA in people with well developed abdominal muscles. This technique was used in 11 patients without complications after surgery. Long-term results are available for all the patients. The relapses were absent. The technique, developed by us, provides first of all restoration of physiological function of the MRA, and also closing of the abdominal wall muscle-aponeurotic defect.

  12. [The transrectus sheath preperitoneal procedure: a safe, effective and cheap surgical approach to inguinal hernia?].

    PubMed

    Prins, M W Wiesje; Voropai, D A Dasha; van Laarhoven, C J H M Kees; Akkersdijk, Willem L

    2013-01-01

    The main complication of surgery for inguinal hernia is chronic postoperative pain. This is often reported following the Lichtenstein procedure. A new, open surgical technique for the repair of inguinal hernia has been developed. This procedure is called the transrectus sheath preperitoneal procedure (TREPP). At TREPP a lightweight mesh with a ring made of memory metal is introduced into the preperitoneal space through the transrectus sheath. The first results of this operative technique are very promising: short operation time, short learning curve and not many patients with chronic postoperative pain. In a randomised, multi-centre study which will start mid-2013 (ISRCTN18591339), the TREPP procedure is compared with the transinguinal preperitoneal procedure. The primary outcome measure of this study is chronic postoperative pain.

  13. Laparoscopic recurrent inguinal hernia repair during the learning curve: it can be done?

    PubMed

    Bracale, Umberto; Sciuto, Antonio; Andreuccetti, Jacopo; Merola, Giovanni; Pecchia, Leandro; Melillo, Paolo; Pignata, Giusto

    2017-01-01

    Trans-Abdominal Preperitoneal Patch (TAPP) repairs for Recurrent Hernia (RH) is a technically demanding procedure. It has to be performed only by surgeons with extensive experience in the laparoscopic approach. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the surgical safety and the efficacy of TAPP for RH performed in a tutoring program by surgeons in practice (SP). All TAPP repairs for RH performed by the same surgical team have been included in the study. We have evaluated the results of three SP during their learning curve in a tutoring program. Then these results have been compared to those of a highly experienced laparoscopic surgeon (Benchmark). A total of 530 TAPP repairs have been performed. Among these, 83 TAPP have been executed for RH, of which 43 by the Benchmark and 40 by the SP. When we have compared the outcomes of the Benchmark with those of SP, no significant difference has been observed about morbidity and recurrence while the operative time has been significantly longer for the SP. No intraoperative complications have occurred. International guidelines urge that TAPP repair for RH has to be performed only by surgeons with extensive experience in the laparoscopic approach. The results of the present study demonstrate that TAPP for RH could be performed also by surgeons in training during a learning program. We retain that an adequate tutoring program could lead a surgeon in practice to perform more complex hernia procedures without jeopardizing patient safety throughout the learning curve period. Laparoscopy, Learning Curve, Recurrent Hernia.

  14. CT and US findings of ovarian torsion within an incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Park Mee; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Yul; Yang, Ik; Yang, Dae Hyun; Hwang, Ji-Young

    2015-02-01

    Inguinal hernia is relatively common in children. Although inguinal hernia is not frequently encountered in girls in comparison to boys, there are occasional cases of uterine or ovarian herniation in female indirect inguinal hernia. Incarcerated ovary in hernia sac has the risk of torsion and strangulation. We present an 8-year-old girl with painful mass in her left groin. With computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US), we made the diagnosis of ovarian strangulation within an incarcerated inguinal hernia. Since ultrasound is primarily used for evaluation of groin mass, CT findings of an incarcerated inguinal hernia is rarely reported.

  15. Laparoscopic approach to incarcerated inguinal hernia in children.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mete; Hückstedt, Thomas; Schier, Felix

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the laparoscopic approach to incarcerated inguinal hernia in children. After unsuccessful manual reduction, 29 patients (aged 3 weeks to 7 years; median, 10 weeks; 44 boys, 15 girls) with incarcerated inguinal hernia underwent immediate laparoscopy. The hernial content was reduced in a combined technique of external manual pressure and internal pulling by forceps. The bowel was inspected, and the hernia was repaired. In all patients, the procedure was successful. No conversion to the open approach was required. Immediate laparoscopic herniorrhaphy in the same session was added. No complications occurred. Laparoscopy allowed for simultaneous reduction under direct visual control, inspection of the incarcerated organ, and definitive repair of the hernia. Technically, it appears easier than the conventional approach because of the internal inguinal ring being widened by intraabdominal carbon dioxide insufflation. The hospital stay is shorter.

  16. Case Report-Inguinoscrotal ureteral hernia diagnosed on micturating cystourethrography.

    PubMed

    Sripathi, Smiti; Rajagopal, Kv; Kakkar, Chandan; Polnaya, Ashwin

    2011-07-01

    The presence of a ureter within an inguinal hernia is an extremely rare entity, usually discovered incidentally during herniorrhaphy and may pose a surgical risk. Early preoperative diagnosis is crucial to guide proper surgical approach and to preserve renal function.

  17. Incisional hernia prevention and use of mesh. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Granados, Pilar; López-Cano, Manuel; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Muysoms, Filip; García-Alamino, Josep; Pereira-Rodríguez, José Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Incisional hernias are a very common problem, with an estimated incidence around 15-20% of all laparotomies. Evisceration is another important problem, with a lower rate (2.5-3%) but severe consequences for patients. Prevention of both complications is an essential objective of correct patient treatment due to the improved quality of life and cost savings. This narrative review intends to provide an update on incisional hernia and evisceration prevention. We analyze the current criteria for proper abdominal wall closure and the possibility to add prosthetic reinforcement in certain cases requiring it. Parastomal, trocar-site hernias and hernias developed after stoma closure are included in this review. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  19. Simultaneous Umbilical Hernia Repair with Transumbilical Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Placement.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Michael J; Loukas, Marios; Oakes, W Jerry; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-01-01

    Recently, placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt via a transumbilical approach has been reported. Herein, we report the repair of an umbilical hernia via the same incision and introduction of the distal end of a ventricultoperitoneal shunt into the peritoneal cavity in 3 patients. A case illustration is included. Both hernia repair and placement of the distal end of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt were uncomplicated in our small case series. To our knowledge, simultaneous repair of an umbilical hernia followed by transumbilical shunt placement has not been reported. As umbilical hernias are so common in infants, this finding, based on our experience, should not exclude placement of peritoneal tubing in the same setting. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Rare Abdominal Wall Malformation: Case Report of Umbilical Cord Hernia.

    PubMed

    Gliha, Andro; Car, Andrija; Višnjić, Stjepan; Zupancic, Bozidar; Kondza, Karmen; Petracic, Ivan

    The umbilical cord hernia is the rarest form of abdominal wall malformations, anatomically completely different from gastroschisis and omphalocele. It occurs due to the permanent physiological evisceration of abdominal organs into umbilical celom and persistence of a patent umbilical ring. The umbilical cord hernia is often mistaken for omphalocele and called "small omphalocele". Here we present a case of a female newborn with umbilical cord hernia treated in our Hospital. After preoperative examinations surgery was done on the second day of life. The abdominal wall was closed without tension. The aim of this article is to present the importance of the proper diagnose of these three entities and to stimulate academic community for the answer, is this umbilical cord hernia or small omphalocele.

  1. Congenital hernia of cord: an often misdiagnosed entity

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Rubin; Satti, Mohamed; Lee, Quoc; Vettraino, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hernia of the cord, also known as umbilical cord hernia, is an often misdiagnosed and under-reported entity, easily confused with a small omphalocele. It is different from postnatally diagnosed umbilical hernias and is believed to arise from persistent physiological mid-gut herniation. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 5000. Unlike an omphalocele, it is considered benign and is not linked with chromosomal anomalies. It has been loosely associated with intestinal anomalies, suggesting the need for a complete fetal anatomical ultrasound evaluation. We present a case of a fetal umbilical cord hernia diagnosed in a 28-year-old woman at 21 weeks gestation. The antenatal and intrapartum courses were uncomplicated. It was misdiagnosed postnatally as a small omphalocele, causing unwarranted anxiety in the parents. Increased awareness and knowledge of such an entity among health professionals is important to prevent unwarranted anxiety from misdiagnosis, and inadvertent bowel injury during cord clamping at delivery. PMID:25899514

  2. Sonography in the postoperative evaluation of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Furtschegger, A; Sandbichler, P; Judmaier, W; Gstir, H; Steiner, E; Egender, G

    1995-09-01

    We evaluated the use of sonography as a means of assessing hernial occlusion and possible postoperative changes such as hematomas or seromas in the inguinal and scrotal regions after 1139 laparoscopic repairs of hernias between August 1992 and November 1994. Changes after laparoscopic hernia repair were found in 307 patients (27%). Hematomas or seromas were seen in 132 patients, protrusion of the prosthetic mesh in 17, mesh infection in two, and small bowel entrapment in an insufficient peritoneal suture in two. Recurrences were diagnosed correctly in six patients, mobile preperitoneal lipomas in five. Sonography is useful in the evaluation of complications after laparoscopic hernia repair, including recurrent hernia. In the absence of symptoms, sonography is not indicated.

  3. [Abdominal wall reconstruction with collagen membrane in an animal model of abdominal hernia. A preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Łukasiewicz, Aleksander; Drewa, Tomasz; Skopińska-Wiśniewska, Joanna; Molski, Stanisław

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal hernia repair is one of the most common surgical procedures. Current data indicate that the best treatment results are achieved with use of synthetic material to reinforce weakened abdominal wall. Prosthetic materials utilized for hernia repair induce adhesions with underlying viscera. They should be therefore separated from them by a layer of peritoneum otherwise adhesions may cause to serious complications such as bowel-skin fistulas. The aim of our work was to determine if implantation of our collagen membrane into abdominal wall defect induce adhesions in rat model of ventral hernia. The collagen film was obtained by acetic acid extraction of rat tail tendons and than casting the soluble fraction onto polyethylene shits. Abdominal wall defect was created in 10 Wistar male rats. Collagen membranes were implanted into the defect using interrupted polypropylene stitches. After 3 months of observation all animals were sacrificed. No adhesions between path structure and bowel developed. In one often rats (10%) adhesion between fixating stitch and omentum was observed. Complete mesothelium lining and vascular ingrowth were microscopically observed within implanted structure. Promising result requires further confirmation in a larger series of animals.

  4. Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia Mesh Repair: Effect on Testicular Blood Flow and Sperm Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Krnić, Dragan; Družijanić, Nikica; Štula, Ivana; Čapkun, Vesna; Krnić, Duška

    2016-05-05

    BACKGROUND The aim of our study was to determine an influence of incarcerated inguinal hernia mesh repair on testicular circulation and to investigate consequent sperm autoimmunity as a possible reason for infertility. MATERIAL AND METHODS This prospective study was performed over a 3-year period, and 50 male patients were included; 25 of these patients underwent elective open mesh hernia repair (Group I). Group II consisted of 25 patients who had surgery for incarcerated inguinal hernia. Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the testicular blood flow and blood samplings for antisperm antibodies (ASA) was performed in all patients before the surgery, on the second day, and 5 months after. Main outcome ultrasound measures were resistive index (RI) and pulsative index (PI), as their values are inversely proportional to testicular blood flow. RESULTS In Group I, RI, and PI temporarily increased after surgery and then returned to basal values in the late postoperative period. Friedman analysis showed a significant difference in RI and PI for all measurements in Group II (p<0.05), with a significant decrease between the preoperative, early, and late postoperative periods. All final values were within reference range, including ASA, despite significant increase of ASA in the late postoperative period. CONCLUSIONS Although statistically significant differences in values of testicular flow parameters and immunologic sensitization in observed time, final values remained within the reference ranges in all patients. Our results suggest that the polypropylene mesh probably does not cause any clinically significant effect on testicular flow and immunologic response in both groups of patients.

  5. Laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of incarcerated indirect inguinal hernia in children.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yiyu; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Fang; Zou, Huaxin; Cao, Hui; Wen, Cheng

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to explore the feasibility and the safety of the laparoscopic surgery for incarcerated indirect inguinal hernia (IIH) in children. From January 2012 to December 2014, 64 children were enrolled into this study. All 64 patients received laparoscopic surgery and we reviewed their perioperative and postoperative follow-up studies. In addition, we enrolled 60 cases of children who received traditional surgery of IIH administered through minimally invasive surgery as the control group. Results from the present study showed that the mean operation time for the laparoscopic group was 41.5 min (range, 15-80 min) which was significantly shorter than the control group. Nine cases developed incarcerated intestine necrosis, expanded umbilical incision and parallel resection anastomosis. They received laparoscopic hernia sac high ligation. Only 5 cases developed scrotum edema after the surgery. The postoperative length of the stay ranged from 2 to 7 days (average, 3.2). The postoperative follow-up was from 6 months to 1 year and no relapse or secondary testicular atrophy was observed in the laparoscopic group. The operation time, incidence of postoperative complications and length of stay in the laparoscopic group were decreased compared to the control group, and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, laparoscopic surgery treatment for incarcerated inguinal hernia is safe and feasible and produced better results compared with the alternative.

  6. Congenital left paraduodenal hernia causing chronic abdominal pain and abdominal catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Felsted, Amy E; Masand, Prakash M; Mothner, Brent A; Nuchtern, Jed G; Rodriguez, J Ruben; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A

    2015-04-01

    Paraduodenal hernias are the most common type of congenital internal hernia. Because of its overall rare incidence, this entity is often overlooked during initial assessment of the patient. Lack of specific diagnostic criteria also makes diagnosis exceedingly difficult, and the resulting diagnostic delays can lead to tragic outcomes for patients. Despite these perceived barriers to timely diagnosis, there may be specific radiographic findings that, when combined with the appropriate constellation of clinical symptoms, would aid in diagnosis. This patient first presented at 8 years of age with vague symptoms of postprandial emesis, chronic abdominal pain, nausea, and syncope. Over the span of 6 years he was evaluated 2 to 3 times a year with similar complaints, all of which quickly resolved spontaneously. He underwent multiple laboratory, imaging, and endoscopic studies, which were nondiagnostic. It was not until he developed signs of a high-grade obstruction and extremis that he was found to have a large left paraduodenal hernia that had volvulized around the superior mesenteric axis. This resulted in the loss of the entire superior mesenteric axis distribution of the small and large intestine and necrosis of the duodenum. In cases of chronic intermittent obstruction without clear etiology, careful attention and consideration should be given to the constellation of symptoms, imaging studies, and potential use of diagnostic laparoscopy. Increased vigilance by primary care and consulting physicians is necessary to detect this rare but readily correctable condition. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. [Prophylactics and treatment of postoperative hernias of the lateral abdominal walls using polypropylene endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Sukovatykh, B S; Valuĭskaia, N M; Pravednikova, N V; Netiaga, A A; Kas'ianova, M A; Zhukovskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of complex examination and treatment of 151 patients after planned and performed surgical interventions on organs of the retroperitoneal space was made. The patients were divided into 4 groups. The first group (of comparison) included 46 patients who were treated by lumbotomy for different diseases of organs of the urinary system. In 35 patients of the second group (prophylactics) the indications were determined and in 20 patients preventive endoprosthesis of the lateral abdominal wall using polypropylene endoprosthesis was fulfilled. Herniotomy with plasty of the lateral abdominal wall using local tissues was fulfilled in 30 patients. Prosthesing hernioplasty of the lateral abdominal wall was fulfilled in 40 patients of the main group. It was found that preventive endoprosthesis of the lateral abdominal wall allowed prevention of progressing anatomo-functional i/isufficiency and the appearance of postoperative hernias. The application of polypropylene endoprosthesis for the treatment of postoperative hernias allows obtaining 36.4% more good results as compared with the control group, 21.7% decreased number of satisfactory results and no recurrent hernias.

  8. Costs of inguinal hernia repair associated with using different medical devices in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Marešová, Petra; Peteja, Matus; Lerch, Milan; Zonca, Pavel; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most frequently carried out operations worldwide. The purpose of this article is to analyze the costs of hernia repair and to specify the loss or profit made under the conditions in the Czech Republic with respect to the currently used medical devices and approaches. This article is based on the Drummond and O'Brien methodology, which specifically determines the content of direct and indirect costs in health services. The costs of operations during the period 2010-2014 were specified for a total of 746 patients. The cost details are described for four patients who represent the use of different types of medical devices. The procedure was a laparoscopic surgery in all cases. The total costs of inguinal hernia repairs (as per 2015 currency conversion rate) are €1,248,579; only part is covered from public funds, resulting in a loss of €218,359 for the hospital. The obtained data indicate that this operation is unprofitable for hospitals under the present conditions. The loss in the subject facility amounts to 17% of the total cost, which is the cost incurred by the hospital in the Czech Republic. The study conducted in the Czech Republic refers to different economic results when using various medical device types. So the medical device selection depends on advantages or disadvantages for the patients, as well as on the cost effectiveness for the hospital.

  9. Randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open mesh repair for inguinal hernia: outcome and cost

    PubMed Central

    Wellwood, James; Sculpher, Mark J; Stoker, David; Nicholls, Graham J; Geddes, Cathy; Whitehead, Anne; Singh, Rameet; Spiegelhalter, David

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To compare tension-free open mesh hernioplasty under local anaesthetic with transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair under general anaesthetic. Design: A randomised controlled trial of 403 patients with inguinal hernias. Setting: Two acute general hospitals in London between May 1995 and December 1996. Subjects: 400 patients with a diagnosis of groin hernia, 200 in each group. Main outcome measures: Time until discharge, postoperative pain, and complications; patients’ perceived health (SF-36), duration of convalescence, and patients’ satisfaction with surgery; and health service costs. Results: More patients in the open group (96%) than in the laparoscopic group (89%) were discharged on the same day as the operation (χ2=6.7; 1 df; P=0.01). Although pain scores were lower in the open group while the effect of the local anaesthetic persisted (proportional odds ratio at 2 hours 3.5 (2.3 to 5.1)), scores after open repair were significantly higher for each day of the first week (0.5 (0.3 to 0.7) on day 7) and during the second week (0.7 (0.5 to 0.9)). At 1 month there was a greater improvement (or less deterioration) in mean SF-36 scores over baseline in the laparoscopic group compared with the open group on seven of eight dimensions, reaching significance on five. For every activity considered the median time until return to normal was significantly shorter for the laparoscopic group. Patients randomised to laparoscopic repair were more satisfied with surgery at 1 month and 3 months after surgery. The mean cost per patient of laparoscopic repair was £335 (95% confidence interval £228 to £441) more than the cost of open repair. Conclusion: This study confirms that laparoscopic hernia repair has considerable short term clinical advantages after discharge compared with open mesh hernioplasty, although it was more expensive. Key messages In the 4 hours after surgery laparoscopic hernia repair with general anaesthesia causes more pain

  10. Left Sided Amyand's Hernia, A Rare Occurance: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ravishankaran, Praveen; Mohan, G; Srinivasan, A; Ravindran, G; Ramalingam, A

    2013-06-01

    This is a case report about a 35 year old man admitted with complains of obstructed left sided inguinal hernia. On exploration of the left inguinal canal to our surprise a normal appendix was found in addition to a gangrenous omentum. Resection of the gangrenous omentum was done. Appendectomy was done. This case is reported for its rare occurance as only three such cases of left sided amyand's hernia has been reported so far in literature[4-6].

  11. Laparoscopic Repair of Sportman's Hernia - The Trinidad Experience.

    PubMed

    Gopeesingh, Anyl; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Seetahal, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Sportman's hernia: (Athletic pubalgia) is an uncommon and poorly understood condition afflicting athletic individuals. Sufferers complain of chronic groin pain and often present diagnostic dilemmas to physicians and physiotherapists. We present a series of cases illustrating the varying presentations of sportman's hernia and diagnostic approaches that can be utilized to exclude common differentials. We also describe laparoscopic mesh repair as an effective treatment option for this condition. © 2013 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incarcerated umbilical hernia leading to small bowel ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-01-01

    A 59-year-old male with history of hepatitis C, refractory ascites requiring multiple paracentesis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement presented to the emergency department with 2 days of abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed blood pressure of 104/66 and pulse of 94. The abdomen was remarkable for distention and a tender incarcerated umbilical hernia. The skin overlying the hernia was pale with areas of necrosis. The patient immediately underwent laparotomy which was successful. PMID:22679256

  13. Incarcerated umbilical hernia leading to small bowel ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-09-19

    A 59-year-old male with history of hepatitis C, refractory ascites requiring multiple paracentesis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement presented to the emergency department with 2 days of abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed blood pressure of 104/66 and pulse of 94. The abdomen was remarkable for distention and a tender incarcerated umbilical hernia. The skin overlying the hernia was pale with areas of necrosis. The patient immediately underwent laparotomy which was successful.

  14. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum in patients with abdominal-wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Mayagoitia, J C; Suárez, D; Arenas, J C; Díaz de León, V

    2006-06-01

    Induction of preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum is an elective procedure in patients with hernias with loss of domain. A prospective study was carried out from June 2003 to May 2005 at the Hospital de Especialidades, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Leon, Mexico. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum was induced using a double-lumen intraabdominal catheter inserted through a Veress needle and daily insufflation of ambient air. Variables analyzed were age, sex, body mass index, type, location and size of defective hernia, number of previous repairs, number of days pneumoperitoneum was maintained, type of hernioplasty, and incidence of complications. Of 12 patients, 2 were excluded because it was technically impossible to induce pneumoperitoneum. Of the remaining 10 patients, 60% were female and 40% were male. The patients' average age was 51.5 years, average body mass index was 34.7, and evolution time of their hernias ranged from 8 months to 23 years. Nine patients had ventral hernias and one had an inguinal hernia. Pneumoperitoneum was maintained for an average of 9.3 days and there were no serious complications relating to the puncture or the maintenance of the pneumoperitoneum. One patient who previously had undergone a mastectomy experienced minor complications. We were able to perform hernioplasty on all patients, eight with the Rives technique, one with supra-aponeurotic mesh, and one using the Lichtenstein method for inguinal hernia repair. One patient's wound became infected postoperatively. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum is a safe procedure that is easy to perform and that facilitates surgical hernia repair in patients with hernia with loss of domain. Complications are infrequent, patient tolerability is adequate, and the proposed modification to the puncture technique makes the procedure even safer.

  15. Post-traumatic diaphragmatic hernias - importance of basic radiographic investigations.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, E

    2013-05-03

    This case presentation highlights important principles in the management of post-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia. A suggestive history should prompt early diagnosis even if the patient appears well. The chest radiograph, although not pathognomonic, is extremely useful in the detection of diaphragmatic hernia if accurately interpreted. Herniated bowel is at high risk of strangulation, especially in the presence of a 'ribbon sign'. Delayed operative intervention can prove fatal.

  16. WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Emergency repair of complicated abdominal hernias is associated with poor prognosis and a high rate of post-operative complications. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013, during the 2nd Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery with the goal of defining recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. PMID:24289453

  17. Robotic assisted laparoscopic repair of a symptomatic ureterosciatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Regelman, Mikhail; Raman, Jay D

    2016-04-01

    Ureterosciatic hernias (USH) are a rare entity and to date there have been limited case reports detailing their presentation, diagnosis, and management. Until recently, repair of ureterosciatic hernias has been performed via open, endoscopic, or purely laparoscopic approaches. We present the second known published case of a robotic approach to the USH repair with detailed outline of the surgical technique accompanied by video recording from the operative procedure.

  18. Beware of spontaneous reduction "en masse" of inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Berney, C R

    2015-12-01

    Reduction 'en masse' of inguinal hernia is a rare entity defined as manual reduction of an external hernia sac back through the abdominal wall but where its content still remains incarcerated or strangulated into a displaced position, most often in the pre-peritoneal space. Small bowel obstruction habitually follows requiring urgent repair, preferentially via a trans-abdominal approach. Pre-operative clinical diagnosis is difficult and abdominal CT-scan imaging is the investigation of choice.

  19. Acute testicular ischemia caused by incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Orth, Robert C; Towbin, Alexander J

    2012-02-01

    Acute testicular ischemia caused by an incarcerated inguinal hernia usually affects infants. There are few reports of diagnosis using US, and the effect of long-standing reducible hernias on testicular growth in infants and children is unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of testicular ischemia secondary to an incarcerated inguinal hernia at scrotal sonography and to determine the effect on testicular size at diagnosis. A hospital database was used to locate scrotal sonography examinations documenting an inguinal hernia, and images were reviewed for signs of testicular ischemia. Testicular volumes were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. A total of 147 patients were identified with an inguinal hernia (age 1 day to 23 years, average 6 years). Ten patients (6.8%) had associated testicular ischemia (age 3 weeks to 6 months, average 9 weeks) and showed a statistically significant increase in ipsilateral testicular size compared to the contralateral testicle (P = 0.012). Patients without testicular ischemia did not show a significant difference in testicular size, regardless of patient age. An incarcerated inguinal hernia should be considered as a cause of acute testicular ischemia in infants younger than 6 months of age.

  20. Long-term quality of life and outcomes following robotic assisted TAPP inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Iraniha, Andrew; Peloquin, Joshua

    2018-06-01

    long-term complications. All patients completed the pain assessment survey and the median pain score, 3 days after the surgery was 3. Narcotics were used for an average of 3.1 days. The modified SF 12 survey assessing for quality of life before and 12-36 months after surgery was completed and returned by 29 patients (response rate of 35.4% and median follow-up of 32 months). Only one recurrence was reported which was repaired with open technique. The analysis of the SF 12 survey that evaluated patient's quality of life, pain score and the ability to perform activities of daily living before and after surgery revealed a significant improvement in those measures 12-36 months after the surgery compare to their baseline. Hernia recurrence, chronic pain and physical impairment are the major long-term concerns after any type of inguinal hernia repair. Our results demonstrate that robotic assisted TAPP inguinal hernia repair appears to be a technically feasible, reproducible and safe minimally invasive alternative with low recurrence, low chronic pain and high health-related quality of life in the long term.

  1. Postoperative urinary retention after inguinal hernia repair: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Blair, A B; Dwarakanath, A; Mehta, A; Liang, H; Hui, X; Wyman, C; Ouanes, J P P; Nguyen, H T

    2017-12-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is a common general surgery procedure with low morbidity. However, postoperative urinary retention (PUR) occurs in up to 22% of patients, resulting in further extraneous treatments.This single institution series investigates whether patient comorbidities, surgical approaches, and anesthesia methods are associated with developing PUR after inguinal hernia repairs. This is a single institution retrospective review of inguinal hernia from 2012 to 2015. PUR was defined as patients without a postoperative urinary catheter who subsequently required bladder decompression due to an inability to void. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to quantify the associations between patient, surgical, and anesthetic factors with PUR. Stratification analysis was conducted at age of 50 years. 445 patients were included (42.9% laparoscopic and 57.1% open). Overall rate of PUR was 11.2% (12% laparoscopic, 10.6% open, and p = 0.64). In univariate analysis, PUR was significantly associated with patient age >50 and history of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Risk stratification for age >50 revealed in this cohort a 2.49 times increased PUR risk with lack of intraoperative bladder decompression (p = 0.013). At our institution, we found that patient age, history of BPH, and bilateral repair were associated with PUR after inguinal hernia repair. No association was found with PUR and laparoscopic vs open approach. Older males may be at higher risk without intraoperative bladder decompression, and therefore, catheter placement should be considered in this population, regardless of surgical approach.

  2. Multicenter review of robotic versus laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: is there a role for robotics?

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter A; May, Audriene C; Mo, Jiandi; Cherla, Deepa V; Santillan, Monica Rosales; Kim, Steven; Ryan, Heidi; Shah, Shinil K; Wilson, Erik B; Tsuda, Shawn

    2018-04-01

    The utilization of robotic platforms for general surgery procedures such as hernia repair is growing rapidly in the United States. A limited amount of data are available evaluating operative outcomes in comparison to standard laparoscopic surgery. We completed a retrospective review comparing robotic and laparoscopic ventral hernia repair to provide safety and outcomes data to help design a future prospective trial design. A retrospective review of 215 patients undergoing ventral hernia repair (142 robotic and 73 laparoscopic) was completed at two large academic centers. Primary outcome measure evaluated was recurrence. Secondary outcomes included incidence of primary fascial closure, and surgical site occurrences. Propensity for treatment match comparison demonstrated that robotic repair was associated with a decreased incidence of recurrence (2.1 versus 4.2%, p < 0.001) and surgical site occurrence (4.2 versus 18.8%, p < 0.001). This may be because robotic repair was associated with increased incidence of primary fascial closure (77.1 versus 66.7%, p < 0.01). Analysis of baseline patient populations showed that robotic repairs were completed on patients with lower body mass index (28.1 ± 3.6 versus 34.2 ± 6.4, p < 0.001) and fewer comorbidities. Our retrospective data show that robotic repair was associated with decreased recurrence and surgical site occurrence. However, the differences noted in the patient populations limit the interpretability of these results. As adoption of robotic ventral hernia repair increases, prospective trials need to be designed in order to investigate the efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness of this evolving technique.

  3. Local Anaesthetic Inguinal Hernia Repair Performed Under Supervision: Early and Long-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, P; Woodward, A

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Local anaesthetic inguinal hernia repair may be technically demanding. There are minimal data regarding the outcomes of local anaesthetic hernia repair by trainees in comparison with consultants. PATIENTS AND METHODS All consecutive local anaesthetic repairs performed by trainees and one consultant over a 9-year period were reviewed. Operation time, volume of local anaesthetic used, early and long-term complications were assessed. A postal survey was conducted to assess chronic groin pain and satisfaction rates. RESULTS A total of 369 repairs were reviewed of which 265 repairs were performed by the consultant and 104 by trainees. The male-to-female ratio was 25:1 and the median age of the study group was 61 years (range, 18–93 years). The volume of local anaesthetic used was significantly higher for trainees than the consultant (42 ml versus 69 ml; P = 0.03). The operative time for the consultant and the trainees was 35 min and 40 min (P = 0.8). The day-case rate was higher for the consultant than the trainees (84% versus 69%; P = 0.02). Three patients operated by trainees required conversion to a general anaesthetic repair. No difference was noted in chronic groin pain (consultant 28% versus trainees 32%; P = 0.52) on the postal survey. The median follow-up was 5 years (range, 2–7 years). CONCLUSIONS Local anaesthetic inguinal hernia repair can be performed safely by surgical trainees under consultant supervision with minimal short- and long-term morbidity. A large volume dilute solution of Lignocaine and Marcaine is recommended when hernia repair is undertaken by trainees. PMID:19785942

  4. Single-Port Laparoscopic Parastomal Hernia Repair with Modified Sugarbaker Technique

    PubMed Central

    Turingan, Isidro; Zajkowska, Marta; Tran, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair with modified Sugarbaker technique has become increasingly the operation of choice because of its low recurrence rates. This study aimed to assess feasibility, safety, and efficiency of performing the same operation with single-incision laparoscopic surgery. Materials and Methods: All patients referred from March 2010 to February 2013 were considered for single-port laparoscopic repair with modified Sugarbaker technique. A SILS port (Covidien, Norwalk, Connecticut, USA) was used together with conventional straight dissecting instruments and a 5.5- mm/52-cm/30° laparoscope. Important technical aspects include modified dissection techniques, namely, “inline” and “chopsticks” to overcome loss of triangulation, insertion of a urinary catheter into an ostomy for ostomy limb identification, safe adhesiolysis by avoiding electocautery, saline -jet dissection to demarcate tissue planes, dissection of an entire laparotomy scar to expose incidental incisional hernias, adequate mobilization of an ostomy limb for lateralization, and wide overlapping of defect with antiadhesive mesh. Results: Of 6 patients, 5 underwent single-port laparoscopic repair, and 1 (whose body mass index [BMI] of 39.4 kg/m2 did not permit SILS port placement) underwent multiport repair. Mean defect size was 10 cm, and mean mesh size was 660 cm2 with 4 patients having incidental incisional hernias repaired by the same mesh. Mean operation time was 270 minutes, and mean hospital stay was 4 days. Appliance malfunction ceased immediately, and pain associated with parastomal hernia disappeared. There was no recurrence with a follow-up of 2 to 36 months. Conclusion: Compared with multiport repair, single-port laparoscopic parastomal repair with modified Sugarbaker technique is safe and efficient, and it may eventually become the standard of care. PMID:24680140

  5. The etiology of indirect inguinal hernia in adults: congenital or acquired?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z P; Yang, B; Wen, L Q; Zhang, Y C; Lai, D M; Li, Y R; Chen, S

    2015-10-01

    During hernioplasty focal thickened tissue containing smooth muscle is found at the neck of the hernia sac in most patients with indirect inguinal hernia. These thickenings may be related to the processus vaginalis and reveal the etiology of indirect inguinal hernia. The study included 50 male adults with indirect inguinal hernia and 50 male adults with direct inguinal hernia, all of them were initial cases. Hernioplasty and excision of the hernia sac were performed, meanwhile anatomical features of the hernia sac and the spermatic cord were recorded, then followed by histological investigation of the hernia sacs. Focal thickenings were observed at the neck of the hernia sac in 88 % of adults with indirect inguinal hernia. Dense adhesion between the hernia sac and the spermatic cord was found where the thickening located. Histological examination identified smooth muscle cells in 57 % of the thickened tissues. No similar findings were observed in patients with direct inguinal hernia. The focal thickening which contains smooth muscle tissue may be remnant of the processus vaginalis after its obliteration. In other word, the presence of the thickening means that fusion of the processus vaginalis has previously taken place. Thus, most indirect inguinal hernias in adults may represent acquired diseases.

  6. Combined open and laparoscopic approach to chronic pain after inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jennifer E; Stefanidis, Demitrios; Dolce, Charles J; Iannitti, David A; Kercher, Kent W; Heniford, B Todd

    2008-08-01

    Chronic groin pain is the most frequent long-term complication after inguinal hernia repair affecting up to 34 per cent of patients. Traditional surgical management includes groin exploration, mesh removal, and neurectomy. We evaluate outcomes of a combined laparoscopic and open approach to chronic pain after inguinal herniorrhaphy. All patients undergoing surgical exploration for chronic pain after inguinal herniorrhaphy were analyzed. In most, the operation consisted of mesh removal (open or laparoscopic), neurectomy, and placement of mesh in the opposite location of the first mesh (laparoscopic if the first was open and vice-versa). Main outcome measures included pain status, numbness, and hernia recurrence. Twenty-one patients (16 male and 5 female) with a mean age of 41 years (22-51 years) underwent surgical treatment for unilateral (n = 18) or bilateral (n = 3) groin pain. Percutaneous nerve block was unsuccessful in all patients. Four had previous surgery for pain. There were no complications. With a minimum of 6 weeks follow-up, 20 of 21 patients reported significant improvement or resolution of symptoms. A combined laparoscopic and open approach for postherniorrhaphy groin pain results in excellent patient satisfaction with minimal morbidity. It may be the preferred technique for the definitive management of chronic neuralgia after hernia repair.

  7. Clinical outcomes after elective repair for small umbilical and epigastric hernias.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Mette Maria Willaume

    2015-11-01

    Repair for an umbilical or epigastric hernia is one of the most frequently conducted gastrointestinal surgical procedures. Al-though it is a minor procedure, there is no consensus on the optimal repair technique. The readmission rate is surprisingly high due to postoperative pain, wound-related complications, and long-term results in terms of recurrence and chronic pain is not well investigated. The overall objective of this thesis was to improve early and long-term postoperative outcomes after repair for umbilical or epigastric hernias. The present thesis consisted of one RCT, one protocol article for a running RCT, and two register-based cohort studies. An abdominal binder had no analgesic effects or impact on seroma formation. We await early and late post-operative outcomes from a running RCT studying clinical effect of closing the hernia defect (inclusion is expected to end in October 2015). The two cohort studies included in the present theses found that mesh repair halved the long-term risk of recurrence compared with sutured repair. Mesh repair did not increase the risk of chronic pain or rate of reoperation for complications.

  8. Umbilical cord sparing technique for repair of congenital hernia into the cord and small omphalocele.

    PubMed

    Ceccanti, Silvia; Falconi, Ilaria; Frediani, Simone; Boscarelli, Alessandro; Musleh, Layla; Cozzi, Denis A

    2017-01-01

    Current repair of small omphaloceles and hernias into the umbilical cord is a straightforward procedure, whose repair may result in a suboptimal cosmetic outcome. We describe a novel repair technique retaining the umbilical cord elements in an attempt to improve the cosmetic appearance of the umbilicus. Eight neonates were consecutively treated more than a ten-year period. Size of the fascial defects ranged 1 to 3cm (median, 2). Present technique entails incision of the amniotic sac without its detachment from the skin, reduction of the extruded contents under direct vision, and closure of the abdominal wall defect by circumferential suturing of peritoneum and fascia around the base of the amniotic sac. The amniotic sac is then re-approximated and folded to create an umbilical stump, which is trimmed and left to shed naturally. All patients achieved a scarless abdomen with a normal appearing umbilicus in 6. The remaining 2 patients are awaiting surgery for persisting umbilical hernia repair and umbilicoplasty, respectively. Poor esthetic outcome was significantly associated with initial fascial defect ≥2.5cm in size (p=0.03). Present technique is a simple and cosmetically appealing repair for umbilical cord hernias and small omphaloceles, especially effective when the size of the fascial defect is less than 2.5cm. IV (Treatment Study). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sonographic prevalence of groin hernias and adductor tendinopathy in patients with femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Naal, Florian D; Dalla Riva, Francesco; Wuerz, Thomas H; Dubs, Beat; Leunig, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common debilitating condition that is associated with groin pain and limitation in young and active patients. Besides FAI, various disorders such as hernias, adductor tendinopathy, athletic pubalgia, lumbar spine affections, and others can cause similar symptoms. To determine the prevalence of inguinal and/or femoral herniation and adductor insertion tendinopathy using dynamic ultrasound in a cohort of patients with radiographic evidence of FAI. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This retrospective study consisted of 74 patients (36 female and 38 male; mean age, 29 years; 83 symptomatic hips) with groin pain and radiographic evidence of FAI. In addition to the usual diagnostic algorithm, all patients underwent a dynamic ultrasound examination for signs of groin herniation and tendinopathy of the proximal insertion of the adductors. Evidence of groin herniation was found in 34 hips (41%). There were 27 inguinal (6 female, 21 male) and 10 femoral (9 female, 1 male) hernias. In 3 cases, inguinal and femoral herniation was coexistent. Overall, 5 patients underwent subsequent hernia repair. Patients with groin herniation were significantly older than those without (33 vs 27 years, respectively; P = .01). There were no significant differences for any of the radiographic or clinical parameters. Tendinopathy of the proximal adductor insertion was detected in 19 cases (23%; 11 female, 8 male). Tendinopathy was coexistent with groin herniation in 8 of the 19 cases. There were no significant differences for any of the radiographic or clinical parameters between patients with or without tendinopathy. Patients with a negative diagnostic hip injection result were more likely to have a concomitant groin hernia than those with a positive injection result (80% vs 27%, respectively). Overall, 38 hips underwent FAI surgery with satisfactory outcomes in terms of score values and subjective improvement. The results demonstrate that groin

  10. Usage of a self-adhesive mesh in TAPP hernia repair: A prospective study based on Herniamed Register

    PubMed Central

    Klobusicky, Pavol; Feyerherd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide in general surgery. The transabdominal laparoscopic (TAPP) approach in the therapy of inguinal hernia seems to be a suitable alternative to classical open inguinal hernia repair mainly in the hands of an experienced surgeon. TAPP repair offers the possibility of gentle dissection with implantation of the mesh and the possibility of non-invasive fixation of the implanted mesh. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data analysis encompassed all patients who underwent inguinal hernia surgery at our Surgical Department within the period from July 1, 2012 to September 30, 2014 and who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The standard surgical technique was used. Data were entered and subsequently analysed on the Herniamed platform. Herniamed is an Internet-based register in German and English, and includes all data of outpatient and hospitalised patients who underwent surgery for some type of hernia. All relevant patient data are collected via Internet. RESULTS: There were 241 patients enrolled in the group and there were 396 inguinal hernias repaired in total. Standard long-term follow-up after 12 months was evaluated in 205 patients (85.06%), and in the rest of the patients during the closing of the study, but at least 6 months after operation. The mean follow-up was at 19.69 months. At the 1-year assessment, mild discomfort was reported in the groin in 10 patients (4.88%) [1-3 on the visual analogue scale (VAS)]. Post-operative pain lasting over 12 months in the groin of moderate degree (4-6 VAS) was reported in two cases (0.97%). There was no recurrence and no chronic post-operative pain of severe degree reported. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using the TAPP technique with the implantation of a self-fixation mesh is fast, effective, reliable and economically advantageous method in experienced hands and, according to our results

  11. Colonic carcinoma presenting as strangulated inguinal hernia: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Slater, R; Amatya, U; Shorthouse, A J

    2008-09-01

    Inguinal hernia and colonic carcinoma are common surgical conditions, yet carcinoma of the colon occurring within an inguinal hernia sac is rare. Of 25 reported cases, only one was a perforated sigmoid colon carcinoma in an inguinal hernia. We report two cases of sigmoid colon carcinoma, one of which had locally perforated. Each presented within a strangulated inguinal hernia. Oncologically correct surgery in these patients presents a technical challenge.

  12. Prevalence of Inguinal Hernia in Adult Men in the Ashanti Region of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Beard, Jessica H; Frimpong-Twumasi, Benjamin; Koranteng, Adofo; Mensah, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Inguinal hernia is thought to be common in rural Ghana, though no recent data exist on hernia prevalence in the country. This information is needed to guide policy and increase access to safe hernia repair in Ghana and other low-resource settings. Adult men randomly selected from the Barekese sub-district of Ashanti Region, Ghana were examined by surgeons for the presence of inguinal hernia. Men with hernia completed a survey on demographics, knowledge of the disease, and barriers to surgical treatment. A total of 803 participants were examined, while 105 participants completed the survey. The prevalence of inguinal hernia was 10.8 % (95 % CI 8.0, 13.6 %), and 2.2 % (95 % CI 0, 5.4 %) of participants had scars indicative of previous repair, making the overall prevalence of treated and untreated inguinal hernia 13.0 % (95 % CI 10.2, 15.7 %). Prevalence of inguinal hernia increased with age; 35.4 % (95 % CI 23.6, 47.2 %) of men aged 65 and older had inguinal hernia. Untreated inguinal hernia was associated with lower socio-economic status. Of those with inguinal hernia, 52.4 % did not know the cause of hernia. The most common reason cited for failing to seek medical care was cost (48.2 %). Although inguinal hernia is common among adult men living in rural Ghana, surgical repair rates are low. We propose a multi-faceted public health campaign aimed at increasing access to safe hernia repair in Ghana. This approach includes a training program of non-surgeons in inguinal hernia repair headed by the Ghana Hernia Society and could be adapted for use in other low-resource settings.

  13. Bochdalek hernia presenting with initial local fat infiltration of the thoracic cavity in a leukemic child.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhen; Min, Xiangde; Wang, Liang

    2017-03-01

    Local fat infiltration of the thoracic cavity is a rare initial presentation of Bochdalek hernia. We report a case of Bochdalek hernia in a child with leukemia that demonstrated initial local fat infiltration of the thoracic cavity on computed tomography scan and progressed to an obvious diaphragmatic hernia on subsequent follow-up. We suggest that initial local fat infiltration of the thoracic cavity on computed tomography scan may indicate a potential diaphragmatic hernia.

  14. An evaluation of hernia education in surgical residency programs.

    PubMed

    Hope, W W; O'Dwyer, B; Adams, A; Hooks, W B; Kotwall, C A; Clancy, T V

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate surgical residents' educational experience related to ventral hernias. A 16-question survey was sent to all program coordinators to distribute to their residents. Consent was obtained following a short introduction of the purpose of the survey. Comparisons based on training level were made using χ(2) test of independence, Fisher's exact, and Fisher's exact with Monte Carlo estimate as appropriate. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. The survey was returned by 183 residents from 250 surgical programs. Resident postgraduate year (PG-Y) level was equivalent among groups. Preferred techniques for open ventral hernia varied; the most common (32 %) was intra-abdominal placement of mesh with defect closure. Twenty-two percent of residents had not heard of the retrorectus technique for hernia repair, 48 % had not performed the operation, and 60 % were somewhat comfortable with and knew the general categories of mesh prosthetics products. Mesh choices, biologic and synthetic, varied among the different products. The most common type of hernia education was teaching in the operating room in 87 %, didactic lecture 69 %, and discussion at journal club 45 %. Number of procedures, comfort level with open and laparoscopic techniques, indications for mesh use and technique, familiarity and use of retrorectus repair, and type of hernia education varied significantly based on resident level (p < 0.05). Exposure to hernia techniques and mesh prosthetics in surgical residency programs appears to vary. Further evaluation is needed and may help in standardizing curriculums for hernia repair for surgical residents.

  15. Natural history of endoscopically detected hiatus herniae at late follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syeda Khadijah; Bright, Tim; Watson, David I

    2018-06-01

    Hiatus herniae are commonly seen at endoscopy. Many patients with a large hiatus hernia are endoscoped for symptoms associated with the hernia and many of these will progress to surgical treatment. However, little is known about the natural history of small to medium size hiatus herniae, and their risk of progressing to a larger hernia requiring surgery. This study aims to determine the need for subsequent surgery in these patients. A retrospective audit of the endoscopy database at Flinders Medical Centre and the Repatriation General Hospital in Adelaide, South Australia for the 2-year period 2002-2003 was performed to identify all patients with a hiatus hernia. Patients under the age of 65 and with a sliding hiatus hernia <5 cm in length were selected for this study, and sent a questionnaire which determines the long-term (>10 years) outcome of these herniae. Small- to medium-sized hiatus herniae (<5 cm length) were found at 10% of endoscopies performed. In this group, 38% had reflux as the indication for endoscopy. 1.5% subsequently progressed to anti-reflux surgery or hiatus hernia repair. Thirty-nine percent reported being on proton pump inhibitors for symptom control. No patients required emergency surgical repair of their hiatus hernia. While patients with small- to medium-sized sliding hiatus hernia commonly have symptomatic reflux, an acute problem requiring emergency surgery is unlikely over long-term follow-up. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. Randomized controlled trial comparing prolene hernia system and lichtenstein method for inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, Pandanaboyana; Harris, Dean; Jones, Philippa; Woodward, Alan

    2006-07-01

    There are no data regarding the long-term outcomes of prolene hernia system (PHS) mesh in the published reports. The aim of the study was to compare the short-term and long-term outcomes of the PHS mesh with the Lichtenstein mesh technique. Sixty-four patients with inguinal hernia were randomized to undergo either a PHS or a Lichtenstein repair under local anaesthesia as a day case. Early outcome measures were duration of surgery, pain scores, analgesic requirements, time to return to work, driving and full activity. Long-term outcome measures were chronic groin pain and recurrence. Mean duration of surgery in the PHS group was 36 min (SD +/- 11) versus 34 min in the Lichtenstein group (SD +/- 8; P = 0.3). There was no significant difference in analgesic requirements (P = 0.65). Overall mean pain score was 3.5/10 versus 2.5/10 (P = 0.1). Mean time to return to work was 42 versus 30 days (P = 0.3), returning to driving was 20 versus 14 days (P = 0.2) and full activity was 21 versus 22 days (P = 0.8). Chronic groin pain developed in four patients in the PHS group (12.9%) and in five patients in the Lichtenstein group (15.1%; P > 0.05). One patient developed recurrent herniation in the PHS group. The median follow up was 4.2 years (range, 4-4.6 years). Patient satisfaction was very high with both the techniques. There is no significant difference in the early and long-term outcomes between PHS and Lichtenstein hernia repairs. The PHS technique involving preperitoneal dissection is well tolerated and easy to carry out under local anaesthesia.

  17. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Extraperitoneal Versus Transperitoneal Colostomy for Preventing Parastomal Hernia.

    PubMed

    Kroese, Leonard F; de Smet, Gijs H J; Jeekel, Johannes; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Lange, Johan F

    2016-07-01

    Parastomal hernia remains a frequent problem after constructing a colostomy. Current research mainly focuses on prophylactic mesh placement as an addition to transperitoneal colostomies. However, for constructing a colostomy, either an extraperitoneal or transperitoneal route can be chosen. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate which technique results in lower parastomal hernia rates in patients undergoing end colostomy. A meta-analysis was conducted according to Preferred Items for Reporting of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. Embase, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases were searched. The study protocol was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews database. Studies comparing extraperitoneal and transperitoneal colostomies were included. Only studies written in English were included. The quality of studies and risk of bias were assessed using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. The quality of nonrandomized studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The intervention was colostomy formation. The main outcome measure was parastomal hernia incidence. Secondary outcome measures were stoma prolapse, stoma necrosis, and operating time. Of 401 articles found, a meta-analysis was conducted of 10 studies (2 randomized controlled trials and 8 retrospective studies) composed of 1048 patients (347 extraperitoneal and 701 transperitoneal). Extraperitoneal colostomy led to significantly lower parastomal hernia rates (22 of 347 (6.3%) for extraperitoneal versus 125 of 701 (17.8%) for transperitoneal; risk ratio = 0.36 (95% CI, 0.21-0.62); I = 26%; p < 0.001) and significantly lower stoma prolapse rates (2 of 185 (1.1%) for extraperitoneal versus 13 of 179 (7.3%) for transperitoneal; risk ratio = 0.21 (95% CI, 0.06-0.73); I = 0%; p = 0.01). Differences in

  18. Sports hernia in National Hockey League players: does surgery affect performance?

    PubMed

    Jakoi, Andre; O'Neill, Craig; Damsgaard, Christopher; Fehring, Keith; Tom, James

    2013-01-01

    Athletic pubalgia is a complex injury that results in loss of play in competitive athletes, especially hockey players. The number of reported sports hernias has been increasing, and the importance of their management is vital. There are no studies reporting whether athletes can return to play at preinjury levels. The focus of this study was to evaluate the productivity of professional hockey players before an established athletic pubalgia diagnosis contrasted with the productivity after sports hernia repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Professional National Hockey League (NHL) players who were reported to have a sports hernia and who underwent surgery from 2001 to 2008 were identified. Statistics were gathered on the players' previous 2 full seasons and compared with the statistics 2 full seasons after surgery. Data concerning games played, goals, average time on ice, time of productivity, and assists were gathered. Players were divided into 3 groups: group A incorporated all players, group B were players with 6 or fewer seasons of play, and group C consisted of players with 7 or more seasons of play. A control group was chosen to compare player deterioration or improvement over a career; each player selected for the study had a corresponding control player with the same tenure in his career and position during the same years. Forty-three hockey players were identified to have had sports hernia repairs from 2001 to 2008; ultimately, 80% would return to play 2 or more full seasons. Group A had statistically significant decreases in games played, goals scored, and assists. Versus the control group, the decreases in games played and assists were supported. Statistical analysis showed significant decreases in games played, goals scored, assists, and average time on ice the following 2 seasons in group C, which was also seen in comparison with the control group. Group B (16 players) showed only statistical significance in games played versus the control group

  19. Polypropylene-based composite mesh versus standard polypropylene mesh in the reconstruction of complicated large abdominal wall hernias: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Kassem, M I; El-Haddad, H M

    2016-10-01

    To compare polypropylene mesh positioned onlay supported by omentum and/or peritoneum versus inlay implantation of polypropylene-based composite mesh in patients with complicated wide-defect ventral hernias. This was a prospective randomized study carried out on 60 patients presenting with complicated large ventral hernia in the period from January 2012 to January 2016 in the department of Gastrointestinal Surgery unit and Surgical Emergency of the Main Alexandria University Hospital, Egypt. Large hernia had an abdominal wall defect that could not be closed. Patients were divided into two groups of 30 patients according to the type of mesh used to deal with the large abdominal wall defect. The study included 38 women (63.3 %) and 22 men (37.7 %); their mean age was 46.5 years (range, 25-70). Complicated incisional hernia was the commonest presentation (56.7 %).The operative and mesh fixation times were longer in the polypropylene group. Seven wound infections and two recurrences were encountered in the propylene group. Mean follow-up was 28.7 months (2-48 months). Composite mesh provided, in one session, satisfactory results in patients with complicated large ventral hernia. The procedure is safe and effective in lowering operative time with a trend of low wound complication and recurrence rates.

  20. Prolene hernia system compared with mesh plug technique: a prospective study of short- to mid-term outcomes in primary groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Huang, C S; Huang, C C; Lien, H H

    2005-05-01

    Two types of anterior tension-free hernioplasty, prolene hernia system (PHS) repair and mesh plug technique (MPT), were introduced to Taiwan in 2001. This study compared the short- to mid-term outcomes following primary groin hernia repair with PHS and MPT. From January 2001 to December 2003, 393 patients with 426 primary groin hernias were operated on by a single surgeon using MPT (n=192) and PHS (n=234). Baseline perioperative details and follow-up information were compared. Demographic characteristics of both groups were similar. The laterality, types of anesthesia, postoperative stay, postoperative wound pain scores, wound complications and days to return to activities of daily life were equally distributed between the two groups. However, the distribution of Gilbert types in the PHS group was shifted a little to the right compared with that of the MPT group. PHS repair had longer operative time (34+/-17 vs 25+/-9 minutes, p<0.01). No recurrence was noted in both groups during the follow-up from 5 to 41 months. Chronic non-disabling groin pains were noted in 2.8% (6/218) of patients in the PHS group and 8.9% (14/175) in the MPT group (p=0.01). Our results show that both PHS and MPT repairs can be performed with short operation time, minor wound pain and quick return to activities of daily life without short- to mid-term recurrences, but postoperatively the MPT group had higher incidence of chronic non-disabling groin pain. Although the MPT is less invasive, the additional protective patch in the preperitoneal space of the PHS may provide a further safeguard against recurrences, especially for those patients with attenuated inguinal floor. Long-term follow-up is needed.

  1. OUTCOME OF LAPAROSCOPIC TOTALLY EXTRAPERITONEAL HERNIOPLASTY FOR INGUINAL HERNIA.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Hammad; Memon, Sohail Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Hernioplasty for Inguinal hernia is one of the commonest operations performed in general surgical wards. More recently, interest has waxed and waned regarding the minimally invasive approach to hernioplasty. This study was carried out to assess the management outcome of minimally invasive hernioplasty (Totally extra-peritoneal approach) as the treatment of choice for uncomplicated (incomplete and reducible) inguinal hernia. In this quasi experimental study patients aged between 14-83 years who were otherwise fit and willing for total extra-peritoneal laparoscopic repair were recruited prospectively over a 10 month period. Thirty-seven such patients were operated and followed up in the hernia clinics. Six cases were later excluded for lack of proper follow-up. The typical patient was middle-aged male with right-sided inguinal hernia. Mean operating time was 53.3 minutes. No conversion was undertaken; however, there was one case of small bowel injury that went unrecognized on-table but necessitated subsequent laparotomy. Overall morbidity was 13.5%. Mean length of hospitalization was 2.89 days. Mean duration to normal routine life was 9.25 days. Overall, 70.9% of patients expressed satisfaction with the surgery. Totally extra-peritoneal mesh repair is a new and safe technique for hernioplasty with acceptable rates of morbidity and it is procedure of choice for recurrent and bilateral inguinal hernias and also used as alternate to open hernioplasty for uncomplicated (incomplete and reducible) inguinal herma.

  2. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: review of 6 years experience.

    PubMed

    Vanclooster, P; Smet, B; de Gheldere, C; Segers, K

    2001-01-01

    Since 6 years, the totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair has become our procedure of choice to manage inguinal hernia in adult patients, especially for bilateral hernias and recurrences after classical anterior repair. Between March 1993 and March 1999, 976 patients underwent 1259 hernia repairs by an endoscopic total extraperitoneal approach. A large polypropylene prosthesis (15 x 15 cm) is placed and covers all potential defects. Follow-up on patients ranged from 6 to 79 months (mean, 39 months). Per- and postoperative morbidity and complications were acceptable (8.4%) and included conversion to open surgery (0.4%), bleedings (0.3%), urinary retention (4.2%), seromas (2.7%), neuralgias (0.2%), vague persistent groin discomfort (0.4%), orchitis (0.08%) and sigmoido-cutaneous fistula (0.08%). Recurrence rate so far is 0.1%. This retrospective study shows that the totally extraperitoneal repair for inguinal hernia should have a promising future because of low morbidity and low recurrence rate.

  3. Thoracoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair in a warmblood mare.

    PubMed

    Röcken, Michael; Mosel, Gesine; Barske, Katharine; Witte, Tanja S

    2013-06-01

    To describe successful repair of a diaphragmatic hernia in a standing sedated horse using a minimally invasive thoracoscopic technique. Clinical report. Warmblood mare with a diaphragmatic hernia. An 18-year-old Warmblood mare with severe colic was referred for surgical treatment of small intestinal strangulation in a diaphragmatic defect. Twelve days after initial conventional colic surgery, left-sided laparoscopy in the standing sedated mare for diaphragmatic herniorrhaphy failed because the spleen obscured the hernia. One week later, a left-sided thoracoscopy was performed in the standing sedated horse and the hernia repaired by an intrathoracic suture technique. No long-term complications occurred (up to 4 years) and the mare returned to her previous athletic activity, followed by use as a broodmare. To avoid the high risks associated with general anesthesia, and to reduce surgical trauma and postoperative recovery, central diaphragmatic hernias are amenable to repair using a minimally invasive thoracoscopic technique in the standing sedated horse. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Reliable and valid assessment of Lichtenstein hernia repair skills.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, C G; Lindorff-Larsen, K; Funch-Jensen, P; Lund, L; Charles, P; Konge, L

    2014-08-01

    Lichtenstein hernia repair is a common surgical procedure and one of the first procedures performed by a surgical trainee. However, formal assessment tools developed for this procedure are few and sparsely validated. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of an assessment tool designed to measure surgical skills in Lichtenstein hernia repair. Key issues were identified through a focus group interview. On this basis, an assessment tool with eight items was designed. Ten surgeons and surgical trainees were video recorded while performing Lichtenstein hernia repair, (four experts, three