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Sample records for hiatal hernia subjects

  1. Hiatal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    A hiatal hernia is a condition in which the upper part of the stomach bulges through an opening in the ... up into the esophagus. When you have a hiatal hernia, it's easier for the acid to come up. ...

  2. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Hiatal hernia is a condition in which part of the stomach extends through an opening of the diaphragm into ... occurs often in people over 50 years. This condition may cause reflux ... acid from the stomach into the esophagus. Children with this condition are ...

  3. Hiatal hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100028.htm Hiatal hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hiatal Hernia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  4. Laparoscopic hernioplasty of hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Hua, Rong; He, Kai; Shen, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is a good choice for surgical treatment of hiatal hernia because of its mini-invasive nature and intraperitoneal view and operating angle. This article will talk about the surgical procedures, technical details, precautions and complications about laparoscopic hernioplasty of hiatal hernia. PMID:27761447

  5. [Diagnosis and surgical therapy of hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Koch, O O; Köhler, G; Antoniou, S A; Pointner, R

    2014-08-01

    Using the usual diagnostic tools like barium swallow examination, endoscopy, and manometry, we are able to diagnose a hiatal hernia, but it is not possible to predict the size of the hernia opening or, respectively, the size of the hiatal defect. At least a correlation can be expected if the gastroesophageal junction is endoscopically assessed in a retroflexed position, and graded according to Hill. So far, it is not possible to come to a clear conclusion how the hiatal closure during hiatal hernia repair should be performed. There is no consensus on using a mesh, and when using a mesh which type or shape should be used. Further studies including long-term results on this issue are necessary. However, it seems obvious to make the decision depending on certain conditions found during operation, and not on preoperative findings.

  6. Hiatal hernia repair with biologic mesh reinforcement reduces recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E; Shaligram, A; Reynoso, J F; Kothari, V; Oleynikov, D

    2014-01-01

    The utility of mesh reinforcement for small hiatal hernia found especially during antireflux surgery is unknown. Initial reports for the use of biological mesh for crural reinforcement during repair for defects greater than 5 cm have been shown to decrease recurrence rates. This study compares patients with small hiatal hernias who underwent onlay biologic mesh buttress repair versus those with suture cruroplasty alone. This is a single-institution retrospective review of all patients undergoing repair of hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm between 2002 and 2009. The patients were evaluated based on surgical repair: one group undergoing crural reinforcement with onlay biologic mesh and other group with suture cruroplasty only. Seventy patients with hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm were identified. Thirty-eight patients had hernia repair with biologic mesh, and 32 patients had repair with suture cruroplasty only. Recurrence rate at 1 year was 16% (5/32) in patients who had suture cruroplasty only and 0% (0/38) in the group with crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh (statistically significant, P = 0.017). Suture cruroplasty alone appears to be inadequate for hiatal hernias measuring 1-5 cm with significant recurrence rate and failure of antireflux surgery. Crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh may reduce hiatal hernia recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

  7. Hiatal hernia on thoracic computed tomography in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tossier, Céline; Dupin, Clairelyne; Plantier, Laurent; Leger, Julie; Flament, Thomas; Favelle, Olivier; Lecomte, Thierry; Diot, Patrice; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain

    2016-09-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux has long been suspected of implication in the genesis and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We hypothesised that hiatal hernia may be more frequent in IPF than in other interstitial lung disease (ILD), and that hiatal hernia may be associated with more severe clinical characteristics in IPF.We retrospectively compared the prevalence of hiatal hernia on computed tomographic (CT) scans in 79 patients with IPF and 103 patients with other ILD (17 scleroderma, 54 other connective tissue diseases and 32 chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis). In the IPF group, we compared the clinical, biological, functional, CT scan characteristics and mortality of patients with hiatal hernia (n=42) and without hiatal hernia (n=37).The prevalence of hiatal hernia on CT scan at IPF diagnosis was 53%, similar to ILD associated with scleroderma, but significantly higher than in the two other ILD groups. The size of the hiatal hernia was not linked to either fibrosis CT scan scores, or reduction in lung function in any group. Mortality from respiratory causes was significantly higher among IPF patients with hiatal hernia than among those without hiatal hernia (p=0.009).Hiatal hernia might have a specific role in IPF genesis, possibly due to pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  8. Hiatal hernia squeezing the heart to flutter.

    PubMed

    Patel, Arpan; Shah, Rushikesh; Nadavaram, Sravanthi; Aggarwal, Aakash

    2014-04-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with failure to thrive and weakness for 14 days. Medical history was significant for polio. On admission her electrocardiogram showed atrial flutter, and cardiac enzymes were elevated. Echocardiogram revealed a high pulmonary artery pressure, but no other wall motion abnormalities or valvulopathies. Chest x-ray showed a large lucency likely representing a diaphragmatic hernia. Computed tomographic scan confirmed the hernia. Our patient remained in atrial flutter despite rate control, and thereafter surgery was consulted to evaluate the patient. She underwent hernia repair. After surgery, the patient was taken off rate control and monitored for 72 hours; she did not have any episode of atrial flutter and was discharged with follow up in a week showing no arrhythmia. Her flutter was caused directly by the mechanical effect of the large hiatal hernia pressing against her heart, as the flutter resolved after the operation.

  9. Association between Increased Gastric Juice Acidity and Sliding Hiatal Hernia Development in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kishikawa, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kayoko; Ito, Asako; Arahata, Kyoko; Takarabe, Sakiko; Kaida, Shogo; Kanai, Takanori; Miura, Soichiro; Nishida, Jiro

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several clinical factors; overweight, male gender and increasing age, have been implicated as the etiology of hiatal hernia. Esophageal shortening due to acid perfusion in the lower esophagus has been suggested as the etiological mechanism. However, little is known about the correlation between gastric acidity and sliding hiatus hernia formation. This study examined whether increased gastric acid secretion is associated with an endoscopic diagnosis of hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 286 consecutive asymptomatic patients (64 were diagnosed as having a hiatal hernia) who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were studied. Clinical findings including fasting gastric juice pH as an indicator of acid secretion, age, sex, body mass index, and Helicobacter pylori infection status determined by both Helicobacter pylori serology and pepsinogen status, were evaluated to identify predictors in subjects with hiatal hernia. Results Male gender, obesity with a body mass index >25, and fasting gastric juice pH were significantly different between subjects with and without hiatal hernia. The cut-off point of fasting gastric juice pH determined by receiver operating curve analysis was 2.1. Multivariate regression analyses using these variables, and age, which is known to be associated with hiatal hernia, revealed that increased gastric acid secretion with fasting gastric juice pH <2.1 (OR = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.38–4.90) was independently associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, previously reported risk factors including male gender (OR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.23–4.35), body mass index >25 (OR = 3.49, 95% CI: 1.77–6.91) and age >65 years (OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.00–3.45), were also significantly associated with hiatal hernia. Conclusions This study suggests that increased gastric acid secretion independently induces the development of hiatal hernia in humans. These results are in accordance with the previously reported hypothesis that high gastric acid itself induces

  10. Hiatal hernia in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pup.

    PubMed

    Biancani, Barbara; Field, Cara L; Dennison, Sophie; Pulver, Robert; Tuttle, Allison D

    2012-06-01

    A 2-wk-old stranded harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) rescued by Mystic Aquarium showed signs of the presence of a hiatal hernia during rehabilitation. Contrast radiographs of esophagus and stomach revealed an intrathoracic radiodensity that contains filling defects typical of stomach, consistent with gastric rugal folds. Mural thickening was observed at the level of the cardia consistent with a diagnosis of a hiatal hernia. Although clinical improvement was noted with medical therapy and tube feeding, surgical correction of the hiatal hernia was considered necessary for full resolution. However, owing to the animal's low body weight, the corrective hernia surgery was postponed until the body condition improved. The seal needed to be surgically treated for a corneal ulcer, and while anesthetized with isoflurane, the seal became dyspneic and developed cardiac arrhythmias; ultimately cardiac arrest ensued. Resuscitation was unsuccessfully attempted and the seal was euthanized. Necropsy confirmed the radiographic diagnosis and further characterized a paraesophageal hiatal hernia.

  11. The History of Hiatal Hernia Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Rattner, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This review addresses the historical evolution of hiatal hernia (HH) repair and reports in a chronological fashion the major milestones in HH surgery before the laparoscopic era. Methods: The medical literature and the collections of the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine were searched. Secondary references from all sources were studied. The senior author's experience and personal communications are also reported. Results: The first report of HH was published in 1853 by Bowditch. Rokitansky in 1855 demonstrated that esophagitis was due to gastroesophageal reflux, and Hirsch in 1900 diagnosed an HH using x-rays. Eppinger diagnosed an HH in a live patient, and Friedenwald and Feldman related the symptoms to the presence of an HH. In 1926, Akerlund proposed the term hiatus hernia and classified HH into the 3 types that we use today. The first elective surgical repair was reported in 1919 by Soresi. The physiologic link between HH and gastroesophageal reflux was made at the second half of the 20th century by Allison and Barrett. In the midst of a physiologic revolution, Nissen and Belsey developed their famous operations. In 1957, Collis published his innovative operation. Thal described his technique in 1965, and in 1967, Hill published his procedure. Many modifications of these procedures were published by Pearson and Henderson, Orringer and Sloan, Rossetti, Dor, and Toupet. Donahue and Demeester significantly improved Nissen's operation, and they were the first to truly understand its physiologic mechanism. Conclusion: Hiatal hernia surgery has evolved from anatomic repair to physiological restoration. PMID:15622007

  12. Laparoscopic Hiatal Hernia Repair in 221 Patients: Outcomes and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernia is a common condition often associated with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair (LHHR) with biologic mesh to reduce and/or alleviate GERD symptoms and associated hiatal hernia recurrence. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed consecutive LHHR procedures with biologic mesh performed by a single surgeon from July 2009 to October 2014. The primary efficacy outcome measures were relief from GERD symptoms, as measured according to the GERD–health-related quality-of-life (GERD-HRQL) scale and hiatal hernia recurrence. A secondary outcome measure was overall safety of the procedure. Results: A total of 221 patients underwent LHHR with biologic mesh during the study period, and pre- and postoperative GERD-HRQL studies were available for 172 of them. At baseline (preoperative), the mean GERD-HRQL score for all procedures was 18.5 ± 14.4. At follow-up (mean, 14.5 ± 11.0 months [range, 2.0–56.0]), the score showed a statistically significant decline to a mean of 4.4 ± 7.5 (P < .0001). To date, 8 patients (3.6%, 8/221) have had a documented anatomic hiatal hernia recurrence. However, a secondary hiatal hernia repair reoperation was necessary in only 1 patient. Most complications were minor (dysphagia, nausea and vomiting). However, there was 1 death caused by a hemorrhage that occurred 1 week after surgery. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using biologic mesh, both with and without a simultaneous bariatric or antireflux procedure, is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for management of hiatal hernia, prevention of recurrence, and relief of symptomatic GERD. PMID:26884676

  13. Relationship of a hiatal hernia to the function of the body of the esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction

    SciTech Connect

    DeMeester, T.R.; Lafontaine, E.; Joelsson, B.E.; Skinner, D.B.; Ryan, J.W.; O'Sullivan, G.C.; Brunsden, B.S.; Johnson, L.F.

    1981-10-01

    One hundred two patients referred to our Esophageal Function Laboratory without endoscopic evidence of esophagitis were divided into two groups on the basis of the presence of a hiatal hernia on endoscopic examination. Fifty-three patients had a hiatal hernia and 49 did not. Both groups and 30 normal volunteer subjects had esophageal manometry and 24 hour esophageal pH monitoring. The incompetency of the cardia in patients with a hiatal hernia was dependent upon loss of components responsible for the antireflux mechanism, mainly a decrease in distal esophageal sphincter pressure and a decrease in the length of the sphincter exposed to the positive-pressure environment of the abdomen. These deficiencies were not related to the presence of a hiatal hernia and were similar to those of patients with an incompetent cardia without a hiatal hernia. Patients with a hiatal hernia and an incompetent cardia had significantly more esophageal exposure to refluxed acid than without a hiatal hernia. On the basis of the number of reflux episodes that lasted 5 minutes or longer and radioisotope transit studies, this increased acid exposure was due to both a loss of competency of the cardia and poor esophageal clearance secondary to the presence of a hiatal hernia. Reduction of the hernia and anchoring the distal esophagus into the abdomen not only may improve the antireflux mechanism, but corrects the clearance abnormality as well. The presence of a hiatal hernia has a detrimental effect on the clearance function of the body of the esophagus and may aggravate the effects of gastroesophageal reflux due to an incompetent cardia.

  14. Surgical Management of Hiatal Hernia in Children with Asplenia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hiromu; Fukumoto, Koji; Yamoto, Masaya; Nouso, Hiroshi; Kaneshiro, Masakatsu; Koyama, Mariko; Urushihara, Naoto

    2016-09-08

    Purpose Patients with asplenia syndrome (AS) are likely to have upper gastrointestinal tract malformations such as hiatal hernia. This report discusses the treatment of such conditions. Methods Seventy-five patients with AS underwent initial palliation in our institution between 1997 and 2013. Of these, 10 patients had hiatal hernia. Of the patients with hiatal hernia, 6 had brachyesophagus and 7 had microgastria. Results Of the 10 patients with hiatal hernia, 9 underwent surgery in infancy (7 before Glenn operation, 2 after Glenn operation). Two underwent typical Toupet fundoplication, and the other 7 underwent atypical repair including reduction of the stomach. Two patients with atypical repair showed recurrence of hernia and required reoperation. Three patients required reoperation due to duodenal obstruction. Duodenal obstruction occurred due to preduodenal portal vein or abnormal vessels compressing the duodenum. Obstructive symptoms were not seen in any cases preoperatively. Conclusions In patients with hiatal hernia, typical fundoplication is often difficult because most have concomitant brachyesophagus, microgastria, and hypoplasia of the esophageal hiatus. However, we should at least reduce the stomach to the abdominal cavity as early as possible to increase thoracic cavity volume and allow good feeding. Increasing the volume of the thoracic cavity thus makes Glenn and Fontan circulations more stable. Duodenal obstruction secondary to vascular anomalies is also common, so the anatomy in the area near the duodenum should be evaluated pre- and intraoperatively.

  15. Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Hiatal Hernia Repair Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Victoria; Kuwada, Timothy; Gersin, Keith; Simms, Connie; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    Large hiatal hernias are notorious for their high recurrence rates after conventional repair. Recurrence rates have been described to be higher in obese patients due to increased intra-abdominal pressure. We hypothesized that patients who undergo hiatal hernia repair (HHR) with bariatric surgery (BAR) will have a lower hernia recurrence rate when compared to patients who undergo HHR with fundoplication (FP) due to the decrease in intra-abdominal pressure observed with weight loss. This was an Institutional Review Board approved retrospective review. The outcomes of patients who underwent HHR+BAR as well as patients who had HHR+FP only from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. Patients who had small hiatal hernias (<2 cm), underwent an anterior repair, or had gastropexy only were excluded. The primary outcome was hernia recurrence and reflux resolution. The outcomes of 58 patients who had HHR+BAR were compared with 30 patients with HHR+FP. Hernia recurrence rate for HHR+BAR was 12 per cent, whereas hernia recurrence rate for HHR+FP was 38 per cent (P < 0.01). Reflux resolution for HHR+FP was 78 per cent, whereas reflux improvement rate for HHR+BAR was 84 per cent (P = n.s.). Combining HHR with BAR leads to a lower hernia recurrence rate when compared to patients who undergo HHR with FP.

  16. Large hiatal hernia in infancy with right intrathoracic stomach along with left sided morgagni hernia.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Uzma; Mazhar, Naveed; Zameer, Shahla

    2014-11-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a very common intrathoracic fetal anomaly with Morgagni hernia typically seen on right side anteriorly and Bochdalek hernia on left side posteriorly, because of the protective effects of liver and heart on either side respectively. Hiatal hernias range from herniation of a small portion of stomach into thoracic cavity to herniation of entire stomach into the left thoracic cavity. Very rarely the herniated stomach has been reported in the right thoracic cavity. Early diagnosis and treatment of all diaphragmatic hernias is essential to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality. We present a very rare and interesting case of an 18 months old baby girl with reverse scenarios. She had a large hiatal hernia with right intrathoracic stomach along with a left sided Morgagni hernia in combination.

  17. Resorbable biosynthetic mesh for crural reinforcement during hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Alicuben, Evan T; Worrell, Stephanie G; DeMeester, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    The use of mesh to reinforce crural closure during hiatal hernia repair is controversial. Although some studies suggest that using synthetic mesh can reduce recurrence, synthetic mesh can erode into the esophagus and in our opinion should be avoided. Studies with absorbable or biologic mesh have not proven to be of benefit for recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of hiatal hernia repair with modern resorbable biosynthetic mesh in combination with adjunct tension reduction techniques. We retrospectively analyzed all patients who had crural reinforcement during repair of a sliding or paraesophageal hiatal hernia with Gore BioA resorbable mesh. Objective follow-up was by videoesophagram and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. There were 114 patients. The majority of operations (72%) were laparoscopic primary repairs with all patients receiving a fundoplication. The crura were closed primarily in all patients and reinforced with a BioA mesh patch. Excessive tension prompted a crural relaxing incision in four per cent and a Collis gastroplasty in 39 per cent of patients. Perioperative morbidity was minor and unrelated to the mesh. Median objective follow-up was one year, but 18 patients have objective follow-up at two or more years. A recurrent hernia was found in one patient (0.9%) three years after repair. The use of crural relaxing incisions and Collis gastroplasty in combination with crural reinforcement with resorbable biosynthetic mesh is associated with a low early hernia recurrence rate and no mesh-related complications. Long-term follow-up will define the role of these techniques for hiatal hernia repair.

  18. Severe Hiatal Hernia as a Cause of Failure to Thrive Discovered by Transthoracic Echocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Clint J.; Conley, Devan A.; Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S.

    2016-01-01

    A newborn infant with failure to thrive presented for murmur evaluation on day of life three due to a harsh 3/6 murmur. During the evaluation, a retrocardiac fluid filled mass was seen by transthoracic echocardiogram. The infant was also found to have a ventricular septal defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous return. Eventually, a large hiatal hernia was diagnosed on subsequent imaging. The infant ultimately underwent surgical repair of the hiatal hernia at a tertiary care facility. Hiatal hernias have been noted as incidental extracardiac findings in adults, but no previous literature has documented hiatal hernias as incidental findings in the pediatric population. PMID:27895952

  19. [Esophageal manometry in patients with sliding hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mata, M; Ixtepan, L; Peña Ancira, F; de Ramírez, A F; Villalobos, J J; Campuzano, M

    1979-01-01

    This presents the method to be followed for the valuation of the gastro-esophagic function in patients with sliding hiatal hernia, twenty-one patients with this diagnosis were studied through X-Rays. Besides gastric and esophagic endoscopy, a complete clinical examinations was made to compare the information obtained from the studies, with the direct measurement of the contractions of the esophagus and the lower sphincter through conventional manometric methods. The relationship between the simptoms and the clinical procedures done in the patients were observed as was the usefulness of esophagic manometry to detect not only the direct pressure of the gastro-esophagic sphincter, but also to determine the concurrent motor changes that can occur in patients which show hiatal hernia. The benefit of this studies to decide the therapeutic handling, specially surgical, is discussed.

  20. Initial outcomes of laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair with mesh.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Steven; Armstrong, Chris; Smith, Brian R; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2013-10-01

    The use of mesh in laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair (LHR) may reduce the risk of late hernia recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate initial outcomes and recurrence rate of 92 patients who underwent LHR reinforced with a synthetic bioabsorbable mesh. Surgical approaches included LHR and Nissen fundoplication (n = 64), LHR without fundoplication (n = 10), reoperative LHR (n = 9), LHR with a bariatric operation (n = 6), and emergent LHR (n = 3). The mean length of hospital stay was 2 ± 3 days (range, 1 to 30 days). There were no conversions to open laparotomy and no intraoperative complications. One of 92 patients (1.1%) required intensive care unit stay. The 90-day mortality was zero. Minor complications occurred in 3.3 per cent, major complications in 2.2 per cent, and late complications in 5.5 per cent of patients. There were no perforations or early hernia recurrence. The 30-day reoperation rate was 1.1 per cent. For patients with available 1-year follow-up, the overall recurrence rate was 18.5 per cent with a mean follow-up of 30 months (range, 12 to 51 months). LHR repair with mesh is associated with low perioperative morbidity and no mortality. The use of bioabsorbable mesh appears to be safe with no early hiatal hernia recurrence or late mesh erosion. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the long-term rate of hernia recurrence associated with LHR with mesh.

  1. Hiatal hernia repair with the use of biologic meshes: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank A

    2011-02-01

    During the past few years, biologic meshes, primarily evolved for routine and complex cases of abdominal wall reconstruction, have been evaluated in clinical cases and experimental models. Although there is published experience on the use of small intestine submucosa and human cadaveric dermis in hiatal hernia repair with encouraging results, porcine dermal collagen (PDC) matrix has not been subject of study to date in this patient population. A systematic review of the literature was conducted, aiming at evaluating the biomechanical characteristics of cross-linked PDC in comparison to synthetic and biologic meshes. Evidence shows that cross-linked PDC is superior to synthetic meshes in terms of incorporation, adhesion formation, and mesh fibrosis; their biodynamic and biotechnical characteristics do not seem to be superior to other bioprosthetic materials according to current data. The clinical and experimental results of cross-linked PDC implants justify their pilot clinical evaluation in hiatal hernia patients.

  2. Surgical treatment of para-oesophageal hiatal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, M. L.; Duffy, J. P.; Beggs, F. D.; Salama, F. D.; Knowles, K. R.; Morgan, W. E.

    2001-01-01

    The development of laparoscopic antireflux surgery has stimulated interest in laparoscopic para-oesophageal hiatal hernia repair. This review of our practice over 10 years using a standard transthoracic technique was undertaken to establish the safety and effectiveness of the open technique to allow comparison. Sixty patients with para-oesophageal hiatal hernia were operated on between 1989 and 1999. There were 38 women and 22 men with a median age of 69.5 years. There were 47 elective and 13 emergency presentations. Operation consisted of a left thoracotomy, hernia reduction and crural repair. An antireflux procedure was added in selected patients. There were no deaths among the elective cases and one among the emergency cases. Median follow-up time was 19 months. There was one recurrence (1.5%). Seven patients (12%) required a single oesophagoscopy and dilatation up to 2 years postoperatively but have been asymptomatic since. Two patients (3%) developed symptomatic reflux which has been well controlled on proton-pump inhibitors. Transthoracic para-oesophageal hernia repair can be safely performed with minimal recurrence. PMID:11777134

  3. The phrenic ampulla: distal esophagus or potential hiatal hernia?

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Brasseur, J G; Pouderoux, P; Kahrilas, P J

    1995-02-01

    The mechanics of phrenic ampullary emptying were analyzed to determine whether this structure functions in a manner similar to the tubular esophagus or a hiatal hernia. Simultaneous videofluoroscopy and intraluminal manometry of the gastroesophageal junction were done during barium swallows in 18 normal volunteers. Esophageal emptying was studied without any external influences, during abdominal compression with a cuff inflated to 100 mmHg, during a Müller maneuver, and after medication with atropine. The key finding of the study was that ampullary emptying was distinct from esophageal bolus transport in several ways: the propagation velocity of the clearing wave was slower, the maximal contact pressures achieved after luminal closure were lower and unaffected by atropine or outflow obstruction, and ampulary emptying was driven by a hydrostatic pressure difference between the ampulla and stomach rather than by a peristaltic contraction. Increased bolus volume slightly enlarged the ampulla. Taken together, these findings suggest that ampullary emptying occurs, in part, as a result of the restoration of esophageal length (presumably by tension from the phrenoesophageal membrane) rather than as a result of an aborally propagated contraction. As such, a normal phrenic ampulla is analogous to a small reducing hiatal hernia. We speculate that overt hernia formation occurs as a result of progressive degeneration of the phrenoesophageal membrane.

  4. Complete Esophageal Obstruction after Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation in a Patient with a Sliding Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Munthir; Abdel-Aziz, Yousef; Awadh, Hesham; Shah, Nihar

    2017-01-01

    Complete esophageal obstruction is a rare complication of endoscopic variceal banding, with only 6 cases in the English literature since the introduction of endoscopic variceal banding in 1986. We report a case of complete esophageal obstruction following esophageal banding due to entrapment of part of a sliding hiatal hernia. To our knowledge, our case is one of few with esophageal obstruction post-banding, and the first associated with a hiatal hernia. We recommend caution when performing esophageal banding on patients with a hiatal hernia. PMID:28144613

  5. Is there a common basis between hiatal hernia and hemorrhoidal disease?

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Zeynep; Uzel, Mehmet; Filik, Levent

    2015-05-01

    In this letter-to-editor, we hypothesize that there is a link between hemorrhoidal disease and hiatal hernia. We underline common risk factors for both and present a cross-sectional patient data. Therefore, we emphasize the necessity of new studies to clarify this coincidence. Clinical benefit of establishment of this link is to delay or prevent development of hiatal hernia as a result of appropriate preventive measures. Accordingly, postoperative period of hiatal hernia operations may also be relieved or recurrence risk may also be decreased with this precautions.

  6. Similar symptom patterns in gastroesophageal reflux patients with and without hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, S A; Koch, O O; Antoniou, G A; Asche, K U; Kaindlstorfer, A; Granderath, F A; Pointner, R

    2013-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common clinical entity in Western societies. Its association with hiatal hernia has been well documented; however, the comparative clinical profile of patients in the presence or absence of hiatal hernia remains mostly unknown. The aim of the present study was to delineate and compare symptom, impedance, and manometric patterns of patients with and without hiatal hernia. A cumulative number of 120 patients with reflux disease were enrolled in the study. Quality of life score, demographic, symptom, manometric, and impedance data were prospectively collected. Data comparison was undertaken between patients with and without hiatal hernia. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Patients with hiatal hernia tended to be older than patients without hernia (52.3 vs. 48.6 years, P < 0.05), whereas quality of life scores were slightly better for the former (97.0 vs. 88.2, P= 0.005). Regurgitation occurred more frequently in patients without hiatal hernia (78.3% vs. 93.9%, P < 0.05). Otherwise, no differences were found with regard to esophageal and extraesophageal symptoms. However, lower esophageal sphincter pressures (7.7 vs. 10.0 mmHg, P= 0.007) and more frequent reflux episodes (upright, 170 vs. 134, P= 0.01; supine, 41 vs. 24, P < 0.03) were documented for patients with hiatal hernia on manometric and impedance studies. Distinct functional characteristics in patients with and without hiatal hernia may suggest a tailored therapeutic management for these diverse patient groups.

  7. Diagnosis of Type-I hiatal hernia: a comparison of high-resolution manometry and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Khajanchee, Y S; Cassera, M A; Swanström, L L; Dunst, C M

    2013-01-01

    Sliding Type-I hiatal hernia is commonly diagnosed using upper endoscopy, barium swallow or less commonly, esophageal manometry. Current data suggest that endoscopy is superior to barium swallow or esophageal manometry. Recently, high-resolution manometry has become available for the assessment of esophageal motility. This novel technology is capable of displaying spatial and topographic pressure profiles of gastroesophageal junction and crural diaphragm in real time. The objective of the current study was to compare the specificity and sensitivity of high-resolution manometry and endoscopy in the diagnosis of sliding hiatal hernia in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Data were analyzed retrospectively for 83 consecutive patients (61% females, mean age 52 ± 13.2 years) with objective gastroesophageal reflux disease who were considered for laparoscopic antireflux surgery between January 2006 and January 2009 and had preoperative high-resolution manometry and endoscopy. Manometrically, hiatal hernia was defined as separation of the gastroesophageal junction >2.0 cm from the crural diaphragm. Intraoperative diagnosis of hiatal hernia was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios of a positive test and a negative test were used to compare the performance of the two diagnostic modalities. Forty-two patients were found to have a Type-I sliding hiatal hernia (>2 cm) during surgery. Twenty-two patients had manometric criteria for a hiatal hernia by high-resolution manometry, and 36 patients were described as having a hiatal hernia by preoperative endoscopy. False positive results were significantly fewer (higher specificity) with high-resolution manometry as compared with endoscopy (4.88% vs. 31.71%, P= 0.01). There were no significant differences in the false negative results (sensitivity) between the two diagnostic modalities (47.62% vs. 45.24%, P= 0.62). Analysis of likelihood ratios of a positive and negative test

  8. [Impaired lung function and anemia from large hiatal hernia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Suppa, Marianna; Colzi, Marina; Magnanelli, Elisa; Migliozzi, Elisa; Negri, Silvia; Millarelli, Federica; Coppola, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    We present the clinical case of a 54 years old man who accessed for dyspnea and severe anemia. After being transfused, he underwent to gastroscopy, which showed an erosive gastritis with large hiatal hernia. The hernia was surgically reduced with laparoscopic hiatoplastic and Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication. In conclusion, dyspnea is not merely a medical competence but also a surgical one.

  9. Esophageal hiatal hernia in three exotic felines--Lynx lynx, Puma concolore, Panthera leo.

    PubMed

    Hettlich, Bianca F; Hobson, H Phil; Ducoté, Julie; Fossum, Theresa W; Johnson, James H

    2010-03-01

    Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in three exotic felines-lynx (Lynx lynx), cougar (Puma concolore), and lion (Panthera leo). All cats had a history of anorexia. Thoracic and abdominal radiographs showed evidence of a soft tissue mass within the caudal mediastinum suggestive of a hiatal hernia in all animals. A barium esophagram was performed in one case. All animals underwent thoracic or abdominal surgery for hernia reduction. Surgical procedures included: intercostal thoracotomy with herniorrhaphy and esophagopexy (lynx and cougar), and incisional gastropexy (lion). Concurrent surgical procedures performed were gastrotomy for gastric foreign body removal and jejunostomy tube placement. Clinical signs related to the hiatal hernia disappeared after surgery and recurrence of signs was not reported for the time of follow-up.

  10. Struggling with a Gastric Volvulus Secondary to a Type IV Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    George, Dafnomilis; Apostolos, Pappas V.; Athanasios, Panoutsopoulos; Emmanuel, Lagoudianakis E.; Nikolaos, Koronakis E.; Nikolaos, Panagiotopoulos; Charalampos, Seretis; George, Karanikas; Andreas, Manouras J.

    2010-01-01

    Type IV hiatal hernias are characterized by herniation of the stomach along with associated viscera such as the spleen, colon, small bowel, and pancreas through the esophageal hiatus. They are relatively rare, representing only about 5%–7% of all hernias, and can be associated with severe complications. We report a 71-year-old veteran wrestler who presented to our department with a type IV paraesophageal hernia containing a gastric volvulus and treated successfully with emergency operation. PMID:20981251

  11. Laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia with mesenterioaxial volvulus of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kazuki; Sakurai, Yoichi; Isogaki, Jun; Komori, Yoshiyuki; Uyama, Ichiro

    2011-04-21

    Although mesenterioaxial gastric volvulus is an uncommon entity characterized by rotation at the transverse axis of the stomach, laparoscopic repair procedures have still been controversial. We reported a case of mesenterioaxial intrathoracic gastric volvulus, which was successfully treated with laparoscopic repair of the diaphragmatic hiatal defect using a polytetrafluoroethylene mesh associated with Toupet fundoplication. A 70-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital because of sudden onset of upper abdominal pain. An upper gastrointestinal series revealed an incarcerated intrathoracic mesenterioaxial volvulus of the distal portion of the stomach and the duodenum. The complete laparoscopic approach was used to repair the volvulus. The laparoscopic procedures involved the repair of the hiatal hernia using polytetrafluoroethylene mesh and Toupet fundoplication. This case highlights the feasibility and effectiveness of the laparoscopic procedure, and laparoscopic repair of the hiatal defect using a polytetrafluoroethylene mesh associated with Toupet fundoplication may be useful for preventing postoperative recurrence of hiatal hernia, volvulus, and gastroesophageal reflux.

  12. Hiatal hernia following total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Murata, S; Yamazaki, M; Kosugi, C; Hirano, A; Yoshimura, Y; Shiragami, R; Suzuki, M; Shuto, K; Koda, K

    2014-01-01

    Hiatal hernias after total gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer are very rare. We review a case of a 44-year-old male who presented with dyspnea and chest pain 2 days after total gastrectomy, lower esophagectomy, and splenectomy with retrocolic Roux-en-Y reconstruction approached by a left thoracoabdominal incision for gastric cancer at the cardia. Plain and cross-sectional imaging identified a large hiatal hernia protruding into the right thorax containing left-sided transverse colon and small intestine. Our patient underwent a laparotomy, and after hernia reduction the hiatal defect was repaired by direct suturing. He experienced anastomotic leakage and right pyothorax, but recovered. The potential cause is discussed here and the published literature on this rare complication is reviewed briefly.

  13. Hiatal hernia in pediatric patients: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Seong-Chul; Hwang, Ji-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic approach for hiatal hernia (HH) in pediatric patients. Methods This was a retrospective study of 33 patients younger than 18 years who underwent an operation for HH between January 1999 and December 2012. Results The HH symptoms were various and included regurgitation, vomiting, weight loss, cough, hoarseness, and cyanosis. Among the 33 patients, there were 25 sliding types, 1 paraesophageal type, and 7 mixed types. Open surgery (OS) and laparoscopic surgery (LS) were used in 16 and 17 patients, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age, or body weight between the groups. The median operating time was longer in the LS group (150 minutes; range, 90-250 minutes vs. 125 minutes; range, 66-194 minutes; P = 0.028). Time to oral intake was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (1 day; range, 1-3 days vs. 2 days; range, 1-7 days; P = 0.001) and time to full feeding was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (6 days; range, 3-16 days vs. 10 days; range, 3-33 days; P = 0.048). There were no differences in length of hospital stay and complications between the two groups. There was no perioperative mortality or recurrence of HH. Conclusion A good surgical outcome for laparoscopic correction of HH was seen in pediatric patients. PMID:24851228

  14. Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy for early gastric cancer accompanied by huge hiatal hernia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Chie; Yajima, Kazuhito; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Oohinata, Ryouki; Yuu, Ken; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Amaki, Misato; Nakano, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    We herein present a case in which we used a totally laparoscopic approach for early gastric cancer accompanied by a huge hiatal hernia. An 80-year-old Japanese woman was referred with a chief complaint of dysphagia. A clinical diagnosis of early gastric cancer, T1b (SM) N0M0, stage IA, accompanied by hiatal hernia, was made. Distal gastrectomy with D1 plus lymphadenectomy was carried out. After the gastrectomy, the hernial sac was excised and the hernial orifice was closed. Reconstruction using the Roux-en-Y method was selected. The postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 10.

  15. Cameron lesions: an often overlooked cause of iron deficiency anaemia in patients with large hiatal hernias

    PubMed Central

    Kimer, Nina; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad; Krag, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    Cameron lesions are linear gastric ulcers or erosions on the mucosal folds at the diaphragmatic impression in patients with a large hiatal hernia. The lesions are associated with occult bleeding and development of chronic iron deficiency anaemia, but are often overlooked during routine endoscopy. We present two patients with known hiatal hernias in who repeated endoscopic examinations had not been able to identify a source of bleeding. In both cases, typical Cameron lesions were found either by repeat gastroscopy or by capsule endoscopy. Treatment with high-dose proton pump inhibitor and iron supplement was initiated. PMID:22791730

  16. [Hiatal hernia incarceration during cardiopulmonary bypass in patient with acute aortic dissection--a case report].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Saito, T; Horimi, H; Kato, M; Kawashima, T; Fuse, K

    1995-09-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital under diagnosis of Stanford type A acute aortic dissection. Chest CT showed aortic dissection from the ascending to descending aorta, and large hiatal hernia. Operation was undergone under cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest with retrograde cerebral perfusion. A graft replacement was carried out from the ascending to transverse arch aorta. After the release of the cross-clamping of aorta, the heart was gradually oppressed anteriorly by extrapericardial mass, so that the patient could not be weaned from the cardiopulmonary bypass. The mass was revealed incarcerated hiatal hernia by ultrasonography. After laparotomy, diaphragm and hiatus were incised, the incarceration was relieved and the diaphgragm was repaired with a Goretex sheet. Then the patient could be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Her postoperative course was uneventful except for acute renal failure, and she was discharged 60 days after the operation. The incarceration of hiatal hernia was thought to be caused by tissue edema and small bleeding during cardiopulmonary bypass. This is the first reported case with the incarceration of hiatal hernia which occurred during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of atypical presentations of hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanagin, Brody A; Mitchell, Myrosia T; Thistlethwaite, William A; Alverdy, John C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery dramatically alters the normal stomach anatomy resulting in a significant incidence of hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although the majority of patients remain asymptomatic, many complain of severe heartburn refractory to medical management and additional highly atypical symptoms. Here, we describe the diagnosis and treatment regarding four cases of symptomatic hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery presenting with atypical symptoms in the University Hospital, USA. Four patients presented following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or duodenal switch/pancreaticobiliary bypass (DS) with disabling and intractable midepigastric abdominal pain characterized as severe and radiating to the jaw, left shoulder, and midscapular area. The pain in all cases was described as paroxysmal and not necessarily associated with eating. All four patients also experienced nausea, vomiting, and failure to thrive at various intervals following laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Routine workup failed to produce any clear mechanical cause of these symptoms. However, complimentary use of multidetector CT and upper gastrointestinal contrast studies eventually revealed the diagnosis of hiatal hernia. Exploration identified the presence of a type I hiatal hernia in all four patients, with the stomach staple lines densely adherent to the diaphragm and parietal peritoneum. Operative intervention led to immediate and complete resolution of symptoms. The presence of a hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery can present with highly atypical symptoms that do not resolve without operative intervention. Recognition of this problem should lead to the consideration of surgery in cases where patients are dependent on artificial nutritional support and whose symptoms are poorly controlled with medication alone.

  18. LAPAROSCOPIC GASTROPEXY FOR CORRECTION OF A HIATAL HERNIA IN A NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL (MIROUNGA ANGUSTIROSTRIS).

    PubMed

    Greene, Rebecca; Van Bonn, William G; Dennison, Sophie E; Greig, Denise J; Gulland, Frances M D

    2015-06-01

    A female northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) weaned pup presented with malnutrition. During rehabilitation, the seal developed regurgitation and reduced lung sounds on auscultation. Radiographs and endoscopy performed under sedation suggested a diaphragmatic hernia. A Type I (or sliding) hiatal hernia was confirmed with a positive contrast upper gastrointestinal study, revealing varying degrees of herniation of the gastric fundus through the diaphragm into the caudal thorax as well as esophageal reflux. The animal was treated preoperatively with an H2 antagonist and antinausea medication. A laparoscopic gastropexy was performed under general anesthesia. The animal recovered well postoperatively and resolution of clinical signs was achieved. The animal was released back into the wild 21 kg above admit weight. To our knowledge, we report here the first surgical correction of a hiatal hernia in a marine mammal.

  19. Hiatal hernia with upside-down stomach. Management of acute incarceration: case presentation and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gryglewski, Andrzej; Kuta, Marcin; Pasternak, Artur; Opach, Zdzisław; Walocha, Jerzy; Richter, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Upside-down stomach (UDS) represents the rarest type of hiatal hernia (<5%) and is characterized by herniation of the entire stomach or most gastric portions into the posterior mediastinum. We present here a very rare complication of such a condition which is incarceration of upside-down stomach. A 54 year-old female was admitted to the emergency department presenting signs of acute epigastric pain radiating into thorax. Computed tomography revealed a giant hiatal hernia with incarceration of the gastric trunk. Immediate operation for reduction of the incarcerated stomach and repair of the hiatal defect was performed. The patient was discharged without any complication and was followed up at the surgical outpatient department. The presented case confirms that differentiation of an acute epigastric or intrathoracic pain in adults should always exclude presence of hiatal hernia which in case of incarceration should be treated by prompt surgical management.

  20. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a brachycephalic dog with hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, M E; Sharp, C R; Garneau, M S

    2014-10-01

    A brachycephalic dog was presented with an acute onset of retching and abdominal discomfort. The dog had a chronic history of stertor and exercise intolerance suggestive of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Radiographs were consistent with a Type II hiatal hernia. The dog was referred and within hours of admission became acutely painful and developed tympanic abdominal distension. A right lateral abdominal radiograph confirmed gastric dilatation and volvulus with herniation of the pylorus through the hiatus. An emergency exploratory coeliotomy was performed, during which the stomach was derotated, and an incisional gastropexy, herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed. A staphylectomy was performed immediately following the exploratory coeliotomy. The dog recovered uneventfully. Gastric dilatation and volvulus is a potentially life-threatening complication that can occur in dogs with Type II hiatal hernia and should be considered a surgical emergency.

  1. Intraluminal pressure, transmucosal potential difference, and pH studies in the oesophagus of patients before and after Collis repair of a hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Habibulla, K. S.; Collis, J. Leigh

    1973-01-01

    Intraluminal pressure, transmucosal potential difference, and endo-oesophageal pH measurements were studied in patients with hiatal hernia—before and after a hiatal repair. The operation employed is the Collis (1968) repair for uncomplicated hiatal hernia and does not refer to gastroplasty as recommended for peptic stricture (Collis, 1961). Postoperative studies show that the repair approximates the inferior oesophageal sphincter to the hiatus with the production of a single band of raised pressure at the lower end of the oesophagus. This band is similar to that seen in normal subjects and its appearance was associated with cure of the symptoms, abolition of the gastro-oesophageal reflux, and improvement in the function of the inferior oesophageal sphincter and the musculature of the body of the oesophagus. Certain physiological implications of this study are discussed. Images PMID:4724501

  2. Biomechanical analyses of prosthetic mesh repair in a hiatal hernia model.

    PubMed

    Alizai, Patrick Hamid; Schmid, Sofie; Otto, Jens; Klink, Christian Daniel; Roeth, Anjali; Nolting, Jochen; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Klinge, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    Recurrence rate of hiatal hernia can be reduced with prosthetic mesh repair; however, type and shape of the mesh are still a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of four conventional meshes: pure polypropylene mesh (PP-P), polypropylene/poliglecaprone mesh (PP-U), polyvinylidenefluoride/polypropylene mesh (PVDF-I), and pure polyvinylidenefluoride mesh (PVDF-S). Meshes were tested either in warp direction (parallel to production direction) or perpendicular to the warp direction. A Zwick testing machine was used to measure elasticity and effective porosity of the textile probes. Stretching of the meshes in warp direction required forces that were up to 85-fold higher than the same elongation in perpendicular direction. Stretch stress led to loss of effective porosity in most meshes, except for PVDF-S. Biomechanical impact of the mesh was additionally evaluated in a hiatal hernia model. The different meshes were used either as rectangular patches or as circular meshes. Circular meshes led to a significant reinforcement of the hiatus, largely unaffected by the orientation of the warp fibers. In contrast, rectangular meshes provided a significant reinforcement only when warp fibers ran perpendicular to the crura. Anisotropic elasticity of prosthetic meshes should therefore be considered in hiatal closure with rectangular patches.

  3. Resorbable Synthetic Mesh Supported With Omentum Flap in the Treatment of Giant Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Lara, F. J.; Marín, R.; del Rey, A.; Oliva, H.

    2014-01-01

    Covering a large hiatal hernia with a mesh has become a basic procedure in the last few years. However, mesh implants are associated with high complication rates (esophageal erosion, perforation, fistula, etc.). We propose using a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap as a possible solution to this problem. A 54-year-old female patient with a large hiatal defect (9 cm) was laparoscopically implanted with a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap. The surgical procedure was successful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. On a follow-up examination 6 months after surgery, she remained free of relapse or complication signs. Supporting an implanted resorbable mesh with an omental flap may be a solution to the problems posed by large esophageal hiatus defects. However, more studies based on larger patient samples and longer follow-up periods are necessary. PMID:25216419

  4. Approaches to the Diagnosis and Grading of Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, Peter J.; Kim, Hyon C.; Pandolfino, John E

    2008-01-01

    Hiatus hernia refers to conditions in which elements of the abdominal cavity, most commonly the stomach, herniate through the esophageal hiatus into the mediastinum. With the most common type (type I or sliding hiatus hernia) this is associated with laxity of the phrenoesophageal membrane and the gastric cardia herniates. Sliding hiatus hernia is readily diagnosed by barium swallow radiography, endoscopy, or manometry when greater than 2 cm in axial span. However, the mobility of the esophagogastric junction precludes the reliable detection of more subtle disruption by endoscopy or radiography. Detecting lesser degrees of axial separation between the lower esophageal sphincter and crural diaphragm can only be reliably accomplished with high resolution manometry, a technique that permits real time localization of these esophagogastric junction components without swallow or distention related artifact. PMID:18656819

  5. Management of large para-esophageal hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Collet, D; Luc, G; Chiche, L

    2013-12-01

    Para-esophageal hernias are relatively rare and typically occur in elderly patients. The various presenting symptoms are non-specific and often occur in combination. These include symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD) in 26 to 70% of cases, microcytic anemia in 17 to 47%, and respiratory symptoms in 9 to 59%. Respiratory symptoms are not completely resolved by surgical intervention. Acute complications such as gastric volvulus with incarceration or strangulation are rare (estimated incidence of 1.2% per patient per year) but gastric ischemia leading to perforation is the main cause of mortality. Only patients with symptomatic hernias should undergo surgery. Prophylactic repair to prevent acute incarceration should only be undertaken in patients younger than 75 in good condition; surgical indications must be discussed individually beyond this age. The laparoscopic approach is now generally accepted. Resection of the hernia sac is associated with a lower incidence of recurrence. Repair of the hiatus can be reinforced with prosthetic material (either synthetic or biologic), but the benefit of prosthetic repair has not been clearly shown. Results of prosthetic reinforcement vary in different studies; it has been variably associated with four times fewer recurrences or with no measurable difference. A Collis type gastroplasty may be useful to lengthen a foreshortened esophagus, but no objective criteria have been defined to support this approach. The anatomic recurrence rate can be as high as 60% at 12years. But most recurrences are asymptomatic and do not affect the quality of life index. It therefore seems more appropriate to evaluate functional results and quality of life measures rather than to gauge success by a strict evaluation of anatomic hernia reduction.

  6. Gastroscopy in patients with hiatal hernia with and without gastroesophageal mucosal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Gryglewski, Andrzej; Pasternak, Artur; Piech, Krzysztof; Gąsior, Grzegorz; Głowacki, Roman; Bereza, Krzysztof; Walocha, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    There are still many doubts in the literature regarding gastroesophageal mucosal prolapse (GEMP) and its clinical course. We still do not know what determines mucosal wedging in esophagogastric junction, and what is the role of the anatomy of that site. To investigate that problem we performed 120 upper digestive tract endoscopies in which a hiatal hernia was diagnosed. Patients referred to our unit with different complaints most frequently of typical or atypical gastroesophageal (GE) reflux symptoms. The aim of that study was to assess hernia dimensions in patients with and without GEMP diagnosed during endoscopy. Additionally we analyzed the type and prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms reported by patients to confirm the observation that GEMP symptoms differ from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms.

  7. An unusual case: a giant paraesophageal hiatal hernia with intrathoracic spleen, preduodenal portal vein, malrotation, and left inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Başaklar, A Can; Sönmez, Kaan; Karabulut, Ramazan; Türkyilmaz, Zafer; Moralioğlu, Serdar

    2007-12-01

    A giant paraesophageal hiatal hernia with preduodenal portal vein, nonrotating gut, intrathoracic spleen, and left inferior vena cava has not been reported to date. This set of complex anomalies can have significant clinical implications. Awareness of these anomalies is essential to avoid further complications.

  8. Effect of perfusion of bile salts solutions into the oesophagus of hiatal hernia patients and controls.

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, G S; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    Tests of the response to perfusion of the oesophagus were made in 54 patients divided into three groups. Group I consisted of patients with symptomatic hiatal hernia, group II hiatal hernia patients with peptic stricture, and group III normal individuals. Each individual oesophagus was perfused at a rate of 45-65 drops per minute over 25 minutes with six solutions: normal saline, N/10 HCl, taurine conjugates of bile salts in normal saline, taurine conjugates of bile salts in N/10 HCl, glycine conjugates of bile salts in normal saline, and taurine and glycine conjugates in a ratio of 1 to 2 in normal saline. It was found that acidified taurine solutions were more irritating than acid alone. With a 2mM/l solution of taurine in acid, symptoms are produced even in controls. With a 1 mM/l solution of the same conjugates, the majority of normal people feel slight heartburn or nothing, and therefore perfusion into the oesophagus of such a solution could be used as a test for oesophagitis. PMID:941112

  9. Gasless laparoscopic surgery plus abdominal wall lifting for giant hiatal hernia-our single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang-Hong; Wu, Ji-Xiang; Yu, Lei; Li, Jian-Ye

    2016-12-01

    Giant hiatal hernia (GHH) comprises 5% of hiatal hernia and is associated with significant complications. The traditional operative procedure, no matter transthoracic or transabdomen repair of giant hiatal hernia, is characteristic of more invasion and more complications. Although laparoscopic repair as a minimally invasive surgery is accepted, a part of patients can not tolerate pneumoperitoneum because of combination with cardiopulmonary diseases or severe posterior mediastinal and neck emphesema during operation. The aim of this article was to analyze our experience in gasless laparoscopic repair with abdominal wall lifting to treat the giant hiatal hernia. We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting from 2012 to 2015 at our institution. The GHH was defined as greater than one-third of the stomach in the chest. Gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting was attempted in 27 patients. Mean age was 67 years. The results showed that there were no conversions to open surgery and no intraoperative deaths. The mean duration of operation was 100 min (range: 90-130 min). One-side pleura was injured in 4 cases (14.8%). The mean postoperative length of stay was 4 days (range: 3-7 days). Median follow- up was 26 months (range: 6-38 months). Transient dysphagia for solid food occurred in three patients (11.1%), and this symptom disappeared within three months. There was one patient with recurrent hiatal hernia who was reoperated on. Two patients still complained of heartburn three months after surgery. Neither reoperation nor endoscopic treatment due to signs of postoperative esophageal stenosis was required in any patient. Totally, satisfactory outcome was reported in 88.9% patients. It was concluded that the gasless laparoscopic approach with abdominal wall lifting to the repair of GHH is feasible, safe, and effective for the patients who cannot tolerate the pneumoperitoneum.

  10. Hiatal hernia causing extrapericardial tamponade after coronary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Papoulidis, Pavlos; Beatty, Jasmine Winter; Dandekar, Uday

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac tamponade is defined as compression of the heart due to accumulation of fluid in the pericardial sac, leading to raised pericardial pressures with haemodynamic compromise. We describe the case of a 76-year old female patient who underwent a routine off-pump coronary artery bypass graft operation and within 48 h developed classic signs of cardiac tamponade. The perioperative echocardiogram and operative findings at re-exploration revealed no clots or fluid collection. A giant hiatus hernia was found to be responsible for the tamponade through extrinsic compression. After insertion of a nasogastric tube and decompression of the stomach, there was a rapid improvement of the clinical picture. The remaining postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged 5 days later, with referral to the general surgeon for further management. We conclude that, in cases of tamponade post-cardiac surgery, extrapericardial pathologies should be considered.

  11. Cardiac complications after laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair. Is it related with staple fixation of the mesh? -Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria del Carmen; Diaz, María; López, Fernando; Martí-Obiol, Roberto; Ortega, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic Nissen operation with mesh reinforcement remains being the most popular operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Complications related to mesh placement have been widely described. Cardiac complications are rare, but have a fatal outcome if they are misdiagnosed. Presentation of cases We sought to outline our institutional experience of three patients who developed cardiac complications following a laparoscopic Nissen operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Discussion Laparoscopic hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication are safe and effective procedures for the hiatal hernia repair, but they are not exempt from complications. Fixation technique and material used must be taken into account. We have conducted a review of the literature on complications related to these procedures. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of hemodynamic instability after laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair, cardiac tamponade and other cardiac complications should be considered. PMID:26635954

  12. Large hiatal hernia at chest radiography in a woman with cardiorespiratory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Torres, Daniele; Parrinello, Gaspare; Cardillo, Mauro; Pomilla, Marina; Trapanese, Caterina; Michele, Bellanca; Lupo, Umberto; Schimmenti, Caterina; Cuttitta, Francesco; Pietrantoni, Rossella; Vogiatzis, Danai; Licata, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is a frequent entity. Rarely, it may exert a wide spectrum of clinical presentations mimicking acute cardiovascular events such as angina-like chest pain until manifestations of cardiac compression that can include postprandial syncope, exercise intolerance, respiratory function, recurrent acute heart failure, and hemodynamic collapse. A 69-year-old woman presented to the emergency department complaining of fatigue on exertion, cough, and episodes of restrosternal pain with less than 1 hour of duration. Her medical history only included some episodes of bronchitis and no history of hypertension. The 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrated sinus rhythm with right bundle-branch block. Laboratory tests, including cardiac troponin I, were within normal reference values. Chest radiography showed no significant pulmonary alterations and revealed in mediastinum a huge abnormal shadow overlapping the right heart compatible with a gastric bubble.The gastroscopy confirmed a large HH. A 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram, using all standard and modified apical and parasternal views, revealed an echolucent mass, compatible with HH, compressing the right atrium. Also, it showed an altered left ventricular relaxation and a mild increase of pulmonary artery pressure (35 mm Hg). Spirometry showed a mild obstruction of the small airways, whereas coronary angiography showed normal coronary arteries. We concluded that the patient's symptomatology was related to the compressive effects of the large hiatal ernia, a neglected cause of cardiorespiratory symptoms. The surgical repair of HH was indicated.

  13. Lower recurrence rates after mesh-reinforced versus simple hiatal hernia repair: a meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Antoniou, George A; Koch, Oliver O; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank A

    2012-12-01

    Mesh hiatoplasty has been postulated to reduce recurrence rates, it is however prone to esophageal stricture, and early-term and mid-term dysphagia. The present meta-analysis was designed to compare the outcome between mesh-reinforced and primary hiatal hernia repair. The databases of Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched; only randomized controlled trials entered the meta-analytical model. Anatomic recurrence documented by barium oesophagography was defined as the primary outcome endpoint. Three randomized controlled trials reporting the outcomes of 267 patients were identified. The follow-up period ranged between 6 and 12 months. The weighted mean recurrence rates after primary and mesh-reinforced hiatoplasty were 24.3% and 5.8%, respectively. Pooled analysis demonstrated increased risk of recurrence in primary hiatal closure (odds ratio, 4.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-9.5; P=0.001). Mesh-reinforced hiatal hernia repair is associated with an approximately 4-fold decreased risk of recurrence in comparison with simple repair. The long-term results of mesh-augmented hiatal closure remain to be investigated.

  14. The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p < 0.0001). Combined 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring after 12 months did not show any evidence of pathological acid or non acid reflux. Conclusion All patients were satisfied of procedure and no hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

  15. Impact of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia repair on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Harshit; Vigneshwaran, Balasubiramaniyan; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Ahuja, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of hiatal hernia repair (HHR) on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in morbidly obese patients with hiatus hernia undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: It is a retrospective study involving ten morbidly obese patients with large hiatus hernia diagnosed on pre-operative endoscopy who underwent LSG and simultaneous HHR. The patients were assessed for symptoms of GERD using a Severity symptom score (SS) questionnaire and anti-reflux medications. RESULTS: Of the ten patients, five patients had GERD preoperatively. At the mean follow-up of 11.70 ± 6.07 months after surgery, four patients (80%) showed complete resolution while one patient complained of persistence of symptoms. Endoscopy in this patient revealed resolution of esophagitis indicating that the persistent symptoms were not attributable to reflux. The other five patients without GERD remained free of any symptom attributable to GERD. Thus, in all ten patients, repair of hiatal hernia (HH) during LSG led to either resolution of GERD or prevented any new onset symptom related to GER. CONCLUSION: In morbidly obese patients with HH with or without GERD undergoing LSG, repair of the hiatus hernia helps in amelioration of GERD and prevents any new onset GER. Thus, the presence of HH should not be considered as a contraindication for LSG. PMID:28281472

  16. Hiatal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  17. Evaluation of conventional laparoscopic versus robot-assisted laparoscopic redo hiatal hernia and antireflux surgery: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tolboom, Robert C; Draaisma, Werner A; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2016-03-01

    Surgery for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia leads to recurrence or persisting dysphagia in a minority of patients. Redo antireflux surgery in GERD and hiatal hernia is known for higher morbidity and mortality. This study aims to evaluate conventional versus robot-assisted laparoscopic redo antireflux surgery, with the objective to detect possible advantages for the robot-assisted approach. A single institute cohort of 75 patients who underwent either conventional laparoscopic or robot-assisted laparoscopic redo surgery for recurrent GERD or severe dysphagia between 2008 and 2013 were included in the study. Baseline characteristics, symptoms, medical history, procedural data, hospital stay, complications and outcome were prospectively gathered. The main indications for redo surgery were dysphagia, pyrosis or a combination of both in combination with a proven anatomic abnormality. The mean time to redo surgery was 1.9 and 2.0 years after primary surgery for the conventional and robot-assisted groups, respectively. The number of conversions was lower in the robot-assisted group compared to conventional laparoscopy (1/45 vs. 5/30, p = 0.035) despite a higher proportion of patients with previous surgery by laparotomy (9/45 vs. 1/30, p = 0.038). Median hospital stay was reduced by 1 day (3 vs. 4, p = 0.042). There were no differences in mortality, complications or outcome. Robotic support, when available, can be regarded beneficial in redo surgery for GERD and hiatal hernia. Results of this observational study suggest technical feasibility for minimal-invasive robot-assisted redo surgery after open primary antireflux surgery, a reduced number of conversions and shorter hospital stay.

  18. Laparoscopic Repair and Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy to Treat Giant Esophageal Hiatal Hernia with Gastric Obstruction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Yoichi; Hihara, Jun; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Furukawa, Takaoki; Yamakita, Ichiko; Ibuki, Yuta; Okada, Morihito

    2015-06-01

    We describe a 74-year-old man with repeated aspiration pneumonia who developed gastric obstruction due to giant esophageal hiatal hernia (EHH). We repaired the giant EHH by laparoscopic surgery and subsequently anchored the stomach to the abdominal wall by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) using gastrofiberscopy. Thereafter, the patient resumed oral intake and was discharged on postoperative day 21. At two years after these procedures, the patient has adequate oral intake and lives at home. Because this condition occurs more frequently in the elderly with comorbidities, laparoscopic surgery contributes to minimally invasive treatment. Furthermore, the procedure combined with concurrent gastropexy via PEG is useful for treating patients who have difficulty swallowing and for preventing recurrent hernia.

  19. Temporal patterns of hiatus hernia recurrence and hiatal failure: quality of life and recurrence after revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Suppiah, A; Sirimanna, P; Vivian, S J; O'Donnell, H; Lee, G; Falk, G L

    2017-04-01

    Antireflux and paraesophageal hernia repair surgery is increasingly performed and there is an increased requirement for revision hiatus hernia surgery. There are no reports on the changes in types of failures and/or the variations in location of crural defects over time following primary surgery and limited reports on the outcomes of revision surgery. The aim of this study is to report the changes in types of hernia recurrence and location of crural defects following primary surgery, to test our hypothesis of the temporal events leading to hiatal recurrence and aid prevention. Quality of life scores following revision surgery are also reported, in one of the largest and longest follow-up series in revision hiatus surgery. Review of a single-surgeon database of all revision hiatal surgery between 1992 and 2015. The type of recurrence and the location of crural defect were noted intraoperatively. Recurrence was diagnosed on gastroscopy and/or contrast study. Quality of life outcomes were measured using Visick, dysphagia, atypical reflux symptoms, satisfaction scores, and Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI). Two-hundred eighty four patients (126 male, 158 female), median age 60.8(48.2-69.1), underwent revision hiatal surgery. Median follow-up following primary surgery was 122.8(75.3-180.3) and 91.6(40.5-152.5) months after revision surgery. The most common type of hernia recurrence in the early period after primary surgery was 'telescope'(42.9%), but overall, fundoplication apparatus transhiatal migration was consistently the predominant type of recurrence at 1-3 years (54.3%), 3-5 years (42.5%), 5-10 years (45.1%), and >10 years (44.1%). The location of crural defects changed over duration following primary surgery as anteroposterior defects was most common in the early period (45.5% in <1 year) but decreased over time (30.3% at 1-3 years) while anterior defects increased in the long term with 35.9%, 40%, and 42.2% at 3-5 years, 5-10 years, and >10 years

  20. [Severe kyphosis and esophagus hiatal hernia affected in the levodopa absorption of a patient with Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Chihara, Norio; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Lin, Youwei; Tsukamoto, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masafumi; Murata, Miho

    2009-08-01

    An 82 year-old woman with Parkinson's disease complained of a tendency to fall. She has had an extensive kyphosis since she was 66 years old. Over the last 6 months, she has repeatedly fallen. Even though she took anti-parkisonian drugs, she had also developed camptocormia. Her plasma levodopa concentration was analyzed for 4 hrs after administrating an oral dose of levodopa (200 mg) plus carbidopa (20 mg) at the time of fasting. The change in the plasma levodopa concentration showed bimodal peaks. The physical symptoms depended on the plasma concentration and improved twice. Esophageal tortuosity and esophageal hiatal hernia were detected by esophagography and upper gastric endoscopy. Such physical symptoms were speculated to have been caused by the transit disturbance of the drug in the gastrointestinal duct. During a second analysis of the plasma levodopa concentration, the patient was instructed to keep extending her back after consuming the same dose of drugs but with a greater amount of water than in the first analysis. A single and a higher peak were observed for the plasma levodopa concentration, and the physical symptoms, including camptocormia and parkinsonism, were improved. Hunched posture could influence the absorption of antiparkinsonian drugs.

  1. [Difficult endoscopic extraction: pneumomediastinum and bilateral pneumothorax after attempted endoscopic extraction of needle incarcerated in hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Scamporrino, A; Mongardini, M; Stagnitti, F; Corona, F; Costantini, A; Priore, F M; Tiberi, R; Iannetti, A; Occhigrossi, G

    2002-01-01

    From June 1987 to April 2000, 167 (74%) of 223 patients suspected of swallowing foreign bodies were treated. Hundred-sixty-three were successfully treated endoscopically. The surgery rate was 2.4%. There was failure to remove a tablespoon, a tooth-brush, a dental prostheses with metallic hook, a knitting-needle. The sharp and pointed foreign bodies were 35 (20.9%). Endoscopic removal of sharp and pointed foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract can be very difficult to manage. The Authors report iatrogenic perforation of esophagus-gastric-fundus in a patient with hiatus hernia who ingested a big knitting-needle in order to suicide. They think that it is absolutely necessary to use special endoscopic equipment during the taking out of foreign-body procedure, especially when pointed and sharp-edge shaped bodies are involved and when there is high risk of iatrogenic lesions.

  2. Unusual Diaphragmatic Hernias Mimicking Cardiac Masses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Hun; Kim, Myoung Gun; Kim, Su Ji; Moon, Jeonggeun; Kang, Woong Chol; Shin, Mi-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Hiatal hernia and Morgagni hernia are sorts of diaphragmatic hernias that are rarely detected on transthoracic echocardiography. Although echocardiographic findings have an important role for differential diagnosis of cardiac masses, we often might overlook diaphragmatic hernia. We report three cases of diaphragmatic hernias having specific features. The first case is huge hiatal hernia that encroaches left atrium with internal swirling flow on transthoracic echocardiography. The second case is a hiatal hernia that encroaches on both atria, incidentally detected on preoperative echocardiography. The third case is Morgagni hernia which encroaches on the right atrium only. So, we need to consider possibility of diaphragmatic hernia when we find a cardiac mass with specific echocardiographic features. PMID:26140154

  3. Cameron Ulcer Causing Severe Anemia in a Patient with Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prashant; Suryadevara, Madhu; Das, Avash; Falterman, James

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 51 Final Diagnosis: Cameron’s ulcer Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Cameron lesions are linear gastric erosions on the mucosal folds at the diaphragmatic impressions found in patients with large hiatal hernias. While usually asymptomatic, hiatal hernias can result in serious sequelae, as this case report will clearly illustrate. Cameron lesions are clinically significant because of their ability to cause significant acute, chronic, or obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, often requiring blood transfusions. Case Report: In this report, we present the case of a 51-year-old white woman who originally presented to the Emergency Department with complaints of a runny nose, dry cough, generalized weakness, and muscle cramping ascribed to a viral infection. However, closer examination revealed substantial pallor with pale conjunctiva prompting further workup that revealed substantial anaemia. Upon further inquiry of her past medical history, she revealed the need for previous blood transfusions, and meticulous review of her medical record indicated a previous diagnosis of hiatal hernia with the presence of Cameron lesions based on esophagogastroduodenoscopy 2 years prior. Conclusions: This case emphasizes the need for a high index of suspicion for Cameron lesions as a causative agent of substantial blood loss in patients with hiatal hernias after other common causes of gastrointestinal bleeding have been ruled out. PMID:26467083

  4. The role of hiatus hernia in GERD.

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Increased esophageal acid exposure in gastroesophageal reflux disease has several potential causes, some related primarily to physiological dysfunction of the LES and others related to anatomic distortion of the gastroesophageal junction as occurs with hiatus hernia. One attractive feature of implicating hiatal hernias in the pathogenesis of reflux disease is that, like reflux disease, axial hernias become more common with age and obesity. However, the importance of hiatus hernia is obscured by imprecise definition and an all-or-none conceptualization that has led to wide variation in estimates of prevalence among normal or diseased populations. There are at least three potentially significant radiographic features of a hiatus hernia: axial length during distention, axial length at rest, and competence of the diaphragmatic hiatus. Although any or all of these features may be abnormal in a particular instance of hiatus hernia, each is of different functional significance. Grouping all abnormalities of the gastroesophageal junction as "hiatus hernia" without detailing the specifics of each case defies logic. Mechanistically, the gastroesophageal junction must protect against reflux both in static and dynamic conditions. During abrupt increases in intra-abdominal pressure, the crural diaphragm normally serves as a "second sphincter," and this mechanism is substantially impaired in individuals with a gaping hiatus. Large, non-reducing hernias also impair the process of esophageal emptying, thereby prolonging acid clearance time following a reflux event (especially while in the supine posture). These anatomically-determined functional impairments of the gastroesophageal junction lead to increased esophageal acid exposure. Thus, although hiatus hernia may or may not be an initiating factor at the inception of reflux disease, it clearly can act as a sustaining factor accounting for the frequently observed chronicity of the disease. PMID:10780571

  5. Bladder hernia.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Massimiliano; De Luca, Francesco

    2006-06-01

    Bladder hernia is a rare condition, but crural herniation of the bladder into the scrotum is very rare. A case of bladder hernia presenting with urological symptoms is described. A 71-year-old man presented to the urological ward complaining for persistent frequency and nocturia associated with loss offorce and decrease of caliber of the urinary stream and the presence of a large mass of the right scrotum. An IVP (intra venous pyelography) showed a large herniation of the bladder through the right inguinal canal into the scrotum. An inguinal incision was made and a crural hernia was identified. The hernia sac, containing bowel and bladder, was dissectedfreefrom the spermatic cord and the testis and the hernia defect was repaired.

  6. [Diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Osmak, Liliana; Cougard, Patrick

    2003-10-15

    A diaphragmatic hernia is the protrusion of abdominal contents into the thoracic cavity, via a hole in the diaphragm, which either presence or size is abnormal. Congenital hernias are rare and often diagnosed at birth. Adults are diagnosed accidentally. Symptoms can be digestive or respiratory, and the risk of volvulus calls for surgery. Diaphragmatic ruptures are seen more often, and are a consequence of violent thoraco-abdominal trauma, or penetrating wound. They should be treated surgically in emergency, but the operation can be delayed if they are not diagnosed at once. Videosurgery has been used more and more often recently to treat diaphragmatic hernias.

  7. Epigastric Hernia.

    PubMed

    Suarez Acosta, Carlos Enrique; Romero Fernandez, Esperanza; Calvo Manuel, Elpidio

    2015-08-01

    Epigastric hernia is a common condition, mostly asymptomatic although sometimes their unusual clinical presentation still represents a diagnostic dilemma for clinician. The theory of extra tension in the epigastric region by the diaphragm is the most likely theory of epigastric hernia formation. A detailed history and clinical examination in our thin, elderly male patient who presented with abdominal pain and constipation of 5 days of evolution was crucial in establishing a diagnosis. Noninvasive radiologic modalities such as ultrasonographic studies in the case of our patient can reliably confirm the diagnosis of epigastric hernia.

  8. Umbilical Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... complicated umbilical hernia with liver cirrhosis and ascites. International Journal of Surgery. 2014;12:181. Cameron JL, et al. In: Current Surgical Therapy. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; ...

  9. Femoral hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or strain. Sometimes, the first symptoms are: Sudden groin pain Abdominal pain Nausea Vomiting This may mean that ... present with the hernia. If you feel sudden pain in your groin, a piece of intestine may be stuck in ...

  10. Paraesophageal hernia with incarceration of the gastric antrum and duodenal bulb: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In cases of esophageal hernia, incarceration of peritoneal organs other than the stomach is rare. Case presentation An 84-year-old female was admitted to our institution with a complaint of nausea and vomiting. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an esophageal hiatal hernia with incarceration of the gastric antrum and duodenal bulb. Gastrofluorography under gastroendoscopy confirmed prolapse of the antrum and duodenal bulb into the esophageal hernial sac. Although gastroendoscopy guided repositioning of the prolapsed organs was successful, reprolapse occurred immediately. Therefore, surgical treatment was indicated. The gastric antrum and duodenal bulb were associated with a paraesophageal hernia. Therefore, they were repositioned, and passage from the duodenal bulb to the descending portion of the duodenum was improved. Conclusion We report a rare case of paraesophageal hernia with incarceration of the gastric antrum and duodenal bulb. PMID:24207166

  11. Hernias (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually required within a few days to prevent development of another incarcerated hernia. The most serious type of hernia is a strangulated hernia, in which the normal blood supply is cut off from the trapped tissue. ...

  12. Transfusion-Dependent Anaemia: An Overlooked Complication of Paraoesophageal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Garett S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. A paraoesophageal hernia (PH) may be one reason for iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) but is often overlooked as a cause. We aimed to assess the incidence and resolution of transfusion-dependent IDA in patients presenting for hiatal hernia surgery. Methods. We analysed a prospective database of patients undergoing laparoscopic hiatal repair in order to identify patients with severe IDA requiring red cell/iron transfusion. Results. Of 138 patients with PH managed over a 4-year period, 7 patients (5.1%; M : F 2 : 5; median age 62 yrs (range 57–82)) with IDA requiring red cell/iron transfusion were identified. Preoperatively, 3/7 patients underwent repetitive and unnecessary diagnostic endoscopic investigations prior to surgery. Only 2/7 ever demonstrated gastric mucosal erosions (Cameron ulcers). All patients were cured from anaemia postoperatively. Discussion. PH is an important differential diagnosis in patients with IDA, even those with marked anaemia and no endoscopically identifiable mucosal lesions. Early recognition can avoid unnecessary additional diagnostic endoscopies. Laparoscopic repair is associated with low morbidity and results in resolution of anaemia. PMID:27379280

  13. Para-oesophageal and parahiatal hernias in an Asian acute care tertiary hospital: an underappreciated surgical condition

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ye Xin; Ong, Lester Wei Lin; Lee, June; Wong, Andrew Siang Yih

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The prevalence of hiatal hernias and para-oesophageal hernias (PEHs) is lower in Asian populations than in Western populations. Progressive herniation can result in giant PEHs, which are associated with significant morbidity. This article presents the experience of an Asian acute care tertiary hospital in the management of giant PEH and parahiatal hernia. METHODS Surgical records dated between January 2003 and January 2013 from the Department of Surgery, Changi General Hospital, Singapore, were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Ten patients underwent surgical repair for giant PEH or parahiatal hernia during the study period. Open surgery was performed for four patients with giant PEH who presented emergently, while elective laparoscopic repair was performed for six patients with either giant PEH or parahiatal hernia (which were preoperatively diagnosed as PEH). Anterior 180° partial fundoplication was performed in eight patients, and mesh reinforcement was used in six patients. The electively repaired patients had minimal or no symptoms during presentation. Gastric volvulus was observed in five patients. There were no cases of mortality. The median follow-up duration was 16.3 months. There were no cases of mesh erosion, complaints of dysphagia or recurrence of PEH in all patients. CONCLUSION Giant PEH and parahiatal hernia are underdiagnosed in Asia. Most patients with giant PEH or parahiatal hernia are asymptomatic; they often present emergently or are incidentally diagnosed. Although surgical outcomes are favourable even with a delayed diagnosis, there should be greater emphasis on early diagnosis and elective repair of these hernias. PMID:26778633

  14. Paraesophageal Hernia Repair With Partial Longitudinal Gastrectomy in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, John; El-Hayek, Kevin; Brethauer, Stacy; Schauer, Philip; Zelisko, Andrea; Chand, Bipan; O'Rourke, Colin; Kroh, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with hiatal hernia in obese patients has proven difficult, as studies demonstrate poor symptom control and high failure rates in this patient population. Recent data have shown that incorporating weight loss procedures into the treatment of reflux may improve overall outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 28 obese and morbidly obese patients who presented from December 2007 through July 2013 with large or recurrent type 3 or 4 paraesophageal hernia. All of the patients underwent combined paraesophageal hernia repair and partial longitudinal gastrectomy. Charts were retrospectively reviewed, and the patients were contacted to determine symptomatic relief. Results: Mean preoperative body mass index was 38.1 ± 4.9 kg/m2. Anatomic failure of prior fundoplication occurred in 7 patients (25%). The remaining 21 had primary paraesophageal hernia, 3 of which were type 4. Postoperative complications included pulmonary embolism (n = 1), pulmonary decompensation (n = 2), and wound infection (n = 1). Mean hospital stay was 5 ± 3 days. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogram was performed in 21 patients with no immediate recurrence or staple line dehiscence. Mean excess weight loss was 44 ± 25%. All of the patients surveyed experienced near to total resolution of their preoperative symptoms within the first month. At 1 year, symptom scores decreased significantly. At 27 months, however, there was a mild increase in the scores. Return of severe symptoms occurred in 2 patients, both of whom underwent conversion to gastric bypass. Conclusions: Combined laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with longitudinal partial gastrectomy offers a safe, feasible approach to the management of large or recurrent paraesophageal hernia in well-selected obese and morbidly obese patients. Short-term results were promising; however, intermediate results showed increasing rates of reflux symptoms that required

  15. Spontaneous Transomental Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    A transomental hernia through the greater or lesser omentum is rare, accounting for approximately 4% of internal hernias. Transomental hernias are generally reported in patients aged over fifty. In such instances, acquired transomental hernias are usual, are commonly iatrogenic, and result from surgical interventions or from trauma or peritoneal inflammation. In rare cases, such as the one described in this study, internal hernias through the greater or lesser omentum occur spontaneously as the result of senile atrophy without history of surgery, trauma, or inflammation. A transomental hernia has a high postoperative mortality rate of 30%, and emergency diagnosis and treatment are critical. We report a case of a spontaneous transomental hernia of the small intestine causing intestinal obstruction. An internal hernia with strangulation of the small bowel in the lesser sac was suspected from the image study. After an emergency laparotomy, a transomental hernia was diagnosed. PMID:26962535

  16. Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia)

    MedlinePlus

    .org Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia) Page ( 1 ) A sports hernia is a painful, so tissue injury that occurs in ... groin area. It most o en occurs during sports that require sudden changes of direction or intense ...

  17. Retrosternal (Morgagni) diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lojszczyk–Szczepaniak, Anna; Komsta, Renata; Debiak, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the case of a shih tzu puppy, in which a rare congenital Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed. The diagnosis was based on abdominal and thoracic radiographs, including a contrast study of the gastrointestinal tract, which revealed a co-existing umbilical hernia. Both hernias were repaired by surgery. PMID:22294795

  18. Primary lumbar hernia: A rarely encountered hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Sharada; Suresh, H.B.; Anirudh, A.V.; Prakash Rozario, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia, making its diagnosis and management a challenge to the treating surgeon. Presentation may be misleading and diagnosis often missed. An imaging study forms an indispensable aid in the diagnosis and surgery is the only treatment option. Presentation of case A 42 year old male presented with history of pain in lower back of 4 years duration and was being treated symptomatically over 4 years with analgesics and physiotherapy. He had noticed a swelling over the left side of his mid-back and consequently on examination was found to have a primary acquired lumbar hernia arising from the deep superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt. Diagnosis was confirmed by Computed Tomographic imaging. Discussion A lumbar hernia may be primary or secondary with only about 300 cases of primary lumbar hernia reported in literature. Lumbar hernias manifest through two possible defects in the posterior abdominal wall, the superior being more common. Management remains surgical with various techniques emerging over the years. The patient at our center underwent an open sublay mesh repair with excellent outcome. Conclusion A surgeon may encounter a primary lumbar hernia perhaps once in his lifetime making it an interesting surgical challenge. Sound anatomical knowledge and adequate imaging are indispensable. Inspite of advances in minimally invasive surgery, it cannot be universally applied to patients with lumbar hernia and management requires a more tailored approach. PMID:26812667

  19. Operation hernia: humanitarian hernia repairs in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sanders, D L; Kingsnorth, A N

    2007-10-01

    Ghana has a high incidence of inguinal hernias and the healthcare system is unable to deliver an adequate repair rate. This results in morbidity and mortality and has a knock-on effect on the local economy. A project has been set up to try and reduce the burden of these hernias by establishing Africa's first Hernia Centre. This is supported by structured visits by European surgeons to the centre. In October 2006, a team of four surgeons, two specialist registrars, one hernia nurse specialist, and three nurses was assembled in order to open the Hernia Centre, which will provide a base for the delivery of hernia services in the West of Ghana. A 2-year teaching programme has been formulated, tailored to the needs of local surgeons and nurses, with the aim of developing an integrated team that will initially deliver up to 50 hernia repairs each month. It is planned that the centre will be supported by structured periodic visits from surgeons and nurses based in Plymouth, the European Hernia Society, and any other volunteers wishing to support the link.

  20. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, especially the differences to laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia are discussed in this article. PMID:27826574

  1. Incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Keith W

    2003-10-01

    Incisional ventral hernias are a common problem encountered by surgeons, with over 100,000 repairs being performed annually in the United States. Although many predisposing factors for incisional ventral hernia are patient-related, some factors such as type of primary closure and materials used may reduce the overall incidence of incisional ventral hernia. With the advent of prosthetic meshes being used for incisional ventral hernia repair, the recurrence rate has dropped to approximately 10%. More recently, with the development of prosthetic mesh that is now safe to place intraperitoneally, the recurrence rate has dropped to under 5%. The current controversies that exist for incisional ventral hernia repair are which approach to use (open versus laparoscopic) and what type of fixation (partial- versus full-thickness abdominal muscular/fascial wall) is necessary to stabilize the position of the mesh while tissue ingrowth occurs. During the next decade the answers to these controversies should be available in the surgical literature.

  2. Laparoscopic treatment of Bochdalek hernia without the use of a mesh.

    PubMed

    Brusciano, L; Izzo, G; Maffettone, V; Rossetti, G; Renzi, A; Napolitano, V; Russo, G; Del Genio, A

    2003-09-01

    Bochdalek hernia is a rare pathology. The preoperative diagnosis is difficult, and few reports are available regarding its treatment. Herein we report the case of a 25-year-old woman referred for symptoms of dyspepsia, dysphagia, and thoracic pain exacerbated by pregnancy. Preoperative radiography, EGD, and CT scan revealed a paraesophageal hiatal hernia. Laparoscopic exploration showed the complete thoracic migration of the stomach through a left posterolateral diaphragmatic foramen. The diagnosis of a Bochdalek hernia was then made. The diaphragmatic defect was repaired without inserting a prosthesis, using five separate non-reabsorbable stitches (Rieder technique). The procedure was completed with a Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication. The duration of the procedure was 150 min. Hospital stay was 12 days. There were no complications. Postoperative Gastrografin radiography of the esophagus and stomach showed a normal-shaped fundoplication and confirmed the subdiaphragmatic location of the stomach. We conclude that the laparoscopic approach represents the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of Bochdalek hernia and any associated complications.

  3. Iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia following laparoscopic left colectomy for splenic flexure cancer An unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Dell'Abate, Paolo; Bertocchi, Elisa; Dalla Valle, Raffaele; Viani, Lorenzo; Del Rio, Paolo; Sianesi, Mario

    2016-11-03

    Iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia following laparoscopic left colectomy for splenic flexure cancer. An unusual complication Diaphragmatic hernias are a migration of abdominal structures into the thorax via a diaphragmatic defect; they may be classified as congenital or acquired and acquired hernias can be hiatal, traumatic or iatrogenic, generally complications of thoracic or abdominal surgery. We report a case of iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia after a laparoscopic left colectomy for splenic flexure tumor; to our knowledge, in literature this case is the first reported. A 51-years-old woman was readmitted to our Hospital on 11th post-operative day for bowel occlusion and a CT - scan revealed left diaphragmatic herniation with fluid dilatation of the small bowel that appeared in the left hemithorax. Laparoscopic surgery resolution was decided and after the reduction of the small bowel in the abdomen we closed the defect using two direct absorbable auto-block hemi-continuous sutures that were covered by a synthetic absorbable mesh. Probably we didn't notice a minimal injury of the left diaphragm caused by ultrasonic scalpel and we can suppose that this delay in presentation may be a result of the gradual enlargement of a microscopic lesion. Patient's gas exchanges were good during surgery and during post-operative course.

  4. Recurrent groin hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P. J.; Leach, R. D.; Ellis, Harold

    1981-01-01

    One hundred consecutive recurrences following repair of inguinal hernias have been studied; 62 were direct, 30 indirect, 7 pantaloon and one a femoral hernia. Half the indirect recurrences occurred within a year of repair and probably represented failure to detect a small indirect sac. Later indirect recurrences probably represented failure to repair the internal ring. Nine of the direct hernias were medial funicular recurrences and represented failure to anchor the darn medially. The rest of the direct recurrences were attributable to tissue insufficiency and could probably have been averted by larger tissue bites. Recurrences following inguinal herniorrhaphy remain an all too common problem but can be reduced by meticulous surgical technique. PMID:7339602

  5. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    PubMed

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome.

  6. Left Aberrant Gastric Vein Causing Isolated Left Hepatic Portal Venous Gas Secondary to an Incarcerated Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Anandpara, Karan; Dey, Amit K.; Kedar, Pradnya; Hira, Priya; Kale, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is an ominous radiological sign suggestive of underlying intestinal sepsis, infection or trauma. Portal pneumatosis secondary to gastric pathologies is rare. Case Report We report a rare case of a 34-year-old man who presented with acute epigastric pain and vomiting, diagnosed to have an incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia causing gastric pneumatosis and resultant portal venous gas. Conclusions Our case highlights an unusual presentation of gastric pneumatosis secondary to an incarcerated hiatal hernia with resultant portal venous gas involving only the left lobe of the liver. An aberrant left gastric vein was responsible for this phenomenon in our case. A sound understanding of anatomical variants is thus crucial to radiological diagnosis. PMID:26251676

  7. Diaphragmatic hernia following oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer – Are we too radical?

    PubMed Central

    Argenti, F.; Luhmann, A.; Dolan, R.; Wilson, M.; Podda, M.; Patil, P.; Shimi, S.; Alijani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diaphragmatic herniation (DH) of abdominal contents into the thorax after oesophageal resection is a recognised and serious complication of surgery. While differences in pressure between the abdominal and thoracic cavities are important, the size of the hiatal defect is something that can be influenced surgically. As with all oncological surgery, safe resection margins are essential without adversely affecting necessary anatomical structure and function. However very little has been published looking at the extent of the hiatal resection. We aim to present a case series of patients who developed DH herniation post operatively in order to raise discussion about the ideal extent of surgical resection required. Methods We present a series of cases of two male and one female who had oesophagectomies for moderately and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the lower oesophagus who developed post-operative DH. We then conducted a detailed literature review using Medline, Pubmed and Google Scholar to identify existing guidance to avoid this complication with particular emphasis on the extent of hiatal resection. Discussion Extended incision and partial resection of the diaphragm are associated with an increased risk of postoperative DH formation. However, these more extensive excisions can ensure clear surgical margins. Post-operative herniation can be an early or late complication of surgery and despite the clear importance of hiatal resection only one paper has been published on this subject which recommends a more limited resection than was carried out in our cases. Conclusion This case series investigated the recommended extent of hiatal dissection in oesophageal surgery. Currently there is no clear guidance available on this subject and further studies are needed to ascertain the optimum resection margin that results in the best balance of oncological parameters vs. post operative morbidity. PMID:27158485

  8. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  9. Diaphragmatic hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100014.htm Diaphragmatic hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview The chest cavity includes the heart and lungs. The abdominal cavity includes the liver, the stomach, ...

  10. Recurrent inguinal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwait, R W

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of 584 operations for recurrent inguinal hernia was made in an attempt to determine the cause of the recurrence based on the anatomic findings. The recurrence was indirect in 300, direct in 241, and various other in 43 operations. The causes of the indirect recurrences appeared to be an unrecognized hernia, incomplete dissection or improper ligation of the sac, failure to narrow the cord, or inadequate reconstruction of the internal ring. No cause for the diffuse direct recurrences was apparent. Of the 241 hernias in Hesselbach's triangle, 144 were small localized defects, usually (112) just lateral to the symphysis. These were considered to be caused by the cutting action of a suture placed under tension. On the basis of these findings, suggestions are made for primary inguinal hernia operations. PMID:4073990

  11. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... repaired hernia. Absorbable mesh will degrade and lose strength over time. It is not intended to provide long-term reinforcement to the repair site. As the material degrades, new tissue growth is intended to provide ...

  12. Ventral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia. PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:539-545. Nagle AP, Soper NJ. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. In: Khatri ... Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players ...

  13. [New aspects in hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Lammers, B J; Goretzki, P E; Otto, T

    2005-07-01

    In the last 10 years in Germany we have seen a lot of hernia repairs using mesh.Meta-analysis shows the advantages of using meshes in hernia surgery; recurrence rates in inguinal hernia surgery are less than 3% in studies. There is some discussion about minimally invasive surgery in Germany.In incisional hernia surgery there is no discussion about using meshes. The role of minimally invasive surgery has not yet been defined.

  14. Diaphragmatic hernia during pregnancy: a case report with a review of the literature from the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Hou, Qiannan; Zhang, Zhu; Zhang, Jian; Xi, Mingrong

    2011-07-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication during pregnancy. Only 30 reports have been published on this subject in English between 1959 and 2009. Due to misdiagnoses and management delays, diaphragmatic hernia usually presents itself as a life-threatening emergency. Here, we present a case report of a patient with a traumatic diaphragmatic hernia who became acutely symptomatic during pregnancy. The diaphragmatic hernia was managed successfully, and we describe the presentation, management and outcome of this case. We also present a review of all of the reported cases of diaphragmatic hernias complicating pregnancy that have been published in English during the past 50 years.

  15. Assessment of Abdominal Muscle's Maximal Force of Contraction Using Surface EMG in Inguinal Hernia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sreenath, G. S.; Subramanian, Senthil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reduction in abdominal muscle’s strength has been implicated in the development of inguinal hernia. Patients with inguinal hernia on one side are shown to be at higher risk of developing inguinal hernia on the other side. Aim To assess the abdominal muscle strength in inguinal hernia subjects using surface Electromyography (EMG) and compare it with healthy controls. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study involving only male subjects. Abdominal (Inguinal) hernia subjects without any known complications were recruited from surgery department and the accompanying healthy individuals were taken as control (Control, n=44, inguinal hernia subjects, n=43). The subjects were asked to perform maximal contraction for three seconds targeting external and internal oblique muscles of right and left sides separately. Motor unit potentials were recorded using surface EMG for individual muscles on both sides during maximal contraction. The maximum amplitude of the motor unit potentials obtained was considered as the strength of the respective muscle. Results In control group, there was no significant difference in strength of external and internal oblique muscles between the two sides. Strength of external and internal oblique muscles of both herniated and unaffected side was reduced in inguinal hernia subjects as compared to healthy controls. Further, the muscle strength of herniated side was less as compared to unaffected side in the inguinal hernia subjects. Conclusion Abdominal muscle strength is reduced in hernia subjects and even the apparently normal side strength is less as compared to controls. This should be considered while performing corrective surgeries in inguinal hernia subjects. PMID:28208924

  16. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  17. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  18. Lesser omental hernia after total colectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Takanori; Morita, Yasuhiro; Takanishi, Kijuro; Nitta, Jun; Matsumoto, Jun; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2014-07-01

    Lesser omental hernia is a rare type of hernia that can cause intestinal obstruction. To our knowledge, there are only 16 documented cases of lesser omental hernia, including the present case. The subject of this case report was a 42-year-old man with a history of total colectomy for colon perforation caused by Crohn's disease 15 years earlier, who presented with epigastralgia and vomiting. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a distended bowel loop ventral to the stomach and convergence of mesenteric vessels at the lesser curvature of the stomach. Based on a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction caused by a lesser omental hernia, he underwent emergency surgery, which revealed a 150-cm jejunal segment herniating through a 5-cm defect in the lesser omentum from the retrogastric space. We reduced the herniated loop and closed the hernial orifice successfully. We describe the characteristic CT findings, which allowed us to make the preoperative diagnosis, and speculate how the past total colectomy, in which the gastrocolic ligament was isolated and the transverse colon was resected, probably caused by this hernia. This case serves to demonstrate that lesser omental hernia could be a postoperative complication of total colectomy.

  19. Sports Hernia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

  20. Terminal ileum gangrene secondary to a type IV paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching Tsai; Hsiao, Po Jen; Chiu, Chih Chien; Chan, Jenq Shyong; Lin, Yee Fung; Lo, Yuan Hung; Hsiao, Chia Jen

    2016-02-28

    Type IV paraesophageal hernia (PEH) is very rare, and is characterized by the intrathoracic herniation of the abdominal viscera other than the stomach into the chest. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented at our emergency department because of epigastric pain that she had experienced over the past 24 h. On the day after admission, her pain became severe and was accompanied by right chest pain and dyspnea. Chest radiography revealed an intrathoracic intestinal gas bubble occupying the right lower lung field. Emergency explorative laparotomy identified a type IV PEH with herniation of only the terminal ileum through a hiatal defect into the right thoracic cavity. In this report, we also present a review of similar cases in the literature published between 1980 and 2015 in PubMed. There were four published cases of small bowel herniation into the thoracic cavity during this period. Our patient represents a rare case of an individual diagnosed with type IV PEH with incarceration of only the terminal ileum.

  1. Bilateral Inguinal Hernias Containing Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Basrur, Gurudutt Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernias are rare in females. The authors report a case of bilateral inguinal hernias in a 10-year-old female. On exploration, the patient was found to be having a sliding hernia containing incarcerated ovary as contents on both sides. Peroperatively the contents were reduced, the sac was transfixed at its base and the redundant sac was excised. The repair of this form of hernias is more difficult because of adhesions between the contents and the wall of the sac and risk of damage during dissection. A description of this clinical presentation in the pre operative assessment and operative management are discussed in this report. PMID:25918632

  2. [Morgagni hernia causing cardiac tamponade].

    PubMed

    S Breinig; Paranon, S; Le Mandat, A; Galinier, P; Dulac, Y; Acar, P

    2010-10-01

    Morgagni hernia is a rare malformation (3% of diaphragmatic hernias). This hernia is usually asymptomatic in children. We report on a case revealed by an unusual complication. Severe cyanosis was due to right-to-left atrial shunt through the foramen ovale assessed by 2D echocardiography. Diagnosis of the Morgagni hernia was made with CT scan. The intrathoracic liver compressed the right chambers of the heart causing tamponade. Cardiac compression was reversed after surgery and replacement of the liver in the abdomen. Six months after the surgery, the infant was symptom-free with normal size right chambers of the heart.

  3. Prosthetic Mesh Repair for Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, Cihad; Tüzün, İshak Sefa; Karşıdağ, Tamer; Kızılkaya, Mehmet Celal; Yılmaz, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incarcerated inguinal hernia is a commonly encountered urgent surgical condition, and tension-free repair is a well-established method for the treatment of non-complicated cases. However, due to the risk of prosthetic material-related infections, the use of mesh in the repair of strangulated or incarcerated hernia has often been subject to debate. Recent studies have demonstrated that biomaterials represent suitable materials for performing urgent hernia repair. Certain studies recommend mesh repair only for cases where no bowel resection is required; other studies, however, recommend mesh repair for patients requiring bowel resection as well. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of different surgical techniques performed for strangulated hernia, and to evaluate the effect of mesh use on postoperative complications. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 151 patients who had been admitted to our hospital’s emergency department to undergo surgery for a diagnosis of incarcerated inguinal hernia. The patients were divided into two groups based on the applied surgical technique. Group 1 consisted of 112 patients treated with mesh-based repair techniques, while Group 2 consisted of 39 patients treated with tissue repair techniques. Patients in Group 1 were further divided into two sub-groups: one consisting of patients undergoing bowel resection (Group 3), and the other consisting of patients not undergoing bowel resection (Group 4). Results: In Group 1, it was observed that eight (7.14%) of the patients had wound infections, while two (1.78%) had hematomas, four (3.57%) had seromas, and one (0.89%) had relapse. In Group 2, one (2.56%) of the patients had a wound infection, while three (7.69%) had hematomas, one (2.56%) had seroma, and none had relapses. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to wound infection, seroma

  4. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  5. Vesicocutaneous fistula after sliding hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Varun; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sureka, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. The incidence of bladder forming a part of an inguinal hernia, called as “scrotal cystocele,” is 1–4%. The risk of bladder injury is as high as 12% when repairing this type of hernia. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a 65-year-old man who presented with urinary leak through the scrotal wound following right inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26941501

  6. Sciatic hernia clinically mimicking obturator hernia, missed by ultrasonography: case report.

    PubMed

    Rather, Shiraz Ahmad; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Parray, Fazal Q; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Asrar, Syed

    2011-05-01

    Sciatic hernia is a rare pelvic floor hernia that occurs through the greater or lesser sciatic foramen. Sciatic hernias often present as pelvic pain, particularly in women, and diagnosis can be difficult. Sciatic hernia is one of the rarest forms of internal hernia, which can present as signs and symptoms of small bowel obstruction, swelling in the respective gluteal region or pelvic pain. Transabdominal and transgluteal operative approaches, including laparoscopic repair, have been reported. We present a case of left-sided sciatic hernia with incarcerated small bowel as its contents. The hernia was missed by ultrasonography and plain abdominal radiography, but the clinical features were suggestive of an obturator hernia.

  7. Delayed diaphragmatic hernia: an unusual complication of tube thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Ozpolat, Berkant; Doğan, Orhan Veli; Yücel, Ertan

    2009-11-01

    The nature of a tube thoracostomy -a blind maneuver- renders it subject to complications. Nevertheless, it is very uncommon to create a diaphragmatic hernia with this procedure. Herein, we present the occurrence of this complication after six months under emergency conditions that was treated by thoracotomy.

  8. Obturator hernia: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjeev R.; Punamiya, Aditya R.; Naniwadekar, Ramchandra G.; Janugade, Hemant B.; Chotai, Tejas D.; Vimal Singh, T.; Natchair, Arafath

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Obturator hernia is an extremely rare type of hernia with relatively high mortality and morbidity. Its early diagnosis is challenging since the signs and symptoms are non specific. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here in we present a case of 70 years old women who presented with complaints of intermittent colicky abdominal pain and vomiting. Plain radiograph of abdomen showed acute dilatation of stomach. Ultrasonography showed small bowel obstruction at the mid ileal level with evidence of coiled loops of ileum in pelvis. On exploration, Right Obstructed Obturator hernia was found. The obstructed Intestine was reduced and resected and the obturator foramen was closed with simple sutures. Postoperative period was uneventful. DISCUSSION Obturator hernia is a rare pelvic hernia and poses a diagnostic challenge. Obturator hernia occurs when there is protrusion of intra-abdominal contents through the obturator foramen in the pelvis. The signs and symptoms are non specific and generally the diagnosis is made during exploration for the intestinal obstruction, one of the four cardinal features. Others are pain on the medial aspect of thigh called as Howship Rombergs sign, repeated attacks of Intestinal Obstruction and palpable mass on the medial aspect of thigh. CONCLUSION Obturator hernia is a rare but significant cause of intestinal obstruction especially in emaciated elderly woman and a diagnostic challenge for the Doctors. CT scan is valuable to establish preoperative diagnosis. Surgery either open or laproscopic, is the only treatment. The need for the awareness is stressed and CT scan can be helpful. PMID:23708307

  9. Sonographic imaging of Spigelian hernias

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Lubiński, Jan; Bojko, Stefania; Gałdyńska, Maria; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to present clinical material referring to rarely occurring abdominal cavity hernias in semilunar line – Spigelian hernias diagnosed with the help of ultrasound. Material and methods In the period from 1995 to 2001 785 anterior abdominal wall hernias were diagnosed including 11 Spigelian hernias (1.4%) diagnosed in 10 patients (7 women and 3 men) aged from 38 to 65 years old (average age 48). Eight patients complained of spastic pain in abdomen, in 5 of them it was accompanied by bloating and sometimes loud peristalsis. All the patients had been observing the mentioned symptoms from 2 to 5 years. Each of them had had colonoscopy and abdominal cavity ultrasound examination performed, some of them even three times. In 3 women with uterine fibroid the uterus was removed which did not eliminate the symptoms. The ultrasound examination of the abdominal integument was performed mainly with the use of linear transducers of the frequency of 7–12 MHz; in obese patients also convex transducers were used (3,5–6 MHz). Each examination of abdominal integument included the assessment of the following areas: linea alba from xiphoid process to pubic symphysis including umbilicus, both semilunar lines from costal margins to pubic bones, and also inguinal areas. Moreover, all types of postoperative scars were examined. Each hernia was assessed in terms of size (the greatest dimension), hernia sac contents, width of the ring and reducibility under the compression of the transducer. Moreover, cough test and Valsalva's maneuver were performed. Generally, the examination was performed in a standing position. Results In 9 patients hernias were localized unilaterally, in one patient bilaterally. In 7 cases the hernia sac contained small bowel, in 2 cases the preperitoneal and omental fat, and in 2 cases preperitoneal fat only. Eight patients presenting with clinical symptoms underwent operative repair. Conclusion Ultrasound examination is beneficial in

  10. Laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; He, Kai; Hua, Rong; Shen, Qiwei

    2017-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common long-term complications after abdominal ostomy. Surgical treatment for parastomal hernia is the only cure but a fairly difficult field because of the problems of infection, effects, complications and recurrence. Laparoscopic repair operations are good choices for Parastomal hernia because of their mini-invasive nature and confirmed effects. There are several major laparoscopic procedures for parastomal hernioplasty. The indications, technical details and complications of them will be introduced and discussed in this article. PMID:28251124

  11. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  12. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent hernias.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C A; McKnight, R L

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of a laparoscopic approach to recurrent inguinal hernia repair which dissected the entire inguinal floor and repaired all potential areas of recurrence without producing tension. Both a transabdominal preperitoneal and a totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach were utilized. Ninety recurrent hernias were repaired in 81 patients. The patients had 26 indirect, 36 direct, and 26 pantaloon recurrent hernias of which eight had a femoral component. In all but one patient the primary operations were open anterior repairs. The median follow-up was 14 months, ranging from 1 to 28 months. Patients returned to normal activities in an average of 1 week. The only recurrence observed was in the one patient whose primary repair was laparoscopic. When the entire inguinal floor of the recurrent hernia was redissected and buttressed with mesh, early recurrence was eliminated and recovery was shortened.

  13. Female Gender and Diabetes Mellitus Increase the Risk of Recurrence after Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, FD; Coleman, M; Ahmed, Z; Bunni, J; Bunting, D; Elshaer, M; Evans, V; Kimble, A; Kostalas, M; Page, G; Singh, J; Szczebiot, L; Wienand-Barnett, S; Wilkins, A; Williams, O; Newell, P

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic hernia repair is used widely for the repair of incisional hernias. Few case studies have focussed on purely ‘incisional’ hernias. This multicentre series represents a collaborative effort and employed statistical analyses to provide insight into the factors predisposing to recurrence of incisional hernia after laparoscopic repair. A specific hypothesis (ie, laterality of hernias as well as proximity to the xyphoid process and pubic symphysis predisposes to recurrence) was also tested. Methods This was a retrospective study of all laparoscopic incisional hernias undertaken in six centres from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010. It comprised a comprehensive review of case notes and a follow-up using a structured telephone questionnaire. Patient demographics, previous medical/surgical history, surgical procedure, postoperative recovery, and perceived effect on quality of life were recorded. Repairs undertaken for primary ventral hernias were excluded. A logistic regression analysis was then fitted with recurrence as the primary outcome. Results A total of 186 cases (91 females) were identified. Median follow-up was 42 months. Telephone interviews were answered by 115/186 (62%) of subjects. Logistic regression analyses suggested that only female sex (odds ratio (OR) 3.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39–8.97) and diabetes mellitus (3.54; 1–12.56) significantly increased the risk of recurrence. Position of the defect had no statistical effect. Conclusions These data suggest an increased risk of recurrence after laparoscopic incisional hernia repair in females and subjects with diabetes mellitus. These data will help inform surgeons and patients when considering laparoscopic management of incisional hernias. We recommend a centrally hosted, prospectively maintained national/international database to carry out additional research. PMID:25723687

  14. Athlete's hernia--a true, early direct inguinal hernia: diagnosis, pathophysiology, and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Chernyavsky, Victoriya S; Davidov, Tomer; Trooskin, Stanley Z; Boyarsky, Andrew

    2011-11-01

    Athlete's hernia (AH) is an activity limiting condition that presents as chronic inguinal pain in elite athletes. The diagnosis involves a thorough history and physical examination and can be aided by ultrasound interrogation of the groin. Operative treatment with a direct tissue repair of the inguinal floor successfully alleviates symptoms and allows for full return to activity. A retrospective analysis of patients with the diagnosis of AH from January 1998 to May 2010 who underwent operative repair was reviewed. Patients were evaluated based on age, gender, sport, time to presentation, subjective and objective physical findings, imaging findings, operative findings, length of follow-up, and return to activity. Ninety-six patients (6 females) with a median age of 22.6 years were evaluated. In the majority of these patients, operative exploration revealed a wide external ring with separation of the fibers of the external oblique aponeurosis and an unprotected and bulging transverses abdominis aponeurosis, very akin to an early direct inguinal hernia. The mean initial follow-up time was 6 weeks at which point all but two of the patients were able to resume their full level of activity without restrictions. The diagnosis of AH, although somewhat elusive, can be easily established with a high degree of suspicion after doing a thorough history and physical exam augmented with ultrasonography. AH is equivalent to an early direct inguinal hernia found in young athletes and can be surgically corrected allowing return to full activity.

  15. Lymphoma Diagnosed at Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Veal, David R; Hammill, Chet W

    2010-01-01

    Tumors presenting in the inguinal hernia sac are considered to be extremely rare, with the more common neoplasms metastasizing from the gastrointestinal tract, ovary and prostate. We report the case of Mantle cell lymphoma identified in the inguinal hernia sac following hernia repair. While the hernia sac appeared normal to the surgeon, evaluation by the pathologist showed subtle gross irregularities, with subsequent histologic and immunochemical diagnosis of Mantle cell lymphoma. Twelve previous cases of a lymphoma diagnosed during hernia repair have been described in the English literature. This is the first report of Mantle cell lymphoma found in the hernia sac. This case illustrates the value of routine microscopic evaluation of hernia sacs found from inguinal/femoral herniorrhaphies, as it may be the primary presentation of an asymptomatic metastatic lymphoma. Additionally, it underscores the importance of the surgeon's role in screening hernia sacs if the practice of submitting only macroscopically abnormal specimens for microscopic evaluation is adopted. PMID:20358722

  16. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia... contents. This generic type of device includes the umbilical truss. (b) Classification. Class I...

  17. Sliding indirect hernia containing both ovaries.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Carol L

    2005-09-01

    Although sliding indirect inguinal hernias containing the ipsilateral ovary and fallopian tube are not uncommon in infant girls, sliding hernias containing both ovaries are rare. This report describes a large indirect inguinal hernia in a 1-year-old infant girl that contained the left uterine fundus, left bladder ear, as well as both ovaries and fallopian tubes.

  18. Laparoscopic repair of adult Bochdalek's hernia

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Musharraf; Hajini, Firdoos Farooq; Ganguly, Pavitra; Bukhari, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Bochdalek's hernia is a type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia occurring in approximately 1 in 2200–12 500 live births. It is considered to be extremely rare in adults and poses a diagnostic challenge. We present a case of a young man who was diagnosed as a case of congenital Bochdalek's hernia and underwent laparoscopic mesh repair. PMID:23761496

  19. An Unusual Trocar Site Hernia after Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Trocar site hernias are rare complications after laparoscopic surgery but most commonly occur at larger trocar sites placed at the umbilicus. With increased utilization of the laparoscopic approach the incidence of trocar site hernia is increasing. We report a case of a trocar site hernia following an otherwise uncomplicated robotic prostatectomy at a 12 mm right lower quadrant port. The vermiform appendix was incarcerated within the trocar site hernia. Subsequent appendectomy and primary repair of the hernia were performed without complication. PMID:27648335

  20. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal incisional hernia is a common complication after open abdominal operations. Laparoscopic procedures have obvious mini-invasive advantages for surgical treatment of abdominal incisional hernia, especially to cases with big hernia defect. Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia has routine mode but the actual operations will be various according to the condition of every hernia. Key points of these operations include design of the position of trocars, closure of defects and fixation of meshes. The details of these issues and experiences of perioperative evaluation and treatment will be talked about in this article. PMID:27761446

  1. Giant congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an adult

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia is the most common type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. It appears frequently in infants but rarely in adults. We present the case of a 50-year-old female han patient with tremendous left-sided congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek hernia) who also has a pair of supernumerary breasts and pulmonary hypoplasia of the lower-left lobe. The patient had an experience of misdiagnosis and she was treated for bronchitis for one year until being admitted to our hospital. This case study emphasizes the rare presentation of Bochdalek hernia in adults and the necessity of high clinical attention to similar cases. PMID:24512974

  2. New injectable elastomeric biomaterials for hernia repair and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Skrobot, J; Zair, L; Ostrowski, M; El Fray, M

    2016-01-01

    Complications associated with implantation of polymeric hernia meshes remain a difficult surgical challenge. We report here on our work, developing for the first time, an injectable viscous material that can be converted to a solid and elastic implant in vivo, thus successfully closing herniated tissue. In this study, long-chain fatty acids were used for the preparation of telechelic macromonomers end-capped with methacrylic functionalities to provide UV curable systems possessing high biocompatibility, good mechanical strength and flexibility. Two different systems, comprising urethane and ester bonds, were synthesized from non-toxic raw materials and then subjected to UV curing after injection of viscous material into the cavity at the abdominal wall during hernioplasty in a rabbit hernia model. No additional fixation or sutures were required. The control group of animals was treated with commercially available polypropylene hernia mesh. The observation period lasted for 28 days. We show here that artificially fabricated defect was healed and no reherniation was observed in the case of the fatty acid derived materials. Importantly, the number of inflammatory cells found in the surrounding tissue was comparable to these found around the standard polypropylene mesh. No inflammatory cells were detected in connective tissues and no sign of necrosis has been observed. Collectively, our results demonstrated that new injectable and photocurable systems can be used for minimally invasive surgical protocols in repair of small hernia defects.

  3. Materials characterization of explanted polypropylene hernia mesh: Patient factor correlation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah E; Cozad, Matthew J; Grant, David A; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Grant, Sheila A

    2016-02-01

    This study quantitatively assessed polypropylene (PP) hernia mesh degradation and its correlation with patient factors including body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status with the goal of improving hernia repair outcomes through patient-matched mesh. Thirty PP hernia mesh explants were subjected to a tissue removal process followed by assessment of their in vivo degradation using Fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis analyses. Results were then analyzed with respect to patient factors (body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status) to determine their influence on in vivo hernia mesh oxidation and degradation. Twenty of the explants show significant surface oxidation. Tobacco use exhibits a positive correlation with modulated differential scanning calorimetry melt temperature and exhibits significantly lower TGA decomposition temperatures than non-/past users. Chemical and thermal characterization of the explanted meshes indicate measurable degradation while in vivo regardless of the patient population; however, tobacco use is correlated with less oxidation and degradation of the polymeric mesh possibly due to a reduced inflammatory response.

  4. Meshless treatment of open inguinal hernia repair: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kassab, Paulo; Franciulli, Ettore Ferrari; Wroclawski, Carolina Kassab; Ilias, Elias Jirjoss; Castro, Osvaldo Antônio Prado; Malheiros, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate two types of meshless open inguinal repair and to evaluate the recurrence rate. Methods: We operated on sequentially 98 men and 15 women with 144 unilateral or bilateral inguinal hernias between December 1988 and April 2007. The surgeries were performed by two experienced surgeons and divided into two groups: Bassini or McVay reconstructive surgery techniques. Bassini type reinforcements were employed for Nyhus II and IIIB with minor destruction of the posterior wall. Patients with Nyhus type IIIA, type IIIB with major destruction of the fascia transversalis, and type IIIC were subjected to the McVay technique. Results: Seventy-five hernias were corrected using the McVay technique. Only two recurrences (2.67%) were observed in this group. For group Bassini, two recurrences for 69 hernias (2.89%) were observed (p=0.658). Mean age for the recurrent group was 56 years. No differences were observed between the ages of males and females (52 years). Conclusions: Non-mesh repair in inguinal hernia can be safely used if performed by experienced surgeons. PMID:23843059

  5. Diaphragmatic hernia: an unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neha; Fernandes, Roland; Thakrar, Amit; Rozati, Hamoun

    2013-01-01

    A 53-year-old lady presented to A&E with a 3-day history of severe epigastric pain and vomiting. This was preceded by a 3-month history of generalised abdominal discomfort, early satiety and increasing shortness of breath. A CT scan showed a left-sided posterior diaphragmatic defect. Urgent repair of the hernia showed herniation of three-quarter of the stomach, half of the transverse colon, the 13 cm spleen and the pancreas in the chest. There were no postoperative complications. Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are known to be a complication of major trauma. However, the patient in this case report presented acutely, after mild physical trauma related to using a rowing machine. This exercise, when not performed correctly can raise intra-abdominal pressure. It is plausible that this trauma, although mild, was sufficient in causing the lady's diaphragmatic hernia. This case would suggest that the trauma required to cause a diaphragmatic hernia need not be as severe as originally thought. PMID:23616319

  6. Incarceration of a colonoscope in an inguinal hernia: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Victoria Ping-Yi; Lee, Yuk Tong; Poon, Jensen Tung Chung

    2013-01-01

    Incarceration of an endoscope in an inguinal hernia may occur during the course of routine colonoscopy. The incarceration may occur on insertion or withdrawal and frequently the hernia is not suspected prior to the colonoscopy. Most commonly, a left sided inguinal hernia is involved, however right inguinal hernias may be implicated in subjects with altered anatomy post abdominal surgery. Incarceration of an endoscope in an inguinal hernia has been seldom reported in the literature which is likely to be related to under reporting. A range of techniques have been suggested by various authors over the last four decades to manage this unusual complication of colonoscopy. These techniques include utilizing fluoroscopy, manual external pressure and/or the fitting of a cap onto the tip of the colonoscope to facilitate colonoscopic navigation. The authors present a case report of incarceration of the colonoscope on withdrawal in an unsuspected left inguinal hernia with a review of the literature on the management of this colonoscopic complication. A management strategy is suggested. PMID:23772270

  7. Hernia fibroblasts lack β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Estrogens are reported to increase type I and type III collagen deposition and to regulate Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression. These proteins are reported to be dysregulated in incisional hernia formation resulting in a significantly decreased type I to III ratio. We aimed to evaluate the β-estradiol mediated regulation of type I and type III collagen genes as well as MMP-2 gene expression in fibroblasts derived from patients with or without history of recurrent incisional hernia disease. We compared primary fibroblast cultures from male/female subjects without/without incisional hernia disease. Results Incisional hernia fibroblasts (IHFs) revealed a decreased type I/III collagen mRNA ratio. Whereas fibroblasts from healthy female donors responded to β-estradiol, type I and type III gene transcription is not affected in fibroblasts from males or affected females. Furthermore β-estradiol had no influence on the impaired type I to III collagen ratio in fibroblasts from recurrent hernia patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that β-estradiol does not restore the imbaired balance of type I/III collagen in incisional hernia fibroblasts. Furthermore, the individual was identified as an independent factor for the β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression. The observation of gender specific β-estradiol-dependent changes of collagen gene expression in vitro is of significance for future studies of cellular response. PMID:17010202

  8. Incidental Non-Inguinals Hernias in Totally Extra-Peritoneal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Old, OJ; Kulkarni, SR; Hardy, TJ; Slim, FJ; Emerson, LG; Bulbulia, RA; Whyman, MR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair allows identification and repair of incidental non-inguinal groin hernias. We assessed the prevalence of incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair and identified the risk factors for incidental hernias. Materials and Methods Consecutive patients undergoing TEP repair from May 2005 to November 2012 were the study cohort. Inspection for ipsilateral femoral, obturator and rarer varieties of hernia was undertaken during TEP repair. Patient characteristics and operative findings were recorded on a prospectively collected database. Results A total of 1,532 TEP repairs were undertaken in 1,196 patients. Ninety-three patients were excluded due to incomplete data, leaving 1,103 patients and 1,404 hernias for analyses (1,380 male; 802 unilateral and 301 bilateral repairs; median age, 59 years). Among the 37 incidental hernias identified (2.6% of cases), the most common type of incidental hernia was femoral (n=32, 2.3%) followed by obturator (n=2, 0.1%). Increasing age was associated with an increased risk of incidental hernia, with a significant linear trend (p<0.01). The risk for patients >60 years of age was 4.0% vs 1.4% for those aged <60 years (p<0.01). Incidental hernias were found in 29.2% of females vs 2.2% of males, (p<0.0001). Risk of incidental hernia in those with a recurrent inguinal hernia was 3.0% vs 2.6% for primary repair (p=0.79). Conclusions Incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair were found in 2.6% of cases and, though infrequent, could cause complications if left untreated. The risk of incidental hernia increased with age and was significantly higher in patients aged >60 years and in females. PMID:25723688

  9. Amyand's hernia in infant: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, V D; Kumar, V; Srivastava, P; Gangopadhyaya, A N

    2009-01-01

    The chance of vermiform appendix lying with in a hernial sac is 1% or less and is known as Amyand's hernia and it is very rare in infant and neonate. Till date, only twenty cases had been reported in English literature. We are reporting a rare case of Amyand's hernia where appendix was present in right inguinal sac of non-obstructed inguinal hernia in a seven month old male infant during operation. The appendectomy was done along with right inguinal herniotomy. In most of the reported cases, appendix was inflamed or perforated, expect in one case where appendix was not inflamed but patient presented with inguinal hernia. This case is reported because of the rarity of Amyand's hernia in infant, the appendix was not inflamed, hernia was not obstructed, and whether in such types of cases appendix should be preserved or not.

  10. Acute pancreatitis secondary to incarcerated paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kafka, N J; Leitman, I M; Tromba, J

    1994-05-01

    Paraesophageal hiatus hernia can be a morbid and even lethal condition. Although many complications from this entity have been described, they almost always involve gastric incarceration and its related complications. Occasionally, the transverse colon or spleen may be involved in the hernia, causing additional symptoms. An unusual case of paraesophageal hiatus hernia involving incarceration of the pylorus, proximal duodenum, and pancreatic head is described. The patient's presentation, operative management, and perioperative course are discussed to emphasize the importance of early elective repair of paraesophageal hiatus hernia before the development of such occurrences.

  11. Acute Scrotum Caused by Hernia Sac Torsion.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Shimada, Keiji; Samma, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A 9-year-old boy was referred to us with an acute pain attack of the left scrotal contents. Ultrasonography showed a normal blood supply to the left testis, suggesting an incarcerated left inguinal hernia. Surgical exploration did not demonstrate an incarcerated left inguinal hernia. After exploration of the left testis, a dark red pedunculated cystic mass, separate from the left testis, was found to be twisted. Immunohistochemical studies of the excised cyst demonstrated torsion of the hernia sac of the peritoneum. In conclusion, we encountered a case of acute scrotum which was probably caused by torsion of the hernia sac.

  12. Current Trends in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Patapis, Paul; Zavras, Nick; Tzanetis, Panagiotis; Machairas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical technique, postoperative complications, and possible recurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) in comparison with open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Database: A Medline search of the current English literature was performed using the terms laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and incisional hernia repair. Conclusions: LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method, with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, shorter recovery, and decreased wound and mesh infections. Incidental enterotomy can be avoided by using a meticulous technique and sharp dissection to avoid thermal injury. PMID:26273186

  13. Laparoscopic features and repair of a combined left Spigelian hernia and left Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Chamary, S L; Chamary, V L

    2015-03-01

    Both Spigelian and Morgagni hernias cause serious morbidity so early diagnosis and timely treatment are necessary. These two types of hernia are more commonly found on the right side of patients. They are rare individually in adults and even rarer in combination. So far, an association between the two hernias has only been reported on the right. We describe the first case of a Spigelian hernia and a Morgagni hernia in a 62-year-old woman, both occurring on the left side. Our accompanying video describes several laparoscopic features that will help lead to early detection and diagnosis.

  14. Laparoscopic Features and Repair of a Combined left Spigelian Hernia and left Morgagni Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Chamary, SL

    2015-01-01

    Both Spigelian and Morgagni hernias cause serious morbidity so early diagnosis and timely treatment are necessary. These two types of hernia are more commonly found on the right side of patients. They are rare individually in adults and even rarer in combination. So far, an association between the two hernias has only been reported on the right. We describe the first case of a Spigelian hernia and a Morgagni hernia in a 62-year-old woman, both occurring on the left side. Our accompanying video describes several laparoscopic features that will help lead to early detection and diagnosis. PMID:25723678

  15. Laparoscopic management of Spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Novell, F; Sanchez, G; Sentis, J; Visa, J; Novell, J; Novell Costa, F

    2000-12-01

    Spigelian hernia (SH) is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia. Its clinical symptoms are not characteristic, and the preoperative diagnosis is often difficult because SH can simulate the symptoms of more classical lower quadrant abdominal diseases. We report a case of SH in an 80-year-old woman that was complicated by incarceration and diagnosed by physical examination and ultrasound. At the time of presentation, she had an abdominal mass that was soft and occasionally painful, and aggravated by movements that increase intraabdominal pressure. Laparoscopic examination of the abdominal cavity identified the incarcerate jejunum ansae. The defect was a large opening in the peritoneum along the lateral margin of the rectus abdominis muscle. After dissection of the intestinal adhesions, a prosthetic polypropylene mesh was introduced and fixed with staples into the lateral abdominal wall. There were no postoperative complications. We conclude that the laparoscopic approach is a feasible alternative to the conventional open technique that is easy, safe, and allows excellent operative visualization.

  16. De Garengeot hernia: an uncommon presentation of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Vos, Cornelis G; Mollema, Robbert; Richir, Milan C

    2017-02-01

    We present a case of a 78-year-old female patient with an uncommon presentation of acute appendicitis. She was found to have a perforated appendicitis which developed in a femoral hernia sack. An appendix present in a femoral hernia is called a De Garengeot Hernia, which is a rare form of femoral hernia. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and management are discussed.

  17. Parastomal hernia repair. An update.

    PubMed

    Wara, P

    2011-04-01

    Repair of parastomal hernia remains controversial. Open suture repair of the fascial defect or stoma resiting are both associated with high morbidity and unacceptably high recurrence rates and are no longer recommended for routine use. Mesh repair appears to provide the best results. Following the first anectodal reports there are accumulating evidence that laparoscopic mesh repair is feasible and has a promising potential in the management of parastomal hernia. Two laparoscopic techniques have emerged, the use of a mesh with a slit and a central keyhole and a mesh without a slit, the latter often termed as a modified Sugarbaker. Published series, however, are observational and often with a short length of follow-up. Most series suffer from small sample size and controlled trials are lacking. The limited data, therefore, make it difficult to draw conclusions. At present none of the methods of open or laparoscopic mesh repair has proved superior. In spite of this laparoscopic repair has gained increasing acceptance. A polypropylene based mesh with an anti-adhesive layer covering the visceral side seems to be applicable using the keyhole technique with a slit as well as the modified Sugarbaker technique. A PTFE mesh should preferably be used with the modified Sugarbaker technique. If a PTFE mesh is used with the keyhole technique parastomal hernia is likely to recur.

  18. Anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is performed more and more nowadays. The anatomy of these procedures is totally different from traditional open procedures because they are performed from different direction and in different space. The important anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be discussed in this article. PMID:27826575

  19. Diaphragmatic Hernia After Pediatric Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Kirnap, Mahir; Akdur, Aydincan; Ozcay, Figen; Soy, Ebru; Coskun, Mehmet; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is an unusual complication after pediatric liver transplant. Nearly half of bowel obstruction cases, which require surgical intervention in liver transplant patients, are caused by diaphragmatic hernia. The smaller patients are at risk for higher rates of diaphragmatic complication after pediatric liver transplant, but diaphragmatic hernia has not been reported as a unique occurrence. Here, we report 3 cases of diaphragmatic hernia after liver transplant and discuss the possible contributing factors. Diaphragmatic hernia should nevertheless be added to the list of potential complications after liver transplant in the pediatric population. Pediatric transplant physicians and surgeons should be aware of this complication so that it is recognized promptly in both acute and nonacute settings and appropriate action is taken.

  20. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach for recurrent inguinal hernia: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly; Hokkam, Emad N.; Ellabban, Goda M.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The repair of the recurrent hernia is a daunting task because of already weakened tissues and distorted anatomy. Open posterior preperitoneal approach gives results far superior to those of the anterior approach. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair is an evolving technique associated with advantages of a minimally invasive approach. The present work aimed at comparing these three approaches for repair of recurrent inguinal hernia regarding complications and early recurrence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 180 patients were divided randomly into three equal groups: A, B, and C. Group A patients were subjected to open posterior preperitoneal approach , those of group B were subjected to transinguinal anterior tension-free repair and group C patients were subjected to TAPP. The primary end point was recurrence and the secondary end points were time off from work, postoperative pain, scrotal swelling, and wound infections. RESULTS: The mean hospital stay, the mean time to return to work and the mean time off from work were less in group C then A and B. Chronic postoperative pain was observed in eight patients in group A (13.33%), in 18 patients in group B (30%) and six patients in group C (10%). The overall complication rate was 19.7% in both groups A and C and 34.36% in group B. CONCLUSION: In recurrent inguinal hernia, the laparoscopic and open posterior approaches are equally effective in term of operative outcome. The open preperitoneal hernia repair is inexpensive, has a low recurrence rate. Postoperative recovery is short and postoperative pain is minimal. This approach gives results far superior to those of the commonly used anterior approach. However, while laparoscopic hernia repair requires a lengthy learning curve and is difficult to learn and perform, it has advantages of less post-operative pain, early recovery with minimal hospital stay, low post-operative complications and recurrence. Trial

  1. Rare variant of inguinal hernia, interparietal hernia and ipsilateral abdominal ectopic testis, mimicking a spiegelian hernia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Takeshi; Ueno, Shigeru

    2013-07-20

    We report a case in which the combination of an interparietal inguinal hernia and ipsilateral ectopic testicle mimicked a spigelian hernia. The patient was a 22-day-old boy who presented with a reducible mass that extended from the right lumbar region to the iliac fossa region. The right testis was palpable in the right lumbar region. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that a small bowel had herniated through the inguinal region below the external oblique aponeurosis. Surgery was performed when the patient was 23 months old. Laparoscopic examination to identify the hernia orifice revealed that it was the deep inguinal ring, and the testicular vessels and the vas deferens passed beneath the hernia sac. An inguinal incision was made, and a hernia sac was observed passing through the deep inguinal ring and extending superiorly below the aponeurosis. The testis was found in the hernia sac. Traditional inguinal herniorrhaphy and traditional orchidopexy were performed, and the postoperative course was uneventful. It is difficult to understand the surgical anatomy of interparietal hernias, but once the surgical anatomy is understood, surgical repair is simple. We report the case with a review of the literature and also emphasize that laparoscopic exploration is helpful during surgery.

  2. Inguinal hernia recurrence: Classification and approach

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, Giampiero; Pettinari, Diego; Cavalli, Marta; Avesani, Ettore Contessini

    2006-01-01

    The authors reviewed the records of 2,468 operations of groin hernia in 2,350 patients, including 277 recurrent hernias updated to January 2005. The data obtained - evaluating technique, results and complications - were used to propose a simple anatomo-clinical classification into three types which could be used to plan the surgical strategy: Type R1: first recurrence ‘high,’ oblique external, reducible hernia with small (<2 cm) defect in non-obese patients, after pure tissue or mesh repairType R2: first recurrence ‘low,’ direct, reducible hernia with small (<2 cm) defect in non-obese patients, after pure tissue or mesh repairType R3: all the other recurrences - including femoral recurrences; recurrent groin hernia with big defect (inguinal eventration); multirecurrent hernias; nonreducible, linked with a controlateral primitive or recurrent hernia; and situations compromised from aggravating factors (for example obesity) or anyway not easily included in R1 or R2, after pure tissue or mesh repair. PMID:21187986

  3. Laparoscopic Repair of Incidentally Found Spigelian Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Nickloes, Todd; Mancini, Greg; Solla, Julio A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A Spigelian hernia is a rare type of hernia that occurs through a defect in the anterior abdominal wall adjacent to the linea semilunaris. Estimation of its incidence has been reported as 0.12% of all abdominal wall hernias. Traditionally, the method of repair has been an open approach. Herein, we discuss a series of laparoscopic repairs. Methods: Case series and review of the literature. Cases: Three patients are presented. All were evaluated and taken to surgery initially for a different disease process, and all were incidentally found to have a spigelian hernia. These patients underwent laparoscopic repair of their hernias; 2 were repaired intraperitoneally and one was repaired totally extraperitoneally. Two patients initially underwent a mesh repair, while the third had an attempted primary repair. Conclusions: There is evidence that supports the use of laparoscopy for both diagnosis and repair of spigelian hernias. There are also reports of successful repairs both primarily and with mesh. In our experience with the preceding 3 patients, we found that laparoscopic repair of incidentally discovered spigelian hernias is a viable option, and we also found that implantation of mesh, when possible, resulted in satisfactory results and no recurrence. PMID:21902949

  4. Sportsman's hernia? An ambiguous term.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption.

  5. Risk factors for early recurrence after inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Family history, male gender and age are significant risk factors for inguinal hernia disease. Family history provides evidence for a genetic trait and could explain early recurrence after inguinal hernia repair despite technical advance at least in a subgroup of patients. This study evaluates if age and family history can be identified as risk factors for early recurrence after primary hernia repair. Methods We performed an observational cohort study for 75 patients having at least two recurrent hernias. The impact of age, gender and family history on the onset of primary hernias, age at first recurrence and recurrence rates was investigated. Results 44% (33/75) of recurrent hernia patients had a family history and primary as well as recurrent hernias occurred significantly earlier in this group (p = 0.04). The older the patients were at onset the earlier they got a recurrent hernia. Smoking could be identified as on additional risk factor for early onset of hernia disease but not for hernia recurrence. Conclusion Our data reveal an increased incidence of family history for recurrent hernia patients when compared with primary hernia patients. Patients with a family history have their primary hernias as well as their recurrence at younger age then patients without a family history. Though recurrent hernia has to be regarded as a disease caused by multiple factors, a family history may be considered as a criterion to identify the risk for recurrence before the primary operation. PMID:20003183

  6. New approaches to managing congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, Felicia A; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2004-06-01

    A number of new techniques have been studied for managing newborns with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and respiratory insufficiency. Among these have been the techniques of delayed approach to the repair of the diaphragmatic hernia; permissive hypercapnia; nitric oxide and surfactant administration; intratracheal pulmonary ventilation; liquid ventilation; perfluorocarbon-induced lung growth; and lung transplantation. These interventions are at various stages of development and evaluation of effectiveness. All, however, are being explored in the hopes of improving outcome in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia who continue to have significant morbidity and mortality in the newborn period.

  7. Colocutaneous Fistula after Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kallis, Panayiotis; Koronakis, Nikolaos; Hadjicostas, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    The plug-and-patch technique is frequently used for the open repair of inguinal hernias; however, serious complications may arise on rare occasions. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient who presented with a colocutaneous fistula with the sigmoid colon 9 years after the repair of a left sliding inguinal hernia with the plug-and-patch technique. The patient underwent sigmoidectomy and excision of the fistulous track. He was discharged on postoperative day 5 and had an uneventful recovery. Although such complications are reported rarely, the surgeon must be aware of them when deciding upon the method of hernia repair. PMID:27738544

  8. [Spontaneous pulmonary hernia: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Petour Gazitúa, Felipe; Pérez Velásquez, Javiera; Quintanilla Guidobono, Felipe; Chehade, Jeanne Marie

    2015-10-13

    Pulmonary hernia is a protrusion of lung tissue through a defect in the chest wall. Its origin can be congenital or acquired; spontaneous presentation is the least frequent. We report a case of spontaneous intercostal pulmonary hernia with a brief description of the disease. In this case, the patient developed a hematoma in the left hemithorax associated to pain at the base of the left hemithorax after a Valsalva's maneuver. The images obtained by thoracic CT scan revealed the existence of a left intercostal hernia. After radiological diagnosis, surgical treatment of the defect was performed with good results.

  9. Diaphragmatic hernia in Denys-Drash syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Devriendt, K.; Deloof, E.; Moerman, P.

    1995-05-22

    We report on a newborn infant with male pseudohermaphroditism and glomerular lesions (Denys-Drash syndrome) but without Wilms tumor. A constitutional heterozygous mutation in the WT1 gene ({sup 366} Arg to His) was identified. In addition the child had a large diaphragmatic hernia, so far not described in Denys-Drash syndrome. The expression of the WT1 gene in pleural and abdominal mesothelium and the occurrence of diaphragmatic hernia in transgenic mice with a homozygous WT1 deletion strongly suggests that the diphragmatic hernia in this patient is part of the malformation pattern caused by WT1 mutations. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various surgical approaches have return-to–athletic activity rates of >80% regardless of the approach. The variety of procedures and lack of outcomes measures in these studies make it difficult to compare one surgical approach to another. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between range of motion–limiting hip disorders (femoroacetabular impingement) and sports hernia/athletic pubalgia in a subset of athletes. This has added increased complexity to the decision-making process regarding treatment. Conclusion: An association between femoroacetabular impingement and athletic pubalgia has been recognized, with better outcomes reported when both are managed concurrently or in a staged manner. PMID:24587864

  11. Obstructive Uropathy Secondary to Uretero-inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lih En; Tan, Chrismin; Li, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Uretero-inguinal hernia in patients with native kidneys is rare. We report a case of an 84-year-old man who was diagnosed with obstructive uropathy secondary to uretero-inguinal hernia, with no past history of herniorrhaphy or congenital genitourinary malformation. Uretero-inguinal hernias are predominantly indirect inguinal hernias and may be paraperitoneal or extraperitoneal. Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for uretero-inguinal hernia. Herniorrhaphy is indicated in all cases of uretero-inguinal hernia to prevent obstructive uropathy. PMID:26180656

  12. [Incarcerated and strangulated hernias--surgical approach and management].

    PubMed

    Mauch, J; Helbling, C; Schlumpf, R

    2000-01-01

    Acute symptomatic groin hernias with potential or definite ischemia represent a special group of all the groin hernias. The method of choice to treat these hernias has to fulfill the following criteria: 1. Easy reduction of the hernia sac and its contents without causing damage. 2. Good exposure and easy access for possible resection. 3. Safe hernia repair through the same access. According to our experience with 44 incarcerated and strangulated groin hernias operated between 1993 and 1997 and after a literature review, we took the following procedure as our routine: Posterior approach and mesh repair. We do not use a meshgraft only in the presence of colonic necrosis or peritonitis.

  13. Single incision endoscopic surgery for lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Shimizu, Satsuki; Shin, Hisato; Matsunoki, Aika; Watanabe, Go

    2011-01-01

    Single Incision Endoscopic Surgery (SIES) has emerged as a less invasive surgery among laparoscopic surgeries, and this approach for incisional hernia was reported recently. This is the first report of SIES for an incisional lumbar hernia. A 66-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our institution because of a left flank hernia that developed after left iliac crest bone harvesting. A 20-mm incision was created on the left side of the umbilicus and all three trocars (12, 5, and 5 mm) were inserted into the incision. The hernial defect was 14 × 9 cm and was repaired with intraperitoneal onlay mesh and a prosthetic graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. SIES for lumbar hernia offers a safe and effective outcome equivalent compared to laparoscopic surgery. In addition, SIES is less invasive and has a cosmetic benefit.

  14. Gallstone ileus in an 'asymptomatic' parastomal hernia.

    PubMed

    Jayamanne, H; Brown, J; Stephenson, B M

    2016-09-01

    Parastomal hernias are common and often asymptomatic. We report the first known case in which later, acute symptoms developed owing to gallstone ileus in a sac containing both omentum and small bowel. Urgent computed tomography established the diagnosis.

  15. Anti-reflux surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... fundoplication - discharge; Toupet fundoplication - discharge; Thal fundoplication - discharge; Hiatal hernia repair - discharge; Endoluminal fundoplication - discharge; GERD - fundoplication discharge; ...

  16. [Treatment of paracolostomic hernias using polypropylene mesh].

    PubMed

    Grigoriuk, A A; Ishchenko, V N; Matveev, A V; Kovalev, V A; Krasnobaev, A E; Stuzhin, S A

    2015-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 23 patients with large paracolostomic hernias. Twenty patients underwent colostomy suturing and hernial ring Onlay-plasty with polypropylene mesh without tension. Onlay-plasty of hernial ring with own tissues and polypropylene mesh and colostomy reconstruction outside of implant were performed in 3 patients. Onlay-alloplasty with polypropylene mesh "PROLENE" is effective method of treatment of postoperative paracolostomic ventral hernias with colostomy closing as well as with its reconstruction outside of implant.

  17. Surgical Treatment of Paraesophageal Hernias: A Review.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Ciro; Jalilvand, Anahita; Plana, Alejandro; Fisichella, P Marco

    2016-10-01

    The management of paraesophageal hernia (PEH) can be challenging due to the lack of consensus regarding indications and principles of operative treatment. In addition, data about the pathophysiology of the hernias are scant. Therefore, the goal of this review is to shed light and describe the classification, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and indications for treatment of PEHs, and provide an overview of the surgical management and a description of the technical principles of the repair.

  18. Umbilical Hernia Repair: Analysis After 934 Procedures.

    PubMed

    Porrero, José L; Cano-Valderrama, Oscar; Marcos, Alberto; Bonachia, Oscar; Ramos, Beatriz; Alcaide, Benito; Villar, Sol; Sánchez-Cabezudo, Carlos; Quirós, Esther; Alonso, María T; Castillo, María J

    2015-09-01

    There is a lack of consensus about the surgical management of umbilical hernias. The aim of this study is to analyze the medium-term results of 934 umbilical hernia repairs. In this study, 934 patients with an umbilical hernia underwent surgery between 2004 and 2010, 599 (64.1%) of which were evaluated at least one year after the surgery. Complications, recurrence, and the reoperation rate were analyzed. Complications were observed in 5.7 per cent of the patients. With a mean follow-up time of 35.5 months, recurrence and reoperation rates were 3.8 per cent and 4.7 per cent, respectively. A higher percentage of female patients (60.9 % vs 29 %, P = 0.001) and a longer follow-up time (47.4 vs 35 months, P = 0.037) were observed in patients who developed a recurrence. No significant differences were observed between complications and the reoperation rate in patients who underwent Ventralex(®) preperitoneal mesh reinforcement and suture repair; however, a trend toward a higher recurrence rate was observed in patients with suture repair (6.5 % vs 3.2 %, P = 0.082). Suture repair had lower recurrence and reoperation rates in patients with umbilical hernias less than 1 cm. Suture repair is an appropriate procedure for small umbilical hernias; however, for larger umbilical hernias, mesh reinforcement should be considered.

  19. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent groin hernias.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C; McKnight, R L

    1994-06-01

    Between November 1991 and May 1993, 54 recurrent groin hernias were laparoscopically repaired in 50 patients. Forty-eight were men and two were women. Forty-six recurrent hernias were unilateral and four bilateral. Twenty-five were direct, 19 indirect, 10 pantaloon, and two had a femoral component. In only 10 patients was the contralateral side normal. In 27 patients, the other side had been previously repaired, and in 13 they had a new contralateral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal technique was used to dissect and repair the entire floor in all patients. A single sheet of polypropylene mesh was used in the repair of the women patients, and a double-buttress technique with the first sheet slitted for the cord was used for the men. Patients were examined every 3 months for the first year and at 6-month intervals thereafter. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 18 months with a mean of 8 months. No patient was lost to follow-up, and no recurrence was observed. Patients returned to normal activity in an average of 1 week. Seroma, which resolved spontaneously, was the most common complication. The overall short-term results suggested that a laparoscopic mesh buttressed repair of recurrent groin hernias is technically feasible and can eliminate early rerecurrence of the hernia so commonly seen after repair of recurrent hernias.

  20. Symposium on the management of inguinal hernias: 3. Laparoscopic groin hernia surgery: the TAPP procedure

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Demetrius E.M.; Pham, Quynh N.; Oleniuk, Fredrick H.; Kluftinger, Andreas M.; Rossi, Ljubomir

    1997-01-01

    Objective To describe the technique and results of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. Design A case series, with a detailed description of the operative technique. Setting A university affiliated hospital. Patients A consecutive series of 554 patients (494 male, 60 female) who underwent laparoscopic hernia repair in a single institution. The mean follow-up was 14 months. Interventions Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair was performed in almost all patients. Simple closure was performed in a patient with a strangulated hernia, and a mesh-based repair was used in a patient with bilateral obturator hernias. Main outcome measures Complications and recurrence. Results The laparoscopic TAPP repair was successful in 550 of the 554 patients who underwent 632 hernia repairs. Conversion was necessary in 4 patients. Complications were infrequent and there were no recurrences. Only 3.4% of patients were lost to follow-up. The most frequent complications were urinary retention (27) and hematoma and seroma (38) in the early postoperative period. Neuralgia (11) and hydrocele (10) also occurred. Mesh infection occurred in only 1 patient and port-site hernias in 3 patients. There was 1 death from an acute myocardial infarction. Conclusion Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair is associated with an exceedingly low recurrence rate and an acceptable complication rate. PMID:9194780

  1. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  2. A peculiar variety of indirect inguinal hernia (juxtacordal indirect inguinal hernia)

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Indirect inguinal hernias are usually congenital, forming a sac in the core of the spermatic cord covered by the internal spermatic, cremasteric, and external spermatic fasciae1−3. Direct inguinal hernias are acquired; the sac lies beside/behind the cord1−3. A rare third type is a combination of indirect and direct sacs on both sides of inferior epigastric vessels1−3. We describe a rare fourth type, juxtacordal indirect oblique inguinal hernia (Fig. 1), in which the sac emerges through a weakness in the deep inguinal ring, lateral to inferior epigastric vessels, and passes into the inguinal canal beside and in contact with the cord but outside of its covering fasciae. Objective Describes a very rare variety of inguinal hernia. Design Case reports. Setting Tikrit Teaching Hospital/Salahuddin/Iraq. Participants: and presentation The first case; a 5-year-old male with right inguinal hernia, the second case; a 25-year-old man with right inguinal hernia, the third case; a 60-year-old man with right inguinal hernia. Interventions Surgery has been done electively for all. Results and discussion Because the sac emerges through the deep inguinal ring and passes through the inguinal canal, it is an indirect type and because it passes beside the spermatic cord we call it juxtacordal hernia. Because of the thick extraperitoneal fat layer over the sac, we think this hernia is acquired. Conclusions Knowing this type of hernia might reduce the risk of inferior epigastric vessels injury and lower the rate of recurrence. PMID:26052435

  3. Which mesh for hernia repair?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, CN; Finch, JG

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The concept of using a mesh to repair hernias was introduced over 50 years ago. Mesh repair is now standard in most countries and widely accepted as superior to primary suture repair. As a result, there has been a rapid growth in the variety of meshes available and choosing the appropriate one can be difficult. This article outlines the general properties of meshes and factors to be considered when selecting one. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a search of the medical literature from 1950 to 1 May 2009, as indexed by Medline, using the PubMed search engine (). To capture all potentially relevant articles with the highest degree of sensitivity, the search terms were intentionally broad. We used the following terms: ‘mesh, pore size, strength, recurrence, complications, lightweight, properties’. We also hand-searched the bibliographies of relevant articles and product literature to identify additional pertinent reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS The most important properties of meshes were found to be the type of filament, tensile strength and porosity. These determine the weight of the mesh and its biocompatibility. The tensile strength required is much less than originally presumed and light-weight meshes are thought to be superior due to their increased flexibility and reduction in discomfort. Large pores are also associated with a reduced risk of infection and shrinkage. For meshes placed in the peritoneal cavity, consideration should also be given to the risk of adhesion formation. A variety of composite meshes have been promoted to address this, but none appears superior to the others. Finally, biomaterials such as acellular dermis have a place for use in infected fields but have yet to prove their worth in routine hernia repair. PMID:20501011

  4. Life-threatening Petersen's hernia following open Beger's procedure

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yan Li; Haworth, Alexander; Wilson, Jeremy; Magee, Conor J.

    2016-01-01

    Petersen's hernia (an internal hernia between the transverse mesocolon and Roux limb following Roux-en-Y reconstruction) is well described following laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. We describe a Petersen-type hernia in a patient who had undergone complex open upper gastrointestinal surgery for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26994105

  5. Mesh Inguinal Hernia Repair and Appendectomy in the Treatment of Amyand's Hernia with Non-Inflamed Appendices

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Emin; Sisik, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is defined as protrusion of the vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac. It is a rare entity with variable clinical presentation from normal vermiform appendix to abscess formation due to perforation of acute appendicitis. Although surgical treatment includes appendectomy and hernia repair, appendectomy in the absence of an inflamed appendix and use of a mesh in cases of appendectomy remain to be controversial. The aim of this study was to review the experience of mesh inguinal hernia repair plus appendectomy performed for Amyand's hernia with noninflamed appendices. There were five male patients with a mean age of 42.4 ± 16.1 years in this retrospective study in which Amyand's hernia was treated with mesh inguinal hernia repair plus appendectomy for noninflamed appendices. Patients with acute appendicitis and perforated vermiform appendix were excluded. There were four right sided and one bilateral inguinal hernia. Postoperative courses were uneventful. During the follow-up period (14.0 ± 7.7 months), there was no inguinal hernia recurrence. Mesh inguinal hernia repair with appendectomy can be performed for Amyand's hernia in the absence of acute appendicitis. However, presence of fibrous connections between the vermiform appendix and the surrounding hernia sac may be regarded as a parameter to perform appendectomy. PMID:28194430

  6. Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... lifting heavy objects. In time, the most common complaint is a bump that is sore and growing. ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  7. Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... and exercise program if you think you are overweight or obese. Make fruits, veggies, and whole grains ... to lift something that's heavy, bend from your knees, not at your waist, or don't lift ...

  8. Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... heavy objects diarrhea or constipation persistent coughing or sneezing pregnancy These types of strain on their own ... a persistent cough from a cold or you sneeze a lot because of allergies , see your doctor ...

  9. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  10. Adult Bochdalek hernia with bowel incarceration.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yeh-Huang; Chien, Yu-Hon; Yan, Sheng-Lei; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2008-10-01

    Bochdalek hernias are rare in adults. We report 2 cases of Bochdalek hernia with bowel obstruction. The first case was a 74-year-old male patient who suffered from abdominal pain and chest tightness for 1 day. Chest radiography indicated a mass-like lesion above the left diaphragm. The pain could not be relieved by nasogastric tube decompression for 12 hours. We arranged computed tomography, which revealed a dilated bowel above the diaphragm and intestinal obstruction with gangrenous change. The patient received emergency laparotomy, and a Bochdalek hernia was detected during the operation. The second case was a 75-year-old female patient who suffered from chest tightness and dyspnea for about 1 week. Chest X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging revealed herniation of small and large bowels at the right posterior aspect of the thoracic cavity. She received transthoracic repair of diaphragmatic hernia, recovered, and was discharged 15 days later. We recommend that adult Bochdalek hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bowel obstruction.

  11. Review article: appendicitis in groin hernias.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Alan K

    2007-10-01

    To review the clinical presentation, outcome and causes of acute appendicitis presenting within a groin hernia. A comprehensive review of the past 70 years of English language surgical literature was conducted pertaining to acute appendicitis presenting within an inguinal or femoral hernia. Thirty-four reports describing 45 patients were reviewed to determine age, position, gender, pathologic stage at presentation, causal suppositions, and clinical outcomes. Hernial appendicitis presented as an inguinal abscess or a tender inguinal mass, often in the femoral position, and most commonly at the extremes of age. It was almost never recognized preoperatively, and, because of the sequestered nature of the inflammatory process, presented with few classic systemic signs or symptoms suggestive of acute appendicitis. Advanced pathologic stage and death correlated with the patient's age, delay in presentation, and delay in recognition. Evaluation of an inguinal abscess or a nonreducible tender groin hernia presenting in a patient at the extremes of age, should include computed tomography to rule out an occult acute appendicitis within the hernia, as systemic signs and symptoms of appendicitis are rarely evident. The condition appears to be caused by inflammatory adhesions caused by appendicitis occurring within an enlarged hernial orifice rather than appendicitis caused by external compression of the appendix base. Early recognition of this unique presentation of appendicitis allows trans-hernial appendectomy and immediate herniorraphy. Delayed diagnosis requires drainage of abscess with appendectomy and interval hernia repair.

  12. A rare variant of inguinal hernia: Cryptorchid testis at the age of 50 years. Etiopathogenicity, prognosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kassir, Radwan; Dubois, Joelle; Berremila, Sid-Ali; Baccot, Sylviane; Boueil-Bourlier, Alexia; Tiffet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cryptorchidism is characterized by the extra-scrotal position of the testis. The surgical community has little to no knowledge of cryptorchid testis in adults apart from of pediatric surgeons. Therefore, we sought to describe this unusual cause of inguinal hernia. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 50-year-old man was referred with a inguinal hernia. Diagnosis of cryptorchidism was made during surgery, as the patient underwent an operation for repair of his left inguinal hernia. The testicle was non-viable and a left testicle was resected. Histopathology report confirmed a atrophic testis without testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). DISCUSSION This is an extremely rare case of cryptorchidism revealed in an adult. The patient remained asymptomatic for 50 years. Most studies have concluded that there is a direct correlation between how long the testis was subjected to a cryptorchid position and TGCT incidence. The recommended age of surgical correction is before the age of 2 years. In our case, we did not find correlation between the time of surgery and risk of TGCT. Histopathology report confirmed the presence of leydig cells, seminiferous tubule and Sertoli cells without TGCT. Very little is known about link between cryptorchidism and TGCT. The correct diagnosis of inguinal hernia is usually made during an inguinal hernia repair. CONCLUSION The surgeon must always be alert to the possibility of cryptorchid testis during a surgical exploration of an inguinal hernia. In suspected cases, laparoscopy ultrasonographic, CT scan and laparoscopy evaluation may be helpful in diagnosing of this atypical inguinal hernia before surgery. PMID:24892247

  13. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia: one-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, 101 consecutive laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repairs (LTPR) were performed in 62 patients by a single surgeon. The series was begun in April 1991, and involved repair of 49 direct, 41 indirect, 4 femoral, 3 umbilical, 3 sliding, and 1 incisional hernias. Twelve cases were bilateral, eleven hernias were incarcerated, and fifteen hernias were recurrent. There were no intraoperative complications, and none of the procedures required conversion to open surgery. Patients experienced the following postoperative complications: transient testicular pain (1), transient anterior thigh paresthesias (2), urinary retention requiring TURP (1), and hernia recurrences (2). Follow up has ranged from 4 - 15 months and initial results have been encouraging.

  14. Giant Inguinal Herniae Managed by Primary Repair: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Madhur; Naku, Narang; Hajong, Debobratta; Singh, K Lenish

    2017-01-01

    Giant inguinal hernia are usually found in developing countries due to delay in seeking medical attention. The management of such hernias may sometimes require procedures to increase the intra-peritoneal capacity prior to the repair of the giant hernia. Otherwise patients may develop abdominal compartment syndrome leading to various unwanted complications. Primary repair of giant hernias are possible in some cases without having significant post-operative complications. In this present case series, we have managed a total of four patients of giant inguinal hernia by primary repair without much post-operative complications. PMID:28384934

  15. An 81-year-old gentleman with symptomatic Bochdalek hernia

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Mohammed Zak; Fisichella, Piero Marco

    2013-01-01

    An 81-year-old gentleman with congenital polycystic kidney disease presented to his primary care physician with dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux refractory to medical management, and 11.25 kg weight loss in a 6 mo-period. A barium swallow misdiagnosed a paraesophageal hernia for a Bochdalek hernia. Herein, we highlight how a Bochdalek hernia may be disregarded in the differential diagnosis and how providers can resort to a more common diagnosis, a paraesophageal hernia, which is more frequently encountered in old age and whose radiologic appearance might mimic a Bochdalek hernia. PMID:23894690

  16. An 81-year-old gentleman with symptomatic Bochdalek hernia.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Mohammed Zak; Fisichella, Piero Marco

    2013-07-27

    An 81-year-old gentleman with congenital polycystic kidney disease presented to his primary care physician with dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux refractory to medical management, and 11.25 kg weight loss in a 6 mo-period. A barium swallow misdiagnosed a paraesophageal hernia for a Bochdalek hernia. Herein, we highlight how a Bochdalek hernia may be disregarded in the differential diagnosis and how providers can resort to a more common diagnosis, a paraesophageal hernia, which is more frequently encountered in old age and whose radiologic appearance might mimic a Bochdalek hernia.

  17. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: is the enthusiasm justified?

    PubMed

    Cooper, S S; McAlhany, J C

    1997-01-01

    One surgeon repaired 72 inguinal hernias in 61 patients by a transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic placement of prosthetic mesh. There were 58 male and 3 female patients; the mean age was 47.9 years. Thirty-six unilateral inguinal hernias (either direct or indirect), 11 bilateral inguinal hernias, 12 recurrent inguinal hernias, and 2 unilateral pantaloon inguinal hernias were repaired. There were no operative mortalities. The mean follow-up was 21 months, with a range of 6 to 42 months. Ten hernia recurrences (13.8%) were documented 3 to 24 months postoperatively (mean, 12 months). There were six direct hernia recurrences, two indirect hernia recurrences, and two recurrences of recurrent hernia repairs. Thirteen patients (21.3%) experienced morbidity: seromas in eight, a hematoma in one, an ileus in one, hematuria in one, and neuropathy in two. In our opinion, the significant morbidity and early recurrence rate of a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair are unacceptable. Enthusiasm for laparoscopic technique to repair inguinal hernias is not justified if similar morbidity and recurrence rates are documented within the surgical community.

  18. Laparoscopic Repair of Internal Transmesocolic Hernia of Transverse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Kishiki, Tomokazu; Mori, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Matsuoka, Hiroyoshi; Abe, Nobutsugu; Masaki, Tadahiko; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Internal hernias are often misdiagnosed because of their rarity, with subsequent significant morbidity. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old Japanese man with no history of surgery was referred for intermittent abdominal pain. CT suggested the presence of a transmesocolic internal hernia. The patient underwent a surgical procedure and was diagnosed with transmesocolic internal hernia. We found internal herniation of the small intestine loop through a defect in the transverse mesocolon, without any strangulation of the small intestine. We were able to complete the operation laparoscopically. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. Discussion. Transmesocolic hernia of the transverse colon is very rare. Transmesocolic hernia of the sigmoid colon accounts for 60% of all other mesocolic hernias. Paraduodenal hernias are difficult to distinguish from internal mesocolic transverse hernias. We can rule out paraduodenal hernias with CT. Conclusion. The patient underwent a surgical procedure and was diagnosed with transmesocolic internal hernia. We report a case of a transmesocolic hernia of the transverse colon with intestinal obstruction that was diagnosed preoperatively and for which laparoscopic surgery was performed. PMID:26246930

  19. Ureteral inguinal hernia: an uncommon trap for general surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Zarif; Al-habbal, Yahya; Hassen, Sayed

    2017-01-01

    Inguinal hernias involving the ureter, a retroperitoneal structure, is an uncommon phenomenon. It can occur with or without obstructive uropathy, the latter posing a trap for the unassuming general surgeon performing a routine inguinal hernia repair. Ureteral inguinal hernia should be included as a differential when a clinical inguinal hernia is diagnosed concurrently with unexplained hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract infection particularly in a male. The present case describes a patient with a known ureteroinguinal hernia who proceeded to having a planned hernia repair and ureteric protection. The case is a reminder that when faced with an unexpected finding such an indirect sliding inguinal hernia, extreme care should be taken to ensure that no structures are inadvertently damaged and that a rare possibility is the entrapment of the ureter in the inguinal canal. PMID:28275027

  20. Strangulated Morgagni's Hernia: A Rare Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mate, Ajay; Rege, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is a rare type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. It accounts for only 3% of all diaphragmatic hernias. The defect is small and hernia being asymptomatic in the majority presents late in adulthood. Obstruction or incarceration in Morgagni hernia is uncommon. We report a rare occurrence of strangulated Morgagni hernia. A 40-year-old gentleman presented to our emergency department with features of intestinal obstruction. Computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed a strangulated right Morgagni hernia. An exploratory laparotomy was performed with resection of the ischemic bowel segment with anastomosis and a primary repair of the diaphragmatic defect. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and asymptomatic at follow-up. PMID:27891284

  1. Bilateral inguinal hernias: simultaneous or sequential repair?

    PubMed Central

    Stott, M. A.; Sutton, R.; Royle, G. T.

    1988-01-01

    Two hundred and forty four patients underwent either simultaneous bilateral inguinal hernia repair (n = 122) or unilateral inguinal hernia (n = 122) repair at a general hospital between January 1971 and December 1981. The two groups of patients were matched for age and sex. Both groups had a similar overall incidence of post-operative complications and in both groups the duration of post-operative stay and duration of operating time were similar. Chest infections developed in 12 patients after bilateral repair and in 3 patients after unilateral repair (P less than 0.02). All patients were assessed prospectively from 4 to 15 years after operation, when no significant difference in the number of recurrent hernias was found. Our results suggest that simultaneous bilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy is economical in terms of both operating time and duration of hospital stay, and that this economy is not bought at a cost of increased short term morbidity or long-term recurrence rate. PMID:3200778

  2. Strangulation of chronic transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kao, Peiyu; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Lu, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Shih-Chao; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Chen, Pin-Ru

    2014-06-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia (TIH) caused by violent coughing is a rare clinical diagnosis. Most patients diagnosed with TIH have a chronic condition consisting of a hernia that can be reduced completely by surgical intervention. Our patient presented with acute abdomen resulting from mechanical bowel obstruction secondary to an incarcerated hernia. Acute TIH presents a diagnostic challenge because of its rarity and lack of specific signs or symptoms in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen. We recommend performing diagnostic computed tomography (CT) early if there is suspicion of TIH. Surgical intervention is always needed. Surgical intervention was complicated in this case, necessitating both transthoracic and abdominal exposure to resect the ischemic bowel segment. Nonetheless, the patient recovered uneventfully.

  3. Diaphragmatic Hernia Masquerading as a Pulmonary Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Appiah, S; Tcherveniakov, P; Krysiak, P

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic injury accounts for the second most common cause of acquired diaphragmatic hernias after penetrating trauma. An increased incidence of these hernias has been observed with the widespread use of laparoscopic surgery. We present the case of a 65-year-old woman who initially underwent sigmoid resection for an adenocarcinoma and a subsequent liver resection for metastasis. She was noted to have a left lower lobe pulmonary nodule on surveillance computed tomography, for which she underwent a mini-thoracotomy for a planned resection. At the time of surgery, the pulmonary nodule was discovered to be a diaphragmatic hernia, most probably of iatrogenic origin. We discuss the difficulty in diagnosis given her history and the location of such a lesion. PMID:25723679

  4. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged.

  5. INFLUENCE OF TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND DIABETES ON THE COLLAGEN OF CREMASTER MUSCLE IN PATIENTS WITH INGUINAL HERNIAS

    PubMed Central

    MÓDENA, Sérgio Ferreira; CALDEIRA, Eduardo José; PERES, Marco Antonio O; ANDREOLLO, Nelson Adami

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: New findings point out that the mechanism of formation of the hernias can be related to the collagenous tissues, under activity of aggressive agents such as the tobacco, alcohol and diabetes. Aim: To analyze the collagen present in the cremaster muscle in patients with inguinal hernias, focusing the effect of tobacco, alcohol, and diabetes. Methods: Fifteen patients with inguinal hernia divided in three groups were studied: group I (n=5) was control; group II (n=5) were smokers and/or drinkers; and group III (n=5) had diabetes mellitus. All subjects were underwent to surgical repair of the inguinal hernias obeying the same pre, intra and postoperative conditions. During surgery, samples of the cremaster muscle were collected for analysis in polarized light microscopy, collagen morphometry and protein. Results: The area occupied by the connective tissue was higher in groups II and III (p<0.05). The collagen tissue occupied the majority of the samples analyzed in comparison to the area occupied by muscle cells. The content of total protein was higher in groups II and III compared to the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion: The tobacco, alcohol and diabetes cause a remodel the cremaster muscle, leading to a loss of support or structural change in this region, which may enhance the occurrences and damage related to inguinal hernias. PMID:28076473

  6. [Prosthetic material in incisional hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    López-Cano, Manuel; Barreiro Morandeira, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    There are different designs of prosthesis for use in the repair of incisional hernia, and it is often difficult to choose the most appropriate. The biological behaviour of the material must be a key part in the selection, although this behaviour will vary depending on what materials are available. A proper understanding of the relationship of the material with the abdominal wall dynamics is another important factor in this selection. Finally we need a stable repair without long term side effects. This paper analyses the prostheses more commonly available for incisional hernia surgery in the non-emergency situation.

  7. [Principles of the management of adult inguinal hernia--recommendations by the European Hernia Society].

    PubMed

    Wéber, György

    2010-10-01

    The European Hernia Society (EHS) presented the EHS Guidelines for the Treatment of Inguinal Hernia in Adult Patients. The Guidelines contain recommendations for the management of inguinal hernia from diagnosis to aftercare. These have been developed by a Working Group consisting of expert surgeons with representatives of 14 member countries of the EHS. The Guidelines are evidence-based and, when necessary, a consensus of all members was reached. The Guidelines have been reviewed by a Steering Committee as well. Before finalisation, feedback from the relevant national hernia societies was obtained. The Guidelines can be used to adjust local protocols, training purposes as well as quality control. In order to keep them updated the next revision will be published in 2012. A short update of new high-level evidence will be provided by the Working Group during the EHS annual congress until the next revision.

  8. Multi-directional mechanical analysis of synthetic scaffolds for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Est, Savannah; Roen, Madeleine; Chi, Tingying; Simien, Adrian; Castile, Ryan M; Thompson, Dominic M; Blatnik, Jeffrey A; Deeken, Corey R; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-02-09

    Hernias remain one of the most common ailments to affect men and women worldwide. Surgical mesh materials were first used to reinforce hernia defects during surgery in the late 1950s (Laker, n.d.). Today, there are well over 50 prosthetic meshes available for hernia repair (Brown and Finch, 2010; Bryan et al., 2014; Hope and El-hayek, 2014). With the multitude of available options, surgeons are faced with the challenging task of optimizing mesh selection for each patient. If the mechanics of the mesh are not compatible with the surrounding tissue, mismatch can occur, which can lead to complications such as mesh failure and/or hernia recurrence. Unfortunately, many aspects of synthetic mesh mechanics remain poorly described. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to provide a more complete mechanical analysis of a variety of commercially available prosthetic meshes for hernia repair, including evaluation of meshes in a variety of orientations. Twenty different meshes were subjected to biaxial tensile tests at both 90° and 45° orientations, and results were analyzed for relative strength, strain behavior, and anisotropy. Peak tension and strain values varied dramatically across all mesh types for all directions, ranging between 4.08 and 25.74N/cm and -5% to 10% strain. Anisotropy ratios for the evaluated meshes ranged from 0.33 to 1.89, demonstrating a wide range in relative direction-dependence of mesh mechanics. While further study of prosthetic meshes and better characterization of properties of the human abdominal wall are needed, results of this study provide valuable data that may aid clinicians in optimizing mesh selection for specific patients and repair conditions.

  9. A computerized tomography scan method for calculating the hernia sac and abdominal cavity volume in complex large incisional hernia with loss of domain.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E Y; Yoo, J H; Rodrigues, A J; Utiyama, E M; Birolini, D; Rasslan, S

    2010-02-01

    Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP) is a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of large incisional hernia (size > 10 cm in width or length) with loss of domain (LIHLD). There is no consensus in the literature on the amount of gas that must be insufflated in a PPP program or even how long it should be maintained. We describe a technique for calculating the hernia sac volume (HSV) and abdominal cavity volume (ACV) based on abdominal computerized tomography (ACT) scanning that eliminates the need for subjective criteria for inclusion in a PPP program and shows the amount of gas that must be insufflated into the abdominal cavity in the PPP program. Our technique is indicated for all patients with large or recurrent incisional hernias evaluated by a senior surgeon with suspected LIHLD. We reviewed our experience from 2001 to 2008 of 23 consecutive hernia surgical procedures of LIHLD undergoing preoperative evaluation with CT scanning and PPP. An ACT was required in all patients with suspected LIHLD in order to determine HSV and ACV. The PPP was performed only if the volume ratio HSV/ACV (VR = HSV/ACV) was >or=25% (VR >or= 25%). We have performed this procedure on 23 patients, with a mean age of 55.6 years (range 31-83). There were 16 women and 7 men with an average age of 55.6 years (range 31-83), and a mean BMI of 38.5 kg/m(2) (range 23-55.2). Almost all patients (21 of 23 patients-91.30%) were overweight; 43.5% (10 patients) were severely obese (obese class III). The mean calculated volumes for ACV and HSV were 9,410 ml (range 6,060-19,230 ml) and 4,500 ml (range 1,850-6,600 ml), respectively. The PPP is performed by permanent catheter placed in a minor surgical procedure. The total amount of CO(2) insufflated ranged from 2,000 to 7,000 ml (mean 4,000 ml). Patients required a mean of 10 PPP sessions (range 4-18) to achieve the desired volume of gas (that is the same volume that was calculated for the hernia sac). Since PPP sessions were performed

  10. [Inguinal hernia repair by the tension free technique of Lichtenstein].

    PubMed

    Prywiński, S; Zomrowski, L; Kapała, A; Mackiewicz, Z

    1997-01-01

    Failure rate in standard groin hernia repair varies from 3 to 10%. Polypropylene mesh implantation based on Lichtenstein "tension free" method in 1986 year reduced the failure rate to less than 1%. From Feb. '95 to Dec.'96, 115 patients were operated on with 127 groin hernias repair. The average age of patients was 58 years 52 direct hernias, 74 indirect hernias and 1 pantaloon hernia have been diagnosed in examined material, 101 primary repairs and 26 repairs of recurrent hernia have been performed. The operations were performed in subarachnoid anaesthesia--66 patients, in general anaesthesia--11 patients in local anaesthesia--38 patients. After having opened the inguinal canal estimated the type of its wall defect. In case of direct hernia the sac usually was invaginated by absorbing suture. In case of indirect hernia sac was cut and peritoneal cavity left opened. The patch made of polypropylene monofilament mesh (size 6 x 8 cm) was sewn with "tension free" method under spermatic funiculus. As a complication 6 patients had haematomas in operating wounds. Four of the patients had wound infections. One of these patients was operated again and the patch was removed. The patients had no recurrence of hernia during the previous 10.6 months of observation. We haven't confirmed recurrence in examined material, yet it was too short time to estimate the efficiency of repair. The proposed way of groin hernia repair is easy and simple in every-day surgery practice.

  11. A retrospective study of inguinal hernia in 35 dogs.

    PubMed

    Waters, D J; Roy, R G; Stone, E A

    1993-01-01

    Inguinal hernia was associated with trauma in five dogs and was considered nontraumatic in 30 dogs. There were 11 males, 13 intact females, and six spayed females with nontraumatic inguinal hernia. Six dogs had bilateral hernias. Five dogs were younger than 4 months at the time of diagnosis. In 11 older dogs with nontraumatic inguinal hernia, the hernias were identified less than 7 days before surgical repair; in 14 older dogs, the hernias had been recognized for 1 to 60 months. Clinical signs in dogs without small intestinal incarceration were usually limited to a visible or palpable mass without pain or systemic illness. Herniorrhaphy approaches included inguinal, midline with contralateral ring evaluation, and celiotomy with or without inguinal exposure. Fat and omentum were the most common hernial contents. Small intestine was within the hernias of 12 dogs. Six dogs had nonviable small intestine. Postoperative complications included two incisional infections, one incisional dehiscence, two cases of peritonitis and sepsis associated with bowel leakage after intestinal resection and anastomosis, and one hernia recurrence. The overall prevalence of postoperative complications was 17%, and the mortality rate was 3%. Vomiting for 2 to 6 days was predictive of nonviable small intestine. Dogs younger than 2 years were at 11 times greater risk for nonviable small intestine than dogs older than 2 years. Four of five dogs with nontraumatic inguinal hernia and nonviable small intestine were intact males, whereas none of 13 intact females were affected. Only one of 14 dogs with longstanding hernias had nonviable small intestine.

  12. Laparoscopic repair of strangulated Morgagni hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    A 73 year old man presented with vomiting and pain due to a strangulated Morgagni hernia containing a gastric volvulus. Laparoscopic operation allowed reduction of the contents, excision of necrotic omentum and the sac, with mesh closure of the large defect. A brief review of the condition is presented along with discussion of the technique used. PMID:17935621

  13. Day-case laparoscopic hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Evans, D S; Ghaneh, P; Khan, I M

    1996-10-01

    Some 114 patients (median age 52 years) underwent laparoscopic hernia repair as a day-case procedure. Twenty-one patients had bilateral and 11 recurrent hernias. Some 113 patients underwent transabdominal preperitoneal mesh repair but one required conversion to open operation. Mean operating time was 24 min for unilateral and 38 min for bilateral repair. In an operating session of 3.5 h, up to five patients (mean 4.4) underwent surgery and as many as seven hernias were repaired. More than 10 per cent of patients were found to have a previously undiagnosed hernia on the opposite side. A total of 111 patients were discharged home on the day of surgery. Major complications included one omental bleed and one small bowel obstruction. Seroma was the commonest minor complication and occurred in 7 per cent of patients. More than 35 per cent of patients needed no postoperative analgesia. To date there has been one recurrence (follow-up range 2-18 months).

  14. What is a Certified Hernia Center? The Example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Köckerling, Ferdinand; Berger, Dieter; Jost, Johannes O.

    2014-01-01

    To date, the scientific definition “hernia center” does not exist and this term is being used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the past 25 years. Differentiated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a “tailored approach” program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore, there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and its verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present, there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations. PMID:25593950

  15. Endoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair for inguinal disruption (Sportsman's hernia): rationale and design of a prospective observational cohort study (TEP-ID-study)

    PubMed Central

    Voorbrood, C E H; Goedhart, E; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Sanders, F; Naafs, D; Burgmans, J P J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inguinal pain is a frequently occurring problem in athletes. A diagnosis of inguinal disruption is performed by exclusion of other conditions causing groin pain. Up to now, conservative medical management is considered to be the primary treatment for this condition. Relevant large and prospective clinical studies regarding the treatment of inguinal disruption are limited; however, recent studies have shown the benefits of the totally extraperitoneal patch (TEP) technique. This study provides a complete assessment of the inguinal area in athletes with chronic inguinal pain before and after treatment with the TEP hernia repair technique. Methods and analysis We describe the rationale and design of an observational cohort study for surgical treatment with the endoscopic TEP hernia repair technique in athletes with a painful groin (inguinal disruption). The study is being conducted in a high-volume, single centre hospital with specialty in TEP hernia repair. Patients over 18 years, suffering from inguinal pain for at least 3 months during or after playing sports, and whom have not undergone previous inguinal surgery and have received no benefit from physiotherapy are eligible for inclusion. Patients with any another cause of inguinal pain, proven by physical examination, inguinal ultrasound, X-pelvis/hip or MRI are excluded. Primary outcome is reduction in pain after 3 months. Secondary outcomes are pain reduction, physical functioning, and resumption of sport (in frequency and intensity). Ethics and dissemination An unrestricted research grant for general study purposes was assigned to the Hernia Centre. This study itself is not directly subject to the above mentioned research grant or any other financial sponsorship. We intend to publish the outcome of the study, regardless of the findings. All authors will give final approval of the manuscript version to be published. PMID:26739740

  16. An unusual presentation of an incarcerated Spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Karen; Huysentruyt, Frederik; Delvaux, Peter

    2016-11-29

    Spigelian hernias are rare hernias, occurring through a defect in the Spigelian aponeurosis. Like other hernias, they may contain abdominal contents but are more likely to be incarcerated due to the small size of the fascial defect. Multiple intra-abdominal organs have reportedly been found in Spigelian hernias. A search of the literature showed only nine reported cases in which an appendix has been found within a Spigelian hernia. We present a patient with a history of lower abdominal pain since 10 weeks with a large intra-abdominal mass in the right iliac fossa. Due to abscess formation with spontaneous evacuation through the abdominal wall, drainage and incision were performed and the patient was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. An explorative laparoscopy after six weeks showed an incarcerated appendix in a Spigelian hernia.

  17. Amyand's hernia in elderly patients: diagnostic, anesthetic, and perioperative considerations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiping; Tao, Zongyuan; Chen, Hao; Li, Qinyu; Chu, Peiguo G; Yen, Yun; Qiu, Weihua

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac is termed as Amyand's hernia. Although rare, mistakes in diagnosis and treatment can cause catastrophic results. Charts of patients with inguinal hernia were reviewed, and four cases of Amyand's hernia were confirmed. The clinical presentation, anesthetic, and perioperative management of Amyand's hernia were further analyzed. The mean age of patients was over 70 years, and all were males. None of the patients were diagnosed preoperatively. All the patients had little abdominal complaint only with a right inguinal mass and dragging sensation for several hours. Due to the short time after incarceration and significant cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities, manual reduction was attempted first in three patients. With complete preoperative evaluation and careful perioperative support, all patients underwent appendectomy and Bassini's hernia repair through a groin incision. Based on age-related organ failure and associated chronic medical illnesses of geriatric patients, the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment are also summarized and analyzed.

  18. Inguinal hernia as a presentation of testicular feminization.

    PubMed

    Gibor, Udit; Ohana, Eric; Elena, Dubilet; Kirshtein, Boris

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of a 20-year-old female who was admitted to our department for an elective inguinal hernia repair. An oval-shaped mass was found in the hernia sac during the surgery that was suspected to be an ovary. Histological examination revealed testicular tissue. Further evaluation confirmed testicular feminization. She underwent laparoscopic orchiectomy and hernia repair from the contralateral side 3 months later.

  19. Obstructed Groin Hernia in a Tropical African Population

    PubMed Central

    Ajao, Oluwole G.

    1979-01-01

    In a 15-month period, at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, 44 cases of obstructed hernia were treated by emergency operation. More than 94 percent were inguinal, but femoral hernia was not common. The ratio of females to males was 1:6.4, and more than 68 percent of hernias occurred on the right side. The youngest patient was two weeks old. One incarcerated hernial sac contained an ileoileal intussusception and a segment of sigmoid colon. PMID:529309

  20. Congenital mesenteric hernia in neonates: Still a dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Alshahwani, Noora; Al-Balushi, Zainab; Arain, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction with devastating outcomes and still remains a challenge to diagnose pre-operatively. Patients are often managed with emergency surgical exploration and may need bowel resection. We present 2 neonates with small bowel obstruction secondary to strangulated transmesenteric hernia through a congenital defect in the small bowel mesentery, which were managed successfully. We have also reviewed the literature about congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates. PMID:26612129

  1. Thoracotomy for Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    PubMed

    Fangbiao, Zhang; Chunhui, Zheng; Chun, Zhao; Hongcan, Shi; Xiangyan, Zhang; Shaosong, Tu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to review our experience in the diagnosis and role of thoracotomy for traumatic diaphragmatic hernia (TDH). Between January 2008 and June 2014, 23 patients from Yangzhou Medical College (Yangzhou China) and Lishui Center Hospital (Lishui China), who underwent thoracotomy for TDH, were analyzed. The clinical features, imaging findings, operative findings, and outcome of treatment in these patients are presented. There were 23 patients (18 males and 5 females) who underwent surgical procedures due to TDH. The median age of the patients was 43.2 years (range, 15-68 years). The cause of rupture was penetrating trauma in 1 (4.3 %) patient and blunt trauma in 22 (95.7 %) patients. The TDH was left sided in 21 patients and right sided in two patients. The diagnosis was made by chest X-ray (n = 2) and chest or abdominal CT (n = 13) and at thoracotomy based on a high index of suspicion (n = 8). Associated injuries were seen in 21 patients (91.3 %). Twenty-two patients underwent thoracotomy, and one underwent thoracotomy with laparotomy. The mean operating time was 112 min (range, 60-185 min) and the mean blood loss was 116 mL (range, 20-400 mL). The most common herniated organs were the omentum (n = 15), stomach (n = 14), spleen (n = 11), colon (n = 10), small bowel (n = 2), and liver (n = 1). All diaphragmatic defects were repaired using interrupted prolene sutures. The overall mortality rate was 4.3 % (n = 1). The diagnosis of TDH is easily missed or delayed. Chest X-ray and computer tomography (CT), especially chest and abdominal CT, are useful in the diagnosis of diaphragmatic ruptures, and thoracotomy is an effective and successful treatment for TDH.

  2. Ruptured abdominal aneurysm disguised as an incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Colpaert, J; Willaert, B; Van Molhem, Y

    2017-01-31

    An incarcerated inguinal hernia is a textbook example of a basic and straightforward diagnosis. In rare cases, an incarcerated hernia may be a symptom of more complex underlying pathology. In this case report a patient with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm presented with an incarcerated left inguinal hernia. Only two other cases have been reported with a stable patient at initial presentation. The diagnosis was suspected when blood seeping next to the internal inguinal ring was detected, and an urgent ultrasound in the operating room confirmed the diagnosis. Whether or not patients with an inguinal hernia are more at risk for an AAA remains unclear.

  3. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R. D.; Katz, M. G.; Fargnoli, A. S.; Kendle, A. P.; Mihalko, K. L.; Bridges, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation. PMID:26293994

  4. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep.

    PubMed

    Williams, R D; Katz, M G; Fargnoli, A S; Kendle, A P; Mihalko, K L; Bridges, C R

    2016-06-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation.

  5. Bilateral Morgagni Hernia: A Unique Presentation of a Rare Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is an unusual congenital herniation of abdominal content through the triangular parasternal gaps of the anterior diaphragm. They are commonly asymptomatic and right-sided. We present a case of a bilateral Morgagni hernia resulting in delayed growth in a 10-month-old boy. The presentation was unique due to its bilateral nature and its symptomatic compression of the mediastinum. Diagnosis was made by 3D reconstructed CT angiogram. The patient underwent medical optimization until he was safely able to tolerate laparoscopic surgical repair of his hernia. Upon laparoscopy, the CT findings were confirmed and the hernia was repaired. PMID:27403367

  6. Incisional hernia involving the neobladder: technical considerations to avoid complications.

    PubMed

    Katkoori, Devendar; Jayathillake, Anuradha; Eldefrawy, Ahmed; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2009-06-30

    The management of incisional hernia following radical cystectomy (RC) and neobladder diversion poses a special challenge. Mesh erosion into the neobladder is a potential complication of hernia repair in this setting. We describe our experience and steps to avoid this complication. Three patients developed incisional hernias following RC involving the neobladder. The incisional hernias were repaired by the same surgeon. A systematic dissection and repair of the hernias with an onlay dual-layer mesh (made of polyglactin and polypropylene) was carried out. The critical steps were placing the polyglactin side of the mesh deeper and positioning of an omental flap anterior to the neobladder. The omental flap adds a protective layer that prevents adhesions between the neobladder and abdominal wall, and prevents erosion of the mesh into the fragile neobladder wall. All of these patients had received two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to RC. The time duration from RC to the repair of hernia was 7, 42, and 54 months. No intraoperative injury to the neobladder or other complication was noted during hernia repair. The patients were followed after hernia repair for 20, 22, and 42 months with no recurrence, mesh erosion, or other complications. Careful understanding and attention to details of the technique can minimize the risk of complications, especially incisional hernia recurrence, injury to the neobladder, and erosion of mesh into the neobladder wall.

  7. Type 4 appendiceal diverticulum within a de Garengeot hernia

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, E

    2016-01-01

    A de Garengeot hernia is defined as an incarcerated femoral hernia containing the vermiform appendix. We describe the case of a patient with a type 4 appendiceal diverticulum within a de Garengeot hernia and delineate valuable learning points. A 76-year-old woman presented with a 2-week history of a non-reducible painless femoral mass. Outpatient ultrasonography demonstrated a 36mm × 20mm smooth walled, multiloculated, partially cystic lesion anterior to the right inguinal ligament in keeping with an incarcerated femoral hernia. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be incarcerated in the sac of the femoral hernia and appendicectomy was performed. Histopathology demonstrated no evidence of inflammation in the appendix. However, an incidental appendiceal diverticulum was identified. It is widely recognised that a de Garengeot hernia may present with concomitant appendicitis, secondary to raised intraluminal pressure in the incarcerated appendix. Appendiceal diverticulosis is also believed to develop in response to raised pressure in the appendix and may therefore develop secondary to incarceration in a de Garengeot hernia. To our knowledge, only one such case has been described in the literature. A de Garengeot hernia is a rare entity, which poses significant diagnostic challenges. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary as these hernias are at particularly high risk of perforation and so prompt surgical management is paramount. PMID:27269437

  8. Increasing Body Mass Index Is Inversely Related to Groin Hernias.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Samine; Batech, Michael; Tejirian, Talar

    2015-10-01

    Few studies describe the relationship between obesity and groin hernias. Our objective was to investigate the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and groin hernias in a large population. Patients with the diagnosis of inguinal or femoral hernia with and without incarceration or strangulation were identified using the Kaiser Permanente Southern California regional database including 14 hospitals over a 7-year period. Patients were stratified by BMI. There were 47,950 patients with a diagnosis of a groin hernia--a prevalence of 2.28 per cent. Relative to normal BMI (20-24.9 kg/m(2)), lower BMI was associated with an increased risk for hernia diagnosis. With increasing BMI, the risk of incarceration or strangulation increased. Additionally, increasing age, male gender, white race, history of hernia, tobacco use history, alcohol use, and higher comorbidity index increased the chance of a groin hernia diagnosis. Complications were higher for women, patients with comorbidities, black race, and alcohol users. Our study is the largest to date correlating obesity and groin hernias in a diverse United States population. Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) is associated with a lower risk of groin hernia diagnosis, but an increased risk of complications. This inverse relationship may be due to limitations of physical exam in obese patients.

  9. Endometriosis in a spigelian hernia sac: an unexpected finding.

    PubMed

    Moris, Demetrios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Vernadakis, Spiridon

    2015-01-01

    Describes the existence of endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac. Spigelian Hernia is a rare ventral hernia, presenting difficulties in diagnosis and carrying a high incarceration and obstruction risk. Endometriomas occur due to implantation of endometrial cells into a surgical wound, most often after a cesarean delivery. A 37-year-old woman presented to our department with persistent abdominal pain, exacerbating during menses, and vomiting for 2 days. Physical examination revealed a mass-like lesion in the border between the left-upper and left-lower quadrant. Ultrasound examination was inconclusive and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed an abdominal wall mass. During surgery, a spigelian hernia was found 5 to 7 cm above a previous cesarean incision. Tissue like "chocolate cysts" was present at the hernia sac. Hernia was repaired while tissue was excised and sent for histological examination that confirmed the diagnosis. Spigelian hernia is a hernia presenting difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. Endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac is a rare diagnosis, confirmed only histologically. Clinical suspicion can be posed only through symptoms and thorough investigation.

  10. Evaluation of the Rebound Hernia Repair Device for Laparoscopic Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Sorcic, Laura; Ruth, George R.; Andrade, Rafael; Martin-del-Campo, Luis A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The characteristics of the ideal type of mesh are still being debated. Mesh shrinkage and fixation have been associated with complications. Avoiding shrinkage and fixation would improve hernia recurrence rates and complications. To our knowledge, this is the first study of a device with a self-expanding frame for laparoscopic hernia repair. Methods: Six Rebound Hernia Repair Devices were placed laparoscopically in pigs. This device is a condensed polypropylene, super-thin, lightweight, macro-porous mesh with a self-expanding Nitinol frame. The devices were assessed for adhesions, shrinkage, and histological examination. Laboratory and radiologic evaluations were also performed. Results: The handling properties of the devices facilitated their laparoscopic placement. They were easily identified with simple x-rays. The mesh was firmly integrated within the surrounding tissue. One device was associated with 3 small adhesions. The other 5 HRDs had no adhesions. We noted no shrinkage or folding. All devices preserved their original size and shape. Conclusions: At this evaluation stage, we found that the Rebound Hernia Repair Device may serve for laparoscopic hernia repair and has favorable handling properties. It prevents folding and shrinkage of the mesh. It may eliminate the need for fixation, thus preventing chronic pain. The Nitinol frame also allowed radiologic evaluation for gross movement. Further studies will be needed to evaluate its clinical application. PMID:20529534

  11. De Garengeot's hernia: an unusual right groin mass due to acute appendicitis in an incarcerated femoral hernia.

    PubMed

    Salkade, Parag R; Chung, Alexander Y F; Law, Y M

    2012-10-01

    The presence of an acutely inflamed vermiform appendix in a femoral hernia sac is extremely rare; the condition is termed De Garengeot's hernia. Here we describe an elderly patient for whom preoperative computed tomography aided the diagnosis of this rare entity. This Chinese woman had presented with a painful right groin mass. The patient successfully underwent an emergency appendicectomy and primary femoral hernia repair. Once diagnosed, it is imperative to follow key surgical principles to limit the spread of infection.

  12. Anterior Tension-Free Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernia Under Local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gianetta, Ezio; Cuneo, Sonia; Vitale, Bruno; Camerini, Giovanni; Marini, Paola; Stella, Mattia

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe a 7-year experience with recurrent inguinal hernia repair performed mainly with tension-free mesh or plug technique under local anesthesia through the anterior approach, and to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this method of treatment. Methods One hundred forty-five elective and 1 emergency herniorrhaphies for recurrent groin hernia were performed in 141 subjects (134 men and 7 women) with a mean age of 65 years (range 30–89). Concomitant medical and surgical problems were present in 73% and 8% of subjects, respectively. In 28 instances, the relapsed hernia had already been operated on once or twice for recurrence. A traditional hernioplasty had been previously performed in the vast majority of cases (136). Tension-free mesh or plug techniques through an anterior approach under local anesthesia were performed in 144 reoperations. Preperitoneal mesh repair and general or spinal anesthesia were used in all but one case when herniorrhaphy was performed during simultaneous operations. Results Mean hospital stay after surgery was 1.5 days (range 3 hours–14 days). No perioperative deaths occurred in this series. General complications were one case of acute intestinal bleeding and two cases of urinary retention. Local complications consisted of eight (5.5%) minor complications and one case of orchitis (0.7%) followed by testicular atrophy. In no instance was postoperative neuralgia or chronic pain reported. Two re-recurrences occurred. Conclusions Given the low complication rate in this and other reported series and the absence of surgical or general complications described after preperitoneal open or laparoscopic repair and after general and spinal anesthesia, anterior mesh repair under local anesthesia seems to be a low-cost surgical technique that can be safely and effectively used even in a teaching hospital for the treatment of the majority of patients with recurrent groin hernias. PMID:10636113

  13. Linea arcuate hernia disguised as Pfannenstiel incision's hernia: a case report and a systemic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vincelli, Veronica; Marazzi, Cesare; Posabella, Alberto; Steiger, Aurore

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 46-year-old woman 2 weeks after a cesarean section with Pfannenstiel incision, who presented at the Emergency Department with a significant abdominal pain accompanied by two episodes of vomiting. After that a clinical examination and an abdominal computed tomography scan were completed, a visceral herniation through Pfannenstiel incision was suspected. The indication of surgical exploration was clear. Finally, the laparotomy revealed a linea arcuata hernia with a hernia of the small intestine. After a reduction of the hernia sac, the defect was repaired and no mesh was placed. An antibiotic treatment with co-amoxicillin for 1 week during the recovery was prescribed. The patient recovered uneventfully and could be discharged by postoperative day 7. PMID:28069882

  14. Linea arcuate hernia disguised as Pfannenstiel incision's hernia: a case report and a systemic literature review.

    PubMed

    Vincelli, Veronica; Marazzi, Cesare; Posabella, Alberto; Steiger, Aurore

    2017-01-08

    We report a rare case of a 46-year-old woman 2 weeks after a cesarean section with Pfannenstiel incision, who presented at the Emergency Department with a significant abdominal pain accompanied by two episodes of vomiting. After that a clinical examination and an abdominal computed tomography scan were completed, a visceral herniation through Pfannenstiel incision was suspected. The indication of surgical exploration was clear. Finally, the laparotomy revealed a linea arcuata hernia with a hernia of the small intestine. After a reduction of the hernia sac, the defect was repaired and no mesh was placed. An antibiotic treatment with co-amoxicillin for 1 week during the recovery was prescribed. The patient recovered uneventfully and could be discharged by postoperative day 7.

  15. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. RESULTS: FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. CONCLUSION: The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy. PMID:26380829

  16. What is inside the hernia sac?

    PubMed Central

    Virgínia, Ana Araújo; Santos, Cláudia; Contente, Helena; Branco, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Most ovarian inguinal hernias occur in children and are frequently associated with congenital genitalia defects. The authors present the case of a multiparous 89-year-old woman, without any genitalia defect, who was brought to the emergency department with an irreducible inguinal hernia. The patient was proposed for emergency surgery during which we encountered an ovary and a fallopian tube inside the hernial sac. An oophorosalpingectomy and a Lichtenstein procedure were carried out and the postoperative period was uneventful. This case shows that, even though it is rare, a hernial sac may contain almost any intra-abdominal organ, including those least frequent such as the appendix, an ovary or the fallopian tubes. PMID:27511751

  17. Incisional Hernia Following Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Positioning.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Matteo; Vezzali, Norberto; Frena, Antonio; Bonatti, Giampietro

    2016-06-01

    Incisional hernia represents a rare complication after ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning due to failure of the fascial suture in the site of abdominal entrance of ventriculoperitoneal catheter. Clinical presentation can be extremely variable, according to patient's performance status, herniated material constitution (i.e. mesenteric fat, bowel loops or both) and complication occurrence (e.g. strangulation or intestinal obstruction). Early diagnosis is fundamental in order to surgically repair the defect and prevent further complications. We present the case of a paucisymptomatic incisional hernia following ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning. Diagnosis was made by means of ultrasound and confirmed by means of computed tomography. The patient was successfully managed by means of surgical repositioning of herniated loop and re-suture.

  18. [Median incisional hernias and coexisting parastomal hernias : new surgical strategies and an algorithm for simultaneous repair].

    PubMed

    Köhler, G

    2014-08-01

    The co-occurrence of incisional and parastomal hernias (PSH) remains a surgical challenge. Standardized treatment guidelines are missing, and the patients concerned require an individualized surgical approach. The laparoscopic techniques can be performed with incised and/or stoma-lateralizing flat meshes with intraperitoneal onlay placement. The purely laparoscopic and laparoscopic-assisted approaches with 3-D meshes offer advantages regarding the complete coverage of the edges of the stomal areas and the option of equilateral or contralateral stoma relocation in cases of PSH, which are difficult to handle due to scarring, adhesions, and large fascial defects > 5 cm with intestinal hernia sac contents. A relevant stoma prolapse can be relocated by tunnel-like preformed 3-D meshes and shortening the stoma bowel. The positive effect on prolapse prevention arises from the dome of the 3-D mesh, which is directed toward the abdominal cavity and tightly fits to the bowel. In cases of large incisional hernias (> 8-10 cm in width) or young patients with higher physical demands, an open abdominal wall reconstruction in sublay technique is required. Component separation techniques that enable tension-free ventral fascial closure should be preferred to mesh-supported defect bridging methods. The modified posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and the minimally invasive anterior component separation are superior to the original Ramirez technique with respect to wound morbidity. By using 3-D textile implants, which were specially designed for parastomal hernia prevention, the stoma can be brought out through the lateral abdominal wall without increased risk of parastomal hernia or prolapse development. An algorithm for surgical treatment, in consideration of the complexity of combined hernias, is introduced for the first time.

  19. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. The procedures include intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair, transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair and total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair. These procedures have totally different anatomic point of view, process and technical key points from open operations. The technical details of these operations are discussed in this article, also the strategies of treatment for some special conditions. PMID:27867954

  20. [Spigelian hernia: clinical, diagnostic and therapeutical aspects].

    PubMed

    Versaci, A; Rossitto, M; Centorrino, T; Barbera, A; Fonti, M T; Broccio, M; Ciccolo, A

    1998-01-01

    The Authors describing a case of Spigelian hernia observed point out clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic considerations about this rare pathology of abdominal wall. They specify the anatomic characteristics of the region and underline as any diagnostic difficulties are by passed by use of USG and TC imaging for formulation of correct preoperative diagnosis. They confirm as surgical treatment by a correct access isn't different by a normal hernioplasty and guarantee the long term surgical outcome.

  1. Thoracic kidney associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Kamal N; Rohilla, Seema; Narang, Rajat; Rattan, Simmi K; Maggu, Sarita; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara B

    2009-09-01

    We report three cases of ectopic thoracic (or superior ectopic) kidney; one in a neonate and two in 6-month-old children, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In all cases the diagnosis was made during surgery and confirmed by intravenous pyelography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the postoperative period. Because of the rarity of this condition we report these cases together with a wide review of the published reports.

  2. Rare presentation of spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shweta; Bali, Roseleen Kaur; Das, Kamanasish; Sisodia, Anula; Dewan, R K; Singla, Rupak

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia without any apparent history of trauma is a very rare condition and is very difficult to diagnose. We present a case of a 21-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain for one month and four episodes of vomiting for one day. Clinical suspicion, chest radiography with nasogastric tube in situ and computed tomography (CT) confirmed the diagnosis. The diaphragmatic defect was repaired surgically. The patient had an uneventful post-operative recovery.

  3. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become increasingly popular as an alternative to open surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal procedure with the use of staple fixation and polypropylene mesh. Methods: A retrospective chart review examined outcomes of 1240 laparoscopic hernia operations in 783 patients, focusing on intraoperative and early postoperative complications, pain, and time until return to work and normal physical activities. Results: There were no intraoperative complications in this series; 106 patients experienced early postoperative complications across 8 evaluated categories: urinary retention (4.1%), seroma (3.0%), testicular/hemiscrotal swelling (1.9%), testicular atrophy (0%), hydrocele (0.6%), mesh infection (0.1%), and neurological symptoms (transient, 1.0%; persistent, 0.2%). Patients used an average of 5.6 Percocet pills after the procedure, and mean times until return to work and normal activities, including their routine exercise regimen, were 3.0 and 3.8 days, respectively. Conclusion: Complication rates and convalescence times were considered equivalent or superior to those found in other studies assessing both laparoscopic and open techniques. The usage of multiple Endostaples did not result in increased neurologic complications in the early postoperative period when compared with findings in the literature. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, total extraperitoneal repair is a safe, effective alternative to open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27493471

  4. Delayed presentation of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, M M; Bryer, J V; Angorn, I B; Baker, L W

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia discovered at least five months after injury are described, of whom 18 were male and seven female. All but one hernia occurred on the left side. Stab wounds were the etiological factor in 22 patients and blunt trauma in three. The diagnosis was most often made by a chest or abdominal radiograph, but barium ingestion confirmed the diagnosis in ten patients. Intercostal drainage of gastric contents provided the diagnosis in two patients. In all nine patients initially approached by a thoracotomy or a thoracoabdominal incision, the hernia was easily reduced and the defect repaired. Although reduction and repair were easily accomplished by the abdominal route in seven patients, this approach was unsatisfactory or inadequate in six others. The colon and stomach were usually in the chest, and strangulation occurred in five patients. The mortality was 20% but rose to 80% when gangrene was present. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:686890

  5. [Unusual ischemic cord compression by discal hernia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Vergeret, J; Noble, Y; Barat, M; Guérin, J; Arné, L

    The discal hernia are unfrequent in dorsal localization and neurological appearances are deceptive. We report a case with amyotrophic and fasciculations developing a progressive spinal cord amyotrophy aspect. The complementary investigations (gaz myelography and spinal angiography) show the discal hernia in T11-T12 which was operated successfully. The vascular factor role is discussed about semiologic and pathogenic view.

  6. Acquired umbilical hernias in four captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Velguth, Karen E; Rochat, Mark C; Langan, Jennifer N; Backues, Kay

    2009-12-01

    Umbilical hernias are a common occurrence in domestic animals and humans but have not been well documented in polar bears. Surgical reduction and herniorrhaphies were performed to correct acquired hernias in the region of the umbilicus in four adult captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) housed in North American zoos. Two of the four bears were clinically unaffected by their hernias prior to surgery. One bear showed signs of severe discomfort following acute enlargement of the hernia. In another bear, re-herniation led to acute abdominal pain due to gastric entrapment and strangulation. The hernias in three bears were surgically repaired by debridement of the hernia ring and direct apposition of the abdominal wall, while the large defect in the most severely affected bear was closed using polypropylene mesh to prevent excessive tension. The cases in this series demonstrate that while small hernias may remain clinically inconsequential for long periods of time, enlargement or recurrence of the defect can lead to incarceration and acute abdominal crisis. Umbilical herniation has not been reported in free-ranging polar bears, and it is suspected that factors such as body condition, limited exercise, or enclosure design potentially contribute to the development of umbilical hernias in captive polar bears.

  7. Diaphragmatic Hernia after Transhiatal Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohun; Kim, Si-Wook; Hong, Jong-Myeon

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia was found in a patient who had undergone transhiatal esophagectomy for early esophageal cancer. Chest X-ray was not helpful, but abdominal or chest computed tomography was useful for accurate diagnosis. Primary repair through thoracotomy was performed and was found to be feasible and effective. However, long-term follow-up is required because hernia recurrence is common. PMID:27525243

  8. Fecally loaded inguinoscrotal hernia masquerading as testicular mass.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Robert David; Wallace, Sophie; Zein, Abdulhalim Al; D'Costa, Horace

    2011-10-01

    An 88-year-old man presented with clinical signs suggestive of a testicular mass. The initial ultrasound examination was inconclusive however regional computed tomography eloquently distinguished a large indirect inguinoscrotal hernia with a hernia sac containing a loop of fecally loaded sigmoid colon.

  9. [Results of surgical treatment of postoperative abdominal hernia].

    PubMed

    Belokonev, V I; Pushkin, S Iu

    2000-09-01

    There were examined 525 patients with postoperative abdominal hernia, in 47.3% of them big, vast and giant hernia was revealed. There were operated 436 patients using local tissues with duplicature formation--according to Mayo, Sapezhko, Napalkov and Yanov method.

  10. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia: imaging aspects in three cases*

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Aranha, André Galante Alencar; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2013-01-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia is uncommon and mostly related to blunt or penetrating trauma. We report three similar cases of cough-induced transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia, highlighting the anatomic findings obtained with different imaging modalities (radiography, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance) in each of the cases. PMID:24068274

  11. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia: imaging aspects in three cases.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Campos, José Ribas Milanez de; Aranha, André Galante Alencar; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2013-01-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia is uncommon and mostly related to blunt or penetrating trauma. We report three similar cases of cough-induced transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia, highlighting the anatomic findings obtained with different imaging modalities (radiography, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance) in each of the cases.

  12. Incidence of Ostomy Site Incisional Hernias after Stoma Closure.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Stephen P; Francis, Jacquelyn K; Valerian, Brian T; Canete, Jonathan J; Chismark, A David; Lee, Edward C

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the incidence of ostomy site incisional hernias after stoma reversal at a single institution. This is a retrospective analysis from 2001 to 2011 evaluating the following demographics: age, gender, indication for stoma, urgent versus elective operation, time to closure, total follow-up time, the incidence of and reoperation for stoma incisional hernia, diabetes, postoperative wound infection, smoking status within six months of surgery, body mass index, and any immunosuppressive medications. A total of 365 patients were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The clinical hernia rate was 19 percent. Significant risk factors for hernia development were age, diabetes, end colostomies, loop colostomies, body mass index >30, and undergoing an urgent operation. The median time to clinical hernia detection was 32 months. Sixty-four percent of patients required surgical repair of their stoma incisional hernia. A significant number of patients undergoing stoma closure developed an incisional hernia at the prior stoma site with the majority requiring definitive repair. These hernias are a late complication after stoma closure and likely why they are under-reported in the literature.

  13. [Rare complication of a post-traumatic left diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Aissa, A; Hassine, A; Hajji, H; Ben Salah, K; Morjène, A; Alouini, R

    2013-12-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is a post-traumatic lesion specific trauma that may go unnoticed. The left hemidiaphragm is the most frequently affected. The diagnosis is then made at the occasion of a complication, especially gastric volvulus. The authors report the case of a young man aged 26 years old with a gastric volvulus on post-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia diagnosed by CT.

  14. Ultrasound Prenatal Diagnosis of Inguinal Scrotal Hernia and Contralateral Hydrocele

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, G.; Sglavo, G.; Cavallaro, A.; Pastore, G.; Nappi, C.; Di Carlo, C.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal inguinal scrotal hernia is a rare condition resulting in an abnormal embryonic process of the tunica vaginalis. We report a case of ultrasound prenatal diagnosis of inguinal scrotal hernia associated with contralateral hydrocele in a woman at 37 weeks of gestation, referred to our clinic for a scrotal mass. Differential diagnosis includes hydrocele, teratoma, hemangiomas, solid tumours of testis, bowel herniation, and testicular torsion. Bowel peristalsis is an important ultrasound sign and it allowed us to make diagnosis of inguinal scrotal hernia. Diagnosis was confirmed at birth and a laparoscopic hernia repair was performed without complications on day 10. During surgery, a bilateral defect of canal inguinal was seen and considered as the cause of scrotal inguinal hernia and contralateral hydrocele observed in utero. PMID:24455356

  15. Laparoscopic Hernia: Umbilical-Pubis Length Versus Technical Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Pierre; Kassir, Radwan; Atger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repair is more difficult than open hernia repair. The totally extraperitoneal procedure with 3 trocars on the midline is more comfortable for the surgeon. We studied the impact of the length between the umbilicus and the pubis on the totally extraperitoneal procedure (95 hernias operated on in 70 patients). This length did not influence the totally extraperitoneal procedure in this study. Background: The laparoscopic repair of hernias is considered to be difficult especially for the totally extra-peritoneal technique (TEP) due to a limited working space and different appreciation of the usual anatomical landmarks seen through an anterior approach. The aim of our study has been to answer a question: does the umbilical-pubic distance, which influences the size of the mesh, affect the TEP technique used in the treatment of inguinal hernias? Methods: From January 2001 to May 2011, the umbilical-pubic (UP) distance was measured with a sterile ruler graduated in centimeters in all patients who underwent a symptomatic inguinal hernia by the TEP technique in two hernia surgery centers. The sex, age, BMI, hernia type, UP distance, operation time, hospital stay and complications were prospectively examined based on the medical records. Results: Seventy patients underwent 95 inguinal hernia repairs by the TEP technique. The umbilical-pubic distance average was 14 cm (10 to 22) and a 25 kg/m2 (16–30) average concerning the body mass index (BMI). Seventy percent of patients were treated on an outpatient basis. The postoperative course was very simple. There was no recurrence of hernia within this early postoperative period. Conclusion: The umbilical-pubic distance had no influence on the production of TEP with 3 trocars on the midline in this study. PMID:25392661

  16. Observations on oesophageal length.

    PubMed Central

    Kalloor, G J; Deshpande, A H; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    The subject of oesophageal length is discussed. The great variations in the length of the oesophagus in individual patients is noted, and the practical use of its recognition in oesophageal surgery is stressed. An apprasial of the various methods available for this measurement is made; this includes the use of external chest measurement, endoscopic measurement, and the measurement of the level of the electrical mucosal potential change. Correlative studies of these various methods are made, and these show a very high degree of significance. These studies involved simultaneous measurement of external and internal oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms, 42 patients with sliding type hiatal hernia, and 17 patients with a peptic stricture in association with hiatal hernia. The method of measuring oesophageal length by the use of the external chest measurement, that is, the distance between the lower incisor teeth and the xiphisternum, measured with the neck fully extended and the patient lying supine, is described in detail, its practical application in oesophageal surgery is illustrated, and its validity tested by internal measurements. The findings of this study demonstrate that the external chest measurement provides a mean of assessing the true static length of the oesophagus, corrected for the size of the individual. Images PMID:941114

  17. Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia--differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Bukvić, Nado; Versić, Ana Bosak; Bacić, Giordano; Gusić, Nadomir; Nikolić, Harry; Bukvić, Frane

    2014-12-01

    The incarceration of diaphragmatic hernia is very rare. We present a case of a four-year-old girl who developed the incarceration of left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, who, until then, was completely asymptomatic. This incarceration of the hernia represented a surgical emergency presenting as obstructive ileus and a severe respiratory distress which developed from what appeared to be full health. During a brief pre-operative examination a number of differential diagnoses were suggested. Along with the laboratory blood analysis (complete blood count and acid-base balance) a plain thoracic and abdominal radiography was done (babygram). After that, through an inserted nasal-gastric tube, barium meal of the upper gastrointestinal tract was done, showing abdominal organs in the left half of the thorax and a significant shift of the mediastinum to the right. With an urgent upper medial laparotomy we accessed the abdominal cavity and made the correct diagnosis. An opening was shown in the rear part of the left hemi-diaphragm with thickened and edematous edges, approx. 6 cm in diameter with incarcerated content. The incarcerated abdominal organs (stomach, transversal colon, small intestine and spleen) gradually moved into the abdominal cavity. The opening was closed with nonresorptive sutures (TiCron) size 2-0 with aprevious control and ventilated expansion of the well-developed left lung. In postoperative course the acid-base balance quickly recovered, as well as the general state of the patient and radiography showed a good expansion and lucency of the lung parenchyma and a return of the mediastinum into the middle part of the thorax.

  18. Dynamic intermittent strain can rapidly impair ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Kallinowski, Friedrich; Baumann, Elena; Harder, Felix; Siassi, Michael; Mahn, Axel; Vollmer, Matthias; Morlock, Michael M

    2015-11-26

    Ventral hernia repair fails frequently despite advanced mesh inserting surgery. A model for dynamic intermittent straining (DIS) of ventral hernia repairs was developed. The influence of phospholipids, position, overlap, fixation and tissue quality of various meshes on the durability of hernia repair was studied. DIS comprises the repetition of submaximal impacts delivered via a hydraulically driven plastic containment. Pig tissues simulate a ventral hernia with a standardized 5cm defect. Commercially available meshes strengthened with tacks, glue and sutures were used to bridge this defect in an underlay (IPOM) or sublay (retromuscular) position starting with a 5cm overlap in all directions. We tested 35 different ways of ventral hernia repair with up to 425 submaximal intermittent dynamic impacts until mesh dislocation occurred 10 times or a maximum of 4000 impacts each were withstood. The likelihood of a failing repair was related to the mesh, the lubricants, the position, the overlap, the fixation and the tissue quality. Most meshes dislocated easily and required fixation. One of the meshes tested was stable without fixation with a 5cm overlap and failed after reducing the overlap. Phospholipids exerted a strong influence on the biomaterial tested. The sublay position was about 10% more durable in comparison to the IPOM position. DIS revealed distinct degrees of stability with primarily stable, intermediate and primarily unstable repairs. Based on the DIS results available, the currently used ventral hernia repair options can be classified. In the future, DIS investigations can improve the durability of hernia repair.

  19. A prospective study of bilateral inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, J. W.; Johnson, C. D.; Jarrett, P. E.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of outcome after inguinal hernia repair in patients undergoing simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias (n = 31), sequential repair of bilateral hernias (n = 5), and unilateral hernia repair (n = 75) is reported. There were no differences in wound complications, post-operative respiratory complications, or other adverse effects in the three groups. Operating time was similar in the unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs (median 55 min), but was longer (100 min) for the combination of two sequential repairs. Hospital stay was shortest for patients undergoing unilateral repair (2 days) but was less with bilateral simultaneous repair (4 days) than after two sequential repairs (total of 6 days). There were 12 (11%) wound complications of which five (5%) were infections. There was no difference in complication rate between unilateral and bilateral hernia repair. Postoperative recovery was assessed prospectively and was recorded at 1 month. There was no difference between unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs in the number of days before the patient was able to climb stairs easily, drive a car or return to work. The duration of the requirement for analgesia was similar in each group. We conclude that bilateral simultaneous hernia repair can be carried out with no greater morbidity than a unilateral repair, and the return to normal activity is as rapid. Bilateral hernias should be repaired simultaneously rather than sequentially. PMID:2221764

  20. Amyand hernia: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Cárdenas, Adrián; Ploneda-Valencia, César Felipe; Sainz-Escárrega, Victor Hugo; Hernández-Campos, Alvaro Cuauhtemoc; Navarro-Muñiz, Eliseo; López-Lizarraga, Carlos René; Bautista-López, Carlos Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Amyand Hernia is a rare disease seen in approximately 1% of all hernias, complications of it, like acute appendicitis, or perforated appendicitis are even more rare, about 0.1%. Its diagnosis is very difficult in the pre-operative period; it is usually an incidental finding. Presentation of case This paper describes the case of a forty-year-old male patient, which was presented to the outpatient clinic of surgery with an incarcerated right side inguinal hernia without any signs of ischemic complications. He was admitted, and an hernioplasty was performed, as an incidental finding we encountered an Amyand hernia treated without appendectomy and placement of a prosthetic mesh without any complications. Discussion This disease represents a very challenging diagnosis, seven years ago the standardization of management had already been established; in this case we encountered a type 1 Amyand's Hernia so we performed a standard tension free hernioplasty without complications. Conclusion Amyand hernia is a rare condition, which represents two of the most common diseases a general surgeon has to face. Standardization of treatment is still ongoing and more prospective studies need to be done. This case demonstrates that this pathology must remain in the mind of the surgeons especially in the event of a strangulated hernia and offer a comprehensive review. PMID:25941568

  1. Recessive and Dominant Mutations in Retinoic Acid Receptor Beta in Cases with Microphthalmia and Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Srour, Myriam; Chitayat, David; Caron, Véronique; Chassaing, Nicolas; Bitoun, Pierre; Patry, Lysanne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capo-Chichi, José-Mario; Francannet, Christine; Calvas, Patrick; Ragge, Nicola; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Hamdan, Fadi F.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Tremblay, André; Michaud, Jacques L.

    2013-01-01

    Anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia, pulmonary hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and cardiac defects are the main features of PDAC syndrome. Recessive mutations in STRA6, encoding a membrane receptor for the retinol-binding protein, have been identified in some cases with PDAC syndrome, although many cases have remained unexplained. Using whole-exome sequencing, we found that two PDAC-syndrome-affected siblings, but not their unaffected sibling, were compound heterozygous for nonsense (c.355C>T [p.Arg119∗]) and frameshift (c.1201_1202insCT [p.Ile403Serfs∗15]) mutations in retinoic acid receptor beta (RARB). Transfection studies showed that p.Arg119∗ and p.Ile403Serfs∗15 altered RARB had no transcriptional activity in response to ligands, confirming that the mutations induced a loss of function. We then sequenced RARB in 15 subjects with anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia and at least one other feature of PDAC syndrome. Surprisingly, three unrelated subjects with microphthalmia and diaphragmatic hernia showed de novo missense mutations affecting the same codon; two of the subjects had the c.1159C>T (Arg387Cys) mutation, whereas the other one carried the c.1159C>A (p.Arg387Ser) mutation. We found that compared to the wild-type receptor, p.Arg387Ser and p.Arg387Cys altered RARB induced a 2- to 3-fold increase in transcriptional activity in response to retinoic acid ligands, suggesting a gain-of-function mechanism. Our study thus suggests that both recessive and dominant mutations in RARB cause anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia and diaphragmatic hernia, providing further evidence of the crucial role of the retinoic acid pathway during eye development and organogenesis. PMID:24075189

  2. Genetic causes of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Julia; Yu, Lan; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a moderately prevalent birth defect that, despite advances in neonatal care, is still a significant cause of infant death, and surviving patients have significant morbidity. The goal of ongoing research to elucidate the genetic causes of CDH is to develop better treatment and ultimately prevention. CDH is a complex developmental defect that is etiologically heterogeneous. This review summarizes the recurrent genetic causes of CDH including aneuploidies, chromosome copy number variants, and single gene mutations. It also discusses strategies for genetic evaluation and genetic counseling in an era of rapidly evolving technologies in clinical genetic diagnostics. PMID:25447988

  3. Genetic aspects of human congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pober, BR

    2010-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common major malformation affecting 1/3000–1/4000 births, which continues to be associated with significant perinatal mortality. Much current research is focused on elucidating the genetics and pathophysiology contributing to CDH to develop more effective therapies. The latest data suggest that many cases of CDH are genetically determined and also indicate that CDH is etiologically heterogeneous. The present review will provide a brief summary of diaphragm development and model organism work most relevant to human CDH and will primarily describe important human phenotypes associated with CDH and also provide recommendations for diagnostic evaluation of a fetus or infant with CDH. PMID:18510546

  4. Sportsman’s hernia? An ambiguous term

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption. PMID:27026822

  5. Spigelian hernias: repair and outcome for 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Larson, David W; Farley, David R

    2002-10-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare partial abdominal wall defect. The frequent lack of physical findings along with vague associated abdominal complaints makes the diagnosis elusive. A retrospective review of Mayo Clinic patients was performed to find all patients who had undergone surgical repair of a Spigelian hernia from 1976 to 1997. Patients were scrutinized for presentation, work-up, therapy, and outcome. The goal of this study was to obtain long-term outcome. The study was set in a tertiary referral center. There were 76 patients in whom 81 Spigelian hernias were repaired. Symptoms most commonly included an intermittent mass (n = 29), pain (n = 20), pain with a mass (n = 22), and bowel obstruction (n = 5). Five patients were asymptomatic. Preoperative imaging was performed in 21 patients and correctly diagnosed the hernia in 15. Spigelian hernias were repaired by primary suture closure (n = 75), mesh (n = 5), and laparoscopic (n = 1) techniques. Eight patients (10%) required emergent operations. Thirteen hernias (17%) were found to be incarcerated at the time of the operation. Overall mean follow-up for the 76 patients was 8 years, with three hernia recurrences identified. Spigelian hernia is rare and requires a high index of suspicion given the lack of consistent symptoms and signs. An astute physician may couple a proper history and physical examination with preoperative imaging to secure the diagnosis. Mesh and laparoscopic repairs are viable alternatives to the durable results of standard primary closure. Given the high rate of incarceration/strangulation, the diagnosis of Spigelian hernia is an indication for surgical repair.

  6. Postoperative interstitial hernia as a cause of obscure incisional wound site pain.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Smietański, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    An interstitial hernia is one in which the hernia sac is located between the layers of the abdominal wall. The analysis of contemporary literature shows that interstitial hernias are most often seen in children as a type of inguinal hernia and often accompany undescended testis. The hernia sac is usually located between the external-oblique and internal-oblique muscles in a lateral-cephalic direction. The authors present 3 cases of interstitial hernia found during laparoscopic exploration of the front abdominal wall done due to incisional wound site pain. No previous diagnosis of hernia was considered in all the cases. Hernias were found as complications of appendectomy and wound healing after radiotherapy of uterine and cervical cancer. In conclusion, in obscure wound site pain, the presence of an interstitial postoperative hernia should be considered as a possible reason for the complaint. Laparoscopic examination of the anterior abdominal wall during adhesiolysis in patients with abdominal pain enables proper diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Unusual findings in inguinal hernia surgery: Report of 6 rare cases

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, K; Kontoulis, Th; Skouras, Ch; Triantafyllou, A; Symeonidis, N; Pavlidis, Th; Marakis, G; Sakadamis, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and aim: To present our experience with unexpected findings during hernia surgery, either unusual hernial contents or pathologic entities, like neoplastic masses, masquerading as a hernia. Patients and methods: We studied retrospectively 856 patients with inguinal hernia who were admitted to our surgical department over a 9-year period. In addition, our study included patients complaining of inguinal protrusion, even without a definitive diagnosis of inguinal hernia upon admission. Results: Five patients presented with unusual hernial contents. Three of them had a vermiform appendix in their sac. Acute appendicitis (Amyands hernia) was found in only one case. One patient had epiploic appendagitis related with a groin hernia. Moreover, an adult woman was diagnosed with ovarian and tubal inguinal hernia. Finally, we report a case of a massive extratesticular intrascrotal lipoma, initially misdiagnosed as a scrotal hernia. Conclusion: a hernia surgeon may encounter unexpected intraoperative findings. It is important to be prepared to detect them and apply the appropriate treatment. PMID:19918306

  8. Obturator hernia: An uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shreshtha, S

    2016-01-01

    A 70 year old lady presented to surgery emergency with small bowel obstruction without any obvious etiology. On exploration she was found to have an obstructed obturator hernia, which is a rare pelvic hernia with an incidence of 0.07-1.4% of all intra-abdominal hernias. Diagnosis is often delayed until laparotomy for bowel obstruction. Strangulation is frequent and mortality remains high (25%). Early diagnosis and surgical treatment contributes greatly to reduce the mortality and morbidity rates. A variety of techniques have been described, however surgical repair has not been standardized. It is an important diagnosis to be considered in elderly patients with intestinal obstruction. PMID:27763487

  9. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  10. Testicular atrophy as a consequence of inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Reid, I; Devlin, H B

    1994-01-01

    Testicular atrophy is an uncommon but well recognized complication of inguinal hernia repair and one that frequently results in litigation. A series of ten cases of testicular atrophy occurring after hernia repair in nine patients is presented. Identifiable risk factors were present in eight instances. Surgeons should make careful enquiries as to previous groin or scrotal surgery and, when indicated, warn the patient before surgery of the increased risk of testicular atrophy. Overzealous dissection of a distal hernia sac, dislocation of the testis from the scrotum into the wound and concomitant scrotal surgery should all be avoided.

  11. Congenital and acquired umbilical hernias: examination and treatment.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Many adults and children with painful swellings to the abdomen present to emergency departments (EDs) and are diagnosed with umbilical hernia. Some of these patients require urgent surgery because the hernia has become incarcerated or strangulated, while others can be discharged home safely. This article explains what an umbilical hernia is and what causes it, and discusses how the abdomen should be examined. The article also reviews potential management techniques in EDs and how nurse practitioners can explain the condition to the patients concerned.

  12. Inguinal endometriosis or irreducible hernia? A difficult preoperative diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, L; Settembre, A; Capasso, P; Piccolboni, D; De Rosa, N; Corcione, F

    2001-03-01

    Two cases of endometriosis infiltrating the round ligament and associated with an inguinal hernia are presented. The initial diagnosis was irreducible hernia, since this rare association often causes unusual preoperative symptoms and diagnostic problems. Diagnosis is frequently made by histologic examination. Surgery is the treatment of choice both for hernia and for endometriosis, and is locally curative. However, in a fertile woman with a painful mass in the inguinal region the possibility of endometriosis should be considered, and if suspected at inguinal exploration a laparoscopy should be made to rule out the presence of intraperitoneal endometriosis.

  13. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature.

  14. Incisional bladder hernia following appendectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shin; Miura, Emi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Toshiyuki

    2014-10-01

    We herein report the case of a 68-year-old male who presented with a few years' history of swelling at the scar of an appendectomy, which he had undergone nearly 40 years earlier, and which was associated with radiating pain towards the penis when he pushed on the swelling. The scar was located in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. Abdominal sonography and a computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated the presence of an incisional bladder hernia, and surgery was performed. The herniated bladder was successfully replaced into the preperitoneal space, and the orifice was covered with a polypropylene mesh. Most bladder hernias develop in the inguinal and/or femoral region, and an incisional bladder hernia is extremely rare, especially after abdominal surgery. To our knowledge, this is the fourth report of an incisional bladder hernia following abdominal surgery.

  15. Tumescent local anesthetic technique for inguinal hernia repairs

    PubMed Central

    Chyung, Ju Won; Kwon, Yujin; Cho, Dong Hui; Lee, Kyung Bok; Park, Sang Soo; Yoon, Jin; Jang, Yong Seog

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the adequacy and feasibility of a tumescent solution containing lidocaine and bupivacaine for inguinal hernia repairs. Methods The medical records of 146 consecutive inguinal hernia patients with 157 hernia repairs using the tumescent local anesthesia technique performed by a single surgeon between September 2009 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Results The mean operation time (±standard deviation) and hospital stay were 64.5 ± 17.6 minutes and 2.7 ± 1.5 days. The postoperative complication rate was 17.8%. There were four cases of recurrences (2.5%) at a mean follow-up of 24 ± 14 months. Conclusion Our results suggest that local anesthesia with the tumescent technique is an effective and safe modality for inguinal hernia repairs. PMID:25485241

  16. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  17. Gallstone ileus in an ‘asymptomatic’ parastomal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Jayamanne, H; Brown, J

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernias are common and often asymptomatic. We report the first known case in which later, acute symptoms developed owing to gallstone ileus in a sac containing both omentum and small bowel. Urgent computed tomography established the diagnosis. PMID:27241611

  18. Diaphragmatic hernia mimicking hydropneumothorax: common error in emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Magu, Sarita; Agarwal, Shalini; Jain, Nitin; Dalal, Nityasha

    2013-01-01

    Detection of diaphragmatic hernia in the acute setting is problematic and diagnosing diaphragmatic hernia as hydropneumothorax is not an uncommon mistake. We present a series of four such cases diagnosed over a 7-year period, from December 2004 to January 2011 and analyse them for how this mistake can be avoided. In case of all the patients reported by us the initial radiographs were technically compromised because the patient could not be positioned properly. Also they were examined by non-radiologists. We feel that treating surgeons in emergency department tend to overdiagnose pneumothorax as it is a life-threatening condition. We feel that in the appropriate setting suspicion of diaphragmatic hernia should be raised in patients having fractured ribs associated with homogenous opacity, which cannot be differentiated from the diaphragm. Evidence of loculation of hydropneumothorax in the appropriate setting should also raise the possibility of diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:23907963

  19. Laparoscopic Repair of a Traumatic Intrapericardial Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kuy, SreyRam; Weigelt, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia is a rare injury. We present a case of an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia from blunt trauma. In this report we will review the current literature and also describe the first report of a primary laparoscopic repair of the defect. Case Description: A 38-year-old unrestrained male passenger had blunt chest and abdominal trauma from a motor vehicle collision. Two months later, on a computed tomography scan, he was found to have an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia. The defect was repaired primarily through a laparoscopic approach. Discussion: Symptoms of intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia are chest pain, upper abdominal pain, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Chest computed tomography is the most useful diagnostic test to define the defect. Even when the injury is diagnosed late, laparoscopy can be used for primary and patch repair. PMID:24960502

  20. [Fetal magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Sebastià, C; Garcia, R; Gomez, O; Paño, B; Nicolau, C

    2014-01-01

    A diaphragmatic hernia is defined as the protrusion of abdominal viscera into the thoracic cavity through a normal or pathological orifice. The herniated viscera compress the lungs, resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension, which are the leading causes of neonatal death in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is diagnosed by sonography in routine prenatal screening. Although magnetic resonance imaging is fundamentally used to determine whether the liver is located within the abdomen or has herniated into the thorax, it also can provide useful information about other herniated structures and the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia. The aim of this article is to review the fetal magnetic resonance findings for congenital diaphragmatic hernia and the signs that enable us to establish the neonatal prognosis when evaluating pulmonary hypoplasia.

  1. Sir Ganga Ram Hospital classification of groin and ventral abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    Chowbey, Pradeep K; Khullar, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Magan; Sharma, Anil; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Background: Numerous classifications for groin and ventral hernias have been proposed over the past five to six decades. The old, simple classification of groin hernia in to direct, inguinal and femoral components is no longer adequate to understand the complex pathophysiology and management of these hernias. The most commonly followed classification for ventral hernias divide them into congenital, acquired, incisional and traumatic, which also does not convey any information regarding the predicted level of difficulty. Aim: All the previous classification systems were based on open hernia repairs and have their own fallacies particularly for uncommon hernias that cannot be classified in these systems. With the advent of laparoscopic/ endoscopic approach, surgical access to the hernia as well as the functional anatomy viewed by the surgeon changed. This change in the surgical approach and functional anatomy opened the doors for newer classifications. The authors have thus proposed a classification system based on the expected level of intraoperative difficulty for endoscopic hernia repair. Classification: In the proposed classification higher grades signify increasing levels of expected intraoperative difficulty. This functional classification grades groin hernias according to the: a) Pre -operative predictive level of difficulty of endoscopic surgery, and b) Intraoperative factors that lead to a difficult repair. Pre operative factors include multiple or pantaloon hernias, recurrent hernias, irreducible and incarcerated hernias. Intraoperative factors include reducibility at operation, degree of descent of the hernial sac and previous hernia repairs. Hernial defects greater than 7 cm in diameter are categorized one grade higher. Conclusion: Though there have been several classification systems for groin or inguinal hernias, none have been described for total classification of all ventral hernias of the abdomen. The system proposed by us includes all abdominal wall

  2. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Harihar, Vivek; Kothudum, Ashwini Rajareddy; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism.

  3. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  4. Laparoscopic Repair of Sportman's Hernia - The Trinidad Experience.

    PubMed

    Gopeesingh, Anyl; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Seetahal, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Sportman's hernia: (Athletic pubalgia) is an uncommon and poorly understood condition afflicting athletic individuals. Sufferers complain of chronic groin pain and often present diagnostic dilemmas to physicians and physiotherapists. We present a series of cases illustrating the varying presentations of sportman's hernia and diagnostic approaches that can be utilized to exclude common differentials. We also describe laparoscopic mesh repair as an effective treatment option for this condition.

  5. Tissue Expanders in Skin Deficient Ventral Hernias Utilizing Component Separation

    PubMed Central

    Molinar, Vanessa E.; Molinar, Alonso; Palladino, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Skin deficient complex ventral hernias are complicated surgical cases that have multimodal approaches. There is no current consensus on the management of those patients who also have concomitant stomas or enterocutaneous fistula. We present 2 cases in which the senior authors were able to apply tissue expanders above and between the abdominal wall in patients with an enterocutaneous fistula or stoma. After expansion and final closure, the patients did not experience recurrent hernias. PMID:26893988

  6. Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia in children: Diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, O.; Mustapha, H.; Ndoye, N. A.; Faye Fall, A. L.; Ngom, G.; Ndoye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia is rare in children. Its diagnosis can be difficult in the acute phase of trauma because its signs are not specific, especially in a poly trauma context. We report two cases of traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia following a blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, highlighting some difficulties in establishing an early diagnosis and the need for a high index of suspicion. PMID:25659563

  7. Small bowel strangulation due to peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 75-year-old Korean man was referred to our hospital with cramping abdominal pain. His chest X-ray showed an abnormal air shadow above the diaphragm, and computed tomography showed an abdominal viscera in the pericardium. We performed surgery and confirmed peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia with small bowel strangulation. Postoperative course was uneventful. Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia is very rare in humans, so we report the case with a literature review. PMID:24694166

  8. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40–132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain. PMID:27635414

  9. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Takeshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40-132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain.

  10. Complications of groin hernia repair: their prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Gaines, R D

    1978-03-01

    An estimated overall complication rate of approximately ten percent is found in the half million patients who annually undergo groin hernia repair in the United States. Certain features in the operative technique are emphasized which should prevent many of these complications.Intraoperative complications during the groin hernia repair are primarily hemorrhage and injury to the vas deferens, the three nerves in the area, the vascular supply of the testis, and the abdominal and pelvic viscera. Miscellaneous intraoperative complications relate to problems associated with the repair of massive hernias, missed hernia, and the loss of strangulated bowel into the abdominal cavity.Early postoperative complications may be either systemic or local with cardiac and respiratory conditions comprising the former group. The early local complications are primarily wound problems of infection, hematoma formation, and scrotal swelling involving the skin and testis. High ligation in excision of the sac in all hernias, repair of the defect in the plane of its occurrence, and suture of fascia to fascia in the same plane without tension are the basic tenets of inguinal hernia repair which should result in a low incidence of recurrence.The most effective prophylactic measures necessary for the prevention of complications considered are a thorough knowledge of inguinofemoral anatomy, mature surgical judgment, and meticulous surgical technique.

  11. Intestinal Obstruction due to Bilateral Strangulated Femoral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Oderuth, Eshan; Ntakomyti, Eleni; Kald, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Femoral hernias are at high risk of strangulation due to the narrow femoral canal and femoral ring. This can lead to symptoms of obstruction or strangulation requiring emergency surgery and possible bowel resection. To our knowledge, there is only one previous published report of bilateral strangulated femoral hernia. We present our case of this phenomenon. Case Report. An 86-year-old woman presented with symptoms of small bowel obstruction. Examination revealed two tender lumps in the area of the femoral triangle. CT scan revealed bilateral femoral hernias. Both hernias were repaired and a small bowel resection on the right side was performed with side to side anastomosis. She made an uneventful recovery. Conclusion. Bilateral femoral hernias are a rare occurrence with only one reported case of bilateral strangulation. Our case highlights the importance of meticulous history taking and clinical examination as any delay in diagnosis will increase the risk of mortality and morbidity for the patient. Hernias should always be considered as a cause if one presents with symptoms of abdominal pain or obstruction. PMID:25057426

  12. Comparative Study of Prolene Hernia System and Lichtenstein Method for Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Badkur, Mayank

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolene Hernia System (PHS) is a bi-layered polypropylene mesh with a connector that combines the anterior and posterior inguinal hernia repair, but still not very popular in this part of the country. Hence a prospective & randomized comparative study was undertaken to compare PHS with the already popular Lichtenstein Hernia Repair (LHR) and determine the post-operative outcome. Materials and Methods Total 67 inguinal hernia repairs were randomly assigned to either PHS or LHR method, and data was collected regarding various outcome measures like duration of surgery, post-operative pain, requirement of analgesia, return to normal activity, and early and late complications. Results Mean duration of surgery was significantly higher for PHS group than LHR group (65.4 min vs 51.26 min, p-value <0.0001). Significant difference was noted between the PHS and LHR group in terms of moderate to severe post-operative pain (15.15% vs 41.18%,p-value 0.018), time of requirement of analgesia (3.7 vs 4.6 days, p-value 0.024), and time to return to normal activity (2.7 vs 3.4 days, p-value 0.023), all in favour of the former technique. No intra-operative complication was noted in either of the groups. 5 patients had early complications in PHS group and 6 in LHR group, but this was statistically not significant. The average time of follow-up for the study was 7.8 month, ranging from 1 to 18 months. Chronic inguinal pain was noted in 1 and 2 patients respectively in PHS and LHR group, again statistically not significant. No recurrence was noted in both the groups till the time of follow-up. Conclusion PHS is a safe and better alternative to the time honored Lichtenstein hernia repair with the added advantage of strengthening whole of myopectineal orifice, and virtually eliminating any risk of recurrence. PMID:26266158

  13. Inguinal hernia repair: are the results from a general hospital comparable to those from dedicated hernia centres?

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Kai Xiong; Lo, Hong Yee; Neo, Jun Xiang Andy; Appasamy, Vijayan; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We aimed to report the outcomes of inguinal hernia repair performed at Tan Tock Seng Hospital and compare them with those performed at dedicated hernia centres. METHODS We retrospectively analysed the medical records and telephone interviews of 520 patients who underwent inguinal hernia repair in 2010. RESULTS The majority of the patients were male (498 [95.8%] men vs. 22 [4.2%] women). The mean age was 59.9 ± 15.7 years. Most patients (n = 445, 85.6%) had unilateral hernias (25.8% direct, 64.3% indirect, 9.9% pantaloon). The overall recurrence rate was 3.8%, with a mean time to recurrence of 12.0 ± 8.6 months. Risk factors for recurrence included contaminated wounds (odds ratio [OR] 50.325; p = 0.004), female gender (OR 8.757; p = 0.003) and pantaloon hernias (OR 5.059; p = 0.013). Complication rates were as follows: chronic pain syndrome (1.2%), hypoaesthesia (5.2%), wound dehiscence (0.4%), infection (0.6%), haematoma/seroma (4.8%), urinary retention (1.3%) and intraoperative visceral injury (0.6%). Most procedures were open repairs (67.7%), and laparoscopic repair constituted 32.3% of all the inguinal hernia repairs. Open repairs resulted in longer operating times than laparoscopic repairs (86.6 mins vs. 71.6 mins; p < 0.001), longer hospital stays (2.7 days vs. 0.7 days; p = 0.020) and a higher incidence of post-repair hypoaesthesia (6.8% vs. 1.8%; p = 0.018). However, there were no significant differences in recurrence or other complications between open and laparoscopic repair. CONCLUSION A general hospital with strict protocols and teaching methodologies can achieve inguinal hernia repair outcomes comparable to those of dedicated hernia centres. PMID:24763834

  14. Gallstone ileus obstructing within an incarcerated lumbar hernia: an unusual presentation of a rare diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziesmann, Markus Tyler; Alotaiby, Nouf; Abbasi, Thamer Al; Rezende-Neto, Joao B

    2014-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with signs and symptoms of small-bowel obstruction and a clinically appreciable, irreducible, left-sided lumbar hernia associated with previous iliac crest bone graft harvesting. Palpation of the hernia demonstrated a small, firm mass within the loops of herniated bowel. CT scanning recognised an intraluminal gallstone at the transition point, establishing the diagnosis of gallstone ileus within an incarcerated lumbar hernia. The proposed explanatory mechanism is that of a gallstone migrating into an easily reducible hernia containing small bowel causing obstruction at the hernia neck by a ball-valve mechanism, resulting in proximal bowel dilation and thus hernia incarceration; it remains unclear when the stone entered the hernia, and whether it enlarged in situ or prior to entering the enteral tract. This is only the second reported instance in the literature of an intraluminal gallstone causing hernia incarceration. PMID:25471112

  15. Gallstone ileus obstructing within an incarcerated lumbar hernia: an unusual presentation of a rare diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ziesmann, Markus Tyler; Alotaiby, Nouf; Al Abbasi, Thamer; Rezende-Neto, Joao B

    2014-12-03

    We describe an unusual case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with signs and symptoms of small-bowel obstruction and a clinically appreciable, irreducible, left-sided lumbar hernia associated with previous iliac crest bone graft harvesting. Palpation of the hernia demonstrated a small, firm mass within the loops of herniated bowel. CT scanning recognised an intraluminal gallstone at the transition point, establishing the diagnosis of gallstone ileus within an incarcerated lumbar hernia. The proposed explanatory mechanism is that of a gallstone migrating into an easily reducible hernia containing small bowel causing obstruction at the hernia neck by a ball-valve mechanism, resulting in proximal bowel dilation and thus hernia incarceration; it remains unclear when the stone entered the hernia, and whether it enlarged in situ or prior to entering the enteral tract. This is only the second reported instance in the literature of an intraluminal gallstone causing hernia incarceration.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions SHORT syndrome short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething delay Enable Javascript to ... Close All Description Short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething delay , commonly known by ...

  17. De Garengeot's Hernia: Two Case Reports with Correct Preoperative Identification of the Vermiform Appendix in the Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Muhammad Rafiz; Nnajiuba, Henry; Samlalsingh, Suzette; Ojo, Akinyede

    2016-01-01

    We present two cases of incarcerated de Garengeot's hernia. This anatomical phenomenon is thought to occur in as few as 0.5% of femoral hernia cases and is a rare cause of acute appendicitis. Risk factors include a long pelvic appendix, abnormal embryological bowel rotation, and a large mobile caecum. In earlier reports operative treatment invariably involves simultaneous appendicectomy and femoral hernia repair. Both patients were correctly diagnosed preoperatively with computed tomography (CT). Both had open femoral hernia repair, one with appendectomy and one with the appendix left in situ. Both patients recovered without complications. Routine diagnostic imaging modalities such as ultrasonography and standard CT have previously shown little success in identifying de Garengeot's hernia preoperatively. We believe this to be the first documented case of CT with concurrent oral and intravenous contrast being used to confidently and correctly diagnose de Garengeot's hernia prior to surgery. We hope that this case report adds to the growing literature on this condition, which will ultimately allow for more detailed case-control studies and systematic reviews in order to establish gold-standard diagnostic studies and optimal surgical management in future. PMID:28070438

  18. Genetic Factors in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Holder, A. M.; Klaassens, M.; Tibboel, D.; de Klein, A.; Lee, B.; Scott, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a relatively common birth defect associated with high mortality and morbidity. Although the exact etiology of most cases of CDH remains unknown, there is a growing body of evidence that genetic factors play an important role in the development of CDH. In this review, we examine key findings that are likely to form the basis for future research in this field. Specific topics include a short overview of normal and abnormal diaphragm development, a discussion of syndromic forms of CDH, a detailed review of chromosomal regions recurrently altered in CDH, a description of the retinoid hypothesis of CDH, and evidence of the roles of specific genes in the development of CDH. PMID:17436238

  19. A Survey of Fuzzy Logic and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Amount of Heat to be Applied ............... 21 10. Symptoms of Patients With Hiatal Hernia ............................................. 35 11. Symptoms...patients numbered 1 through 57 all have hiatal hernia , while the others, numbered 58 through 107, suffer from gallstones. In Tables 10 and 11, which list...least 20 lb in 6 mos.) 11. Persistence of pain (at least 1 month in length). Table 10. Symptoms of Patients With Hiatal Hernia Patient Symptoms 1 0 1

  20. Management of a large abdominal aortic aneurysm in conjunction with a massive inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Wartman, Sarah M; Woo, Karen; Brewer, Michael; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-04-04

    The majority of inguinal hernias that are concomitant with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are clinically insignificant. However, management of AAA associated with a complex hernia can be challenging. We report a case of a 72-year-old male with a 7 cm AAA and a massive inguinal hernia involving loss of abdominal domain. Using a multidisciplinary approach, a staged hybrid endovascular and open repair of the AAA was performed followed by hernia repair.

  1. Discal hernia in children and teenagers: medical, surgical and recovery treatment.

    PubMed

    Burnei, G; Gavriliu, S; Vlad, C; Georgescu, Ileana; Hurmuz, Lucia; Hodorogea, D

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar disc hernia represents a rare situation for the physician. The first intervention in disc hernia was performed during the '40. The rate of surgery needing lumbar hernia is about 1-2%. Lumbar disc hernia in children and teenagers has 4 main causes: familial history, trauma, congenital malformation of the spine and disc degeneration. The symptoms in young patients are dominated by local or ischiadic irradiated pain, but neurological discrepancies rarely occur.

  2. Asymptomatic extraperitoneal inguinoscrotal hernia involving ureter: A case presentation and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Falidas, Evangelos; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Veloudis, George; Exarchou, Elena; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Villias, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    An inguinoscrotal hernia is a common disorder that usually contains intraperitoneal organs (small intestine, colon, appendix, ovaries). Extraperitoneal ureteral herniation into an inguinoscrotal hernia is a rare condition and often associated with congenital abnormalities or postoperative anatomic changes. A high index of suspicion is needed in order to avoid intraoperative ureteric injuries. We herein report the case of a ureteric herniation into an inguinoscrotal hernia incidentally found during a scheduled hernia repair. PMID:26604607

  3. Bochdalek hernia presenting with initial local fat infiltration of the thoracic cavity in a leukemic child.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhen; Min, Xiangde; Wang, Liang

    2017-03-01

    Local fat infiltration of the thoracic cavity is a rare initial presentation of Bochdalek hernia. We report a case of Bochdalek hernia in a child with leukemia that demonstrated initial local fat infiltration of the thoracic cavity on computed tomography scan and progressed to an obvious diaphragmatic hernia on subsequent follow-up. We suggest that initial local fat infiltration of the thoracic cavity on computed tomography scan may indicate a potential diaphragmatic hernia.

  4. Pericecal hernia manifesting as a small bowel obstruction successfully treated with laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ogami, Takuya; Honjo, Hirotaka; Kusanagi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A pericecal hernia is a type of internal hernia, which rarely causes small bowel obstruction (SBO). At our institution, a 92-year-old man presented with vomiting and abdominal pain. He was conservatively treated with a diagnosis of SBO. After 2 weeks of copious drainage output, he was taken to the operating room. Laparoscopy revealed a pericecal hernia that was successfully reduced. We conclude that laparoscopic surgery is an effective way to treat SBOs secondary to pericecal hernias. PMID:26933000

  5. Cystogram with dumbbell shaped urinary bladder in a sliding inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Mahadevappa, Basant; Suresh, Sumanth Channapatna; Natarajan, K; Thomas, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias present with various symptoms and these are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. Case reports and series have been published with various organs and rare organs being part of the hernia. Urinary bladder is a known content of sliding hernias. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a picturesque manner and the importance of radiological investigations for pre-surgical evaluation.

  6. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia: Three-Case Presentation and the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Godazandeh, Gholamali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Morgagni hernia is a rare form of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case Presentation. We present three cases of Morgagni hernia with GI symptoms treated by laparoscopic surgery. Discussion. Hernial sac was excised in two cases and left in situ in one case. There was no recurrence in symptoms after 30 months from surgery. PMID:27957378

  7. Management of strangulated abdominal wall hernias with mesh; early results

    PubMed Central

    Ozbagriacik, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Basak, Fatih; Sisik, Abdullah; Acar, Aylin; Kudas, Ilyas; Yucel, Metin; Ozpek, Adnan; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgery for abdominal wall hernias is a common procedure in general surgery practice. The main causes of delay for the operation are comorbid problems and patient unwillingness, which eventually, means that some patients are admitted to emergency clinics with strangulated hernias. In this report, patients who admitted to the emergency department with strangulated adominal wall hernias are presented together with their clinical management. METHODS: Patients who admitted to our clinic between January 2009 and November 2011 and underwent emergency operation were included in the study retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, hernia type, length of hospital stay, surgical treatment and complications were assessed. RESULTS: A total 81 patients (37 female, 44 male) with a mean age of 52.1±17.64 years were included in the study. Inguinal, femoral, umbilical and incisional hernias were detected in 40, 26, 9 and 6 patients respectively. Polypropylene mesh was used in 75 patients for repair. Primary repair without mesh was used in six patients. Small bowel (n=10; 12.34%), omentum (n=19; 23.45%), appendix (n=1; 1.2%) and Meckel’s diverticulum (n=1; 1.2%) were resected. Median length of hospital stay was 2 (1–7) days. Surgical site infection was detected in five (6.2%) patients. No significant difference was detected for length of hospital stay and surgical site infection in patients who had mesh repair (p=0.232 and 0.326 respectively). CONCLUSION: The need for bowel resection is common in strangulated abdominal wall hernias which undergo emergency operation. In the present study, an increase of morbidity was seen in patients who underwent bowel resection. No morbidity was detected related to the usage of prosthetic materials in repair of hernias. Hence, we believe that prosthetic materials can be used safely in emergency cases. PMID:28058336

  8. Laparoscopic Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satendra; Afaque, Yusuf; Bhartia, Abhishek Kumar; Bhartia, Vishnu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background, Aims, and Objectives. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia typically presents in childhood but in adults is extremely rare entity. Surgery is indicated for symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who are fit for surgery. It can be done by laparotomy, thoracotomy, thoracoscopy, or laparoscopy. With the advent of minimal access techniques, the open surgical repair for this hernia has decreased and results are comparable with early recovery and less hospital stay. The aim of this study is to establish that laparoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study of laparoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair done during May 2011 to Oct 2014. Total n = 13 (M/F: 11/2) cases of confirmed diaphragmatic hernia on CT scan, 4 cases Bochdalek hernia (BH), 8 cases of left eventration of the diaphragm (ED), and one case of right-sided eventration of the diaphragm (ED) were included in the study. Largest defect found on the left side was 15 × 6 cm and on the right side it was 15 × 8 cm. Stomach, small intestine, transverse colon, and omentum were contents in the hernial sac. The contents were reduced with harmonic scalpel and thin sacs were usually excised. The eventration was plicated and hernial orifices were repaired with interrupted horizontal mattress sutures buttressed by Teflon pieces. A composite mesh was fixed with nonabsorbable tackers. All patients had good postoperative recovery and went home early with normal follow-up and were followed up for 2 years. Conclusion. The laparoscopic repair is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment for congenital diaphragmatic hernia in experienced hands. PMID:28074156

  9. [A Case of Abdominal Wall Hernia Rupture during Bevacizumab Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuaki; Hirose, Sou; Michiura, Toshiya; Fujita, Shigeo; Yamabe, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Satoru; Nagaoka, Makio

    2015-11-01

    A 78 -year-old man with rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced wound infection, leading to an abdominal wall hernia. Two years following surgery, a rise in the serum CEA level was seen. A metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. VATS right lung inferior lobe segmental resection was performed. After lobectomy, the serum CEA level continued to increase. Another metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab was commenced. The erosive part of the abdominal wall scar hernia extended during the nine weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was then discontinued. In the follow-up CT scan, a right pleural recurrence, local recurrence in the pelvis, and a liver metastasis were detected. Chemotherapy was re-introduced 3 years after surgery. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia again began to spread with chemotherapy recommencement. Four months after restarting chemotherapy, the hernia ruptured, with a loop of the small intestine protruding out of it. The patient covered this with a sheet of vinyl and was taken by the ambulance to our hospital. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia had split by 10 cm, and a loop of the small intestine was protruding. As ischemia of the small intestine was not observed, we replaced it into the abdominal cavity, and performed a temporary suture repair of the hernia sac. Following this, bevacizumab was discontinued, and the erosive part reduced. We performed a radical operation for abdominal wall scar hernia repair 11 weeks after the discontinuation of bevacizumab.

  10. Open tension free repair of inguinal hernias; the Lichtenstein technique

    PubMed Central

    Sakorafas, George H; Halikias, Ioannis; Nissotakis, Christos; Kotsifopoulos, Nikolaos; Stavrou, Alexios; Antonopoulos, Constantinos; Kassaras, George A

    2001-01-01

    Background Recurrences have been a significant problem following hernia repair. Prosthetic materials have been increasingly used in hernia repair to prevent recurrences. Their use has been associated with several advantages, such as less postoperative pain, rapid recovery, low recurrence rates. Methods In this retrospective study, 540 tension-free inguinal hernia repairs were performed between August 1994 and December 1999 in 510 patients, using a polypropylene mesh (Lichtenstein technique). The main outcome measure was early and late morbidity and especially recurrence. Results Inguinal hernia was indirect in 55 % of cases (297 patients), direct in 30 % (162 patients) and of the pantaloon (mixed) type in 15 % (81 patients). Mean patient age was 53.7 years (range, 18 – 85). Follow-up was completed in 407 patients (80 %) by clinical examination or phone call. The median follow-up period was 3.8 years (range, 1 – 6 years). Seroma and hematoma formation requiring drainage was observed in 6 and 2 patients, respectively, while transient testicular swelling occurred in 5 patients. We have not observed acute infection or abscess formation related to the presence of the foreign body (mesh). In two patients, however, a delayed rejection of the mesh occurred 10 months and 4 years following surgery. There was one recurrence of the hernia (in one of these patients with late mesh rejection) (recurrence rate = 0.2 %). Postoperative neuralgia was observed in 5 patients (1 %). Conclusion Lichtenstein tension-free mesh inguinal hernia repair is a simple, safe, comfortable, effective method, with extremely low early and late morbidity and remarkably low recurrence rate and therefore it is our preferred method for hernia repair since 1994. PMID:11696246

  11. "Amyand's Hernia" – Pathophysiology, Role of Investigations and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    SINGAL, Rikki; GUPTA, Samita

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: In the present era, appendicitis and hernia are common problems but their presentations in different positions are rare to be seen. It is difficult to make diagnose pre-operatively of contents as appendicitis in obstructed hernia. The term "Amyand's hernia" was lost in the literature and we are describing its pathophysiology and management. The aggravating factors are: complex injuries related to hernia (size, degree of sliding, multiplicity, etc.), patient characteristics (age, activity, respiratory disease, dysuria, obesity, constipation). If not treated in the earliest stages then it can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Existing literature describes almost exclusively its pathophysiology, investigations and treatment. Material and Methods: We have focused on clinical presentation, radiological investigations and management of "Amyand's hernia". In literature, there is still confusion regarding investigations and treatment. We are presenting such rare entity managed in time without encountering any post-operative complications. Results: Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography are useful tests but clinical correlation is necessary in incarcerated appendix. Regarding treatment, it is clear that if appendix is inflamed then it should be removed, but we concluded that if appendix is found to be normal in obstructed hernia then it should also be removed due to possible later inflammation. Conclusion: If the appendix found in the hernial sac is inflamed then chances of mortality increase. Although emergency surgery is indicated in all obstructed hernias, morbidity and mortality can be decreased if operated on time. Early recognition and its awareness, along with good surgical technique in such cases are keys to success when dealing with this problem. PMID:22879848

  12. The lightweight and large porous mesh concept for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Junge, Karsten; Klinge, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    In modern hernia surgery, there are two competing mesh concepts which often lead to controversial discussions, on the one hand the heavyweight small porous model and on the other, the lightweight large porous hypothesis. The present review illustrates the rationale of both mesh concepts and compares experimental data with the first clinical data available. In summary, the lightweight large porous mesh philosophy takes into consideration all of the recent data regarding physiology and mechanics of the abdominal wall and inguinal region. Furthermore, the new mesh concept reveals an optimized foreign body reaction based on reduced amounts of mesh material and, in particular, a significantly decreased surface area in contact with the recipient host tissues by the large porous model. Finally, recent data demonstrate that alterations in the extracellular matrix of hernia patients play a crucial role in the development of hernia recurrence. In particular, long-term recurrences months or years after surgery and implantation of mesh can be explained by the extracellular matrix hypothesis. However, if the altered extracellular matrix proves to be the weak area, the decisive question is whether the amount of material as well as mechanical and tensile strength of the surgical mesh are really of significant importance for the development of recurrent hernia. All experimental evidence and first clinical data indicate the superiority of the lightweight large porous mesh concept with regard to a reduced number of long-term complications and particularly, increased comfort and quality of life after hernia repair.

  13. Amyand's Hernia with Appendicitis: A Case Report and Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa Cavalcante, Jéssica; Melo Teixeira Batista, Hermes; Cavalcante Pita Neto, Ivo; Fernandes Frutuoso, Jairo; Rodrigues Pinheiro, Woneska; Maria Pinheiro Bezerra, Italla; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; de Menezes Silveira, Gylmara Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Inguinal hernia is a common disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1.2% of the entire population and it is 12 times more common in males. Objective. To describe a case of appendix with signs of inflammation in the hernia sac, condition that is rare and difficult to diagnose, and to perform literature review, describing the most relevant aspects and the main controversies. Method. Report of a case and search in PubMed on June 1, 2015, using the terms “Appendix” [MeSH term] AND “hernia, inguinal” [MeSH term]. Results. The search resulted in 38 articles in total, and after deleting the articles that were not part of the inclusion criteria, there were 26 case reports remaining. Discussion. The search resulted in a total of 38 articles and after deleting the articles that were not part of the inclusion criteria, there were 26 case reports remaining. Conclusion. Amyand's hernia is a rare and difficult to diagnose condition, being commonly found occasionally in surgical procedures. It should be remembered in the presence of cases of incarcerated hernia, due to its possible complications if not diagnosed. PMID:26640737

  14. Definitive Surgical Treatment of Infected or Exposed Ventral Hernia Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Szczerba, Steven R.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To discuss the difficulties in dealing with infected or exposed ventral hernia mesh, and to illustrate one solution using an autogenous abdominal wall reconstruction technique. Summary Background Data The definitive treatment for any infected prosthetic material in the body is removal and substitution. When ventral hernia mesh becomes exposed or infected, its removal requires a solution to prevent a subsequent hernia or evisceration. Methods Eleven patients with ventral hernia mesh that was exposed, nonincorporated, with chronic drainage, or associated with a spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula were referred by their initial surgeons after failed local wound care for definitive management. The patients were treated with radical en bloc excision of mesh and scarred fascia followed by immediate abdominal wall reconstruction using bilateral sliding rectus abdominis myofascial advancement flaps. Results Four of the 11 patients treated for infected mesh additionally required a bowel resection. Transverse defect size ranged from 8 to 18 cm (average 13 cm). Average procedure duration was 3 hours without bowel repair and 5 hours with bowel repair. Postoperative length of stay was 5 to 7 days without bowel repair and 7 to 9 days with bowel repair. Complications included hernia recurrence in one case and stitch abscesses in two cases. Follow-up ranges from 6 to 54 months (average 24 months). Conclusions Removal of infected mesh and autogenous flap reconstruction is a safe, reliable, and one-step surgical solution to the problem of infected abdominal wall mesh. PMID:12616130

  15. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair with Suprapubic Incision

    PubMed Central

    Turingan, Isidro; Tran, Mai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery promises truly scarless surgery, this has not progressed beyond the experimental setting and a few clinical cases in the field of ventral hernia repair. This is mainly because of the problem of sterilizing natural orifices, which prevents the use of any prosthetic material because of unacceptable risks of infection. Single-incision laparoscopic ventral hernia repair has gained more widespread acceptance by specialized hernia centers. Even so, there is a special subset of patients who are young and/or scar conscious and find any visible scar unacceptable. This study illustrates an innovative way of performing single-incision laparoscopic ventral hernia repair by a transverse suprapubic incision below the pubic hair/bikini line in 2 young male patients who had both umbilical and epigastric hernias as well as attenuated linea alba in the upper abdomen. Case Description: Both patients underwent successful laparoscopic repair, and both were highly satisfied with the procedure, which produced no visible scars on their abdomen. Discussion: Willingness to adopt new innovative procedures, such as single-incision laparoscopic surgery, has allowed modification of the incision site to produce invisible scars and hence become highly attractive to the young and scar-phobic segment of the population. PMID:23925028

  16. Does inguinal hernia repair have an effect on sexual functions?

    PubMed Central

    Sonbahar, Bilgehan Çağdaş; Bora, Gül; Özalp, Necdet; Kara, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate sexual functions which are affected by inguinal hernias and may change after hernia repair surgery. Material and methods A total of 47 patients who underwent Lichtenstein tension-free anterior repair and inguinal hernia surgery were evaluated in terms of erectile function, intercourse function, sexual desire, overall satisfaction and orgasm satisfaction using the International Index of Erectile function questionnaire (IIEF) scoring system before surgery and in the first and sixth months after surgery. Parameters evaluated with the IIEF score before the surgery and in the first and sixth months after surgery were compared statistically using the Wilcoxon test. Results The average age of patients was 46.2 ±11.2 years (range: 22–67). It was determined that all scores, apart from sexual desire (p = 0.08), significantly increased in the postoperative first and sixth months compared to the preoperative period. It was measured that the preoperative sexual desire score increased significantly in the postoperative sixth month (p <0.001). A significant score was also detected when all scores in the postoperative sixth month were compared to the postoperative first month. Conclusions Inguinal hernia surgery positively affects sexual functions compared to the preoperative period. The improvement in sexual parameters in addition to the benefits of hernia removal and presence of no significant postoperative complications indicates that this surgery is useful and safe. PMID:27551560

  17. Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair With Fibrin Glue in Select Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Olmi; Luca, Saguatti; Claudio, Pagano; Giuseppe, Vittoria; Enrico, Croce

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective: Laparoscopic treatment of incisional hernias can be performed using different types of fixation devices and prosthesis. We present a case series of 19 patients with incisional hernias with a diameter of <6cm, who underwent laparoscopic repair using Hi-tex dual-side mesh, positioned intraperitoneally, fixed to the abdominal wall by fibrin glue (Tissucol). Methods: Nineteen patients with incisional hernias <6cm in diameter were enrolled in this study and treated laparoscopically with Hi-tex and Tissucol. Surgical complications and patient outcomes were assessed with a clinical follow-up. Results: Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias by using Hi-tex mesh affixed to the parietal wall with fibrin glue was feasible and easy in patients with parietal defects <6cm in diameter. Mean operating time was 30 minutes. Mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. Almost no postoperative pain, major surgical complications, seroma formation, relapses, or prosthesis infection occurred during a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: In select patients, Hi-tex mesh affixed using fibrin glue allows laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias with very good patient outcomes, especially in terms of postoperative pain and seroma formation. PMID:20932376

  18. Recurrent Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, I.C.; Ko, S.F.; Shieh, C.S.; Huang, C.F.; Chien, S.J.; Liang, C.D.

    2006-10-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) includes a group of connective tissue disorders with abnormal collagen metabolism and a diverse clinical spectrum. We report two siblings with EDS who both presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The elder sister suffered from recurrent diaphragmatic hernia twice and EDS was overlooked initially. Echocardiography as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed dilatation of the pulmonary artery, and marked elongation and tortuosity of the aorta and its branches. A diagnosis of EDS was eventually established when these findings were coupled with the clinical features of hyperelastic skin. Her younger brother also had similar features. This report emphasizes that EDS may present as CDH in a small child which could easily be overlooked. Without appropriate surgery, diaphragmatic hernia might occur. Echocardiographic screening is recommended in patients with CDH. Contrast-enhanced MRA can be helpful in delineation of abnormally tortuous aortic great vessels that are an important clue to the early diagnosis of EDS.

  19. [Some aspects of surgical treatment of postoperative ventral hernia].

    PubMed

    Lukomskiĭ, G I; Shulutko, A M; Antropova, N V; Moiseev, A Iu; El-Said, A Kh

    1995-01-01

    The results of surgical treatment of of 392 patients with postoperative ventral hernia are discussed. The algorithm of treatment of patients with large hernias was developed. Special preoperative management by dosed pneumocompression in an antioverload costume makes it possible to avoid menacing complications after the operation, which are caused by increased intraabdominal pressure. Test for tolerance to increase of intraabodominal pressure allowed prognostication of the character of the operative intervention: with or without decrease of the volume of the abdominal cavity (autoplasty or alloplasty, respectively). Prevention of wound complications consisted in control of infection, improvement of operative techniques, and use of modern surgical instruments. The prevention of recurrent hernias should be directed at correct choice of the method of plastics and removal of wound complications.

  20. Prospective analysis of ventral hernia repair using the Ventralight™ ST hernia patch.

    PubMed

    Tollens, Tim; Topal, Halit; Ovaere, Sander; Beunis, Anthony; Vermeiren, Koen; Aelvoet, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current prospective study was to show the results of a new type of medium-weight monofilament polypropylene mesh covered with a hydrogel barrier on the visceral side. Between July 2011 and April 2013 prospectively collected data on 30 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal wall hernia repair using a medium-weight mesh covered with carboxymethylcellulose-sodiumhyaluronate coating (Ventralight™ ST mesh, Davol Inc, Subsidary of C. R. Bard, Inc. Warwick, RI) were analyzed. Out of these patients, those who had a follow-up of at least 12 months were selected. Short- and long-term outcomes were described. Meanwhile, registration continues up to completion of a series with 100 included patients. A total of 17 patients were selected (men/women ratio 11/6). Median follow-up was 12 months (range 12-21). Mean hernia diameter was 7 cm x 5 cm (craniocaudal x laterolateral) (range 1.5 x 1.5 to 20 x 15). Mean length of hospital stay was 6.1 days. Postoperative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at last follow-up was significantly lower than the preoperative VAS (P = 0.017) There were no intraoperative complications. Four patients (23%) developed minor complications. Two patients had mild discomfort, another two patients developed a seroma. No recurrences were observed. This intermediate study shows good results using a biofilm coated mesh and confirm the positive results obtained in the Sasse clinical trial.

  1. Biologic Prosthesis Reduces Recurrence After Laparoscopic Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oelschlager, Brant K.; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Hunter, John; Soper, Nathaniel; Brunt, Michael; Sheppard, Brett; Jobe, Blair; Polissar, Nayak; Mitsumori, Lee; Nelson, James; Swanstrom, L

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair (LPEHR) is associated with a high recurrence rate. Repair with synthetic mesh lowers recurrence but can cause dysphagia and visceral erosions. This trial was designed to study the value of a biologic prosthesis, small intestinal submucosa (SIS), in LPEHR. Methods: Patients undergoing LPEHR (n = 108) at 4 institutions were randomized to primary repair −1° (n = 57) or primary repair buttressed with SIS (n = 51) using a standardized technique. The primary outcome measure was evidence of recurrent hernia (≥2 cm) on UGI, read by a study radiologist blinded to the randomization status, 6 months after operation. Results: At 6 months, 99 (93%) patients completed clinical symptomatic follow-up and 95 (90%) patients had an UGI. The groups had similar clinical presentations (symptom profile, quality of life, type and size of hernia, esophageal length, and BMI). Operative times (SIS 202 minutes vs. 1° 183 minutes, P = 0.15) and perioperative complications did not differ. There were no operations for recurrent hernia nor mesh-related complications. At 6 months, 4 patients (9%) developed a recurrent hernia >2 cm in the SIS group and 12 patients (24%) in the 1° group (P = 0.04). Both groups experienced a significant reduction in all measured symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia, chest pain, early satiety, and postprandial pain) and improved QOL (SF-36) after operation. There was no difference between groups in either pre or postoperative symptom severity. Patients with a recurrent hernia had more chest pain (2.7 vs. 1.0, P = 0.03) and early satiety (2.8 vs. 1.3, P = 0.02) and worse physical functioning (63 vs. 72, P = 0.03 per SF-36). Conclusions: Adding a biologic prosthesis during LPEHR reduces the likelihood of recurrence at 6 months, without mesh-related complications or side effects. PMID:16998356

  2. The role of antibiotic prophylaxis in mesh repair of primary inguinal hernias using prolene hernia system: a randomized prospective double-blind control trial.

    PubMed

    Jain, S K; Jayant, M; Norbu, C

    2008-04-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is being commonly used in mesh repair of inguinal hernia but its role has been questioned in a recent Cochrane analysis performed in 2003. Routine use of antibiotic prophylaxis in mesh repair of inguinal hernia can lead to bacterial resistance and increase in cost. In a present double-blind placebo controlled trial involving 120 patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair using prolene hernia system, we did not find any benefit of the routine use of antibiotic prophylaxis in terms of wound infection rate.

  3. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia with Delayed Presentation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is caused due to abnormal formation of the muscular parts of diaphragm. The incidence of CDH in common births ranges from 1/25000 to 1/30000. Pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension are factors that associate with the increase of mortality and morbidity due to CDH. We presented a 68-year-old Iranian woman with abdominal pain and tenderness in right upper quadrant who was diagnosed as having CDH. The disease was detected using chest X-ray and chest and abdomen sonography and confirmed with chest and abdomen CT scan with and without oral contrast. A defect was revealed in posterolateral right diaphragm with omentum and transverse colon herniated through it. Right posterolateral thoracotomy was performed to cure the disease. CT and CXR were the two useful methods in diagnosis of CDH in this patient, although CDH detection prior to surgery is too challenging because of rare cases and different types of CDH. In order to improve clinical cares in adult CDH patients, investigating more cases and long term follow-up are recommended. PMID:27872786

  4. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, management in the newborn.

    PubMed

    McHoney, Merrill

    2015-11-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) in the newborn poses challenges to the multi-disciplinary teams involved in its management. Mortality remains significantly high, despite growing understanding and treatment options. Early intubation of antenatally diagnosed cases is crucial in preventing deterioration and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Early recognition of cases not diagnosed on antenatal scan, with appreciation of differential diagnosis, requires an index of suspicion and imaging. Increasing options and modalities are available, with only modest, if any, survival advantage. Permissive hypercapnea and minimal ventilation have made the most significant impact on survival in modern era. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), treatment of pulmonary hypertension, and ECMO are used in a somewhat stepwise manner for stabilisation. Delayed surgery has become established later in management plan. The impact of individual therapies (e.g. HFOV, iNO, ECMO) on outcome is difficult to ascertain. Little level 1 or 2 evidence exists. Randomised studies and reviews on the role of ECMO have not yet proven any long-term survival benefit. One pilot randomised study of thoracoscopic repair suggests increased acidosis; intraoperative blood gases and CO2 levels should be closely monitored. Monitoring tissue oxygenation should be considered. There is no evidence to suggest the best patch material.

  5. Anatomy, pathology, and MRI findings in the sports hernia.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Conor P; Zoga, Adam C; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Meyers, William C

    2008-03-01

    "Sports hernia" is a frequently used term on athletic injury reports and in the sportscasting media, but its true definition remains elusive in the medical literature. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful tool in the evaluation of clinical athletic pubalgia, yet specific pathologies associated with this commonly encountered syndrome are poorly described in the imaging literature. In this article we review the musculoskeletal anatomy of the pubic region as well as several reproducible patterns of pathology on MRI we have encountered in patients with a clinical diagnosis of sports hernia.

  6. Current options in inguinal hernia repair in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Kulacoglu, H

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a very common problem. Surgical repair is the current approach, whereas asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic hernias may be good candidate for watchful waiting. Prophylactic antibiotics can be used in centers with high rate of wound infection. Local anesthesia is a suitable and economic option for open repairs, and should be popularized in day-case setting. Numerous repair methods have been described to date. Mesh repairs are superior to "nonmesh" tissue-suture repairs. Lichtenstein repair and endoscopic/laparoscopic techniques have similar efficacy. Standard polypropylene mesh is still the choice, whereas use of partially absorbable lightweight meshes seems to have some advantages. PMID:22435019

  7. Primary inguinal hernia repair: how audit changed a surgeon's practice.

    PubMed Central

    Drew, P J; Hartley, J E; Qureshi, A; Lee, P W

    1998-01-01

    Over 10 years one senior consultant surgeon performed 114 standard plication darn herniorraphies on 92 patients with primary inguinal hernias. These patients were contacted and were reviewed if there was any suspicion of recurrence. Four recurrences were detected, giving an overall recurrence rate of about 3.5%. According to actuarial life-table analysis the risks of recurrence at 1 year, 5 years and 10 years were 0.94%, 3.02% and 9%. This level of recurrence is unacceptable in modern practice and, as a result of the audit, the surgeon changed his technique of primary inguinal hernia repair. PMID:10325875

  8. Synchronous ipsilateral Bochdalek and Morgagni diaphragmatic hernias: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jelin, Eric B; Kim, Tyson N; Nathan, Nirmal; Miniati, Doug

    2011-12-01

    The etiology of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is unknown. Phenotypic patterns of CDH defects provide clues about normal diaphragm development and the pathophysiology of CDH. We report a case of a patient who was diagnosed with CDH postnatally and was found on imaging to have simultaneous Bochdalek and Morgagni hernias on the right side. During the operative repair of these defects, an additional left-sided Morgagni-type defect was also found. To the best of our knowledge, this form of CDH has not been previously reported.

  9. Recurrence of inguinal hernias repaired in a large hernia surgical specialty hospital and general hospitals in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Atiqa; Bell, Chaim M.; Stukel, Thérèse A.; Urbach, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of hospital specialization on the risk of hernia recurrence after inguinal hernia repair is not well described. Methods We studied Ontario residents who had primary elective inguinal hernia repair at an Ontario hospital between 1993 and 2007 using population-based, administrative health data. We compared patients from a large hernia specialty hospital (Shouldice Hospital) with those from general hospitals to determine the risk of recurrence. Results We studied 235 192 patients, 27.7% of whom had surgery at Shouldice hospital. The age-standardized proportion of patients who had a recurrence ranged from 5.21% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.94%–5.49%) among patients who had surgery at the lowest volume general hospitals to 4.79% (95% CI 4.54%–5.04%) who had surgery at the highest volume general hospitals. In contrast, patients who had surgery at the Shouldice Hospital had an age-standardized recurrence risk of 1.15% (95% CI 1.05%–1.25%). Compared with patients who had surgery at the lowest volume hospitals, hernia recurrence among those treated at the Shouldice Hospital was significantly lower after adjustment for the effects of age, sex, comorbidity and income level (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, 95% CI 0.19–0.23, p < 0.001). Conclusion Inguinal hernia repair at Shouldice Hospital was associated with a significantly lower risk of subsequent surgery for recurrence than repair at a general hospital. While specialty hospitals may have better outcomes for treatment of common surgical conditions than general hospitals, these benefits must be weighed against potential negative impacts on clinical care and the financial sustainability of general hospitals. PMID:26574701

  10. Sliding appendiceal inguinal hernia with a congenital fibrovascular band connecting the appendix vermiformis to the right testis.

    PubMed

    Oguzkurt, P; Kayaselçuk, F; Oz, S; Arda, I S; Oguzkurt, L

    2001-09-01

    It is not uncommon to find the appendix vermiformis within a hernia sac; however, sliding appendiceal inguinal hernia is rare. A 9-month-old boy with an incarcerated right scrotal hernia is presented in this case report. Although the hernia was reduced through a conservative approach, appendix vermiformis remained in the hernia sac because of its attachment to the upper pole of the right testis. Exploratory surgery during the inguinal hernia repair revealed a connecting band that extended from the appendix vermiformis into the scrotum and attached to the right testicle. Histologic examination showed that the band was congenital. After reduction of an incarcerated hernia, the persistence of a thickened or a cord-like structure is a warning for the presence of a sliding hernia. We suggest that this uncommon developmental anomaly is likely to cause the processus vaginalis to remain patent, thus facilitating hernia formation.

  11. Transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic approach for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; Zhang, Guangyong; Jin, Cuihong; Cao, Jinxin; Zhu, Yilin; Shen, Yingmo; Wang, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the efficacy, key technical points, and complication management of the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair. Seventy-three patients with incarcerated inguinal hernias underwent TAPP surgery in our department between Jan 2010 and Dec 2015. A retrospective review was performed by analyzing the perioperative data from these patients. The operation was successfully completed in all 73 patients. Operation time was 54.0 ± 18.8 minutes (range, 35–100 minutes). Length of stay was 3.9 ± 1.1 days (range, 3–9 days). There was 1 case of incisional infection, 32 cases of seroma, and 3 cases of postoperative pain during follow-up. All patients recovered after the appropriate treatment. No recurrence or fistula was observed. The TAPP approach represents a safe and effective technique for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair because of its potential in assessment of hernia content and decreasing incisional infection rate. However, it requires experienced surgeons to ensure safety with special attention paid to the key technical points as well as complication management. PMID:28033260

  12. [Iatrogenic lesions of the femoral vessels during hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Stilo, F; Basile, G; Carpentieri, G; Milone, A

    2003-01-01

    The vascular lesions in hernia surgery are difficult to be found: on the basis of three cases personally treated and on literature data, the authors dwell upon the factors that influence the frequency of this event, they discuss about the therapeutic choices and they illustrate the short and long term prognosis.

  13. A pseudo-TEP repair of an incarcerated obturator hernia

    PubMed Central

    Maricevich, Marco; Farley, David

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Obturator hernia (OH) is a rare condition and difficult to diagnose. While they account for as few as 0.073% of all hernias, mortality can be as high as 70%. The typical clinical presentation for OH is small bowel obstruction. Computed tomography is the diagnostic tool of choice. Surgical repair is mandatory in virtually all cases of OH and traditionally consists of performing an exploratory laparotomy. Presentation of case A 90-year-old female was admitted to our surgical service with signs of small bowel obstruction and a CT scan revealing incarcerated fatty tissue and small bowel within a left OH. Discussion The role of laparoscopic surgery in the management of OH has been limited to elective repairs; most reports detail that the OH was found serendipitously during laparoscopic inguinal hernia operations or other pelvic procedures. A few reports describe the use of laparoscopy to treat OH associated with bowel obstruction in an emergency setting using a TAPP approach. A strict TEP hernia repair is not indicated for all patients with OH, and should rarely be performed in emergency situations given its limitation to assess or resect bowel if necessary. In selected cases, a formal exploratory laparoscopy that is negative for compromised bowel can be safely followed by a TEP repair using the same umbilical access as shown in our patient. Conclusion A 90-year-old female with a small bowel obstruction related to an incarcerated OH was treated effectively with an extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach. PMID:22096757

  14. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Occupational Therapy: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Angela C.

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes occupational therapy (OT) intervention in an outpatient setting and outcomes for a child diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) from 4 to 28 months of age. There is little information on therapy intervention and outcomes of children who have survived. The patient is a white male, born at 35 weeks gestation…

  15. Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis in a neonate with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Akinkuotu, Adesola C; Sheikh, Fariha; Cass, Darrell L; Lee, Timothy C; Welty, Stephen E; Kearney, Debra L; Olutoye, Oluyinka O

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension (PHTN). We present a neonate with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and concurrent PCH. Severe PHTN was unrelenting and death occurred at 4 months. Diagnosis of PCH is challenging in the setting of CDH and portends a poor prognosis.

  16. Inguinal Hernia and Airport Scanners: An Emerging Indication for Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Maharaj, Ravi; Dan, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The use of advanced imaging technology at international airports is increasing in popularity as a corollary to heightened security concerns across the globe. Operators of airport scanners should be educated about common medical disorders such as inguinal herniae in order to avoid unnecessary harassment of travelers since they will encounter these with increasing frequency. PMID:24368923

  17. Pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery: a rare complication of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nichols-Totten, Kysha; Pollema, Travis; Moncure, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) is a recognized complication of surgery; however, it is a very rare clinical occurrence. The anatomic position of the IEA subjects patients to possible IEA injury during abdominal wall procedures that are close to the artery, such as insertions of drains, Tenckhoff catheters, laparoscopic trocars, or paracentesis. Treatment options include open surgery, percutaneous coil embolization, embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate, sonographic-guided thrombin injection, or sonographic-guided compression. We report the first case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the IEA after a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. To our knowledge, 17 IEA pseudoaneurysms have been reported, only 3 of which were spontaneous. The pseudoaneurysm in our patient was successfully treated by percutaneous injection of thrombin by interventional radiology.

  18. Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias: a Canadian experience

    PubMed Central

    Boushey, Robin P.; Moloo, Husein; Burpee, Stephen; Schlachta, Christopher M.; Poulin, Eric C.; Haggar, Fatima; Trottier, Daniel C.; Mamazza, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Background The surgical approach to paraesophageal hernias (PEH) has changed with the advent of laparoscopic techniques. Variation in both perioperative outcomes and hernia recurrence rates are reported in the literature. We sought to evaluate the short-and intermediate-term outcomes with laparoscopic PEH repair. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients having laparoscopic repair of PEH between June 1998 and September 2002. We included patients with more than 120 days of follow-up. Results A total of 58 patients with a mean age of 60.4 (standard deviation [SD] 15.0) years had a laparoscopic procedure to repair a primary PEH, as well as adequate follow-up, during the study period. The types of PEH included type II (n = 13), III (n = 44) and IV (n = 1). The most common symptoms were epigastric pain (57%), dysphagia (40%), heartburn (31%) and vomiting (28%). Associated procedures included 56 (96%) Nissen fundoplications and 2 (4%) gastropexies. We closed all crural defects either with or without pledgets, and 2 patients required the use of mesh. There was 1 conversion to open surgery owing to intraoperative bleeding secondary to a consumptive coagulopathy; we observed no other major intraoperative emergencies. Minor or major complications occurred in 15 patients (26%). Late postoperative complications included 1 umbilical hernia. The mean length of stay in hospital was 3.8 (SD 2.5) days. After surgery, 19 patients were completely asymptomatic, and the majority of the remaining patients (83%) described marked symptom improvement. Upper gastrointestinal series performed in symptomatic patients in the postoperative setting identified 5 recurrent paraesophageal hernias (8.6%) and 5 small sliding hernias (9%). Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of PEH is associated with improved long-term symptom relief, low morbidity and acceptable recurrence rates when performed in an experienced centre. PMID:18841230

  19. Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia. Report on a new case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, L; Brayer, C; Attali, T; Samperiz, S; Tiran-Rajaofera, I; Ramful, D; Pilorget, H

    2005-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by coarse facies, diaphragmatic hernia, distal limb hypoplasia and malformations of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and central nervous systems. Diaphragmatic hernia is a leading diagnostic feature in Fryns syndrome, recorded in more than 80% of cases. We report a newborn with clinical features of Fryns syndrome except the diaphragmatic hernia. Cases of Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia are reviewed. Even in the absence of diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary anomalies are described in Fryns syndrome, especially pulmonary hypoplasia. Fetal mice, exposed to nitrofen, have a high incidence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and other malformations similar to that seen in Fryns syndrome. Nitrofen might target molecular mechanisms similar to those involved in Fryns syndrome.

  20. A Rare Type of Primary Internal Hernia Causing Small Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Vandana; Rath, Pratap Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Primary internal hernias are extremely rare in adults. They are an important cause of small intestinal obstruction and lead to high morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Clinical presentation of internal hernia is nonspecific. Imaging has been of limited utility in cases of acute intestinal obstruction; moreover, interpretation of imaging features is operator dependant. Thus, internal hernias are usually detected at laparotomy and preoperative diagnosis in an emergency setting is either difficult or most of the time not suspected. We report herein a case of a 45-year-old male who presented with acute intestinal obstruction which was attributed later to a very rare type of internal hernia on exploratory laparotomy. A loop of ileum was found to enter the retroperitoneum through a hernia gate which was located lateral to the sigmoid colon in the left paracolic gutter. The segment of intestine was reduced and the hernial defect was closed. Our finding represents an extremely rare variant of retroperitoneal hernias. PMID:27999703

  1. Indirect inguinal hernia sac containing testis and spermatic cord in an adult patient with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Yusuf; Karaman, Kerem; Altintoprak, Fatih; Kahyaoglu, Zeynep; Zengin, Ismail; Uzunoglu, Mustafa Yener; Demir, Hakan

    2014-03-07

    Sliding hernias are those in which part of the sac wall is formed by a retroperitoneal organ and/or its mesentery protruding outside the abdominal wall cavity. The hernia sac may contain jejunum, ileum, vermiform appendix, Meckel's diverticulum, stomach, ovary, fallopian tube or urinary bladder. Our report features an adult case with cryptorchidism in which testis and spermatic cord constitute a component of the indirect inguinal hernia sac.

  2. A rare case of persistent muellerian duct syndrome presenting as inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Shankar Das; Karmakar, Nisith Chandra; Sengupta, Ritankar; Sengupta, Tamal Kanti; Biswas, Ravi Shankar; Mukherjee, Rina

    2011-10-01

    Irreducible inguinal hernia is a very common emergency surgical problem. In most of the cases the content is either bowel or omentum. Testis, as a content of hernial sac is also found in undescended testis presenting as obstructed or irreducible congenital inguinal hernia. Here a case is reported of a phenotypically normal looking male presenting with irreducible left sided inguinal hernia which on exploration revealed uterus, fallopian tubes and testis. The case is presented because of its rarity of presentation.

  3. De Garengeot's hernia: 40 years after Bassini inguinal hernioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liipo, Tommi K E; Seppälä, Toni T; Mattila, Anne K

    2015-01-01

    De Garengeot's hernia (DGH) is a rare entity in which the vermiform appendix is located within the femoral hernia sac. Even though DGH is known to be more common in females, we report a case of a male patient having undergone Bassini-type inguinal hernia repair over 40 years ago. We present the preoperative diagnostic measures and an example of the surgical management of this rare entity. PMID:25733091

  4. Indirect inguinal hernia sac containing testis and spermatic cord in an adult patient with cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Yusuf; Karaman, Kerem; Altintoprak, Fatih; Kahyaoglu, Zeynep; Zengin, Ismail; Uzunoglu, Mustafa Yener; Demir, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Sliding hernias are those in which part of the sac wall is formed by a retroperitoneal organ and/or its mesentery protruding outside the abdominal wall cavity. The hernia sac may contain jejunum, ileum, vermiform appendix, Meckel's diverticulum, stomach, ovary, fallopian tube or urinary bladder. Our report features an adult case with cryptorchidism in which testis and spermatic cord constitute a component of the indirect inguinal hernia sac. PMID:24876399

  5. Anterior preperitoneal repair of extremely large inguinal hernias: An alternative technique☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Koning, Giel G.; Vriens, Patrick W.H.E.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Standard open anterior inguinal hernia repair is nowadays performed using a soft mesh to prevent recurrence and to minimalize postoperative chronic pain. To further reduce postoperative chronic pain, the use of a preperitoneal placed mesh has been suggested. In extremely large hernias, the lateral side of the mesh can be insufficient to fully embrace the hernial sac. We describe the use of two preperitoneal placed meshes to repair extremely large hernias. This ‘Butterfly Technique’ has proven to be useful. Hernias were classified according to hernia classification of the European Hernia Society (EHS) during operation. Extremely large indirect hernias were repaired by using two inverted meshes to cover the deep inguinal ring both medial and lateral. Follow up was at least 6 months. VAS pain score was assessed in all patients during follow up. Outcomes of these Butterfly repairs were evaluated. Medical drawings were made to illustrate this technique. A Total of 689 patients underwent anterior hernia repair 2006–2008. PRESENTATION OF CASE Seven male patients (1%) presented with extremely large hernial sacs. All these patients were men. Mean age 69.9 years (range: 63–76), EHS classifications of hernias were all unilateral. Follow up was at least 6 months. Recurrence did not occur after repair. Chronic pain was not reported. Discussion Open preperitoneal hernia repair of extremely large hernias has not been described. The seven patients were trated with this technique uneventfully. No chronic pain occurred. CONCLUSION The Butterfly Technique is an easy and safe alternative in anterior preperitoneal repair of extremely large inguinal hernias. PMID:22288042

  6. Appendicitis in a Spigelian hernia: an unusual cause for a tender right iliac fossa mass.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M P; Avula, S K; England, R; Stevenson, L

    2013-05-01

    Spigelian hernias are a rare type of hernia through the Spigelian aponeurosis, whose contents commonly include omentum or small bowel. In the absence of incarceration or strangulation, they can be difficult to diagnose clinically. In the emergency setting, they can present rarely as a painful abdominal mass and computed tomography provides a reliable diagnostic imaging modality. We report an emergency presentation of a Spigelian hernia containing the appendix.

  7. Autopsy features in a newborn baby affected by a central congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Bolino, Giorgio; Gitto, Lorenzo; Serinelli, Serenella; Maiese, Aniello

    2015-03-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a congenital malformation of the diaphragm, resulting in the herniation of the abdominal organs into the thoracic cavity. The most common types of congenital diaphragmatic hernia are Bochdalek hernia (postero-lateral hernia), Morgagni hernia (anterior defect), and diaphragm eventration (abnormal displacement of part or all of an otherwise intact diaphragm into the chest cavity). Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a life-threatening pathology in infants, and a major cause of death due to pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. We present a fatal case of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a newborn. At the autopsy, a central defect of the diaphragm was found, 8 × 5 cm in size, that led to a herniation of the small intestine, the right lobe of the liver, and the right adrenal gland into the thorax. An esophageal atresia was associated with the congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The lungs showed severe hypoplasia and atelectasia. Physicians should pay attention to a prenatal diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in order to prevent newborn fatalities.

  8. Is there a Place for Prebiotics in the Management of Neonatal Inguinal Hernia? A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Dhaou, Mahdi Ben; Zouari, Mohamed; Ammar, Saloua; Bouraoui, Amira; Gassara, Imene; Feki, Ines; Zitouni, , Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Masmoudi, Jawaher; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Mhiri, Riadh

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the place of prebiotics in the management of neonatal inguinal hernia. Boys with a diagnosis of unilateral non-complicated inguinal hernia, aged less than 40 days, were prospectively followed from January 2012 to December 2014. Clinical and psychiatric data and outcomes were collected before and after prebiotics (Primalac AC) administration. Ninety-eight patients were included. There were 75 inguinal hernias and 23 inguino-scrotal hernias. Before prebiotics administration 72.2% of infants had abdominal distention and 98% had colic. After prebiotics, abdominal distention and colic regressed in 85.2% and 73.2% of patients, respectively. Hernias disappeared clinically in 66.3% of cases. The factors associated with the disappearance of hernias were the type of the hernia (p<0.001), colic (p<0.001), and abdominal distention (p<0.001). Prebiotics would be a new adjunct in the management of neonatal inguinal hernia. They decrease colic and abdominal distention, which seems helpful to prevent strangulation and probably get spontaneous resolution of small hernias. PMID:28083493

  9. Is there a Place for Prebiotics in the Management of Neonatal Inguinal Hernia? A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Dhaou, Mahdi Ben; Zouari, Mohamed; Ammar, Saloua; Bouraoui, Amira; Gassara, Imene; Feki, Ines; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Masmoudi, Jawaher; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Mhiri, Riadh

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the place of prebiotics in the management of neonatal inguinal hernia. Boys with a diagnosis of unilateral non-complicated inguinal hernia, aged less than 40 days, were prospectively followed from January 2012 to December 2014. Clinical and psychiatric data and outcomes were collected before and after prebiotics (Primalac AC) administration. Ninety-eight patients were included. There were 75 inguinal hernias and 23 inguino-scrotal hernias. Before prebiotics administration 72.2% of infants had abdominal distention and 98% had colic. After prebiotics, abdominal distention and colic regressed in 85.2% and 73.2% of patients, respectively. Hernias disappeared clinically in 66.3% of cases. The factors associated with the disappearance of hernias were the type of the hernia (p<0.001), colic (p<0.001), and abdominal distention (p<0.001). Prebiotics would be a new adjunct in the management of neonatal inguinal hernia. They decrease colic and abdominal distention, which seems helpful to prevent strangulation and probably get spontaneous resolution of small hernias.

  10. Irreducible inguinal hernia due to crossed testicular ectopia in an infant.

    PubMed

    Vaos, G; Zavras, N

    2004-12-01

    The usual presentation of crossed testicular ectopia (CTE) is that of inguinal hernia with contralateral absent testis. We report on a 10-month-old infant with CTE, which presented as irreducible inguinal hernia. Diagnosis was made during surgery, as the child underwent an emergency operation for repair of his irreducible right inguinal hernia. A normal-sized and normal-shaped testis was found in the hernial sac with its blood vessels and vas deferens. A herniotomy with fixation of the ectopic gonad to the opposite hemiscrotum was done. The child remained asymptomatic 1 year postoperatively. Crossed testicular ectopia in infancy may present as irreducible hernia, requiring urgent surgery.

  11. Incarceration of umbilical hernia: a rare complication of large volume paracentesis.

    PubMed

    Khodarahmi, Iman; Shahid, Muhammad Usman; Contractor, Sohail

    2015-09-01

    We present two cases of umbilical hernia incarceration following large volume paracentesis (LVP) in patients with cirrhotic ascites. Both patients became symptomatic within 48 hours after the LVP. Although being rare, given the significantly higher mortality rate of cirrhotic patients undergoing emergent herniorrhaphy, this complication of LVP is potentially serious. Therefore, it is recommended that patients be examined closely for the presence of umbilical hernias before removal of ascitic fluid and an attempt should be made for external reduction of easily reducible hernias, if a hernia is present.

  12. Incarceration of umbilical hernia: a rare complication of large volume paracentesis

    PubMed Central

    Khodarahmi, Iman; Shahid, Muhammad Usman; Contractor, Sohail

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of umbilical hernia incarceration following large volume paracentesis (LVP) in patients with cirrhotic ascites. Both patients became symptomatic within 48 hours after the LVP. Although being rare, given the significantly higher mortality rate of cirrhotic patients undergoing emergent herniorrhaphy, this complication of LVP is potentially serious. Therefore, it is recommended that patients be examined closely for the presence of umbilical hernias before removal of ascitic fluid and an attempt should be made for external reduction of easily reducible hernias, if a hernia is present. PMID:26629305

  13. Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations in 15 dogs with perineal hernia.

    PubMed

    Mann, F A; Boothe, H W; Amoss, M S; Tangner, C H; Puglisi, T A; Hobson, H P

    1989-06-01

    Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations, and serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio were evaluated in 15 dogs (greater than or equal to 5 years old) with perineal hernia (9 sexually intact males and 6 castrated males) and in 9 clinically normal sexually intact male dogs greater than or equal to 5 years old. There was no significant difference in serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio between sexually intact male dogs with perineal hernia and clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. In castrated dogs with perineal hernia, serum testosterone concentration and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio were significantly (P less than 0.05) lower, compared with those values in sexually intact dogs with perineal hernia and in clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. There was no significant difference in serum estradiol 17-beta concentration among sexually intact male dogs with perineal hernia, castrated dogs with perineal hernia, and clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations in dogs with perineal hernia did not differ from those values in clinically normal male dogs of the same age. Castration cannot be recommended for the treatment of perineal hernia unless a castration-responsive contributing factor such as prostatomegaly is identified, unless the pelvic diaphragm of dogs with perineal hernia has high sensitivity to normal or low serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations, or unless there is documentation that other androgens and/or estrogens are involved.

  14. [Amyand's hernia: a report of two cases and review of the bibliography].

    PubMed

    Manzanares-Campillo, Maria del Carmen; Muñoz-Atienza, Virginia; Sánchez-García, Susana; García-Santos, Esther; Ruescas-García, Francisco; Martín-Fernández, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: encontrar el apéndice vermiforme en un saco herniario inguinal es un hallazgo infrecuente (1%), excepcionalmente raro si está inflamado (0.13%). Clínicamente simula una hernia inguinal incarcerada y el diagnóstico preoperatorio adecuado se establece en contadas excepciones. Se reportan dos casos excepcionales de hernias de Amyand y se revisa la bibliografía. Casos clínicos: 1. Paciente masculino de 78 años con una hernia inguinal derecha, incarcerada, en el que el diagnóstico de hernia de Amyand se estableció antes de la cirugía mediante tomografía computada abdominal. Caso clínico 2. Paciente femenina de 82 años de edad, con clínica de hernia crural derecha incarcerada con una hernia de Amyand a través de una hernia inguinal derecha. Conclusiones: la hernia de Amyand es una rara enfermedad cuyo diagnóstico preoperatorio es infrecuente y que siempre debe considerarse en el diagnóstico diferencial en los casos con signos clínicos de hernia inguinal derecha incarcerada.

  15. Aspiration pneumonia as a complication of a rare type of hernia

    PubMed Central

    Fazekas, Balazs; Frecker, Peter; Francis, Lucy; Patel, Kunal

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Inguinal hernias are a common pathology and can contain unusual abdominal contents; the stomach is only infrequently involved due to its position in the abdominal cavity. PRESENTATION OF CASE An 85-year old male patient presented with symptoms of bowel obstruction and was subsequently found to have an incarcerated stomach within his chronic left-sided inguinal hernia. The patient had also developed aspiration pneumonia. DISCUSSION Aspiration pneumonia is a yet unreported complication of this unusual type of hernia. Our aim is to describe the presentation and management of this complication. CONCLUSION Development of aspiration pneumonia in a patient with an incarcerated stomach within an inguinal hernia. PMID:25460474

  16. EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Although esophageal hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux often occur together, they can occur separately. Reflux of digestive juice into the...esophagus is the physiologic malfunction which causes symptoms and complications, whereas hiatal hernia is an anatomic abnormality which itself rarely

  17. Extracolonic Findings on CT Colonography Increases Yield of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    gallstones; hiatal hernia E3 Likely unimportant finding, incompletely characterized: workup may be indicated Complex renal cyst; lung nodule E4...of which were renal cysts, neph­ rolithiasis, hiatal hernias , or benign liver cysts. The majority of findings for patients in the E3 group (n = 211

  18. [Modified Rives technic in the treatment of recurrent inguinal hernia].

    PubMed

    Zuvela, M; Milićević, M; Galun, D; Bulajić, P; Raznatović, Z; Lekić, N; Basarić, D; Palibrk, I; Petrović, M

    2003-01-01

    After the introduction of prosthetic material in hernia surgery the fundamental changes in operative strategy occurred. This is because the coverage of myopectineal orifitium with non-absorbable prosthesis decreases the incidence of recurrences. Because of the appearance of lateral re-recurrences after the classical Rives procedure, we modified the operative technique. The modified Rives technique consists of the following: always polypropilen mesh 15x10 cm; creation of the new internal inguinal ring between Poupart's ligament and mesh; no lateral notching the mesh and anchoring mesh 2-3 cm from the medial, inferior, lateral and superior edge. During the period January 2001-December 2003, 34 cases of recurrent hernias were operated on 7th dept. of I Surgical Clinic of CCS. The recurrences were managed by classical (10/34) or modified Rives technique through direct inguinal approach (22/34), less frequently Lichtenstein procedure (1/34) and McVay (1/34) technique. Among 10 patients with recurrent inguinal hernias managed by classical Rives technique 2 re-recurrences appeared (indirect and interstitial) and 2 cases of infection (immediately after the operation or 7 months after the operation), and in the group of 22 cases with recurrent inguinal hernias managed by modified Rives technique the aim complications didn't appear. Using the modified Rives technique we managed the primary hernias in 56 cases without recurrences and infections. The modified Rives technique, because of the way of mesh fixation (all around), no lateral notching of mesh and remaining hem in all directions secures abdominal wall protection 2-3 cm from the line of fixation and prevents any movement of the mesh. This procedure enables management of all inguinal hernias regardless to their size and full protection of the medial, femoral and lateral inguinal triangle. The modified Rives technique is the technique of choice for big multiple defects (giant inguino-scrotal and re

  19. A Prospective Randomized Study Comparing Fibrin Glue Versus Prolene Suture for Mesh Fixation in Lichtenstein Inguinal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Karigoudar, Ashirwad; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Mukharjee, Sourabh; Gupta, Nikhil; Durga, C K

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the advantages of fibrin glue over Prolene suture in fixation of the mesh in open inguinal hernia repair. Sixty-four cases of inguinal hernia underwent hernia repair by the Lichtenstein method in the department of surgery in PGIMER & Dr. RML Hospital, New Delhi. The patients were randomized prospectively into group A (fibrin glue group) and group B (Prolene suture group). In group A, fibrin glue was used for mesh fixation, and in group B, Prolene suture was used for mesh fixation. The mean age of patients in group A was 44.5 years and that of group B patients was 44.2 years. There was a significant difference in the duration of surgery, with the mean duration in fibrin glue group being 30.6 min and that of the suture group was 43.3 min. The mean visual analogue pain score of postoperative pain at 1, 6, 12, and 24 h was significantly higher in the suture group than in the fibrin glue group (p < 0.001). The mean total dose of analgesia in ampoules of tramadol was significantly less in the fibrin glue group (1.56 ampoules) than that in the suture group (4.125 ampoules) with p = 0.000. At the end of the first month, 25 % of subjects in the suture group presented with mild groin pain (p value = 0.0048). At the end of the second and third month, 22 % (p 68 value = 0.0048) and 12.5 % (p value = 0.1132) of subjects respectively presented with mild groin pain in the suture group. The present study demonstrates that the use of fibrin glue in place of Prolene suture for mesh fixation in open inguinal hernia repair can help decreasing the time required for surgery, reduce the intensity of postoperative pain, shorten the duration of hospital stay, and prevent the incidence of chronic groin pain.

  20. Clinical presentation and operative repair of hernia of Morgagni

    PubMed Central

    Loong, T; Kocher, H

    2005-01-01

    A 77 year old woman who presented with an incarcerated hernia of Morgagni was successfully treated without complications. A Medline search (1996 to date) along with cross referencing was done to quantify the number of acute presentations in adults compared to children. Different investigating modalities—for example, lateral chest and abdominal radiography, contrast studies or, in difficult cases, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging—can be used to diagnose hernia of Morgagni. The favoured method of repair—laparotomy or laparoscopy—is also discussed. A total of 47 case reports on children and 93 case reports on adults were found. Fourteen percent of children (seven out of 47) presented acutely compared with 12% of adults (12 out of 93). Repair at laparotomy was the method of choice but if uncertain, laparoscopy would be a useful diagnostic tool before attempted repair. Laparoscopic repair was favoured in adults especially in non-acute cases. PMID:15640427

  1. Laparoscopic management of foramen of Winslow incarcerated hernia.

    PubMed

    Daher, Ronald; Montana, Laura; Abdullah, Jarrah; d'Alessandro, Antonio; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-12-01

    Foramen of Winslow hernia (FWH) is a rare and often overlooked diagnosis with a high mortality rate. Widespread availability of cross-sectional imaging allows early diagnosis and prompt management. In this setting, before ischemia occurs, explorative laparoscopy would be the most suitable approach. Experience, however, remains sparse, and technical difficulties may be encountered. This is the case of a 38-year-old Caucasian woman who presented to the emergency department for a sudden epigastric pain. Physical exam was unremarkable, and routine blood tests were within normal range. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of ileocaecal herniation through the foramen of Winslow. Under urgent laparoscopy, the caecum appeared viable but incarcerated in the lesser sac. Caecal puncture was the key to achieving atraumatic reduction of the hernia and bowel salvage.

  2. Diaphragmatic hernia in a cat mimicking a pulmonary mass.

    PubMed

    White, J D; Tisdall, P L C; Norris, J M; Malik, R

    2003-06-01

    A seven-year-old castrated British shorthair cross cat was presented for coughing of five-weeks duration. Thoracic radiographs and an unguided bronchoalveolar lavage showed changes consistent with inflammatory airway disease. In addition, a soft tissue density was evident in the thoracic films between the heart and the diaphragm. Exploratory thoracotomy demonstrated a diaphragmatic hernia, probably congenital in origin, with incarceration of a portion of the hepatic parenchyma. The herniated portion of liver was resected surgically and the defect in the diaphragm closed. The cat was given a 10-day course of doxycycline post-operatively and the cough did not recur subsequently. In retrospect, the hernia was potentially an incidental problem, the cat's coughing being attributable to inflammatory airway disease.

  3. Two Different Surgical Approaches for Strangulated Obturator Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Sze Li, Siow; Kenneth Kher Ti, Voon

    2012-01-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare condition that may present in an acute or subacute setting in correlation with the degree of small-bowel obstruction. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult, as symptoms are often non-specific. A high index of suspicion should be maintained for emaciated elderly women with small-bowel obstruction without a previous abdominal operation and a positive Howship–Romberg sign. When diagnosis is in doubt, computed tomography scan of the abdomen and the pelvis (if available) or laparotomy should be performed immediately, as high mortality rate is related to the perforation of gangrenous bowels. We present 2 cases of strangulated obturator hernia, managed differently with both open and laparoscopic approaches. The diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography scan is highlighted followed by a brief literature review with an emphasis placed on surgical management. PMID:22977378

  4. Large bowel obstruction complicating a posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Umer Hasan; Dawani, Surrendar

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernia is a rare cause of large bowel obstruction, and can present weeks or years after the initial trauma. Herein, we report the case of a 28-year-old man who presented with signs and symptoms of bowel obstruction nine months after he had a stab wound to his left chest. Chest radiography showed multiple air-fluid levels in the right upper quadrant, an air-fluid level in the left thoracic cavity and significant free air under the diaphragm. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a contaminated abdomen with perforations in the caecum and proximal transverse colon, and a 4 cm × 4 cm defect in the left posterolateral (septal) aspect of the diaphragm, which was closed with a nonabsorbable suture. Posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernias should be part of the differential diagnosis for patients with bowel obstruction, especially if there is a history of trauma. Radiography is useful in facilitating a quick diagnosis. PMID:25917476

  5. Anesthesia for Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia Associated with Corneal Laceration.

    PubMed

    Safaeian, Reza; Hassani, Valiollah; Faiz, Hamid Reza

    2016-09-06

    BACKGROUND Diaphragmatic rupture can be seen in up to 5% of car accidents, and 80%-100% of diaphragmatic hernias are associated with other vital organ injuries. Brain, pelvis, long bones, liver, spleen, and aorta are some other organs that can be severely damaged and need different anesthetic managements. CASE REPORT A 37-year-old male victim of a head-on collision who was suffering diaphragmatic rupture and corneal laceration was prepared for an emergency operation 11 hours after the car accident. Gastric decompression, pre-oxygenation, rapid sequence induction with succinylcholine, immediate use of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant, and mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume after intubation were used in anesthetic management of the patient. CONCLUSIONS Because of the high prevalence of coexisting pathologies with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia, anesthetic management must be tailored to the associated pathologies.

  6. Open safety pin ingestion presenting as incarcerated umbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Bilal; Sheikh, Afzal

    2011-09-01

    Foreign body ingestion is common in children. Sharp foreign bodies are potentially harmful and can result various complications. An 8-month-old infant presented with incarcerated umbilical hernia. With a suspicion of strangulation, operation was performed that revealed a loop of ileum being stuck in the umbilical defect. The loop of ileum was freed from the umbilicus which demonstrated open ends of safety pin piercing out of bowel lumen. The enterotomy followed by removal of safety pin was performed.

  7. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and retinoids: searching for an etiology

    PubMed Central

    Montedonico, Sandra; Nakazawa, Nana

    2008-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a major life-threatening cause of respiratory failure in the newborn. Recent data reveal the role of a retinoid-signaling pathway disruption in the pathogenesis of CDH. We describe the epidemiology and pathophysiology of human CDH, the metabolism of retinoids and the implications of retinoids in the development of the diaphragm and lung. Finally, we describe the existing evidence of a disruption of the retinoid-signaling pathway in CDH. PMID:18401587

  8. Acute Osteomyelitis of the Symphysis Pubis after Inguinal Hernia Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Recep; Ceylan Tekin, Rojbin; Ceylan Cevik, Figen; Cevik, Remzi

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis of pubic symphysis is infectious inflammatory condition of the symphysis pubis and rare complication of surgery around inguinal and groin region. It should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lower pelvic pain and should be sought in cases of pelvic insufficiency fractures. Herein, we present a case of a 55-year-old man with osteomyelitis of the symphysis pubis following inguinal hernia surgery for diagnosis and management of this rare condition. PMID:25973280

  9. Quality of inguinal hernia operative reports: room for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Grace W.; Pooni, Amandeep; Forbes, Shawn S.; Eskicioglu, Cagla; Pearsall, Emily; Brenneman, Fred D.; McLeod, Robin S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Operative reports (ORs) serve as the official documentation of surgical procedures. They are essential for optimal patient care, physician accountability and billing, and direction for clinical research and auditing. Nonstandardized narrative reports are often of poor quality and lacking in detail. We sought to audit the completeness of narrative inguinal hernia ORs. Methods A standardized checklist for inguinal hernia repair (IHR) comprising 33 variables was developed by consensus of 4 surgeons. Five high-volume IHR surgeons categorized items as essential, preferable or nonessential. We audited ORs for open IHR at 6 academic hospitals. Results We audited 213 ORs, and we excluded 7 femoral hernia ORs. Tension-free repairs were the most common (82.5%), and the plug-and-patch technique was the most frequent (52.9%). Residents dictated 59% of ORs. Of 33 variables, 15 were considered essential and, on average, 10.8 ± 1.3 were included. Poorly reported elements included first occurrence versus recurrent repair (8.3%), small bowel viability in incarcerated hernias (10.7%) and occurrence of intraoperative complications (32.5%). Of 18 nonessential elements, deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis, preoperative antibiotics and urgency were reported in 1.9%, 11.7% and 24.3% of ORs, respectively. Repair-specific details were reported in 0 to 97.1% of ORs, including patch sutured to tubercle (55.1%) and location of plug (67.0%). Conclusion Completeness of IHR ORs varied with regards to essential and nonessential items but were generally incomplete, suggesting there is opportunity for improvement, including implementation of a standardized synoptic OR. PMID:24284146

  10. Oral, intestinal, and skin bacteria in ventral hernia mesh implants

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Abesha-Belay, Emnet; Enersen, Morten; Røkke, Ola; Olsen, Ingar

    2016-01-01

    Background In ventral hernia surgery, mesh implants are used to reduce recurrence. Infection after mesh implantation can be a problem and rates around 6–10% have been reported. Bacterial colonization of mesh implants in patients without clinical signs of infection has not been thoroughly investigated. Molecular techniques have proven effective in demonstrating bacterial diversity in various environments and are able to identify bacteria on a gene-specific level. Objective The purpose of this study was to detect bacterial biofilm in mesh implants, analyze its bacterial diversity, and look for possible resemblance with bacterial biofilm from the periodontal pocket. Methods Thirty patients referred to our hospital for recurrence after former ventral hernia mesh repair, were examined for periodontitis in advance of new surgical hernia repair. Oral examination included periapical radiographs, periodontal probing, and subgingival plaque collection. A piece of mesh (1×1 cm) from the abdominal wall was harvested during the new surgical hernia repair and analyzed for bacteria by PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From patients with positive PCR mesh samples, subgingival plaque samples were analyzed with the same techniques. Results A great variety of taxa were detected in 20 (66.7%) mesh samples, including typical oral commensals and periodontopathogens, enterics, and skin bacteria. Mesh and periodontal bacteria were further analyzed for similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequences. In 17 sequences, the level of resemblance between mesh and subgingival bacterial colonization was 98–100% suggesting, but not proving, a transfer of oral bacteria to the mesh. Conclusion The results show great bacterial diversity on mesh implants from the anterior abdominal wall including oral commensals and periodontopathogens. Mesh can be reached by bacteria in several ways including hematogenous spread from an oral site. However, other sites such as gut and skin may also serve as sources for the

  11. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a prospective evaluation at Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra; Sood, Shasank; Bhattarai, Bal Krishna; Agrawal, Chandra Shekhar; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inguinal hernias have been treated traditionally with open methods of herniorrhaphy or hernioplasty. But the trends have changed in the last decade with the introduction of minimal access surgery. Methods This study was a prospective descriptive study in patients presenting to Surgery Department of B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal with reducible inguinal hernias from January 2011 to June 2012. All patients >18 years of age presenting with inguinal hernias were given the choice of laparoscopic repair or open repair. Those who opted for laparoscopic repair were included in the study. Results There were 50 patients, age ranged from 18 to 71 years with 34 being median age at presentation. In 41 patients, totally extraperitoneal repair was attempted. Of these, 2 (4%) repairs were converted to transabdominal repair and 2 to open mesh repair (4%). In 9 patients, transabdominal repair was done. The median total hospital stay was 4 days (range 3-32 days), the mean postoperative stay was 3.38±3.14 days (range 2-23 days), average time taken for full ambulation postoperatively was 2.05±1.39 days (range 1-10 days), and median time taken to return for normal activity was 5 days (range 2-50 days). One patient developed recurrence (2%). None of the patients who had laparoscopic repair completed complained of neuralgias in the follow-up. Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias could be contemplated safely both via totally extra peritoneal as well as transperitoneal route even in our setup of a developing country with modifications. PMID:25170385

  12. Inguinal hernia repair in overweight and obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Yong; Kim, Jung Chul; Kim, Shin Kon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes after inguinal hernia repair in overweight and obese patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 636 adult patients who underwent mesh plug inguinal hernia repair performed by one surgeon from November 2001 to January 2009.The clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes of the patients were analyzed. According to the body mass index, patients higher than 23 were defined as overweight and obese patient group (O group) and patients between 18.5 and 23 were defined as normal weight patient group (N group). Seventeen underweight patients were excluded in this study. Results Of 619 cases, the number for O group was 344 (55.6%) and for N group was 275 (44.4%). The mean age was significantly higher in N group (62.2 ± 12.6 vs. 64.4 ± 14.8, P = 0.048). Underlying diseases were present in 226 (65.7%) of the O group and 191 (69.5%) of the N group (P = 0.322). Anesthesia method, operative time and postoperative hospital stay had no significant difference between the two groups. Postoperative complications developed in 41 (11.9%) of the O group and in 28 (10.2%) of the N group, respectively, and no major complications developed in either group. Conclusion Adult inguinal hernias developed at a relatively younger age in overweight and obese patients than in normal weight patients. There were no specific differences in other clinical characteristics and outcomes between the two groups. Therefore inguinal hernia repair in overweight and obese patients is a safe procedure as in normal weight patients. PMID:22066122

  13. Needlescopic Surgery Versus Single-port Laparoscopy for Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Hollinsky, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In recent years, 2 modifications of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair—needlescopic (nTAPP) surgery and single-port (sTAPP) surgery—have greatly improved patient outcomes over traditional approaches. For a comparison of these 2 modifications, we sought to investigate and compare the extent of surgical trauma and postoperative consequences for the abdominal wall in these two procedures. Methods: In a retrospective study, 50 nTAPP and 35 sTAPP procedures occurring at a community hospital from November 1, 2009, through July 31, 2012 were reviewed. Intraoperative data, including length of the umbilical skin incision and operative time, were recorded. A follow-up evaluation included investigation of hernia recurrence, postoperative pain, abdominal wall mobility, cosmetic satisfaction, and period of sick leave. Results: The mean umbilical skin incision was 13 ± 4 mm in nTAPP vs 27 ± 3 mm in sTAPP (P < .001). The nTAPP procedure required less operating time than the sTAPP procedure (54.8 ± 16.9 minutes vs 85.9 ± 19.7 minutes; P < .001). The mean immediate postoperative pain score on the visual analog scale was 2.7 ± 2.1 in the nTAPP group and 4.4 ± 1.9 in the sTAPP group (P = .016). In addition, patients who underwent nTAPP had a shorter period of sick leave (11.2 ± 8.4 days vs 24.1 ± 20.1 days; P = .02). At the follow-up evaluation after approximately 30 months, abdominal wall mobility and cosmetic satisfaction were equally positive, with no hernia recurrence. Conclusion: In patients with uncomplicated inguinal hernia, the nTAPP procedure, with less surgical trauma and operating time, has distinct advantages in reduction of immediate postoperative pain and sick leave time. PMID:26229421

  14. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia Using Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Mesh.

    PubMed

    Godazandeh, Gholamali; Mortazian, Meysam

    2012-10-01

    We report the cases of two patients diagnosed with Morgagni hernia who presented with nonspecific abdominal symptoms. Both underwent laparoscopic surgery that used a dual-sided mesh, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF; Dynamesh IPOM®). The procedures were successful and both patients were discharged with no complications. There was no recurrence in 18 months of follow up.Herein is the report of these cases and a literature review.

  15. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia Using Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Godazandeh, Gholamali; Mortazian, Meysam

    2012-01-01

    We report the cases of two patients diagnosed with Morgagni hernia who presented with nonspecific abdominal symptoms. Both underwent laparoscopic surgery that used a dual-sided mesh, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF; Dynamesh IPOM®). The procedures were successful and both patients were discharged with no complications. There was no recurrence in 18 months of follow up.Herein is the report of these cases and a literature review. PMID:24829663

  16. Hopkins syndrome and phantom hernia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Elizabeth, K E; Guruprasad, C S; Sindhu, T G

    2011-06-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), other than paralytic poliomyelitis, are usually due to demyelination like Guillian Barre syndrome (GBS), transverse myelitis and traumatic neuritis. Poliomyelitis like illness, Hopkins syndrome or Post Asthmatic Amotrophy, associated with bronchial asthma and hyperIgEemia has been reported in literature. We present a two and a half year old child who developed AFP with phantom hernia following an episode of bronchial asthma.

  17. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-03-26

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly.

  18. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly. PMID:24671325

  19. Morgagni hernia: A rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Pattnaik, Manoj Kumar; Sahoo, Sarada Prasanna; Panigrahy, Sameer Kumar; Nayak, Kalyani Bala

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernias (MHs) are rare and constitute about 2% of all diaphragmatic hernias. Although uncommon, it has potential for considerable morbidity if the diagnosis is missed. An elderly woman with known history of chronic asthma and constipation presented to us with vague right-sided chest pain. General physical examination was unremarkable and coincidentally diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus. Chest roentgenogram posteroanterior view revealed a right paracardiac opacity and right lateral view showed the opacity in the peridiaphragmatic area of anterior mediastinum. Computed tomographic scan of the chest and abdomen revealed a right-sided MH containing omental fat. Standard right posterolateral thoracotomy was done, and there was a rent at the medial end of the xiphoid process with hernia sac containing the omentum, which was compressing adjacent lungs and heart. The sac was opened; redundant omentum was resected, and rent closed with intercostal muscle with prolene. MH being rare must be addressed with appropriate investigation to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. PMID:27578938

  20. [The carcinogenic potential of biomaterials in hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Ghadimi, B M; Langer, C; Becker, H

    2002-08-01

    The implantation of meshes to correct inguinal as well as incisional hernias is widely used in the U.S.A. and Western Europe. The short and long term results of meshes are convincing concerning complications, recurrence rate and patient's comfort. On the other hand side some scientific groups discuss the possibility of malignant tumor development due to implanted meshes. In fact, experimental models exist which demonstrate that soft tissue sarcomas can be induced in mice and rats by implanting artificial materials such as synthetics or metal. Beside millions of hernia repairs using meshes worldwide no patient has been reported with a soft tissue tumor until today. The analyses of molecular markers of proliferation, of apoptosis as well as the modulation of heat shock proteins seem not to prove the carcinogenic potential of meshes. In conclusion, there are no data so far indicating a real risk for humans to develop malignant tumors due to implanted meshes. Therefore we further propagate the implantation of meshes in hernia repair in adult patients.

  1. Pyometra in an inguinal hernia in a bitch.

    PubMed

    Gogny, A; Bruyas, J-F; Fiéni, F

    2010-12-01

    Pyometra in an inguinal hernia was diagnosed in a 10-year-old intact cross-bred bitch which had had dysorexia, depression and inguinal distension. The hernia contained caudal portions of the two uterine horns, uterine cervix and cranial part of the vagina. As the organs were enlarged and full of pus, manual attempt to push back the uterine horns and the vagina in the abdominal cavity through the inguinal canal was unsuccessful. Herniated uterine horns were ligated and cut in their median portion, so it became possible to remove the cervix and the caudal portion of the horns through the hernial orifice, and the ovaries and the cranial part of the horns through a peritoneal midline incision. This bitch was not intended for breeding purposes and, given the presence of a huge pyometra associated with an inguinal hernia, an ovario-hysterectomy was recommended. Uterine herniation should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a caudal lateral inguinal mass. When pushing the uterus back in the abdominal cavity is impossible, a surgical procedure should be performed to detect ischemia–reperfusion injury and/or a septic risk.

  2. Anesthesia for Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia Associated with Corneal Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Reza; Hassani, Valiollah; Faiz, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 37 Final Diagnosis: Diaphragmatic hernia Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT-scan Specialty: Anesthesiology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Diaphragmatic rupture can be seen in up to 5% of car accidents, and 80%–100% of diaphragmatic hernias are associated with other vital organ injuries. Brain, pelvis, long bones, liver, spleen, and aorta are some other organs that can be severely damaged and need different anesthetic managements. Case Report: A 37-year-old male victim of a head-on collision who was suffering diaphragmatic rupture and corneal laceration was prepared for an emergency operation 11 hours after the car accident. Gastric decompression, preoxygenation, rapid sequence induction with succinylcholine, immediate use of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant, and mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume after intubation were used in anesthetic management of the patient. Conclusions: Because of the high prevalence of coexisting pathologies with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia, anesthetic management must be tailored to the associated pathologies. PMID:27595907

  3. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%–76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  4. A fatal case of complicated congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Keltie A.; Britton, Ann P.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia is a rare condition most commonly reported in cats and dogs. A 6-week-old Holstein heifer calf with a congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia complicated by a perforated abomasal ulcer is described. The clinical signs and pathological findings are compared with those reported in other species. PMID:24155464

  5. Single-incision laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair for a Grynfeltt hernia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A superior lumbar hernia, which is also known as a Grynfeltt hernia, is a rare abdominal wall defect that can be primary or secondary to trauma or orthopedic surgery. The anatomic location of a lumbar hernia makes diagnosis and repair challenging. We successfully repaired a lumbar hernia using a single-incision laparoscopic total extraperitoneal approach. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this surgical technique in the treatment of a primary Grynfeltt hernia. Case presentation A 76-year-old Taiwanese man presented to our hospital with a left lower bulging mass noted for over three months. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a left Grynfeltt hernia. We performed a single-incision laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair. Our patient was discharged uneventfully on the fourth day after the operation. There was no evidence of recurrence after six months of follow-up. Conclusion A laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair for a lumbar hernia provides an excellent operative view and minimal invasiveness. The single-incision technique also provides better cosmetic outcomes. Our experience suggests that the single-incision laparoscopic total extraperitoneal approach may be a feasible and safe alterative to conventional approaches in lumbar hernia repair. PMID:24428946

  6. Local and General Anesthesia in the Laparoscopic Preperitoneal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ferzli, George

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach (EXTRA) has been shown to be an effective and safe repair for primary (PIH), recurrent (RIH) and bilateral hernia (BIH). There is very little data examining the merits of laparoscopic repair for hernias under local anesthesia. In this paper, we compare EXTRA performed under both general and local anesthesia. Methods: This nonrandomized prospective study was performed selectively on a male population only. Patients with associated pulmonary disease and high risk for general surgery were selected. Patients with recurrence and previous abdominal operations were excluded to decrease confounding variables in the study. A Prolene mesh was used in all patients. Results: Between May 1997 and September 1998, 92 male patients underwent the repair of 107 groin hernias using the EXTRA technique. The procedure was explained to them, and different anesthesia options were given. Fourteen of these repairs were performed under local anesthesia and 93 under general anesthesia. Of the 10 patients who underwent a repair under local anesthesia, there were 8 indirect, 5 direct and 1 pantaloon. The mean age was 53 years. In the group of general anesthesia, the types of hernias repaired were 45 indirect, 30 direct and 11 pantaloon. The mean age was 45 years. The mean follow-up was 15 months. Each patient was sent home the same day. Two peritoneal tears were recorded in the first group. The operative time was longer in the local group (47 ± 11 vs 18 ± 3). None of the patients required conversion to an open technique or change of anesthesia. No recurrences were found in either group. The average time of return to work and regular activity was 3.5 ± 1 and 3 ± 1 days, respectively. Conclusion: There appears to be no significant difference in recurrence and complication rates when the EXTRA is performed under local anesthesia as compared to general. Blunt dissection of the preperitoneal space does not trigger pain and does not require

  7. The laparoscopic approach for repair of indirect inguinal hernias in infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Juang, David; Fraser, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Repair of an indirect inguinal hernia is one of the most common operations performed around the world by pediatric surgeons. Until the last 15 years, most inguinal hernia repairs were performed using an inguinal crease incision and extraperitoneal ligation of the patent processes vaginalis. However, since 2000, the laparoscopic approach has gained popularity and there have been increasing descriptions about various techniques for laparoscopic hernia (LH) repair. At our institution, we have transitioned the majority of inguinal hernia repairs to the laparoscopic approach. In this article, we will describe the technique that is utilized at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri (USA) and express our thoughts on the current debate regarding laparoscopic versus open inguinal hernia repair in infants and children. PMID:27867843

  8. [A case of ascending colon carcinoma metastasized to an inguinal hernia sac].

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yasuhiro; Kato, Takeshi; Katayama, Kinzo; Doi, Takashi; Oshima, Kazuteru; Handa, Rio; Hoshi, Minako; Makari, Yoichi; Oshima, Satoshi; Iijima, Shohei; Kurokawa, Eiji; Kikkawa, Nobuteru

    2007-11-01

    While inguinal hernia is one of the most common diseases, metastatic cancer of an inguinal hernia sac is rare. We report a case of ascending colon cancer metastasized to an inguinal hernia sac. A 60-year-old man, who was undergone a right hemicolectomy for an ascending colon cancer, was pointed out a palpable inguinal mass at one year and eight months after the operation. He was diagnosed as inguinal hernia, and herniorrhaphy was performed. In the operation, a tumor of the inguinal hernia sac, which invaded to spermatic cord, could be found and was removed with right testis. Bassini's method was performed after the resection of the inguinal tumor. Histological examination revealed that the tumor was metastasis of colon carcinoma. Examination of the entire body showed no other metastasis. As for the advanced colon cancer, we need to mention the possibility of metastatic saccular tumor.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis in open inguinal hernia repair: a literature review and summary of current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Makarewicz, Wojciech; Ropel, Jerzy; Bobowicz, Maciej; Kąkol, Michał; Śmietański, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    More than 1 million inguinal hernia repairs are performed in Europe and the US annually. Although antibiotic prophylaxis is not required in clean, elective procedures, the routine use of implants (90% of inguinal hernia repairs are performed with mesh) makes the topic controversial. The European Hernia Society does not recommend routine antibiotic prophylaxis for elective inguinal hernia repairs. However, the latest randomized controlled trial, published by Mazaki et al., indicates that the use of prophylaxis is effective for the prevention of surgical site infection. Unnecessary prophylaxis contributes to the development of bacterial resistance and significantly increases healthcare costs. This review documents clinical trials on inguinal hernia repairs with mesh and summarizes the current knowledge. It also tries to solve certain problems, namely: what constitutes a real risk factor, late-onset infection, and how the “surgical environment” impacts on the need to use antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:27829934

  10. De Garengeot's hernia in an 82-year-old man: a case report and clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Túlio F.; Chagas, Carlos A.A.; Pires, Lucas A.S.; Cisne, Rafael; Babinski, Márcio A.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the appendix within a femoral hernia (FH) sac is known as Garengeot's hernia (GH). We report on current study a rare case of an elderly man with a combined inguinal and Garengeot's hernia and discuss the clinical aspects. An 82-year-old man clinically stable, presented history of pain at the right inguinal region for over a week, without vomit, nausea, fever or any alteration of intestinal or urinary eliminations. Clinical examination revealed a FH and the ultrasonography confirmed the hernia sac. During the surgery, the appendix was recognized within the sac, and then, the patient underwent appendectomy and hernia repair. In conclusion, the presence of the vermiform appendix in a FH sac is rare, thus, requiring knowledge of the surgeon regarding this clinical entity. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment is the key to avoid complications. PMID:27381019

  11. Right-sided diaphragmatic rupture after repair of a large Morgagni hernia.

    PubMed

    Schiergens, T S; Koch, J G; Khalil, P N; Graser, A; Zügel, N P; Jauch, K-W; Kleespies, A

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of a combination of primary and secondary diaphragmatic hernia in a 63-year male patient. For progressive dyspnea and palpitations caused by a large and symptomatic Morgagni hernia resulting in a right-sided enterothorax, an open tension-free mesh repair was performed. The postoperative course was complicated by a secondary hepatothorax through a spontaneous rupture of the right diaphragm. Primary mesh repair of the Morgagni hernia, however, proved to be sufficient. This recurrent herniation might be a consequence of (1) preexisting atrophy of the right diaphragm caused by disposition and/or long-term diaphragmatic dysfunction due to the large hernia, combined with (2) further thinning out of the diaphragm by intraoperative hernia sac resection, and (3) postoperative increase of intra-abdominal pressure.

  12. Posttraumatic Transdiaphragmatic Intercostal Hernia: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kalles, Vasileios; Dasiou, Maria; Doga, Georgia; Papapanagiotou, Ioannis; Konstantinou, Evangelos A; Mekras, Alexandros; Mariolis-Sapsakos, Theodoros; Anastasiou, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Intercostal hernias are rare, and usually occur following injuries of the thoracic wall. The scope of this report is to present a case of a 53-year-old obese patient that developed a transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia. The patient presented with a palpable, sizeable, reducible mass in the right lateral thoracic wall, with evident bowel sounds in the area, 6 months after a motor-vehicle accident. On computed tomography (CT), the hernia sac contained part of the liver and part of the ascending colon. A surgical repair of the defect was performed, using a prosthetic patch. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and she remains recurrence free at 12 months after surgery. Intercostal hernias should be suspected following high-impact injuries of the thoracic wall, and CT scans will facilitate the diagnosis of intercostal hernia. We consider the surgical repair of the defect, with placement of a prosthetic mesh, as the treatment of choice to ensure a favorable outcome. PMID:25785325

  13. Inguinal hernia containing uterus and uterine adnexa in female infants: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yung-Ching; Luo, Chih-Cheng; Chao, Hsun-Chin; Chu, Shih-Ming

    2011-04-01

    We herein report two female cases, aged 1 and 1.5 months, of inguinal sliding hernias containing the uterus, fallopian tube, and ovary. The diagnosis of inguinal hernia with uterus and uterine adnexa was highly suspected preoperatively by ultrasonography and was confirmed during surgical correction. Freeing the attachment of fallopian tube and uterus from the sac and with reduction of the uterus, ovary, and fallopian tube back to the peritoneal cavity, high ligation of the hernia sac was performed in these cases. In conclusion, the hernia sac containing fallopian tube, ovary, and uterus in the female is very rare. We present our experience of treatment with these rare cases and suggest that sonography be performed routinely in female infants with an inguinal hernia containing a palpable movable mass.

  14. Perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia after iliac crest bone graft - a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of perforated diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia constitutes an extremely rare condition. Case presentation We report a case of a 66 year old Caucasian woman presenting with perforated sigmoid diverticulitis localized in a lumbar hernia following iliac crest bone graft performed 18 years ago. Emergency treatment consisted of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. Elective sigmoid resection was scheduled four months later. At the same time a laparoscopic hernia repair with a biologic mesh graft was performed. Conclusion This case shows a very seldom clinical presentation of lumbar hernia. Secondary colonic resection and concurrent hernia repair with a biologic implant have proven useful in treating this rare condition. PMID:25051974

  15. A comparative study on trans-umbilical single-port laparoscopic approach versus conventional repair for incarcerated inguinal hernia in children

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Zhang; Juntao, Ge; Shuli, Liu; Li, Long

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to determine whether singleport laparoscopic repair (SLR) for incarcerated inguinal hernia in children is superior toconventional repair (CR) approaches. METHOD: Between March 2013 and September 2013, 126 infants and children treatedwere retrospectively reviewed. All the patients were divided into three groups. Group A (48 patients) underwent trans-umbilical SLR, group B (36 patients) was subjected to trans-umbilical conventional two-port laparoscopic repair (TLR) while the conventional open surgery repair (COR) was performed in group C (42 patients). Data regarding the operating time, bleeding volume, post-operative hydrocele formation, testicular atrophy, cosmetic results, recurrence rate, and duration of hospital stay of the patients were collected. RESULT: All the cases were completed successfully without conversion. The mean operative time for group A was 15 ± 3.9 min and 24 ± 7.2 min for unilateral hernia and bilateral hernia respectively, whereas for group B, it was 13 ± 6.7 min and 23 ± 9.2 min. The mean duration of surgery in group C was 35 ± 5.2 min for unilateral hernia. The recurrence rate was 0% in all the three groups. There were statistically significant differences in theoperating time, bleeding volume, post-operative hydrocele formation, cosmetic results and duration hospital stay between the three groups (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences between SLR and TLR were observed except the more cosmetic result in SLR. CONCLUSION: SLR is safe and effective, minimally invasive, and is a new technology worth promoting. PMID:27073306

  16. Comparison of the outcomes between laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair and prolene hernia system for inguinal hernia; review of one surgeon's experience

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Young; Han, Sun Wook; Bae, Sang Ho; Kim, Sung Yong; Hur, Kyung Yul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes between laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair and prolene hernia system (PHS) repair for inguinal hernia. Methods A retrospective analysis of 237 patients scheduled for laparoscopic TEP or PHS repair of groin hernia from 2005 to 2009 was performed. Results The mean age was 52.3 years in TEP group and 55.7 years in PHS group. Of 119 TEP cases, 98 were indirect inguinal hernia, 15 direct type, 5 femoral hernia and 1 complex hernia; Of 118 PHS cases, 100 indirect, 18 direct type. All in TEP group were performed under general anesthesia and 64% of PHS group were performed under spinal or epidural anesthesia. Preoperatively, 10 cases of recurrent inguinal hernia were involved in our study (4 in TEP, 6 in PHS group). The mean operative time was similar in both groups (74.8 in TEP, 71.2 in PHS group), however mean hospital stay (1.6 days in TEP, 3.2 days in PHS group, P = 0.018) and mean usage of analgesics (0.54 times in TEP, 2.03 times in PHS group, P < 0.01), complications (36 cases in TEP, 6 cases in PHS group, P < 0.01) showed statistical differences. There is only 1 case of postoperative recurrence inguinal hernia in PHS group but it has no statistical significance (P = 0.314). Conclusion Compared to PHS repair, laparoscopic TEP repair has some advantages; shorter hospital stay, less frequent need of analgesics; as well as more postoperative complications such as hematoma, seroma, scrotal swelling. PMID:22324045

  17. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

  18. Inguinodynia following Lichtenstein tension-free hernia repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, Abdul; Shanmugam, Venkatesh

    2011-04-14

    Chronic groin pain (Inguinodynia) following inguinal hernia repair is a significant, though under-reported problem. Mild pain lasting for a few days is common following mesh inguinal hernia repair. However, moderate to severe pain persisting more than 3 mo after inguinal herniorrhaphy should be considered as pathological. The major reasons for chronic groin pain have been identified as neuropathic cause due to inguinal nerve(s) damage or non-neuropathic cause due to mesh or other related factors. The symptom complex of chronic groin pain varies from a dull ache to sharp shooting pain along the distribution of inguinal nerves. Thorough history and meticulous clinical examination should be performed to identify the exact cause of chronic groin pain, as there is no single test to confirm the aetiology behind the pain or to point out the exact nerve involved. Various studies have been performed to look at the difference in chronic groin pain rates with the use of mesh vs non-mesh repair, use of heavyweight vs lightweight mesh and mesh fixation with sutures vs. glue. Though there is no convincing evidence favouring one over the other, lightweight meshes are generally preferred because of their lesser foreign body reaction and better tolerance by the patients. Identification of all three nerves has been shown to be an important factor in reducing chronic groin pain, though there are no well conducted randomised studies to recommend the benefits of nerve excision vs preservation. Both non-surgical and surgical options have been tried for chronic groin pain, with their consequent risks of analgesic side-effects, recurrent pain, recurrent hernia and significant sensory loss. By far the best treatment for chronic groin pain is to avoid bestowing this on the patient by careful intra-operative handling of inguinal structures and better patient counselling pre- and post-herniorraphy.

  19. Strangulated Groin Hernia Repair: A New Approach for All

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Vallabhdas Srinivas; Kumar, Dodda Ramesh; Reddy, Bande Karunakar; Boda, Kumara Swamy; Madipeddi, Venkanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The available classical approaches for Groin hernia are multiple. The change of approach with change of incision is needed with these approaches when the bowel is gangrenous. Aim To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new approach for all strangulated groin hernias (inguinal, femoral and obturator), in terms of change of approach/complications. Materials and Methods It was conducted in surgical unit-2 of MGM Hospital, Kakatiya Medical College Warangal, Telangana State, India, from Nov 2000 to Oct 2010. Total 52 patients operated with classical approach were compared with 52 patients operated present new approach. All the cases (52+52) were with gangrenous bowel which required resection and end to end anastomosis of bowel. All the cases (52+52) were managed with mesh repair and the results were analysed. Results In classical approach: Three cases required laparotomy (5.7%). Twelve cases required change of approach with change of incision (23%). Eight cases developed wound infection after mesh repair (15%). Four cases required removal of mesh (7.6%). Two Cases developed recurrence (3.8%). In present new approach: No laparotomy (0%), no change of incision (0%), no removal of mesh (0%) and no recurrence(0%). Only 2 cases (3.8%) developed wound infection at lateral part of incision ie. p<0.05. Conclusion This new approach for all - gives a best approach for strangulated groin hernias as it is easy to follow. It obviates the change of incision and need for a laparotomy. It further retains normal anatomy, prevents contamination of the inguinal canal and permits a mesh repair leading to decreasing the chances of recurrence. PMID:27190878

  20. Primary fascial closure with laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duyen H; Nguyen, Mylan T; Askenasy, Erik P; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) has grown in popularity. Typically, this procedure is performed with a mesh bridge technique that results in high rates of seroma, eventration (bulging), and patient dissatisfaction. In an effort to avoid these complications, there is growing interest in the role of laparoscopic primary fascial closure with intraperitoneal mesh placement. This systematic review evaluated the outcomes of closure of the central defect during LVHR. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane databases, and Embase was conducted using PRISMA guidelines. MINORS was used to assess the methodologic quality. Primary outcome was hernia recurrence. Secondary outcomes were surgical-site infection, seroma formation, bulging, and patient-centered items (satisfaction, chronic pain, functional status). Eleven studies were identified, eight of which were case series (level 4 data). Three comparative studies examined the difference between closure and nonclosure of the fascial defect during laparoscopic ventral incisional hernia repairs (level 3 and 4 data). These studies suggested that primary fascial closure (n = 138) compared to nonclosure (n = 255) resulted in lower recurrence rates (0-5.7 vs. 4.8-16.7 %) and seroma formation rates (5.6-11.4 vs. 4.3-27.8 %). Follow-up periods for both groups were similar (1-108 months). Only one study evaluated patient function and clinical bulging. It showed better outcomes with primary fascial closure. Closure of the central defect during LVHR resulted in less recurrence, bulging, and seroma than nonclosure. Patients with closure were more satisfied with the results and had better functional status. The quality of the data was poor, however. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the role of closure of the central defect during LVHR is warranted.

  1. Laparoscopic Reduction and Closure of an Internal Hernia Secondary to Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kawarai Lefor, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Internal hernia is a rare cause of bowel obstruction which often requires emergent surgery. In general, the preoperative diagnosis of internal hernia is difficult. The pelvic cavity has various spaces with the potential to result in a hernia, especially in females. In this report, we describe a patient with an internal hernia secondary to previous gynecologic surgery. A 49-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and a history of previous right oophorectomy for a benign ovarian cyst. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed obstruction with strangulation and emergent laparoscopic exploration was performed. Intraoperatively, there was an incarcerated internal hernia in the pelvis, located in the vesicouterine pouch, which was reduced. The orifice of the hernia was a 2 cm defect caused by adhesions between the uterus and bladder. The defect was closed with a continuous suture. The herniated bowel was viable, and the operation was completed without intestinal resection. She was discharged four days after surgery without complications. Laparoscopy is useful to diagnose bowel obstruction in selected patients and may also be used for definitive therapy. It is important to understand pelvic anatomy and consider an internal hernia of the pelvic cavity in females, in the differential diagnosis of bowel obstruction, especially those with a history of gynecological surgery.

  2. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernia Using Surgisis Mesh and Fibrin Sealant

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant is an effective long-term treatment for repair of inguinal hernia. This case series involved 38 adult patients with 51 inguinal hernias treated in a primary care center. Methods: Between December 2002 and May 2005, 38 patients with 45 primary and 6 recurrent inguinal hernias were treated with laparoscopic repair by the total extra-peritoneal mesh placement (TEP) technique using Surgisis mesh secured into place with fibrin sealant. Postoperative complications, incidence of pain, and recurrence were recorded, as evaluated at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 1 year, and with a follow-up questionnaire and telephone interview conducted in May and June 2005. Results: The operations were successfully performed on all patients with no complications or revisions to an open procedure. Average follow-up was 13 months (range, 1 to 30). One hernia recurred (second recurrence of unilateral direct hernia), indicating a 2% recurrence rate. Conclusions: Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant can be effectively used to treat primary, recurrent, direct, indirect, and bilateral inguinal hernias in adults without complications and minimal recurrence within 1-year of follow-up. PMID:17575758

  3. Appendicular abscess with appendicolith in a Spigelian hernia masquerading caecal volvulus—A case report

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, G.A.; Nair, M.S.; Al-Abed, Y.; Alobaid, N.; Safar-Aly, H.; Athow, A.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spigelian hernias are rare hernias of the anterior abdominal wall named after Adrian van den Spiegel, the anatomist who first described them in the 16th century. They represent around 2% of all hernias. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present an 83-year-old female with one week history of a painful right iliac fossa swelling, her examination revealed a tender lump with no cough impulse and non-reducible and her computed tomography (CT) scan showed a mass anterior to ileocaecal valve suggestive of a caecal volvulus. Intra-operative the finding was a Spigelian hernia containing an appendicular abscess and an appendicolith. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Spigelian hernias represents a challenge for the surgeons principally due to their rarity but also due to their anatomy and the variety of their contents. Searching the literature we found many different intra-abdominal structures presenting within a Spigelian hernia but we did not encounter a case similar to this. CONCLUSION Clinicians need to be aware of these hernias when dealing with lower abdominal swellings and have a high index of suspicion even in the presence of negative clinical and CT findings. PMID:22771909

  4. [Strangulated umbilical hernia in children (Burkina Faso): differences with developed countries].

    PubMed

    Bandré, E; Kaboré, R A F; Sanou, A; Ouédraogo, I; Soré, O; Tapsoba, T; Nébié, B; Wandaogo, A; Bachy, B

    2010-05-01

    Umbilical hernias occur frequently in children but complications are rarely reported. This study assesses the incidence of complicated umbilical hernias in our patients, evaluates data for risk factors, and shows dissimilarities with those encountered in developed countries. This study reports all children operated for complications due to strangulated umbilical hernia over a period of 3 years. On the whole, 162 children had umbilical hernias treated during this period. Thirty (18.5%) of these had complicated hernias. The average age of the complicated group was 3(1/2) years. Twenty-nine cases had a painful irreducible umbilical mass. Twenty-four children had bowel obstruction, while stercoral fistula occurred in one child. The average diameter of the hernia ranged between 1 and 1.5 cm. Five patients had ischemic intestine that required resection. One patient died. When active observation and follow-up after 1 year is difficult or not feasible when the wall defect diameter is 1.5 cm or less, and in suspicion of incarceration (unexplained abdominal pain, and irreducibility), umbilical hernia should be operated.

  5. Role of conventional radiology and MRi defecography of pelvic floor hernias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Purpose of the study is to define the role of conventional radiology and MRI in the evaluation of pelvic floor hernias in female pelvic floor disorders. Methods A MEDLINE and PubMed search was performed for journals before March 2013 with MeSH major terms 'MR Defecography' and 'pelvic floor hernias'. Results The prevalence of pelvic floor hernias at conventional radiology was higher if compared with that at MRI. Concerning the hernia content, there were significantly more enteroceles and sigmoidoceles on conventional radiology than on MRI, whereas, in relation to the hernia development modalities, the prevalence of elytroceles, edroceles, and Douglas' hernias at conventional radiology was significantly higher than that at MRI. Conclusions MRI shows lower sensitivity than conventional radiology in the detection of pelvic floor hernias development. The less-invasive MRI may have a role in a better evaluation of the entire pelvic anatomy and pelvic organ interaction especially in patients with multicompartmental defects, planned for surgery. PMID:24267789

  6. Laparoscopic Repair Reduces Incidence of Surgical Site Infections for All Ventral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Nestor A.; Nguyen, Mylan T.; Nguyen, Duyen H.; Berger, Rachel L.; Lew, Debbie F.; Suliburk, James T.; Askenasy, Erik P.; Kao, Lillian S.; Liang, Mike K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias remains incompletely defined. We hypothesize that laparoscopy, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases surgical site infection (SSI) for all ventral hernia types. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were reviewed to identify studies evaluating outcomes of laparoscopic versus open repair with mesh of ventral hernias and divided into groups (primary or incisional). Studies with high risk of bias were excluded. Primary outcomes of interest were recurrence and SSI. Fixed effects model was used unless significant heterogeneity, assessed with the Higgins I-square (I2), was encountered. Results There were five and fifteen studies for primary and incisional cohorts. No difference was seen in recurrence between laparoscopic and open repair in the two hernia groups. SSI was more common with open repair in both hernia groups: primary (OR 4.17, 95%CI [2.03–8.55]) and incisional (OR 5.16, 95%CI [2.79–9.57]). Conclusions Laparoscopic repair, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases rates of SSI in all types of ventral hernias with no difference in recurrence. This data suggests that laparoscopic approach may be the treatment of choice for all types of ventral hernias. PMID:25294541

  7. Mesh erosion into urinary bladder following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Arjun Singh; Kumar, Ameet; Kumar, Bharath N.

    2017-01-01

    Along with advantages, evolving surgical techniques bring unique complications. A young male developed urinary symptoms a few months after undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. On evaluation, mesh erosion into the urinary bladder was found. Removal of mesh with repair of bladder was done. A vesico-cutaneous fistula resulted which was managed with repeat surgery. We review all such cases reported in literature; discuss the etiopathogenesis, presentation, management and possible preventive measures. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the 12th case being reported. PMID:28281479

  8. Preperitoneal Surgery Using a Self-Adhesive Mesh for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oguntodu, Olakunle F.; Rodriguez, Francisco; Rassadi, Roozbeh; Haley, Michael; Shively, Cynthia J.; Dzandu, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair with mesh has been reported to result in improved patient outcomes. However, there are few published data on the use of a totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and evaluate early outcomes of TEP inguinal hernia repair with self-adhesive mesh. Methods: This cohort study was a retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernial repair from April 4, 2010, through July 22, 2014. Data assessed were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hernia repair indications, hernia type, pain, paresthesia, occurrence (bilateral or unilateral), recurrence, and patient satisfaction. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: Six hundred forty patients underwent laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia surgery with self-adhesive mesh. The average age was 56 years, nearly all were men (95.8%), and the mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m2. Cases involved primary hernia more frequently than recurrent hernia (94% vs 6%; P < .05). After surgery, 92% of the patients reported no more than minimal pain, <1% reported paresthesia, and 0.2% had early recurrence. There were 7 conversions to an open procedure. The patients had no adverse reactions to anesthesia and no bladder injury. Postoperative acute pain or recurrence was not explained by demographics, BMI, or preoperative pain. There were significant associations of hernia side, recurrence, occurrence, and sex with composite end points. Nearly all patients (98%) were satisfied with the outcome. Conclusion: The use of self-adhesive, Velcro-type mesh in laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced pain; low rates of early recurrence, infection, and hematoma; and improved patient satisfaction. PMID:25587212

  9. Incisional Hernia as a Cause of Blader Outlet Obstruction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shadan; Desai, Gunjan; Sharma, Kartikeya; Thomas, Shaji

    2016-01-01

    Incisional hernia usually contains intra peritoneal organs as its content. Extra peritoneal structures like bladder as a content of incisional hernia are relatively uncommon. We managed a young male with an incisional hernia containing a large bladder diverticulum as its content. The bladder diverticulum was going up to the base of scrotum along the posterolateral surface of penile corpora. The patient was diagnosed pre operatively with radiological investigations and underwent exploration with release of diverticulum from corpora and pubic arch followed by diverticulectomy and herniorraphy. To the best of our knowledge and available literature search, there isn’t any similar reported case. PMID:27790521

  10. Ovotesticular Disorders of Sexual Development: A Case of Hernia Uteri Inguinalis.

    PubMed

    Barham, David W; DeRosa, Raffaella; Pederson, Anita M; Freeman, Judy H; Rooks, Veronica J; McMann, Leah P

    2016-07-01

    Ovotesticular disorders of sexual development result in the presence of both testis and ovarian tissue. Most commonly, gonadal structures in the scrotum or inguinal canal are comprised of testis tissue. The presence of a uterus within an inguinal hernia sac in a phenotypically male patient is referred to as hernia uteri inguinalis. This condition has rarely been reported in patients with ovotesticular disorders of sexual development. We present a patient with rare mosaicism in combination with an unusual location of Müllerian duct structures within an inguinal hernia sac.

  11. [A case of hernia uteri inguinalis with a left crossed ectopic testis].

    PubMed

    Hihara, T; Nagata, Y; Katsuoka, Y; Kinoshita, H; Kawamura, N

    1985-11-01

    A 70-year-old man with the complaint of dysuria and painless swelling of the right scrotal sac and inguinal region was operated on for suspected right inguinal hernia. The hernia sac contained two testis and immature uterine tissue, which were pathognomonic of left crossed ectopic testis complicated by hernia uteri inguinalis. The chromosomes were normal. Statistics on 57 similar cases indicated that this was the eldest of all such patients reported in Japan; since he had two children, he seems to have been fertile.

  12. Round Ligament Leiomyoma Presenting as an Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign gynecologic tumors occurring in up to 30% of women. Round ligament leiomyomas however are very rare and, if symptomatic, can present as an inguinal hernia. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman who presented with an irreducible inguinal mass consistent with an incarcerated hernia. Intraoperatively, the mass was found to be a round ligament leiomyoma, a diagnosis that was confirmed by histopathology following excision of the mass. Although rare, round ligament leiomyomas should be part of the differential diagnosis of an inguinal hernia in females. PMID:27144048

  13. Pulmonary sequestration mimicking a pancreas herniation in a case of recurrent Bochdalek hernia

    PubMed Central

    Perentes, Jean Yannis; Ris, Hans-Beat; Halkic, Nermin

    2017-01-01

    In the reported scenario, the patient known for a history of operated Bochdalek hernia or congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) presented with new abdominal pain. The CT-scan suspected the presence of pancreas herniation through a recurrent CDH. Intraoperatively, the patient was found to have a recurrent CDH containing greater omentum concomitantly with a pulmonary sequestration (PS). This case report highlights the fact that intraoperative findings can be different from preoperative radiological diagnosis. In this patient the unusual diaphragmatic hernia content was not identified on preoperative CT. PMID:28203431

  14. Paralysis of the femoral nerve following totally extraperitoneal laparascopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Lange, B; Langer, C; Markus, P M; Becker, H

    2003-07-01

    Totally extraperitoneal preparation (TEP) of an inguinal hernia is an established method of treating inguinal hernias associated with an acceptable complication rate (2-12%) and low rate of recurrence (0-3%). This is the first reported case of sensorimotor paralysis of the femoral nerve following the complete endoscopic mesh treatment of a primary inguinal hernia to the left side. Following a discussion of the necessary diagnostic and therapeutic steps, traumatic postsurgical paralysis of the nerve as well as spontaneous paralysis of the femoral nerve are discussed. The prognosis is positive given the lack of macroscopic evidence of any direct damage to the nerve.

  15. Hernia uterine inguinale with transverse testicular ectopia and mixed germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Jaka, Rajshekhar C.; Shankar, M.

    2007-01-01

    Persistent mullerian duct syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of uterus and fallopian tube in 46XY phenotypic males and is ascribed to defects in the synthesis or action of anti-mullerian hormone. We report a rare case of hernia uterine inguinale, transverse testicular ectopia associated with mixed germ cell tumor of the testis with metastasis. Transverse testicular ectopia should be suspected preoperatively in patients who have unilateral inguinal hernia associated with contralateral nonpalpable testis. In such cases ultrasonography should be done prior to repair of hernia to evaluate the possible presence of mullerian structures and testicular malignancy, for better management. PMID:19675770

  16. Successful surgical management of ruptured umbilical hernias in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Bradley, J Andrew; Harper, Simon; Butler, Andrew; Jah, Asif; Huguet, Emmanuel; Praseedom, Raaj K; Allison, Michael; Gibbs, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Acute umbilical hernia rupture in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and ascites is an unusual, but potentially life-threatening complication, with postoperative morbidity about 70% and mortality between 60%-80% after supportive care and 6%-20% after urgent surgical repair. Management options include primary surgical repair with or without concomitant portal venous system decompression for the control of the ascites. We present a retrospective analysis of our centre’s experience over the last 6 years. Our cohort consisted of 11 consecutive patients (median age: 53 years, range: 36-63 years) with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Appropriate patient resuscitation and optimisation with intravenous fluids, prophylactic antibiotics and local measures was instituted. One failed attempt for conservative management was followed by a successful primary repair. In all cases, with one exception, a primary repair with non-absorbable Nylon, interrupted sutures, without mesh, was performed. The perioperative complication rate was 25% and the recurrence rate 8.3%. No mortality was recorded. Median length of hospital stay was 14 d (range: 4-31 d). Based on our experience, the management of ruptured umbilical hernias in patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites is feasible without the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt routinely in the preoperative period, provided that meticulous patient optimisation is performed. PMID:25780312

  17. Forensic Features of Lethal Late-Presenting Diaphragmatic Hernias.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Melissa; Wills, Stephen; Byard, Roger W

    2016-09-01

    Diaphragmatic defects are a relatively common and benign finding in adults which may be congenital or secondarily acquired. The case files at Forensic Sciences South Australia were reviewed over a 10-year period from July 2005 to June 2015 for all adult (>17 years) cases in which diaphragmatic hernias were identified at postmortem examination that had either caused or contributed to death. Five cases were found: age range 49-90 years (average 67.2 years); male:female ratio 2:3. Herniated organs included the stomach (N = 3), small (N = 3) and large intestines (N = 2). Mechanisms of death involved lung compression with respiratory failure and/or mediastinal shift, and vascular compromise with gastric or intestinal infarction and/or perforation. Diaphragmatic hernias may not be identified until the time of autopsy and may be quite complex entities to evaluate due to a lack of clinical history and to difficulties in determining their origin and possible contributions to mechanisms of death.

  18. Diagnosis of a Strangulated Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia with Point-of-Care Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Argintaru, Niran; Al-Den, Ahmed; Chenkin, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    The use of point-of-care ultrasound for the diagnosis of bowel obstructions and hernias is becoming increasingly common in the emergency department (ED). Using a relatively rare case of an incisional port hernia, we demonstrate the ultrasound findings of a strangulated hernia causing a partial small bowel obstruction. A 46-year-old female presented four days following a laparoscopic surgery complaining of abdominal pain, nausea and lack of bowel movements. There was a palpable mass in the left lower quadrant under the 12mm trocar port incision. ED point-of-care ultrasound revealed herniated akinetic loops of bowel through her laparoscopy incision. This is the first case report to describe the use of point-of-care ultrasound for the diagnosis of a strangulated incisional port hernia at the bedside. PMID:25987928

  19. Are fibrinogen and complete blood count parameters predictive in incarcerated abdominal hernia repair?

    PubMed

    Kahramanca, Sahin; Kaya, Oskay; Ozgehan, Gulay; Guzel, Hakan; Azili, Cem; Gokce, Emre; Kucukpinar, Tevfik; Kulacoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic delays in cases of external incarcerated hernias typically result in increasing morbidity, mortality, and health expenditures. We investigated the diagnostic role of blood fibrinogen level, white blood count (WBC), mean platelet volume (MPV), and platelet distribution width (PDW) in patients with incarcerated hernia. Two groups, each containing 100 patients, were studied. Group A underwent elective, and group B underwent incarcerated and urgent external hernia repair. We observed high fibrinogen and WBC levels but low MPV and PDW values for patients in group B. Contrary to our expectations, we found lower MPV and PDW values in the complicated group than in the elective group. The morbidity rate and cost burden were higher in group B, and the results were statistically significant. Early operation should be recommended for patients with incarcerated external hernias if their fibrinogen and WBC levels are high.

  20. Hernia surgery for the third millennium. Does classical herniorraphy still play a role?

    PubMed

    Arroyo, A; Pérez, F; Ferrer, R; García, P; Serrano, P; Candela, F; Calpena, R

    2001-07-01

    The steadily increasing use of prosthetic grafts in hernia repairs can be said to play down the classical approach for repairing groin hernia. We retrospectively report on 894 patients operated on for groin hernia at our out-patient surgery clinic from June 1992 to May 1998. Herniorraphy was widely performed (96.3%). The recurrence rate was of 1.6% (overall). For patients younger than 45 yr with no systemic concurrent disease, as few as 0.1% relapsed after a 58-month average follow-up. According to our results, ambulatory herniorraphy can provide an excellent degree of efficiency in selected young patients suffering from indirect unilateral primary groin hernia. Likewise, we regard the prosthetic repair as the gold standard technique in those patients with a weakened posterior inguinal wall.

  1. Antibiotic Coating of Hernia Meshes: The Next Step Toward Preventing Mesh Infection.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Arnab; Neupane, Ruel; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2015-11-01

    Mesh bacterial colonization/infection remains a critical issue in complex ventral hernia repair. Despite the recent emergence of biologic meshes, current strategies to prevent and treat mesh infection are largely ineffective, often leading to device failure and subsequent explantation along with the associated costs and effect on patient welfare. Unacceptably high rates of morbidity and hernia recurrence following mesh infection highlight the need for innovation in the area of hernia repair for the complex patient. One recent strategy to address such shortcomings is local antibiosis in the form of polymer coatings applied to the mesh itself. Current literature regarding the use of antibiotic-coated hernia mesh is limited but does illustrate the ability of these devices to inhibit bacterial growth and prevent mesh infection in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Although there is a paucity of literature regarding long-term clinical efficacy, this provides opportunity for further inquiry into a promising new development to combat mesh infective complications.

  2. MANAGEMENT OF OMPHALOPHLEBITIS AND UMBILICAL HERNIA IN THREE NEONATAL GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS).

    PubMed

    Selig, Michael; Lewandowski, Albert; Burton, Michael S; Ball, Ray L

    2015-12-01

    Umbilical disorders, including omphalophlebitis, omphaloarteritis, external umbilical abscesses, urachal abscesses, patent urachus, and umbilical hernias, represent a significant challenge to the health and well-being of a neonate. The three neonatal giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) in this report were evaluated for umbilical swellings. Two developed omphalophlebitis, and one had an uncomplicated umbilical hernia. Omphalophlebitis is an inflammation and/or infection of the umbilical vein. Giraffe calves with a failure of passive transfer may be predisposed and should be thoroughly evaluated for the condition. Umbilical hernias result from a failure of the umbilical ring to close after parturition or from malformation of the umbilical ring during embryogenesis. These problems were surgically corrected for all three individuals, although one died due to postsurgical complications. The risks involved include anesthetic complications, surgical dehiscence, and maternal rejection. Early detection and surgical intervention are recommended for the correction of omphalophlebitis and umbilical hernias in neonatal giraffe.

  3. Cyanoacrylate surgical glue for mesh fixation in laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallejo, Luis; Couto-Gonzalez, Ivan; Concheiro-Coello, Pablo; Brea-Garcia, Beatriz; Taboada-Suarez, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an attempt to find the ideal surgical technique for mesh fixation during laparoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair, we evaluate the use of a synthetic surgical glue (N-butyl-cyanoacrylate-Glubran 2) in an effort to reduce postoperative pain and the complications associated with the use of staples. We have prospectively evaluated 61 consecutive patients (73 hernias) with a minimum follow-up period of 18 months and an average of 29.7 months, without any significant complications present. The majority (59%) only required low dosages of painkillers during the first 24 hours after surgery and have not experienced any cases of chronic pain or recurring hernias in the time period described. On the basis of this initial experience, the use of the surgical glue used to repair inguinal hernias with the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal technique has been proved to be a simple and effective surgical method for mesh fixation.

  4. Treatment of a giant inguinal hernia using transabdominal pre-peritoneal repair

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, Masato; Mizutani, Fumitoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuyoshi; Aoyama, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a male Japanese patient with a giant inguinal hernia that extended to his knees while standing. A transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) repair was performed under general anesthesia. Complete reduction of the contents of the hernia was achieved within 2 h 50 min. A blood loss of approximately 700 ml was noted. The patient was discharged from the hospital on post-operative Day 12, with no recurrence of the hernia 6 months post-surgery. Factors contributing to the successful outcomes included preparation of several reduction methods before surgery, use of a large size mesh and implementation of pre-operative measures to prevent abdominal compartment syndrome. Further studies are required to evaluate the feasibility of laparoscopic repair in the management of giant inguinal hernia. PMID:27672103

  5. Incarceration of a sessile uterine fibroid in an umbilical hernia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Seims, A D; Lube, M W

    2009-06-01

    On rare occasions, uterine fibroids complicate pregnancy. More commonly, fibroids exert a mass effect that either prevents implantation of an egg or becomes problematic as a fetus grows. Less frequently, pregnancies are affected by fibroid herniation through a fascial defect. Several publications describing herniation of pedunculated fibroids exist, two of which were in umbilical hernia sacs. There is, to our knowledge, only one publication describing the presence of a sessile uterine fibroid in an umbilical hernia. This case report adds to the literature by describing a 34-year-old primigravid woman with an umbilical hernia that contained a sessile uterine fibroid and provides parameters that can be used in the initial evaluation of a pregnant woman with an abdominal wall hernia.

  6. Simplified technique of mesh fixation during laparoscopic repair of abdominal ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Piskun, G; Shaftan, G; Fogler, R

    1999-04-01

    The current techniques for intraperitoneal mesh fixation are complex and time-consuming. We present here a simple technique for the fixation of the mesh during laparoscopic intraperitoneal ventral hernia repair.

  7. Amyand's Hernia Complicated by Omental Infarct Presenting as Acute Scrotum: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Amin; Sahebpour, Alireza Aalam; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernia with acute appendicitis known as Amyand's hernia is uncommon. It may clinically manifest as acute scrotum, inguinal lymphadenitis, or strangulated hernia. The presentation of Amyand's hernia with acute scrotum has been rarely described. Also, the manifestation of infarcted omentum in the inguinal hernia has been described in one case previously. However, the coexistence of perforated appendix with infarcted omentum in the hernia sac which manifests acute scrotum has not been described previously. Herein, we described a case of a 5-year-old boy, admitted with right tense, painful, and erythematous scrotum in the emergency room. The diagnosis of herniated appendicitis was performed preoperatively by ultrasound. Moreover, the ischemic omentum was confirmed during surgery. PMID:25785221

  8. Thoracoscopic Patch Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Neonate using Spiral Tacks: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    A Riquelme, Mario; D Guajardo, Carlos; A Juarez-Parra, Marco; A Elizondo, Rodolfo; C Cortinas, Julio

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of congenital diaphragmatic hernia that was successfully treated with spi-ral tacks using thoracoscopy. A newborn female was diagnosed with a diaphragmatic hernia at 20 weeks of gestation. The defect was surgically repaired by thoracoscopy and primary closure. On postoperative day 25, she developed respiratory distress. Chest x-ray showed a recurrence and was taken to the OR for surgical repair with spiral tacks. PMID:26290813

  9. Serial tightening of Prolene mesh in the repair of a large ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anurag

    2006-04-01

    A 9-month-old female baby was brought to our hospital with a large ventral hernia which had developed after conservative treatment of an exomphalos. A hitherto undescribed technique involving serial tightening of a Prolene mesh was utilised to close the ventral hernia. We were able to achieve a good result within a short period of 2 weeks, without resorting to ventilation. We propose this procedure as an alternative to other existing techniques in similar situations.

  10. Non-intubated laparoscopic repair of giant Morgagni’s hernia for a young man

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Liu, Dong; Pan, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenbin; Hu, Zhengqun

    2016-01-01

    An asymptomatic patient was admitted as his chest photograph and computed tomography scans showed a giant Morgagni’s hernia (MH). And it was repaired by laparoscopic approach under epidural anesthesia without endotracheal intubation. The hernia content of omentum was repositioned back into the abdominal cavity, and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with composite mesh. Which indicated that non-intubated laparoscopic mesh repair via epidural anesthesia is reliable and satisfactory for MH. PMID:27621903

  11. Right Bochdalek Hernia Associated with Kartagener Syndrome: Developmental and Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Carmelo; Turiaco, Nunzio; Gitto, Eloisa; Borruto, Francesca Astra; Santoro, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel case of the association of right-sided Bochdalek hernia, a diaphragmatic life-threatening malformation, and Kartagener syndrome, which is characterized by congenital bronchiectasis, chronic sinusitis, and situs inversus. The developmental and clinical findings are discussed. When an association of diaphragmatic hernia with situs viscerum inversus is encountered, physicians should be mindful of the possibility of Kartagener syndrome because this condition could significantly affect the morbidity of the patient. PMID:25755941

  12. [Treatment of medial ventral hernias with the use of synthetic endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Pushkin, S Iu; Belokonev, V I

    2010-01-01

    350 patients with medial ventral hernias were operated on. 307 of them had various concurrent diseases; 177 required simultaneous surgery on that account. Endoprosthesis (synthetic mesh) was fixed using an "inlay-sub-lay" technique. Local complications were detected in 19.4% of patients, 5.4% developed common complications. 1.1% of patients had died. Long-term hernia recurrence was registered in 1.1%.

  13. A Triad of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Meckel's Diverticulum, and Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Al Saied, Amer; Ali, Mansour J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a common developmental anomaly encountered by paediatric surgeons. It is known to be associated with extradiaphragmatic malformations, which include cardiac, renal, genital, and chromosomal abnormalities. Herein, we report a newborn born with concurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia, Meckel's diverticulum, and heterotopic pancreatic tissue. This is the first case report of such a triad with description of possible mechanisms of the development. PMID:24804135

  14. Right bochdalek hernia associated with kartagener syndrome: developmental and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Carmelo; Turiaco, Nunzio; Gitto, Eloisa; Borruto, Francesca Astra; Santoro, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel case of the association of right-sided Bochdalek hernia, a diaphragmatic life-threatening malformation, and Kartagener syndrome, which is characterized by congenital bronchiectasis, chronic sinusitis, and situs inversus. The developmental and clinical findings are discussed. When an association of diaphragmatic hernia with situs viscerum inversus is encountered, physicians should be mindful of the possibility of Kartagener syndrome because this condition could significantly affect the morbidity of the patient.

  15. Hepatopulmonary fusion: a rare and potentially lethal association with right congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishesh; Yadav, Devendra Kumar; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gupta, Devendra Kumar

    2017-02-14

    Hepatopulmonary fusion is an extremely rare accompaniment of right congenital diaphragmatic hernia. It is associated with abnormal systemic arterial supply and venous drainage of the right lung along with congenital heart disease. Children with this condition have a comparatively poor prognosis. We report a case of right congenital diaphragmatic hernia with hepatopulmonary fusion along with review of the literature with stress on diagnosis and management.

  16. [Plastic repair using the demineralized matrix of flat allogeneic bone in an operation for ventral hernia].

    PubMed

    Isaĭchev, B A; Chikaleva, V I

    1990-11-01

    Investigations were performed in experiments on 36 dogs. Clinico-morphological results of plasty of artificial defects of the anterior abdominal wall by demineralized matrix of a flat allogeneic bone have shown good taking by tissues. In clinic the demineralized matrix of flat allogeneic bone (scapula, skull fornix) was used in ventral hernias in 36 patients. No recurrent hernias were noted in these patients within 20 months after operation.

  17. Unusual Finding in the Inguinal Canal: Abdominal Tuberculosis Presenting as Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Dhandore, Priya; Hombalkar, Narendra Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal findings in the inguinal canal during Herniotomy are not very rare for a paediatric surgeon. These abnormal findings may range from opposite gender sex organ (e.g. uterus and fallopian tube during orchidopexy) to unexpected malignancy (e.g. Rhabdomyosarcoma) to the abnormal embryological development (Splenogonadal fusion). Though abdominal tuberculosis is common, abdominal tuberculosis presenting as an inguinal hernia is exceedingly uncommon. We report an unusual case of abdominal tuberculosis presenting as inguinal hernia. PMID:27190886

  18. Richter’s Hernia and Sir Frederick Treves: An Original Clinical Experience, Review, and Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Wolfgang; Zellweger, René

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical recognition, pathology, and management of Richter’s hernia and to review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Summary Background Data The earliest known reported case of Richter’s hernia occurred in 1598 and was described by Fabricius Hildanus. The first scientific description of this particular hernia was given by August Gottlob Richter in 1778, who presented it as “the small rupture.” In 1887, Sir Frederick Treves gave an excellent overview on the topic and proposed the title “Richter’s hernia.” To his work—a cornerstone to modern understanding—hardly any new aspects can be added today. Since then, only occasional case reports or small series of retrospectively collected Richter’s hernias have been published. Methods The authors draw on their experience with 18 prospectively collected cases treated in the ICRC Lopiding Hospital for War Surgery in northern Kenya between February and December 1998 and review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Results The classic features of Richter’s hernia were confirmed in all case studies of patients: only part of the circumference of the bowel is entrapped and strangulated in the hernial orifice. The involved segment may rapidly pass into gangrene, yet signs of intestinal obstruction are often absent. The death rate in the authors’ collective was 17%. Conclusion Richter’s hernia is a deceptive entity whose high death rate can be reduced by accurate diagnosis and early surgery. Considering the increasing incidence at laparoscope insertion sites, awareness of this special type of hernia with its misleading clinical appearance is important and of general interest. PMID:11066144

  19. Successful treatment of flail chest with chondrosternal disruption and traumatic parasternal lung hernia with titanium rib bridges

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Corona, Rodrigo; Loyola-Garcia, Ulises; Camacho Partida, Iris; Rodriguez-Ortega, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The surgical principles for the treatment of flail chest have yet to be fully established. Furthermore, the relationship between flail chest and lung hernias is unclear. We report here a rare case of chondrosternal traumatic disruption and lung hernia that was treated with a novel technique using titanium rib bridges and clips, which successfully reduced the hernia defect and provided stability to the chest wall. This procedure was beneficial in minimising the patient's ventilation time and time away from work. PMID:23608852

  20. Successful treatment of flail chest with chondrosternal disruption and traumatic parasternal lung hernia with titanium rib bridges.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Corona, Rodrigo; Loyola-Garcia, Ulises; Partida, Iris Camacho; Rodriguez-Ortega, Fernando

    2013-04-22

    The surgical principles for the treatment of flail chest have yet to be fully established. Furthermore, the relationship between flail chest and lung hernias is unclear. We report here a rare case of chondrosternal traumatic disruption and lung hernia that was treated with a novel technique using titanium rib bridges and clips, which successfully reduced the hernia defect and provided stability to the chest wall. This procedure was beneficial in minimising the patient's ventilation time and time away from work.

  1. Appendiceal diverticulitis in a femoral hernia causing necrotizing fasciitis of the right inguinal region: report of a unique case.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, G K; Bali, C; Theodorou, S J; Zioga, A; Fatouros, M

    2013-02-01

    De Garengeot's hernia--a rare finding occurring mostly in women--is defined by the presence of the vermiform appendix within the sac of a femoral hernia. The incidence of appendicitis is rarer still, with less than a 100 cases reported to date. We present a unique case of an 84-year-old male patient with perforated appendiceal diverticulitis within a De Garengeot's hernia causing abscess and necrotizing infection of the overlying soft tissues.

  2. Postmortem investigation of mylohyoid hiatus and hernia: aetiological factors of plunging ranula.

    PubMed

    Harrison, John D; Kim, Ann; Al-Ali, Saad; Morton, Randall P

    2013-09-01

    The mylohyoid hiatus and hernia were discovered in the nineteenth century and were considered to explain the origin of the plunging ranula from the sublingual gland. This formed the rationale for sublingual sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula. However, a more recent, extensive histological investigation reported that hernias contained submandibular gland, which supported an origin of the plunging ranula from the submandibular gland and submandibular sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula. We therefore decided to investigate the occurrence and location of the hiatus and the histological nature of the hernia. Twenty-three adult cadavers were dissected in the submandibular region. The locations and dimensions of mylohyoid hiatuses were measured before taking biopsies of hernias. Hiatuses with associated hernias were found in ten cadavers: unilateral in six; and bilateral in four, in one of which there were three hiatuses. Sublingual gland was identified in nine hernias and fat without gland in six. This investigation supports clinical and experimental evidence that the plunging ranula originates from the sublingual gland and may enter the neck through the mylohyoid muscle. It confirms the rationale of sublingual sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula.

  3. Abdominal musculature abnormalities as a cause of groin pain in athletes. Inguinal hernias and pubalgia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D C; Meyers, W C; Moylan, J A; Lohnes, J; Bassett, F H; Garrett, W E

    1991-01-01

    There has been increasing interest within the European sports medicine community regarding the etiology and treatment of groin pain in the athlete. Groin pain is most commonly caused by musculotendinous strains of the adductors and other muscles crossing the hip joint, but may also be related to abdominal wall abnormalities. Cases may be termed "pubalgia" if physical examination does not reveal inguinal hernia and there is an absence of other etiology for groin pain. We present nine cases of patients who underwent herniorrhaphies for groin pain. Two patients had groin pain without evidence of a hernia preoperatively (pubalgia). In the remaining seven patients we determined the presence of a hernia by physical examination. At operation, eight patients were found to have inguinal hernias. One patient had no hernia but had partial avulsion of the internal oblique fibers from their insertion at the public tubercle. The average interval from operation to return to full activity was 11 weeks. All patients returned to full activity within 3 months of surgery. One patient had persistent symptoms of mild incisional tenderness, but otherwise there were no recurrences, complications, or persistence of symptoms. Abnormalities of the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernias and microscopic tears or avulsions of the internal oblique muscle, can be an overlooked source of groin pain in the athlete. Operative treatment of this condition with herniorrhaphy can return the athlete to his sport within 3 months.

  4. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Femoral Hernia; Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Majid; Karami, MohamamdYasin; Zangouri, Vahid; Deilami, Iman; Maalhagh, Mehrnoush

    2016-01-01

    Femoral hernias account for 2% to 4% of groin hernias, are more common in women, and are more appropriate to present with strangulation and require emergency surgery.This condition may lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction or strangulation and possible bowel resection-anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge, there is few reports of strangulated femoral hernia.We herein present an 82-year-old lady who presented with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On examination, the patient had a generalized tenderness and distention. The working diagnosis at this time was a bowel obstruction. A computed tomography scan revealed the hernia occurring medial to the femoral vessels and below the inguinal ligament .Laparotomy was performed and patient was treated successfully with surgical therapy.Herniawas repaired and a small bowel resection was performed with end to end anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was doing well at a 12-month follow-up visit. Obstructing femoral hernia of the small bowel is rare and the physician should suspect femoral hernia as a bowel obstruction cause. PMID:27162928

  5. Grynfeltt Hernia: A Deceptive Lumbar Mass with a Lipoma-Like Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Jonathan R.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Patel, Chetan; Kozol, Robert; Lopez-Viego, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    The Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia is a rare posterior abdominal wall defect that allows for the herniation of retro- and intraperitoneal structures through the upper lumbar triangle. While this hernia may initially present as a small asymptomatic bulge, the defect typically enlarges over time and can become symptomatic with potentially serious complications. In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. Due to the limited number of lumbar hernioplasties performed, there has not been a large study that definitively identifies the best repair technique. It is generally accepted that abdominal hernias such as these should be repaired by tension-free methods. Both laparoscopic and open techniques are described in modern literature with unique advantages and complications for each. We present the case of an unexpected Grynfeltt hernia diagnosed following an attempted lipoma resection. We chose to perform an open repair involving a combination of fascial approximation and dual-layer polypropylene mesh placement. The patient's recovery was uneventful and there has been no evidence of recurrence at over six months. Our goal herein is to increase awareness of upper lumbar hernias and to discuss approaches to their surgical management. PMID:26697256

  6. Incarcerated femoral hernia containing the right uterine tube. A pre-operative diagnosis is possible.

    PubMed

    Engin, Omer; Cicek, Ebru; Oner, Soner Recai; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    The incarcerated femoral hernia containing the right uterine tube is very rare to see. The case report is important to accumulate knowledge of very rare cases. The diagnosis of the case was established pre-operatively with abdominal computerized tomography (CT) On CT examination, the mass in the hernia sac was not connected with the intestines and a tubal structure on the right side of the uterus was shown to extend out of the abdomen. In the operation, the right uterine tube(RUT) was reduced into the abdomen after its blood supply was shown to be normal. A hernia repair was performed. Sometimes in obese patients, incarcerated femoral or inguinal hernias may not been noted. Ultrasonography, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used frequently to diagnose abdominal wall hernias. The organs in the incarcerated sac must be examined carefully and the viability must be checked. The surgeon must decide whether or not to resect the organs. In our case, strangulation was not found and polypropylene mesh was not used for hernia repair due to a fear of infection of the prosthesis. Incarceration of the uterine tube in the sac is traumatic and this condition may lead to infection. Such conditions may lead to ectopic pregnancy. The patient must be informed about ectopic pregnancy due to a previous incarceration of the tube because ectopic pregnancy may be fatal.

  7. Repair of Concomitant Incisional and Parastomal Hernias Using a Hybrid Technique: A Series of 32 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinyong; Tian, Wen; Li, Jiye; Sun, Pengjun; Pei, Lijuan; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Concomitant incisional and parastomal hernias is a challenging condition. We used a hybrid technique of sublay and onlay to treat patients with this condition. Material/Methods The clinical data of 32 consecutive patients treated from February 2008 to April 2014 for concomitant incisional and parastomal hernias were retrospectively reviewed. The mean diameter was 9 (range 4–13) cm of the incisional hernias, and 6 (range 4.5–8) cm of the parastomal hernias. Results The mean operative time was 247 (range 220–290) min. The mean hospital stay was 20 (range 14–27) days. All surgical wounds healed by primary intention. Seven patients had postoperative seroma and were well managed with puncture and compression. All 32 patients were followed up for a mean of 48 (range 5–68) months. Four patients recurred with parastomal hernias and were treated with secondary surgery. No further recurrence occurred until the last follow-up. Conclusions This hybrid technique of sublay and onlay is only suitable for the repair of complex incisional and parastomal hernias. PMID:26186130

  8. Symptomatic Right-Sided Diaphragmatic Hernia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Graham; Moore, B. Todd; Serrone, Rosemarie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated diaphragmatic hernias is widely recognized as both safe and effective. However, symptomatic diaphragmatic hernias encountered in the setting of pregnancy, while rare, present a significant surgical challenge. Furthermore, right-sided diaphragmatic hernias account for only 13% of cases. Here, we present a case in which a symptomatic, posterior right-sided diaphragmatic hernia, presenting in the later stages of pregnancy, was successfully repaired using a laparoscopic approach. Methods: Our patient is a 42-y-old gravid woman who, at 27 wk gestation, was admitted to the gynecology service with a 2-d history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain, right shoulder pain, abdominal distension, and obstipation. Results: Computed tomography of the chest demonstrated an incarcerated right diaphragmatic hernia. Surgical consultation was obtained, and the patient was taken to the operating room urgently for repair. Intraoperatively, the cecum was reduced and the diaphragm repaired primarily using a laparoscopic approach. The patient recovered well and was discharged home on postoperative day 8 with no complications to the patient or the pregnancy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic reduction and repair of symptomatic incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia can be safely performed in the third trimester of pregnancy. PMID:23925038

  9. Development of an Optimal Diaphragmatic Hernia Rabbit Model for Pediatric Thoracoscopic Training

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Merino, Eva M.; Usón-Casaús, Jesús M.; Zaragoza-Bayle, Concepción; Rivera-Barreno, Ramón; Rodríguez-Alarcón, Carlos A.; Palme, Rupert; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to standarize the procedure needed to reproduce a similar surgical scene which a pediatric surgeon would face on repairing a Bochdalek hernia in newborns and to define the optimal time period for hernia development that achieve a realistic surgical scenario with minimimal animal suffering. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits weighing 3–3.5 kg were divided into four groups depending on the time frame since hernia creation to thoracoscopic repair: 48 h, 72 h, 96 h and 30 days. Bochdalek trigono was identified and procedures for hernia creation and thoracoscopic repair were standarized. Blood was collected for hematology (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, hemoglobin and hematocrit), biochemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase) and gas analysis (arterial blood pH, partial pressure of oxygen, partial pressure of carbón dioxide, oxygen saturation and bicarbonate) at baseline and before the surgial repairment. Glucocorticoid metabolites concentration in faeces was measured. Thoracoscopy video recordings were evaluated by six pediatric surgeons and rated from 0 to 10 according to similarities with congenital diaphragmatic hernia in newborn and with its thoracoscopic approach. Statistical methods included the analysis of variance, and comparisons between groups were followed by a post-hoc Tukey’s test. Fourty -eight h showed to be the optimal time frame to obtain a diaphragmatic hernia similar to newborn scenario from a surgical point of view with minimal stress for the animals. PMID:24521868

  10. Repair of an inguinoscrotal hernia in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    TATULLI, F.; CARAGLIA, A.; DELCURATOLO, A.; CASSANO, S.; CHETTA, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inguinal hernia repairs are routinely performed as outpatient procedures in most patients, whereas a few require admission due to clinical or social peculiarities. Muscular dystrophies are inherited disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. In case of surgery there is no definite recommendation for either general or regional anesthesia. Case report This contribution regards a 48 y. o. male patient diagnosed with Becker Muscular Dystrophy by muscle biopsy 10 years earlier. He had a left-sided sizable inguinoscrotal hernia with repeat episodes of incarceration. An elective mesh repair with suction drainage was accomplished under selective spinal anesthesia. The post-operative course was uneventful. Discussion A few inguinal hernia repairs require admission due to peculiarities such as extensive scrotal hernias requiring suction drainage. Muscular dystrophies are inherited disorders with no cure and no two dystrophy patients are exactly alike, therefore the health issues will be different for each individual. In case of surgery there is no definite recommendation for either general or regional anesthesia. This contribution regards the successful elective mesh repair with suction drainage of a large left-sided inguino-scrotal hernia in a 48 y. o. male patient affected by Becker muscular dystrophy by selective spinal anesthesia obtained by 10 milligrams of hyperbaric bupivacaine. Conclusion Effective mesh repair with suction drainage of large inguinal hernias under spinal anesthesia can be achieved in patients affected by muscular dystrophy. PMID:28098058

  11. Prenatal imaging of a fetus with the rare combination of a right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and a giant omphalocele.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ayasa; Hidaka, Nobuhiro; Kido, Saki; Fukushima, Kotaro; Kato, Kiyoko

    2014-11-01

    A co-existing right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and omphalocele is rare. We present images of a fetus diagnosed with this rare combination of anomalies. Early neonatal death occurred immediately after full-term birth due to severe respiratory insufficiency. In this case, disturbance of chest wall development due to the omphalocele rather than the diaphragmatic hernia was considered as the main cause of lung hypoplasia. Our experience suggests that caution should be exercised for severe respiratory insufficiency in a neonate with an omphalocele and diaphragmatic hernia, even in the absence of an intra-thoracic liver, one of the indicators of poor outcome for congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

  12. Percutaneous suturing technique and single-site umbilical laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni hernia: Review of three cases.

    PubMed

    Zouari, M; Jallouli, M; Bendhaou, M; Zitouni, H; Mhiri, R

    2015-12-01

    Morgagni hernias are uncommon, accounting for only 1-2% of all congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Minimally invasive surgery is today the gold standard treatment. We present a technique using percutaneous suturing and single-site umbilical laparoscopic repair of Morgagni hernia in three children. Recovery was uneventful in all three patients. There was no recurrence and the chest radiograph remained normal during the postoperative follow-up. The percutaneous suturing technique and single-site umbilical laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni hernia is an easy and effective alternative to standard laparoscopic repair.

  13. The Cause of Unexpected Acute Abdomen and Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhage in 24-Week Pregnant Woman: Bochdalek Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Ibrahim; Yazkan, Rasih

    2016-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia (BH) is the most common type of congenital diaphragm hernia and is rarely seen in adults. In adult patients, BH often remains asymptomatic or presents with nondiagnostic symptoms and may lead to complications, though rarely. The necrosis and perforations occurring in the hernia may lead to mortality. In this report, we present a 34-year-old pregnant woman at 24 gestational weeks who presented with Bochdalek hernia causing gastric volvulus associated with perforation and intra-abdominal hemorrhage associated with splenic rupture. PMID:28018700

  14. Comparison of herniorrhaphy versus clamping of umbilical hernias in horses: a retrospective study of 93 cases (1982-1994).

    PubMed Central

    Riley, C B; Cruz, A M; Bailey, J V; Barber, S M; Fretz, P B

    1996-01-01

    Many uncomplicated umbilical hernias have been managed successfully in foals by the application of a hernia clamp. Isolated reports of complications following clamp application have led some authors to suggest that it is an unsuitable method of treatment. Little information has been published comparing the complication rates associated with the use of hernia clamps and herniorrhaphy in the treatment of umbilical hernias. The purpose of this retrospective study was to report the characteristics of clinical cases of umbilical hernia and to compare the complication rates following these 2 treatment approaches. Information was collected from records or from owners to identify the occurrence of complications and owner satisfaction following treatment. Of 93 cases, 10 complicated and 18 uncomplicated hernias were treated by herniorrhaphy, 40 uncomplicated hernias were treated by clamping, 1 originally uncomplicated hernia was treated by both techniques, and 24 cases were untreated. Nineteen percent of uncomplicated hernias treated by herniorrhaphy, and 19% of those clamped developed minor complications. This study demonstrates that although minor complications may be associated with either technique, they generally do not result in significant morbidity. PMID:8705974

  15. Composite mesh and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flap for perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Marios; Hübner, Gunnar; Bednarek, Marzena; Arafkas, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Perineal hernia is an uncommon complication following abdominoperineal rectum resection. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for perineal hernia repair, including perineal, laparoscopic and abdominal approaches. Repair techniques can be classified into primary suture techniques, mesh placements and repairs with autogenous tissue. We report a 68-year-old man with a perineal hernia, who underwent a pelvic floor reconstruction with a transperineal composite mesh and a gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flap. We conclude that a combined approach with transperineal mesh reconstruction and gluteal fasciocutaneous flap could be an alternative choice in perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection.

  16. Dynamic ultrasound with postural change facilitated the detection of an incisional hernia in a case with negative MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Wongsithichai, Patcharaporn; Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2015-09-01

    Incisional hernias commonly develop after abdominal surgeries with a lower incidence in patients receiving laparoscopy. Diagnosis through a non-surgical approach is usually made by computed tomography or magnetic resonance images (MRI) but both image modalities require patients to be examined in a supine position. We reported a case noticing a mass over her right lower abdomen after a laparoscopic liver segmentectomy with negative findings of hernia on MRI. A hernia sac was found by ultrasound with the patient being standing, highlighting the utility of dynamic ultrasound with postural change in investigation of incisional hernias.

  17. The Use of Biological Meshes in Diaphragmatic Defects - An Evidence-Based Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank-Alexander; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of meshes for hiatal hernia repair has emerged in the era of laparoscopic surgery, although sporadic cases of mesh augmentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture have been reported. The indications for biologic meshes in diaphragmatic repair are ill defined. This systematic review aims to investigate the available evidence on the role of biologic meshes in diaphragmatic rupture and hiatal hernia repair. Limited data from sporadic case reports and case series have demonstrated that repair of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture with biologic mesh is safe technique in both the acute or chronic setting. High level evidence demonstrates short-term benefits of biologic mesh augmentation in hiatal hernia repair over primary repair, although adequate long-term data are not currently available. Long-term follow-up data suggest no benefit of hiatal hernia repair using porcine small intestine submucosa over suture repair. The effectiveness of different biologic mesh materials on hernia recurrence requires further investigation.

  18. The Use of Biological Meshes in Diaphragmatic Defects – An Evidence-Based Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Stavros A.; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank-Alexander; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of meshes for hiatal hernia repair has emerged in the era of laparoscopic surgery, although sporadic cases of mesh augmentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture have been reported. The indications for biologic meshes in diaphragmatic repair are ill defined. This systematic review aims to investigate the available evidence on the role of biologic meshes in diaphragmatic rupture and hiatal hernia repair. Limited data from sporadic case reports and case series have demonstrated that repair of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture with biologic mesh is safe technique in both the acute or chronic setting. High level evidence demonstrates short-term benefits of biologic mesh augmentation in hiatal hernia repair over primary repair, although adequate long-term data are not currently available. Long-term follow-up data suggest no benefit of hiatal hernia repair using porcine small intestine submucosa over suture repair. The effectiveness of different biologic mesh materials on hernia recurrence requires further investigation. PMID:26539439

  19. [Inguinal hernia in Africa and laparoscopy: utopia or realism?].

    PubMed

    Pallas, G; Simon, F; Sockeel, P; Chapuis, O; Jancovici, R

    2000-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a common indication for surgery in Africa. Most cases involve men and are treated in advanced stages often with complications. Until now the benchmark technique for surgical management has been the well-defined herniorrhaphy technique. Use of prosthetic implants has been rare because of high cost. Recently there has been a growing interest in video-assisted surgery throughout developing countries. However this enthusiasm should not obscure the fact that the technique is still in the developing stage and thus is more costly for the local economy. Indications for video-assisted surgery should be carefully selected in function of local conditions as well as problems specific to developing countries.

  20. Abdominal adhesions in laparoscopic hernia repair. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Eller, R; Twaddell, C; Poulos, E; Jenevein, E; McIntire, D; Russell, S

    1994-03-01

    Laparoscopic herniorrhaphy is becoming an increasingly common procedure. The possible creation of intraperitoneal adhesions during laparoscopic herniorrhaphy has not been examined. For the transperitoneal hernia repair to be an acceptable option, the hypothesis that this approach will incite significant adhesions must be rejected. To test this hypothesis, 21 pigs underwent laparoscopic herniorrhaphy using a standard procedure with the implantation of a polypropylene mesh graft on one side while a sham procedure was performed on the other. These animals were later examined laparoscopically for adhesion formation and the condition of the graft. None of the 21 animals developed adhesions to the trocar sites, 12 animals developed adhesions to the area of the polypropylene mesh, and 3 developed adhesions to the side of the sham procedure. There were no adhesions involving the small intestine. It is therefore concluded that the hypothesis should be rejected and that laparoscopic herniorrhaphy does not incite significant adhesions.

  1. Pneumothorax as a complication of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Ferzli, G S; Kiel, T; Hurwitz, J B; Davidson, P; Piperno, B; Fiorillo, M A; Hayek, N E; Riina, L L; Sayad, P

    1997-02-01

    Pneumothorax was identified as a complication of endoscopic hernia repair in two patients with insufflation pressures of 15 mmHg and operating times exceeding 2 h. These patients also showed intraoperative perturbations in both oxygen saturation and end-tidal CO2 production. A prospective study was undertaken to determine whether similar complications would arise if preperitoneal insufflation pressures were limited to 10 mmHg. Postoperative chest x-rays were obtained on all patients to check for pneumothoraces, even clinically occult ones. Fifty patients were studied, with average operating times of 67 min. No patient demonstrated any hemodynamic or ventilatory changes, and none had any evidence of pneumothorax on x-ray. We conclude that these complications were not present when insufflation pressure was maintained at 10 mmHg and that routine x-ray is not warranted. Larger randomized trials of insufflation pressures are needed.

  2. Planned ventral hernia. Staged management for acute abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Pritchard, F E; Minard, G; Hickerson, W L; Howell, R L; Schurr, M J; Kudsk, K A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of a staged management scheme for initial and definitive management of acute abdominal wall defects is provided. METHODS: A four-staged scheme for managing acute abdominal wall defects consists of the following stages: stage I--prosthetic insertion; stage II--2 to 3 weeks after prosthetic insertion and wound granulation, the prosthesis is removed; stage III--2 to 3 days later, planned ventral hernia (split thickness skin graft [STSG] or full-thickness skin and subcutaneous fat); stage IV--6 to 12 months later, definitive reconstruction. Cases were evaluated retrospectively for benefits and risks of the techniques employed. RESULTS: Eighty-eight cases (39 visceral edema, 27 abdominal sepsis, 22 abdominal wall resection) were managed during 8.5 years. Prostheses included polypropylene mesh in 45 cases, polyglactin 910 mesh in 27, polytetrafluorethylene in 10, and plastic in 6. Twenty-four patients died from their initial disease. The fistula rates associated with prosthetic management was 9%; no wound-related mortality occurred. Most wounds had split thickness skin graft applied after prosthetic removal. Definitive reconstruction was undertaken in 21 patients in the authors' institution (prosthetic mesh in 12 and modified components separation in 9). Recurrent hernias developed in 33% of mesh reconstructions and 11% of the components separation technique. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that 1) this staged approach was associated with low morbidity and no technique-related mortality; 2) prostheses placed for edema were removed with fascial approximation accomplished in half of those cases; 3) absorbable mesh provided the advantages of reasonable durability, ease of removal, and relatively low cost--it has become the prosthesis of choice; and 4) the modified components separation technique of reconstruction provided good results in patients with moderate sized defects. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8203973

  3. Congenital retrosternal hernias of Morgagni: Manifestation and treatment in children

    PubMed Central

    Slepov, Oleksii; Kurinnyi, Sergii; Ponomarenko, Oleksii; Migur, Mikhailo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to scarcity of congenital diaphragmatic hearnias of Morgagni (CDHM), non-specific clinical presentation in the pediatric age group, we aimed to investigate the incidence, clinical manifestations, anatomical characteristics, and develop diagnostic algorithm and treatment of CDHM in children. Materials and Methods: The patients’ records of children with CDHM treated in our hospital during past 20 years were retrospectively reviewed for the age at diagnosis, gender, clinical findings, anatomical features, operative details and outcome. Results: Since 1995 to 2014 we observed 6 (3 boys, 3 girls) patients with CDHM, that comprise 3.2% of all congenital diaphragmatic hernia cases (n = 185). Age at diagnosis varied from 3 mo. to 10y.o. Failure to thrive was main symptom in 4 patients, followed by recurrent respiratory infections (n = 3), dyspnea (n = 3), and gastrointestinal manifestations: constipation (n = 2), abdominal pain (n = 1). Work-up consisted of plain X-ray for all (n = 6), upper GI (n = 3), barium enema (n = 2), sonography (n = 6) and CT (n = 2). Abdominal approach used in 5 patients, and thoracotomy in one. Herniated contents were: liver lobes (n = 4), transverse colon (n = 3) and greater omentum (n = 1). 5 had right-sided lesion, 1- left-sided. Defect repaired using local tissues. Post-operative course was uneventful; all patients appeared well during follow-up. Conclusion: CDHM is very uncommon anomaly, very occasionally diagnosed at the early age. Failure to thrive and recurrent respiratory infections are most frequent clinical manifestations. In suspected CDHM we advocate the following work-up: plain chest and abdominal X-ray, contrast study (upper GI series or barium enema), ultrasonographic screen and CT scan. Surgical repair via abdominal approach, using local tissues and hernia sac removal is preferred. PMID:27251653

  4. A simplified technique for giant inguinal hernia repair in infants.

    PubMed

    Banieghbal, B

    2008-06-01

    Repair of giant inguino-scrotal hernia (GISH) in male infants is a difficult operation, even in experienced hands. It requires an immaculate technique to avoid known complications such as tearing of the sac, injury to delicate testicular vessels and dividing of vas deferens. Moreover, a recurrence rate of 9% is noted in a number of reports. This article describes a new surgical maneuver to simplify the procedure. All GISH repaired by the author, over a 5-year period (October 2001-September 2006), were reviewed retrospectively. In total, 89 infants with 106 GISH underwent uni- or bilateral herniotomies. A standard inguinal incision is made and Scarpa's fascia is sharply opened; the external inguinal ring and the cord is identified. By gentle manipulation and blunt dissection, the spermatic cord together with the testis is exteriorized. The assistant applies gentle traction to the cord, which allows for easy identification of the inguinal sac and its subsequent separation from vas and vessels. Testis is replaced in the scrotum, hernial sac suture ligated at its base and the wound closed in layers. All cases were managed with the above approach. The average length of the procedure was 11 min for unilateral and 19 min for bilateral cases. Except for minimal scrotal swelling post-operatively, no other surgery-related complications were noted during or immediately after the operation. Testicular atrophy or iatrogenic undescended testes were not encountered in the follow-up period. Ipsilateral recurrent hernia was noted in one infant after 6 months which required re-operation with the same technique. In cases of GISH; dislocating the testis into the wound and applying a gentle stretch on the cord allows for a safe dissection of the hernial sac and subsequent herniotomy. This maneuver converts a difficult procedure into a relatively simple one.

  5. FBN1 Contributing to Familial Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Tyler F.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Li, Alexander H.; Abo-Zahrah, Reem; Jordan, Valerie K.; Hernandez-Garcia, Andres; Wiszniewski, Wojciech K.; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Lee, Brendan; Reardon, Willie; Scott, Daryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a relatively common, life-threatening birth defect. We present a family with recurrent CDH—paraesophageal and central—for whom exome sequencing (ES) revealed a frameshift mutation (c.4969_4970insA, p. Ile1657Asnfs*30) in the fibrillin 1 gene (FBN1) that causes Marfan syndrome. A diagnosis of Marfan syndrome had not been considered previously in this family. However, a review of the literature demonstrated that FBN1 mutations have an unusual pattern of CDH in which paraesophageal hernias are particularly common. Subsequent clinical evaluations revealed evidence for ectopia lentis in affected family members supporting a clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. Since only two other cases of familial CDH have been described in association with FBN1 mutations, we investigated an oligogenic hypothesis by examining ES data for deleterious sequence changes in other CDH-related genes. This search revealed putatively deleterious sequence changes in four other genes that have been shown to cause diaphragm defects in humans and/or mice—FREM1, DES, PAX3 and MET. It is unclear whether these changes, alone or in aggregate, are contributing to the development of CDH in this family. However, their individual contribution is likely to be small compared to that of the frameshift mutation in FBN1. We conclude that ES can be used to identify both major and minor genetic factors that may contribute to CDH. These results also suggest that ES should be considered in the diagnostic evaluation of individuals and families with CDH, particularly when other diagnostic modalities have failed to reveal a molecular etiology. PMID:25736269

  6. Pain and convalescence following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-12-01

    Severe pain is usual after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). Mesh fixation with titanium tacks may play a key role in the development of acute and chronic pain and alternative fixation methods should therefore be investigated. This PhD thesis was based on three studies and aimed too: 1) assess the intensity and impact of postoperative pain by detailed patient-reported description of pain and convalescence after LVHR (Study I), 2) evaluate the feasibility of fibrin sealant (FS) for mesh fixation in an experimental pig model (Study II), and 3) investigate FS vs. tacks for mesh fixation in LVHR in a randomised, double-blinded, clinical controlled study with acute postoperative pain as the primary outcome (Study III). In Study I - a prospective descriptive study - 35 patients were prospectively included and underwent LVHR. Scores of pain, quality of life, convalescence, fatigue, and general well-being were obtained from each patient. Follow-up was six months. Average pain from postoperative day (POD) 0-2 and POD 0-6 measured on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) was 61 and 48, respectively. Pain scores reached preoperative values at POD 30. The incidence of severe chronic pain was 7%. No parameter predicted postoperative pain significantly. Significant correlations were found between pain, and general well-being (rS= -0.8, p < 0.001), satisfaction (rS= -0.67, p < quality of life score (rS= -0.63, p < 0.001) six months postoperatively. Patients resumed normal daily activity at POD 14. In Study II - a randomised experimental study in pigs - nine pigs were operated laparoscopically with insertion of two different meshes fixed with either FS or tacks. All pigs were euthanized on POD 30. The primary outcome parameter was strength of ingrowth between the mesh and the anterior abdominal wall. A mechanical peel test was performed for each tissue sample. The secondary outcome parameters were grade and strength of adhesions to the mesh, shrinkage and displacement

  7. Shouldice inguinal hernia repair in the male adult: the gold standard? A multicenter controlled trial in 1578 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, J M; Boudet, M J; Fingerhut, A; Poucher, J; Hennet, H; Habib, E; Veyrières, M; Flamant, Y

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hernia repair is the second most frequently performed operation in France and in the United States, the prevalence being 36 for every 1000 males. Lowering the recurrence rate by 1% would mean 1000 fewer operations for hernia repair per year in France. METHODS: Between 1983 and 1989, 1578 adult males with a total of 1706 nonrecurrent inguinal hernias were prospectively and randomly allotted to undergo either a Bassini's repair, Cooper's ligament, or Shouldice repair with polypropylene or a Shouldice repair with stainless steel for determination of which technique was associated with the lowest recurrence rate. Fifty-nine hernia repairs were withdrawn after inclusion. Of the 1647 remaining hernias, 52.2% were indirect, 25.6% were direct, and 23.2% were combined. Patients were seen every 6 months for 3 years and then every year. Median follow-up was 5 years 8 months (range, 3 months-8.5 years). RESULTS: At 8.5 years, 5.6% of hernias were lost to follow-up. Ninety-seven hernia repairs failed, 50% during the first 2 years. The actuarial recurrence rate was 7.94% at 8.5 years. The Shouldice repair (stainless steel or polypropylene) was associated with fewer recurrences (6.1%) than either the Bassini's (8.6%) or Cooper's ligament repair (11.2%) technique (p < 0.001). This difference remained significant even when the maximal bias test was used. Fewer recurrences (5.9%) were observed with the stainless steel wire Shouldice repair than with polypropylene version (6.5%), but the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Shouldice hernia repair provides the patient with the best chances of nonrecurrence regardless of the anatomical type of hernia. The Shouldice hernia repair should be the gold standard for inguinal hernia repair in men and serves as the basis for comparison with all other techniques, be they prosthetic or laparoscopic. PMID:8526578

  8. [Total extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP) in the treatment of incarcerated and irreponible inguinal and femoral hernias].

    PubMed

    Mainik, F; Flade-Kuthe, R; Kuthe, A

    2005-12-01

    To estimate the value of TEP in the treatment of incarcerated and irreponible inguinal and femoral hernias more exactly we prospectively collected and evaluated the data of our clinic for the period of Oct. 1999 until Dec. 2003. In this period we performed in total 1 671 hernia repairs including 79 patients suffering from an incarcerated (n = 33) or irreponible (n = 46) inguinal or femoral hernia. Using only the TEP-technique we treated mainly the irreponible hernias (46 patients). In the combination of LAP (laparoscopy) and TEP (27 patients) the laparoscopy provided the possibility to classify as well the incarcerated tissue as the result of the reposition. With this combined technique we treated the majority of the incarcerated hernias. To confirm the recovery of the incarcerated tissue laparoscopy can be of high value at the end of the combined LAP + TEP (2 patients). Thus TEP was performed in 92 % of the cases. In 2 cases we performed a conventional hernioplasty and one operation was finished conventionally after switching from endoscopic to conventional procedure. In 2 patients we performed a laparoscopically supported resection of the incarcerated tissue without patch implantation. 1 patient acquired TAPP. The use of different operative techniques and their combinations demonstrates as well the possibility as the necessity of a differentiated and case adapted proceeding in the treatment of incarcerated hernias. Lethality with 1.2 % and early postoperative morbidity with only 5.0 % were low. The hospitalisation period was 4.7 d on average. Our results are comparable to results of literature and show that TEP-technique and combined TEP + LAP-technique are possible and reasonable for the treatment of incarcerated and irreponible hernias.

  9. A Comparative Analysis Between Laparoscopic and Open Ventral Hernia Repair at a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, STEPHEN W.; TURZA, KRISTIN C.; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; SCHIRMER, BRUCE D.; HALLOWELL, PETER T.

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair reportedly yields lower postoperative complications than open repair. We hypothesized that patients undergoing laparoscopic repair would have lower postoperative infectious outcomes. Also, certain preoperative patient characteristics and preoperative hernia characteristics are hypothesized to increase complication risk in both groups. All ventral hernia repairs performed at University of Virginia from January 2004 to January 2006 were reviewed. Primary outcomes included wound healing complications and hernia recurrence. Categorical data were analyzed with χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. Continuous variables were evaluated with independent t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. Multivariable logistic regression was performed. A total of 268 repairs (110 open, 158 laparoscopic) were evaluated. Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between groups, though the percents of wound contamination (5.4% vs 0.6%; P = 0.02) and simultaneous surgery (7.2% vs 0%; P = 0.001) were greater in the open procedures. Univariate analysis also revealed that open cases had a greater incidence of postoperative superficial surgical site infection (SSI) (30.0% vs 10.7%; P < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that both diabetes and open repair were associated with an increased risk of superficial SSI (P = 0.019; odds ratio = 3.512; 95% confidence interval = 1.229–10.037 and P = 0.001; odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.9–11.2, respectively). Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair yielded lower rates of postoperative superficial SSI than open surgery. Other pre-operative patient characteristics and preoperative hernia characteristics, with the exception of diabetes, were not found to be associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications. PMID:22856497

  10. Inguinal hernia: preperitoneal placement of a memory-ring patch by anterior approach. Preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Pélissier, E P

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to set up and evaluate a technique allowing, by the mean of a memory ring, easy placement of the patch in the preperitoneal space (PPS), directly via the hernia orifice, so as to associate the advantages of the preperitoneal patch, anterior approach and minimally invasive surgery. The memory-ring patch was made by basting a PDS cord around a 14 x 7.5 cm oval shaped polypropylene mesh. The hernia sac was dissected, blunt dissection of the PPS was carried out through the hernia orifice and the patch was introduced in the PPS via the orifice. Spreading of the patch in the PPS was facilitated by the memory-ring. One hundred and twenty nine hernias, classified as Nyhus Type IIIa, IIIb and IV, were operated on 126 patients; 11 were big pantaloon or sliding hernias. The anesthesia was spinal in 116 cases and local in 10 cases. There were three benign postoperative complications (2.3%) related to the hernia repair. Ninety six percent of the patients were evaluated with a mean follow up of 24.5 months (12-42). Two recurrences (1.6%) occurred, 7 patients (5.6%) felt some degree of light pain, but not any case of disabling pain was observed. This technique offers many advantages. It is tension-free and almost sutureless. The patch is placed in the PPS through the hernia orifice without any remote opening in the abdominal wall. The patch applied directly to the deep surface of the fascia reinforces the weak inguinal area by restoring the normal anatomic disposition. The good preliminary results are encouraging and justify further randomized evaluation.

  11. A 5-year Review of Darning Technique of Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Olasehinde, Olalekan O; Adisa, Adewale O; Agbakwuru, Elugwaraonu A; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu C; Kolawole, Oladapo A; Mosanya, Arinze O

    2015-01-01

    Context: The Darning technique of inguinal hernia repair is a tissue-based technique with documented low recurrence rate in some parts of the world. Though practiced in our setting, little is documented on its outcome. Aims: The aim was to review the outcome of Darning technique of inguinal hernia repair in our setting. Study Design: A descriptive retrospective study. Patients and Methods: Clinical records of all patients who had inguinal hernia repair using the Darning technique between January 2007 and December 2011 in our institution were obtained. Details of sociodemographic data, intraoperative findings and postoperative complications were reviewed. Statistical Analysis Used: simple frequencies, proportions and cross-tabulations. Results: A total of 132 patients whose ages ranged from 15 to 84 years (mean = 49.4 years) with a male: female ratio of 12:1 were studied. Majority of the hernias were right sided (68.9%), mostly indirect (81.8%). The procedures were for emergencies in 17 (12.9%) cases whereas the rest (87.1%) were done electively. Most procedures, 110 (83.3%) were performed under local anesthesia. Surgical site infection was the most common complication occurring in six patients (4.5%), while four patients (3%) had chronic groin pain. At a mean follow-up period of 15 months there were two recurrences (1.5%) both occurring in patients with bilateral hernias (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The Darning technique of inguinal hernia repair is a safe and effective method for inguinal hernia repair in our setting. PMID:25838768

  12. Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mann, CD; Luther, A; Hart, C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The laparoscopic approach to repairing ventral and incisional hernias has gained increasing popularity worldwide. We reviewed the experience of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair at a district general hospital in the UK with particular reference to patients with massive defects (diameter ≥15cm) and the morbidly obese. Methods A total of 144 patients underwent laparoscopic ventral (incisional or umbilical/paraumbilical) hernia repair between April 2007 and September 2012. Results The prevalence of conversion to open surgery was 2.8%. The prevalence of postoperative complications was 3.5%. Median postoperative follow-up was 30.2 months. A total of 5.6% cases suffered late complications and 2.8% developed recurrence. Thirty-four patients underwent repair of defects ≥10cm in diameter with a prevalence of recurrence of 5.6%. Sixteen patients underwent repair of ‘massive’ incisional hernia (diameter ≥15cm) with a prevalence of recurrence of 12.5%. Sixteen patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥40kg/m2 (range, 40–61kg/m2) underwent laparoscopic repair with a prevalence of recurrence of 6.3% (p>0.05 vs BMI <40kg/m2). Conclusions Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair can be carried out safely with a low prevalence of recurrence. It may have advantages in morbidly obese patients in whom open repair would represent a significant undertaking. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair may be used in cases of large and massive hernias, in which the risk of recurrence increases but is comparable with open repair and associated with low morbidity. PMID:25519261

  13. Bochdalek hernia and repetitive pancreatitis in a 33 year old woman

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Medina Andrade Luis; David, Coot Polanco Reyes; Laura, Medina Andrade; Abraham, Medina Andrade; Stephanie, Serrano Collazos; Grecia, Ortiz Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bochdalek hernia presentation in adulthood is rare. The presentation in newborns is the most common, manifesting with data from respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia, requiring urgent surgical intervention with high morbidity and mortality. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a 33 year old woman admitted in the emergency room with severe abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant and disnea. After physical examination and laboratory test we diagnose mild acute pancreatitis. The patient haven’t colelitiasis by ulstrasound or any risk factor for pancreatitis. Initially she received medical treatment and was discharged after one week. After four weeks she presented the same symptoms in two different occasions, with severe and mild pancreatitis respectively. A computed tomography report a left posterolateral diafragmatic hernia. In spite of the rare association of pancreatitis and Bochdalek hernia, we realized it as the etiology until the second event and planned his surgery. We made a posterolateral torachotomy and diafragmatic plasty with a politetrafluoroetileno mesh and after a 6 months follow up she has coursed asymptomatic. DISCUSSION The high rate of complications in this type of hernia requires us to perform surgical treatment as the hernia is detected. In this case it is prudent medical treatment prior to surgical correction despite this being the origin of the pancreatitis, because the systemic inflammatory response added by the surgical act could result in a higher rate of complications if not performed at the appropriate time. There is no precise rule to determine the type of approach of choice in this type of hernia which thoracotomy or laparotomy may be used. CONCLUSION Bochdalek hernia is a rare find in adults who require treatment immediately after diagnosis because of the high risk of complications. When presented with data from pancreatitis is recommended to complete the medical treatment of pancreatitis before

  14. Early results of a randomised trial comparing Prolene and VyproII-mesh in endoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair (TEP) of recurrent unilateral hernias.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, T; Wollert, S; Osterberg, J; Smedberg, S; Bringman, S

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a lightweight mesh to a standard polypropylene hernia mesh in endoscopic extraperitoneal hernioplasty in recurrent hernias. A total of 140 men with recurrent unilateral inguinal hernias were randomised to a totally extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP) with Prolene or VyproII in a single-blinded multi-center trial. The randomisation and all data handling were performed through the Internet. 137 patients were operated as allocated. Follow-up was completed in 88% of the patients. The median operation times were 55 (24-125) min and 53.5 (21-123) min for the Prolene and VyproII groups, respectively. The meshes had comparable results in the surgeon's assessment of the handling of the mesh, return to work, return to daily activities, complications, postoperative pain and quality of life during the first 8 weeks of rehabilitation, except in General Health (GH) SF-36, where the VyproII-group had a significantly better score (P=0.045). The use of Prolene and VyproII-meshes in endoscopic repair of recurrent inguinal hernia seems to result in similar short-term outcomes and quality of life.

  15. Inferior Lumbar Triangle Hernia as a Rarely Report Cause of Low Back Pain: A Report of 4 Cases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    to overlook a lumbar hernia may be lumbago, lumbar radicular syndrome, or lumbar somatic dysfunction . This prob- lem will not have radicular signs or...detect defects between muscular and fascial layers, visualize herniated viscera, and differentiate a hernia from renal and other soft-tissue tumors is one

  16. Migration of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt into a Hernia Sac: An Unusual Complication of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Surgery in Children.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir; Pant, Nitin; Kumar, Piyush; Pandey, Anand; Khan, Tanvir Roshan; Gupta, Archika; Rawat, Jiledar

    2016-01-01

    We report 2 cases of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt migration into an inguinal hernia sac. In both cases hernia manifested itself on the right side in late infancy. We attempted to analyse the anatomical and mechanical factors leading to shunt migration as seen in the X-rays of our cases.

  17. [The operations of the abdominal hernias with the use propylene material in patients operated due to abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Pupka, Artur; Lepiesza, Agnieszka; Skóra, Jan; Nega, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between abdominal hernias and aortic aneurysm has been well documented in literature. The pathophysiology of aneurysm and hernia formation is seen within the abnormal collagen metabolism, resulting in extracellular matrix defects. This study presents a group of 8 men in the age of 36 to 78 years old (average 63, 5 years old) who underwent both an operation for the aneurysm and for the abdominal hernia. Of the reported 8 patients, 7 had postoperative hernias, where 4 of the cases there were recurrent postoperative hernias. The remaining patient had an inguinal hernia. In 7 cases patients underwent an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) operation and in one case a hepatic artery aneurysm endovascular operation was performed. Due to the fact that postoperative hernias are an immense problem, especially within the group of patient with collagen defects, the area of research and improvement of the materials that are used in prosthetic hernia surgery today needs to progress. This study also presents a short review of the various types of prosthetic materials used in the production of hernial meshes. This is to emphasize the necessity of improving operational techniques to minimize the risk of herniation, especially within a group of patients with collagen defects.

  18. Obesity increases the odds of acquiring and incarcerating noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Lau, Briana; Kim, Hanjoo; Haigh, Philip I; Tejirian, Talar

    2012-10-01

    The current data available describing the relationship of obesity and abdominal wall hernias is sparse. The objective of this study was to investigate the current prevalence of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias and their correlation with body mass index (BMI) and other demographic risk factors. Patients with umbilical, incisional, ventral, epigastric, or Spigelian hernias with or without incarceration were identified using the regional database for 14 hospitals over a 3-year period. Patients were stratified based on their BMI. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to distinguish other significant risk factors associated with the hernias. Of 2,807,414 patients, 26,268 (0.9%) had one of the specified diagnoses. Average age of the patients was 52 years and 61 per cent were male. The majority of patients had nonincarcerated umbilical hernias (74%). Average BMI was 32 kg/m2. Compared with patients with a normal BMI, the odds of having a hernia increased with BMI: BMI of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 odds ratio (OR) 1.63, BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m2 OR 2.62, BMI 40 to 49.9 kg/m2 OR 3.91, BMI 50 to 59.9 kg/m2 OR 4.85, and BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 OR 5.17 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years was associated with a higher risk for having a hernia (OR, 2.12; 95% [CI], 2.07 to 2.17), whereas female gender was associated with a lower risk (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.55). Those with incarcerated hernias had a higher average BMI (32 kg/m2 vs 35 kg/m2; P<0.0001). Overall, BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 showed an increased chance of incarceration, and a BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 had the highest chance of incarceration, OR 12.7 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years and female gender were also associated with a higher risk of incarceration (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.59 and OR, 1.80; CI, 1.45 to 2.24). Increasing BMI and increasing age are associated with a higher prevalence and an increased risk of incarceration of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

  19. Incidence of Port-Site Incisional Hernia After Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rainville, Harvey; Ikedilo, Ojinika; Vemulapali, Pratibha

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity among minimally invasive surgeons and is now being applied to a broad number of surgical procedures. Although this technique uses only 1 port, the diameter of the incision is larger than in standard laparoscopic surgery. The long-term incidence of port-site hernias after single-incision laparoscopic surgery has yet to be determined. Methods: All patients who underwent a single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedure from May 2008 through May 2009 were included in the study. Single-incision laparoscopic surgical operations were performed either by a multiport technique or with a 3-trocar single-incision laparoscopic surgery port. The patients were seen at 30 to 36 months' follow-up, at which time they were examined for any evidence of port-site incisional hernia. Patients found to have hernias on clinical examination underwent repairs with mesh. Results: A total of 211 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The types of operations included were cholecystectomy, appendectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric banding, Nissen fundoplication, colectomy, and gastrojejunostomy. We found a port-site hernia rate of 2.9% at 30 to 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Port-site incisional hernia after single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedures remains a major setback for patients. The true incidence remains largely unknown because most patients are asymptomatic and therefore do not seek surgical aid. PMID:24960483

  20. [Lumbar hernias in adults. Apropos of 4 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Le Neel, J C; Sartre, J Y; Borde, L; Guiberteau, B; Bourseau, J C

    1993-10-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare (2% of abdominal wall hernias). Symptomatology consists frequently only of an arch formation seen best with the patient sitting and when coughing. In adults it is twice as frequent in women and on the left side. Acute events, dominated by incarceration of a digestive segment, particularly colic, often suggest the diagnosis (10% of cases). Diagnosis is simple when confronted with a large hernia, but difficulties arise with those less than 5 cm in diameter, often diagnosed as a lipoma or parietal tumor. Conventional radiographs and ultrasound images are usually sufficient to establish the correct diagnosis and to determine the content of the hernial sac, but computed tomography scans can provide data on the exact limits of the defect and allow evaluation of possible problems during surgical repair. Rarely congenital (10%), these hernias occur either secondary to a violent lumbo-abdomino-pelvic injury (25%) or following surgical intervention to the lumbar region (50% of cases). Small hernias can be repaired using the direct approach but larger deficits require the insertion of a reinforcing non absorbable prosthesis. Long term results, both for the 4 cases reported and those published in the literature, were assessed as satisfactory.

  1. Tactical and surgical techniques issues in the surgical treatment of incisional hernias

    PubMed Central

    Gangură, AG; Palade, RŞ

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Within five years, between 2006 and 2011, a total of 368 incisional hernias have been operated in the Surgery Clinic 1, University Emergency Hospital Bucharest. The study followed the morphological and biological parameters, associated pathology, tactics and surgical technique used and postoperative morbidity. The average age of patients was 61.75 years, female sex was predominant (81.25%), and incisional hernias were large and giant in a percentage of 73.37%. Locations were predominantly median (83.42%). Recurrent incisional hernias and multiple relapsed hernias represented 25.54%. Associated pathology was dominated by obesity (51,09%) and cardiovascular disease (37,77%). We have used both methods of tissue procedures (22.83%), and the prosthetic procedures (77.17%). Prosthetic techniques, retro muscle fitting mesh in the rectus abdominis muscle sheath (Rives-Stoppa technique), fitting ov er the fascia and tissue replacement techniques were performed. Immediate postoperative morbidity was represented by seroma (14.13%), prolonged postoperative ileus (8.69%), prolonged hematic drainage (6.52%), and hematoma (1.9%). Late postoperative morbidity was given by granulomas (5.7%) and recurrence of incisional hernias (4.34%). Good and very good results were obtained in the 89.96% of the operated cases. PMID:25408770

  2. Clinical importance of duodenal recesses with special reference to internal hernias

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kum Kum; Kakar, Arun; Aggarwal, Satish; Aggrawal, Anil; Kakar, Smita; Borkar, Nitinkumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The detailed knowledge of the peritoneal recesses has great significance with respect to internal hernias. The recesses are usually related to rotation and adhesion of abdominal viscera to the posterior abdominal wall and/or the presence of retroperitoneal vessels which raises the serosal fold. The duodenal recesses are usually related to the 3rd and 4th parts of the duodenum. Internal hernias with respect to these recesses are difficult to diagnose clinically and usually noticed at the time of laparotomy. So, the knowledge of these recesses can be valuable to abdominal surgeons. Material and methods The present study was conducted in 100 cases including 10 cadavers, 45 post mortem cases and 45 cases undergoing laparotomy. Results We found superior and inferior duodenal recesses in 28% and 52% respectively, paraduodenal in 12%, mesentericoparietal in 3%, retroduodenal in 2% and duodenojejunal in 18% of cases. Two abnormal duodenojejunal recesses were found, one on the right (instead of the left) of the abdominal aorta, and in the other the opening was directed upwards instead of downwards. The incidence of internal hernias was 3%. Conclusions Thus it was observed that there is low incidence of superior and inferior duodenal recesses, and high incidence of paraduodenal recess. The abnormal recesses might be due to malrotation of the gut. In laparotomy cases, the internal hernia was noticed when the abdomen was opened for intestinal obstruction. The incidence of internal hernia was found to be high. PMID:28144266

  3. Loss of range of motion of the hip joint: a hypothesis for etiology of sports hernia

    PubMed Central

    Rambani, Rohit; Hackney, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: sports hernia is a well-recognized cause of groin pain in athletes involved in sports, especially football and rugby. Loss of range of motion of the hip joint is a possible contributory factor to stress across the symphysis pubis leading to the instability. Methods: twenty-five athletes presenting with sports hernia were matched to age, sex, physical/sports activity and co-morbidities with twenty-five athletes without sports hernia. The range of movement of both the hips was compared in athletes of both the groups. Results: there was marked restriction of internal rotation with the hip flexed to 90 degrees (average 17 degrees) and external rotation (average 26 degrees) in sports hernia group compared to the control group. Other movements of the hip were comparable in both the groups. Conclusion: the study highlights observation of limitation of hip rotation with the hip flexed to 90 degrees as a possible factor in the aetiology of sports hernia. There may be an association with other pathologies of the hip such as impingement that requires further investigation. Though this study has its limitation in being a small number and a case control study, it does helps in understanding the possible mechanism of development of this condition. PMID:25878984

  4. Muscle hernias of the leg: A case report and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jesse T; Nguyen, Jenny L; Wheatley, Michael J; Nguyen, Tuan A

    2013-01-01

    A case involving a retired, elderly male war veteran with a symptomatic peroneus brevis muscle hernia causing superficial peroneal nerve compression with chosen surgical management is presented. Symptomatic muscle hernias of the extremities occur most commonly in the leg and are a rare cause of chronic leg pain. Historically, treating military surgeons pioneered the early documentation of leg hernias observed in active military recruits. A focal fascial defect can cause a muscle to herniate, forming a variable palpable subcutaneous mass, and causing pain and potentially neuropathic symptoms with nerve involvement. While the true incidence is not known, the etiology has been classified as secondary to a congenital (or constitutional) fascial weakness, or acquired fascial defect, usually secondary to direct or indirect trauma. The highest occurrence is believed to be in young, physically active males. Involvement of the tibialis anterior is most common, although other muscles have been reported. Dynamic ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging is often used to confirm diagnosis and guide treatment. Most symptomatic cases respond successfully to conservative treatment, with surgery reserved for refractory cases. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from fasciotomy to anatomical repair of the fascial defect, with no consensus on optimal treatment. Clinicians must remember to consider muscle hernias in their repertoire of differential diagnoses for chronic leg pain or neuropathy. A comprehensive review of muscle hernias of the leg is presented to highlight their history, occurrence, presentation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24497767

  5. Elective inguinal hernia repair: a unified informed consent, or who wants to know what?

    PubMed

    Losanoff, Julian E; Litwinczuk, Kathleen M; Ranella, Michael J; Basson, Marc D

    2009-04-01

    Informed consent is increasingly being standardized. We sought to evaluate variability in the amount and quality of information desired by patients in choosing whether to undergo elective surgical hernia repair, a prototypical low- to moderate-risk common procedure. Consecutive stable outpatients were asked to assume that they were considering hernia repair and interviewed with a standard questionnaire that asked them to rate their interest in learning about the natural history, pathology, and management of inguinal hernia as well as herniorrhaphy complications and postoperative recovery. Ninety-eight consecutive patients exhibited substantial interpersonal variability in their level of interest in receiving information. Although interest in some types of information tended to correlate with interest in other types of information, patients' degree of interest in receiving information about anesthesia during the procedure was independent of other variables. Education and previous exposure to individuals with hernias also affected interest in receiving potentially important information before deciding whether to consent to hernia surgery. Patients may vary with regard to the information they want to receive when deciding whether to consent to an invasive procedure. It may be preferable to individualize the consent process to patients' preferences rather than adhering to standardized content.

  6. NiTiNol Hernia Device Stability in Inguinal Hernioplasty Without Fixation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective: To determine whether the NiTiNol frame of a novel hernia repair device utilizing polypropylene mesh for inguinal hernioplasty remains stable and intransient without fixation after a minimum of 6 months. Methods: Twenty patients had 27 inguinal hernias repaired using a novel hernia repair device that has a NiTiNol frame without any fixation. Initial single-view, postoperative X-rays were compared with a second X-ray obtained at least 6 months later. The NiTiNol frame, which can be easily visualized on a plain X-ray, was measured in 2 dimensions, as were anatomic landmarks. The measurements obtained and the appearances of the 2 X-rays were compared to determine the percentage of change in device size and device stability with regard to device location and shape. Results: There were minimal changes noted between the 2 sets of measurements obtained with an overall trend towards a slight increase in the size of the hernia repair device. The devices demonstrated intransience of position and stability of shape. Conclusions: The NiTiNol frame of a novel hernia repair device utilizing polypropylene mesh exhibits radiographic evidence of size and shape stability and intransience of position without fixation when used in inguinal hernioplasty after a minimum follow-up of 6 months. PMID:21902967

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for Total Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Almost 20 years after the first laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair was performed, single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS™) is set to revolutionize minimally invasive surgery. However, the loss of triangulation must be overcome before the technique can be popularized. This study reports the first 100 laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repairs using a single incision. The study cohort comprised 68 patients with a mean age of 44 (range, 18 to 83): 36 unilateral and 32 bilateral hernias. Twelve patients also underwent umbilical hernia repair with the Ventralex patch requiring no additional incisions. A 2.5-cm to 3-cm crescentic incision within the confines of the umbilicus was performed. Standard dissecting instruments and 52-cm/5.5-mm/300 laparoscope were used. Operation times were 50 minutes for unilateral and 80 minutes for bilateral. There was one conversion to conventional 3-port laparoscopic repair and none to open surgery. Outpatient surgery was achieved in all (except one). Analgesic requirements were minimal: 8 Dextropropoxyphene tablets (range, 0 to 20). There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications with a high patient satisfaction score. Single-incision laparoscopic hernia repair is safe and efficient simply by modifying dissection techniques (so-called “inline” and “vertical”). Comparable success can be obtained while negating the risks of bowel and vascular injuries from sharp trocars and achieving improved cosmetic results. PMID:21902942

  8. Obstructive Jaundice Caused by Hepatic Torsion in an Infant with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Iftikhar Ahmad; Al Hamoudi, Basmah; AlJunaibi, Abdulla; Mussa, Abdelmatlub Ben

    2017-01-01

    Right sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia may cause biliary obstruction. We present a 2 months female infant who had respiratory distress and persistent jaundice since birth. Investigations suggested direct hyperbilirubinemia, right-sided diaphragmatic hernia with liver herniation in the thorax, and intra- and extrahepatic biliary dilatation. Laparotomy showed herniation of liver in the chest with hepatic torsion of about 180° causing obstruction of bile ducts. Liver torsion was corrected and liver relocated in the abdomen. An operative cholangiogram confirmed free passage of contrast to the intestine after correction of hepatic torsion. Repair of the diaphragmatic hernia was performed. Only skin closure was performed leaving a ventral hernia to avoid abdominal compartment syndrome. Postoperatively, the baby was kept on ventilator for 2 days and then extubated. She showed rapid recovery and was discharged in a stable condition. The ventral hernia was repaired at the age of 6 months. Her total bilirubin levels dropped gradually from 12.50 mg/dl into its normal values within 3 months. PMID:28082781

  9. Trocar site hernia after laparoscopic colectomy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pamela, Delmonaco; Roberto, Cirocchi; Francesco, La Mura; Umberto, Morelli; Carla, Migliaccio; Vincenzo, Napolitano; Stefano, Trastulli; Eriberto, Farinella; Daniele, Giuliani; Angelo, Desol; Diego, Milani; Micol Sole, Di Patrizi; Alessandro, Spizzirri; Maurizio, Bravetti; Vito, Sciannameo; Nicola, Avenia; Francesco, Sciannameo

    2011-01-01

    Background. Trocar Site Hernia (TSH) is defined as an incisional hernia which occurs after minimally invasive surgery on the trocar incision site.In 2004 Tonouchi classified trocar site hernias into 3 types: Early onset type; Late onset type; Special type. Case Report. We report the case of a 76-year old woman that underwent an emergency explorative laparotomy on the 10th p.o. day after a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy. Surgery showed a small bowel herniation through the 12 mm trocar incision site; the intestinal loop appeared necrotic and had to be resected, and the hernia orifice was repaired. We carried out a review of literature about this topic. Discussion. The clinical onset of a trocar site hernia is usually early, occurring within the 30th post operative day and it is caused by the omentum or small bowel entrapment into the trocar orifice. The clinical presentation is insidious, with progression to an acute abdomen, and an emergency surgical approach is often required. Conclusions. TSH is a severe complication of operative laparoscopy especially with large-bore trocar ports. The incidence of TSH resulting from our review ranges from 0.007% to 22% with an average of 1.85%. Prevention of TSH appears to be more effective when trocar insertion through the abdominal wall is tangential, the closure of both the fascia and the peritoneum is performed if the incision is greater than 7 mm, the suture of extra umbilical port site is performed under laparoscopic vision.

  10. Minilaparoscopic Technique for Inguinal Hernia Repair Combining Transabdominal Pre-Peritoneal and Totally Extraperitoneal Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Marcelo P.; Bonin, Eduardo A; Claus, Christiano P.; Silva, Frederico W.; Cury, Antonio M.; Fernandes, Flavio A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Endoscopic surgical repair of inguinal hernia is currently conducted using 2 techniques: the totally extraperitoneal (TEP) and the transabdominal (TAPP) hernia repair. The TEP procedure is technically advantageous, because of the use of no mesh fixation and the elimination of the peritoneal flap, leading to less postoperative pain and faster recovery. The drawback is that TEP is not performed as frequently, because of its complexity and longer learning curve. In this study, we propose a hybrid technique that could potentially become the gold standard of minimally invasive inguinal hernia surgery. This will be achieved by combining established advantages of TEP and TAPP associated with the precision and cosmetics of minilaparoscopy (MINI). Materials and Surgical Technique: Between January and July 2011, 22 patients were admitted for endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. The combined technique was initiated with TAPP inspection and direct visualization of a minilaparoscopic trocar dissection of the preperitoneum space. A10-mm trocar was then placed inside the previously dissected preperitoneal space, using the same umbilical TAPP skin incision. Minilaparoscopic retroperitoneal dissection was completed by TEP, and the surgical procedure was finalized with intraperitoneal review and correction of the preperitoneal work. Discussion: The minilaparoscopic TEP-TAPP combined approach for inguinal hernia is feasible, safe, and allows a simple endoscopic repair. This is achieved by combining features and advantages of both TAPP and TEP techniques using precise and sophisticated MINI instruments. Minilaparoscopic preperitoneal dissection allows a faster and easier creation of the preperitoneal space for the TEP component of the procedure. PMID:23484566

  11. Bowel Obstruction and Peritoneal Dialysis: A Case Report of a Patient with Complications from a Broad Ligament Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Otani-Takei, Naoko; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sadatomo, Ai; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal hernias are a common cause of bowel obstruction. The major types of abdominal hernias are external or abdominal wall hernias, which occur at areas of congenital or acquired weakness in the abdominal wall. An alternative entity is internal hernias, which are characterized by a protrusion of viscera through the peritoneum or mesentery. We herein present the case of a female peritoneal dialysis patient with bowel obstruction due to an internal hernia. Although an initial work-up did not lead to a correct diagnosis, an exploratory laparotomy revealed that she had intestinal herniation due to a defect in the broad ligament of the uterus, which was promptly corrected by surgery. The concerns about the perioperative dialytic management as well as the diagnostic problems regarding the disease that arose in our experience with the present patient are also discussed. PMID:27547042

  12. Changes in the Frequencies of Abdominal Wall Hernias and the Preferences for Their Repair: A Multicenter National Study From Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şeker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, İbrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%.1–3 As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world.4 Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic),5,6 the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional),7,8 and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).9,10 PMID:25216417

  13. Physical activity, fitness, and dyspnea perception in children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Turchetta, Attilio; Fintini, Danilo; Cafiero, Giulia; Calzolari, Armando; Giordano, Ugo; Cutrera, Renato; Morini, Francesco; Braguglia, Annabella; Bagolan, Pietro

    2011-10-01

    We assessed whether physical activity could influence the performance and perception of dyspnea in children who were operated on for high risk congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We hypothesized that CDH children with normal activity would have better lung function and exercise performance level when compared to sedentary CDH subjects. We studied 18 children (11 males and 7 females, mean age 6.6 ± 2.6 years) who were surgically corrected. All children underwent physical examination, ECG at rest, and a maximal exercise stress test on a treadmill to measure the duration of exercise, maximal heart rate and blood pressure, maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)  max and VO(2)  ml/kg/min). Lung function testing to measure forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1) ), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) was also performed. Following the stress test, the Dalhousie dyspnea and effort scale was shown to children as a pictorial panel with three groups of increasing (from 1 to 7) levels of effort perception, throat discomfort, and chest dyspnea. Children were divided into group A (sedentary) and group B (regular physical participation). There was no difference in CDH severity between the two groups. Group A had a statistically significant lower duration of exercise (P < 0.01), maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2)  max P < 0.0001), VO(2)  ml/kg/min (P < 0.001), higher throat closing feeling (P < 0.004), chest dyspnea (P < 0.001), and effort perception (P < 0.04) compared to group B. No differences were found in lung function tests. In conclusion, our data may suggest that children with a history of CDH who are active maintain a higher level of performance with less perception of dyspnea and effort.

  14. A Rare Case Report of Inguinal Hernia with Persistent Mullerian Duct and Klinefelter Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dadheech, Darpan; Om, Prabha; Shridatt, Sharma Ankit; Patni, Ankur; Verma, Naveen

    2016-06-01

    Inguinal hernia in male is a common problem but having female reproductive organs in hernial sac is rare. It occur because of failure of mullerian duct to regress in a male fetus during embryonic development, result in a syndrome known as Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), which is a rare entity of male pseudohermaphroditism. We hereby present a case of 21-year-old male patient reported with complains of cryptorchidism and inguinal hernia. Generally diagnosis of PMDS was established during investigation like ultrasonography, MRI for localization of undescended testis and during surgical exploration for inguinal hernia or cryptorchidism. Our patient was operated by bilateral inguinal incision; hernial sac contained adult size uterus fallopian tube and upper 2/3(rd) of vagina. On karyotyping it was found that he was a case of klinefelter syndrome also. Association of PMDS with klinefelter syndrome is very rare.

  15. A Rare Case Report of Inguinal Hernia with Persistent Mullerian Duct and Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Om, Prabha; Shridatt, Sharma Ankit; Patni, Ankur; Verma, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal hernia in male is a common problem but having female reproductive organs in hernial sac is rare. It occur because of failure of mullerian duct to regress in a male fetus during embryonic development, result in a syndrome known as Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), which is a rare entity of male pseudohermaphroditism. We hereby present a case of 21-year-old male patient reported with complains of cryptorchidism and inguinal hernia. Generally diagnosis of PMDS was established during investigation like ultrasonography, MRI for localization of undescended testis and during surgical exploration for inguinal hernia or cryptorchidism. Our patient was operated by bilateral inguinal incision; hernial sac contained adult size uterus fallopian tube and upper 2/3rd of vagina. On karyotyping it was found that he was a case of klinefelter syndrome also. Association of PMDS with klinefelter syndrome is very rare. PMID:27504355

  16. Repair of a bowel-containing, scrotal hernia with incarceration contributed by femorofemoral bypass graft

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Schouten, Jonathan A.; Itani, Kamal M. F.

    2017-01-01

    The rising use of endovascular techniques utilizing femoral artery access may increase the frequency with which surgeons face the challenge of hernia repair in reoperative groins—which may or may not include a vascular graft. We present a case where a vascular graft contributed to an acute presentation and complicated dissection, and review the literature. A 67-year-old man who had undergone prior endovascular aneurysm repair via open bilateral femoral artery access and concomitant prosthetic femorofemoral bypass, presented with an incarcerated, scrotal inguinal hernia. The graft with its associated fibrosis contributed to the incarceration by compressing the inguinal ring. Repair was undertaken via an open, anterior approach with tension-free, Lichtenstein herniorraphy after releasing graft-associated fibrosis. Repair of groin hernias in this complex setting requires careful surgical planning, preparation for potential vascular reconstruction and meticulous technique to avoid bowel injury in the face of a vascular conduit and mesh. PMID:28069880

  17. A complication to remember: stitch sinus following laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Rabiu, Abdul-Rasheed; Tan, Lam Chin

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a diagnostic dilemma and what we believe to be a previously unreported case of a stitch sinus caused by the presence of a non-absorbable centring suture used during laparoscopic mesh repair of an umbilical hernia. Successful treatment was achieved through umbilical excision and removal of the offending suture; the patient's recovery thereafter was uneventful. Surgeons should be aware of this complication when consenting patients and should consider the use of absorbable sutures to minimize such risk in similar procedures. In addition, clinicians may add this to their list of differential diagnoses in a patient presenting with pain, discharge or what appears to be a recurrence of their hernia following laparoscopic mesh repair of an umbilical hernia. PMID:27572679

  18. Small bowel perforation in a hernia sac after TVT placement at the time of colpocleisis.

    PubMed

    Gurshumov, Emil L; Klapper, Allan S; Sierecki, Ava R

    2010-03-01

    Tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) is commonly considered as the first line of treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with demonstrated efficacy and limited complications. An 82-year-old woman with complete uterine procidentia and SUI underwent a Le Forte colpocleisis, TVT, posterior repair, and cystoscopy. A 4-cm bulge was noted over the site of the left TVT incision on postoperative day 1. On postoperative day 3, she developed bilious vomiting with slight abdominal distention. Computed tomography scan showed a strangulated left inguinal hernia. An immediate exploratory laparotomy noted an inguinal hernia displaced medially with loops of small bowel in the hernia sac. Although properly positioned, one loop of bowel was perforated by the sling mesh. A small bowel resection was performed and the mesh trimmed below the resection on involved side. At 2 months postoperative visit, the patient was asymptomatic, denied stress or urge incontinence. Vaginal examination noted well-supported vaginal walls.

  19. Liver Position Is a Prenatal Predictive Factor of Prosthetic Repair in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kunisaki, Shaun M.; Barnewolt, Carol E.; Estroff, Judy A.; Nemes, Luanne P.; Jennings, Russell W.; Wilson, Jay M.; Fauza, Dario O.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine whether any common maternal-fetal variable has prenatal predictive value of prosthetic repair in congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Methods This was a 5-year single-center retrospective review of fetal congenital diaphragmatic hernia referrals. Multiple prenatal variables were correlated with the need for a prosthetic repair. Statistical analyses were by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests, as appropriate (p < 0.05). Results Fetal liver position was a predictor of prosthetic repair. The presence or absence of liver herniation was correlated with prosthetic repair rates of 83.3 and 23.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). All patients with moderate/severe liver herniation required a prosthetic patch. Conclusion Liver herniation has prenatal predictive value for the need for prosthetic repair in congenital diaphragmatic hernia. This finding should be valuable during prenatal counseling for clinical trials of engineered diaphragmatic repair. PMID:18417990

  20. Anesthetic management for repair of adult Bochdalek hernia by laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Kazuhide; Nakahara, Yumi; Ando, Satoko; Hasegawa, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2005-01-01

    This report describes anesthetic management of a case (a 64-year-old man) who was originally diagnosed as paraesophageal hernia before surgery and later diagnosed as Bochdalek hernia during laparoscopic surgery. Anesthesia was started with oxygen, nitrous oxide, and sevoflurane, and respiration was managed using controlled mechanical ventilation. Although left pneumothorax was noticed during laparoscopic surgery (aeroperitonia pressure: 10 cmH2O), the surgery was performed using the same anesthesia procedure, because hardly any changes were observed on the monitor and vital signs were stable. The surgery was completed without incident. However, postoperative chest X-rays revealed the residual large pneumothorax. A chest drain tube was inserted immediately, after which the pneumothorax was improved. Pneumothorax is considered to be inevitable in cases of laparoscopic repair of Bochdalek hernia. To prevent exacerbation of pneumothorax, anesthetic management should consist of discontinuing the use of nitrous oxide and lowering the aeroperitonia pressure concomitently with the use of positive airway pressure.

  1. Enterocutaneous fistula as a postoperative complication of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Klein, A M; Banever, T C

    1999-01-01

    Trocar injuries to the small bowel during laparoscopic hernia repair are a rare complication, the most common complications being postoperative neuralgias, scrotal swelling, scrotal ecchymosis, and hematoma. A 15-year-old boy was admitted 5 days status-post transabdominal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair of a symptomatic right pantaloon hernia, with signs and symptoms of a retrocecal abscess. Despite laparotic intervention and appendectomy, the next 2 years passed with almost daily, purulent, right lower quadrant wound drainage, in an otherwise asymptomatic patient. Superficial wound exploration and sinogram in 1996 revealed a sinus tract in direct communication with the small bowel. Elective laparotomy in December 1997 involved a successful resection of a 2.5-cm fistula with involved mesh, and the communicating small bowel through a midline incision, followed by a primary closure of the small-bowel opening. The patient has recovered without complications.

  2. Fibrin sealing versus stapling of hernia meshes in an onlay model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Petter-Puchner, Alexander H; Fortelny, R; Mittermayr, R; Ohlinger, W; Redl, H

    2005-12-01

    Incisional and inguinal hernia repair are among the most common procedures of general surgery. Mesh fixation by means of staples or sutures may lead to severe complications. The use of fibrin sealant (FS) has been suggested as alternative, but data on biocompatibility and adhesive strength of FS in combination with macroporous meshes is limited. Ventral hernia (n = 8 per group) was treated in rats in onlay technique with two types of meshes, fibrin sealed or stapled. TI-Mesh (TMxl) extralight and VYPROII (VPII) were tested 17 days post op. No failure in mechanical tests (tensile and burst strength) occurred in sealed or stapled meshes. Histology revealed equally good tissue integration and neovascularization in all groups. Fibrin sealant yields excellent fixation in experimental hernia repair. This rat model is suitable for testing meshes and fixation techniques.

  3. De Garengeot’s Hernia – A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Anekal, Nagaraja; Rathnakar, Surag Kajoor

    2016-01-01

    De Garengeot’s hernia is an eponym for femoral hernia containing vermiform appendix as its content and is named after Rene-Jacques croissant De Garengeot after he first described the condition in 1731. We present a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented with right inguinal swelling for 15 years associated with pain and vomiting for 2 days. Clinical examination revealed an irreducible femoral hernia. Emergency surgery was done and inflamed appendix was found as content of the sac. Appendectomy followed by mesh repair was done. Standard treatment protocol does not exist owing to its rarity and the outcome depends on the time of diagnosis and treatment given. A low inguinal approach is reasonable and use of polypropylene mesh warrants further study. This article is being presented because of its rarity and intends to briefly discuss the surgical pitfalls and considerations through an up-to-date literature review. PMID:28050438

  4. Drain-Site Hernia Containing the Vermiform Appendix: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Zynamon, Anatol; von Flüe, Markus; Peterli, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    The herniated vermiform appendix has been described as content of every hernia orifice in the right lower quadrant. While the femoral and inguinal herniated vermiform appendix is frequent enough to result in an own designation, port-site or even drain-site hernias are less frequently described. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman who presented with right lower quadrant pain seven years after Roux-en-Y Cystojejunostomy for a pancreatic cyst. CT scan showed herniation of the vermiform appendix through a former drain-site. A diagnostic laparoscopy with appendectomy and direct closure of the abdominal wall defect combined with mesh reinforcement was performed. Despite the decreasing use of intraperitoneal drains over the recent years, a multitude of patients had intraperitoneal drainage in former times. These patients face nowadays the risk of drain-site hernias with sometimes even unexpected structures inside. PMID:23862093

  5. Direct radionuclide cystography imaging in colovesical fistula due to inguinal hernia operation complication.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Muge; Yavuz, Hatice Sümeyye; Hacimahmutoğlu, Serafettin; Mülazimoğlu, Mehmet; Kacar, Tulay; Ozpacaci, Tevfik

    2009-09-01

    Colovesical fistula is an abnormal connection between the enteric and urinary systems, usually sigmoid colon, caused by various conditions. One cause of colovesical fistula is iatrogenic injury, such as induced by inguinal hernia surgery. We present a case of colovesical fistula. A 57-year-old male was admitted to a local hospital with complaints of dysuria and pneumaturia. He had a past history of total extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair operation 7 years previously for bilateral inguinal hernia. The case was assessed with radiologic and scintigraphic techniques. Radiologic techniques (plain abdominal radiography, intravenous pyelogram, ultrasound examination, double-contrast barium enema, CT, MRI) were inadequate to determine the colovesical fistula. The colovesical fistula was visualized with direct radionuclide voiding cystography as an alternative scintigraphic method.

  6. Bilateral Morgagni hernia: operative discovery of appendix lying on superior pulmonary vein.

    PubMed

    Lammy, S; Stewart, M; Carnochan, F M; Walker, W S

    2013-08-01

    A patient presented having an acute abdomen on a background of a twelve-month history of worsening asthma. Computed tomography showed giant bilateral intrathoracic hernias extending to both thoracic apices. Our case was unusual as the defect was bilateral and left-sided. Surgical repair revealed each hernia sac measuring >20 cm and to contain the entirety of the small bowel and colon (including retroperitoneal bowel). The appendix was discovered adjacent to right superior pulmonary vein. Both sacs were excised and the defects dissected and transfixed in a single stage operation. In the post-operative stage, he developed a 6.3 cm fluid collection anterior to the right atrium and a left-sided pleural effusion. Morgagni hernias can escape detection and be attributed to other diagnoses courtesy of false localising signs on clinical examination and symptoms in the history.

  7. Nontraumatic massive right-sided Bochdalek hernia in an adult: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Sofi, Fayaz A; Ahmed, Sheikh Hilal; Dar, Majid A; Nabhi, Dhobi G; Mufti, Showkat; Bhat, Mohammad Akbar; Tabassum, Parvez Nazir

    2011-03-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias in adults usually pose a diagnostic challenge; the presentations are varied and range from acute abdominal pain with features of gut obstruction, pleuritic chest pain, breathlessness, to a pregnant woman with pain abdomen. The usual cause in adults is posttraumatic. Because of varied presentations, the diagnosis is often delayed. We present a case of a young woman who presented with sudden-onset breathlessness with similar episodes in the past and no history of trauma, who proved to be having a right-sided diaphragmatic hernia. This case is reported not only because of rarity of nontraumatic right-sided Bochdalek hernias in adults, but also because of peculiar presentation and history.

  8. Parastomal Hernia Repair and Reinforcement: The Role of Biologic and Synthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gillern, Suzanne; Bleier, Joshua I. S.

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a prevalent problem and treatment can pose difficulties due to significant rates of recurrence and morbidities of the repair. The current standard of care is to perform parastomal hernia repair with mesh whenever possible. There exist multiple options for mesh reinforcement (biologic and synthetic) as well as surgical techniques, to include type of repair (keyhole and Sugarbaker) and position of mesh placement (onlay, sublay, or intraperitoneal). The sublay and intraperitoneal positions have been shown to be superior with a lower incidence of recurrence. This procedure may be performed open or laparoscopically, both having similar recurrence and morbidity results. Prophylactic mesh placement at the time of stoma formation has been shown to significantly decrease the rates of parastomal hernia formation. PMID:25435825

  9. A young man with concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated right indirect inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ditsatham, Chagkrit; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia rarely present in the same episode. Our study reports patient presentation, diagnosis method, and treatment of an unusual case at the Chiang Mai University Hospital. Method Case report. Result A 20-year-old man visited the Chiang Mai University Hospital with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass which could not be reduced. The computerized tomography scan showed acute appendicitis and omentum in the hernia sac. Operative treatment was an appendectomy and herniorrhaphy. The treatment was successful, and the patient was discharged from our hospital without any complications. Conclusion Concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia are very rare, but should be kept in mind if a patient presents with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass. Further investigation may be helpful if the diagnosis is uncertain. Operative priority treatment depends on each individual case. PMID:26834499

  10. Clinical outcomes of single incision laparoscopic surgery and conventional laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Ece, Ilhan; Yilmaz, Huseyin; Yormaz, Serdar; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic surgery has been a frequently performed method for inguinal hernia repair. Studies have demonstrated that the laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach is an appropriate choice for inguinal hernia repair. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) was developed to improve the cosmetic effects of conventional laparoscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of SILS-TAPP compared with TAPP technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 148 patients who underwent TAPP or SILS-TAPP in our surgery clinic between December 2012 and January 2015 were enrolled. Data including patient demographics, hernia characteristics, operative time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and recurrence rate were retrospectively collected. RESULTS: In total, 60 SILS-TAPP and 88 TAPP procedures were performed in the study period. The two groups were similar in terms of gender, type of hernia, and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification score. The patients in the SILS-TAPP group were younger when compared the TAPP group. Port site hernia (PSH) rate was significantly high in the SILS-TAPP group, and all PSHs were recorded in patients with severe comorbidities. The mean operative time has no significant difference in two groups. All SILS procedures were completed successfully without conversion to conventional laparoscopy or open repair. No intraoperative complication was recorded. There was no recurrence during the mean follow-up period of 15.2 ± 3.8 months. CONCLUSION: SILS TAPP for inguinal hernia repair seems to be a feasible, safe method, and is comparable with TAPP technique. However, randomized trials are required to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:27251835

  11. Single-Port Onlay Mesh Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernias after Failed Anterior and Laparoscopic Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Despite the exponential increase in the use of laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, a growing number of patients are presenting with recurrent hernias after conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs have failed. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair of these hernias. Methods: Patients referred with two or more recurrences of inguinal hernia underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1, 2009, to June 24, 2014. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made, and an SIL port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques were used: chopstick and inline dissection, 5.5-mm/52-cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments. The peritoneum was incised above the pubic symphysis, and dissection was continued laterally and proximally, raising the inferior flap below the previous extraperitoneal mesh while reducing any direct, indirect, femoral, or cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh, which was fixed to the pubic ramus, as well as superiorly, with nonabsorbable tacks before the inferior border was fixed with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: Nine male patients underwent SIL-IPOM. Their mean age was 53 years and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes, with a hospital stay of 1 day. The umbilical scar length was 23 mm at the 6-week follow-up. There were no intra-/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence of the hernia during a mean follow-up of 24 months. Conclusion: Inguinal hernias recurring after two or more failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be safely and efficiently treated with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25848186

  12. Complications and recurrences associated with laparoscopic repair of groin hernias. A multi-institutional retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Tetik, C; Arregui, M E; Dulucq, J L; Fitzgibbons, R J; Franklin, M E; McKernan, J B; Rosin, R D; Schultz, L S; Toy, F K

    1994-11-01

    Although the laparoscopic technique is a new approach to groin hernia, it is becoming more widely accepted as an alternative to traditional open techniques. This study is a preliminary review of complications and recurrences. A questionnaire specific for complications was sent to each investigator. From 12/89 to 4/93, 1,514 hernias were repaired; 119 (7.8%) were bilateral and 192 (12.7%) recurrent. There were 860 indirect, 560 direct, 43 pantaloon, 37 femoral, and 6 obturator hernias, and 8 were not specified; 553 were repaired using a transabdominal preperitoneal mesh technique (TAPP), 457 with a total extraperitoneal technique (TEP), 320 with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM), 102 by ring closure, and 82 involved plug and patch technique. Eighteen intraoperative and 188 postoperative complications were seen. The total complication rate was 13.6%, of which 1.2% were intraoperative. Of the intraoperative complications, 12 were related to the laparoscopic technique, three were related to the hernia repair, and one was related to anesthesia. The rate of conversion to open was 0.8%. Of the postoperative complications, there were 95 local, 25 neurologic, 23 testicular, 23 urinary, 10 mesh, and 12 miscellaneous. There were 34 recurrences after the 1,514 hernia repairs (2.2%). The follow-up was reported in 825 patients for an average of 13 months. The recurrence rate varied drastically with the technique: A 22% recurrence rate after the plug and patch vs 3%, 2.2%, 0.7%, and 0.4% with the ring closure, IPOM, TAPP, and TEP, respectively. Laparoscopic repair of groin hernia can be safely performed. Complications, mostly minor, diminish with experience. The recurrence rate is less with large mesh which is anchored.

  13. New minimally invasive technique of parastomal hernia repair – methods and review

    PubMed Central

    Skoneczny, Paweł; Przywózka, Alicja; Czyżewski, Piotr; Bury, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parastomal hernia is described as the most common complication in patients with ostomy. It is reported that its incidence varies from 3% to 39% for colostomies and 0 to 6% for ileostomies. Surgical repair remains the treatment of choice. There are three types of surgical treatment – fascial repair, stoma relocation and repair using prosthetic mesh via a laparoscopic or open approach. Recently there have been several meta-analyses and systematic reviews aiming to compare the results of surgical treatment, and the authors agreed that the quality of evidence precludes firm conclusions. Aim To describe the novel concept of parastomal hernia repair – HyPER/SPHR technique (hybrid parastomal endoscopic re-do/Szczepkowski parastomal hernia repair) and its early results in 12 consecutive cases. Material and methods Twelve consecutive patients were operated on due to parastomal hernia using the new HyPER hybrid technique between June 2013 and May 2014. The patients’ condition was evaluated during the perioperative period, 6 weeks and then every 3 months after surgery. Results After 6 weeks of follow-up we have not observed any mesh-related complications. All 12 patients were examined 3 months and 6 months after repair surgery for evaluation. No recurrence, stoma site infection or stoma-related problems were found. None of the patients complained of pain and none of them needed to be hospitalized again. Reported quality of life on a 0–10 scale after 6 weeks of follow-up was 8 (range: 7–10). Conclusions The HyPER procedure for treatment of parastomal hernias proposed by the authors is a safe and feasible surgical technique with a high patient satisfaction rate and a low number of complications. The hybrid procedure seems to be a promising method for parastomal hernia repair. PMID:25960785

  14. Single site and conventional totally extraperitoneal techniques for uncomplicated inguinal hernia repair: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Felipe Brandão Corrêa; Starling, Eduardo Simão; Maricevich, Marco; Tobias-Machado, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of endoscopic extraperitoneal single site (EESS) inguinal hernia repair and compare it outcomes with the conventional totally extraperitoneal (TEP) technique. BACKGROUND: TEP inguinal hernia repair is a widely accepted alternative to conventional open technique with several perioperative advantages. Transumbilical laparoendoscopic singlesite surgery (LESS) is an emerging approach and has been reported for a number of surgical procedures with superior aesthetic results but other advantages need to be proven. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight uncomplicated inguinal hernias were repaired by EESS approach between January 2010 and January 2011. All procedures were performed through a 25 cm infraumbilical incision using the Alexis wound retractor attached to a surgical glove and three trocars. Body mass index, age, operative time, blood loss, complications, conversion rate, analgesia requirement, hospital stay, return to normal activities and patient satisfaction with aesthetic results were analysed and compared with the last 38 matched-pair group of patients who underwent a conventional TEP inguinal hernia repair by the same surgeon. RESULTS: All procedures were performed successfully with no conversion. In both unilateral and bilateral EESS inguinal repairs, the mean operative time was longer than conventional TEP (55± 20 vs. 40± 15 min, P = 0.049 and 70± 15 vs. 55± 10 min, P = 0.014). Aesthetic result was superior in the EESS group (2.88± 0.43 vs. 2.79± 0.51, P = 0.042). There was no difference between the two approaches regarding blood loss, complications, hospital stay, time until returns to normal activities and analgesic requirement. CONCLUSION: EESS inguinal hernia repair is safe and effective, with superior cosmetic results in the treatment of uncomplicated inguinal hernias. Other advantages of this new technique still need to be proven. PMID:25336820

  15. Comparison between laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with sleeve gastrectomy and paraesophageal hernia repair alone in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Aziz M; Cook, Michael W; Srinivasan, Jahnavi; Davis, S Scott; Sweeney, John F; Lin, Edward

    2009-07-01

    Treatment options for morbidly obese patients with complications from large paraesophageal hernias (PEH) are limited. Simple repair of the PEH has a high recurrence rate and may be associated with poor gastric function. We compared a series of patients who underwent repair of large PEH plus gastrostomy tube gastropexy (PEH-GT) with PEH plus sleeve gastrectomy (PEH-SG). Retrospective review of patients undergoing PEH-SG and patients with PEH-GT was performed. We assessed symptoms of delayed gastric emptying and reflux postoperatively. In selected patients, gastric-emptying studies and upper gastrointestinal contrast studies were also obtained. All patients with large PEH were repaired laparoscopically with sac resection, primary crural closure using pledgeted sutures, and biologic patch onlay. SG for patients undergoing concomitant weight loss surgery (PEH-SG) was performed with linear endoscopic staplers and staple line reinforcement. Patients undergoing PEH repair alone had a gastrostomy tube gastropexy (PEH-GT). Patients had intraoperative endoscopic evaluation and postoperative contrast swallow studies. In a 12-month period, five patients underwent laparoscopic PEH-SG; two of five had previous antireflux surgery and one of five with a previous diagnosis of delayed gastric emptying. Postoperatively, two patients undergoing PEH-SG had readmission for dehydration and odynophagia. Six-month follow-up body mass index was 32 kg/m2 for the PEH-SG group with no hernia recurrence and complete resolution of gastroesophageal reflux disorder symptoms. Six patients underwent PEH-GT, one for acute incarceration and anemia and four with previous antireflux surgery. Follow up at 8 months demonstrated one recurrence, four of six had severe delayed gastric emptying and reflux, three of six had additional hospitalization for poor oral intake, and three of six underwent reoperation for delayed gastric emptying. There were no perforations, leaks, or deaths in either group. Combined

  16. The assessment of oesophagitis in hiatus hernia patients

    PubMed Central

    Ward, A. S.; Wright, D. H.; Collis, J. Leigh

    1970-01-01

    The incidence of oesophagitis has been determined in 108 patients with sliding hiatus hernias using endoscopic, histological, and radiological criteria. Particular consideration has been given to the relationship between inflammatory disease and clinical symptoms. All the patients were attending a thoracic surgical clinic and the spectrum of disease encountered was fairly severe; over half of the cases had established strictures when first seen. The incidence of oesophagitis based on endoscopic evidence was 76·9%, while inflammatory change was noted on biopsy in 56·2% and at barium swallow in 58·3% of the patients. Oesophagoscopy proved to be the most satisfactory method of assessment; biopsy specimens were either inadequate or correlated poorly with other criteria while barium swallow was of diagnostic value only in severe oesophagitis. The main symptoms were pain, heartburn with regurgitation, dysphagia, and bleeding. Dysphagia was common due to the preponderance of patients with strictures, while obvious bleeding was very uncommon. Endoscopic oesophagitis was found in 75% of the patients with specific retrosternal pain and in 60% of those with heartburn and regurgitation. The inability to equate heartburn with oesophagitis is emphasized. The incidence of inflammatory change in patients with dysphagia was 87·2%; nearly all the cases in this group showed stricture formation. PMID:5489179

  17. Vasopressin Improves Hemodynamic Status in Infants with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Shannon N.; Kinsella, John P.; Abman, Steven H.; Gien, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the ability of vasopressin to stabilize hemodynamics in infants with systemic hypotension secondary to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Study design A retrospective chart review was performed to identify 13 patients with CDH treated with vasopressin for refractory hypotension, to assess the effect of vasopressin on pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics and gas exchange in this setting. Data collected included demographics, respiratory support, inotropic agents, pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics, urine output, and serum and urine sodium levels during vasopressin therapy. Results Vasopressin therapy increased mean arterial pressure and decreased pulmonary: systemic pressure ratio, heart rate and FiO2. In 6 of 13 patients, ECMO was no longer indicated after vasopressin treatment. Improvement in left ventricular (LV) function and oxygenation index after vasopressin initiation were associated with a decreased need for ECMO. Prolonged vasopressin treatment was associated with hyponatremia, increased urine output and increased urine sodium. Conclusions Vasopressin stabilized systemic hemodynamics without adverse effects on pulmonary hemodynamics in a subset of infants with CDH. Our results suggest a potential role for vasopressin therapy in patients with CDH with catecholamine resistant refractory hypotension. PMID:24840762

  18. Octreotide for chylous effusions in congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Melissa W.; Butler, Dawn; Lim, Foong Yen; Keswani, Sundeep; Frischer, Jason; Haberman, Beth; Kingma, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose Chylothorax is a frequent complication in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) infants and is associated with significant morbidity. The optimal treatment strategy remains unclear. We hypothesize that octreotide decreases chylous effusions in infants with CDH. Methods This is a retrospective study of all infants with CDH admitted to our institution from October 2006 to October 2011. Results Eleven (12%) infants developed a chylothorax. Five infants were managed conservatively with thoracostomy and total parenteral nutrition. Six infants were started on octreotide therapy. None of the infants required surgical intervention to stop the effusion. There was no significant difference in survival to discharge, length of stay, or average daily chest tube output between groups. There appeared to be a temporally associated drop in chest tube output upon initiation of octreotide in two infants; however, the overall rate of decline in chest tube drainage was unchanged. In addition, there were infants in the conservative group who demonstrated a similar drop in daily chest tube output despite the absence of octreotide. Conclusions Our data suggest that the majority of chylous effusions in CDH infants resolve with conservative therapy alone. PMID:24210190

  19. Management of pulmonary hypertension in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gien, J; Kinsella, J P

    2016-06-01

    In infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a posterolateral diaphragmatic defect results in herniation of abdominal contents into the chest and compression of the intrathoracic structures. In the most severe cases, hypoplasia of the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs, severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular (LV) hypoplasia/dysfunction all contribute to increased mortality. The management of PH in CDH is complicated by structural and functional changes in the heart, pulmonary vasculature, airways and lung parenchyma; consequently, determining optimal management strategies is challenging. Treatment of PH in patients with CDH changes as the underlying pathophysiology evolves in the days and weeks after birth. During the early transition, the use of pulmonary vasodilators is limited by LV structural and functional abnormalities, and pulmonary vasodilators such as inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) may have a limited role (for example, stabilization for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), treatment of marked preductal desaturation and treatment of PH as LV performance improves). In contrast, subacute treatment of PH in CDH with iNO has an important role in recurrent or persistent PH and potentially improves survival. Chronic PH and vascular abnormalities may persist into childhood in patients with CDH, contributing to late mortality. It is unclear how pulmonary vasodilator therapies, such as iNO, sildenafil and bosentan, will modulate late outcomes in CDH with late/chronic PH.

  20. Life threatening iatrogenic major vascular injuries complicating groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Aghaji, M A; Ojimba, T A

    1993-01-01

    Major vascular injuries complicating groin hernia repairs are very rare. Five such cases seen at the vascular unit of the Department of Surgery, UNTH, Enugu, Nigeria over a five year period are presented. The patients all of whom were adults (age range 49-65) had initial problems of hypovolaemia due to massive blood loss followed by infection and anaemia. One of the patients died from irreversible shock while still in the Casualty Unit. The vascular injuries were dealt with by either primary repair, vein graft or dacron graft depending on the prevailing conditions e.g. presence or absence of infection. The other 4 patients who had surgery did well postoperatively and on 5 to 58 months follow-up. Emphasis is laid on the underlying causes of these iatrogenic injuries which include inexperience on the part of the operator and inadequate anaesthesia (often wrongly applied local anaesthesia). If this complication however occurs, the wound should be tightly packed and patient sent immediately to a unit with vascular surgical facilities.