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Sample records for hiberix clinical review

  1. MTA: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Tawil, Peter Z; Duggan, Derek J.; Galicia, Johnah C.

    2016-01-01

    MTA has been a revolutionary material in endodontics. Since it’s introduction in the 1990’s several studies have demonstrated its use in several clinical applications. MTA has been extensively studied and is currently used for perforation repairs, apexifications, regenerative procedures, apexogenesis, pulpotomies & pulp capping. This article will review the history, composition, research findings and clinical applications of this versatile material. PMID:25821936

  2. Rosacea: a Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Holmgren, Helene Ringe; Kjellman, Petra; Heidenheim, Michael; Kappinnen, Ari; Bjerring, Peter; Huldt-Nystrøm, Theis

    2016-01-01

    Rosacea is a field within dermatology with new insight within immunological research and new treatment-algorithm. Patient education on rosacea and appropriate treatments is an important aspect in helping patients succeed with therapy. Treatment should be tailored to each individual patient, taking into account: symptoms, trigger factors, patients’ wishes, most bothersome symptoms, psychological aspect, individual needs. A combination of clinical therapies to treat different symptoms concomitantly may offer the best possible outcomes for the patient. In this review article we describe these aspects. PMID:27942368

  3. Clinical review: Hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Guillermo; Reines, H David; Wulf-Gutierrez, Marian E

    2004-01-01

    This review addresses the pathophysiology and treatment of hemorrhagic shock – a condition produced by rapid and significant loss of intravascular volume, which may lead sequentially to hemodynamic instability, decreases in oxygen delivery, decreased tissue perfusion, cellular hypoxia, organ damage, and death. Hemorrhagic shock can be rapidly fatal. The primary goals are to stop the bleeding and to restore circulating blood volume. Resuscitation may well depend on the estimated severity of hemorrhage. It now appears that patients with moderate hypotension from bleeding may benefit by delaying massive fluid resuscitation until they reach a definitive care facility. On the other hand, the use of intravenous fluids, crystalloids or colloids, and blood products can be life saving in those patients who are in severe hemorrhagic shock. The optimal method of resuscitation has not been clearly established. A hemoglobin level of 7–8 g/dl appears to be an appropriate threshold for transfusion in critically ill patients with no evidence of tissue hypoxia. However, maintaining a higher hemoglobin level of 10 g/dl is a reasonable goal in actively bleeding patients, the elderly, or individuals who are at risk for myocardial infarction. Moreover, hemoglobin concentration should not be the only therapeutic guide in actively bleeding patients. Instead, therapy should be aimed at restoring intravascular volume and adequate hemodynamic parameters. PMID:15469601

  4. [Clinical pharmacy and surgery: Review].

    PubMed

    Jarfaut, A; Nivoix, Y; Vigouroux, D; Kehrli, P; Gaudias, J; Kempf, J-F; Levêque, D; Gourieux, B

    2014-05-01

    Clinical pharmacy has been developed and evaluated in various medical hospital activities. Reviews conducted in this area reported a higher value of this discipline. In surgical services, evenly adverse drug events may occur, so clinical pharmacy activities must also help to optimize the management of drug's patient. The objectives of this literature review is to determine the profile of clinical pharmacy activities developed in surgical services and identify indicators. The research was conducted on Pubmed(®) database with the following keywords (2000-2013), "surgery", "pharmacy", "pharmacist", "pharmaceutical care", "impact" and limited to French or English papers. Studies dealing on simultaneously medical and surgical areas were excluded. Twenty-one papers were selected. The most frequently developed clinical pharmacy activities were history and therapeutic drug monitoring (antibiotics or anticoagulants). Two types of indicators were identified: activity indicators with the number of pharmaceutical interventions, their description and clinical signification, the acceptance rate and workload. Impact indicators were mostly clinical and economic impacts. The development of clinical pharmacy related to surgical patients is documented and appears to have, as for medical patients, a clinical and economical value.

  5. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  6. Pfeiffer syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Cantrell, S B; Trott, J A; David, D J

    1995-01-01

    The combination of bicoronal craniosynostosis, broad thumbs and great toes, and partial variable soft tissue syndactyly of the hands and feet (i.e., Pfeiffer syndrome) classically followed a benign clinical course. A review of the clinical features of those Pfeiffer syndrome patients presenting to our unit confirm another subgroup in whom the craniofacial and associated manifestations are more extreme, with a significant risk of early demise. The early aggressive surgical management of craniostenosis, hydrocephalus, exorbitism, faciostenosis, and upper airway obstruction has provided the potential for prolonged useful survival in these cases.

  7. Tracheobronchial tuberculosis: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) is defined as tuberculous infection of the tracheobronchial tree. The exact pathogenesis is unclear, and it has a heterogenous clinical course. Its diagnosis requires the clinician to have a high index of suspicion based on clinical symptoms and radiological features. Computed tomography and bronchoscopy are useful tools in its evaluation. The goal of treatment is in the eradication of tuberculous bacilli with appropriate anti-tuberculous therapy. Use of corticosteroids is controversial for the prevention of tracheobronchial stenosis. Interventional bronchoscopy or surgical intervention is employed to restore airway patency once significant stenosis occurs. PMID:28203440

  8. Osteoarthritis year 2012 in review: clinical.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, M C

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical research in osteoarthritis (OA) continues to focus on analytic and descriptive epidemiology, and the role of both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies in the management of OA, respectively. A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed for the period between September 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012. Selected articles in these areas are discussed in this narrative review article.

  9. Thymomas: Review of Current Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszek, Sandra; Wigle, Dennis A.; Keshavjee, Shaf; Fischer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Thymomas are the most common tumors of the mediastinum. The introduction of multimodality treatment strategies, as well as novel approaches to the diagnosis of these tumors, has led to changes in the clinical management of thymomas. Here we review the literature for current clinical practice in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of thymomas. PMID:19463649

  10. Citicoline: pharmacological and clinical review, 2010 update.

    PubMed

    Secades, J J

    2011-03-14

    This review is based on the previous one published in 2006 -Secades JJ, Lorenzo JL. Citicoline: pharmacological and clinical review, 2006 update. Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol 2006; 28 (Suppl B): S1-56-, incorporating the new references until now, having all the information available to facilitate the access to the informacion in one document. This review is focused on the main indications of the drug, as acute stroke and its sequelae, including the cognitive impairment, and traumatic brain injury and its sequelae. There are retrieved the most important experimental and clinical data in both indications.

  11. Ischaemic priapism: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Ridgley, Joanne; Raison, Nicholas; Sheikh, M. Iqbal; Dasgupta, Prokar; Khan, M. Shamim; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    Objective Ischaemic priapism is a rare condition characterised by little or no cavernosal blood flow, pain and rigidity of the penis. Immediate intervention is required to restore blood flow, prevent necrosis and erectile dysfunction. This review was conducted to determine the best course of treatment and identify areas in current guidelines to which improvements could be made. Material and methods PubMed, Ovid, MEDLINE (1946–December 2016) and the Cochrane Library were searched as sources for literature. Key studies in each of the areas of management were identified and analysed. Results A total of 45 articles were reviewed. The first step in treatment should be aspiration of corporeal blood. Further studies are needed to make firm recommendations as to whether irrigation should follow, as currently literature is inconclusive. If this fails to cause detumescence, sympathomimetics should be injected. The sympathomimetic of choice is phenylephrine as it is effective, specific and causes minimal cardiovascular side effects. It should be injected at a concentration of 100–500 μg/mL, with 1 mL being injected every 3–5 minutes for up to an hour (maximum 1mg in an hour). Surgical shunting is the next step, except in the cases of delayed priapism (48–72 hours duration) where immediate penile prosthesis insertion may be considered more appropriate. Distal shunts should be performed first, followed by proximal ones to minimise damage leading to erectile dysfunction. There exists little evidence recommending one shunting procedure over another. The final intervention is insertion of a penile prosthesis. Literature suggests that an inflatable prosthesis inserted immediately will yield the greatest patient satisfaction. Conclusion A review of the literature has highlighted areas in which further research needs to be done to make conclusive recommendations, including whether irrigation should accompany aspiration and efficacy of shunting procedures. Further studies are

  12. Huntington's disease: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by unwanted choreatic movements, behavioral and psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Prevalence in the Caucasian population is estimated at 1/10,000-1/20,000. Mean age at onset of symptoms is 30-50 years. In some cases symptoms start before the age of 20 years with behavior disturbances and learning difficulties at school (Juvenile Huntington's disease; JHD). The classic sign is chorea that gradually spreads to all muscles. All psychomotor processes become severely retarded. Patients experience psychiatric symptoms and cognitive decline. HD is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat (36 repeats or more) on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 in the Huntingtine gene. The longer the CAG repeat, the earlier the onset of disease. In cases of JHD the repeat often exceeds 55. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and signs in an individual with a parent with proven HD, and is confirmed by DNA determination. Pre-manifest diagnosis should only be performed by multidisciplinary teams in healthy at-risk adult individuals who want to know whether they carry the mutation or not. Differential diagnoses include other causes of chorea including general internal disorders or iatrogenic disorders. Phenocopies (clinically diagnosed cases of HD without the genetic mutation) are observed. Prenatal diagnosis is possible by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. Preimplantation diagnosis with in vitro fertilization is offered in several countries. There is no cure. Management should be multidisciplinary and is based on treating symptoms with a view to improving quality of life. Chorea is treated with dopamine receptor blocking or depleting agents. Medication and non-medical care for depression and aggressive behavior may be required. The progression of the disease leads to a complete dependency in daily life, which results in patients

  13. Huntington's disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Roos, Raymund A C

    2010-12-20

    Huntington disease (HD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by unwanted choreatic movements, behavioral and psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Prevalence in the Caucasian population is estimated at 1/10,000-1/20,000. Mean age at onset of symptoms is 30-50 years. In some cases symptoms start before the age of 20 years with behavior disturbances and learning difficulties at school (Juvenile Huntington's disease; JHD). The classic sign is chorea that gradually spreads to all muscles. All psychomotor processes become severely retarded. Patients experience psychiatric symptoms and cognitive decline. HD is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat (36 repeats or more) on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 in the Huntingtine gene. The longer the CAG repeat, the earlier the onset of disease. In cases of JHD the repeat often exceeds 55. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and signs in an individual with a parent with proven HD, and is confirmed by DNA determination. Pre-manifest diagnosis should only be performed by multidisciplinary teams in healthy at-risk adult individuals who want to know whether they carry the mutation or not. Differential diagnoses include other causes of chorea including general internal disorders or iatrogenic disorders. Phenocopies (clinically diagnosed cases of HD without the genetic mutation) are observed. Prenatal diagnosis is possible by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. Preimplantation diagnosis with in vitro fertilization is offered in several countries. There is no cure. Management should be multidisciplinary and is based on treating symptoms with a view to improving quality of life. Chorea is treated with dopamine receptor blocking or depleting agents. Medication and non-medical care for depression and aggressive behavior may be required. The progression of the disease leads to a complete dependency in daily life, which results in patients

  14. Human Schistosomiasis: Clinical Perspective: Review

    PubMed Central

    Barsoum, Rashad S.; Esmat, Gamal; El-Baz, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of schistosomiasis pass by acute, sub acute and chronic stages that mirror the immune response to infection. The later includes in succession innate, TH1 and TH2 adaptive stages, with an ultimate establishment of concomitant immunity. Some patients may also develop late complications, or suffer the sequelae of co-infection with other parasites, bacteria or viruses. Acute manifestations are species-independent; occur during the early stages of invasion and migration, where infection-naivety and the host’s racial and genetic setting play a major role. Sub acute manifestations occur after maturity of the parasite and settlement in target organs. They are related to the formation of granulomata around eggs or dead worms, primarily in the lower urinary tract with Schistosoma haematobium, and the colon and rectum with Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma intercalatum and Schistosoma mekongi infection. Secondary manifestations during this stage may occur in the kidneys, liver, lungs or other ectopic sites. Chronic morbidity is attributed to the healing of granulomata by fibrosis and calcification at the sites of oval entrapment, deposition of schistosomal antigen-antibody complexes in the renal glomeruli or the development of secondary amyloidosis. Malignancy may complicate the chronic lesions in the urinary bladder or colon. Co-infection with salmonella or hepatitis viruses B or C may confound the clinical picture of schistosomiasis, while the latter may have a negative impact on the course of other co-infections as malaria, leishmaniasis and HIV. Prevention of schistosomiasis is basically geared around education and periodic mass treatment, an effective vaccine being still experimental. Praziquantel is the drug of choice in the treatment of active infection by any species, with a cure rate of 80%. Other antischistosomal drugs include metrifonate for S. haematobium, oxamniquine for S. mansoni and Artemether and, possibly

  15. Design of oncology clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Menon, Sandeep

    2013-10-01

    Cancer is a disease that occurs due to the uncontrolled multiplication of cells that invade nearby tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. An increased incidence of cancer in the world has led to an increase in oncology research and in the number of oncology trials. Well designed oncology clinical trials are a key part of developing effective anti-cancer drugs. This review focuses on statistical considerations in the design and analysis of oncology clinical trials.

  16. Clinical practice guidelines in hypertension: a review.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita Lizbeth; Galvez-Olortegui, José Kelvin; Galvez-Olortegui, Tomas Vladimir; Sosa-Rosado, José Manuel; Camacho-Saavedra, Luis Arturo

    2015-10-23

    The aim of this study is the methodological evaluation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) in hypertension. This is the first in a series of review articles, analysis, assessment in methodology and content of clinical practice guidelines in Cardiology. Of all clinical practice guidelines, three were selected and the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument was used to assess each guide. The guidelines obtained the lowest score in the domain of applicability (mean 43.8%); while the highest score was for clarity of presentation (mean 81.5%). The lowest percentage was found in the applicability domain (European guideline) and the highest of all scores was found in two domains: scope and purpose, and clarity of presentation (Canadian guideline). Assessing the quality of the clinical practice guidelines analyzed, the Canadian is one with the best scores obtained by applying the AGREE II instrument, and it is advised to be used without modifications.

  17. Institutional ethics review of clinical study agreements.

    PubMed

    DuVal, G

    2004-02-01

    Clinical Study Agreements (CSAs) can have profound effects both on the protection of human subjects and on the independence of investigators to conduct research with scientific integrity. Sponsors, institutions, and even investigators may fail to give adequate attention to these issues in the negotiation of CSAs. Despite the key role of CSAs in structuring ethically important aspects of research, they remain largely unregulated and unreviewed for adherence to ethical norms. Academic institutions routinely enter into research contracts that fail to meet adequate ethical standards. This is a failing that can have serious consequences. Accordingly, it is necessary that some independent body have the authority both to review research contracts for compliance with norms of subject protection and ethical integrity, and to reject studies that fail to meet ethical standards. Such review should take place prior to the start of research, not later. Because of its expertise and authority, the institutional ethics review board (IRB or REB) is the appropriate body to undertake such review. Much recent commentary has focused on contractual restrictions on the investigator's freedom to publish research findings. The Olivieri experience, and that of other investigators, has brought freedom of publication issues into sharp focus. Clinical study agreements also raise a number of other ethical issues relating to human subjects and research integrity, however, including disclosures relating to patient safety, data analysis and reporting, budget, confidentiality, and premature termination of the study. This paper describes the ethical issues at stake in structuring such agreements and suggests ethical standards to guide institutional ethics review.

  18. A review of clinical research in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, J F; Antczak-Bouckoms, A A; Tuncay, O C

    1989-06-01

    The orthodontic journals should provide valid and reliable information that helps clinicians make appropriate decisions about patient care. The nature of the published literature has not been categorized. The American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (formerly the American Journal of Orthodontics) was reviewed for the years 1976, 1981, and 1986, to determine the frequency of clinical articles, the topics reported, the study designs used to obtain information, the senior author affiliation, and the major funding sources. This review demonstrates that more than half the articles in this Journal report data on patients, with the majority focusing on the evaluation or description of therapeutic interventions. Academic institutions contribute the majority of the clinical research, although only a few student theses are published. The major support for this work continues to be from departmental resources with little external funding. Despite the introduction of powerful research designs such as randomized clinical trials, these methods have not been widely adopted for orthodontic clinical research. The case report (study containing fewer than 10 patients with no control nor comparison group) continues to be the most frequently published format. Clinicians should become aware of the inherent weakness in the research designs generally used and recognize the limited information that can be obtained from such methods. Support for this research needs to be greatly expanded if the more powerful type of study required to provide valid and reliable clinical information is to be continued.

  19. Clinical Microbiology Reviews: genesis of a journal.

    PubMed

    Morello, J A

    1999-04-01

    In 1986 planning for a new ASM review journal, Clinical Microbiology Reviews (CMR), began. CMR would publish articles primarily of interest to persons concerned with pathogenesis, laboratory diagnosis, epidemiology, and control of human and veterinary pathogens. The first issue was published in January 1988, with quarterly publication since then. The journal quickly became successful in terms of subscribers and impact on the field, earning a strong national and international reputation. The achievements of CMR are owed to many persons, including the editorial board, the production team, and especially the contributing authors.

  20. Infant botulism: review and clinical update.

    PubMed

    Rosow, Laura K; Strober, Jonathan B

    2015-05-01

    Botulism is a rare neuromuscular condition, and multiple clinical forms are recognized. Infant botulism was first identified in the 1970s, and it typically occurs in infants younger than 1 year of age who ingest Clostridium botulinum spores. A specific treatment for infant botulism, intravenous botulism immunoglobulin (BIG-IV or BabyBIG®), was developed in 2003, and this treatment has substantially decreased both morbidity and hospital costs associated with this illness. This article will review the pathogenesis of infant botulism as well as the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition.

  1. Review of clinical medicine and religious practice.

    PubMed

    Stewart, William C; Adams, Michelle P; Stewart, Jeanette A; Nelson, Lindsay A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose was to evaluate faith-based studies within the medical literature to determine whether there are ways to help physicians understand how religion affects patients’ lives and diseases. We reviewed articles that assessed the influence of religious practices on medicine as a primary or secondary variable in clinical practice. This review evaluated 49 articles and found that religious faith is important to many patients, particularly those with serious disease, and patients depend on it as a positive coping mechanism. The findings of this review can suggest that patients frequently practice religion and interact with God about their disease state. This spiritual interaction may benefit the patient by providing comfort, increasing knowledge about their disease, greater treatment adherence, and quality of life. The results of prayer on specific disease states appear inconsistent with cardiovascular disease but stronger in other disease states.

  2. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  3. Clinical Aspects of Feline Retroviruses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia), and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less commonly diagnosed than in the previous 20 years; prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. However, FeLV importance may be underestimated as it has been shown that regressively infected cats (that are negative in routinely used FeLV tests) also can develop clinical signs. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. This article provides a review of clinical syndromes in progressively and regressively FeLV-infected cats as well as in FIV-infected cats. PMID:23202500

  4. Osteoarthritis year in review 2014: clinical.

    PubMed

    Hawker, G A; Stanaitis, I

    2014-12-01

    A systematic search was conducted for the time period April 1 2013 to March 30 2014 using PubMed to identify major osteoarthritis (OA) clinical research themes of the past year. Articles within each theme were selected for inclusion in this review based on study quality and relevance. Two major themes emerged, which relate to the current understanding of OA as a heterogeneous condition with multiple pathogenic mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Theme 1 stems from the role of systemic inflammation in OA pathogenesis, and the concept of 'metabolic OA'. Over the past year, research has examined the effect of OA on incidence and progression of other 'metabolic syndrome'-related conditions, especially cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes and the impact of multi-morbidity on the clinical management of OA. Theme 2 focuses on the concept of personalized medicine as it relates to the treatment of OA. It is hypothesized that the modest efficacy of available OA treatments is a result of inclusion of heterogeneous groups of OA patients in clinical trials. Prognostic studies in the past year have been helpful in identifying 'OA phenotypes' that are more or less likely to respond to treatments--e.g., the presence of synovitis on imaging, central pain sensitization on quantitative sensory testing (QST), or coping efficacy by self-reported patient questionnaire. Their findings are being increasingly used to target interventions to these identified 'OA responder' subgroups with the hopes that treatment effect will be amplified.

  5. Clinical Management of Priapism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Priapism is defined as a persistent and painful erection lasting longer than four hours without sexual stimulation. Based on episode history and pathophysiology, priapism is classified into three subtypes: ischemic (low-flow), non-ischemic (high-flow), and stuttering priapism. Ischemic priapism is characterized by a persistent, painful erection with remarkable rigidity of the corpora cavernosa caused by a disorder of venous blood outflow from this tissue mass, and is similar to penile compartment syndrome. Stuttering priapism is characterized by a self-limited, recurrent, and intermittent erection, frequently occurring in patients with sickle cell disease. Non-ischemic priapism is characterized by a painless, persistent nonsexual erection that is not fully rigid and is caused by excess arterial blood flow into the corpora cavernosa. Because ischemic and non-ischemic priapism differ based on emergency status and treatment options, appropriate discrimination of each type of priapism is required to initiate adequate clinical management. The goal of management of priapism is to achieve detumescence of the persistent penile erection and to preserve erectile function after resolution of the priapism. To achieve successful management, urologists should address this emergency clinical condition. In the present article, we review the diagnosis and clinical management of the three types of priapism. PMID:27169123

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosa LS

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains a clinical challenge in the 21st century. It’s the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal condition and also the most common reason for referral to gastroenterology clinics. Its can affect up to one in five people at some point in their lives, and has a significantly impact of life quality and health care utilization. The prevalence varies according to country and criteria used to define IBS. Various mechanisms and theories have been proposed about its etiology, but the biopsychosocial model is the most currently accepted for IBS. The complex of symptoms would be the result of the interaction between psychological, behavioral, psychosocial and environmental factors. The diagnosis of IBS is not confirmed by a specific test or structural abnormality. It is made using criteria based on clinical symptoms such as Rome criteria, unless the symptoms are thought to be atypical. Today the Rome Criteria III is the current gold-standard for the diagnoses of IBS. Secure positive evidence of IBS by means of specific disease marker is currently not possible and cannot be currently recommended for routine diagnosis. There is still no clinical evidence to recommend the use of biomarkers in blood to diagnose IBS. However, a number of different changes in IBS patients were demonstrated in recent years, some of which can be used in the future as a diagnostic support. IBS has no definitive treatment but could be controlled by non-pharmacologic management eliminating of some exacerbating factors such certain drugs, stressor conditions and changes in dietary habits.The traditional pharmacologic management of IBS has been symptom based and several drugs have been used. However, the cornerstone of its therapy is a solid patient physician relationship. This review will provide a summary of pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria and current and emerging therapies for IBS. PMID:25232249

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rosa L S

    2014-09-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains a clinical challenge in the 21(st) century. It's the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal condition and also the most common reason for referral to gastroenterology clinics. Its can affect up to one in five people at some point in their lives, and has a significantly impact of life quality and health care utilization. The prevalence varies according to country and criteria used to define IBS. Various mechanisms and theories have been proposed about its etiology, but the biopsychosocial model is the most currently accepted for IBS. The complex of symptoms would be the result of the interaction between psychological, behavioral, psychosocial and environmental factors. The diagnosis of IBS is not confirmed by a specific test or structural abnormality. It is made using criteria based on clinical symptoms such as Rome criteria, unless the symptoms are thought to be atypical. Today the Rome Criteria III is the current gold-standard for the diagnoses of IBS. Secure positive evidence of IBS by means of specific disease marker is currently not possible and cannot be currently recommended for routine diagnosis. There is still no clinical evidence to recommend the use of biomarkers in blood to diagnose IBS. However, a number of different changes in IBS patients were demonstrated in recent years, some of which can be used in the future as a diagnostic support. IBS has no definitive treatment but could be controlled by non-pharmacologic management eliminating of some exacerbating factors such certain drugs, stressor conditions and changes in dietary habits.The traditional pharmacologic management of IBS has been symptom based and several drugs have been used. However, the cornerstone of its therapy is a solid patient physician relationship. This review will provide a summary of pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria and current and emerging therapies for IBS.

  8. Antidepressants and psychotherapy: a clinical research review

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Ellen; Novick, Danielle; Kupfer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on information concerning antidepressants and psychotherapy in the treatement of both acute and chronic forms of unipolar depression in the English language literature. In it, we address the use of combination therapy, both from the outset of treatment and in a variety of sequences, ie, we examine the potential advantages of adding a targeted psychotherapy to an incompletely effective pharmacotherapy and the potential advantages of adding pharmacotherapy to an incompletely effective psychotherapy The number of research reports available to address these questions is small relative to their importance for clinical practice. There is a clear need for more information about the relative efficacy of pharmacotherapy-psychotherapy combinations or sequences versus either pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy provided as monotherapies. PMID:16156384

  9. Topical antioxidants in radiodermatitis: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Kodiyan, Joyson; Amber, Kyle T

    2015-09-01

    Radiation-induced skin toxicity is the most prevalent side effect of radiation therapy. Not only does it have a significant effect on patients' quality of life, but it also results in poor follow-up and early termination of radiotherapy treatment. Several skin care practices and topical applications have been studied in the field of radiodermatitis, including skin washing, topical steroids, and mechanical skin barriers. Aside from these methods, many patients turn to complementary and alternative medicine for the prevention and treatment of radiodermatitis. Many of these alternative therapies are topically applied antioxidants. While the rationale behind the use of antioxidants in treating radiodermatitis is strong, clinical studies have been far less consistent. Even in large scale randomised controlled trials, findings have been limited by the inconsistent use of topical vehicles and placebos. In this article, the authors review the role of topical antioxidants to better help the practitioner navigate through different available skin directed antioxidants.

  10. Clinical review: The management of hypertensive crises

    PubMed Central

    Varon, Joseph; Marik, Paul E

    2003-01-01

    Hypertension is an extremely common clinical problem, affecting approximately 50 million people in the USA and approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. Approximately 1% of these patients will develop acute elevations in blood pressure at some point in their lifetime. A number of terms have been applied to severe hypertension, including hypertensive crises, emergencies, and urgencies. By definition, acute elevations in blood pressure that are associated with end-organ damage are called hypertensive crises. Immediate reduction in blood pressure is required only in patients with acute end-organ damage. This article reviews current concepts, and common misconceptions and pitfalls in the diagnosis and management of patients with acutely elevated blood pressure. PMID:12974970

  11. Osteoarthritis Year in Review 2015: Clinical

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Leena

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight clinical research in osteoarthritis. A literature search was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) with the search terms “osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND treatment [All Fields]” and the following limits activated: humans, English language, all adult 19+ years, published between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2015. A second literature search was then conducted with the search terms “osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND epidemiology [All Fields]”, with the same limits. Reports of surgical outcome, case series, surgical technique, tissue sample or culture studies, trial protocols, and pilot studies were excluded. Of 1523, 148 were considered relevant. Among epidemiologic and observational clinical studies, themes included physical activity, early knee OA, and confidence/instability/falls. Symptom outcomes of pharmacologic treatments were reported for methotrexate, adalimumab, anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibodies, strontium ranelate, bisphosphonates, glucosamine, and chondroitin sulfate, and structural outcomes of pharmacologic treatments for strontium ranelate, recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18, and glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. Symptom outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for: neuromuscular exercise, quadriceps strengthening, weight reduction and maintenance, TENS, therapeutic ultrasound, stepped care strategies, cognitive behavior therapy for sleep disturbance, acupuncture, gait modification, booster physical therapy, a web-based therapeutic exercise resource center for knee OA; hip physical therapy for hip OA; and joint protection and hand exercises for hand OA. Structure outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for patellofemoral bracing. PMID:26707991

  12. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: clinical.

    PubMed

    Sharma, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight clinical research in osteoarthritis (OA). A literature search was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND treatment [All Fields]" and the following limits activated: humans, English language, all adult 19+ years, published between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2015. A second literature search was then conducted with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND epidemiology [All Fields]", with the same limits. Reports of surgical outcome, case series, surgical technique, tissue sample or culture studies, trial protocols, and pilot studies were excluded. Of 1523, 150 were considered relevant. Among epidemiologic and observational clinical studies, themes included physical activity, early knee OA, and confidence/instability/falls. Symptom outcomes of pharmacologic treatments were reported for methotrexate, adalimumab, anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibodies, strontium ranelate, bisphosphonates, glucosamine, and chondroitin sulfate, and structural outcomes of pharmacologic treatments for strontium ranelate, recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18, and glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. Symptom outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for: neuromuscular exercise, quadriceps strengthening, weight reduction and maintenance, TENS, therapeutic ultrasound, stepped care strategies, cognitive behavior therapy for sleep disturbance, acupuncture, gait modification, booster physical therapy, a web-based therapeutic exercise resource center for knee OA; hip physical therapy for hip OA; and joint protection and hand exercises for hand OA. Structure outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for patellofemoral bracing.

  13. Clinical review: Long-term noninvasive ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Dominique; Argaud, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Noninvasive positive ventilation has undergone a remarkable evolution over the past decades and is assuming an important role in the management of both acute and chronic respiratory failure. Long-term ventilatory support should be considered a standard of care to treat selected patients following an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. In this setting, appropriate use of noninvasive ventilation can be expected to improve patient outcomes, reduce ICU admission, enhance patient comfort, and increase the efficiency of health care resource utilization. Current literature indicates that noninvasive ventilation improves and stabilizes the clinical course of many patients with chronic ventilatory failure. Noninvasive ventilation also permits long-term mechanical ventilation to be an acceptable option for patients who otherwise would not have been treated if tracheostomy were the only alternative. Nevertheless, these results appear to be better in patients with neuromuscular/-parietal disorders than in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This clinical review will address the use of noninvasive ventilation (not including continuous positive airway pressure) mainly in diseases responsible for chronic hypoventilation (that is, restrictive disorders, including neuromuscular disease and lung disease) and incidentally in others such as obstructive sleep apnea or problems of central drive. PMID:17419882

  14. Kava hepatotoxicity--a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    This review critically analyzes the clinical data of patients with suspected kava hepatotoxicity and suggests recommendations for minimizing risk. Kava is a plant (Piper methysticum) of the pepper family Piperaceae, and its rhizome is used for traditional aqueous extracts in the South Pacific Islands and for commercial ethanolic and acetonic medicinal products as anxiolytic herbs in Western countries. A regulatory ban for ethanolic and acetonic kava extracts was issued in 2002 for Germany on the basis of reports connecting liver disease with the use of kava, but the regulatory causality assessment was a matter of international discussions. Based on one positive reexposure test with the kava drug, it was indeed confirmed that kava is potentially hepatotoxic. In subsequent studies using a structured, quantitative and hepatotoxicity specific causality assessment method in 14 patients with liver disease described worldwide, causality for kava +/- comedicated drugs and dietary supplements including herbal ones was highly probable (n = 1), probable (n = 4) or possible (n = 9) regarding aqueous extracts (n = 3), ethanolic extracts (n = 5), acetonic extracts (n = 4), and mixtures containing kava (n = 2). Risk factors included overdose, prolonged treatment, and comedication with synthetic drugs and dietary supplements comprizing herbal ones in most of the 14 patients. Hepatotoxicity occurred independently of the used solvent, suggesting poor kava raw material quality as additional causative factor. In conclusion, in a few individuals kava may be hepatotoxic due to overdose, prolonged treatment, comedication, and probably triggered by an unacceptable quality of the kava raw material; standardization is now required, minimizing thereby hepatotoxic risks.

  15. Consistency between Peer Reviewers for a Clinical Specialty Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, David J.; Macaulay, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of reliability among peer reviews of 422 unsolicited articles for the "Journal of Clinical Anesthesia" found that most articles' reviews were consistent or near consistent. However, articles reviewed by two of the editorial board members were much less likely to be accepted than those read by two nonmembers. (Author/MSE)

  16. Hyperbaric Oxygenation (HBO) Clinical Trials: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    16 Table 3. HBO Clinical Trials: Multiple Sclerosis ..... 17 Table 4. HBO Clinical Trials: Diabetic Foot Ulcers.. .17 Table 5. HBO...treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) (table 3), and two reported on diabetic foot ulcers (table 4). The remaining seven reported on seven different...group of MS trials is convincing that HBO was not effective for MS. The diabetic foot ulcer trials are difficult to compare. They used different HBO

  17. A Review of the Clinical Education in Podiatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baerg, Richard H.

    1979-01-01

    Contemporary clinical educational programs at five colleges of podiatric medicine are reviewed. Both classroom contact hours and clinical experience are examined and compared among institutions. Course offerings in podiatric medicine, radiology, surgery, othopedics, community health, etc., are listed by college. (MLW)

  18. Clinical xenotransplantation, a closer reality: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Aristizabal, Ana María; Caicedo, Luis Armando; Martínez, Juan Manuel; Moreno, Manuel; J Echeverri, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    Xenotransplantation could provide an unlimited supply of organs and solve the current shortage of organs for transplantation. To become a reality in clinical practice, the immunological and physiological barriers and the risk of xenozoonosis that they possess should be resolved. From the immunological point of view, in the last 30 years a significant progress in the production of transgenic pigs has prevented the hyperacute rejection. About xenozoonosis, attention has been focused on the risk of transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses; however, today, it is considered that the risk is very low and the inevitable transmission should not prevent the clinical xenotransplantation. Regarding the physiological barriers, encouraging results have been obtained and it's expected that the barriers that still need to be corrected can be solved in the future through genetic modifications.

  19. Diabetic neuropathy, A review of clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, A M; Abraira, C

    1976-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy in some form or other afflicts a majority of patients with diabetes mellitus. Neuropathic disturbance of sensory, motor or autonomic nerves may occur singly or in combination. Cranial nerve and other mononeuropathies generally resolve spontaneously. Autonomic neuropathy which can result in orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis diabeticorum, nocturnal diarrhea, atonic bladder and impotence, although chronic, may wax and wane in clinical severity. Neuritis, disesthesias and painful sensory neuritis may resolve with good diabetic control; on occasion, diphenylhydantoin has been of therapeutic benefit.

  20. Loose connections between peer-reviewed clinical journals and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Haynes, R B

    1990-11-01

    Many important advances in medical care are first reported in the biomedical literature, but physicians find the literature overwhelming and, therefore, are often unaware of advances. This article examines the ways in which peer-reviewed clinical journals contribute to this problem and proposes some solutions for both their editors and clinical readers. Peer-reviewed clinical journals impede the dissemination of validated advances to practitioners by mixing a few rigorous studies (communications from scientists to practitioners) with many preliminary investigations (communications from scientists to scientists). Journals wishing to improve communication with practitioners should feature rigorous studies of the nature, cause, prognosis, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease and should feature sound clinical review articles (communications from practitioners to practitioners). Additional strategies for improving communication between medical scientists and practitioners include improving publication standards for clinical journals, proving more informative abstracts for clinical articles, fostering the development of derivative literature services, and enhancing practitioners' skills in critically appraising the medical literature.

  1. Clinical experience with Angiojet: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, A M; Xhepa, G; Piffaretti, G; Bacuzzi, A; Tozzi, M; Carbone, M; Barile, A; Squillaci, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Carrafiello, G

    2015-12-01

    The development of various sophisticated mechanical thrombectomy devices and the amassed experience of physicians in minimal invasive therapy produced a paradigm shift in vascular access management toward percutaneous declotting procedures, using pharmaceutical thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, balloon thrombectomy, and a combination of the above techniques. In this setting, in the last years, AngioJet™ (Possis, Minneapolis, MN, USA) rheolytic thrombectomy (RT) showed an increasing use in emergency and election patients. The purpose of this review is to present the current status of percutaneous rheolytic thrombectomy in different fields of applications.

  2. Endemic mycoses in AIDS: a clinical review.

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, J

    1995-01-01

    Histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis are serious opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS who reside in areas of endemicity of the United States and Central and South America. Blastomycosis, although less common, also must be recognized as an opportunistic infection in patients with AIDS. Prompt diagnosis requires knowledge of the clinical syndromes and diagnostic tests as well as a high index of suspicion. Histoplasmosis and blastomycosis respond well to antifungal treatment, but relapse is common without chronic suppressive therapy. Improvements in treatment are needed in coccidioidomycosis. Research is needed to identify preventive strategies for patients at risk. These strategies may include use of prophylactic antifungal therapy or vaccination. PMID:7704892

  3. Plasma-Lyte 148: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Laurence; Collins, Neil; Van Mourik, Kiara; Tan, Chong; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To outline the physiochemical properties and specific clinical uses of Plasma-Lyte 148 as choice of solution for fluid intervention in critical illness, surgery and perioperative medicine. METHODS We performed an electronic literature search from Medline and PubMed (via Ovid), anesthesia and pharmacology textbooks, and online sources including studies that compared Plasma-Lyte 148 to other crystalloid solutions. The following keywords were used: “surgery”, “anaesthesia”, “anesthesia”, “anesthesiology”, “anaesthesiology”, “fluids”, “fluid therapy”, “crystalloid”, “saline”, “plasma-Lyte”, “plasmalyte”, “hartmann’s”, “ringers” “acetate”, “gluconate”, “malate”, “lactate”. All relevant articles were accessed in full. We summarized the data and reported the data in tables and text. RESULTS We retrieved 104 articles relevant to the choice of Plasma-Lyte 148 for fluid intervention in critical illness, surgery and perioperative medicine. We analyzed the data and reported the results in tables and text. CONCLUSION Plasma-Lyte 148 is an isotonic, buffered intravenous crystalloid solution with a physiochemical composition that closely reflects human plasma. Emerging data supports the use of buffered crystalloid solutions in preference to saline in improving physicochemical outcomes. Further large randomized controlled trials assessing the comparative effectiveness of Plasma-Lyte 148 and other crystalloid solutions in measuring clinically important outcomes such as morbidity and mortality are needed. PMID:27896148

  4. Clinical librarian support for rapid review of clinical utility of cancer molecular biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yimin; Fowler, Clara S; Fulton, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The clinical librarian used a restricted literature searching and quality-filtering approach to provide relevant clinical evidence for the use of cancer molecular biomarkers by institutional policy makers and clinicians in the rapid review process. The librarian-provided evidence was compared with the cited references in the institutional molecular biomarker algorithm. The overall incorporation rate of the librarian-provided references into the algorithm was above 80%. This study suggests the usefulness of clinical librarian expertise for clinical practice. The searching and filtering methods for high-level evidence can be adopted by information professionals who are involved in the rapid literature review.

  5. Adult constipation: a review and clinical guide.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, T. Q.; Pamies, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Constipation is a common complaint that can be a symptom of serious disease. Awareness of the potential etiologies can help direct the history, physical exam and subsequent work-up for the presenting individual. This article details the differential diagnosis and pathophysiology of constipation based on a review of the literature. The article is also designed to be useful as a guide to the work-up of constipation. Key elements of the history, physical exam and testing are outlined. Included is a detailed flow diagram to guide the work-up of constipation. Testing methods and their value in the evaluation of chronic idiopathic constipation are discussed. Finally, although the focus of this article is the evaluation of constipation, a section on the treatment of constipation is included. PMID:12653377

  6. Melasma: a clinical and epidemiological review*

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Ana Carolina; Miot, Luciane Donida Bartoli; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    Melasma is a chronic acquired hypermelanosis of the skin, characterized by irregular brown macules symmetrically distributed on sun-exposed areas of the body, particularly on the face. It is a common cause of demand for dermatological care that affects mainly women (especially during the menacme), and more pigmented phenotypes (Fitzpatrick skin types III-V). Due to its frequent facial involvement, the disease has an impact on the quality of life of patients. Its pathogeny is not yet completely understood, although there are some known triggering factors such as sun exposure, pregnancy, sexual hormones, inflammatory processes of the skin, use of cosmetics, steroids, and photosensitizing drugs. There is also a clear genetic predisposition, since over 40% of patients reported having relatives affected with the disease. In this manuscript, the authors discuss the main clinical and epidemiological aspects of melasma. PMID:25184917

  7. Melasma: a clinical and epidemiological review.

    PubMed

    Handel, Ana Carolina; Miot, Luciane Donida Bartoli; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    Melasma is a chronic acquired hypermelanosis of the skin, characterized by irregular brown macules symmetrically distributed on sun-exposed areas of the body, particularly on the face. It is a common cause of demand for dermatological care that affects mainly women (especially during the menacme), and more pigmented phenotypes (Fitzpatrick skin types III-V). Due to its frequent facial involvement, the disease has an impact on the quality of life of patients. Its pathogeny is not yet completely understood, although there are some known triggering factors such as sun exposure, pregnancy, sexual hormones, inflammatory processes of the skin, use of cosmetics, steroids, and photosensitizing drugs. There is also a clear genetic predisposition, since over 40% of patients reported having relatives affected with the disease. In this manuscript, the authors discuss the main clinical and epidemiological aspects of melasma.

  8. The ART approach: clinical aspects reviewed.

    PubMed

    Molina, Gustavo Fabián; Cabral, Ricardo Juan; Frencken, Jo E

    2009-01-01

    The success of ART as a caries management approach is supported by more than 20 years of scientific evidence. ART follows the contemporary concepts of modern cariology and restorative dentistry. It challenges treatment concepts such as step-wise excavation and the need for complete removal of affected dentine. The ART approach so far has mainly used high-viscosity glass-ionomer as the sealant and restorative material. Cariostatic and remineralization properties have been ascribed to this material which requires further research to establish its clinical relevance. The adhesion of high-viscosity glass-ionomer to enamel in pits and fissures is apparently strong, as its remnants, blocking the pits and fissures, have been considered a possible reason for the low prevalence of carious lesion development after the glass-ionomer has clinically disappeared from it. Encapsulated high-viscosity glass-ionomers may lead to higher restoration survival results than those of the hand-mixed version and should, therefore, not be neglected when using ART. Similarly, the use of resin-modified glass-ionomer with ART should be researched. The effectiveness of ART when compared to conventional caries management approaches has been shown in numerous studies. Proper case selection is an important factor for long-lasting ART restoration survival. This is based on the caries risk situation of the individual, the size of the cavity opening, the strategic position of the cavitated tooth and the presence of adequate caries control measures. As the operator is one of the main causes for failure of ART restorations, attending a well-conducted ART training course is mandatory for successful implementation of ART.

  9. Characteristics of leadership that influence clinical learning: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel; Cooke, Marie; Henderson, Amanda; Creedy, Debra K

    2011-11-01

    Leadership has been consistently implied in fostering clinical learning. However there is a lack of clarity about the form leadership should take. Limited quantitative research indicated a narrative approach to review literature from a broad perspective. A framework to guide the synthesis was developed to ensure a rigorous review process. Preliminary reading and review of papers using search terms nursing and leadership and clinical learning and learning culture narrowed the inclusion criteria to 245 papers published between 2000 and 2010. Given the diversity of the papers' focus, aim and context, a refined screening process justified the inclusion of twenty-six papers in the review. A critical appraisal of these peer-reviewed quantitative, qualitative and commentary papers identified factors/elements integral to effective leadership. Across the literature leadership was discussed in relation to two broad themes: influence of leadership on organisational learning and development and; influence of leadership on undergraduate clinical education. The factors central to leadership emerged as transformative principles, the role of the nurse unit/ward manager, collaboration and relationship building and role-modelling. The review has raised some suggestions for future research aimed at examining the impact of a leadership capacity building intervention that supports clinical learning.

  10. Project Management of Randomized Clinical Trials: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    Context: A well-structured protocol for a clinical trial may be able to answer clinical questions, but it cannot be deemed enough to ensure success in the face of incompetent management of time as well as human and economic resources. To address this problem, in this article, we present our literature review on evidence as to how a good knowledge of proper management among researchers can enhance the likelihood of the success of clinical trial projects. Evidence Acquisition: Using multiple search strategies, we conducted a literature review on published studies in the English language from 2002 to 2012 by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and EMBASE. Results: Our review suggests that a successful trial requires a work plan or work scope as well as a timeline. The trial manager should subsequently manage the study in accordance with the plan and the timeline. Many research units have called for a clinical project manager with scientific background and regulatory skills to effect coordination among various aspects of a clinical trial. Conclusions: Project management may benefit both the managerial and scientific aspects of medical projects and reduce fund waste. However, little has been written to date on project management in the context of clinical research. The suggestions represent the views of the individual authors. To provide a high level of evidence in this regard, we recommend that a randomized controlled trial be performed to compare trial projects progressed with and without the use of project management. PMID:26430517

  11. Periosteal osteosarcoma: a review of clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Wei; Zi, Ying; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Han, Tian-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Periosteal osteosarcoma (PO) is a rare primary malignant bone tumor and a variant of osteosarcoma. It is a surface lesion without evidence of medullary involvement. The radiologic appearance of periosteal osteosarcoma is a broad-based surface soft-tissue mass that causes extrinsic erosion of thickened underlying diaphyseal cortex and perpendicular periosteal reaction extending into the soft-tissue component. The tumour presents as non-homogeneous masses of speculated osteoid matrix progressively denser from the periphery to their cortical base. The average age is around 28 and the most common location is the proximal third of the femur; with all the lesions diaphyseal in location. The treatment usually indicated is amputation, but in selected cases, radical segmental resection is appropriate. Long-term disease-free survival is possible after resection of the local recurrence. Limb-salvage therapy seems to offer survival equivalent to amputation, and there does not seem to be a substantial risk of late recurrence, dedifferentiation, or disease progression. The current review also highlights on various rare occurrences of periosteal osteosarcoma including the one of calcaneum, fifth metatarsal, mandible cranium, jaws, clavicle, maxilla, sphenoid bone with extensive periosteal extension, metacarpal in a paediatric age group and bilateral metachronous periosteal osteosarcoma. Recent findings relating to genetic factors governing the pathogenesis of PO is also presented.

  12. Review of splanchnic oximetry in clinical medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sean M.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2016-09-01

    Global tissue perfusion and oxygenation are important indicators of physiologic function in humans. The monitoring of splanchnic oximetry through the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging method used to assess tissue oxygenation status. Splanchnic tissue oxygenation (SrS) is thought to be potentially of high value in critically ill patients because gastrointestinal organs can often be the first to suffer ischemic injury. During conditions of hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or decreased oxygen-carrying capacity, blood flow is diverted toward vital organs, such as the brain and the heart at the expense of the splanchnic circulation. While monitoring SrS has great potential benefit, there are limitations to the technology and techniques. SrS has been found to have a relatively high degree of variability that can potentially make it difficult to interpret. In addition, because splanchnic organs only lie near the skin surface in children and infants, and energy from currently available sensors only penetrates a few centimeters deep, it can be difficult to use clinically in a noninvasive manner in adults. Research thus far is showing that splanchnic oximetry holds great promise in the ability to monitor patient oxygenation status and detect disease states in humans, especially in pediatric populations.

  13. Hypoxic Hepatitis: A Review and Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Najeff; Chen, Po-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischemic hepatitis or shock liver, is characterized by a massive, rapid rise in serum aminotransferases resulting from reduced oxygen delivery to the liver. The most common predisposing condition is cardiac failure, followed by circulatory failure as occurs in septic shock and respiratory failure. HH does, however, occur in the absence of a documented hypotensive event or shock state in 50% of patients. In intensive care units, the incidence of HH is near 2.5%, but has been reported as high as 10% in some studies. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, but often involves hepatic congestion from right heart failure along with reduced hepatic blood flow, total body hypoxemia, reduced oxygen uptake by hepatocytes or reperfusion injury following ischemia. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, and typically does not require liver biopsy. The definitive treatment of HH involves correction of the underlying disease state, but successful management includes monitoring for the potential complications such as hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, hyperammonemia and hepatopulmonary syndrome. Prognosis of HH remains poor, especially for cases in which there was a delay in diagnosis. The in-hospital mortality rate is >50%, and the most frequent cause of death is the predisposing condition and not the liver injury itself. PMID:27777895

  14. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jonathan N; Mack, Kenneth J; Kuntz, Nancy L; Brands, Chad K; Porter, Coburn J; Fischer, Philip R

    2010-02-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome was defined in adult patients as an increase >30 beats per minute in heart rate of a symptomatic patient when moving from supine to upright position. Clinical signs may include postural tachycardia, headache, abdominal discomfort, dizziness/presyncope, nausea, and fatigue. The most common adolescent presentation involves teenagers within 1-3 years of their growth spurt who, after a period of inactivity from illness or injury, cannot return to normal activity levels because of symptoms induced by upright posture. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is complex and likely has numerous, concurrent pathophysiologic etiologies, presenting along a wide spectrum of potential symptoms. Nonpharmacologic treatment includes (1) increasing aerobic exercise, (2) lower-extremity strengthening, (3) increasing fluid/salt intake, (4) psychophysiologic training for management of pain/anxiety, and (5) family education. Pharmacologic treatment is recommended on a case-by-case basis, and can include beta-blocking agents to blunt orthostatic increases in heart rate, alpha-adrenergic agents to increase peripheral vascular resistance, mineralocorticoid agents to increase blood volume, and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. An interdisciplinary research approach may determine mechanistic root causes of symptoms, and is investigating novel management plans for affected patients.

  15. Nutrition Informatics Applications in Clinical Practice: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    North, Jennifer C; Jordan, Kristine C; Metos, Julie; Hurdle, John F

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition care and metabolic control contribute to clinical patient outcomes. Biomedical informatics applications represent a way to potentially improve quality and efficiency of nutrition management. We performed a systematic literature review to identify clinical decision support and computerized provider order entry systems used to manage nutrition care. Online research databases were searched using a specific set of keywords. Additionally, bibliographies were referenced for supplemental citations. Four independent reviewers selected sixteen studies out of 364 for review. These papers described adult and neonatal nutrition support applications, blood glucose management applications, and other nutrition applications. Overall, results indicated that computerized interventions could contribute to improved patient outcomes and provider performance. Specifically, computer systems in the clinical setting improved nutrient delivery, rates of malnutrition, weight loss, blood glucose values, clinician efficiency, and error rates. In conclusion, further investigation of informatics applications on nutritional and performance outcomes utilizing rigorous study designs is recommended.

  16. Nutrition Informatics Applications in Clinical Practice: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    North, Jennifer C.; Jordan, Kristine C.; Metos, Julie; Hurdle, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition care and metabolic control contribute to clinical patient outcomes. Biomedical informatics applications represent a way to potentially improve quality and efficiency of nutrition management. We performed a systematic literature review to identify clinical decision support and computerized provider order entry systems used to manage nutrition care. Online research databases were searched using a specific set of keywords. Additionally, bibliographies were referenced for supplemental citations. Four independent reviewers selected sixteen studies out of 364 for review. These papers described adult and neonatal nutrition support applications, blood glucose management applications, and other nutrition applications. Overall, results indicated that computerized interventions could contribute to improved patient outcomes and provider performance. Specifically, computer systems in the clinical setting improved nutrient delivery, rates of malnutrition, weight loss, blood glucose values, clinician efficiency, and error rates. In conclusion, further investigation of informatics applications on nutritional and performance outcomes utilizing rigorous study designs is recommended. PMID:26958233

  17. Open circuit mouthpiece ventilation: Concise clinical review.

    PubMed

    Garuti, G; Nicolini, A; Grecchi, B; Lusuardi, M; Winck, J C; Bach, J R

    2014-01-01

    technique is now warranted. This review highlights the indications, techniques, advantages and disadvantages of mouthpiece NIV.

  18. [Rivastigmine: a review of its clinical effectiveness].

    PubMed

    Spiegel, R

    The progression of Alzheimer s disease (AD) is linked with the appearance of symptoms in three key domains, namely activities of daily living (ADL), behaviour and cognition. The development and decline of these symptoms gives rise to a loss in the patient s functional capacity and contributes to the social, health care and economic costs associated with the disease. Tests suggest that the onset of these symptoms, in AD and in other types of dementia (e.g. frontotemporal dementia, dementia in Parkinson s disease and vascular dementia [VaD]), can be attributed to the loss of acetylcholine and cholinergic neurons in areas of the brain that are central to learning and memory, to execution functions and to behavioural and emotional responses, such as the cerebral cortex, the hippocampus and the limbic regions. There is evidence to show that the use of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors, including rivastigmine, donepezil and galanthamine, to enhance the survival of cholinergic neurotransmission is beneficial in the treatment of these symptoms. For example, administering rivastigmine stabilises and improves the performance of ADL in mild to moderate stages and slows down the decline in the capacity to carry out ADL in patients with serious AD. There is an improvement in the behavioural symptoms, the appearance of new symptoms diminishes and the use of other psychotropic drugs is reduced. Cognitive deficits become stable or improve during short term treatment and the treatment also delays the cognitive decline associated with the progression of the disease. A review of the available data reveals that ChE inhibition is beneficial in the long term in the three key symptomatic domains in different stages of the disease, as well as its perhaps being useful in different dementias. Therefore, it is likely that treatment with a ChE inhibitor improves quality of life and reduces the social and economic burden of these disorders

  19. Feline heartworm disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Litster, Annette L; Atwell, Richard B

    2008-04-01

    Feline heartworm disease is caused by the filarial nematode Dirofilaria immitis, and is transmitted by mosquitoes in heartworm-endemic areas worldwide. While dogs are the definitive hosts for this parasite, cats can also be infected, and the overall prevalence in cats is between 5% and 10% of that in dogs in any given area. The spectrum of feline presentations varies from asymptomatic infections to chronic respiratory signs, sometimes accompanied by chronic vomiting to acute death with no premonitory signs. Ante-mortem diagnosis can be challenging and relies on a combination of tests, including antigen and antibody serology, thoracic radiography and echocardiography. As treatment with heartworm adulticidal drugs can be life-threatening and heartworm infection in cats is often self-limiting, infected cats are frequently managed with supportive treatment (corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and anti-emetics). Surgical removal of filariae using extraction devices may be considered in some acute cases where immediate curative treatment is necessary, but filarial breakage during the procedure may result in an acute fatal shock-like reaction. Necropsy findings are mainly pulmonary and include muscular hypertrophy of the pulmonary arteries and arterioles on histopathology. A number of safe and effective macrocytic lactone drugs are available for prophylaxis in cats. These drugs can kill a range of larval and adult life-cycle stage heartworms, which may be advantageous in cases of owner compliance failure or when heartworm infection status is undetermined at the time prophylaxis is commenced. An index of suspicion for feline heartworm disease is warranted in unprotected cats with respiratory signs, and perhaps chronic vomiting, in areas where canine heartworm disease is endemic. Many cats, once diagnosed and with appropriate supportive care and monitoring, will resolve their infection and be free of clinical signs.

  20. Oxycodone: a pharmacological and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez Gallego, A; González Barón, M; Espinosa Arranz, E

    2007-05-01

    Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid with an agonist activity on mu, kappa and delta receptors. Equivalence with regard to morphine is 1:2. Its effect commences one hour after administration and lasts for 12 h in the controlled-release formulation. Plasma halflife is 3-5 h (half that of morphine) and stable plasma levels are reached within 24 h (2-7 days for morphine). Oral bioavailability ranges from 60 to 87%, and plasma protein binding is 45%. Most of the drug is metabolised in the liver, while the rest is excreted by the kidney along with its metabolites. The two main metabolites are oxymorphone--which is also a very potent analgesic--and noroxycodone, a weak analgesic. Oxycodone metabolism is more predictable than that of morphine, and therefore titration is easier. Oxycodone has the same mechanism of action as other opioids: binding to a receptor, inhibition of adenylyl-cyclase and hyperpolarisation of neurons, and decreased excitability. These mechanisms also play a part in the onset of dependence and tolerance. The clinical efficacy of oxycodone is similar to that of morphine, with a ratio of 1/1.5-2 for the treatment of cancer pain. Long-term administration may be associated with less toxicity in comparison with morphine. In the future, both opioids could be used simultaneously at low doses to reduce toxicity. It does not appear that there are any differences between immediate and slow-release oxycodone, except their half-life is 3-4 h, and 12 h, respectively. In Spain, controlled-release oxycodone (OxyContin) is marketed as 10-, 20-, 40- or 80-mg tablets for b.i.d. administration. Tablets must be taken whole and must not be broken, chewed or crushed. There is no food interference. The initial dose is 10 mg b.i.d. for new treatments and no dose reduction is needed in the elderly or in cases of moderate hepatic or renal failure. Immediate-release oxycodone (OxyNorm) is also available in capsules and oral solution. Side effects are those common to opioids

  1. Concise Review of Optical Coherence Tomography in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min-I; Chen, Chun-Yen; Yeh, Hung-I; Wang, Kuang-Te

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel image modality with higher resolution in the catheterization laboratory. It can differentiate tissue characteristics and provide detailed information, including dissection, tissue prolapse, thrombi, and stent apposition. In this study, we comprehensively reviewed the current pros and cons of OCT clinical applications and presented our clinical experiences associated with the advantages and limitations of this new imaging modality. PMID:27471350

  2. Clinical prediction rules in practice: review of clinical guidelines and survey of GPs

    PubMed Central

    Plüddemann, Annette; Wallace, Emma; Bankhead, Clare; Keogh, Claire; Van der Windt, Danielle; Lasserson, Daniel; Galvin, Rose; Moschetti, Ivan; Kearley, Karen; O’Brien, Kirsty; Sanders, Sharon; Mallett, Susan; Malanda, Uriell; Thompson, Matthew; Fahey, Tom; Stevens, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background The publication of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) studies has risen significantly. It is unclear if this reflects increasing usage of these tools in clinical practice or how this may vary across clinical areas. Aim To review clinical guidelines in selected areas and survey GPs in order to explore CPR usefulness in the opinion of experts and use at the point of care. Design and setting A review of clinical guidelines and survey of UK GPs. Method Clinical guidelines in eight clinical domains with published CPRs were reviewed for recommendations to use CPRs including primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke, diabetes mellitus, fracture risk assessment in osteoporosis, lower limb fractures, breast cancer, depression, and acute infections in childhood. An online survey of 401 UK GPs was also conducted. Results Guideline review: Of 7637 records screened by title and/or abstract, 243 clinical guidelines met inclusion criteria. CPRs were most commonly recommended in guidelines regarding primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (67%) and depression (67%). There was little consensus across various clinical guidelines as to which CPR to use preferentially. Survey: Of 401 responders to the GP survey, most were aware of and applied named CPRs in the clinical areas of cardiovascular disease and depression. The commonest reasons for using CPRs were to guide management and conform to local policy requirements. Conclusion GPs use CPRs to guide management but also to comply with local policy requirements. Future research could focus on which clinical areas clinicians would most benefit from CPRs and promoting the use of robust, externally validated CPRs. PMID:24686888

  3. Clinical use of Skype: a review of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Armfield, Nigel R; Gray, Leonard C; Smith, Anthony C

    2012-04-01

    Skype is a popular and free software application that allows PCs and mobile devices to be used for video communication over the Internet. We reviewed the literature to determine whether the clinical use of Skype is supported by evidence. One small (n = 7) controlled clinical trial had assessed the effect of nursing communication using Skype on elderly patients with dementia and their carers. However, we were unable to identify any large, well-designed studies which had formally evaluated the safety, clinical effectiveness, security and privacy of Skype for the routine delivery of patient care. While there were many case reports and small studies, no firm evidence either in favour of, or against the use of Skype for clinical telehealth was found. The risks and benefits of using Skype for clinical purposes are not known.

  4. Book Review: ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews "ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management" by Steven R. Pliszka, Caryn L. Carlson, and James M. Swanson, a book that provides information on children displaying both attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other comorbid psychiatric conditions, complex psychopharmacological interventions that may…

  5. Ectodermal dysplasias: A clinical classification and a causal review

    SciTech Connect

    Pinheiro, M.; Freire-Maia, N.

    1994-11-01

    The authors present a causal review of 154 ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) as classified into 11 clinical subgroups. The number of EDs in each subgroup varies from one to 43. The numbers of conditions due to autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked genes are, respectively, 41, 52, and 8. In 53 conditions cause is unknown; 35 of them present some causal (genetic) suggestion.

  6. WhatsApp in Clinical Practice: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Mars, Maurice; Scott, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    Several spontaneous telemedicine services using WhatsApp Messenger have started in South Africa raising issues of confidentiality, data security and storage, record keeping and reporting. This study reviewed the literature on WhatsApp in clinical practice, to determine how it is used, and users' satisfaction.

  7. Evidence-Based Clinical Voice Assessment: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nelson; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Eadie, Tanya; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Mehta, Daryush; Paul, Diane; Hillman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what research evidence exists to support the use of voice measures in the clinical assessment of patients with voice disorders. Method: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders staff searched 29 databases for peer-reviewed English-language…

  8. Public titles of clinical trials should have ethics review.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Carla; Reveiz, Ludovic; Tisdale, John F

    2015-09-01

    A key aspect to guarantee that research with human subjects is ethical is being overlooked. Ethics review committees invest great effort examining the informed consent documents of research protocols to ensure that potential participants can provide consent validly and are not deluded into thinking that the experimental intervention they may sign up for is already known to be therapeutic. However, these efforts to avoid what is called the "therapeutic misconception" might be in vain if the title with which the studies are being introduced to the potential participants escapes ethics review. Research participants might be deceived by clinical trials entitled "novel therapy" when the point of the trial is precisely to find out whether the intervention at stake is therapeutic or not. Providing potential research participants with such misleading information hampers their ability to make informed decisions. The well-established scrutiny that ethics review committees exercise with regard to consent forms is limited if the registration of clinical trials, for which a public title is chosen, constitutes a process that is independent from the ethics review. In this article, we examine this problem, assess recent measures to integrate clinical trial registration with ethics review processes, and provide specific recommendations to solve the problem and ultimately enhance the accountability, transparency, and ethics of research with human subjects.

  9. Teaching of clinical anatomy in rheumatology: a review of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Torralba, Karina D; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Evelyn, Christine M; Koolaee, R Michelle; Kalish, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Clinical anatomy may be defined as anatomy that is applied to the care of the patient. It is the foundation of a well-informed physical examination that is so important in rheumatologic practice. Unfortunately, there is both documented and observed evidence of a significant deficiency in the teaching and performance of a competent musculoskeletal examination at multiple levels of medical education including in rheumatology trainees. At the Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Boston, MA, that took place in November 2014, a Clinical Anatomy Study Group met to share techniques of teaching clinical anatomy to rheumatology fellows, residents, and students. Techniques that were reviewed included traditional anatomic diagrams, hands-on cross-examination, cadaver study, and musculoskeletal ultrasound. The proceedings of the Study Group section are described in this review.

  10. 78 FR 52932 - Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: Institutional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Investigators, and Sponsors: Institutional Review Board Responsibilities for Reviewing the Qualifications of... ``Guidance for IRBs, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB Responsibilities for Reviewing the... fulfilling responsibilities related to reviewing the qualifications of investigators and adequacy of...

  11. Clinical correlates of common corneal neovascular diseases: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Abdelfattah, Nizar Saleh; Amgad, Mohamed; Zayed, Amira A; Salem, Hamdy; Elkhanany, Ahmed E; Hussein, Heba; Abd El-Baky, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    A large subset of corneal pathologies involves the formation of new blood and lymph vessels (neovascularization), leading to compromised visual acuity. This article aims to review the clinical causes and presentations of corneal neovascularization (CNV) by examining the mechanisms behind common CNV-related corneal pathologies, with a particular focus on herpes simplex stromal keratitis, contact lenses-induced keratitis and CNV secondary to keratoplasty. Moreover, we reviewed CNV in the context of different types of corneal transplantation and keratoprosthesis, and summarized the most relevant treatments available so far. PMID:25709930

  12. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia: A Comprehensive Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Salter, Benjamin S; Weiner, Menachem M; Trinh, Muoi A; Heller, Joshua; Evans, Adam S; Adams, David H; Fischer, Gregory W

    2016-05-31

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a profoundly dangerous, potentially lethal, immunologically mediated adverse drug reaction to unfractionated heparin or, less commonly, to low-molecular weight heparin. In this comprehensive review, the authors highlight heparin-induced thrombocytopenia's risk factors, clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnostic principles, and treatment. The authors place special emphasis on the management of patients requiring procedures using cardiopulmonary bypass or interventions in the catheterization laboratory. Clinical vigilance of this disease process is important to ensure its recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. Misdiagnosis of the syndrome, as well as misunderstanding of the disease process, continues to contribute to its morbidity and mortality.

  13. Semantic Interoperability in Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Bellika, Johan Gustav

    2015-01-01

    The interoperability of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems with other health information systems has become one of the main limitations to their broad adoption. Semantic interoperability must be granted in order to share CDS modules across different health information systems. Currently, numerous standards for different purposes are available to enable the interoperability of CDS systems. We performed a literature review to identify and provide an overview of the available standards that enable CDS interoperability in the areas of clinical information, decision logic, terminology, and web service interfaces.

  14. Clinical research regulation: challenges to the institutional review board system.

    PubMed

    Straight, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    The system in place to ensure the ethical conduct of human subject research in accordance with federal regulations has drawn great criticism from all sides, to include clinical investigators, administrators, research subjects, and legislators. The administrative requirements associated with clinical trials has changed dramatically in the last several decades, as has the complexity of the science being regulated. The institutional review board (IRB) system, however, appears to be struggling to keep pace, and has even been labeled a "system in jeopardy" by a national committee of experts. This contribution outlines the current obstacles and critique of IRBs, providing a discussion of the structure of the IRB system and strategies to meet these challenges.

  15. Peer review in Clinical Pharmacology using the 8-D Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Barry G.

    2017-01-01

    The requirement for editors of clinical pharmacology journals to maintain an overview of the peer review process for manuscripts submitted can be facilitated by use of the 8-D Assessment. The 8-D Assessment comprises peer review criteria to determine if the:1. Design of the study, 2. Diagnoses employed, 3. Drug molecules involved, 4. Dosages applied, 5. Data collected, 6. Discussion of the findings, 7. Deductions made, and 8. Documentation are in accord with the objectives of the study and meet the requirements of evidence-based medicine. This tool, although easy to apply, requires a high level of clinical pharmacology expertise, especially in the fields of drug disposition, pharmacokinetics, and drug action. PMID:28218890

  16. Resting-state brain networks: literature review and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Rosazza, Cristina; Minati, Ludovico

    2011-10-01

    This review focuses on resting-state functional connectivity, a functional MRI technique which allows the study of spontaneous brain activity generated under resting conditions. This approach is useful to explore the brain's functional organization and to examine if it is altered in neurological or psychiatric diseases. Resting-state functional connectivity has revealed a number of networks which are consistently found in healthy subjects and represent specific patterns of synchronous activity. In this review, we examine the behavioral, physiological and neurological evidences relevant to this coherent brain activity and, in particular, to each network. The investigation of functional connectivity appears promising from a clinical perspective, considering the amount of evidence regarding the importance of spontaneous activity and that resting-state paradigms are inherently simple to implement. We also discuss some examples of existing clinical applications, such as in Alzheimer's disease, and emerging possibilities such as in pre-operative mapping and disorders of consciousness.

  17. Trachyonychia: Review and Update on Clinical Aspects, Histology, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haber, Jessica S.; Chairatchaneeboon, Manasmon; Rubin, Adam I.

    2017-01-01

    Trachyonychia is a disorder of the nail unit that most commonly presents with rough, longitudinally ridged nails (opaque trachyonychia) or less frequently, uniform, opalescent nails with pits (shiny trachyonychia). The term trachyonychia refers to ‘rough nails.’ This article comprehensively reviews the clinical, histologic, and therapeutic aspects of trachyonychia. The authors' preferred evaluation and management strategies of trachyonychia are included. PMID:28232917

  18. Pineal cyst: a review of clinical and radiological features.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Kim, Won; Spasic, Marko; Voth, Brittany; Yew, Andrew; Yang, Isaac

    2011-07-01

    Pineal cysts (PCs) are benign and often asymptomatic lesions of the pineal region that are typically small and do not change in size over time. PCs appear as small, well circumscribed, unilocular masses that either reside within or completely replace the pineal gland. This article reviews and discusses the characteristic features of PCs-clinical, histological, and identifiable by various imaging modalities-which assist clinicians in narrowing the differential diagnosis for pineal lesions.

  19. Efficacy of clinical gait analysis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wren, Tishya A L; Gorton, George E; Ounpuu, Sylvia; Tucker, Carole A

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate and summarize the current evidence base related to the clinical efficacy of gait analysis. A literature review was conducted to identify references related to human gait analysis published between January 2000 and September 2009 plus relevant older references. The references were assessed independently by four reviewers using a hierarchical model of efficacy adapted for gait analysis, and final scores were agreed upon by at least three of the four reviewers. 1528 references were identified relating to human instrumented gait analysis. Of these, 116 original articles addressed technical accuracy efficacy, 89 addressed diagnostic accuracy efficacy, 11 addressed diagnostic thinking and treatment efficacy, seven addressed patient outcomes efficacy, and one addressed societal efficacy, with some of the articles addressing multiple levels of efficacy. This body of literature provides strong evidence for the technical, diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic thinking and treatment efficacy of gait analysis. The existing evidence also indicates efficacy at the higher levels of patient outcomes and societal cost-effectiveness, but this evidence is more sparse and does not include any randomized controlled trials. Thus, the current evidence supports the clinical efficacy of gait analysis, particularly at the lower levels of efficacy, but additional research is needed to strengthen the evidence base at the higher levels of efficacy.

  20. [Mastocytosis. Review of the literature and description of clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Melikian, A L; Subortseva, I N; Goriacheva, S R; Kolosheinova, T I; Vakhrusheva, M V; Kovrigina, A M; Sudarikov, A B; Dvirnyk, V N; Obukhova, T N

    2014-01-01

    The term mastocytosis (MC) encompasses a group of rare diseases characterized by the tumorous proliferation of clonal mast cells and the infiltration of one or several organs. The clinical picture of MC is extremely diverse from skin lesions that can spontaneously regress to the aggressive disease forms associated with organ dysfunction and short survival. Nowadays, the 2008 WHO classification identifies 7 MC subtypes. The disease is diagnosed on the basis of its clinical manifestations and detection of tumorous mast cell infiltrations via morphological, immunohistochemical, immunophenotypic, genetic, and molecular examinations. Abnormal mast cells are characterized by the atypical morphology and pathological expression of CD25 and CD2 antigens. Enhanced serum tryptase activity is a common sign in all MC subtypes. More than 90% of the patients have D816V KIT mutations in the mast cells. This paper reviews the literature. Three cases are described as a clinical example in patients with different MC subtypes.

  1. Statistical challenges for central monitoring in clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Oba, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the complexity and costs of clinical trials have increased dramatically, especially in the area of new drug development. Risk-based monitoring (RBM) has been attracting attention as an efficient and effective trial monitoring approach, which can be applied irrespectively of the trial sponsor, i.e., academic institution or pharmaceutical company. In the RBM paradigm, it is expected that a statistical approach to central monitoring can help improve the effectiveness of on-site monitoring by prioritizing and guiding site visits according to central statistical data checks, as evidenced by examples of actual trial datasets. In this review, several statistical methods for central monitoring are presented. It is important to share knowledge about the role and performance capabilities of statistical methodology among clinical trial team members (i.e., sponsors, investigators, data managers, monitors, and biostatisticians) in order to adopt central statistical monitoring for assessing data quality in the actual clinical trial.

  2. Review of clinical validation of ADHD behavior rating scales.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Steven M; Hall, James R; Cornwell, Sonya L; Quintana, Humberto

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to assess the range of overall accuracies for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) behavior rating scales evaluated in clinical validation studies. Studies were characterized according to the evidence standards of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). Studies were excluded due to major design problems such as overfitting by discriminant analysis. The 13 included evaluations of rating scales revealed overall accuracy in the range of 59%-79% with a pooled mean of 69% (+/-7%, standard deviation) and a pooled sample size of 2228 subjects from nine studies. While some of the excluded studies demonstrated higher overall accuracies (>79%), these studies were observed to have factors in experimen tal design and statistics that are known to unduly inflate accuracy. We recommend further research following the full AAN standards, namely well-designed, blinded, pro spective studies of rating scales applied to clinically representative samples evaluated with a clinical standard.

  3. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-01-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician’s understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc phosphate, Zinc polycarboxylate, Zinc oxide-eugenol, Glass-ionomer, Resin modified GIC, Compomers and Resin cement. The purpose of this article is to provide a discussion that provides a clinical perspective of luting cements currently available to help the general practitioner make smarter and appropriate choices. How to cite the article: Lad PP, Kamath M, Tarale K, Kusugal PB. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):116-20. PMID:24653615

  4. Current clinical practice guidelines in atrial fibrillation: a review.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Olortegui, José Kelvin; Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita Lizbeth; Galvez-Olortegui, Tomas Vladimir; Godoy-Palomino, Armando; Camacho-Saavedra, Luis

    2016-01-14

    The aim of this study is the methodological evaluation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) in atrial fibrillation. This is the second in a series of articles of review, analysis, assessment in methodology and content of clinical practice guidelines in Cardiology. Among all clinical practice guidelines, we selected the American, Canadian and NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) guidelines. We used the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) II instrument for the assessment. In general, the guidelines obtained the lowest score in the applicability domain (mean 36.1%); while the highest score was for clarity of presentation (mean 93.5%). The lowest percentage was found in the editorial independence domain (Canadian guideline) and the highest of all scores in the applicability domain (NICE guideline). Regarding global quality, the NICE guideline obtained the AGREE II instrument best scores, followed by the American guideline, both recommended for use without modifications.

  5. Agonist Replacement for Stimulant Dependence: A Review of Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Rush, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulant use disorders are an unrelenting public health concern worldwide. Agonist replacement therapy is among the most effective strategies for managing substance use disorders including nicotine and opioid dependence. The present paper reviewed clinical data from human laboratory self-administration studies and clinical trials to determine whether agonist replacement therapy is a viable strategy for managing cocaine and/or amphetamine use disorders. The extant literature suggests that agonist replacement therapy may be effective for managing stimulant use disorders, however, the clinical selection of an agonist replacement medication likely needs to be based on the pharmacological mechanism of the medication and the stimulant abused by patients. Specifically, dopamine releasers appear most effective for reducing cocaine use whereas dopamine reuptake inhibitors appear most effective for reducing amphetamine use. PMID:23574440

  6. [Detection of MRD and its clinical application--review].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Mei; Chen, Sai-Juan

    2005-12-01

    With recent development and progress achieved in the diagnosis and treatment of leukemia, relapse of disease still remains as the major problem in clinical management and the minimal residual disease (MRD) has been confirmed to be associated with leukemia relapse in the past decades. Due to the low sensitivity, morphology-based assays have limitation in the MRD monitoring. With the development of molecular assays, especially the real-time RT-PCR method have been a sensitive, precise and reliable tool to MRD detection. Numerous clinical studies demonstrated that the existence of MRD reflects the clinical and molecular response, and remain as a major prognostic factor for leukemia. Another important application of MRD detection is to evaluate the efficacy of different therapy at molecular level. In this paper, the different methods and their clinical application for MRD detection were systemically reviewed and it is confident that the establishment of standardized MRD detection system will be important in the clinical prevention for relapse of leukemia.

  7. Adaptive designs undertaken in clinical research: a review of registered clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Isabella; Allison, Annabel; Flight, Laura; Julious, Steven A; Dimairo, Munyaradzi

    2016-03-19

    Adaptive designs have the potential to improve efficiency in the evaluation of new medical treatments in comparison to traditional fixed sample size designs. However, they are still not widely used in practice in clinical research. Little research has been conducted to investigate what adaptive designs are being undertaken. This review highlights the current state of registered adaptive designs and their characteristics. The review looked at phase II, II/III and III trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov from 29 February 2000 to 1 June 2014, supplemented with trials from the National Institute for Health Research register and known adaptive trials. A range of adaptive design search terms were applied to the trials extracted from each database. Characteristics of the adaptive designs were then recorded including funder, therapeutic area and type of adaptation. The results in the paper suggest that the use of adaptive designs has increased. They seem to be most often used in phase II trials and in oncology. In phase III trials, the most popular form of adaptation is the group sequential design. The review failed to capture all trials with adaptive designs, which suggests that the reporting of adaptive designs, such as in clinical trials registers, needs much improving. We recommend that clinical trial registers should contain sections dedicated to the type and scope of the adaptation and that the term 'adaptive design' should be included in the trial title or at least in the brief summary or design sections.

  8. Review of Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical Medical Populations

    PubMed Central

    Macaskill, Ann

    2016-01-01

    This review examines the application of positive psychology concepts in physical health care contexts. Positive psychology aims to promote well-being in the general population. Studies identifying character strengths associated with well-being in healthy populations are numerous. Such strengths have been classified and Positive Psychology Interventions (PPIs) have been created to further develop these strengths in individuals. Positive psychology research is increasingly being undertaken in health care contexts. The review identified that most of this research involves measuring character strengths and their association with health outcomes in patients with a range of different conditions, similar to the position in positive psychology research on non-clinical populations. More recently, PPIs are beginning to be applied to clinical populations with physical health problems and this research, although relatively scarce, is reviewed here for cancer, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. In common with PPIs being evaluated in the general population, high quality studies are scarce. Applying PPIs to patients with serious health conditions presents significant challenges to health psychologists. They must ensure that patients are dealt with appropriately and ethically, given that exaggerated claims for PPIs are made on the internet quite frequently. This is discussed along with the need for more high quality research. PMID:27618122

  9. Review of Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical Medical Populations.

    PubMed

    Macaskill, Ann

    2016-09-07

    This review examines the application of positive psychology concepts in physical health care contexts. Positive psychology aims to promote well-being in the general population. Studies identifying character strengths associated with well-being in healthy populations are numerous. Such strengths have been classified and Positive Psychology Interventions (PPIs) have been created to further develop these strengths in individuals. Positive psychology research is increasingly being undertaken in health care contexts. The review identified that most of this research involves measuring character strengths and their association with health outcomes in patients with a range of different conditions, similar to the position in positive psychology research on non-clinical populations. More recently, PPIs are beginning to be applied to clinical populations with physical health problems and this research, although relatively scarce, is reviewed here for cancer, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. In common with PPIs being evaluated in the general population, high quality studies are scarce. Applying PPIs to patients with serious health conditions presents significant challenges to health psychologists. They must ensure that patients are dealt with appropriately and ethically, given that exaggerated claims for PPIs are made on the internet quite frequently. This is discussed along with the need for more high quality research.

  10. Review and classification of variability analysis techniques with clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bravi, Andrea; Longtin, André; Seely, Andrew J E

    2011-10-10

    Analysis of patterns of variation of time-series, termed variability analysis, represents a rapidly evolving discipline with increasing applications in different fields of science. In medicine and in particular critical care, efforts have focussed on evaluating the clinical utility of variability. However, the growth and complexity of techniques applicable to this field have made interpretation and understanding of variability more challenging. Our objective is to provide an updated review of variability analysis techniques suitable for clinical applications. We review more than 70 variability techniques, providing for each technique a brief description of the underlying theory and assumptions, together with a summary of clinical applications. We propose a revised classification for the domains of variability techniques, which include statistical, geometric, energetic, informational, and invariant. We discuss the process of calculation, often necessitating a mathematical transform of the time-series. Our aims are to summarize a broad literature, promote a shared vocabulary that would improve the exchange of ideas, and the analyses of the results between different studies. We conclude with challenges for the evolving science of variability analysis.

  11. Review and classification of variability analysis techniques with clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of patterns of variation of time-series, termed variability analysis, represents a rapidly evolving discipline with increasing applications in different fields of science. In medicine and in particular critical care, efforts have focussed on evaluating the clinical utility of variability. However, the growth and complexity of techniques applicable to this field have made interpretation and understanding of variability more challenging. Our objective is to provide an updated review of variability analysis techniques suitable for clinical applications. We review more than 70 variability techniques, providing for each technique a brief description of the underlying theory and assumptions, together with a summary of clinical applications. We propose a revised classification for the domains of variability techniques, which include statistical, geometric, energetic, informational, and invariant. We discuss the process of calculation, often necessitating a mathematical transform of the time-series. Our aims are to summarize a broad literature, promote a shared vocabulary that would improve the exchange of ideas, and the analyses of the results between different studies. We conclude with challenges for the evolving science of variability analysis. PMID:21985357

  12. Orofacial pain of cardiac origin: Review literature and clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Vicente, Laia; Jané-Salas, Enric; Estrugo-Devesa, Albert; Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Roca-Elias, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The most common types of orofacial pain originate at the dental or periodontal level or in the musculoskeletal structures. However, the patient may present pain in this region even though the source is located elsewhere in the body. One possible source of heterotopic pain is of cardiac origin. Objectives: Report two cases of orofacial pain of cardiac origin and review the clinical cases described in the literature. Study Design: Description of clinical cases and review of clinical cases. Results and conclusions: Nine cases of atypical pain of cardiac origin are recorded, which include 5 females and 4 males. In craniofacial structures, pain of cardiac origin is usually bilateral. At the craniofacial level, the most frequent location described is in the throat and jaw. Pain of cardiac origin is considered atypical due to its location, although roughly 10% of the cases of cardiac ischemia manifest primarily in craniofacial structures. Finally, the differential diagnosis of pain of odontogenic origin must be taken into account with pain of non-odontogenic origin (muscle, psychogenic, neuronal, cardiac, sinus and neurovascular pain) in order to avoid diagnostic errors in the dental practice as well as unnecessary treatments. Key words:Orofacial pain, ischemic heart disease, heterotopic pain, odontalgia. PMID:22322488

  13. Perfectionism as a transdiagnostic process: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Egan, Sarah J; Wade, Tracey D; Shafran, Roz

    2011-03-01

    Perfectionism is a risk and maintaining factor for eating disorders, anxiety disorders and depression. The objective of this paper is to review the four bodies of evidence supporting the notion that perfectionism is a transdiagnostic process. First, a review of the literature was conducted that demonstrates the elevation of perfectionism across numerous anxiety disorders, depression, and eating disorders compared to healthy controls. Data is presented that shows perfectionism increases vulnerability for eating disorders, and that it maintains obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety and depression as it predicts treatment outcome in these disorders. Second, evidence is examined showing that elevated perfectionism is associated with co-occurrence of psychopathology. Third, the different conceptualisations of perfectionism are reviewed, including a cognitive-behavioural conceptualisation of clinical perfectionism that can be utilised to understand this transdiagnostic process. Fourth, evidence that treatment of perfectionism results in reductions in anxiety, depression and eating pathology is reviewed. Finally, the importance of clinicians considering the routine assessment and treatment of perfectionism is outlined.

  14. Lyell's Syndrome and Antimalarials: A Case Report and Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Joana Miranda; Santareno, Sofia; Guerreiro, Lina; Margalho, Ana Filipa

    2017-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) or Lyell's syndrome is a rare, however, life-threatening mucocutaneous disorder with an epidermal detachment of a total body surface area (TBSA) of >30%. It is triggered by an idiosyncratic immune-allergic reaction to a drug, with many possible drugs implicated. Treatment success relies on early diagnosis and withdrawal of suspected/causative drug(s) and supportive care. Clinical evidence for specific therapies is still sparse. It is described a case of Lyell syndrome by sulfonamides for chemoprophylaxis of malaria. The patient presented with an extensive, rapidly evolving skin detachment, which progressed, despite supportive therapy, involving about 80% of TBSA. This led us to initiate a course of immunoglobulin with good clinical response. The aim of this work is to provide a discussion of the case and simultaneously make a practical literature review of TEN. PMID:28250622

  15. Skeletal Muscle Laminopathies: A Review of Clinical and Molecular Features

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Lorenzo; Carboni, Nicola; Bernasconi, Pia

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-related disorders are caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes for the nuclear envelope proteins, lamin A and C, via alternative splicing. Laminopathies are associated with a wide range of disease phenotypes, including neuromuscular, cardiac, metabolic disorders and premature aging syndromes. The most frequent diseases associated with mutations in the LMNA gene are characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement. This review will focus on genetics and clinical features of laminopathies affecting primarily skeletal muscle. Although only symptomatic treatment is available for these patients, many achievements have been made in clarifying the pathogenesis and improving the management of these diseases. PMID:27529282

  16. Genetics of hereditary nephrotic syndrome: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Advances in podocytology and genetic techniques have expanded our understanding of the pathogenesis of hereditary steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). In the past 20 years, over 45 genetic mutations have been identified in patients with hereditary SRNS. Genetic mutations on structural and functional molecules in podocytes can lead to serious injury in the podocytes themselves and in adjacent structures, causing sclerotic lesions such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis or diffuse mesangial sclerosis. This paper provides an update on the current knowledge of podocyte genes involved in the development of hereditary nephrotic syndrome and, thereby, reviews genotype-phenotype correlations to propose an approach for appropriate mutational screening based on clinical aspects. PMID:28392820

  17. [Cerebral hydatid cyst: Clinical case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Acha-Sánchez, José Luis; Yaya-Loo, Héctor José; Chipana-Sotomayor, Marco Enrique

    2016-12-13

    Hydatid disease is an accidental parasitosis, with brain location being rare. The case is reported of a 33year-old male, with no history of note, who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension syndrome and right hemiparesis. Computed tomography showed a cystic lesion in the left frontal-parietal lobule. Surgery was performed by complete excision of the lesion, with a good outcome. Hydatid disease is a rare condition in the brain. Clinical suspicion is important for an early diagnosis. A review is presented on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cerebral hydatid disease.

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Symptomatic Vertebral Artery Dissection. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Sharma, Priti; Robinson, Karen A.; Arnan, Martinson; Tsui, Megan; Ladha, Karim; Newman-Toker, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) is an important cause of stroke in the young. It can present nonspecifically and may be misdiagnosed with adverse consequences. We assessed the frequency of head/neck pain, other neurological symptoms, and cerebrovascular events in symptomatic VAD. Methods We conducted a systematic review of observational studies, searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE) for English-language manuscripts with >5 subjects with clinical or radiological features of VAD. Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion; a third adjudicated differences. Studies were assessed for methodological quality and clinical data were abstracted. Pooled proportions were calculated. Results Of 3996 citations, we screened 511manuscripts and selected 75 studies describing 1,972 VAD patients. The most common symptoms were dizziness/vertigo (58%), headache (51%) and neck pain (46%). Stroke was common (63%), especially with extracranial dissections (66% vs. 32%, p<0.0001), while TIA (14%) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (10%) were uncommon. SAH was seen only with intracranial dissections (57% vs. 0%, p=0.003). Fewer than half of the patients had obvious trauma, and only 7.9% had a known connective tissue disease. Outcome was good (modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0-1) in 67% and poor (mRS 5-6) in 10%. Conclusion VAD is associated with nonspecific symptoms such as dizziness, vertigo, headache, or neck pain. Ischemic stroke is the most common reported cerebrovascular complication. VAD should be considered in the diagnostic assessment of patients presenting with dizziness or craniocervical pain, even in the absence of other risk factors. Future studies should compare clinical findings as predictors in well-defined, undifferentiated populations of clinical VAD suspects. PMID:22931728

  19. [Clinical research VIII. Structured review of an article].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    There has been proposed several strategies to select an article under the assumption of quality and relevance. Mostly depend on the presence or absence of a number of features and others, depends of the judgment of other people. However, these strategies do not allow us to know the magnitude of the error contained within each article. And considering that there is not a perfect one, it is important to identify the magnitude of the error and the impact of this in the final result; consequently, it is necessary to develop skills that allow us to review a paper, identify potential errors, and generate a sense of the impact of it over the result. Using the information contained in Clinical Research Series I-VII, we have tried to show its application in a structured review of an article of causality beginning with the revision of the baseline, the maneuver and the outcome, with systematic errors (bias) generated in each section, followed by the appropriate of the statistical test and the sample size used, and finally, the clinical relevance.

  20. Cannabis and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2009-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illegitimate substance in the world, and the number of users has increased by 10% over the last decade worldwide. Therefore, it is important to review the evidence on psychoactive properties of cannabis and its possible association with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD). We searched MEDLINE with the key words cannabis and schizophrenia. The search was limited to articles published in English over the last 10 years (1999-2009). Bibliographies of cited literature were also searched. Data sources included reviews published in core clinical journals, cohort studies, interventional studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional analyses and epidemiological data. Results are discussed under 2 topics. Firstly, evidence related to biochemical functioning of cannabinoids and their relationship to endocannabinoid system is discussed briefly. Secondly, the evidence from clinical studies on cannabis, psychosis proneness and SSD are discussed in detail. The discussion is structured to fit in the evidence from results section to 3 plausible hypotheses on cannabis use and SSD. The evidence for and against each hypothesis is discussed. Despite new evidence, the exact relationship between cannabis and SSD is unclear. There is no firm evidence that cannabis causes SSD. The evidence for the argument that schizophrenic patients are attracted to cannabis is also not strong. The most plausible explanation is that cannabis use and psychosis proneness may have synergistic effects in a vulnerable minority. PMID:21938097

  1. Clinical TVA-based studies: a general review

    PubMed Central

    Habekost, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In combination with whole report and partial report tasks, the theory of visual attention (TVA) can be used to estimate individual differences in five basic attentional parameters: the visual processing speed, the storage capacity of visual short-term memory, the perceptual threshold, the efficiency of top–down selectivity, and the spatial bias of attentional weighting. TVA-based assessment has been used in about 30 studies to investigate attentional deficits in a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions: (a) neglect and simultanagnosia, (b) reading disturbances, (c) aging and neurodegenerative diseases, and most recently (d) neurodevelopmental disorders. The article introduces TVA based assessment, discusses its methodology and psychometric properties, and reviews the progress made in each of the four research fields. The empirical results demonstrate the general usefulness of TVA-based assessment for many types of clinical neuropsychological research. The method’s most important qualities are cognitive specificity and theoretical grounding, but it is also characterized by good reliability and sensitivity to minor deficits. The review concludes by pointing to promising new areas for clinical TVA-based research. PMID:25852607

  2. The Clinical Features of Myositis-Associated Autoantibodies: a Review.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Harsha

    2017-02-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are a group of autoimmune diseases traditionally defined by clinical manifestations including skeletal muscle weakness, skin rashes, elevated skeletal muscle enzymes, and neurophysiological and/or histological evidence of muscle inflammation. Patients with myositis overlap can develop other features including parenchymal lung disease, inflammatory arthritis, gastrointestinal manifestations and marked constitutional symptoms. Although patients may be diagnosed as having polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) under the IIM spectrum, it is quite clear that disease course between subgroups of patients is different. For example, interstitial lung disease may predominate in some, whereas cutaneous complications, cancer risk, or severe refractory myopathy may be a significant feature in others. Therefore, tools that facilitate diagnosis and indicate which patients require more detailed investigation for disease complications are invaluable in clinical practice. The expanding field of autoantibodies (autoAbs) associated with connective tissue disease (CTD)-myositis overlap has generated considerable interest over the last few years. Using an immunological diagnostic approach, this group of heterogeneous conditions can be separated into a number of distinct clinical phenotypes. Rather than diagnose a patient as simply having PM, DM or overlap CTD, we can define syndromes to differentiate disease subsets that emphasise clinical outcomes and guide management. There are now over 15 CTD-myositis overlap autoAbs found in patients with a range of clinical manifestations including interstitial pneumonia, cutaneous disease, cancer-associated myositis and autoimmune-mediated necrotising myopathy. This review describes their diagnostic utility, potential role in disease monitoring and response to treatment. In the future, routine use of these autoAb will allow a stratified approach to managing this complex set of conditions.

  3. Systematic review of clinical outcomes after prophylactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, C R; Trevatt, Aej; Dixit, A; Datta, V

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Prophylactic appendicectomy is performed prior to military, polar and space expeditions to prevent acute appendicitis in the field. However, the risk-benefit ratio of prophylactic surgery is controversial. This study aimed to systematically review the evidence for prophylactic appendicectomy. It is supplemented by a clinical example of prophylactic surgery resulting in life-threatening complications. Methods A systematic review was performed using MEDLINE(®) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Keyword variants of 'prophylaxis' and 'appendicectomy' were combined to identify potential papers for inclusion. Papers related to prophylactic appendicectomy risks and benefits were reviewed. Results Overall, 511 papers were identified, with 37 papers satisfying the inclusion criteria. Nine reported outcomes after incidental appendicectomy during concurrent surgical procedures. No papers focused explicitly on prophylactic appendicectomy in asymptomatic patients. The clinical example outlined acute obstruction secondary to adhesions from a prophylactic appendicectomy. Complications after elective appendicectomy versus the natural history of acute appendicitis in scenarios such as polar expeditions or covert operations suggest prophylactic appendicectomy may be appropriate prior to extreme situations. Nevertheless, the long-term risk of adhesion related complications render prophylactic appendicectomy feasible only when the short-term risk of acute appendicitis outweighs the long-term risks of surgery. Conclusions Prophylactic appendicectomy is rarely performed and not without risk. This is the first documented evidence of long-term complications following prophylactic appendicectomy. Surgery should be considered on an individual basis by balancing the risks of acute appendicitis in the field with the potential consequences of an otherwise unnecessary surgical procedure in a healthy patient.

  4. Systematic review of clinical outcomes after prophylactic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Davis, CR; Trevatt, AEJ; Dixit, A; Datta, V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prophylactic appendicectomy is performed prior to military, polar and space expeditions to prevent acute appendicitis in the field. However, the risk–benefit ratio of prophylactic surgery is controversial. This study aimed to systematically review the evidence for prophylactic appendicectomy. It is supplemented by a clinical example of prophylactic surgery resulting in life-threatening complications. Methods A systematic review was performed using MEDLINE® and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Keyword variants of ‘prophylaxis’ and ‘appendicectomy’ were combined to identify potential papers for inclusion. Papers related to prophylactic appendicectomy risks and benefits were reviewed. Results Overall, 511 papers were identified, with 37 papers satisfying the inclusion criteria. Nine reported outcomes after incidental appendicectomy during concurrent surgical procedures. No papers focused explicitly on prophylactic appendicectomy in asymptomatic patients. The clinical example outlined acute obstruction secondary to adhesions from a prophylactic appendicectomy. Complications after elective appendicectomy versus the natural history of acute appendicitis in scenarios such as polar expeditions or covert operations suggest prophylactic appendicectomy may be appropriate prior to extreme situations. Nevertheless, the long-term risk of adhesion related complications render prophylactic appendicectomy feasible only when the short-term risk of acute appendicitis outweighs the long-term risks of surgery. Conclusions Prophylactic appendicectomy is rarely performed and not without risk. This is the first documented evidence of long-term complications following prophylactic appendicectomy. Surgery should be considered on an individual basis by balancing the risks of acute appendicitis in the field with the potential consequences of an otherwise unnecessary surgical procedure in a healthy patient. PMID:27023639

  5. Practical clinical trials in psychopharmacology: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Benedetto

    2015-04-01

    Practical clinical trials (PCTs) are randomized experiments under typical practice conditions with the aim of testing the "real-life" benefits and risks of therapeutic interventions. Influential PCTs have been conducted in cardiology, oncology, and internal medicine. Psychotropic medications are widely and increasingly used in medical practice. This review examines recent progress in conducting PCTs in psychopharmacology. The January 2000 to October 2014 MEDLINE, Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched for peer-reviewed publications of PCTs with at least 100 subjects per treatment arm. Most PCTs in psychiatry evaluated mental health services or psychosocial interventions rather than specific pharmacotherapies. Of 157 PCTs in psychiatry, 30 (19%) were in psychopharmacology, with a median of 2 publications per year and no increase during the period of observation. Sample size ranged from 200 to 18,154; only 11 studies randomized 500 patients or more. Psychopharmacology PCTs were equally likely to be funded by industry as by public agencies. There were 10 PCTs of antidepressants, for a total of 4206 patients (in comparison with at least 46 PCTs of antihypertensive medications, for a total of 208,014 patients). Some psychopharmacology PCTs used suicidal behavior, treatment discontinuation, or mortality as primary outcome and produced effectiveness and safety data that have influenced both practice guidelines and regulatory decisions. Practical clinical trials can constitute an important source of information for clinicians, patients, regulators, and policy makers but have been relatively underused in psychopharmacology. Electronic medical records and integrated practice research networks offer promising platforms for a more efficient conduct of PCTs.

  6. Autogenic training: a narrative and quantitative review of clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Linden, W

    1994-09-01

    This review of controlled outcome research on Autogenic Training complements the literature by pooling narrative and quantitative approaches, by including only studies with experimental controls, by integrating the English and German literature, and by adding research findings published since the last review. Whereas previous reviews have already reported positive effects of Autogenic Training for migraine, insomnia, and test anxiety, additional supportive findings for angina pectoris, asthma, childbirth, eczema, hypertension, infertility, Raynaud's disease, and recovery from myocardial infarction are discussed here. The impact of protocol variations on outcome is described, and the specificity of Autogenic Training relative to other stress management techniques is highlighted. Quantitative findings suggested that Autogenic Training was associated with medium-sized pre- to posttreatment effects ranging from d = .43 for biological indices of change to d = .58 for psychological and behavioral indices thus matching effect sizes for other biobehavioral treatment techniques like biofeedback and muscular relaxation. Length of treatment did not affect clinical outcome. The discussion emphasizes how narrative and quantitative strategies complement one another.

  7. The clinical features of the piriformis syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fujian; Riera, Ricardo; Sambandan, Sidha

    2010-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome, sciatica caused by compression of the sciatic nerve by the piriformis muscle, has been described for over 70 years; yet, it remains controversial. The literature consists mainly of case series and narrative reviews. The objectives of the study were: first, to make the best use of existing evidence to estimate the frequencies of clinical features in patients reported to have PS; second, to identify future research questions. A systematic review was conducted of any study type that reported extractable data relevant to diagnosis. The search included all studies up to 1 March 2008 in four databases: AMED, CINAHL, Embase and Medline. Screening, data extraction and analysis were all performed independently by two reviewers. A total of 55 studies were included: 51 individual and 3 aggregated data studies, and 1 combined study. The most common features found were: buttock pain, external tenderness over the greater sciatic notch, aggravation of the pain through sitting and augmentation of the pain with manoeuvres that increase piriformis muscle tension. Future research could start with comparing the frequencies of these features in sciatica patients with and without disc herniation or spinal stenosis. PMID:20596735

  8. Clinical applications of bovine colostrum therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rathe, Mathias; Müller, Klaus; Sangild, Per Torp; Husby, Steffen

    2014-04-01

    Bovine colostrum, the first milk that cows produce after parturition, contains high levels of growth factors and immunomodulatory components. Some healthy and diseased individuals may gain health benefits by consuming bovine colostrum as a food supplement. This review provides a systematic, critical evaluation of the current state of knowledge in this area. Fifty-one eligible studies were identified from the following databases: Medline, Embase, Global Health, the Cochrane Library, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Studies were heterogeneous with regard to populations, outcomes, and methodological quality, as judged by the Jadad assessment tool. Many studies used surrogate markers to study the effects of bovine colostrum. Studies suggesting clinical benefits of colostrum supplementation were generally of poor methodological quality, and results could not be confirmed by other investigators. Bovine colostrum may provide gastrointestinal and immunological benefits, but further studies are required before recommendations can be made for clinical application. Animal models may help researchers to better understand the mechanisms of bovine colostrum supplementation, the dosage regimens required to obtain clinical benefits, and the optimal methods for testing these effects in humans.

  9. Computer-interpretable clinical guidelines: a methodological review.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Mor

    2013-08-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aim to improve the quality of care, reduce unjustified practice variations and reduce healthcare costs. In order for them to be effective, clinical guidelines need to be integrated with the care flow and provide patient-specific advice when and where needed. Hence, their formalization as computer-interpretable guidelines (CIGs) makes it possible to develop CIG-based decision-support systems (DSSs), which have a better chance of impacting clinician behavior than narrative guidelines. This paper reviews the literature on CIG-related methodologies since the inception of CIGs, while focusing and drawing themes for classifying CIG research from CIG-related publications in the Journal of Biomedical Informatics (JBI). The themes span the entire life-cycle of CIG development and include: knowledge acquisition and specification for improved CIG design, including (1) CIG modeling languages and (2) CIG acquisition and specification methodologies, (3) integration of CIGs with electronic health records (EHRs) and organizational workflow, (4) CIG validation and verification, (5) CIG execution engines and supportive tools, (6) exception handling in CIGs, (7) CIG maintenance, including analyzing clinician's compliance to CIG recommendations and CIG versioning and evolution, and finally (8) CIG sharing. I examine the temporal trends in CIG-related research and discuss additional themes that were not identified in JBI papers, including existing themes such as overcoming implementation barriers, modeling clinical goals, and temporal expressions, as well as futuristic themes, such as patient-centric CIGs and distributed CIGs.

  10. Cryopreservation of Human Stem Cells for Clinical Application: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Stem cells have been used in a clinical setting for many years. Haematopoietic stem cells have been used for the treatment of both haematological and non-haematological disease; while more recently mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow have been the subject of both laboratory and early clinical studies. Whilst these cells show both multipotency and expansion potential, they nonetheless do not form stable cell lines in culture which is likely to limit the breadth of their application in the field of regenerative medicine. Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells, capable of forming stable cell lines which retain the capacity to differentiate into cells from all three germ layers. This makes them of special significance in both regenerative medicine and toxicology. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may also provide a similar breadth of utility without some of the confounding ethical issues surrounding embryonic stem cells. An essential pre-requisite to the commercial and clinical application of stem cells are suitable cryopreservation protocols for long-term storage. Whilst effective methods for cryopreservation and storage have been developed for haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic cells and iPS cells have proved more refractory. This paper reviews the current state of cryopreservation as it pertains to stem cells and in particular the embryonic and iPS cell. PMID:21566712

  11. The clinical phenotypes of autoimmune hepatitis: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qixia; Yang, Fan; Miao, Qi; Krawitt, Edward L; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) fulfills the generally accepted contemporary criteria of an autoimmune liver disease: the presence of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells, a female gender bias, association with other autoimmune diseases, response to immunosuppressive therapy and strong associations with the major histocompatibility complex HLA loci. It occurs worldwide in both children and adults and is marked by both etiopathogenic and clinical heterogeneity, differing from the other putative autoimmune liver diseases, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), albeit occasionally presenting with overlapping features of PBC or PSC. Although diagnostic criteria have been established and validated, there are still major issues to be clarified due to its variability, such as autoantibody-negative AIH, drug-induced AIH, AIH sharing features with PBC or PSC, and post-transplant de novo AIH. In view of the diverse presentations and courses, including classical chronic onset, acute and acute severe onset, cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis, individualized management of patients is indicated. Each patient should receive a personalized analysis of the benefits and side effect risks of drugs. Herein we describe a comprehensive review of the clinical phenotypes of AIH underscoring its clinical heterogeneity.

  12. CYP17A1: a biochemistry, chemistry, and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Porubek, David

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1; also P450c17and P450sccII) is a critically important enzyme in humans that catalyzes the formation of all endogenous androgens. It is an atypical cytochrome P450 enzyme in that it catalyzes two distinct types of substrate oxidation. Through its hydroxylase activity, it catalyzes the 17α-hydroxylation of pregnenolone to 17α-OH pregnenolone. Subsequently, through its C17,20lyase activity, it can further convert 17α-OH pregnenolone to the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone, which is a precursor to androstenedione, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone. The importance of androgens in diseases such as prostate cancer has been appreciated for decades and the discovery of extra-testicular formation of androgens has helped clarify the pathology of the disease, especially the castrate- resistant disease. Therefore, specific inhibition of CYP17A1 by therapeutic intervention has been an area of considerable effort in several research laboratories. This basic research has led to the discovery of several promising drug candidates followed by the conduct of several clinical trials. Recently, all these efforts have culminated in the first approval by FDA of an inhibitor of CYP17A1 for the treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Ongoing clinical trials are now evaluating the agent in earlier stages of prostate cancer and even rare forms of androgen-dependent breast cancer. Accordingly, this review focuses on the biochemistry, chemistry, and clinical inhibitors of CYP17A1.

  13. Clinical Manifestations Associated with Neurocysticercosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Carabin, Hélène; Ndimubanzi, Patrick Cyaga; Budke, Christine M.; Nguyen, Hai; Qian, Yingjun; Cowan, Linda Demetry; Stoner, Julie Ann; Rainwater, Elizabeth; Dickey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis (NCC) are poorly understood. This systematic review aims to estimate the frequencies of different manifestations, complications and disabilities associated with NCC. Methods A systematic search of the literature published from January 1, 1990, to June 1, 2008, in 24 different electronic databases and 8 languages was conducted. Meta-analyses were conducted when appropriate. Results A total of 1569 documents were identified, and 21 included in the analysis. Among patients seen in neurology clinics, seizures/epilepsy were the most common manifestations (78.8%, 95%CI: 65.1%–89.7%) followed by headaches (37.9%, 95%CI: 23.3%–53.7%), focal deficits (16.0%, 95%CI: 9.7%–23.6%) and signs of increased intracranial pressure (11.7%, 95%CI: 6.0%–18.9%). All other manifestations occurred in less than 10% of symptomatic NCC patients. Only four studies reported on the mortality rate of NCC. Conclusions NCC is a pleomorphic disease linked to a range of manifestations. Although definitions of manifestations were very rarely provided, and varied from study to study, the proportion of NCC cases with seizures/epilepsy and the proportion of headaches were consistent across studies. These estimates are only applicable to patients who are ill enough to seek care in neurology clinics and likely over estimate the frequency of manifestations among all NCC cases. PMID:21629722

  14. A Review of Update Clinical Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions. PMID:22798685

  15. Clinical, genetic and pathological heterogeneity of frontotemporal dementia: a review.

    PubMed

    Seelaar, Harro; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Fox, Nick C; van Swieten, John C

    2011-05-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common young-onset dementia and is clinically characterised by progressive behavioural change, executive dysfunction and language difficulties. Three clinical syndromes, behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia and progressive non-fluent aphasia, form part of a clinicopathological spectrum named frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The classical neuropsychological phenotype of FTD has been enriched by tests exploring Theory of Mind, social cognition and emotional processing. Imaging studies have detailed the patterns of atrophy associated with different clinical and pathological subtypes. These patterns offer some diagnostic utility, while measures of progression of atrophy may be of use in future trials. 30-50% of FTD is familial, and mutations in two genes, microtubule associated protein tau and Progranulin (GRN), account for about half of these cases. Rare defects in VCP, CHMP2B, TARDP and FUS genes have been found in a small number of families. Linkage to chromosome 9p13.2-21.3 has been established in familial FTD with motor neuron disease, although the causative gene is yet to be identified. Recent developments in the immunohistochemistry of FTLD, and also in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), have led to a new pathological nomenclature. The two major groups are those with tau-positive inclusions (FTLD-tau) and those with ubiquitin-positive and TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP). Recently, a new protein involved in familial ALS, fused in sarcoma (FUS), has been found in FTLD patients with ubiquitin-positive and TDP-43-negative inclusions. In this review, the authors discuss recent clinical, neuropsychological, imaging, genetic and pathological developments that have changed our understanding of FTD, its classification and criteria. The potential to establish an early diagnosis, predict underlying pathology during life and quantify disease progression will

  16. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  17. Phytosomal curcumin: A review of pharmacokinetic, experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Shakeri, Abolfazl; Rashidi, Bahman; Jalili, Amin; Banikazemi, Zarrin; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol, is the principal constituent extracted from dried rhizomes of Curcuma longa L. (turmeric). Curcumin is known as a strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent that has different pharmacological effects. In addition, several studies have demonstrated that curcumin is safe even at dosages as high as 8g per day; however, instability at physiological pH, low solubility in water and rapid metabolism results in a low oral bioavailability of curcumin. The phytosomal formulation of curcumin (a complex of curcumin with phosphatidylcholine) has been shown to improve curcumin bioavailability. Existence of phospholipids in phytosomes leads to specific physicochemical properties such as amphiphilic nature that allows dispersion in both hydrophilic and lipophilic media. The efficacy and safety of curcumin phytosomes have been shown against several human diseases including cancer, osteoarthritis, diabetic microangiopathy and retinopathy, and inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics as well as pharmacological and clinical effects of phytosomal curcumin.

  18. Lyme borreliosis: reviewing potential vaccines, clinical aspects and health economics.

    PubMed

    Šmit, Renata; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a multisystem infectious disease with a growing burden in many parts of North America, Asia and Europe. Persistent infection of LB can usually be treated effectively with antibiotic therapy, but it may be followed by post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Therefore, it is important to begin with treatment in the early phase of the disease. Vaccination shows potential as the most effective way of preventing LB and reducing its burden in these continents. It is concluded that there is a need for continuous effort in research from all perspectives on LB, especially regarding prevention with novel vaccines, their development, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. This review may help to further develop (cost-) effective strategies for prevention and control of the disease to reduce its burden and achieve population-wide health benefits.

  19. Medical Wikis Dedicated to Clinical Practice: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Llorca, Guy; Letrilliart, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Background Wikis may give clinician communities the opportunity to build knowledge relevant to their practice. The only previous study reviewing a set of health-related wikis, without specification of purpose or audience, globally showed a poor reliability. Objective Our aim was to review medical wiki websites dedicated to clinical practices. Methods We used Google in ten languages, PubMed, Embase, Lilacs, and Web of Science to identify websites. The review included wiki sites, accessible and operating, having a topic relevant for clinical medicine, targeting physicians or medical students. Wikis were described according to their purposes, platform, management, information framework, contributions, content, and activity. Purposes were classified as “encyclopedic” or “non-encyclopedic”. The information framework quality was assessed based on the Health On the Net (HONcode) principles for collaborative websites, with additional criteria related to users’ transparency and editorial policy. From a sample of five articles per wikis, we assessed the readability using the Flesch test and compared articles according to the wikis’ main purpose. Annual editorial activities were estimated using the Google engine. Results Among 25 wikis included, 11 aimed at building an encyclopedia, five a textbook, three lessons, two oncology protocols, one a single article, and three at reporting clinical cases. Sixteen wikis were specialized with specific themes or disciplines. Fifteen wikis were using MediaWiki software as-is, three were hosted by online wiki farms, and seven were purpose-built. Except for one MediaWiki-based site, only purpose-built platforms managed detailed user disclosures. The owners were ten organizations, six individuals, four private companies, two universities, two scientific societies, and one unknown. Among 21 open communities, 10 required users’ credentials to give editing rights. The median information framework quality score was 6 out of 16

  20. Restless legs syndrome: a review of clinical and pathophysiologic features.

    PubMed

    Allen, R P; Earley, C J

    2001-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), although long ignored and still much underdiagnosed, disrupts the life and sleep considerably of those who have it. Recent clinical and basic research provides for better definition and pathophysiologic understanding of the disorder. The body of knowledge about this disorder has been expanding rapidly during the past decade and it has altered our concepts of this disorder. This review of RLS covers history, diagnosis, morbidity of sleep disturbance, relation to periodic limb movements in both sleep and waking, secondary causes, severity assessment methods, phenotypes for possible genetic patterns, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and medical treatment considerations. The emphasis on pathophysiology includes consideration of central nervous system localization, neurotransmitter and other systems involved, and the role of iron metabolism. Studies to date support the authors' recently advanced iron-dopamine model of RLS.

  1. Clinical experience with aurora kinase inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Boss, David S; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2009-08-01

    The aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases comprises three members, designated auroras A, B, and C. Auroras A and B are essential components of the mitotic pathway, ensuring proper chromosome assembly, formation of the mitotic spindle, and cytokinesis. The role of aurora C is less clear. Overexpression of aurora A and B has been observed in several tumor types, and has been linked with a poor prognosis of cancer patients. Several small molecules targeting aurora kinases A and B or both have been evaluated preclinically and in early phase I trials. In this review we aim to summarize the most recent advances in the development of aurora kinase inhibitors, with a focus on the clinical data.

  2. Practical Clinical Trials in Psychopharmacology: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    Practical clinical trials (PCT) are randomized experiments under typical practice conditions with the aim of testing the “real life” benefits and risks of therapeutic interventions. Influential PCTs have been conducted in cardiology, oncology, and internal medicine. Psychotropic medications are widely and increasingly used in medical practice. This review examines recent progress in conducting PCTs in psychopharmacology. The January 2000 – October 2014 MEDLINE, Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched for peer-reviewed publications of PCTs with at least 100 subjects per treatment arm. Most PCTs in psychiatry evaluated mental health services or psychosocial interventions rather than specific pharmacotherapies. Of 157 PCTs in psychiatry, 30 (19%) were in psychopharmacology, with a median of 2 publications per year and no increase over the period of observation. Sample size ranged from 200 to 18,154; only 11 studies randomized 500 patients or more. Psychopharmacology PCTs were equally likely to be funded by industry as by public agencies. There were 10 PCTs of antidepressants, for a total of 4,206 patients (in comparison with at least 46 PCT of antihypertensive medications, for a total of 208,014 patients). Some psychopharmacology PCTs used suicidal behavior, treatment discontinuation, or mortality as primary outcome, and produced effectiveness and safety data that have influenced both practice guidelines and regulatory decisions. PCTs can constitute an important source of information for clinicians, patients, regulators, and policy makers, but have been relatively underutilized in psychopharmacology. Electronic medical records and integrated practice research networks offer promising platforms for a more efficient conduct of PCTs. PMID:25679131

  3. Alzheimer’s Disease: A Clinical Practice-Oriented Review

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luísa; Correia, Ana Sofia A.; Miguel, Rita; Alegria, Paulo; Bugalho, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Investigation in the field of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the commonest cause of dementia, has been very active in recent years and it may be difficult for the clinician to keep up with all the innovations and to be aware of the implications they have in clinical practice. The authors, thus, reviewed recent literature on the theme in order to provide the clinician with an updated overview, intended to support decision-making on aspects of diagnosis and management. This article begins to focus on the concept of AD and on its pathogenesis. Afterward, epidemiology and non-genetic risk factors are approached. Genetics, including genetic risk factors and guidelines for genetic testing, are mentioned next. Recommendations for diagnosis of AD, including recently proposed criteria, are then reviewed. Data on the variants of AD is presented. First approach to the patient is dealt with next, followed by neuropsychological evaluation. Biomarkers, namely magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission tomography, FDG PET, PiB PET, CSF tau, and Aβ analysis, as well as available data on their diagnostic accuracy, are also discussed. Factors predicting rate of disease progression are briefly mentioned. Finally, non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments, including established and emerging drugs, are addressed. PMID:22529838

  4. Psychological aspects of prostate cancer: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, A; Sonavane, S; Mehta, J

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men. It is fraught with both physical and psychological symptomatology. Depression, anxiety, stress, fatigue, pain and psychosocial factors all affect the patient with prostate cancer. Impotence, erectile dysfunction, sexual issues and incontinence in these patients complicate matters further. Anxiety may exist both before testing and while awaiting test results. Confusion over choosing from various interventions often adds to anxiety and depression in these patients. Various demographic factors and the developmental stage of the couple affect these psychological symptoms. The caregiver may undergo significant psychological turmoil while caring for a patient diagnosed with prostate cancer, which is addressed. The role of nurses in the management of prostate cancer is discussed. The present review looks at psychological issues in patients with prostate cancer from a clinical perspective, with the aim of highlighting these issues for the clinical urologist dealing with these patients. It also explores the consultation-liaison relationship between psychiatrists, psychologists and urologists as a team for the multimodal management of prostate cancer.

  5. Clinical and molecular review of atypical congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is one of the most common inherited metabolic disorders. It comprises a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by the mutations in the genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes that involved cortisol synthesis. More than 90% of cases are caused by a defect in the enzyme 21-hydroxylase. Four other enzyme deficiencies (cholesterol side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase [P450c17], 11β-hydroxylase [P450c11β], 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in the steroid biosynthesis pathway, along with one cholesterol transport protein defect (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein), and one electrontransfer protein (P450 oxidoreductase) account for the remaining cases. The clinical symptoms of the different forms of CAH result from the particular hormones that are deficient and those that are produced in excess. A characteristic feature of CAH is genital ambiguity or disordered sex development, and most variants are associated with glucocorticoid deficiency. However, in the rare forms of CAH other than 21-hydroxylase deficiency so-called "atypical CAH", the clinical and hormonal phenotypes can be more complicated, and are not well recognized. This review will focus on the atypical forms of CAH, including the genetic analyses, and phenotypic correlates. PMID:25883920

  6. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Review from a Clinically Oriented Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Lurdes; Barr, Alasdair M.; Scarapicchia, Vanessa; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel

    2015-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially life-threatening sideeffect that can occur in response to treatment with antipsychotic drugs. Symptoms commonly include hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, autonomic dysfunction and altered mental status. In the current review we provide an overview on past and current developments in understanding the causes and treatment of NMS. Studies on the epidemiological incidence of NMS are evaluated, and we provide new data from the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online database to elaborate on drug-specific and antipsychotic drug polypharmacy instances of NMS reported between 1965 and 2012. Established risk factors are summarized with an emphasis on pharmacological and environmental causes. Leading theories about the etiopathology of NMS are discussed, including the potential contribution of the impact of dopamine receptor blockade and musculoskeletal fiber toxicity. A clinical perspective is provided whereby the clinical presentation and phenomenology of NMS is detailed, while the diagnosis of NMS and its differential is expounded. Current therapeutic strategies are outlined and the role for both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment strategies in alleviating the symptoms of NMS are discussed. PMID:26411967

  7. Use of procalcitonin in clinical oncology: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, Andrea; Torchio, Martina; Comolli, Giuditta; Antonuzzo, Andrea; Danova, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The use of procalcitonin (PCT) as an early marker of infectious episodes in cancer patients is still controversial. We performed a MEDLINE search of peer-reviewed articles published between January 1990 and December 2015, and finally we analysed 15 articles. PCT seems to have a good diagnostic value of infectious episodes in cancer patients and its accuracy seems greater if we consider major events, such as bloodstream infections and sepsis. Serial evaluations of this protein seem to be more accurate in the diagnostic phase and useful to predict outcome and response to antibacterial treatment. On the other hand, some issues have yet to be solved, such as the use of a validated method of determination, the definition of a standard cut-off, and the heterogeneity among different settings of patients (e.g. early versus advanced-stage cancer, or haematological versus solid tumours). However, it is credible to think that PCT use in everyday clinical practice, preferably in combination with other clinical or laboratory tests, might be of help in finding and detecting early infectious complications in cancer patients.

  8. Five common clinical presentations in the elderly: An anatomical review.

    PubMed

    Collin, Peter G; Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; D'Antoni, Anthony V; Shane Tubbs, R

    2017-03-01

    Elderly patients face distinct health challenges and have an increased demand for specific medical procedures. As the aging population continues to increase, age-associated conditions such as congestive heart failure, hip fractures, spine degeneration, dementia, and airway compromise will increase in prevalence and procedures to correct these conditions will be increasingly performed. A clear understanding of the clinical anatomy of these diseases and procedures is imperative for anatomists and clinicians alike in order to best treat patients and continue to advance aging research and better teach future medical practitioners about the specific anatomy often involved in this group. The aging process mirrors in a variety of ways the common pathologies of the elderly, but it is key to draw the distinction between normal aging and pathology, particularly for congestive heart failure and dementia, in the clinical setting. This article aims to review the common presentations or procedures of the elderly and how the normal aging process is associated with the anatomy of these conditions or complications. Clin. Anat. 30:168-174, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Clinical spectrum of food allergies: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ho, Marco H-K; Wong, Wilfred H-S; Chang, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Food allergy is defined as an adverse immune response towards food proteins or as a form of a food intolerance associated with a hypersensitive immune response. It should also be reproducible by a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. Many reported that food reactions are not allergic but are intolerances. Food allergy often presents to clinicians as a symptom complex. This review focuses on the clinical spectrum and manifestations of various forms of food allergies. According to clinical presentations and allergy testing, there are three types of food allergy: IgE mediated, mixed (IgE/Non-IgE), and non-IgE mediated (cellular, delayed type hypersensitivity). Recent advances in food allergy in early childhood have highlighted increasing recognition of a spectrum of delayed-onset non-IgE-mediated manifestation of food allergy. Common presentations of food allergy in infancy including atopic eczema, infantile colic, and gastroesophageal reflux. These clinical observations are frequently associated with food hypersensitivity and respond to dietary elimination. Non-IgE-mediated food allergy includes a wide range of diseases, from atopic dermatitis to food protein-induced enterocolitis and from eosinophilic esophagitis to celiac disease. The most common food allergies in children include milk, egg, soy, wheat, peanut, treenut, fish, and shellfish. Milk and egg allergies are usually outgrown, but peanut and treenut allergy tends to persist. The prevalence of food allergy in infancy is increasing and may affect up to 15-20 % of infants. The alarming rate of increase calls for a public health approach in the prevention and treatment of food allergy in children.

  10. Review of Clinical Presentation and Diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksz, C.J.; Harmatz, P.; Beck, M.; Jones, S.; Wood, T.; Lachman, R.; Gravance, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe ”classical” phenotype to a mild “attenuated” phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed. PMID:23665161

  11. Review of clinical presentation and diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Hendriksz, C J; Harmatz, P; Beck, M; Jones, S; Wood, T; Lachman, R; Gravance, C G; Orii, T; Tomatsu, S

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe "classical" phenotype to a mild "attenuated" phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed.

  12. Guidelines for randomized clinical trial protocol content: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) require a protocol; however, numerous studies have highlighted protocol deficiencies. Reporting guidelines may improve the content of research reports and, if developed using robust methods, may increase the utility of reports to stakeholders. The objective of this study was to systematically identify and review RCT protocol guidelines, to assess their characteristics and methods of development, and to compare recommendations. Methods We conducted a systematic review of indexed literature (MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Methodology Register from inception to September 2010; reference lists; related article features; forward citation searching) and a targeted search of supplementary sources, including a survey of major trial funding agencies in six countries. Records were eligible if they described a content guideline in English or French relevant to RCT protocols. Guidelines were excluded if they specified content for protocols for trials of specific procedures or conditions or were intended to assess trial quality. We extracted guideline characteristics and methods. Content was mapped for a subset of guidelines that described development methods or had institutional endorsement. Results Forty guidelines published in journals, books and institutional reports were included in the review; seven were specific to RCT protocols. Only eight (20%) described development methods which included informal consensus methods, pilot testing and formal validation; no guideline described all of these methods. No guideline described formal consensus methods or a systematic retrieval of empirical evidence to inform its development. The guidelines included a median of 23 concepts per guideline (interquartile range (IQR) = 14 to 34; range = 7 to 109). Among the subset of guidelines (n = 23) for which content was mapped, approximately 380 concepts were explicitly addressed (median concepts per guideline IQR = 31 (24

  13. Citalopram--a review of pharmacological and clinical effects.

    PubMed Central

    Bezchlibnyk-Butler, K; Aleksic, I; Kennedy, S H

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide clinicians with a critical evaluation of citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that has been available in Canada since March 1999. DATA SOURCES: Commercial searches (MEDLINE and BiblioTech) and an "in-house" search (InfoDrug) were used to find published English-language references for clinical and preclinical publications. There was no restriction of publication dates. Primary index terms used were: pharmacological properties, receptors, pharmacological selectivity, pharmacokinetics, age-related pharmacokinetics, sex-related pharmacokinetics, renal dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction, cytochrome activity, drug interactions, adverse reactions, antidepressant switching, precautions, overdose, drug discontinuation, children, geriatric, depression, combination therapy, placebo control, refractory depression, anxiety disorders and medical disorders. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 74 studies were reviewed. Twenty-one of these studies specifically examined the clinical efficacy and tolerability of citalopram in depressive disorders as well as other disorders. In depressive disorders, clinical studies were required to have either placebo or active comparison controls for a minimum of 3 weeks. For other disorders, in the absence of double-blind trials, open-label studies were included. Pharmacological studies were limited to animal studies focusing on citalopram's selectivity and receptor specificity, and positron emission tomography studies were incorporated to include human pharmacological data. Pharmacokinetic studies focused on the metabolism, safety and tolerability of citalopram, specifically with reference to adverse reactions, drug interactions and overdose in addition to citalopram's effect on vulnerable populations, such as children, the elderly and patients with metabolic diseases. DATA EXTRACTION: Data on clinical studies were summarized according to test measures, study duration and outcome of study. Pharmacokinetic and

  14. Evidence-based review of clinical studies on pulpotomy.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    Although pulpotomy procedures have a long history of clinical application, comparatively few dental clinical trials have evaluated this treatment approach. In this section, we provide an analysis of recent clinical studies evaluating pulpotomy procedures in dental patients.

  15. Clinical Problems in the Hospitalized Parkinson's Disease Patient: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Oliver HH; Winogrodzka, Ania; Weber, Wim EJ

    2011-01-01

    The problems Parkinson's disease (PD) patients encounter when admitted to a hospital, are known to be numerous and serious. These problems have been inventoried through a systematic review of literature on reasons for emergency and hospital admissions in PD patients, problems encountered during hospitalization, and possible solutions for the encountered problems using the Pubmed database. PD patients are hospitalized in frequencies ranging from 7 to 28% per year. PD/parkinsonism patients are approximately one and a half times more frequently and generally 2 to 14 days longer hospitalized than non-PD patients. Acute events occurring during hospitalization were mainly urinary infection, confusion, and pressure ulcers. Medication errors were also frequent adverse events. During and after surgery PD patients had an increased incidence of infections, confusion, falls, and decubitus, and 31% of patients was dissatisfied in the way their PD was managed. There are only two studies on medication continuation during surgery and one analyzing the effect of an early postoperative neurologic consultation, and numerous case reports, and opinionated views and reviews including other substitutes for dopaminergic medication intraoperatively. In conclusion, most studies were retrospective on small numbers of patients. The major clinical problems are injuries, infections, poor control of PD, and complications of PD treatment. There are many (un-researched) proposals for improvement. A substantial number of PD patients' admissions might be prevented. There should be guidelines concerning the hospitalized PD patients, with accent on early neurological consultation and team work between different specialities, and incorporating nonoral dopaminergic replacement therapy when necessary. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society PMID:21284037

  16. History, Epidemiology, and Clinical Manifestations of Zika: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Florisneide; da Glória Teixeira, Maria; da Conceição N. Costa, Maria; Rodrigues, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To describe salient epidemiological characteristics of Zika virus outbreaks across the world and to examine the clinical presentations, complications, and atypical manifestations related to their occurrence in recent history. Methods. We conducted a systematic review of the literature by searching through MEDLINE, Embase, and Global Health Library, as well as the epidemiological bulletins and alerts from the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control over the period 1954 to 2016. Results. The search yielded 547 records. We retained 333 for further analysis, to which we added 11 epidemiological bulletins from various sources. Of these, we systematically reviewed 52 articles and reports, revealing some epidemiological features and patterns of spread of the Zika virus worldwide, as well as pathological outcomes suspected to be linked to Zika outbreaks. Neurologic disorders among zika patients were similar in Brazil and French Polynesia but a causal link is not established. Incidence of zika infection in pregnant women is not known. In Brazil, during the zika outbreak the incidence of microcephaly increased more than 20 times. Among 35 infants with microcephaly, born from women suspected to have Zika infection during pregnancy in northeast Brazil, 74% of the mothers reported rash during the first and second trimester. Conclusions. On February 1, 2016, The World Health Organization declared the ongoing Zika crisis an emergency and that, although not yet scientifically proven, the link between the virus and growing numbers of microcephaly cases was “strongly suspected.” However, the causal relationship between zika and microcephaly is not universally accepted. Public Health Implications. The current situation with regard to Zika is not encouraging, because there is no vaccine, no treatment, and no good serological test, and vector control remains a challenge. PMID:26959260

  17. Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines Related to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Cheng, Chuang; Yan, Weiping; Xu, Guanghui; Feng, Jinzhou; Wang, Tianzhu; Chen, Cindy Si; Qin, Xinyue

    2014-01-01

    Background High quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) can provide clinicians with explicit recommendations on how to manage health conditions and bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. Unfortunately, the quality of CPGs for multiple sclerosis (MS) has not been evaluated. Objective To evaluate the methodological quality of CPGs on MS using the AGREE II instrument. Methods According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, we searched four databases and two websites related to CPGs, including the Cochrane library, PubMed, EMBASE, DynaMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC), and Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM). The searches were performed on September 20th 2013. All CPGs on MS were evaluated by the AGREE II instrument. The software used for analysis was SPSS 17.0. Results A total of 27 CPGs on MS met inclusion criteria. The overall agreement among reviews was good or substantial (ICC was above 0.70). The mean scores for each of all six domains were presented as follows: scope and purpose (mean ± SD: 59.05±16.13), stakeholder involvement (mean ± SD: 29.53±17.67), rigor of development (mean ± SD: 31.52±21.50), clarity of presentation (mean ± SD: 60.39±13.73), applicability (mean ± SD: 27.08±17.66), editorial independence (mean ± SD: 28.70±22.03). Conclusions The methodological quality of CPGs for MS was acceptable for scope, purpose and clarity of presentation. The developers of CPGs need to pay more attention to editorial independence, applicability, rigor of development and stakeholder involvement during the development process. The AGREE II instrument should be adopted by guideline developers. PMID:25302678

  18. Clinical experience of baclofen in alcohol dependence: A chart review

    PubMed Central

    Rozatkar, Abhijit R.; Kapoor, Abhishek; Sidana, Ajeet; Chavan, Bir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Craving is recognized as a formidable barrier in the management of patients with alcohol dependence. Among pharmacological agents that have been used in experimental studies for reduction in craving, baclofen appears to have a significant advantage over other agents. Methodology: The study is retrospective chart review of patients (n = 113) who have been treated with baclofen for alcohol dependence in a tertiary hospital of North India. Baseline assessments included sociodemography, motivation, quantity-frequency of alcohol use, and other alcohol-related clinical parameters. Weekly assessments, for a period of 4 weeks, were extracted from records which included dose of baclofen, craving intensity, and alcohol consumption. Results: The study sample was predominantly male, mean age of 41.49 (±9.75) years, most having a family history of substance use (70.97%), and many reporting binge use pattern in last year (49.46%). Baseline assessment revealed 48.7% of the sample was in precontemplation phase for alcohol use and 70% reported severe and persistent craving. This persistent craving was reported by only 15% of the sample by the end of 4 weeks treatment with baclofen (20–40 mg/day). Thirty-four percent of patients reported continued problematic use of alcohol by the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion: Our clinical experience suggests that baclofen reduces craving and alcohol consumption including in those with poor motivation. The drug causes few side effects and does not add to the intoxication effect of alcohol. Considering that baclofen is safe in those with liver cirrhosis and reduces withdrawal symptoms due to alcohol, a controlled trial comparing it with standard treatment is required. PMID:28163402

  19. A Review of Clinical Cases of Infection with Photorhabdus Asymbiotica.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, John G; Stevens, Robert P

    2017-03-17

    The three recognised Photorhabdus species are bioluminescent Gram-negative bacilli of the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are all pathogenic to insects and form a symbiotic relationship with nematodes of the genus Heterorhabditis. P. luminescens and P. temperata are both harmless to humans whilst P. asymbiotica, on the other hand, is a human pathogen that is a symbiont of the newly described nematode vector, Heterorhabditis gerrardi. In this chapter, we review the epidemiological and clinical features of eighteen human cases of P. asymbiotica infection including fifteen from the published literature and three previously unreported cases. Human infection has been reported in the USA and Australia and probably occurs in other parts of Asia where it remains undocumented. Infection occurs most commonly in warmer months particularly after rainfall. Patients may have a history of recent exposure to sand or sandy soil. P. asymbiotica causes both locally invasive soft tissue infection and disseminated disease with bacteraemia. Soft tissue infection may be multifocal with involvement of more than one limb and the trunk. The organism is sensitive to a number of antibiotics in vitro, but treatment failures have been associated with the use of beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. We suggest treatment with a four-week course of an oral fluoroquinolone such as ciprofloxacin. The organism grows readily on standard media from specimens such as wound swabs, pus, blood and even sputum and can be identified in a clinical microbiology laboratory but the diagnosis needs to be considered. The correct diagnosis is most likely to be made where there is close cooperation between clinician and microbiologist.

  20. 78 FR 79703 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Application Process for Clinical Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Application Process for Clinical Research Training and Medical... contact: Robert M. Lembo, MD, Deputy Director, Office of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education... Process for Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the Clinical Center and its Impact...

  1. [Ethic review on clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Wang, Ning; Xu, Shining

    2011-07-01

    Clinical experiments are always used to evaluate the safety and validity of medical devices. The experiments have two types of clinical trying and testing. Ethic review must be done by the ethics committee of the medical department with the qualification of clinical research, and the approval must be made before the experiments. In order to ensure the safety and validity of clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions, the contents, process and approval criterions of the ethic review were analyzed and discussed.

  2. Equine cyathostomins: a review of biology, clinical significance and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Corning, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The small strongyles of horses, also known as cyathostomins, are considered the most prevalent and pathogenic parasites of horses today. The clinical syndrome of larval cyathostominosis which occurs as a result of mass emergence of inhibited stages has a high fatality rate despite the best standard of care given to affected horses. Management of the challenge level of cyathostomins to prevent the syndrome is preferable. Many different management programmes have been tried over the past two decades, with mixed success. Programmes have relied heavily on repeated use of anthelmintic treatments throughout the life of a horse. The widespread incidence of resistance to certain anthelmintics is reducing these options. An understanding of the biology of cyathostomins, risk factors for infection and appropriate strategic use of still effective anthelmintics is essential for the future management of this parasite group. This review highlights the necessity to use currently available anthelmintics that are appropriately suited to the biology of cyathostomins, and to maintain heir efficacy through an appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:19778462

  3. Epidemiological, clinical, and immunological characteristics of neuromyelitis optica: A review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Wildéa Lice de Carvalho Jennings; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Kallaur, Ana Paula; Kaimen-Maciel, Damacio Ramón

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this study was to review the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and the immunopathological mechanisms involved in the neuronal damage. NMO is an inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that most commonly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. NMO is thought to be more prevalent among non-Caucasians and where multiple sclerosis (MS) prevalence is low. NMO follows a relapsing course in more than 80-90% of cases, which is more commonly in women. It is a complex disease with an interaction between host genetic and environmental factors and the main immunological feature is the presence of anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibodies in a subset of patients. NMO is frequently associated with multiple other autoantibodies and there is a strong association between NMO with other systemic autoimmune diseases. AQP4-IgG can cause antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) when effector cells are present and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) when complement is present. Acute therapies, including corticosteroids and plasma exchange, are designed to minimize injury and accelerate recovery. Several aspects of NMO pathogenesis remain unclear. More advances in the understanding of NMO disease mechanisms are needed in order to identify more specific biomarkers to NMO diagnosis.

  4. Clinical Pharmacology of Furosemide in Neonates: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2013-01-01

    Furosemide is the diuretic most used in newborn infants. It blocks the Na+-K+-2Cl− symporter in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle increasing urinary excretion of Na+ and Cl−. This article aimed to review the published data on the clinical pharmacology of furosemide in neonates to provide a critical, comprehensive, authoritative and, updated survey on the metabolism, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and side-effects of furosemide in neonates. The bibliographic search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases as search engines; January 2013 was the cutoff point. Furosemide half-life (t1/2) is 6 to 20-fold longer, clearance (Cl) is 1.2 to 14-fold smaller and volume of distribution (Vd) is 1.3 to 6-fold larger than the adult values. t1/2 shortens and Cl increases as the neonatal maturation proceeds. Continuous intravenous infusion of furosemide yields more controlled diuresis than the intermittent intravenous infusion. Furosemide may be administered by inhalation to infants with chronic lung disease to improve pulmonary mechanics. Furosemide stimulates prostaglandin E2 synthesis, a potent dilator of the patent ductus arteriosus, and the administration of furosemide to any preterm infants should be carefully weighed against the risk of precipitation of a symptomatic patent ductus arteriosus. Infants with low birthweight treated with chronic furosemide are at risk for the development of intra-renal calcifications. PMID:24276421

  5. Portal annular pancreas: a systematic review of a clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Harnoss, Jonathan M; Harnoss, Julian C; Diener, Markus K; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B; Büchler, Markus W; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H

    2014-10-01

    Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF).On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered.In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery).Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option.

  6. Cytochrome P450 structure, function and clinical significance: A review.

    PubMed

    Palrasu, Manikandan; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2017-01-25

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are membrane-bound hemoproteins that play a pivotal role in the detoxification of xenobiotics, cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Induction or inhibition of CYP enzymes is a major mechanism that underlies drug-drug interactions. CYP enzymes can be transcriptionally activated by various xenobiotics and endogenous substrates through receptor-dependent mechanisms. CYP enzyme inhibition is a principal mechanism for metabolism-based drug-drug interactions. Many chemotherapeutic drugs can cause drug interactions due to their ability to either inhibit or induce the CYP enzyme system. Predictions based on in silico analyses followed by validation have identified several microRNAs that regulate CYPs. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic changes in CYP genes may be responsible for inter-individual and inter-ethnic variations in disease susceptibility and the therapeutic efficacy of drugs. Knowledge about the substrates, inducers, inhibitors of CYP isoforms, and the polymorphisms of CYP enzymes may be used as an aid by clinicians to determine therapeutic strategy, and treatment doses for drugs that are metabolized by CYP gene products. The present review is a comprehensive compilation of cytochrome P450 structure, function, pharmacogenetics, and pharmacoepigenetics and clinical significance.

  7. Disinfection of Needleless Connector Hubs: Clinical Evidence Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Needleless connectors (NC) are used on virtually all intravascular devices, providing an easy access point for infusion connection. Colonization of NC is considered the cause of 50% of postinsertion catheter-related infections. Breaks in aseptic technique, from failure to disinfect, result in contamination and subsequent biofilm formation within NC and catheters increasing the potential for infection of central and peripheral catheters. Methods. This systematic review evaluated 140 studies and 34 abstracts on NC disinfection practices, the impact of hub contamination on infection, and measures of education and compliance. Results. The greatest risk for contamination of the catheter after insertion is the NC with 33–45% contaminated, and compliance with disinfection as low as 10%. The optimal technique or disinfection time has not been identified, although scrubbing with 70% alcohol for 5–60 seconds is recommended. Studies have reported statistically significant results in infection reduction when passive alcohol disinfection caps are used (48–86% reduction). Clinical Implications. It is critical for healthcare facilities and clinicians to take responsibility for compliance with basic principles of asepsis compliance, to involve frontline staff in strategies, to facilitate education that promotes understanding of the consequences of failure, and to comply with the standard of care for hub disinfection. PMID:26075093

  8. A Review of Glass-Ionomer Cements for Clinical Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Sharanbir K; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-28

    This article is an updated review of the published literature on glass-ionomer cements and covers their structure, properties and clinical uses within dentistry, with an emphasis on findings from the last five years or so. Glass-ionomers are shown to set by an acid-base reaction within 2-3 min and to form hard, reasonably strong materials with acceptable appearance. They release fluoride and are bioactive, so that they gradually develop a strong, durable interfacial ion-exchange layer at the interface with the tooth, which is responsible for their adhesion. Modified forms of glass-ionomers, namely resin-modified glass-ionomers and glass carbomer, are also described and their properties and applications covered. Physical properties of the resin-modified glass-ionomers are shown to be good, and comparable with those of conventional glass-ionomers, but biocompatibility is somewhat compromised by the presence of the resin component, 2 hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Properties of glass carbomer appear to be slightly inferior to those of the best modern conventional glass-ionomers, and there is not yet sufficient information to determine how their bioactivity compares, although they have been formulated to enhance this particular feature.

  9. Flowable Resin Composites: A Systematic Review and Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about flowable composite materials. Most literature mentions conventional composite materials at large, giving minimal emphasis to flowables in particular. This paper briefly gives an in depth insight to the multiple facets of this versatile material. Aim To exclusively review the most salient features of flowable composite materials in comparison to conventional composites and to give clinicians a detailed understanding of the advantages, drawbacks, indications and contraindications based on composition and physical/mechanical properties. Methodology Data Sources: A thorough literature search from the year 1996 up to January 2015 was done on PubMed Central, The Cochrane Library, Science Direct, Wiley Online Library, and Google Scholar. Grey literature (pending patents, technical reports etc.) was also screened. The search terms used were “dental flowable resin composites”. Search Strategy After omitting the duplicates/repetitions, a total of 491 full text articles were assessed. As including all articles were out of the scope of this paper. Only relevant articles that fulfilled the reviewer’s objectives {mentioning indications, contraindications, applications, assessment of physical/mechanical/biological properties (in vitro/ in vivo /ex vivo)} were considered. A total of 92 full text articles were selected. Conclusion Flowable composites exhibit a variable composition and consequently variable mechanical/ physical properties. Clinicians must be aware of this aspect to make a proper material selection based on specific properties and indications of each material relevant to a particular clinical situation. PMID:26266238

  10. A Comprehensive Review on Clinical Applications of Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekarana, Vidya; Chand, Parkash

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of DNA damage and ineffective repair mechanisms are the underlying bio-molecular events in the pathogenesis of most of the life-threatening diseases like cancer and degenerative diseases. The sources of DNA damage can be either exogenous or endogenous in origin. Imbalance between the oxidants and antioxidants resulting in increased reactive oxygen species mostly accounts for the endogenously derived attacks on DNA. Among the various methods employed in the estimation of DNA damage, alkaline comet assay is proven to be a relatively simple and versatile tool in the assessment of DNA damage and also in determining the efficacy of DNA repair mechanism. The aim of this article is to review the application of comet assay in the field of medicine towards human biomonitoring, understanding the pathogenesis of cancer and progression of chronic and degenerative diseases, prediction of tumour radio & chemosensitivity and in male infertility. A standardized protocol and analysis system of various variants of comet assay in different types of cells, across the labs will be of useful and reliable clinical tool in the field of Medicine for the estimation of levels of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. PMID:25954633

  11. A Review of Glass-Ionomer Cements for Clinical Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Sharanbir K.; Nicholson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    This article is an updated review of the published literature on glass-ionomer cements and covers their structure, properties and clinical uses within dentistry, with an emphasis on findings from the last five years or so. Glass-ionomers are shown to set by an acid-base reaction within 2–3 min and to form hard, reasonably strong materials with acceptable appearance. They release fluoride and are bioactive, so that they gradually develop a strong, durable interfacial ion-exchange layer at the interface with the tooth, which is responsible for their adhesion. Modified forms of glass-ionomers, namely resin-modified glass-ionomers and glass carbomer, are also described and their properties and applications covered. Physical properties of the resin-modified glass-ionomers are shown to be good, and comparable with those of conventional glass-ionomers, but biocompatibility is somewhat compromised by the presence of the resin component, 2 hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Properties of glass carbomer appear to be slightly inferior to those of the best modern conventional glass-ionomers, and there is not yet sufficient information to determine how their bioactivity compares, although they have been formulated to enhance this particular feature. PMID:27367737

  12. Protein alterations in ESCC and clinical implications: a review.

    PubMed

    Lin, D-C; Du, X-L; Wang, M-R

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant histological subtype of esophageal cancer in Asia, characterized by high incidence and mortality rate. Although significant progress has been made in surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, the prognosis of the patients with this cancer still remains poor. Investigation into protein alterations that occurred in tumors can provide clues to discover new biomarkers for improving diagnosis and guiding targeted therapy. Hundreds of papers have appeared over the past several decades concerning protein alterations in ESCC. This review summarizes all the dysregulated proteins investigated in the disease from 187 published papers and analyzes their contributions to tumor development and progression. We document protein alterations associated with tumor metastasis and the transition from normal esophageal epithelia to dysplasia in order to reveal the most useful markers for prediction of clinical outcome, early detection, and identification of high-risk patients for targeted therapies. In particular, we discuss the largest and most rigorous studies on prognostic implications of proteins in ESCC, in which cyclin D1, p53, E-cadherin and VEGF appeared to have the strongest evidence as independent predictors of patient outcome.

  13. Clinical review: Early patient mobilization in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Early mobilization (EM) of ICU patients is a physiologically logical intervention to attenuate critical illness-associated muscle weakness. However, its long-term value remains controversial. We performed a detailed analytical review of the literature using multiple relevant key terms in order to provide a comprehensive assessment of current knowledge on EM in critically ill patients. We found that the term EM remains undefined and encompasses a range of heterogeneous interventions that have been used alone or in combination. Nonetheless, several studies suggest that different forms of EM may be both safe and feasible in ICU patients, including those receiving mechanical ventilation. Unfortunately, these studies of EM are mostly single center in design, have limited external validity and have highly variable control treatments. In addition, new technology to facilitate EM such as cycle ergometry, transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation and video therapy are increasingly being used to achieve such EM despite limited evidence of efficacy. We conclude that although preliminary low-level evidence suggests that EM in the ICU is safe, feasible and may yield clinical benefits, EM is also labor-intensive and requires appropriate staffing models and equipment. More research is thus required to identify current standard practice, optimal EM techniques and appropriate outcome measures before EM can be introduced into the routine care of critically ill patients. PMID:23672747

  14. Clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. A review.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2015-06-01

    Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is very important in anesthetic practice because of its relatively short time to peak analgesic effect and the rapid termination of action after small bolus doses. The objective of this survey is to review the clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. The bibliographic search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases as search engines. In addition, the books Neofax: A manual of drugs used in neonatal care and Neonatal formulary were consulted. Fentanyl is N-dealkylated by CYP3A4 into the inactive norfentanyl. Fentanyl may be administered as bolus doses or as a continuous infusion. In neonates, there is a remarkable interindividual variability in the kinetic parameters. In neonates, fentanyl half-life ranges from 317 minutes to 1266 minutes and in adults it is 222 minutes. Respiratory depression occurs when fentanyl doses are >5 μg/kg. Chest wall rigidity may occur in neonates and occasionally is associated with laryngospasm. Tolerance to fentanyl may develop after prolonged use of this drug. Significant withdrawal symptoms have been reported in infants treated with continuous infusion for 5 days or longer. Fentanyl is an extremely potent analgesic and is the opioid analgesic most frequently used in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  15. Clinical development and review times for new drugs in Japan: associated factors.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, T; Yasuda, K; Kusama, M; Sugiyama, Y; Ono, S

    2010-10-01

    The length of clinical development and review procedures related to new drugs approved in Japan in 2000-2009 were analyzed. The length of time taken for clinical development varied depending on diversification of strategies, and the review times showed a decline during this period. Regression analyses suggested that clinical development times were significantly shorter for non-new molecular entities (non-NMEs), priority reviews, conditional approvals, and drugs utilizing foreign clinical data. The review times were shorter for new drug applications (NDAs) submitted to the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) and for priority reviews. The effects of pre-NDA consultations were mixed; the review time was shorter, but the clinical development period was prolonged.

  16. Evaluation of instruments developed to measure the clinical learning environment: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Hooven, Katie

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the clinical learning environment has a huge impact on student learning. This article reviews current methods available for evaluating the clinical learning environment. Five instruments were identified that measure the clinical learning environment. All of these instruments focus solely on the student perspective of the clinical learning environment. Although gaining student input is important, there are other perspectives that offer valuable insights on the nature of the clinical learning environment. The findings from this integrative review indicate the need for future development and testing of an instrument to evaluate the clinical learning environment from the staff nurse and nurse faculty perspective.

  17. Review of the randomized clinical stroke rehabilitation trials in 2009

    PubMed Central

    Rabadi, Meheroz H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Recent review of the available evidence on interventions for motor recovery after stroke, showed that improvements in recovery of arm function were seen for constraint-induced movement therapy, electromyographic biofeedback, mental practice with motor imagery, and robotics. Similar improvement in transfer ability or balance were seen with repetitive task training, biofeedback, and training with a moving platform. Walking speed was improved by physical fitness training, high-intensity physiotherapy and repetitive task training. However, most of these trials were small and had design limitations. Material/Methods In this article, randomized control trials (RCT’s) published in 2009 of rehabilitation therapies for acute (≤2 weeks), sub-acute (2 to 12 weeks) and chronic (≥12 weeks) stroke was reviewed. A Medline search was performed to identify all RCT’s in stroke rehabilitation in the year 2009. The search strategy that was used for PubMed is presented in the Appendix 1. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of these treatment modalities in stroke rehabilitation. Results This generated 35 RCT’s under 5 categories which were found and analyzed. The methodological quality was assessed by using the PEDro scale for external and internal validity. Conclusions These trials were primarily efficacy studies. Most of these studies enrolled small numbers of patient which precluded their clinical applicability (limited external validity). However, the constraint induced movement therapy (CIT), regularly used in chronic stroke patients did not improve affected arm-hand function when used in acute stroke patients at ≤4 weeks. Intensive CIT did not lead to motor improvement in arm-hand function. Robotic arm treatment helped decrease motor impairment and improved function in chronic stroke patients only. Therapist provided exercise programs (when self-administered by patients during their off-therapy time in a rehabilitation setting) did improve

  18. Craniofacial muscle pain: review of mechanisms and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic surveys of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have demonstrated that a considerable proportion of the population--up to 5% or 6%--will experience persistent pain severe enough to seek treatment. Unfortunately, the current diagnostic classification of craniofacial muscle pain is based on descriptions of signs and symptoms rather than on knowledge of pain mechanisms. Furthermore, the pathophysiology and etiology of craniofacial muscle pain are not known in sufficient detail to allow causal treatment. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain cause-effect relationships; however, it is still uncertain what may be the cause of muscle pain and what is the effect of muscle pain. This article reviews the literature in which craniofacial muscle pain has been induced by experimental techniques in animals and human volunteers and in which the effects on somatosensory and motor function have been assessed under standardized conditions. This information is compared to the clinical correlates, which can be derived from the numerous cross-sectional studies in patients with craniofacial muscle pain. The experimental literature clearly indicates that muscle pain has significant effects on both somatosensory and craniofacial motor function. Typical somatosensory manifestations of experimental muscle pain are referred pain and increased sensitivity of homotopic areas. The craniofacial motor function is inhibited mainly during experimental muscle pain, but phase-dependent excitation is also found during mastication to reduce the amplitude and velocity of jaw movements. The underlying neurobiologic mechanisms probably involve varying combinations of sensitization of peripheral afferents, hyperexcitability of central neurons, and imbalance in descending pain modulatory systems. Reflex circuits in the brain stem seem important for the adjustment of sensorimotor function in the presence of craniofacial pain. Changes in somatosensory and motor function may therefore be

  19. Randomized clinical trials of constitutional acupuncture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Choi, Sun-Mi; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to compile and critically evaluate the evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of acupuncture using constitutional medicine compared to standard acupuncture. Ten databases were searched through to December 2008 without language restrictions. We also hand-searched nine Korean journals of oriental medicine. We included prospective RCTs of any form of acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation. The included trials had to investigate constitutional medicine. There were no restrictions on population characteristics. Forty-one relevant studies were identified, and three RCTs were included. The methodological quality of the trials was variable. One RCT found Sasang constitutional acupuncture to be superior to standard acupuncture in terms of the Unified PD Rating Scale and freezing gate in Parkinson's disease (PD). Another two RCTs reported favorable effects of eight constitutional acupuncture on pain reduction in patients with herniated nucleus pulposi and knee osteoarthritis. Meta-analysis demonstrated positive results for eight constitutional acupuncture compared to standard acupuncture on pain reduction (weighted mean difference: 10 cm VAS, 1.69, 95% CI 0.85-2.54, P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: tau(2) = 0.00, chi(2) = 0.00, P = 0.96, I(2) = 0%). Our results provide suggestive evidence for the effectiveness of constitutional acupuncture in treating pain conditions compared to standard acupuncture. However, the total number of RCTs and the total sample size included in our analysis were too small to draw definite conclusions. Future RCTs should assess larger patient samples with longer treatment periods and appropriate controls.

  20. 77 FR 11555 - Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: Institutional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... assure the protection of the rights and welfare of subjects in clinical investigations. DATES: Submit... the criteria, process, and frequency of continuing review to assure the protection of the rights and welfare of subjects in clinical investigations. The guidance should also help clinical investigators...

  1. Clinical Instructor Characteristics, Behaviors and Skills in Allied Health Care Settings: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Sexton, Patrick; Willeford, K. Sean; Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to compare both clinical instructor and student perceptions of helpful and hindering clinical instructor characteristics, behaviors and skills in athletic training and allied health care settings. Clinical education in athletic training is similar to that of other allied health care professions. Clinical…

  2. Idiopathic Facial Aseptic Granuloma: Review of an Evolving Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, Kristine B; Sheil, Amy T; Fleck, Robert; Schwentker, Ann; Lucky, Anne W

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma (IFAG), originally termed pyodermite froide du visage, describes a generally asymptomatic facial nodule presenting in childhood with clinical resemblance to pyoderma or cystic, granulomatous, or vascular lesions. Clinical understanding is constantly evolving, with recent observations indicating that IFAG may represent a subtype of childhood rosacea. We present a case of IFAG associated with eyelid chalazions in a 19-month-old boy. Although his clinical course paralleled previously reported IFAG cases, we observed a unique ultrasound variation during initial diagnostic examination. Further delineation of clinical, imaging, and histologic properties of IFAG may reveal insights into etiologic associations and ideal management.

  3. Chart Review Skills: A Dimension of Clinical Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Axel A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A study of undergraduate medical students' abilities to identify salient information in reviewing patient charts was conducted at Southern Illinois University. Specific goals were to develop and test a method for assessing chart skills and to test several hypotheses that examine the effect of certain factors on chart review performance.…

  4. Review of clinical and basic approaches of fungal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Zhang, Wen-Song; Zhao, Jing; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Fungal keratitis (FK) is a serious disease which can cause blindness. This review has current information about the pathogenesis, limitations of traditional diagnosis and therapeutic strategies, immune recognition and the diagnosis and therapy of FK. The information of this summary was reviewed regularly and updated as what we need in the diagnosis and therapy of FK nowadays. PMID:27990375

  5. Clinical review: the implications of experimental and clinical studies of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Enrique; Villagrá, Ana; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Blanch, Lluis

    2004-04-01

    Mechanical ventilation can cause and perpetuate lung injury if alveolar overdistension, cyclic collapse, and reopening of alveolar units occur. The use of low tidal volume and limited airway pressure has improved survival in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The use of recruitment maneuvers has been proposed as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation to re-expand collapsed lung tissue. Many investigators have studied the benefits of recruitment maneuvers in healthy anesthetized patients and in patients ventilated with low positive end-expiratory pressure. However, it is unclear whether recruitment maneuvers are useful when patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome are ventilated with high positive end-expiratory pressure, and in the presence of lung fibrosis or a stiff chest wall. Moreover, it is unclear whether the use of high airway pressures during recruitment maneuvers can cause bacterial translocation. This article reviews the intrinsic mechanisms of mechanical stress, the controversy regarding clinical use of recruitment maneuvers, and the interactions between lung infection and application of high intrathoracic pressures.

  6. Supernatural impotence: historical review with anthropological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Margolin, J; Witztum, E

    1989-12-01

    The historical and cultural background of the belief in supernatural impotence is presented, emphasizing its possible implications for clinical practice. A brief historical survey of the concept in Judaism and Christianity is followed by a short anthropological survey of supernatural impotence in different ethnic subcultures in Israel. A case demonstration exemplifies the connection between understanding the patient's cultural background and beliefs and the clinical competence of the therapist. The relationship between the clinical-therapeutic process in psychiatric practice and knowledge of the patient's cultural background and beliefs is stressed.

  7. Assessing walking speed in clinical research: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Graham, James E.; Ostir, Glenn V.; Fisher, Steven R.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To provide a systematic review and describe how assessments of walking speed are reported in the health care literature. Methods MEDLINE electronic database and bibliographies of select articles were searched for terms describing walking speed and distances walked. The search was limited to English language journals from 1996 to 2006. The initial title search yielded 793 articles. A review of the abstracts reduced the number to 154 articles. Of these, 108 provided sufficient information for inclusion in the current review. Results Of the 108 studies included in the review 61 were descriptive, 39 intervention and 8 randomized controlled trials. Neurological (n = 55) and geriatric (n = 27) were the two most frequent participant groups in the studies reviewed. Instruction to walk at a usual or normal speed was reported in 55 of the studies, while 31 studies did not describe speed instructions. A static (standing) start was slightly more common than a dynamic (rolling) start (30 vs 26 studies); however, half of the studies did not describe the starting protocol. Walking 10, 6 and 4 m was the most common distances used, and reported in 37, 20 and 11 studies respectively. Only four studies included information on whether verbal encouragement was given during the walking task. Conclusions Tests of walking speed have been used in a wide range of populations. However, methodologies and descriptions of walking tests vary widely from study to study, which makes comparison difficult. There is a need to find consensus for a standardized walking test methodology. PMID:18462283

  8. The Noonan Syndrome--A Review of the Clinical and Genetic Features of 27 Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Edith; Turner, Gillian

    1973-01-01

    Reviewed were clinical and genetic features of 27 cases of the Noonan Syndrome, a condition with characteristics such as webbing of the neck, short stature, frequent congential heart lesions, and chromosomal irregularities. (DB)

  9. [Review of 1,172 clinical cases with human communication disorders].

    PubMed

    de Díaz, M R; de Pustilnik, N F; Tortolero, Y

    1976-01-01

    The study comprised 1,172 clinical cases that were classified according to sex, age and speech disorders. A review is made on the most common alterations that they present, the selective treatment in each type and their rehabilitation.

  10. The barriers to clinical coding in general practice: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Lusignan, S

    2005-06-01

    Clinical coding is variable in UK general practice. The reasons for this remain undefined. This review explains why there are no readily available alternatives to recording structured clinical data and reviews the barriers to recording structured clinical data. Methods used included a literature review of bibliographic databases, university health informatics departments, and national and international medical informatics associations. The results show that the current state of development of computers and data processing means there is no practical alternative to coding data. The identified barriers to clinical coding are: the limitations of the coding systems and terminologies and the skill gap in their use; recording structured data in the consultation takes time and is distracting; the level of motivation of primary care professionals; and the priority within the organization. A taxonomy is proposed to describe the barriers to clinical coding. This can be used to identify barriers to coding and facilitate the development of strategies to overcome them.

  11. Reproducibility of peer review in clinical neuroscience. Is agreement between reviewers any greater than would be expected by chance alone?

    PubMed

    Rothwell, P M; Martyn, C N

    2000-09-01

    We aimed to determine the reproducibility of assessments made by independent reviewers of papers submitted for publication to clinical neuroscience journals and abstracts submitted for presentation at clinical neuroscience conferences. We studied two journals in which manuscripts were routinely assessed by two reviewers, and two conferences in which abstracts were routinely scored by multiple reviewers. Agreement between the reviewers as to whether manuscripts should be accepted, revised or rejected was not significantly greater than that expected by chance [kappa = 0.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.04 to -0.20] for 179 consecutive papers submitted to Journal A, and was poor (kappa = 0.28, 0.12 to 0. 40) for 116 papers submitted to Journal B. However, editors were very much more likely to publish papers when both reviewers recommended acceptance than when they disagreed or recommended rejection (Journal A, odds ratio = 73, 95% CI = 27 to 200; Journal B, 51, 17 to 155). There was little or no agreement between the reviewers as to the priority (low, medium, or high) for publication (Journal A, kappa = -0.12, 95% CI -0.30 to -0.11; Journal B, kappa = 0.27, 0.01 to 0.53). Abstracts submitted for presentation at the conferences were given a score of 1 (poor) to 6 (excellent) by multiple independent reviewers. For each conference, analysis of variance of the scores given to abstracts revealed that differences between individual abstracts accounted for only 10-20% of the total variance of the scores. Thus, although recommendations made by reviewers have considerable influence on the fate of both papers submitted to journals and abstracts submitted to conferences, agreement between reviewers in clinical neuroscience was little greater than would be expected by chance alone.

  12. Improving clinical practice using clinical decision support systems: a systematic review of trials to identify features critical to success

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Houlihan, Caitlin A; Balas, E Andrew; Lobach, David F

    2005-01-01

    Objective To identify features of clinical decision support systems critical for improving clinical practice. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Literature searches via Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to 2003; and searches of reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. Study selection Studies had to evaluate the ability of decision support systems to improve clinical practice. Data extraction Studies were assessed for statistically and clinically significant improvement in clinical practice and for the presence of 15 decision support system features whose importance had been repeatedly suggested in the literature. Results Seventy studies were included. Decision support systems significantly improved clinical practice in 68% of trials. Univariate analyses revealed that, for five of the system features, interventions possessing the feature were significantly more likely to improve clinical practice than interventions lacking the feature. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified four features as independent predictors of improved clinical practice: automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow (P < 0.00001), provision of recommendations rather than just assessments (P = 0.0187), provision of decision support at the time and location of decision making (P = 0.0263), and computer based decision support (P = 0.0294). Of 32 systems possessing all four features, 30 (94%) significantly improved clinical practice. Furthermore, direct experimental justification was found for providing periodic performance feedback, sharing recommendations with patients, and requesting documentation of reasons for not following recommendations. Conclusions Several features were closely correlated with decision support systems' ability to improve patient care significantly. Clinicians and other stakeholders should implement clinical decision support systems that incorporate these

  13. Clinical review: Bedside lung ultrasound in critical care practice

    PubMed Central

    Bouhemad, Bélaïd; Zhang, Mao; Lu, Qin; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Lung ultrasound can be routinely performed at the bedside by intensive care unit physicians and may provide accurate information on lung status with diagnostic and therapeutic relevance. This article reviews the performance of bedside lung ultrasound for diagnosing pleural effusion, pneumothorax, alveolar-interstitial syndrome, lung consolidation, pulmonary abscess and lung recruitment/derecruitment in critically ill patients with acute lung injury. PMID:17316468

  14. Assessing Violence Risk: A Review and Clinical Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard-Grann, Ulrika

    2007-01-01

    Guidance to identify and manage clients with a perceived high risk for future violence is of great importance for mental health professionals. In the past decade, several structured instruments have been developed to assess risk of future violence. Awareness of the limits and abilities of such instruments is required. This article reviews the most…

  15. Denture adhesive use in complete dentures: clinical recommendations and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Duqum, Ibrahim; Powers, Kendall Ann; Cooper, Lyndon; Felton, David

    2012-01-01

    This literature review sought to determine the advantages and disadvantages of denture adhesive use among complete denture patients. Manuscripts were obtained by searching the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database, Cochrane Collaboration Library, ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry website, and EMBASE database. A total of 85 abstracts were reviewed, and 38 articles that met the inclusion criteria for this review were selected. The inclusion criteria included clinical trials and case series in which 10 or more patients were treated, as well as Cochrane collaboration reviews and in vitro studies where clinical relevance could be determined. The selected manuscripts were reviewed using a standardized manuscript review matrix. Although denture adhesives improve the retention and function of complete dentures, standardized guidelines are needed for the proper use, application, and removal of denture adhesives. Additionally, long-term studies are warranted on the biologic effects of denture adhesives. There is a need to establish a regular recall program for complete denture patients.

  16. Clinical Pharmacology of Citrus bergamia: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Carmen; Navarra, Michele; Calapai, Fabrizio; Squeri, Raffaele; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2017-01-01

    Citrus bergamia Risso et Poiteau ("Bergamot") originated from the Mediterranean ecoregion (southern Italy, Calabria). Bergamot essential oil (BEO) is used in perfumes, cosmetics, and for stress reduction. Juice from C. bergamia has been used for hyperlipidemia. We evaluated literature published on C. bergamia clinical applications. Clinical trials on C. bergamia not combined with other substances, published in English, were searched. We selected ten articles, six describing BEO effects on stress, three reporting effects of polyphenolic fraction of C. bergamia juice in hyperlipidemia and the last describing BEO effects in chronic psoriasis. Clinical studies were analyzed following Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials for herbal therapy. Studies were conducted on small sample sizes and not have high quality level. Analysis indicates that BEO aromatherapy could be safe and useful to reduce stress symptoms. One study suggests its potential supportive role in ultraviolet B therapy against psoriasis. Supplementation with polyphenols from bergamot juice reduces plasma lipids and improves lipoprotein profile in moderate hyperlipidemia. Effectiveness and safety of C. bergamia cannot be definitively drawn because of publication bias and low quality level of the majority of studies. Further large-scale trials with rigorous design are required to define the role of C. bergamia in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Understanding Pica Behavior: A Review for Clinical and Education Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiegler, Lillian N.

    2005-01-01

    Pica is defined as the compulsive, recurrent consumption of nonnutritive items. Pica behavior often occurs in individuals with developmental disabilities; therefore, education and clinical professionals may be required to participate in various aspects of management, including identification, assessment, and treatment. This article will discuss…

  18. 78 FR 55262 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Sponsors, and Institutional Review Boards on Investigational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Institutional Review Boards on Investigational New Drug Applications--Determining Whether Human Research Studies... availability of a guidance for clinical investigators, sponsors, and institutional review boards (IRBs... Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740. Send one...

  19. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  20. 76 FR 80948 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards, and Food and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... developed to promote the initiation of clinical investigations to evaluate the medical devices under FDA's... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration Decisions...

  1. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  2. The Adolescent Health Review: Test of a Computerized Screening Tool in School-Based Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Patricia A.; Beebe, Timothy J.; Funk, Eunkyung; Rancome, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Implemented a computerized screening instrument, the Adolescent Health Review, in urban school-based clinics to test the viability of a stand-alone screening process and its acceptance by patients and providers, examining the relationship between health risks and the stated purpose for the clinic visit. Patients and providers readily accepted the…

  3. Female Pathological Gamblers--A Critical Review of the Clinical Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Hanne Gro; Dahl, Alv A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that more and more women gamble and develop gambling problems and pathological gambling (PG). Research has further indicated that female and male PGs differ in their clinical characteristics. The aim of this study is to do a critical review of the literature concerning clinical characteristics of female pathological…

  4. International nursing students and what impacts their clinical learning: literature review.

    PubMed

    Edgecombe, Kay; Jennings, Michele; Bowden, Margaret

    2013-02-01

    This paper reviews the sparse literature about international nursing students' clinical learning experiences, and also draws on the literature about international higher education students' learning experiences across disciplines as well as nursing students' experiences when undertaking international clinical placements. The paper aims to identify factors that may impact international nursing students' clinical learning with a view to initiating further research into these students' attributes and how to work with these to enhance the students' clinical learning. Issues commonly cited as affecting international students are socialisation, communication, culture, relationships, and unmet expectations and aspirations. International student attributes tend to be included by implication rather than as part of the literature's focus. The review concludes that recognition and valuing of international nursing students' attributes in academic and clinical contexts are needed to facilitate effective strategies to support their clinical practice in new environments.

  5. Clinical review: Vascular access for fluid infusion in children

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Nikolaus A

    2004-01-01

    The current literature on venous access in infants and children for acute intravascular access in the routine situation and in emergency or intensive care settings is reviewed. The various techniques for facilitating venous cannulation, such as application of local warmth, transillumination techniques and epidermal nitroglycerine, are described. Preferred sites for central venous access in infants and children are the external and internal jugular veins, the subclavian and axillary veins, and the femoral vein. The femoral venous cannulation appears to be the most safe and reliable technique in children of all ages, with a high success and low complication rates. Evidence from the reviewed literature strongly supports the use of real-time ultrasound techniques for venous cannulation in infants and children. Additionally, in emergency situations the intraosseous access has almost completly replaced saphenous cutdown procedures in children and has decreased the need for immediate central venous access. PMID:15566619

  6. Hyperuricemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease: clinical review.

    PubMed

    Gudiño Gomezjurado, Álvaro

    2016-11-15

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several risk factors have been associated with the development of these pathologies. However, there is controversy about whether hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease. To answer this question, we performed a recent literature review of relevant published material to assess the association of hyperuricemia with four major cardiovascular diseases: hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

  7. Ameloblastoma: a clinical review and trends in management.

    PubMed

    McClary, Andrew C; West, Robert B; McClary, Ashley C; Pollack, Jonathan R; Fischbein, Nancy J; Holsinger, Christopher F; Sunwoo, John; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Sirjani, Davud

    2016-07-01

    Ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the mandible and maxilla, with multiple histologic variants, and high recurrence rates if improperly treated. The current mainstay of treatment is wide local excision with appropriate margins and immediate reconstruction. Here we review the ameloblastoma literature, using the available evidence to highlight the change in management over the past several decades. In addition, we explore the recent molecular characterization of these tumors which may point towards new potential avenues of personalized treatment.

  8. Clinical applications of glass ionomers in endodontics: a review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan

    2012-10-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are biocompatible and have capacities to release fluoride and to bond to dentine, and thus are appropriate for use in endodontics. This paper reviews the composition and properties of different GICs, including their biocompatibility and antibacterial activity, their applications as intraorifice barriers and root canal sealers, and their use in the repair of root perforations, root-end fillings and temporary coronal restorations.

  9. Depression and Exercise: A Clinical Review and Management Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Elaheh; Memari, Amir Hossein; Hafizi, Sina; Shayestehfar, Monir; Mirfazeli, Fatemeh Sadat; Eshghi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Context: There is an increasing interest to detect how exercise affects depression symptoms. Although recent findings confirm the positive effect of exercise on depression, there is no clear guideline regarding advice on exercise for patients with depression. The following review aims at presenting the contemporary literature regarding the nature of depression, exercise, the underlying mechanisms and the management of an exercise program in individuals with depression. Evidence Acquisition: We searched electronic databases including Cochrane Library, PubMed, ISI web of knowledge and PsychInfo (from January 2000 to October 2014). We reviewed the systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and large-scale randomized control trials on effects of exercise on depression. Results: Recent evidence has emerged on characteristics of effective exercise programs and those patients with depression that will most benefit from the exercise programs. However due to the methodological weaknesses and inconsistencies of studies, conclusions must be made with caution. Conclusions: We have provided a number of recommendations for clinicians and researchers who plan to use exercise protocols in depression. PMID:26448838

  10. The clinical effects of Synsepalum dulcificum: a review.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Kaki B; Hadi, Suwaibah Abd; Sekaran, Muniandy; Pichika, Mallikarjuna Rao

    2014-11-01

    Synsepalum dulcificum or the "miracle fruit" is well known for its taste-modifying ability. The aim of this review was to assess the published medically beneficial as well as potential characteristics of this fruit. A search in three databases, including PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar, was made with appropriate keywords. The resulting articles were screened in different stages based on the title, abstract, and content. A total of nine articles were included in this review. This review summarized the findings of previously published studies on the effects of miracle fruit. The main studied characteristic of the fruit was its effect on the taste receptors, resulting in the sweet sensation when substances with acidic content were ingested. This effect was shown to be related to a glycoprotein called "miraculin." Other beneficial characteristics of this fruit were its antioxidant and anticancer abilities that are due to the various amides existing in the miracle fruit. Apart from the above, the other observed effect of this fruit was its antidiabetic effect that was tested in rats. Further studies should be conducted to establish the findings. The miracle fruit can be a healthy additive due to its unique characteristics, including sour taste sensation modification as well as its antioxidant and antidiabetic effects.

  11. Clinical review: The Israeli experience: conventional terrorism and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Aschkenasy-Steuer, Gabriella; Shamir, Micha; Rivkind, Avraham; Mosheiff, Rami; Shushan, Yigal; Rosenthal, Guy; Mintz, Yoav; Weissman, Charles; Sprung, Charles L; Weiss, Yoram G

    2005-01-01

    Over the past four years there have been 93 multiple-casualty terrorist attacks in Israel, 33 of them in Jerusalem. The Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center is the only Level I trauma center in Jerusalem and has therefore gained important experience in caring for critically injured patients. To do so we have developed a highly flexible operational system for managing the general intensive care unit (GICU). The focus of this review will be on the organizational steps needed to provide operational flexibility, emphasizing the importance of forward deployment of intensive care unit personnel to the trauma bay and emergency room and the existence of a chain of command to limit chaos. A retrospective review of the hospital's response to multiple-casualty terror incidents occurring between 1 October 2000 and 1 September 2004 was performed. Information was assembled from the medical center's trauma registry and from GICU patient admission and discharge records. Patients are described with regard to the severity and type of injury. The organizational work within intensive care is described. Finally, specific issues related to the diagnosis and management of lung, brain, orthopedic and abdominal injuries, caused by bomb blast events associated with shrapnel, are described. This review emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach in caring for these patients. PMID:16277738

  12. Review of methodological issues of clinical trials in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Montalban, Xavier

    2011-12-01

    There are currently six approved disease-modifying therapies available to the physician for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Their efficacy on clinical and radiological parameters has been demonstrated in Phase III pivotal clinical trials over the past two decades. Perceptions of the relative potency of these treatments have been driven principally by the response measured relative to a placebo group. However, efficacy comparisons between trials is of limited value because of differences in study methodology, in characteristics of the patient populations included, in the behaviour of the placebo group during the trial and in the time at which the trial was conducted. Moreover, and most importantly, the assumption that the efficacy observed in clinical trial settings is the same as that achievable in everyday clinical practice is inevitably flawed. Impressions of the relative efficacy of two treatments may differ dramatically depending on whether absolute or relative differences with respect to placebo are compared. Randomised direct comparative trials are therefore the only objective way to evaluate the relative efficacy of two therapies. It is clear that between-treatment differences are difficult to quantify in short-term studies and require large numbers of patients. Long-term outcome is increasingly important to monitor in spite of the inherent methodological limitations in order to establish the safety profile of a potentially lifelong treatment. New disease-modifying treatments for multiple sclerosis will soon be available. Although these are eagerly awaited, their risk-benefit profile, and their place in therapy, will only be adequately understood once real-life and long-term use has been documented as well as it has been for current treatments. Over the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the methodology of clinical trials in multiple sclerosis. Consensual standardised protocols have been designed and validated for Phase II and

  13. Congenital Hemifacial Hyperplasia: Clinical Presentation and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Karpagavalli; Vedam, V K Vaishnavi; Ganapathy, Sivadas; Sathish, Sivan; Satti, Parvathi

    2016-01-01

    Hemifacial hyperplasia is a rare congenital malformation characterized by noticeable unilateral excess development of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in Congenital Hemifacial Hyperplasia (CHH) is usually evident at birth and accentuated at the age of puberty. The affected side grows exponentially as compared to the unaffected side. Multiple tissue involvement has resulted due to etiological heterogeneity like heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions. As this lesion is rarely seen in our routine clinical practice, we present a case of hemifacial hyperplasia with reported orofacial features that supplement existing clinical knowledge. This paper also adds knowledge to the readers regarding detailed investigation procedures which has complemented our diagnosis. Further emphasis has been placed on periodic approach to its diagnosis and multidisciplinary management following correct diagnosis.

  14. LEPROSY NEPHROPATHY: A REVIEW OF CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL FEATURES

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco; Pires, Roberto da Justa; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Meneses, Gdayllon Cavalcante; Araújo, Sônia Maria Holanda Almeida; Barros, Elvino José Guardão

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, highly incapacitating, and with systemic involvement in some cases. Renal involvement has been reported in all forms of the disease, and it is more frequent in multibacillary forms. The clinical presentation is variable and is determined by the host immunologic system reaction to the bacilli. During the course of the disease there are the so called reactional states, in which the immune system reacts against the bacilli, exacerbating the clinical manifestations. Different renal lesions have been described in leprosy, including acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, secondary amyloidosis and pyelonephritis. The exact mechanism that leads to glomerulonephritis in leprosy is not completely understood. Leprosy treatment includes rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine. Prednisone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be used to control acute immunological episodes. PMID:25651321

  15. A clinical review of the treatment of catatonia.

    PubMed

    Sienaert, Pascal; Dhossche, Dirk M; Vancampfort, Davy; De Hert, Marc; Gazdag, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Catatonia is a severe motor syndrome with an estimated prevalence among psychiatric inpatients of about 10%. At times, it is life-threatening especially in its malignant form when complicated by fever and autonomic disturbances. Catatonia can accompany many different psychiatric illnesses and somatic diseases. In order to recognize the catatonic syndrome, apart from thorough and repeated observation, a clinical examination is needed. A screening instrument, such as the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale, can guide the clinician through the neuropsychiatric examination. Although severe and life-threatening, catatonia has a good prognosis. Research on the treatment of catatonia is scarce, but there is overwhelming clinical evidence of the efficacy of benzodiazepines, such as lorazepam, and electroconvulsive therapy.

  16. Clinical characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Bastarahang, Sara; Abbasi, Niloufar; Ghehi, Ghazaleh Sheikhi; Farhadbakhtiarian, Sara; Arezi, Parastoo; Hosseini, Mahsa; Baravati, Sholeh Zaeemi; Jokar, Zahra; Chermahin, Sara Ganji

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are known as clustering Gram-positive cocci, nonmotile, non-spore forming facultatively anaerobic that classified in two main groups, coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative. Staphylococcus epidermidis with the highest percentage has the prominent role among coagulase-negative Staphylococci that is the most important reason of clinical infections. Due to various virulence factors and unique features, this microorganism is respected as a common cause of nosocomial infections. Because of potential ability in biofilm formation and colonization in different surfaces, also using of medical implant devices in immunocompromised and hospitalized patients the related infections have been increased. In recent decades the clinical importance and the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strains have created many challenges in the treatment process. PMID:25285267

  17. Female Pattern Hair Loss: a clinical and pathophysiological review*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Paulo Müller; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Female Pattern Hair Loss or female androgenetic alopecia is the main cause of hair loss in adult women and has a major impact on patients' quality of life. It evolves from the progressive miniaturization of follicles that lead to a subsequent decrease of the hair density, leading to a non-scarring diffuse alopecia, with characteristic clinical, dermoscopic and histological patterns. In spite of the high frequency of the disease and the relevance of its psychological impact, its pathogenesis is not yet fully understood, being influenced by genetic, hormonal and environmental factors. In addition, response to treatment is variable. In this article, authors discuss the main clinical, epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects of female pattern hair loss. PMID:26375223

  18. Congenital Hemifacial Hyperplasia: Clinical Presentation and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugasundaram, Karpagavalli; Ganapathy, Sivadas; Sathish, Sivan; Satti, Parvathi

    2016-01-01

    Hemifacial hyperplasia is a rare congenital malformation characterized by noticeable unilateral excess development of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in Congenital Hemifacial Hyperplasia (CHH) is usually evident at birth and accentuated at the age of puberty. The affected side grows exponentially as compared to the unaffected side. Multiple tissue involvement has resulted due to etiological heterogeneity like heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions. As this lesion is rarely seen in our routine clinical practice, we present a case of hemifacial hyperplasia with reported orofacial features that supplement existing clinical knowledge. This paper also adds knowledge to the readers regarding detailed investigation procedures which has complemented our diagnosis. Further emphasis has been placed on periodic approach to its diagnosis and multidisciplinary management following correct diagnosis. PMID:27843653

  19. Compressed sensing MRI: a review of the clinical literature

    PubMed Central

    Jaspan, Oren N; Fleysher, Roman

    2015-01-01

    MRI is one of the most dynamic and safe imaging techniques available in the clinic today. However, MRI acquisitions tend to be slow, limiting patient throughput and limiting potential indications for use while driving up costs. Compressed sensing (CS) is a method for accelerating MRI acquisition by acquiring less data through undersampling of k-space. This has the potential to mitigate the time-intensiveness of MRI. The limited body of research evaluating the effects of CS on MR images has been mostly positive with regards to its potential as a clinical tool. Studies have successfully accelerated MRI with this technology, with varying degrees of success. However, more must be performed before its diagnostic efficacy and benefits are clear. Studies involving a greater number radiologists and images must be completed, rating CS based on its diagnostic efficacy. Also, standardized methods for determining optimal imaging parameters must be developed. PMID:26402216

  20. A Clinical Review of the Treatment of Catatonia

    PubMed Central

    Sienaert, Pascal; Dhossche, Dirk M.; Vancampfort, Davy; De Hert, Marc; Gazdag, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Catatonia is a severe motor syndrome with an estimated prevalence among psychiatric inpatients of about 10%. At times, it is life-threatening especially in its malignant form when complicated by fever and autonomic disturbances. Catatonia can accompany many different psychiatric illnesses and somatic diseases. In order to recognize the catatonic syndrome, apart from thorough and repeated observation, a clinical examination is needed. A screening instrument, such as the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale, can guide the clinician through the neuropsychiatric examination. Although severe and life-threatening, catatonia has a good prognosis. Research on the treatment of catatonia is scarce, but there is overwhelming clinical evidence of the efficacy of benzodiazepines, such as lorazepam, and electroconvulsive therapy. PMID:25538636

  1. Intravenous iron in digestive diseases: a clinical (re)view

    PubMed Central

    Gomollón, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P.; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous iron has been considered dangerous by many clinicians. In the last two decades, considerable experience has been gained with new formulations in different clinical settings. Data from clinical trials, observational studies, and postmarketing surveillance studies demonstrate that intravenous iron is safe and effective to treat iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. Iron deficiency is particularly common in many digestive diseases: oral iron often fails while transfusions are not without considerable risks. In particular, in inflammatory bowel diseases, there is enough evidence to recommend intravenous iron in moderate-to-severe iron deficiency anaemia, in intolerance to oral iron, and in patients needing quick recovery (pre-operative setting). New formulations make treatment even easier and more convenient. Recent guidelines are available for inflammatory bowel diseases, and new guidelines in acute and chronic gastrointestinal bleeding are needed. PMID:23251730

  2. The survey of clinical human experimentation research in ethical review of postgraduates students.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifan; Zhu, Zheng; Wang, Liyu

    2012-06-01

    An anonymous questionnaire was used to investigate the status quo of ethics review of human subject experiments among postgraduate students in clinical practice with the main conclusions as follows: Human subject experiments make up a large ratio of clinical research; the construction of an ethics review has been initially formulated, but there exists a gap in ethics awareness between advisors and the postgraduates with the desperate need to receive ethics review. It is necessary to realize the importance of informed consent and to strengthen the strict supervision of placebo application.

  3. Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Delineation: A Systematic Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    specialist. Clinical Nurse Specialist. 1(Summer 1987) 81 - 84. 11. Hodson, D.M., The evolving role of advanced practice nurses in surgery AORN Journal 67...The evolving role of advanced practice nurses in surgery . AORN Journal, 67(5), 998-1009. Hulley, S. B., Cummings, S .R., Browner, W. S., Grady, D...Montana. State of Montana Laws, Statutes & Regulations 1996 Jul; 228 p. These nurses are trained to perform minor surgery . Same-Day Surgery 2004 Mar; 28

  4. Guidelines for clinical use of CBCT: a review

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, L; Taylor, K; Glenny, A-M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify guidelines on the clinical use of CBCT in dental and maxillofacial radiology, in particular selection criteria, to consider how they were produced, to appraise their quality objectively and to compare their recommendations. Methods: A literature search using MEDLINE (Ovid®) was undertaken prospectively from 1 January 2000 to identify published material classifiable as “guidelines” pertaining to the use of CBCT in dentistry. This was supplemented by searches on websites, an internet search engine, hand searching of theses and by information from personal contacts. Quality assessment of publications was performed using the AGREE II instrument. Publications were examined for areas of agreement and disagreement. Results: 26 publications were identified, 11 of which were specifically written to give guidelines on the clinical use of CBCT and contained sections on selection criteria. The remainder were a heterogeneous mixture of publications that included guidelines relating to CBCT. Two had used a formal evidence-based approach for guideline development and two used consensus methods. The quality of publications was frequently low as assessed using AGREE II, with many lacking evidence of adequate methodology. There was broad agreement between publications on clinical use, apart from treatment planning, in implant dentistry. Conclusions: Reporting of guideline development is often poorly presented. Guideline development panels should aim to perform and report their work using the AGREE II instrument as a template to raise standards and avoid the risk of suspicions of bias. PMID:25270063

  5. Paranasal sinuses malignancies: A 12-year review of clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sarafraz, Alireza; Chamani, Mojtaba; Derakhshandeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Inadequate epidemiologic investigations of the paranasal sinuses malignancies prompted this retrospective study with special emphasis on a major group of 111 tumors. Material and Methods Clinical records of 111 patients with histologically confirmed malignant tumors of the paranasal sinuses were investigated retrospectively from April 2000 to January 2012. Collection of data included demographic information, clinical manifestations, treatment plans, and histopathology of the tumor. Results There were 69 (62.16%) male and 42 (37.83%) female patients (male-to-female ratio of 1.6:1), with a median age of 49±12.2 years (range 21 to 88 years). A high level of occurrence was noticed in the fifth (26.3%) decade of life. The most frequent histological types were squamous cell carcinoma (43.5%) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (19%). Among clinical manifestations, nasal obstruction was the most frequent followed by diplopia, and facial swelling. Fifty three patients (47.74%) were treated with combined approach of surgery and radiation therapy. Conclusions Paranasal sinuses malignancies are rare conditions with nonspecific symptoms which make early diagnosis of the lesions more challenging. The optimal therapeutic protocol for patients suffering from these tumors is still a somewhat controversial entity and requires further studies. Key words:Paranasal sinuses, malignancy, surgery,radiotherapy. PMID:27475693

  6. A Systematic Review on the Designs of Clinical Technology: Findings and Recommendations for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    PhD, Greg Alexander; Staggers, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Human factors (HF) studies are increasingly important as technology infuses into clinical settings. No nursing research reviews exist in this area. The authors conducted a systematic review on designs of clinical technology, 34 articles with 50 studies met inclusion criteria. Findings were classified into three categories based on HF research goals. The majority of studies evaluated effectiveness of clinical design; efficiency was fewest. Current research ranges across many interface types examined with no apparent pattern or obvious rationale. Future research should expand types, settings, participants; integrate displays; and expand outcome variables. PMID:19707093

  7. [Review of the 2008 revision of the ethical guidelines for clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Imoto, Masakatsu

    2010-05-01

    The ethical guidelines for clinical studies were revised in 2008 and enforced in April 2009. This was the second revision but first regular revision and largely reviewed. In particular, articles under the purview of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for clinical studies are reviewed and enhanced. This additional role further increases the authority of the IRB, and those who fix the IRB must exhibit the activity of the IRB to the public and report to the MHLW annually. The provision of compensation for clinical studies on the evaluation of drugs and medical devices has been added to this version of the ethical guidelines. The compensation for interventional clinical studies using drugs and medical devices has not yet been decided, similar to "chiken," which is defined in pharmaceutical affairs laws (PAL). Since April 2009, some insurance offices have started offering special insurance covers for clinical studies. New registration rules have been established for clinical studies. Moreover, there is now a database for clinical study registration called "Japan Primary Registries Network (JPRN)," which is certified by WHO. This database comprises 3 open databases, which were originally independent, related to clinical trials in Japan. They are however under the purview of the National Institute of Public Health. This institution works in collaboration with the "International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP)" of WHO.

  8. Clinical Judgement in Context: A Review of Situational Factors in Person Perception during Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Tony

    1985-01-01

    Argues that the basic psychological processes involved in clinical judgment can be compared with those involved in everyday social judgment. Summarizes evidence on the sophistication and complexity of clinical judgment and on the likely impact on it of several factors. (Author/RH)

  9. Paediatric lung recruitment: a review of the clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Jauncey-Cooke, Jacqui; East, Chris E; Bogossian, Fiona

    2015-03-01

    Lung recruitment is used as an adjunct to lung protective ventilation strategies. Lung recruitment is a brief, deliberate elevation of transpulmonary pressures beyond what is achieved during tidal ventilation levels. The aim of lung recruitment is to maximise the number of alveoli participating in gas exchange particularly in distal and dependant regions of the lung. This may improve oxygenation and end expiratory levels. Restoration of end expiratory levels and stabilisation of the alveoli may reduce the incidence of ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). Various methods of lung recruitment have been studied in adult and experimental populations. This review aims to establish the evidence for lung recruitment in the pediatric population.

  10. Pathogenic free-living amoebae: epidemiology and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, H; Dendana, F; Sellami, A; Sellami, H; Cheikhrouhou, F; Neji, S; Makni, F; Ayadi, A

    2012-12-01

    Free-living amoebae are widely distributed in soil and water. Small number of them was implicated in human disease: Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris and Sappinia diploidea. Some of the infections were opportunistic, occurring mainly in immunocompromised hosts (Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia encephalitis) while others are non opportunistic (Acanthamoeba keratitis, Naegleria meningoencephalitis and some cases of Balamuthia encephalitis). Although, the number of infections caused by these amoebae is low, their diagnosis was still difficult to confirm and so there was a higher mortality, particularly, associated with encephalitis. In this review, we present some information about epidemiology, ecology and the types of diseases caused by these pathogens amoebae.

  11. Clinical and histopathological review of 229 cases of ranula.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yulin; Zhao, Yifang; Chen, Xinming

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the relationship between the thrombosis and secretory duct dilation, lesion size, clinical types, nature (primary or recurrent) and duration of illness in the development of ranula. A total of 229 cases of sublingual gland cysts were treated with surgical resection from Jan. 1990 to Feb. 2010. The patients' data were investigated on histopathological findings, size of ranula, the clinical types, nature of ranula (primary or recurrent) and duration of illness. Sections from the paraffin-embedded blocks were HE-stained. CK expression was immunohistochemically detected. Among 229 cases the incidence of venous thrombosis was 58.52%. The incidence of venous thrombosis with or without duct dilation was 73.25% and 26.39% respectively, with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.005). The incidence of venous thrombosis of ranulas with diameter larger or less than 3 cm was 72.22% and 46.28% (P<0.005). The incidence of venous thrombosis of oral ranula, plunging ranula and mixed ranula was 49.37%, 77.19% and 85.71% respectively, with a significant difference found between oral and plunging or mixed ranula (P<0.01). The incidence of venous thrombosis in ranula patients with duration of illness longer or less than 3 months was 69.77% and 51.75% (P<0.01). The incidence of venous thrombosis with recurrent and primary ranulas was 51.85% and 64.85%, without a significant difference noted between them (P>0.05). It is concluded that the formation of venous thrombosis was related to the dilation of secretory duct, lesion size, clinical types, duration of lesion but formation of venous thrombosis was not related to the nature (primary or recurrent) of ranulas.

  12. Clinical manifestations of Kingella kingae infections: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Morrison, V A; Wagner, K F

    1989-01-01

    A patient with antecedent coccidioidal pulmonary cavitary disease who developed an empyema due to Kingella kingae prompted our analysis of the literature regarding this unusual bacterial pathogen. Formerly classified among other genera and considered a nonpathogen, K. kingae has been increasingly recognized as a cause of human infection. While the most commonly diagnosed infections due to this organism are endocarditis and septic arthritis, there have also been isolated reports of bacteremia, diskitis, abscesses, meningitis, and oropharyngeal infections. The treatment of choice is penicillin, to which K. kingae strains are uniformly susceptible. Recognition of the potential pathogenicity of this microorganism in appropriate clinical settings will probably result in more prompt and specific therapy.

  13. Myelitis and Lupus: Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis and Treatment. Review.

    PubMed

    Chiganer, Edson Hernán; Hryb, Javier Pablo; Carnero Contentti, Edgar

    2016-08-23

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects multiple systems. Myelopathy is one of 19 neuropsychiatric syndromes related to SLE defined by the American College of Rheumatology. Although infrequent, it is a severe manifestation, leading to motor and sensory deficits, and sphincter dysfunction. The pathogenesis is not clearly known, but may be related to arterial thrombosis and vasculitis. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings, laboratory tests and the use of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. The standard therapy is the combination of intravenous cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids. In refractory disease, other treatments such as plasmapheresis or rituximab have been used.

  14. Desloratadine for chronic idiopathic urticaria: a review of clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    DuBuske, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is a disabling affliction that considerably limits patients' daily activities and interferes with sleep. Clinical studies have shown that histamine H1-receptor antagonists (antihistamines) are highly effective for inhibiting the hives/wheals and pruritus associated with CIU, as well as improving patients' quality of life. Desloratadine is a rapid-acting, once-daily, nonsedating selective H1-receptor antagonist/inverse receptor agonist with proven clinical efficacy in patients with CIU. It has 10-20 times the in vivo H1 receptor-binding affinity of loratadine, its parent compound, and 52-194 times the H1 receptor-binding affinity of cetirizine, ebastine, loratadine, and fexofenadine. Desloratadine displays linear pharmacokinetics after oral administration. Age and sex have no apparent effect on the drug's metabolism and elimination, and food does not affect its bioavailability or absorption. Desloratadine also exerts anti-inflammatory effects via mechanisms that are independent of H1-receptor antagonism. Results from randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of 6 weeks' duration in adults and adolescents with moderate-to-severe CIU indicate that desloratadine significantly minimizes the severity of pruritus, reduces the number and size of hives, and improves disease-impaired sleep and daily activities. Improvements were noted after a single dose of desloratadine and were maintained over 6 weeks of treatment. Desloratadine was safe and well tolerated in clinical trials of patients with CIU. The adverse effect profile of desloratadine in adults, as well as in children aged from 6 months to 11 years, is comparable to that of placebo. Evaluations of cognitive and psychomotor performance in adults indicate no impairment of function with dosages of desloratadine 5 mg/day. In conclusion, desloratadine is an important therapeutic option for prompt and enduring symptom relief in patients with moderate-to-severe CIU. In addition

  15. Clinical Anatomy of the Liver: Review of the 19th Meeting of the Japanese Research Society of Clinical Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Kokudo, Norihiro; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Akita, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Precise clinical knowledge of liver anatomy is required to safely perform a hepatectomy, for both open and laparoscopic surgery. At the 19th meeting of the Japanese Research Society of Clinical Anatomy (JRSCA), we conducted special symposia on essential issues of liver surgery, such as the history of hepatic segmentation, the glissonean pedicle approach, application of 3-D imaging simulation and fluorescent imaging using indocyanine green solution, a variety of segmentectomies including caudate lobectomy, the associating liver partition and portal vein embolization for stage hepatectomy and harvesting liver grafts for living donor liver transplantation. The present review article provides useful information for liver surgeons and anatomic researchers. PMID:28275581

  16. Cangrelor: a review on pharmacology and clinical trial development.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Muñiz-Lozano, Ana; Cho, Jung Rae; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2013-10-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and an oral ADP P2Y12 receptor antagonist is the standard-of-care for the prevention of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, currently available ADP P2Y12 receptor antagonists have several limitations, such as interindividual response variability, drug-drug interactions, slow onset/offset and only oral availability. Cangrelor is a reversible, potent, intravenous, competitive inhibitor of the ADP P2Y12 receptor that rapidly achieves near complete and predictable platelet inhibition. Along with reversible binding to the receptor cangrelor also has a very short half-life (3-5 min), which in turn results in a rapid offset of action. These properties make cangrelor a promising drug for clinical use in patients undergoing PCI or patients waiting for major surgery but still require antiplatelet protection. This manuscript provides an update of the current status of knowledge on cangrelor, focusing on its pharmacologic properties and clinical trial development, including the BRIDGE and CHAMPION-PHOENIX trials.

  17. Feline Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Clinical Manifestations and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Ozgur; Duda, Lili; Sánchez, Melissa D; Lewis, John R

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most commonly encountered malignant oral tumor in cats. The etiology of this locally invasive tumor is likely multifactorial. Several risk factors have been identified, including the use of flea collars, and a history of feeding canned food and canned tuna. Clinical signs vary depending on tumor location. The tumor commonly arises from the gingiva and mucosa of the maxilla, mandible, tongue, sublingual area, or tonsillar region. Maxillary SCC commonly presents clinically as an ulcerative lesion, whereas mandibular SCC is commonly proliferative, expansile, and firm. Lingual/sublingual SCC may be ulcerative, necrotic, infiltrative, or proliferative. In general, feline oral SCC is an invasive and malignant neoplasm regardless of its location. Surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and combinations thereof have been attempted with rarely a satisfactory response. Currently, cures are obtained only in a small subset of cats whose tumors are amenable to complete resection, or where resection with microscopic residual disease is followed by definitive radiation therapy. A multimodal treatment approach likely offers the best chance of success. For cats with advanced disease, palliative care may improve patients' quality of life, albeit transiently. Sequelae associated with tumor progression and local tissue destruction often result in euthanasia of feline patients with oral SCC.

  18. Molar incisor hypomineralization: review and recommendations for clinical management.

    PubMed

    William, Vanessa; Messer, Louise B; Burrow, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) describes the clinical picture of hypomineralization of systemic origin affecting one or more first permanent molars (FPMs) that are associated frequently with affected incisors. Etiological associations with systemic conditions or environmental insults during the child's first 3 years have been implicated. The complex care involved in treating affected children must address their behavior and anxiety, aiming to provide a durable restoration under pain-free conditions. The challenges include adequate anaesthesia, suitable cavity design, and choice of restorative materials. Restorations in hypomineralized molars appear to fail frequently; there is little evidence-based literature to facilitate clinical decisions on cavity design and material choice. A 6-step approach to management is described: (1) risk identification; (2) early diagnosis; (3) remineralization and desensitization; (4) prevention of caries and posteruption breakdown; (5) restorations and extractions; and (6) maintenance. The high prevalence of MIH indicates the need for research to clarify etiological factors and improve the durability of restorations in affected teeth. The purpose of this paper was to describe the diagnosis, prevalence, putative etiological factors, and features of hypomineralized enamel in molar incisor hypomineralization and to present a sequential approach to management.

  19. IMMUNOGENETIC FACTORS INFLUENCING CLINICAL COURSE OF HCV INFECTION (REVIEW).

    PubMed

    Kamkamidze, G; Butsashvili, M; Gendzekhadze, K

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains one of the most important blood-borne diseases worldwide with about 130-170 million people chronically infected with hepatitis C virus, and more than 350 000 people die from hepatitis C-related liver diseases each year. Infection with HCV becomes chronic in approximately 80% of cases, while in up to 20% of cases hepatitis C virus is cleared from the human organism. Chronic infections of hepatitis C often leads to the end-stage liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The clinical course and the outcome of the HCV infection is determined by the complex interplay between the viral replication and the host defense mechanisms. Several recent studies have shown that MHC class I and class II as well as natural killer (NK) cell's immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) loci can be associated with the HCV protection and clearance as well as with disease progression and responsiveness to antiviral treatment. Current status of our knowledge about the influence of immunogenetic factors on the clinical course of HCV infection is presented in the paper. Plans to investigate these factors among HCV infected patients enrolled in the HCV Elimination Program (launched in April 2015 in Georgia) are discussed.

  20. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a clinical review including Korean cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Only 5th decade ago, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was only recognized as disease group of presenting features like peripheral lymphocytosis, organomegaly including of splenomegaly. As understanding of disease biology and molecular diagnostic tools are getting improved gradually, characterization of variation in CLL’s clinical courses was facilitated, resulting in better risk stratification and targeted treatments. Consequently multiple new targeted agents have been used in treatment of CLL, it makes improved clinical outcome. Rituximab containing chemoimmunotherapy (combination of rituximab, fludarabine, and cyclophosphamide) have shown better overall response rate and progression-free survival on fit patients’ group in front-line setting, result in standard first-line therapeutic option for CLL. Furthermore, after introducing that the B-cell receptor is crucial for the evolution and progression of CLL, emerging treatments targeting highly activated surface antigens and oncogenic signaling pathways have been associated with several successes in recent decades. These include new anti-CD 20 monoclonal antibody (obinutuzumab), the bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor (ibrutinib), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor (idelalisib), and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 inhibitor (ABT-199 and ABT-263). So, we discuss not only general pathophysiology of CLL, but also rapidly advancing treatment strategies that are being studied or approved for treatment of CLL. PMID:27044858

  1. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists.

  2. E-recruitment based clinical research: notes for Research Ethics Committees/Institutional Review Boards.

    PubMed

    Refolo, P; Sacchini, D; Minacori, R; Daloiso, V; Spagnolo, A G

    2015-01-01

    Patient recruitment is a critical point of today's clinical research. Several proposals have been made for improving it, but the effectiveness of these measures is actually uncertain. The use of Internet (e-recruitment) could represent a great chance to improve patient enrolment, even though the effectiveness of this implementation is not so evident. E-recruitment could bring some advantages, such as better interaction between clinical research demand and clinical research supply, time and resources optimization, and reduction of data entry errors. It raises some issues too, such as sampling errors, validity of informed consent, and protection of privacy. Research Ethics Committees/Institutional Review Boards should consider these critical points. The paper deals with Internet recruitment for clinical research. It also attempts to provide Research Ethics Committees/Institutional Review Boards with notes for assessing e-recruitment based clinical protocols.

  3. A Review of Clinical Data for Currently Approved Hysteroscopic Sterilization Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Basinski, Cindy M

    2010-01-01

    Two hysteroscopic permanent sterilization procedures are approved for use in the United States: Essure® Permanent Birth Control System (Conceptus Incorporated, Mountain View, CA) and Adiana® Permanent Contraception (Hologic, Inc., Bedford, MA). This review compares the clinical trial data for these procedures. A notable difference is the resultant clinical pregnancy risk. The clinical trials for the Essure procedure have reported no pregnancies in 643 relying women in the 9 years since initiation of the studies. The clinical trial for the Adiana procedure has reported 12 pregnancies in 570 relying women in nearly 5 years of collected data. Other clinical outcome parameters concerning Essure and Adiana are examined in this review. PMID:21364861

  4. Trauma-induced coagulopathy--a review of the systematic reviews: is there sufficient evidence to guide clinical transfusion practice?

    PubMed

    Curry, Nicola; Stanworth, Simon; Hopewell, Sally; Dorée, Carolyn; Brohi, Karim; Hyde, Chris

    2011-07-01

    Systematic reviews are accepted as a robust and less biased means of appraising and synthesizing results from high-quality studies. This report collated and summarized all the systematic review evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of trauma-related coagulopathy and transfusion, thereby covering the widest possible body of literature. We defined 4 key clinical questions: (1) What are the best methods of predicting and diagnosing trauma-related coagulopathy? (2) Which methods of clinical management correct coagulopathy? (3) Which methods of clinical management correct bleeding? and (4) What are the outcomes of transfusion in trauma? Thirty-seven systematic reviews were identified through searches of MEDLINE (1950-July 2010), EMBASE (1980-July 2010), The Cochrane Library (Issue 7, 2010), National Guidelines Clearing House, National Library for Health Guidelines Finder, and UKBTS SRI Transfusion Evidence Library (www.transfusionevidencelibrary.com). The evidence from the systematic review literature was scanty with many gaps, and we were not able to conclusively answer any of our 4 questions. Much more needs to be understood about how coagulopathy and bleeding in trauma are altered by transfusion practices and, most importantly, whether this translates into improved survival. There is a need for randomized controlled trials to answer these questions. The approach described in this report provides a framework for incorporating new evidence.

  5. Clinical and Oral Implications of Dengue Fever: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Roopashri, G; Vaishali, M R; David, Maria Priscilla; Baig, Muqeet; Navneetham, Anuradha; Venkataraghavan, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a viral infection with fatal potential complications. It is also called as break-bone fever. Worldwide dengue infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease. It is caused by vector Aedesa egypti and represents a major public health issue in more than 100 tropical countries. The word dengue is obtained from Swahili phrase Ka-dinga pepo meaning “cramplikeseizure.” Dengue viral infections are characterized by abrupt febrile illness, but can also lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Hence, it requires an early and correct diagnosis. Gingival bleeding is the most common oral manifestation of dengue infection. Although oral lesions are uncommon in dengue infections and if manifested, may be mistaken for bleeding disorders. This review emphasizes the significance of oral lesions as it may be the early indicators of dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25859113

  6. School nurse survival: reviewing clinical skills in the simulation laboratory.

    PubMed

    McKee, Sue; Bultas, Margaret; Ahearn, Tina

    2011-07-01

    School nursing is a specialty that requires nurses to provide holistic health care to a diverse population. Federal disability laws make it necessary for the school nurse to maintain and competently perform higher level technical skills--outside the home or hospital setting. Skills include tracheotomy care, gastric tube care, urinary catheterizations, central line care, oxygen delivery, ostomy care, and advanced assessment skills. How do school nurses maintain these skills if they are not used frequently enough to assure competency? The authors' college of nursing and a school outreach department have partnered to offer an annual school nurse conference. One option for participants is to use the simulation laboratory to refresh these skills and to review newer equipment and technology. The simulation laboratory staff and pediatric faculty are available to demonstrate and assist participants with skills technique. Participants have responded positively to this collaborative effort.

  7. Caring for critically ill oldest old patients: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Nicola; Tibullo, Loredana; Landi, Emanuela; Carifi, Giovanni; Pirone, Alfonso; Pippo, Antonio; Alviggi, Immacolata; Tizzano, Renato; Salsano, Elisa; Di Grezia, Francesco; Vargas, Maria

    2016-10-19

    Despite technological advances, the mortality rate for critically ill oldest old patients remains high. The intensive caring should be able to combine technology and a deep humanity considering that the patients are living the last part of their lives. In addition to the traditional goals of ICU of reducing morbidity and mortality, of maintaining organ functions and restoring health, caring for seriously oldest old patients should take into account their end-of-life preferences, the advance or proxy directives if available, the prognosis, the communication, their life expectancy and the impact of multimorbidity. The aim of this review was to focus on all these aspects with an emphasis on some intensive procedures such as mechanical ventilation, noninvasive mechanical ventilation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, renal replacement therapy, hemodynamic support, evaluation of delirium and malnutrition in this heterogeneous frail ICU population.

  8. Radium-223 dichloride in clinical practice: a review.

    PubMed

    Florimonte, Luigia; Dellavedova, Luca; Maffioli, Lorenzo Stefano

    2016-09-01

    The onset of skeletal metastases is typical of advanced-stage prostate cancer and requires a multidisciplinary approach to alleviate bone pain and try to delay disease progression. The current therapeutic armamentarium includes conventional analgesics, chemotherapeutic agents, immunotherapy, androgen-deprivation therapy, osteoclast inhibitors (bisphosphonates, denosumab), surgical interventions, external-beam radiotherapy and radionuclide metabolic therapy. Many studies in recent decades have demonstrated the efficacy of various radiopharmaceuticals, including strontium-89 and samarium-153, for palliation of pain from diffuse skeletal metastases, but no significant benefit in terms of disease progression and overall survival has been shown. The therapeutic landscape of metastatic skeletal cancer significantly changed after the introduction of radium-223, the first bone-homing radiopharmaceutical with disease-modifying properties. In this paper we extensively review the literature on the use of radium-223 dichloride in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  9. The role of Citrobacter in clinical disease of children: review.

    PubMed

    Doran, T I

    1999-02-01

    Various species of Citrobacter may cause infections in neonates and immunocompromised hosts. Citrobacter koseri (formerly Citrobacter diversus) is best known as the cause of sepsis and meningitis leading to central nervous system (CNS) abscesses in neonates and young infants. Early onset and late-onset infections occur as for other neonatal bacterial infections. The majority of cases are sporadic, with no clear source of infection. A few have been confirmed to be vertically transmitted, and nosocomial outbreaks have occurred in neonatal care units. The pathophysiology is not well understood, but a surface protein has been identified as a possible virulence factor among strains that cause citrobacter brain abscesses in neonates. Despite improvements in diagnostic imaging techniques, surgery, and antibiotic therapy, approximately one-third of infants with abscesses die, and one-half sustain CNS damage. In this article, the taxonomy, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of citrobacter disease in children are reviewed.

  10. Clinical review: Update of avian influenza A infections in humans

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, Christian; Kelly, Terra

    2007-01-01

    Influenza A viruses have a wide host range for infection, from wild waterfowl to poultry to humans. Recently, the cross-species transmission of avian influenza A, particularly subtype H5N1, has highlighted the importance of the non-human subtypes and their incidence in the human population has increased over the past decade. During cross-species transmission, human disease can range from the asymptomatic to mild conjunctivitis to fulminant pneumonia and death. With these cases, however, the risk for genetic change and development of a novel virus increases, heightening the need for public health and hospital measures. This review discusses the epidemiology, host range, human disease, outcome, treatment, and prevention of cross-transmission of avian influenza A into humans. PMID:17419881

  11. Fragile X syndrome: A review of clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Reymundo; Azarang, Atoosa; Wilaisakditipakorn, Tanaporn; Hagerman, Randi J

    2016-01-01

    Summary The fragile X mental retardation 1 gene, which codes for the fragile X mental retardation 1 protein, usually has 5 to 40 CGG repeats in the 5′ untranslated promoter. The full mutation is the almost always the cause of fragile X syndrome (FXS). The prevalence of FXS is about 1 in 4,000 to 1 in 7,000 in the general population although the prevalence varies in different regions of the world. FXS is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to many targeted treatments, but none have cured this disorder. The treatment of the medical problems and associated behaviors remain the most useful intervention for children with FXS. In this review, we focus on the non-pharmacological and pharmacological management of medical and behavioral problems associated with FXS as well as current recommendations for follow-up and surveillance. PMID:27672537

  12. Clinical, Molecular, and Genetic Characteristics of PAPA Syndrome: A Review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elisabeth J; Allantaz, Florence; Bennett, Lynda; Zhang, Dongping; Gao, Xiaochong; Wood, Geryl; Kastner, Daniel L; Punaro, Marilynn; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pascual, Virginia; Wise, Carol A

    2010-11-01

    PAPA syndrome (Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, and Acne) is an autosomal dominant, hereditary auto-inflammatory disease arising from mutations in the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 gene on chromosome 15q. These mutations produce a hyper-phosphorylated PSTPIP1 protein and alter its participation in activation of the "inflammasome" involved in interleukin-1 (IL-1β) production. Overproduction of IL-1β is a clear molecular feature of PAPA syndrome. Ongoing research is implicating other biochemical pathways that may be relevant to the distinct pyogenic inflammation of the skin and joints characteristic of this disease. This review summarizes the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on these molecular aspects of PAPA syndrome and related disorders.

  13. Hypodermoclysis: a literature review to assist in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Vanessa Galuppo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the information available in the literature about the drugs that can be administered through hypodermoclysis and the resulting impact that this information may have on the routine of the pharmacist working at a hospital. The study was based on a review of the literature. The results showed positive points of the procedure, but little specific information about medications such as routes of administration, standard dilutions, optimal doses, etc. Thus, it was possible to verify that there is no definite information as to the correct way to administer the drugs in this route, even though this is an effective and safe option, according to the literature. The lack of information has a negative impact on the support provided by the pharmacist to the nursing staff to ensure that the drug actually reaches its therapeutic goals safely. PMID:25807246

  14. Perchlorate Clinical Pharmacology and Human Health: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie Porat; Braverman, Lewis E.; Lamm, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Potassium perchlorate has been used at various times during the last 50 years to treat hyperthyroidism. Since World War II ammonium perchlorate has been used as a propellant for rockets. In 1997, the assay sensitivity for perchlorate in water was improved from 0.4 mg/L (ppm) to 4 µg/L (ppb). As a result, public water supplies in Southern California were found to contain perchlorate ions in the range of 5 to 8 ppb, and those in Southern Nevada were found to contain 5 to 24 ppb. Research programs have been developed to assess the safety or risk from these exposures and to assist state and regulatory agencies in setting a reasonable safe level for perchlorate in drinking water. This report reviews the evidence on the human health effects of perchlorate exposure. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of iodine uptake. All of its pharmacologic effects at current therapeutic levels or lower are associated with inhibition of the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) on the thyroid follicular cell membrane. A review of the medical and occupational studies has been undertaken to identify perchlorate exposure levels at which thyroid hormone levels may be reduced or thyrotropin levels increased. This exposure level may begin in the 35 to 100 mg/d range. Volunteer studies have been designed to determine the exposure levels at which perchlorate begins to affect iodine uptake in humans. Such effects may begin at levels of approximately 1 mg/d. Environmental studies have assessed the thyroidal health of newborns and adults at current environmental exposures to perchlorate and have concluded that the present levels appear to be safe. Whereas additional studies are underway both in laboratory animals and in the field, it appears that a safe level can be established for perchlorate in water and that regulatory agencies and others are now trying to determine that level. PMID:11477312

  15. Clinical features of trisomy 12 mosaicism-Report and review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bo; Zunich, Janice; Openshaw, Amanda; M Toydemir, Reha

    2017-03-27

    Trisomy 12 mosaicism is a rare condition. Herein, we report a patient with mosaic trisomy 12 who was conceived by in vitro fertilization. She presented with mild dysmorphic features at birth, including down-slanting palpebral fissures, a depressed and creased nasal bridge, and mild rhizomelic shortening of the limbs. She had age-appropriate development at 6 months of age, but displayed slightly more dysmorphic features than at birth. Chromosome analysis on peripheral blood revealed a normal female karyotype in 50 metaphases. A concurrent genomic microarray analysis showed trisomy 12 in about 25% of the specimen, which was also confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with the CEP12 probe. Our findings further delineate the clinical features in trisomy 12 mosaicism in liveborns and demonstrate the utility of genomic microarray analysis in identification of mosaic aneuploidies.

  16. Personalized therapy for urothelial cancer: review of the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Guancial, Elizabeth A.; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a detailed understanding of the molecular aberrations driving the development of urothelial cancers, this knowledge has not translated into advances for the treatment of this disease. Urothelial cancers are chemosensitive, and platinum-based combination chemotherapy remains the standard of care for advanced disease, as well as neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy for locally advanced disease. However, nearly half of patients who undergo resection of locally advanced urothelial cancer will relapse and eventually develop platinum-resistant disease. Clinical trials of targeted agents against angiogenesis and growth factors, as well as novel chemotheraputics, have generally been unsuccessful in urothelial cancers. Improvements in the theraputic arsenal for urothelial cancer depend upon identification of new targets and strategies to overcome platinum resistance. PMID:22754656

  17. Summary measures for clinical gait analysis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela

    2014-04-01

    Instrumented 3D-gait analysis (3D-GA) is an important method used to obtain information that is crucial for establishing the level of functional limitation due to pathology, observing its evolution over time and evaluating rehabilitative intervention effects. However, a typical 3D-GA evaluation produces a vast amount of data, and despite its objectivity, its use is complicated, and the data interpretation is difficult. It is even more difficult to obtain an overview on patient cohorts for a comparison. Moreover, there is a growing awareness of the need for a concise index, specifically, a single measure of the 'quality' of a particular gait pattern. Several gait summary measures, which have been used in conjunction with 3D-GA, have been proposed to objectify clinical impression, quantify the degree of gait deviation from normal, stratify the severity of pathology, document the changes in gait patterns over time and evaluate interventions.

  18. A clinically oriented comprehensive pictorial review of canine elbow anatomy.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Gheorghe M; Constantinescu, Ileana A

    2009-02-01

    The clinically oriented canine elbow anatomy in its complexity earned a high importance in surgery especially after multiple imaging modalities have been used in the benefit of diagnosis and treatment of canine elbow disorders. The bony, joint, and muscular structures, the arteries, the veins and the nerves supplying the elbow are described and illustrated in textbooks and atlases in the context of the comparative anatomy. Nevertheless, there is no publication focused on all of these structures described together from the skin to the bones in a systematic and topographic order, nor through cross and/or sagittal and coronal sections. The figures used in this article are original and drawn after dissection, cross, sagittal, and coronal sections of the elbow structures. The sections are correlated to the multiple imaging modalities shown in the next article.

  19. Multilocus microsatellite typing of Leishmania and clinical applications: a review

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Srikanth; Hide, Mallorie; Michel, Gregory; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Marty, Pierre; Pomares, Christelle

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite markers have been used for Leishmania genetic studies worldwide, giving useful insight into leishmaniasis epidemiology. Understanding the geographic distribution, dynamics of Leishmania populations, and disease epidemiology improved markedly with this tool. In endemic foci, the origins of antimony-resistant strains and multidrug treatment failures were explored with multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT). High genetic variability was detected but no association between parasite genotypes and drug resistance was established. An association between MLMT profiles and clinical disease manifestations was highlighted in only three studies and this data needs further confirmation. At the individual level, MLMT provided information on relapse and reinfection when multiple leishmaniasis episodes occurred. This information could improve knowledge of epidemiology and guide therapeutic choices for active chronic visceral leishmaniasis, the disease form in some HIV-positive patients. PMID:25950900

  20. A Clinical Review of Tick-Borne Diseases in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Beebe, Alexandria; Chaudhury, Arun; Haselow, Dirk; Patil, Sowmya; Weinstein, Sue; Taffner, Richard; Patil, Naveen

    2016-05-01

    Tick-borne diseases are illnesses transmitted by ticks harboring wide variety of pathogens. Arkansas is reported as one of the states with a high incidence of tick-borne diseases. In Arkansas the four most frequently occurring tick-borne diseases are Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF, also known as Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis), Ehrlichiosis, Tularemia and Anaplasmosis. Lyme disease, on the other hand, is not acquired in Arkansas and is only acquired by traveling to states where Lyme disease is endemic. The majority of tick-borne diseases are diagnosed based on a history of tick bite or exposure and the individual's clinical presentation. The recognition of specific symptoms requires prompt treatment to prevent long-term sequelae. Hence, knowledge of tick-borne diseases and preventive measures can help reduce the risks associated with the infection.

  1. Trimetazidine in Practice: Review of the Clinical and Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dézsi, Csaba A.

    2016-01-01

    All of the following traditional agents for the management of stable angina pectoris include the symptomatic treatment with heart rate–lowering agents such as β-blockers or non-dihydropyridine Ca-channel blockers, or ivabradine—the first selective sinus node If channel inhibitor—vasodilatators and preventive use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors affect the parameters of circulation directly. Trimetazidine exerts its anti-ischemic action by modulating cardiac metabolism without altering the hemodynamic functions, therefore represents an excellent complementary potential to the conventional angina treatment. It has a beneficial effect on the inflammatory profile and endothelial function and shows diverse benefits by reducing the number and the intensity of angina attacks and improving the clinical signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia given as monotherapy as well as combined with other antianginal agents. Patients undergoing coronary revascularization procedures or with comorbid left ventricular dysfunction and diabetes mellitus also benefit from the protective effects of trimetazidine. PMID:25756467

  2. A short clinical review of vaccination against measles

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Gavin; Metcalfe, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    Major epidemics of measles are again in the news across the UK because of our failure to maintain population herd immunity. This situation has occurred primarily because of a loss of public confidence in the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, which was never restored following the Wakefield debacle, and a lack of awareness of the potential morbidity and mortality associated with measles. This article provides healthcare professionals with a succinct overview of important clinical aspects of measles and also describes the history of measles vaccination in the UK. Restoration of herd immunity will require higher public acceptance of the MMR vaccine in the context of recognition that measles remains an important infection. While achievement of this appears to be challenging, recent UK-based research suggests that it can be ascertained. PMID:25057386

  3. Eurythmy Therapy in clinical studies: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Büssing, Arndt; Ostermann, Thomas; Majorek, Magdalena; Matthiessen, Peter F

    2008-01-01

    Background We aimed to overview the current literature on eurythmy therapy (EYT) which is an integral part of Anthroposophic Medicine. EYT can be described as a movement therapy in which speech movements are transposed into exercises which address the patient's capability to soul expression and strengthen his salutogenetic resources. Methods We searched several databases such as Cochrane, EMBASE, NCCAM, NLM, DIMDI, CAMbase, and Medline for case-control studies, cohort studies and randomised controlled trials on the treatment effects of EYT in a clinical setting. In a second search we included journal databases from Karger, Kluwer, Springer, Thieme, and Merkurstab archive. Results We found 8 citations which met the inclusion criterion: 4 publications referring to a prospective cohort study without control group (the AMOS study), and 4 articles referring to 2 explorative pre-post studies without control group, 1 prospective, non-randomized comparative study, and 1 descriptive study with a control group. The methodological quality of studies ranged in from poor to good, and in sample size from 5 to 898 patients. In most studies, EYT was used as an add-on, not as a mono-therapy. The studies described positive treatment effects with clinically relevant effect sizes in most cases. Conclusion Indications, study designs and the usage of additional treatments within the identified studies were quite heterogeneous. Despite of this, EYT can be regarded as a potentially relevant add-on in a therapeutic concept, although its specific relevance remains to be clarified. Well performed controlled studies on this unique treatment are highly recommended. PMID:18377647

  4. Cerebral proliferative angiopathy: Clinical, angiographic features and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Lv, Xianli; Lv, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Here we present our experience with five cerebral proliferative angiopathy (CPA) patients to better delineate the clinical and angiographic features as well as the treatment selection of this disease. Methods Between October 2008 and October 2012, five consecutive patients diagnosed with CPA were admitted to our department in our hospital. All the five patients received magnetic resonance imaging, digital subtraction angiography, and positron emission computed tomography (PET) to definitively confirm this disease. We also collected 15 previously published instances of CPA to analyze the characteristics of this rare entity. Results As to the five patients, three were female and two were male, between the ages of 4 and 52 years with a mean age of 24.8 ± 20.6 years. The PET results showed that perfusion was decreased over the affected hemispheres in all five patients. As to the treatment, only one patient received encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) revascularization surgery. The other four patients were conservatively observed. During the follow-up period (range 3–6 years, mean 4 ± 1.9 years), the patient who underwent EDAS surgery manifested relief of clinical symptoms. In the conservative series, the symptoms in two patients aggravated and suffered permanent neurologic deficits. Conclusion CPA is a rare entity. Natural history has showed this disease is not stable and may progress at a certain time point. The EDAS procedure may be a treatment for CPA-related oligemia since there is currently little data and follow-up available. PMID:26472638

  5. [Optic nerve pits: clinical and therapeutic review of 21 cases].

    PubMed

    Montenegro, M; Bonnet, M

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study of optic nerve pits in patients referred to our clinic during the last 15 years was conducted. The study included 21 eyes in 19 patients. The optic pit was associated with a serous macular detachment (SMD) in 19 eyes (90%). Various treatments of the SMD were used depending on the time period. Systemic corticosteroids were used in five patients. The SMD did not respond to this treatment. Argon laser photocoagulation was applied to the temporal side of the optic disc in five patients. Intravitreal injection of pure gas was used as an adjunct to photocoagulation treatment in eleven eyes. Pure SF 6 was used in 8 eyes, and C 3 F 8 in 3 eyes. The follow-up after treatment was over 6 months in 10 patients who underwent photocoagulation or the combination of photocoagulation and gas injection. The SMD remained unchanged in two eyes which underwent photocoagulation treatment without gas injection. In the group of patients treated by photocoagulation in association with SF 6 injection, the SMD totally reattached in one eye, decreased in 2 eyes and remained unchanged in 2 eyes. Total resorption of subretinal fluid and permanent retinal reattachment occurred in the 3 eyes treated by intravitreal injection of pure C 3 F 8 as an adjunct to photocoagulation treatment. Further clinical investigations on large series of patients are required to determine whether prolonged retinal tamponade by C 3 F 8 gas in association with photocoagulation treatment is a valuable method in the management of SMD complicating optic nerve pits.

  6. Using Data Mining Strategies in Clinical Decision Making: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu-Yen A; Fawcett, Tonks N

    2016-10-01

    Several data-mining models have been embedded in the clinical environment to improve decision making and patient safety. Consequently, it is crucial to survey the principal data-mining strategies currently used in clinical decision making and to determine the disadvantages and advantages of using these strategies in data mining in clinical decision making. A literature review was conducted, which identified 21 relevant articles. The article findings showed that multiple models of data mining were used in clinical decision making. Although data mining is efficient and accurate, the models are limited with respect to disease and condition.

  7. Evidence-Based Rationale for Ankle Cartilage Allograft Replacement: A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pierce; Lee, Daniel K

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of ankle arthritis remains controversial. Ankle cartilage allograft replacement is a novel and complex procedure. Many clinical studies have shown some level of promise, as well complications. We performed a systematic review of the clinical outcomes to describe and assess the different techniques and clinical outcomes for ankle cartilage allograft replacement. We performed a review of the published studies using MEDLINE(®) by way of PubMed(®) and Google Scholar(®) from January 2000 through October 2014, ranging from case reports to clinical studies. The inclusion criteria consisted of ankle cartilage allograft procedures with objective findings and clinical outcome scoring and complication and fusion rates and excluded nonallograft synthetic graft techniques, bone substitutes or expanders, review reports, and technique instructional manuals. Evidence with the combination of objective findings and clinical outcomes for all 3 type of allograft replacement (osteochondral, unipolar, and bipolar) is lacking. Several techniques for cartilage fixation have been described, including absorbable and metallic fixation. Most of the studies reported many occurrences and a variety of complications. A myriad of techniques for ankle cartilage allograft replacement exists. The results from the present systematic review of the published studies appear promising; however, the lack of statistical power and inconsistent documentation made it difficult to determine the superiority of any one intervention compared with another for the treatment of ankle arthritis.

  8. Role of Ambulatory and Home Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Daichi; Abdalla, Marwah; Falzon, Louise; Townsend, Raymond R.; Muntner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension, a common cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor, is usually diagnosed and treated based on blood pressure readings obtained in the clinic setting. Blood pressure may differ considerably when measured in the clinic versus outside of the clinic setting. Over the past several decades, evidence has accumulated on two approaches for measuring out-of-clinic blood pressure: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM). Blood pressure measures on ABPM and HBPM each have a stronger association with CVD outcomes than clinic blood pressure. Controversy exists whether ABPM or HBPM is superior for estimating CVD risk, and under what circumstances these methods should be used in clinical practice for assessing out-of-clinic blood pressure. This review describes ABPM and HBPM procedures, the blood pressure phenotypic measures that can be ascertained, and the evidence that supports the use of each approach to measure out-of-clinic blood pressure. This review also describes barriers to the successful implementation of ABPM and HBPM in clinical practice, proposes core competencies for the conduct of these procedures, and highlights important areas for future research. PMID:26457954

  9. Recommendations for enhancing clinical trials education: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stepan, Karen A; Gonzalez, Amy P; Dorsey, Vivian S; Frye, Debra K; Pyle, Nita D; Smith, Regina F; Throckmorton, Terry A; Villejo, Louise A; Cantor, Scott B

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to apply the evidence-based practice (EBP) process to determine the factors that influence patients' understanding of, participation in, and satisfaction with clinical trials, the informed consent process, and treatment decisions and to make recommendations for improving clinical trials education. Beginning with evidence retrieval, the authors identified key search terms and searched MEDLINE--Ovid, MEDLINE--PubMed, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature to identify articles published between July 2001 and July 2006 that highlighted clinical trials education. The articles were reviewed for clinical trials patient education information, clinician methods of communicating clinical trial information to patients, and patient satisfaction with the clinical trials process, including the informed consent process. As a result, practice changes were recommended for the patient/family, staff/community, and institution. From the literature review, 81 articles were identified. Recurring themes included decision-making, patient education, staff education, and pediatrics. Most articles focused on methods and strategies aimed at improving education at the patient/family, staff/community, and institutional levels. The issues surrounding clinical trial education are complex due to multiple variables interfering with poor patient understanding of, participation in, and satisfaction with clinical trial treatment decisions. On the basis of our findings, we recommend that clinicians involved in educating patients, families, staff, and communities about clinical trials have an awareness of and understanding for very complex issues.

  10. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: A Clinical and Pathophysiological Review.

    PubMed

    Mastria, Giulio; Mancini, Valentina; Viganò, Alessandro; Di Piero, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Alice in Wonderland Syndrome (AIWS) is a perceptual disorder, principally involving visual and somesthetic integration, firstly reported by Todd, on the literary suggestion of the strange experiences described by Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland books. Symptoms may comprise among others aschematia and dysmetropsia. This syndrome has many different etiologies; however EBV infection is the most common cause in children, while migraine affects more commonly adults. Many data support a strict relationship between migraine and AIWS, which could be considered in many patients as an aura or a migraine equivalent, particularly in children. Nevertheless, AIWS seems to have anatomical correlates. According to neuroimaging, temporoparietal-occipital carrefour (TPO-C) is a key region for developing many of AIWS symptoms. The final part of this review aims to find the relationship between AIWS symptoms, presenting a pathophysiological model. In brief, AIWS symptoms depend on an alteration of TPO-C where visual-spatial and somatosensory information are integrated. Alterations in these brain regions may cause the cooccurrence of dysmetropsia and disorders of body schema. In our opinion, the association of other symptoms reported in literature could vary depending on different etiologies and the lack of clear diagnostic criteria.

  11. Intranasal administration of oxytocin: behavioral and clinical effects, a review.

    PubMed

    Veening, Jan G; Olivier, Berend

    2013-09-01

    The intranasal (IN-) administration of substances is attracting attention from scientists as well as pharmaceutical companies. The effects are surprisingly fast and specific. The present review explores our current knowledge about the routes of access to the cranial cavity. 'Direct-access-pathways' from the nasal cavity have been described but many additional experiments are needed to answer a variety of open questions regarding anatomy and physiology. Among the IN-applied substances oxytocin (OT) has an extensive history. Originally applied in women for its physiological effects related to lactation and parturition, over the last decade most studies focused on their behavioral 'prosocial' effects: from social relations and 'trust' to treatment of 'autism'. Only very recently in a microdialysis study in rats and mice, the 'direct-nose-brain-pathways' of IN-OT have been investigated directly, implying that we are strongly dependent on results obtained from other IN-applied substances. Especially the possibility that IN-OT activates the 'intrinsic' OT-system in the hypothalamus as well needs further clarification. We conclude that IN-OT administration may be a promising approach to influence human communication but that the existing lack of information about the neural and physiological mechanisms involved is a serious problem for the proper understanding and interpretation of the observed effects.

  12. Antimicrobial therapy of acute diarrhoea: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhoea is one of the most commonly occurring diseases. This article presents a review of the current state of the treatment of acute infectious diarrhoea, as well as of the most important pathogens. The general principles of the therapy of diarrhoea are exemplified, followed by a description of the targeted antimicrobial therapy of the most important bacterial gastrointestinal infections, including salmonellosis, shigellosis and Campylobacter infections, as well as infections with pathogenic Escherichia coli strains, yersiniosis and cholera. Diarrhoea caused by toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains has increased in incidence and in severity. These infections will therefore be described in detail, including important new aspects of treatment. Symptomatic therapy is still the most important component of the treatment of infectious diarrhoea. However, empirical antibiotic therapy should be considered for severely ill patients with a high frequency of stools, fever, bloody diarrhoea, underlying immune deficiency, advanced age or significant comorbidities. Increasing resistance, in particular against fluoroquinolones, must be taken into consideration. Therapy with motility inhibitors is not recommended for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and severe colitis. The macrocyclic antibiotic fidaxomicin can reduce the rate of recurrent disease in CDI. Furthermore, evidence for the benefits of faecal microbiota transplantation as a treatment option for multiple recurrences of CDI is increasing. In conclusion, the treatment of acute diarrhoea is still primarily supportive. General empirical antibiotic therapy for acute diarrhoea is not evidence-based.

  13. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: A Clinical and Pathophysiological Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alice in Wonderland Syndrome (AIWS) is a perceptual disorder, principally involving visual and somesthetic integration, firstly reported by Todd, on the literary suggestion of the strange experiences described by Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland books. Symptoms may comprise among others aschematia and dysmetropsia. This syndrome has many different etiologies; however EBV infection is the most common cause in children, while migraine affects more commonly adults. Many data support a strict relationship between migraine and AIWS, which could be considered in many patients as an aura or a migraine equivalent, particularly in children. Nevertheless, AIWS seems to have anatomical correlates. According to neuroimaging, temporoparietal-occipital carrefour (TPO-C) is a key region for developing many of AIWS symptoms. The final part of this review aims to find the relationship between AIWS symptoms, presenting a pathophysiological model. In brief, AIWS symptoms depend on an alteration of TPO-C where visual-spatial and somatosensory information are integrated. Alterations in these brain regions may cause the cooccurrence of dysmetropsia and disorders of body schema. In our opinion, the association of other symptoms reported in literature could vary depending on different etiologies and the lack of clear diagnostic criteria. PMID:28116304

  14. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Eddington, Helen; Sinha, Smeeta; Kalra, Philip A

    2009-03-01

    Vascular calcification, which is associated with arterial stiffness, is now known to be an important predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with renal disease. This calcification starts developing in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is present in over 50% of patients at the time of dialysis commencement. Once calcification is present it continues to progress, though some medications have been shown to slow this progression. Vascular calcification and bone abnormalities are now both encompassed by the term of CKD-mineral bone disorder and are thought to be part of the same disease process in CKD. Vascular calcification and arterial stiffness have been extensively researched in the renal population and many factors are known to be associated with their presence and progression. This calcification is an important factor to be considered in the management of the renal patient but there are different methods available for its measurement. These details will be discussed further in this review along with evidence available for management of this important complication of renal disease.

  15. Clinical review: Prothrombin complex concentrates - evaluation of safety and thrombogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) are used mainly for emergency reversal of vitamin K antagonist therapy. Historically, the major drawback with PCCs has been the risk of thrombotic complications. The aims of the present review are to examine thrombotic complications reported with PCCs, and to compare the safety of PCCs with human fresh frozen plasma. The risk of thrombotic complications may be increased by underlying disease, high or frequent PCC dosing, and poorly balanced PCC constituents. The causes of PCC thrombogenicity remain uncertain but accumulating evidence indicates the importance of factor II (prothrombin). With the inclusion of coagulation inhibitors and other manufacturing improvements, today's PCCs may be considered safer than earlier products. PCCs may be considered preferable to fresh frozen plasma for emergency anticoagulant reversal, and this is reflected in the latest British and American guidelines. Care should be taken to avoid excessive substitution with prothrombin, however, and accurate monitoring of patients' coagulation status may allow thrombotic risk to be reduced. The risk of a thrombotic complication due to treatment with PCCs should be weighed against the need for rapid and effective correction of coagulopathy. PMID:21345266

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Varicocele Repair in Infertile Men: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Varicoceles are a major cause of impaired spermatogenesis and the most common correctable cause of male infertility. They are found in approximately 40% of men with primary infertility and 80% of men with secondary infertility, although they also occur in 12% of men with normal semen parameters. The presence of a varicocele does not always affect spermatogenesis, as it has been reported that only 20% of men with documented varicoceles suffer fertility problems. However, varicocele repair appears to have beneficial effects in men with impaired semen parameters and palpable varicoceles. Currently, the main procedures employed for varicocele repair are microsurgical subinguinal or inguinal varicocelectomy, laparoscopic varicocelectomy, and radiological percutaneous embolization. Microsurgical varicocelectomy appears to be the optimal treatment in most cases, whereas the other procedures are useful only in specific cases. After treatment, it typically takes 3 to 6 months for patients' semen parameters to improve; thus, other therapies, including assisted reproductive technology, should be considered if infertility persists after this interval, especially in older couples. Controversies still remain regarding how varicoceles in certain subgroups, such as adolescents or men with azoospermia, should be treated. Due to their relatively high prevalence rate among the general population, varicoceles can occur concomitantly with other conditions that cause impaired spermatogenesis. Further studies are necessary in order to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment. In this review, we sought to summarize the issues currently associated with varicocele treatment in infertile men. PMID:27574593

  17. Dietary sodium intake and asthma: an epidemiological and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Mickleborough, T D; Fogarty, A

    2006-12-01

    The changes in diet associated with the development of a more affluent lifestyle have been considered one of the environmental factors that may have contributed to the rise in the prevalence of asthma over the past few decades, and dietary sodium has been considered to be a dietary constituent which may be implicated in this phenomenon. The data presented in this review demonstrate that adoption of a low sodium diet for a period of 2-5 weeks may improve lung function and decrease bronchial reactivity in adults with asthma, while sodium loading appears to have a detrimental effect. Similarly, a low sodium diet maintained for 1-2 weeks decreases bronchoconstriction in response to exercise in individuals with asthma. There is no data as to the longer-term effect of a low sodium diet on either the prevalence or severity of asthma or on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. As a low sodium diet has other beneficial health effects, it can be considered as a therapeutic option for adults with asthma, although it should be considered as an adjunctive intervention to supplement optimal pharmacological management of asthma and not as an alternative. If the relationship between higher sodium intake and increased prevalence and severity of asthma is causal, then there are potential population benefits for asthma as well as cardiovascular disease to be derived from public health measures to reduce sodium consumption.

  18. Angelman syndrome: a review of the clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Clayton-Smith, J; Laan, L

    2003-02-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe learning difficulties, ataxia, a seizure disorder with a characteristic EEG, subtle dysmorphic facial features, and a happy, sociable disposition. Most children present with delay in developmental milestones and slowing of head growth during the first year of life. In the majority of cases speech does not develop. Patients with AS have a characteristic behavioural phenotype with jerky movements, frequent and sometimes inappropriate laughter, a love of water, and sleep disorder. The facial features are subtle and include a wide, smiling mouth, prominent chin, and deep set eyes. It is caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities involving the chromosome 15q11-13 region, which is subject to genomic imprinting. These include maternal deletion, paternal uniparental disomy, imprinting defects, and point mutations or small deletions within the UBE3A gene, which lies within this region. UBE3A shows tissue specific imprinting, being expressed exclusively from the maternal allele in brain. The genetic mechanisms identified so far in AS are found in 85-90% of those with the clinical phenotype and all interfere with UBE3A expression.

  19. Clinical review: Vasopressin and terlipressin in septic shock patients

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Anne; Leone, Marc; Rousseau, Sébastien; Albanèse, Jacques; Martin, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) is emerging as a potentially major advance in the treatment of septic shock. Terlipressin (tricyl-lysine-vasopressin) is the synthetic, long-acting analogue of vasopressin, and has comparable pharmacodynamic but different pharmacokinetic properties. Vasopressin mediates vasoconstriction via V1 receptor activation on vascular smooth muscle. Septic shock first causes a transient early increase in blood vasopressin concentrations; these concentrations subsequently decrease to very low levels as compared with those observed with other causes of hypotension. Infusions of 0.01–0.04 U/min vasopressin in septic shock patients increase plasma vasopressin concentrations. This increase is associated with reduced need for other vasopressors. Vasopressin has been shown to result in greater blood flow diversion from nonvital to vital organ beds compared with adrenaline (epinephrine). Of concern is a constant decrease in cardiac output and oxygen delivery, the consequences of which in terms of development of multiple organ failure are not yet known. Terlipressin (one or two boluses of 1 mg) has similar effects, but this drug has been used in far fewer patients. Large randomized clinical trials should be conducted to establish the utility of these drugs as therapeutic agents in patients with septic shock. PMID:15774080

  20. Clinical review: Critical care management of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, Fred; Mayer, Stephan A

    2008-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is by far the most destructive form of stroke. The clinical presentation is characterized by a rapidly deteriorating neurological exam coupled with signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure. The diagnosis is easily established by the use of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Ventilatory support, blood pressure control, reversal of any preexisting coagulopathy, intracranial pressure monitoring, osmotherapy, fever control, seizure prophylaxis, treatment of hyerglycemia, and nutritional supplementation are the cornerstones of supportive care in the intensive care unit. Dexamethasone and other glucocorticoids should be avoided. Ventricular drainage should be performed urgently in all stuporous or comatose patients with intraventricular blood and acute hydrocephalus. Emergent surgical evacuation or hemicraniectomy should be considered for patients with large (>3 cm) cerebellar hemorrhages, and in those with large lobar hemorrhages, significant mass effect, and a deteriorating neurological exam. Apart from management in a specialized stroke or neurological intensive care unit, no specific medical therapies have been shown to consistently improve outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:19108704

  1. Cerebral Microbleeds: A Review of Clinical, Genetic, and Neuroimaging Associations

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Paul A.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Desmond, Patricia M.; Masters, Colin L.; Rowe, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (microbleeds) are small, punctuate hypointense lesions seen in T2* Gradient-Recall Echo (GRE) and Susceptibility-Weighted (SWI) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences, corresponding to areas of hemosiderin breakdown products from prior microscopic hemorrhages. They occur in the setting of impaired small vessel integrity, commonly due to either hypertensive vasculopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Microbleeds are more prevalent in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and in those with both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However they are also found in asymptomatic individuals, with increasing prevalence with age, particularly in carriers of the Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele. Other neuroimaging findings that have been linked with microbleeds include lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI, and increased cerebral β-amyloid burden using 11C-PiB Positron Emission Tomography. The presence of microbleeds has been suggested to confer increased risk of incident intracerebral hemorrhage – particularly in the setting of anticoagulation – and of complications of immunotherapy for AD. Prospective data regarding the natural history and sequelae of microbleeds are currently limited, however there is a growing evidence base that will serve to inform clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:24432010

  2. Clinical perspective: creating an effective practice peer review process-a primer.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Manisha; Louis, Frances S; Wilson, Shae H; Clark, Steven L

    2017-03-01

    Peer review serves as an important adjunct to other hospital quality and safety programs. Despite its importance, the available literature contains virtually no guidance regarding the structure and function of effective peer review committees. This Clinical Perspective provides a summary of the purposes, structure, and functioning of effective peer review committees. We also discuss important legal considerations that are a necessary component of such processes. This discussion includes useful templates for case selection and review. Proper committee structure, membership, work flow, and leadership as well as close cooperation with the hospital medical executive committee and legal representatives are essential to any effective peer review process. A thoughtful, fair, systematic, and organized approach to creating a peer review process will lead to confidence in the committee by providers, hospital leadership, and patients. If properly constructed, such committees may also assist in monitoring and enforcing compliance with departmental protocols, thus reducing harm and promoting high-quality practice.

  3. A Review on Technical and Clinical Impact of Microsoft Kinect on Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi Hondori, Hossein; Khademi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews technical and clinical impact of the Microsoft Kinect in physical therapy and rehabilitation. It covers the studies on patients with neurological disorders including stroke, Parkinson's, cerebral palsy, and MS as well as the elderly patients. Search results in Pubmed and Google scholar reveal increasing interest in using Kinect in medical application. Relevant papers are reviewed and divided into three groups: (1) papers which evaluated Kinect's accuracy and reliability, (2) papers which used Kinect for a rehabilitation system and provided clinical evaluation involving patients, and (3) papers which proposed a Kinect-based system for rehabilitation but fell short of providing clinical validation. At last, to serve as technical comparison to help future rehabilitation design other sensors similar to Kinect are reviewed. PMID:27006935

  4. A Review on Technical and Clinical Impact of Microsoft Kinect on Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mousavi Hondori, Hossein; Khademi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews technical and clinical impact of the Microsoft Kinect in physical therapy and rehabilitation. It covers the studies on patients with neurological disorders including stroke, Parkinson's, cerebral palsy, and MS as well as the elderly patients. Search results in Pubmed and Google scholar reveal increasing interest in using Kinect in medical application. Relevant papers are reviewed and divided into three groups: (1) papers which evaluated Kinect's accuracy and reliability, (2) papers which used Kinect for a rehabilitation system and provided clinical evaluation involving patients, and (3) papers which proposed a Kinect-based system for rehabilitation but fell short of providing clinical validation. At last, to serve as technical comparison to help future rehabilitation design other sensors similar to Kinect are reviewed.

  5. Association of parathyroid carcinoma and thyroid disorders: A clinical review.

    PubMed

    Campennì, Alfredo; Giovinazzo, Salvatore; Pignata, Salvatore Antonio; Di Mauro, Francesca; Santoro, Domenico; Curtò, Lorenzo; Trimarchi, Francesco; Ruggeri, Rosaria Maddalena; Baldari, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare malignancy, which usually occurs as a sporadic disease, and less frequently in the setting of genetic syndromes. Despite the association of parathyroid and thyroid disorders being quite common, the coexistence of parathyroid carcinoma and thyroid disease is rare. We reviewed the pertinent literature. The terms "parathyroid carcinoma" and "thyroid disease, hyperthyroidism, thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism, thyroid nodule(s), Graves' disease, autonomously functioning thyroid nodules" were used both separately and in reciprocal conjunction to search MEDLINE for articles published from January 2007 to March 2016. The search was prompted by the observation of a never reported association of autonomously functioning thyroid nodules and parathyroid carcinoma. Two hundred and twenty-one parathyroid carcinoma patients have been described during the last 10 years. Neck ultrasonography and parathyroid scintigraphy are the most common instrumental studies used in detecting parathyroid lesions. Serum parathyroid hormone and calcium levels are high in the majority of parathyroid carcinoma patients. Only 21 patients with parathyroid carcinoma and thyroid disorders were found. Our patient is the first casual association between parathyroid carcinoma and autonomously functioning thyroid nodules reported in literature and diagnosed using parathyroid and thyroid scintigraphies. Parathyroid carcinoma is a very rare endocrine tumor and association with thyroid disease is not frequent. Parathyroid carcinoma pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult also because available literature data are not homogenous and there is not a common operative guideline. Our case confirms the role of parathyroid scintigraphy, encouraging the association with thyroid scintigraphy, especially in the presence of (multi)-nodular goiter in order to address the most appropriate surgical management.

  6. Teleconsultation and Clinical Decision Making: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Deldar, Kolsoum; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz; Tara, Seyed Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background: The goal of teleconsultation is to omit geographical and functional distance between two or more geographically separated health care providers. The purpose of present study is to review and analyze physician-physician teleconsultations. Method: The PubMed electronic database was searched. The primary search was done on January 2015 and was updated on December 2015. A fetch and tag plan was designed by the researchers using an online Zotero library. Results: 174 full-text articles of 1702 records met inclusion criteria. Teleconsultation for pediatric patients accounts for 14.36 percent of accepted articles. Surgery and general medicine were the most prevalent medical fields in the adults and pediatrics, respectively. Most teleconsultations were inland experiences (no=135), and the USA, Italy and Australia were the three top countries in this group. Non-specialists health care providers/centers were the dominant group who requested teleconsultation (no=130). Real time, store and forward, and hybrid technologies were used in 50, 31, and 16.7 percent of articles, respectively. The teleconsultation were reported to result in change in treatment plan, referral or evacuation rate, change in diagnosis, educational effects, and rapid decision making. Use of structured or semi-structured template had been noticed only in a very few articles. Conclusion: The present study focused on the recent ten years of published articles on physician-physician teleconsultations. Our findings showed that although there are positive impacts of teleconsultation as improving patient management, still have gaps that need to be repaired. PMID:27708494

  7. Pharmacogenetic testing in psychiatry: a review of features and clinical realities.

    PubMed

    de Leon, José; Arranz, Maria J; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2008-12-01

    This article focuses on the first generation of pharmacogenetic tests that are potentially useful in psychiatry. All pharmacogenetic tests currently on the market, or soon to be marketed in psychiatry, for which some information has been published in peer-reviewed journal articles (or abstracts), were selected. Five pharmacogenetic tests are reviewed in detail: the Roche AmpliChip CYP450 Test, the Luminex Tag-It Mutation Detection Kit, the LGC clozapine response test, the PGxPredict: Clozapine test, and the Genomas PhyzioType system. After reviewing these tests, three practical aspects of implementing pharmacogenetic testing in psychiatric clinical practice are briefly reviewed: (1) the evaluation of these tests in clinical practice, (2) cost-effectiveness, and (3) regulatory oversight. Finally, the future of these and other pharmacogenetic tests in psychiatry is discussed.

  8. Religion, Spirituality, and HIV Clinical Outcomes: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, B R; Justice, A C; Fiellin, D A

    2016-12-21

    This systematic review evaluates the association between religion, spirituality and clinical outcomes in HIV-infected individuals. A systematic literature review was conducted for all English language articles published between 1980 and 2016 in relevant databases. Six hundred fourteen studies were evaluated. 15 met inclusion criteria. Ten (67%) studies reported a positive association between religion or spirituality and a clinical HIV outcome. Two (13%) studies failed to detect such an association; and two (13%) demonstrated a negative association. One study (7%) identified features of religiosity and spirituality that had both negative and positive associations with HIV clinical outcomes. Recognizing the religious or spiritual commitments of patients may serve as an important component of patient care. Further longitudinal studies and interventions might be required to further clarify the potential impact of religion and spirituality on HIV clinical outcomes.

  9. A systematic literature review of automated clinical coding and classification systems.

    PubMed

    Stanfill, Mary H; Williams, Margaret; Fenton, Susan H; Jenders, Robert A; Hersh, William R

    2010-01-01

    Clinical coding and classification processes transform natural language descriptions in clinical text into data that can subsequently be used for clinical care, research, and other purposes. This systematic literature review examined studies that evaluated all types of automated coding and classification systems to determine the performance of such systems. Studies indexed in Medline or other relevant databases prior to March 2009 were considered. The 113 studies included in this review show that automated tools exist for a variety of coding and classification purposes, focus on various healthcare specialties, and handle a wide variety of clinical document types. Automated coding and classification systems themselves are not generalizable, nor are the results of the studies evaluating them. Published research shows these systems hold promise, but these data must be considered in context, with performance relative to the complexity of the task and the desired outcome.

  10. Online ethics discussion forum facilitates medical center clinical ethics case reviews.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, David J; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Anderson-Shaw, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Clinical ethics consultants are increasingly called upon to give counsel in the clinical arena on issues including but not limited to withdrawal or withholding of specific medical treatments, assisting minors and mentally impaired patients with care decisions, working with difficult patients and families, identifying appropriate surrogate decision makers, and executing advance directives and end-of-life decisions. Often, the consultant may need to convene the ethics committee members to review and provide feedback for a given case. This process may be difficult to schedule in a timely way because of member's clinical and other work-related obligations. To this end, the University of Illinois Medical Center in Chicago has set up a unique Web board to facilitate ongoing case discussions via a secured, password-protected ethics committee online forum. This allows for real-time review by all ethics committee members. We will explain our online process as well as discuss our clinical case experiences.

  11. A review of how the quality of HIV clinical services has been evaluated or improved.

    PubMed

    Hung, Anna; Pradel, Françoise

    2015-06-01

    To examine approaches being used to evaluate and improve quality of HIV clinical services we searched the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library collection, EMBASE, Global Health, and Web of Science databases for articles and abstracts focused on evaluating or improving quality of HIV clinical services. We extracted country income level, targeted clinical services, and quality evaluation approaches, data sources, and criteria. Fifty journal articles and 46 meeting abstracts were included. Of the 96 studies reviewed, 65% were programme evaluations, 71% focused on low- and middle-income countries, and 65% focused on antiretroviral therapy services. With regard to quality, 45% used a quality improvement model or programme, 13% set a quality threshold, and 51% examined patient records to evaluate quality. No studies provided a definition for quality HIV care. Quality assurance and improvement of HIV clinical services is increasingly important. This review highlights gaps in knowledge for future research, and may also help countries and programmes develop their HIV care quality improvement frameworks.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of COX-2 Inhibitors in the Clinical Management of Arthritis: Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Sam T.; Devi S, Gayathri; Prasanth, V. V.; Vinod, B.

    2011-01-01

    In the clinical management of arthritis, the choice of nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drug (NSAID) remains confusing and controversial. A common practice on the choice of NSAID in clinical management of arthritis is the risk benefit ratio. The main objective of this review is to addresses the main arguments for the pharmacological and clinical use of COX-2 inhibitors in relation to nonselective NSAIDs for the clinical management of arthritis. This review concluded that, both NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors are equally effective and are associated with increased risk of GI, renal, and CV, adverse effects. Complete understanding of the patient's comorbid conditions and concomitant medications, coupled with precise monitoring during the treatment, may help to decrease the threat of adverse effects induced by nonselective NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:22084715

  13. Evaluating clinical competence during nursing education: A comprehensive integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Lejonqvist, Gun-Britt; Eriksson, Katie; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    This paper explored concepts, definitions and theoretical perspectives evaluating clinical competence during nursing education. The questions were: (i) How is clinical competence evaluated? and (ii) What is evaluated? An integrative review of 19 original research articles from 2009 to 2013 was performed. Results showed that evaluation tools were used in 14, observations in 2 and reflecting writing in 3 studies. The students participated in all but one evaluation alone or together with peers, faculty members or preceptors. Three themes were found: (i) professional practice with a caring perspective; (ii) clinical skills and reflective practice; and (iii) cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills both with a nursing perspective. This review shows an emphasis on structured methods with a risk reducing nursing to tasks and skills why combinations with qualitative evaluations are recommended. A holistic view of competence dominated and in designing evaluations, explicit perspectives and operationalized definitions of clinical competence became evident.

  14. Childhood Autism—A Review of the Clinical and Experimental Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, Edward M.

    1973-01-01

    This review of the literature on childhood autism discusses the clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the autistic behavioral syndrome from a developmental perspective. It includes a discussion of the influence of prenatal and perinatal antecedents, genetic and socio-familial factors, and epidemiologic considerations. Neurologic, electro-encephalographic and experimental neurophysiologic, metabolic, biochemical and hematologic investigations are reviewed. Special emphasis has been given to the changing clinical manifestations which accompany maturation and to the problems of recognition of childhood autism in the very young child. PMID:4120820

  15. Rosuvastatin: A Review of the Pharmacology and Clinical Effectiveness in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luvai, Ahai; Mbagaya, Wycliffe; Hall, Alistair S.; Barth, Julian H.

    2012-01-01

    Rosuvastatin is a new generation HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor which exhibits some unique pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic properties. It has low extrahepatic tissue penetration, low potential for CYP3A4 interactions and substantial LDL-C lowering capacity and therefore has distinct advantages. We conducted a Medline literature search to identify rosuvastatin papers published in English. In this review, we outline the pharmacology of rosuvastatin, highlighting its efficacy and safety. We also review the major clinical trials with reference to primary and secondary prevention, familial hypercholesterolaemia and comparison with other statins. Finally we address its place in clinical practice. PMID:22442638

  16. Anatomy of the Ophthalmic Artery: A Review concerning Its Modern Surgical and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Michalinos, Adamantios; Zogana, Sofia; Kotsiomitis, Evangelos; Mazarakis, Antonios; Troupis, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy of ophthalmic artery has been thoroughly studied and reviewed in many anatomical and surgical textbooks and papers. Issues of interest are its intracranial and extracranial course, its branches, its importance for vision, and its interaction with various intracranial pathologies. Improvement of our understanding about pathophysiology of certain diseases like aneurysm formation, central retinal artery occlusion, and retinoblastoma and also invention of new therapeutic modalities like superselective catheterization, intra-arterial fibrinolysis, and intra-arterial chemotherapy necessitate a reappraisal of its anatomy from a clinical point of view. The aim of this review is to examine clinical anatomy of ophthalmic artery and correlate it with new diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26635976

  17. What is new in adolescent psychiatry? Literature review and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gabriel

    2013-04-01

    This article provides the adolescent medicine physician with a review of seminal psychiatric research published in 2011 and 2012 and its clinical relevance for day-to-day practice. The present review focuses on conditions commonly encountered by adolescent medicine physicians such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, bipolar disorder, tic disorders, and major depression. Additionally, there is a section that outlines specific clinical situations for which psychiatric consultation must be obtained, as well as helpful resources and suggestions to mitigate the unavailability of appointments in a mental health office.

  18. Association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regenerative therapy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Koidou, Vasiliki-Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this review is to systematically investigate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis with the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. Material and Methods Based on a focused question, an electronic search identified 155 unique citations. Three journals (Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology and Journal of Periodontal Research), references of relevant studies and review articles were hand-searched. Two independent reviewers implementing eligibility inclusion criteria selected the studies. Results Of the 155, four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All studies were published between 2000 and 2004 and the samples’ size was 40 to 86 patients. Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene were included in all. Three out of four studies failed to identify an association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration, while one found an association. The heterogeneity and small number of studies included prevented the conduct of a meta-analysis. No studies were identified evaluating the effect of other genotypes and as a result only IL-1 genotype studies were included. Conclusions Within the limits of the present review, no direct conclusion for the effect of a susceptible IL-1 genotype status to the clinical outcome after periodontal regeneration could be drawn. The need of more qualitative studies to explore a possible association emerges. Key words:Periodontitis, genotype, periodontal therapy, regeneration, susceptibility, systematic review. PMID:26946210

  19. Factors that influence career progression among postdoctoral clinical academics: a scoping review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Veronica; Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of academic medicine is uncertain. Concerns regarding the future availability of qualified and willing trainee clinical academics have been raised worldwide. Of significant concern is our failure to retain postdoctoral trainee clinical academics, who are likely to be our next generation of leaders in scientific discovery. Objectives To review the literature about factors that may influence postdoctoral career progression in early career clinical academics. Design This study employed a scoping review method. Three reviewers separately assessed whether the articles found fit the inclusion criteria. Data sources PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar (1991–2015). Article selection The review encompassed a broad search of English language studies published anytime up to November 2015. All articles were eligible for inclusion, including research papers employing either quantitative or qualitative methods, as well as editorials and other summary articles. Data extraction Data extracted from included publications were charted according to author(s), sample population, study design, key findings, country of origin and year of publication. Results Our review identified 6 key influences: intrinsic motivation, work–life balance, inclusiveness, work environment, mentorship and availability of funding. It also detected significant gaps within the literature about these influences. Conclusions Three key steps are proposed to help support postdoctoral trainee clinical academics. These focus on ensuring that researchers feel encouraged in their workplace, involved in collaborative dialogue with key stakeholders and able to access reliable information regarding their chosen career pathway. Finally, we highlight recommendations for future research. PMID:27798036

  20. Regulatory challenges in the review of data from global clinical trials: the PMDA perspective.

    PubMed

    Asano, K; Tanaka, A; Sato, T; Uyama, Y

    2013-08-01

    Regulatory agencies face challenges in reviewing data from global clinical trials (GCTs) in the era of globalization of drug development. One major challenge is consideration of ethnic factors in evaluating GCT data so as to extrapolate foreign population data to one's own national population. Here, we present the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) perspective in reviewing GCT data in new drug applications (NDAs) and discuss future challenges for new drug approval.

  1. A Review of Clinical Trials of Human Papillomavirus Prophylactic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, John T.; Castellsagué, Xavier; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    End of study analyses of the phase III trials of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines in young women are now largely completed. Two distinct vaccines were evaluated, Gardasil® (Merck & Co., Whitehouse Station, NJ USA) a quadrivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 6, 11, 16 and 18 and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium), a bivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 16 and 18. Both vaccines exhibited excellent safety and immunogenicity profiles. The vaccines also demonstrated remarkably high and similar efficacy against the vaccine-targeted types for a range of cervical endpoints from persistent infection to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) in women naïve to the corresponding type at the time of vaccination. However, protection from incident infection or disease from non-vaccine types was restricted, and the vaccines had no effect on prevalent infection or disease. Gardasil® also demonstrated strong protection against genital warts and vulvar/vaginal neoplasia associated with the vaccine types. In other trials, Gardasil® protected mid-adult women from incident infection and CIN caused by the vaccine types and protected men for incident infection, genital warts and anal intraepithelial neoplasia by the vaccine types. Cervarix® protected against vaccine-targeted anal infections in women in an end of study evaluation. For practical reasons, efficacy studies have not been conducted in the primary target populations of current vaccination programs, adolescent girls and boys. However, immunogenicity bridging studies demonstrating excellent safety and strong immune responses in adolescence, coupled with the documentation of durable antibody responses and protection in young adults, leads to an optimistic projection of the effectiveness of the vaccines in adolescent vaccination programs. Taken together, the excellent clinical trial results strongly support the potential of the vaccines as

  2. HIV-1 tropism testing and clinical management of CCR5 antagonists: Quebec review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Cécile; Hardy, Isabelle; Lalonde, Richard; Trottier, Benoit; Tsarevsky, Irina; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 tropism assays play a crucial role in determining the response to CCR5 receptor antagonists. Initially, phenotypic tests were used, but limited access to these tests prompted the development of alternative strategies. Recently, genotyping tropism has been validated using a Canadian technology in clinical trials investigating the use of maraviroc in both experienced and treatment-naive patients. The present guidelines review the evidence supporting the use of genotypic assays and provide recommendations regarding tropism testing in daily clinical management.

  3. Treatment-resistant depression in adolescents: review and updates on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Fadi T; Atwi, Mia; Brent, David A

    2011-11-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) in adolescents is prevalent and impairing. We here review the definition, prevalence, clinical significance, risk factors, and management of TRD in adolescents. Risk factors associated with TRD include characteristics of depression (severity, level of hopelessness, and suicidal ideation), psychiatric and medical comorbidities, environmental factors (family conflict, maternal depression, and history of abuse), and pharmacokinetics and other biomarkers. Management options include review of the adequacy of the initial treatment, re-assessment for the above-noted factors that might predispose to treatment resistance, switching antidepressants, and augmentation with medication or psychotherapy. Other modalities, such as electroconvulsive therapy, vagal nerve stimulation, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, are also reviewed.

  4. A review of the current state of digital plate reading of cultures in clinical microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, Daniel D.; Novak, Susan M.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2015-01-01

    Digital plate reading (DPR) is increasingly being adopted as a means to facilitate the analysis and improve the quality and efficiency within the clinical microbiology laboratory. This review discusses the role of DPR in the context of total laboratory automation and explores some of the platforms currently available or in development for digital image capturing of microbial growth on media. The review focuses on the advantages and challenges of DPR. Peer-reviewed studies describing the utility and quality of these novel DPR systems are largely lacking, and professional guidelines for DPR implementation and quality management are needed. Further development and more widespread adoption of DPR is anticipated. PMID:26110091

  5. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users.

  6. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: review of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Helen; Byrne, Susan; Barrett, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kieran C.; Cotter, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a form of encephalitis occurring primarily in women and associated with antibodies against NR1 or NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor. As a potentially treatable differential for symptoms and signs seen in neurology and psychiatric clinics, clinicians practising across the lifespan should be aware of this form of encephalitis. Common clinical features include auditory and visual hallucinations, delusions, behavioural change (frequently with agitation), impaired consciousness, motor disturbance (ranging from dyskinesia to catatonia), seizures, and autonomic dysfunction. We present a review of the literature on the disorder, including its clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment and prognosis. PMID:26191419

  7. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: review of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Barry, Helen; Byrne, Susan; Barrett, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kieran C; Cotter, David R

    2015-02-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a form of encephalitis occurring primarily in women and associated with antibodies against NR1 or NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor. As a potentially treatable differential for symptoms and signs seen in neurology and psychiatric clinics, clinicians practising across the lifespan should be aware of this form of encephalitis. Common clinical features include auditory and visual hallucinations, delusions, behavioural change (frequently with agitation), impaired consciousness, motor disturbance (ranging from dyskinesia to catatonia), seizures, and autonomic dysfunction. We present a review of the literature on the disorder, including its clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment and prognosis.

  8. Methamphetamine abuse and dentistry: a review of the literature and presentation of a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, Jason H; Donaldson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Methamphetamine is not a new drug. It has a long and storied history of legitimate clinical use and recreational abuse. Unfortunately, abuse of methamphetamine is increasing with alarming frequency in the United States and leads to appalling destruction of dentition. The pathognomonic effects of methamphetamine abuse on teeth have led to the term "meth mouth." This term, while descriptive of the clinical appearance of patients, is a misnomer. A review of available information on methamphetamine abuse is presented and discussed. A clinical case is documented to help clinicians recognize and manage patients who may be abusing methamphetamines.

  9. Clinical Applications of Saffron (Crocus sativus) and its Constituents: A Review.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, M; Vahabzadeh, M; Hosseinzadeh, H

    2015-06-01

    Commonly known as saffron, Crocus sativus L and its active components have shown several useful pharmacological effects such as anticonvulsant, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, radical scavenger effects, learning and memory improving effects, etc. There has been an increasing body of data on saffron use in medical databases within the last 20 years. In the current review, the strengths and weaknesses of some of the clinical trials about different pharmacological effects of saffron will be discussed C. sativus extract has been studied in 8 anti-depressant clinical trials in comparison to placebo or some antidepressant drugs, in which saffron showed effectiveness as an antidepressant drug. Clinical trials on anti-Alzheimer effect of saffron demonstrated that it was more effective than the placebo, and as effective as donepezil. 2 clinical trials on antipruritic and complexion promoter in skin care effects of saffron both confirmed that saffron was more efficient than the placebo. In another clinical trial, it was proved that in addition to the weight loss treatment, saffron could reduce snacking frequency. Clinical trials conducted on women with premenstrual syndrome showed that saffron could reduce suffering symptoms more than the placebo and similar to standard treatments.Furthermore, additional clinical trials on effects of saffron on erection dysfunction, allergies, cardiovascular and immune system as well as its safety, toxicity and human pharmacokinetics are reviewed herein.

  10. Characteristics of unsafe undergraduate nursing students in clinical practice: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Killam, Laura A; Luhanga, Florence; Bakker, Debra

    2011-08-01

    Providing quality clinical experiences for nursing students is vital to the development of safe and competent professional nurses. However, clinical educators often have difficulty identifying and coping with students whose performance is unsatisfactory. The purposes of this integrative review were to examine the extent and quality of the literature focusing on unsafe nursing students in clinical settings and to describe the characteristics of nursing students considered unsafe in clinical settings. A structured literature search yielded 11 relevant articles: five theoretical articles and six research studies. Analysis of findings revealed three themes: ineffective interpersonal interactions, knowledge and skill incompetence, and unprofessional image. The themes reflected the attitudes, actions, and behaviors that influenced students' ability to develop a safe milieu for client care. The findings provide clarity for early identification of students in need of increased support and facilitate clinical educators in meeting students' learning needs to ensure patient safety.

  11. Pharmacotherapy in the management of asthma in the elderly: a review of clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Song, Woo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Asthma in the elderly is a disease with emerging concern. Despite some recent advances in our understanding of epidemiology and pathophysiology, there is a considerable lack of clinical evidence specific to elderly patients. Currently available high quality clinical evidence has been mostly obtained from younger adults, but rarely from elderly patients. Under-representation of elderly patients in previous randomized trials may have been due to being, old age, or having comorbidities. Thus, a question may be raised whether current clinical evidence could be well generalized into elderly patients. Further clinical trials should address clinical issues raised in elderly population. In this review, we aimed to overview the efficacy and safety of pharmacological management, and also to summarize the literature relevant to elderly asthma. PMID:26844215

  12. Mobile technology and its use in clinical nursing education: a literature review.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Nursing students face a variety of challenges to learning in clinical practice, from the theory-practice gap, to a lack of clinical supervision and the ad hoc nature of learning in clinical environments. Mobile technology is proposed as one way to address these challenges. This article comprehensively summarizes and critically reviews the available literature on mobile technology used in undergraduate clinical nursing education. It identifies the lack of clear definitions and theory in the current body of evidence; the variety of mobile devices and applications used; the benefits of mobile platforms in nursing education; and the complexity of sociotechnical factors, such as the cost, usability, portability, and quality of mobile tools, that affect their use in undergraduate clinical nursing education. Implications for nursing education and practice are outlined, and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  13. The Clinical Use of Robots for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Joshua J.; Schmitt, Lauren M.; Villano, Michael; Crowell, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    We examined peer-reviewed studies in order to understand the current status of empirically based evidence on the clinical applications of robots in the diagnosis and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Studies are organized into four broad categories: (a) the response of individuals with ASD to robots or robot-like behavior in comparison…

  14. Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Physiotherapy: Review and Recommendations for Future Clinical Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Orsolya; Fazekas, Gabor; Zsiga, Katalin; Denes, Zoltan

    2011-01-01

    Robot-mediated physiotherapy provides a new possibility for improving the outcome of rehabilitation of patients who are recovering from stroke. This study is a review of robot-supported upper limb physiotherapy focusing on the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. A literature search was carried out in PubMed, OVID, and EBSCO for clinical trials with robots…

  15. Fringe phenotypes in autism: a review of clinical, biochemical and cognitive studies.

    PubMed

    Goussé, Véronique; Plumet, Marie Hélène; Chabane, Nadia; Mouren-Siméoni, Marie-Christine; Ferradian, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion

    2002-05-01

    Progress in identifying the genetic vulnerability factors in autism requires correct identification of the inherited phenotype(s). This can be achieved not only by the accurate description of the affected subject but also by the identification of vulnerability traits in non-affected relatives of autistic probands. This review will focus on this last strategy and principally on clinical, biochemical and cognitive traits.

  16. 75 FR 1790 - Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical... Approval'' (September 1998, Office of Health Affairs, Food and Drug Administration). To enhance human subject protection and reduce regulatory burden, the Department of Health and Human Services, Office...

  17. Current Clinical Interventions for Smoking Cessation: A Review of Empirical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcellino, Robert Leonard, Jr.

    This document reviews all empirical studies on clinically-based smoking cessation interventions that were reported in "Psychological Abstracts" between January 1982 and March 1990. Interventions are categorized as either physiological or psychological in orientation and are further grouped according to specific treatment type:…

  18. [Arterial steal via an arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis. A clinical case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Juliá Montoya, J; Lozano Vilardell, P; Corominas Roura, C; Blanes Mompó, I; Flores López, D; Manuel-Rimbau Muñoz, E; García de la Torre, A

    1993-01-01

    We related a case of arterial atrappment in the left upper limb by an arteriovenous humerus-cephalic hyperfunctioning fistula. Surgical procedure consisted on the insertion of a PTFE's banding around the arterialized vein obtaining satisfactory clinic and functional results. We review in the literature, the frequency the pathogeny and the therapeutics possibilities.

  19. 75 FR 39263 - Guidance for Humanitarian Device Exemption Holders, Institutional Review Boards, Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ..., Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Humanitarian Device... requirements set forth in the Pediatric Medical Device Safety and Improvement Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-85). The Pediatric Medical Device Safety and Improvement Act of 2007 includes a provision requiring...

  20. Religion and Spirituality within Counselling/Clinical Psychology Training Programmes: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jafari, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing efforts to attend to religious and spiritual issues within clinical/counselling psychology. However, there is limited research demonstrating how successfully such content is integrated into existing training programmes. This investigation sought to review primary research literature related to training…

  1. Computer Technology in Clinical Psychology Services for People with Mental Retardation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Sara; Hastings, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Review of the literature on computer technology in clinical psychology services for people with mental retardation is organized around stages of a scientist-practitioner working model: assessment, formulation, and intervention. Examples of technologies to facilitate work at each stage are given. Practical difficulties with implementation of…

  2. Music Therapy with Children: A Review of Clinical Utility and Application to Special Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaw, John David Andrew

    This paper reviews the effectiveness of music therapy in treating children with psychiatric and developmental problems. The clinical utility of music therapy is first evaluated by examining the foundational effects of music on affect and behavior. Next, the two broad approaches to music therapy, active and passive music therapy, are discussed.…

  3. Alternative Methodologies in Research Literature Review: Links between Clinical Work and MFT Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Shelia M.; Sandberg, Jonathan G.; Corby, Joy; Robila, Mihaela; Platt, Jason J.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews 15 years of clinical research in three family therapy (FT) journals that provide evidence for the effectiveness of marriage and family therapy. Considers designs that are being utilized in reports on the effectiveness of various models of FT. Makes connections between research and the everyday work of clinicians to make the work more…

  4. Assessing the Clinical Skills of Dental Students: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carly L.; Grey, Nick; Satterthwaite, Julian D.

    2013-01-01

    Education, from a student perspective, is largely driven by assessment. An effective assessment tool should be both valid and reliable, yet this is often not achieved. The aim of this literature review is to identify and appraise the evidence base for assessment tools used primarily in evaluating clinical skills of dental students. Methods:…

  5. Review of Self-Awareness and Its Clinical Application in Stroke Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Daniel P. K.; Liu, Karen P. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to explore, following a literature review, the concepts of self-awareness, its assessment, and intervention for self-awareness deficits, as well as its clinical significance in stroke rehabilitation; and (ii) to apply the concepts of self-awareness in the context of a rehabilitation program. The search was…

  6. FDA’s (Federal Drug Administration) Reviews of New Drugs: Changes Needed in Process for Reviewing and Reporting on Clinical Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    and the reliability of test data submitted to FDA in support of new drug applications. GAO reviewed the Division’s activities, including its...responsibilities relating to the approval of new drug and biologic products; the accuracy of FDA data and adequacy of oversight regarding clinical...investigators, institutional review boards, and toxicology laboratories involved in studies supporting new drug applications; FDA’s review of studies by clinical

  7. Five-year review of an international clinical research-training program

    PubMed Central

    Suemoto, Claudia Kimie; Ismail, Sherine; Corrêa, Paulo César Rodrigues Pinto; Khawaja, Faiza; Jerves, Teodoro; Pesantez, Laura; Germani, Ana Claudia Camargo Gonçalves; Zaina, Fabio; dos Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ricardo Jorge; Singh, Priyamvada; Paulo, Judy Vicente; Matsubayashi, Suely Reiko; Vidor, Liliane Pinto; Andretta, Guilherme; Tomás, Rita; Illigens, Ben MW; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The exponential increase in clinical research has profoundly changed medical sciences. Evidence that has accumulated in the past three decades from clinical trials has led to the proposal that clinical care should not be based solely on clinical expertise and patient values, and should integrate robust data from systematic research. As a consequence, clinical research has become more complex and methods have become more rigorous, and evidence is usually not easily translated into clinical practice. Therefore, the instruction of clinical research methods for scientists and clinicians must adapt to this new reality. To address this challenge, a global distance-learning clinical research-training program was developed, based on collaborative learning, the pedagogical goal of which was to develop critical thinking skills in clinical research. We describe and analyze the challenges and possible solutions of this course after 5 years of experience (2008–2012) with this program. Through evaluation by students and faculty, we identified and reviewed the following challenges of our program: 1) student engagement and motivation, 2) impact of heterogeneous audience on learning, 3) learning in large groups, 4) enhancing group learning, 5) enhancing social presence, 6) dropouts, 7) quality control, and 8) course management. We discuss these issues and potential alternatives with regard to our research and background. PMID:25878518

  8. Clinical applications of videoconferencing: a scoping review of the literature for the period 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Farhad; Armfield, Nigel R; Dimitrijevic, Mila; Gray, Leonard C

    2014-10-01

    We conducted a scoping review of the literature on the clinical applications of videoconferencing. Electronic searches were performed using the PubMed, Embase and CINHAL databases to retrieve papers published from 2002 to 2012 that described clinical applications of videoconferencing. The initial search yielded 4923 records and after removing the duplicates and screening at title/abstract level, 505 articles met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed at full-text level. The countries with the highest number of papers were the US, Australia and Canada. Most studies were non-randomised controlled trials. The discipline with highest number of published studies (39%) was mental health, followed by surgery (7%) and general medicine (6%). The type of care delivered via video comprised acute, sub-acute and chronic care, but in 44% of the papers, the intervention was used for a combination of these purposes. Videoconferencing was used for all age groups but more frequently for adults (20%). Most of the papers (91%) reported using videoconferencing for several clinical purposes including management, diagnosis, counselling and monitoring. The review showed that videoconferencing has been used in a wide range of disciplines and settings for different clinical purposes. The practical value of published papers would be improved by following standard guidelines for reporting research projects and clinical trials.

  9. Quantitative clinical pharmacology for size and age scaling in pediatric drug development: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Samant, Tanay S; Mangal, Naveen; Lukacova, Viera; Schmidt, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The establishment of drug dosing in children is often hindered by the lack of actual pediatric efficacy and safety data. To overcome this limitation, scaling approaches are frequently employed to leverage adult clinical information for informing pediatric dosing. The objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the different scaling approaches used in pediatric pharmacotherapy as well as their proper implementation in drug development and clinical use. We will start out with a brief overview of the current regulatory requirements in pediatric drug development, followed by a review of the most commonly employed scaling approaches in increasing order of complexity ranging from simple body weight-based dosing to physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling approaches. Each of the presented approaches has advantages and limitations, which will be highlighted throughout the course of the review by the use of clinically-relevant examples. The choice of the approach employed consequently depends on the clinical question at hand and the availability of sufficient clinical data. The main effort while establishing and qualifying these scaling approaches should be directed towards the development of safe and effective dosing regimens in children rather than identifying the best model, ie models should be fit for purpose.

  10. Bovine placenta: a review on morphology, components, and defects from terminology and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Peter, Augustine T

    2013-10-15

    The bovine placenta has been the subject of many studies. Concurrently, several specialized terms have been developed to describe its development, morphology, components, function, and pathology. Many of these terms are simple, some are difficult to understand and use, and others are antiquated and may not be scientifically accurate. Defining and adopting terminology for the bovine placenta that is clear, precise and understandable, and available in a single source is expected to facilitate exchange of clinical and research information. This review presents a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding the bovine placenta and attempts to define terms. In this process, conventional terminology is presented, and contemporary and novel terms are proposed from a biological perspective. For example, use of terms such as syndesmochorial, retained placenta, and large offspring syndrome should be revisited. Furthermore, the clinical relevance of the structure and function of the bovine placenta is reviewed. Finally, terms discussed in this review are summarized (in table format).

  11. The science of salt: a systematic review of clinical salt studies 2013 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Claire; Raj, Thout Sudhir; Trudeau, Luc; Bacon, Simon L; Padwal, Raj; Webster, Jacqui; Campbell, Norm

    2015-05-01

    The authors provided a systematic review of the clinical and population health impact of increased dietary salt intake during 1 year. Randomized controlled trials or cohort studies or meta-analyses on the effect of sodium intake were examined from Medline searches between June 2013 to May 2014. Quality indicators were used to select studies that were relevant to clinical and public health. A total of 213 studies were reviewed, of which 11 (n=186,357) were eligible. These studies confirmed a causal relationship between increasing dietary salt and increased blood pressure and an association between several adverse health outcomes and increased dietary salt. A new association between salt intake and renal cell cancer was published. No study that met inclusion criteria found harm from lowering dietary salt. The findings of this systematic review are consistent with previous data relating increased dietary salt to increased blood pressure and adverse health outcomes.

  12. Current status on clinical applications of magnesium-based orthopaedic implants: A review from clinical translational perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dewei; Witte, Frank; Lu, Faqiang; Wang, Jiali; Li, Junlei; Qin, Ling

    2017-01-01

    As a new generation of medical metallic material, magnesium (Mg) and its alloys with or without surface coating have attracted a great deal of attention due to its biodegradability and potential for avoiding a removal operation after the implant has fulfilled its function for surgical fixation of injured musculoskeletal tissues. Although a few clinical cases on Mg-based orthopaedic implants were reported more than a century ago, it was not until recently that clinical trials using these implants with improved physicochemical properties were carried out in Germany, China and Korea for bone fracture fixation. The promising results so far suggest a bright future for biodegradable Mg-based orthopaedic implants and would warrant large scale phase II/III studies. Given the increasing interest on this emerging biomaterials and intense effort to improve its properties for various clinical applications, this review covers the evolution, current strategies, and future perspectives in the development of Mg-based orthopaedic implants. We also highlight a few clinical cases performed in China that may be unfamiliar to the general orthopaedic community.

  13. Yoga for Health Care in Korea: A Protocol for Systematic Review of Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiae; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Ju Ah; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2016-08-01

    This systematic review aims to evaluate the therapeutic effects of yoga therapy using an evidence-based approach and investigates the relationship between yoga and the meridian energies based on all available clinical studies in Korea. Sixteen electronic databases will be searched from the inception of the study until January 2016. All clinical evidences that evaluate any type of yoga and any type of control in individuals with any type of condition will be eligible. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials and the Newcastle-Ottawa scale for nonrandomized studies. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility and the risk of bias, and then they will extract the data. With its extensive, unbiased search of the Korean literature from various databases without any language restrictions, this systematic review will be useful for both practitioners in the field of yoga research as well as for patients.

  14. Clinical performance and failures of zirconia-based fixed partial dentures: a review literature

    PubMed Central

    Triwatana, Premwara; Nagaviroj, Noppavan

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Zirconia has been used in clinical dentistry for approximately a decade, and there have been several reports regarding the clinical performance and survival rates of zirconia-based restorations. The aim of this article was to review the literatures published from 2000 to 2010 regarding the clinical performance and the causes of failure of zirconia fixed partial dentures (FPDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literatures was performed through PubMed to obtain all the clinical studies focused on the performance of the zirconia FPDs. The electronic search was supplemented by manual searching through the references of the selected articles for possible inclusion of some articles. Randomized controlled clinical trials, longitudinal prospective and retrospective cohort studies were the focuses of this review. Articles that did not focus on the restoration of teeth using zirconia-based restorations were excluded from this review. RESULTS There have been three studies for the study of zirconia single crowns. The clinical outcome was satisfactory (acceptable) according to the CDA evaluation. There have been 14 studies for the study of zirconia FPDs. The survival rates of zirconia anterior and posterior FPDs ranged between 73.9% - 100% after 2 - 5 years. The causes of failure were veneer fracture, ceramic core fracture, abutment tooth fracture, secondary caries, and restoration dislodgment. CONCLUSION The overall performance of zirconia FPDs was satisfactory according to either USPHS criteria or CDA evaluations. Fracture resistance of core and veneering ceramics, bonding between core and veneering materials, and marginal discrepancy of zirconia-based restorations were discussed as the causes of failure. Because of its repeated occurrence in many studies, future researches are essentially required to clarify this problem and to reduce the fracture incident. PMID:22737311

  15. A Systematic Approach to Clinical Peer Review in a Critical Access Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Deyo-Svendsen, Mark E.; Phillips, Michael R.; Albright, Jill K.; Schilling, Keith A.; Palmer, Karl B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical provider peer review (CPPR) is a process for evaluating a patient's experience in encounters of care. It is part of ongoing professional practice evaluation and focused professional practice evaluation—important contributors to provider credentialing and privileging. Critical access hospitals are hindered in CPPR by having a limited number of providers, shortages of staff resources, and relationships among staff members that make unbiased review difficult. Small departments within larger institutions may face similar challenges. Methods: A CPPR process created at Mayo Clinic Health System is described. It involved a case review questionnaire built on the Institute of Medicine “Six Aims for Changing the Health Care System,” a standardized intervention algorithm and tracking tool. Outcomes: During 2007 through 2014, a total of 994 cases were reviewed; 31% led to provider dialog and education or intervention. Findings were applied to core measure processes with success rate going from 87% to 97%. Changes were adopted in end-of-life care, contributing to a 50% reduction in all-cause mortality rate. Conclusions: Providing peer review tools to a critical access hospital can keep peer review within a group with knowledge of the individual provider's practice and can make process improvement the everyday work of those involved. PMID:27749718

  16. Definitions and outcome measures of clinical trials regarding opioid-induced constipation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Jan; Siemens, Waldemar; Camilleri, Michael; Davies, Andrew; Drossman, Douglas A; Webster, Lynn R; Becker, Gerhild

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a frequent symptom in patients treated with opioids and impacts the patients' quality of life. However, there is no generally accepted definition for OIC. The aims of this study were to identify definitions for OIC in clinical trials and Cochrane Reviews and to compile assessment tools and outcome measures that were used in clinical trials. In a systematic review, 5 databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and EMBASE) were searched to identify clinical trials assessing OIC in adult patients or healthy volunteers. Studies published between 1993 and August 2013 were included. A total of 1488 studies were retrieved and 47 publications were included in the analysis. A minority of the publications (n=16, 34%) provided a clear definition for OIC. The definitions were highly variable and the present or recent history of opioid therapy was frequently (n=6, 38%) not included in these definitions. Of 46 clinical trials, 17 (37%) relied exclusively on objective measures such as bowel movement frequency, whereas another 17 studies additionally included patient-reported outcome measures such as, "feeling of incomplete bowel evacuation." Few trials (n=7, 15%) assessed the patient-reported global burden of OIC. Standard definitions and outcome measures are necessary (i) for consistency in OIC diagnosis in clinical practice and clinical trials; and (ii) to assure comparability of trial findings (eg, in meta-analyses). An OIC definition and outcome measures are proposed.

  17. A Clinical Update and Radiologic Review of Pediatric Orbital and Ocular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ajay A.; Naheedy, John H.; Chen, James Y.-Y.; Robbins, Shira L.; Ramkumar, Hema L.

    2013-01-01

    While pediatric orbital tumors are most often managed in tertiary care centers, clinicians should be aware of the signs of intraocular and orbital neoplasms. In the pediatric population, a delay in diagnosis of orbital and intraocular lesions, even if benign, can lead to vision loss and deformity. Intraocular lesions reviewed are retinoblastoma, medulloepithelioma, and retinal astrocytic hamartoma. Orbital neoplasms reviewed are rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma metastases, optic pathway glioma, plexiform neurofibroma, leukemia, lymphoprolipherative disease, orbital inflammatory syndrome, dermoid and epidermoid inclusion cysts, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Vascular lesions reviewed are infantile hemangioma and venous lymphatic malformation. In conjunction with clinical examination, high-resolution ophthalmic imaging and radiologic imaging play an important role in making a diagnosis and differentiating between benign and likely malignant processes. The radiologic imaging characteristics of these lesions will be discussed to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment. The current treatment modalities and management of tumors will also be reviewed. PMID:23577029

  18. Education and training to support the use of clinical telehealth: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Edirippulige, S; Armfield, N R

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Despite a growing literature base, substantial investment, and policy changes within governments, the integration of telehealth into routine clinical care has been limited. The availability of appropriate systematic education and training for practitioners has been highlighted as necessary for strong adoption. However, the availability and nature of telehealth-related education and training for practitioners is not understood. By reviewing the literature, we aimed to describe the delivery of education and training in telehealth, with particular focus on content, modes of delivery, types of institutions, and target clinician groups. Methods We performed searches using PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library, and ERIC. We included studies that were focused on the delivery of telehealth-related academic or vocational education and training. We extracted information pertaining to country, programs and their participants, and tabulated the results. Results Altogether 388 articles were identified, of which nine studies were selected for final review. Programs from five countries were represented and articles were spread across telemedicine and clinically oriented journals. Education and training in telehealth has been provided as both university level and vocational courses using conventional classroom based delivery methods and e-learning. Reported curriculum items included terminology, clinical applications, the evidence-base, and technological aspects. Conclusions Published evidence in peer-reviewed literature on telehealth education and training is limited. According to this review, a number of topics relating to telehealth have been covered by existing education programs both within tertiary and professional development levels.

  19. Factors influencing nursing students' academic and clinical performance and attrition: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Victoria; Powis, David; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Hunter, Sharyn

    2012-11-01

    Predicted workforce shortages have resulted in government initiatives to increase student numbers in preregistration nursing education. In tandem schools of nursing need to ensure students' progress and complete. The aim of this review was to identify factors that influence preregistration nursing students' academic performance, clinical performance and attrition. An integrative review of both quantitative and qualitative literature was conducted using validated appraisal checklists. The review included studies published from 1999 to 2011 in the databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Proquest nursing, Proquest Education (via Proquest 5000), ERIC, Journals@Ovid, PsychINFO and ScienceDirect. Studies were categorised according to their impact on academic progression, clinical progression and attrition. Forty four studies were found; most used quantitative methodologies. The review identified that few studies explored factors that impact on students' clinical performance. The four categories that potentially impact on nursing students' academic performance and attrition were: demographic, academic, cognitive and personality/behavioural factors. The challenge for universities committed to students' success is to develop strategies aimed at addressing these factors that are appropriate to specific contexts and student cohorts.

  20. Systematic Literature Review of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Clinical Trials for Blepharospasm and Hemifacial Spasm

    PubMed Central

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Chen, Jack J.; Frei, Karen; Nahab, Fatta; Tagliati, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim was to elucidate clinical trial efficacy, safety, and dosing practices of abobotulinumtoxinA (ABO) treatment in adult patients with blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. To date, most literature reviews for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm have examined the effectiveness of all botulinum neurotoxin type A products as a class. However, differences in dosing units and recommended schemes provide a clear rationale for reviewing each product separately. Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify randomized controlled trials and other comparative clinical studies of ABO in the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm published in English between January 1991 and March 2015. Medical literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane library, EMBASE) were searched. A total of five primary publications that evaluated ABO for the management of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm were identified and summarized. Results Data included 374 subjects with blepharospasm and 172 subjects with hemifacial spasm treated with ABO. Total ABO doses ranged between 80 and 340 U for blepharospasm and 25 and 85 U for hemifacial spasm, depending on the severity of the clinical condition. All studies showed statistically significant benefits for the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. ABO was generally well tolerated across the individual studies. Adverse events considered to be associated with ABO treatment included: ptosis, tearing, blurred vision, double vision, dry eyes, and facial weakness. Discussion These data from 5 randomized clinical studies represents the available evidence base of ABO in blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. Future studies in this area will add to this evidence base. PMID:26566457

  1. The Full Spectrum of Clinical Ethical Issues in Kidney Failure. Findings of a Systematic Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Kahrass, Hannes; Strech, Daniel; Mertz, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Background When treating patients with kidney failure, unavoidable ethical issues often arise. Current clinical practice guidelines some of them, but lack comprehensive information about the full range of relevant ethical issues in kidney failure. A systematic literature review of such ethical issues supports medical professionalism in nephrology, and offers a solid evidential base for efforts that aim to improve ethical conduct in health care. Aim To identify the full spectrum of clinical ethical issues that can arise for patients with kidney failure in a systematic and transparent manner. Method A systematic review in Medline (publications in English or German between 2000 and 2014) and Google Books (with no restrictions) was conducted. Ethical issues were identified by qualitative text analysis and normative analysis. Results The literature review retrieved 106 references that together mentioned 27 ethical issues in clinical care of kidney failure. This set of ethical issues was structured into a matrix consisting of seven major categories and further first and second-order categories. Conclusions The systematically-derived matrix helps raise awareness and understanding of the complexity of ethical issues in kidney failure. It can be used to identify ethical issues that should be addressed in specific training programs for clinicians, clinical practice guidelines, or other types of policies dealing with kidney failure. PMID:26938863

  2. A Review of Barriers to Minorities' Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials: Implications for Future Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Salman, Ali; Nguyen, Claire; Lee, Yi-Hui; Cooksey-James, Tawna

    2016-04-01

    To enhance nurses' awareness and competencies in practice and research by reporting the common barriers to participation of minorities in cancer clinical trials and discussing facilitators and useful strategies for recruitment. Several databases were searched for articles published in peer reviewed journals. Some of the barriers to minorities' participation in clinical trials were identified within the cultural social-context of cancer patients. The involvement of community networking was suggested as the most effective strategy for the recruitment of minorities in cancer clinical trials. Using culturally sensitive approaches to enhance ethnic minorities' participation is important for advancing cancer care and eliminating health disparities. Awareness of barriers and potential facilitators to the enrollment of ethnic minority cancer patients may contribute to enhancing nurses' competencies of recruiting ethnic minorities in nursing research, playing efficient roles in cancer clinical trials team, and providing culturally competent quality care.

  3. The Ultimaster Biodegradable-Polymer Sirolimus-Eluting Stent: An Updated Review of Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Chisari, Alberto; Pistritto, Anna Maria; Piccolo, Raffaele; La Manna, Alessio; Danzi, Gian Battista

    2016-09-06

    The Ultimaster coronary stent system (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) represents a new iteration in drug-eluting stent (DES) technology that has recently received the Conformité Européenne (CE) mark approval for clinical use. The Ultimaster is a thin-strut, cobalt chromium, biodegradable-polymer, sirolimus-eluting coronary stent. The high elasticity of the biodegradable-polymer (PDLLA-PCL) and the abluminal gradient coating technology are additional novel features of this coronary device. The Ultimaster DES has undergone extensive clinical evaluation in two studies: The CENTURY I and II trials. Results from these two landmark studies suggested an excellent efficacy and safety profile of the Ultimaster DES across several lesion and patient subsets, with similar clinical outcomes to contemporary, new-generation DES. The aim of this review is to summarize the rationale behind this novel DES technology and to provide an update of available evidence about the clinical performance of the Ultimaster DES.

  4. Biomechanical Modeling to Improve Coronary Artery Bifurcation Stenting: Expert Review Document on Techniques and Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Antonios P; Mortier, Peter; Kassab, Ghassan; Dubini, Gabriele; Foin, Nicolas; Murasato, Yoshinobu; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Tu, Shengxian; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Hikichi, Yutaka; Migliavacca, Francesco; Chiastra, Claudio; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank; Reiber, Johan H C; Barlis, Peter; Serruys, Patrick W; Bhatt, Deepak L; Stankovic, Goran; Edelman, Elazer R; Giannoglou, George D; Louvard, Yves; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S

    2015-08-24

    Treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions remains an ongoing challenge for interventional cardiologists. Stenting of coronary bifurcations carries higher risk for in-stent restenosis, stent thrombosis, and recurrent clinical events. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding application and use of biomechanical modeling in the study of stent properties, local flow dynamics, and outcomes after percutaneous coronary interventions in bifurcation lesions. Biomechanical modeling of bifurcation stenting involves computational simulations and in vitro bench testing using subject-specific arterial geometries obtained from in vivo imaging. Biomechanical modeling has the potential to optimize stenting strategies and stent design, thereby reducing adverse outcomes. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish the translation of pre-clinical findings to the clinical arena.

  5. The Ultimaster Biodegradable-Polymer Sirolimus-Eluting Stent: An Updated Review of Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chisari, Alberto; Pistritto, Anna Maria; Piccolo, Raffaele; La Manna, Alessio; Danzi, Gian Battista

    2016-01-01

    The Ultimaster coronary stent system (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) represents a new iteration in drug-eluting stent (DES) technology that has recently received the Conformité Européenne (CE) mark approval for clinical use. The Ultimaster is a thin-strut, cobalt chromium, biodegradable-polymer, sirolimus-eluting coronary stent. The high elasticity of the biodegradable-polymer (PDLLA-PCL) and the abluminal gradient coating technology are additional novel features of this coronary device. The Ultimaster DES has undergone extensive clinical evaluation in two studies: The CENTURY I and II trials. Results from these two landmark studies suggested an excellent efficacy and safety profile of the Ultimaster DES across several lesion and patient subsets, with similar clinical outcomes to contemporary, new-generation DES. The aim of this review is to summarize the rationale behind this novel DES technology and to provide an update of available evidence about the clinical performance of the Ultimaster DES. PMID:27608017

  6. [Major depression in primary care and clinical impacts of treatment strategies: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Beaucage, Clément; Cardinal, Lise; Kavanagh, Mélanie; Aubé, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Major or clinical depression represents a frequent mental illness that is often associated with a high level of morbidity and mortality. Yet, major depression remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. On the level of treatment, it would appear desirable for reasons of better prognosis, to aim more than the simple reduction of depressive symptoms and target their remission resolutely and the fastest return to the individual's optimal functioning. This article presents a systematic review of the literature relating to the clinical impacts of treatment strategies aiming at the improvement of services offered to people who suffer of clinical depression and who consult in primary care. The authors summarize results drawn from 41 studies that include a measurement of the clinical impacts (reduction of symptoms, response, remission and functioning) of various treatment strategies. It appears that using complex treatment strategies favour positive outcomes. The authors propose various paths of research to further increase current knowledge.

  7. Paediatric early warning systems for detecting and responding to clinical deterioration in children: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Veronica; Matthews, Anne; MacDonell, Rachel; Fitzsimons, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the available evidence on paediatric early warning systems (PEWS) for use in acute paediatric healthcare settings for the detection of, and timely response to, clinical deterioration in children. Method The electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and Cochrane were searched systematically from inception up to August 2016. Eligible studies had to refer to PEWS, inclusive of rapid response systems and teams. Outcomes had to be specific to the identification of and/or response to clinical deterioration in children (including neonates) in paediatric hospital settings (including emergency departments). 2 review authors independently completed the screening and selection process, the quality appraisal of the retrieved evidence and data extraction; with a third reviewer resolving any discrepancies, as required. Results were narratively synthesised. Results From a total screening of 2742 papers, 90 papers, of varied designs, were identified as eligible for inclusion in the review. Findings revealed that PEWS are extensively used internationally in paediatric inpatient hospital settings. However, robust empirical evidence on which PEWS is most effective was limited. The studies examined did however highlight some evidence of positive directional trends in improving clinical and process-based outcomes for clinically deteriorating children. Favourable outcomes were also identified for enhanced multidisciplinary team work, communication and confidence in recognising, reporting and making decisions about child clinical deterioration. Conclusions Despite many studies reporting on the complexity and multifaceted nature of PEWS, no evidence was sourced which examined PEWS as a complex healthcare intervention. Future research needs to investigate PEWS as a complex multifaceted sociotechnical system that is embedded in a wider safety culture influenced by many organisational and human factors. PEWS should be embraced as a part of a

  8. Cytochrome P450 2C8 pharmacogenetics: a review of clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Daily, Elizabeth B; Aquilante, Christina L

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8 is responsible for the oxidative metabolism of many clinically available drugs from a diverse number of drug classes (e.g., thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, NSAIDs, antimalarials and chemotherapeutic taxanes). The CYP2C8 enzyme is encoded by the CYP2C8 gene, and several common nonsynonymous polymorphisms (e.g., CYP2C8*2 and CYP2C8*3) exist in this gene. The CYP2C8*2 and *3 alleles have been associated in vitro with decreased metabolism of paclitaxel and arachidonic acid. Recently, the influence of CYP2C8 polymorphisms on substrate disposition in humans has been investigated in a number of clinical pharmacogenetic studies. Contrary to in vitro data, clinical data suggest that the CYP2C8*3 allele is associated with increased metabolism of the CYP2C8 substrates, rosiglitazone, pioglitazone and repaglinide. However, the CYP2C8*3 allele has not been associated with paclitaxel pharmacokinetics in most clinical studies. Furthermore, clinical data regarding the impact of the CYP2C8*3 allele on the disposition of NSAIDs are conflicting and no definitive conclusions can be made at this time. The purpose of this review is to highlight these clinical studies that have investigated the association between CYP2C8 polymorphisms and CYP2C8 substrate pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics in humans. In this review, CYP2C8 clinical pharmacogenetic data are provided by drug class, followed by a discussion of the future of CYP2C8 clinical pharmacogenetic research. PMID:19761371

  9. Systematic reviews of animal experiments demonstrate poor human clinical and toxicological utility.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    The assumption that animal models are reasonably predictive of human outcomes provides the basis for their widespread use in toxicity testing and in biomedical research aimed at developing cures for human diseases. To investigate the validity of this assumption, the comprehensive Scopus biomedical bibliographic databases were searched for published systematic reviews of the human clinical or toxicological utility of animal experiments. In 20 reviews in which clinical utility was examined, the authors concluded that animal models were either significantly useful in contributing to the development of clinical interventions, or were substantially consistent with clinical outcomes, in only two cases, one of which was contentious. These included reviews of the clinical utility of experiments expected by ethics committees to lead to medical advances, of highly-cited experiments published in major journals, and of chimpanzee experiments--those involving the species considered most likely to be predictive of human outcomes. Seven additional reviews failed to clearly demonstrate utility in predicting human toxicological outcomes, such as carcinogenicity and teratogenicity. Consequently, animal data may not generally be assumed to be substantially useful for these purposes. Possible causes include interspecies differences, the distortion of outcomes arising from experimental environments and protocols, and the poor methodological quality of many animal experiments, which was evident in at least 11 reviews. No reviews existed in which the majority of animal experiments were of good methodological quality. Whilst the effects of some of these problems might be minimised with concerted effort (given their widespread prevalence), the limitations resulting from interspecies differences are likely to be technically and theoretically impossible to overcome. Non-animal models are generally required to pass formal scientific validation prior to their regulatory acceptance. In contrast

  10. Is Clinical Research in Oesophageal Cancer in South Africa in Crisis? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Loots, E; Sartorius, B; Madiba, T E; Mulder, C J J; Clarke, D L

    2017-03-01

    Oesophageal cancer (OC) is responsible for the second highest number of cancer-related deaths in South Africa (SA). Squamous cell carcinoma is the most prevalent type with an incidence of 46.7/100,000 and 19.2/100,000 for males and females. This is a systematic review of the clinical diagnosis and management of OC within the South African context. This protocol was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) (registration number CRD42016034053) with adherence to PRISMA guidelines. An online search was performed using MEDLINE, EBSCOHost and PubMed. Eligibility criteria for articles included published, original peer-reviewed research addressing clinical management of oesophageal cancer in South Africa. Review articles, case reports, scientific letters and studies published in languages other than English or Afrikaans were excluded. The research terms were 'etiology', 'human', 'esophageal cancer', 'esophageal carcinoma', 'oesophageal cancer', and 'oesophageal carcinoma', 'squamous cell carcinoma', 'Africa' and 'South Africa'. A total of 336 articles were identified. Of these, 146 were immediately excluded and a further 159 were excluded after review. A total of 31 appropriate articles, i.e. 9.2% of searched articles, were included. Thirteen articles addressed chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, 9 oesophageal luminal therapy, 7 oesophageal surgery and 2 screening. OC research of in SA over the last two decades has mainly been in the form of reviews and opinion papers. Clinical research, auditing and prospectively analysing OC management and outcomes in SA hospitals are sorely needed and should be promoted by both healthcare workers and policy makers alike.

  11. Acupuncture for treating alopecia areata: a protocol of systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Ju Ah; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acupuncture is frequently used in dermatology for treating a number of skin disorders. There is no critically appraised evidence of the potential benefits and harm of acupuncture for alopecia areata (AA). This review aims to systematically evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for the management of AA in randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Methods and analysis 13 databases will be searched from their inception. These include PubMed, AMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, 6 Korean medical databases (Koreanstudies Information Service System, DBPIA, The Town Society of Science Technology, Research Information Sharing Service, KoreaMed and the Korean National Assembly Library), 3 Chinese Databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI), the Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database (VIP) and the Wanfang Database). Only randomised clinical trials (RCTs) using any type of acupuncture for AA will be considered. The selection of the studies, data abstraction and validation will be performed independently by two researchers. Methodological quality will be assessed with Cochrane risk of bias. Dissemination The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The review will also be disseminated electronically and in print. Updates of the review will be conducted to inform and guide the healthcare practice and policy. Trial registration number PROSPERO 2015: CRD42015020397. PMID:26503391

  12. A working model for the extraordinary review of clinical privileges for doctors and dentists in the Australian Capital Territory.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Olivia M; O'Leary, Elizabeth M; Cormack, Mark F; Chong, Guan C

    2010-05-01

    The extraordinary (unplanned) review of clinical privileges is the means by which an organisation can manage specific complaints about individual practitioners' clinical competence that require immediate investigation. To date, the extraordinary review of clinical privileges for doctors and dentists has not been the subject of much research and there is a pressing need for the evaluation and review of how different legislated and non-legislated administrative processes work and what they achieve. Although it seems a fair proposition that comprehensive processes for the evaluation of the clinical competence of doctors and dentists may improve the overall delivery of an organisation's clinical services, in fact, little is known about the relationship between the safety and quality of specific clinical services, procedures and interventions and the efficiency or effectiveness of established methodologies for the routine or the extraordinary review of clinical privileges. The authors present a model of a structured approach to the extraordinary review of clinical privileges within a clinical governance framework in the Australian Capital Territory. The assessment framework uses a primarily qualitative methodology, underpinned by a process of systematic review of clinical competence against the agreed standards of the CanMEDS Physician Competency Framework. The model is a practical, working framework that could be implemented on a hospital-, area health service- or state- and territory-wide basis in any other Australian jurisdiction.

  13. Integrating Quality Improvement Education into the Nephrology Curricular Milestones Framework and the Clinical Learning Environment Review.

    PubMed

    Prince, Lisa K; Little, Dustin J; Schexneider, Katherine I; Yuan, Christina M

    2017-02-07

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that trainees show progressive milestone attainment in the practice-based learning and systems-based practice competencies. As part of the Clinical Learning Environment Review, sponsoring hospitals must educate trainees in health care quality improvement, provide them with specialty-specific quality data, and ensure trainee participation in quality improvement activities and committees. Subspecialty-specific quality improvement curricula in nephrology training programs have not been reported, although considerable curricular and assessment material exists for specialty residencies, including tools for assessing trainee and faculty competence. Nephrology-specific didactic material exists to assist nephrology fellows and faculty mentors in designing and implementing quality improvement projects. Nephrology is notable among internal medicine subspecialties for the emphasis placed on adherence to quality thresholds-specifically for chronic RRT shown by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Quality Incentive Program. We have developed a nephrology-specific curriculum that meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and Clinical Learning Environment Review requirements, acknowledges regulatory quality improvement requirements, integrates with ongoing divisional quality improvement activities, and has improved clinical care and the training program. In addition to didactic training in quality improvement, we track trainee compliance with Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes CKD and ESRD quality indicators (emphasizing Quality Improvement Program indicators), and fellows collaborate on a yearly multidisciplinary quality improvement project. Over the past 6 years, each fellowship class has, on the basis of a successful quality improvement project, shown milestone achievement in Systems-Based Practice and Practice-Based Learning. Fellow quality improvement projects have improved

  14. Diabetic Osteoporosis: A Review of Its Traditional Chinese Medicinal Use and Clinical and Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rufeng; Zhu, Ruyuan; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yubo; Liu, Chenyue; Liu, Haixia; Liu, Fengwei; Li, Hongjun; Li, Yu; Fu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The incidence of diabetic osteoporosis (DOP) is increasing due to lack of effective management over the past few decades. This review aims to summarize traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) suitability in the pathogenesis and clinical and preclinical management of DOP. Methods. Literature sources used were from Medline (Pubmed), CNKI (China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database), and CSTJ (China Science and Technology Journal Database) online databases. For the consultation, keywords such as diabetic osteoporosis (DOP), TCM, clinical study, animal experiment, toxicity, and research progress were used in various combinations. Around 100 research papers and reviews were visited. Results. Liver-spleen-kidney insufficiency may result in development of DOP. 18 clinical trials are identified to use TCM compound prescriptions for management of patients with DOP. TCM herbs and their active ingredients are effective in preventing the development of DOP in streptozotocin (STZ) and alloxan as well as STZ combined with ovariectomy insulted rats. Among them, most frequently used TCM herbs in clinical trials are Radix Astragali, Radix et Rhizoma Salviae Miltiorrhizae, Radix Rehmanniae Preparata, and Herba Epimedii. Some of TCM herbs also exhibit toxicities in clinical and preclinical research. Conclusions. TCM herbs may act as the novel sources of anti-DOP drugs by improving bone and glucolipid metabolisms. However, the pathogenesis of DOP and the material base of TCM herbs still merit further study. PMID:27698674

  15. Non-anti-infective effects of antimicrobials and their clinical applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Sapna P; Estes, Lynn L; Steckelberg, James M

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are undoubtedly one of the key advances in the history of modern medicine and infectious diseases, improving the clinical outcomes of infection owing to their inhibitory effects on microbial growth. However, many antimicrobial agents also have biological activities stemming from their interactions with host receptors and effects on host inflammatory responses and other human or bacterial cellular biological pathways. These result in clinical uses of antimicrobial drugs that are distinct from their direct bacteriostatic or bactericidal properties. We reviewed the published literature regarding non-anti-infective therapeutic properties and proposed clinical applications of selected antimicrobials, specifically, macrolides, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and ketoconazole. The clinical applications reviewed were varied, and we focused on uses that were clinically relevant (in terms of importance and burden of disease) and where published evidence exists. Such uses include chronic inflammatory pulmonary and skin disorders, chronic periodontitis, gastrointestinal dysmotility, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Most of these potential therapeutic uses are not Food and Drug Administration approved. Clinicians need to weigh the use of antimicrobial agents for their non-anti-infective benefits, considering potential adverse effects and long-term effect on microbial resistance.

  16. Music therapy services in pediatric oncology: a national clinical practice review.

    PubMed

    Tucquet, Belinda; Leung, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national clinical practice review conducted in Australia of music therapy services in pediatric oncology hospitals. Literature specifically related to music therapy and symptom management in pediatric oncology is reviewed. The results from a national benchmarking survey distributed to all music therapists working with children with cancer in Australian pediatric hospitals are discussed. Patient and family feedback provided from a quality improvement activity conducted at a major pediatric tertiary hospital is summarized, and considerations for future growth as a profession and further research is proposed.

  17. Review of 212 individuals attending a city centre genitourinary medicine clinic following acute sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C

    2006-05-01

    A retrospective case note review of 212 individuals (190 women) attending a city-centre Genitourinary Medicine clinic between 1/4/2002 and 31/3/2004 following an acute sexual assault. Direct referral by the Forensic Medical Examiner to the dedicated weekly clinic for victims of sexual assault facilitated the attendance of 55/113 attending the dedicated clinic. The 99 individuals who did not disclose a recent assault as the reason for attendance were seen at routine clinics. One third of individuals attending the dedicated clinic were less than 16 years old, reflecting the facilitated referral pathway. Those attending the dedicated clinic were more likely to be offered the extended service outlined in the departmental protocol. Twenty four sexually transmitted infections were detected in 23 (11%) individuals but 23/24 could have been acquired during other recent consensual sexual activity. Overall, the assailant was known to the victim in 53% cases, there was an allegation of violence associated with the assault in 20%, suspicion of a drug facilitated ('spiked drink') assault in 24% and admission of alcohol intoxication in 11% cases. The 22/212 (10%) who were male were more likely to present to a routine clinic.

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis of Hypericum perforatum in depression: a comprehensive clinical review.

    PubMed

    Whiskey, E; Werneke, U; Taylor, D

    2001-09-01

    The herbal remedy St John's wort is widely used as an antidepressant but its efficacy has not been systematically investigated. Meta-analyses and systematic reviews of published trials strongly suggest St John's wort is more effective than placebo although comparative efficacy to standard antidepressants is less clearly established. We updated and expanded previous meta-analyses of St John's wort, scrutinised the validity of published reports and examined possible mechanisms of action. Twenty-two randomised controlled trials were identified. Meta-analysis showed St John's wort to be significantly more effective than placebo (relative risk (RR) 1.98 (95% CI 1.49-2.62)) but not significantly different in efficacy from active antidepressants (RR 1.0 (0.90-1.11)). A sub-analysis of six placebo-controlled trials and four active comparator trials satisfying stricter methodological criteria also suggested that St John's wort was more effective than placebo (RR 1.77 (1.16-2.70)) and of similar effectiveness to standard antidepressants (RR 1.04 (0.94-1.15)). There was no evidence of publication bias. Adverse effects occurred more frequently with standard antidepressants than with St John's wort. The mechanism of action of St John's wort remains unknown. Future research should include large scale, appropriately powered comparisons of St John's wort and standard antidepressants.

  19. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia in 'Brugada syndrome': clinical case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Allocca, Giuseppe; Proclemer, Alessandro; Nucifora, Gaetano; Dall'Armellina, Erica; Rebellato, Luca

    2008-08-01

    A 20-year-old white judoka was admitted for severe palpitations during exercise followed by syncope. The electrocardiogram on admission revealed a wide-complex monomorphic tachycardia at a rate of 260 beats/min, with right bundle brunch block morphology and right axis deviation. Following electrical cardioversion, the electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm with type 1 pattern of Brugada syndrome. We describe in detail the clinical course, the results of electrophysiological study, and therapeutic management. We reviewed literature data concerning a few cases of 'atypical Brugada syndrome' characterized by monomorphic ventricular tachycardia as clinical arrhythmia.

  20. Clinical and Economic Outcomes of Thyroid Surgery in Elderly Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michael C.; Roman, Sanziana A.; Sosa, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. population is undergoing a dramatic shift in demographics, with a rise in the proportion of elderly Americans. Given an increased prevalence of thyroid disease and malignancy with age, understanding the safety of thyroid surgery in this age group is increasingly pertinent. There remains disagreement regarding the clinical outcomes of elderly patients after thyroidectomy and the applicability of single-institution cohorts to the population at large. This paper reviews the epidemiology of thyroid disease in the elderly, current surgical indications and practice patterns, and the clinical and economic outcomes of elderly patients with thyroid disease after surgical intervention. PMID:22779035

  1. What do we know about pulmonary blastoma?: review of literature and clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Brodowska-Kania, Dorota; Kotwica, Ewa; Paturej, Aleksandra; Sośnicki, Witold; Patera, Janusz; Giżewska, Agnieszka; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary blastoma (PB) is a rare form of lung tumour and is accountable for 0.25-0.5% of primary pulmonary malignancies. Initially pulmonary blastoma was divided into three subtypes: biphasic pulmonary blastoma (BPB) consisting of an epithelial and mesenchymal component, well differentiated fetal adenocarcinoma (WDFA) built of well differentiated epithelium and a mesenchymal component and malignant pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). Prognosis in this type of cancer is really poor. We present a current review of literature and a clinical case report. Treatment of PB is very difficult. Data and recommendations about the treatment of pulmonary blastoma are still available therefore we should use only observations and clinical case reports.

  2. Characteristics of corneal dystrophies: a review from clinical, histological and genetic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ze-Nan; Chen, Jie; Cui, Hong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Corneal dystrophy is a common type of hereditary corneal diseases. It includes many types, which have varied pathology, histology and clinical manifestations. Recently, the examination techniques of ophthalmology and gene sequencing advance greatly, which do benefit to our understanding of these diseases. However, many aspects remain still unknown. And due to the poor knowledge of these diseases, the results of the treatments are not satisfoctory. The purpose of this review was to summarize the clinical, histological and genetic characteristics of different types of corneal dystrophies. PMID:27366696

  3. Measuring Quality in Emergency Medical Services: A Review of Clinical Performance Indicators

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, Mazen J.

    2012-01-01

    Measuring quality in Emergency Medical Services (EMSs) systems is challenging. This paper reviews the current approaches to measuring quality in health care and EMS with a focus on currently used clinical performance indicators in EMS systems (US and international systems). The different types of performance indicators, the advantages and limitations of each type, and the evidence-based prehospital clinical bundles are discussed. This paper aims at introducing emergency physicians and health care providers to quality initiatives in EMS and serves as a reference for tools that EMS medical directors can use to launch new or modify existing quality control programs in their systems. PMID:22046554

  4. Proliferative Fasciitis in Childhood: A Review of Clinical Data Apropos of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Mouravas, Vassilios; Kepertis, Chrysostomos; Lambropoulos, Vassilios; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Proliferative Fasciitis (PF) is a benign lesion with histologic and clinical features overlapping with those of malignant soft tissue tumours. Its occurrence in children is considered very rare. We present a case of PF appearing as a painful, red, gradually increasing in size lesion, during a period of a few weeks, on the finger of a five-year-old boy compromising the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. We were able to locate literature on 20 paediatric PF cases, which we review. Only five of these focus on the clinical data, the rest describing mainly histological findings. It is the first reported paediatric case appearing on the finger. PMID:28384932

  5. External beam radiotherapy in thyroid carcinoma: clinical review and recommendations of the AIRO "Radioterapia Metabolica" Group.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Monica; Gobitti, Carlo; Autorino, Rosa; Cerizza, Lorenzo; Furlan, Carlo; Mazzarotto, Renzo; Monari, Fabio; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Vianello, Federica; Basso, Michela; Zanirato Rambaldi, Giuseppe; Russi, Elvio; Tagliaferri, Luca

    2017-03-24

    The therapeutic approach to thyroid carcinoma usually involves surgery as initial treatment. The use of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is limited to high-risk patients and depends on clinical stage and histologic type. Different behavior patterns and degrees of aggressiveness of thyroid carcinomas require different management for differentiated, medullary, and anaplastic carcinoma. However, the role of EBRT is an issue of debate. Most clinical studies are retrospective and based on single-institution experiences. In this article, we review the main literature and give recommendations for the use of EBRT in thyroid carcinoma on behalf of the "Radioterapia Metabolica" Group of the Italian Radiation Oncology Association.

  6. Emerging clinical imaging techniques for cerebral cavernous malformations: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Peter G.; Jabbour, Pascal; Yadla, Sanjay; Awad, Issam A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are divided into sporadic and familial forms. For clinical imaging, T2-weighted gradient-echo sequences have been shown to be more sensitive than conventional sequences. Recently more advanced imaging techniques such as high-field and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has been employed for the evaluation of CCMs. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging have been applied to the preoperative and intraoperative management of these lesions. In this paper, the authors attempt to provide a concise review of the emerging imaging methods utilized in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of CCMs. PMID:20809764

  7. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hem, Marit Helene; Pedersen, Reidar; Norvoll, Reidun; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-06-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five studies were included. The ethics support activities described were moral case deliberations and ethics rounds. Different qualitative and quantitative research methods were utilized. The results show that (a) participants felt that they gained an increased insight into moral issues through systematic reflection; (b) there was improved cooperation among multidisciplinary team members; (c) it was uncertain whether clinical ethics support services led to better patient care; (d) the issue of patient and client participation is complex; and (e) the implementation process is challenging. Clinical ethics support services have mainly been studied through the experiences of the participating facilitators and healthcare professionals. Hence, there is limited knowledge of whether and how various types of clinical ethics support services influence the quality of care and how patients and relatives may evaluate clinical ethics support services. Based on the six excluded 'grey zone articles', in which there was an implicit focus on ethics reflection, other ways of working with ethical reflection in practice are discussed. Implementing and evaluating clinical ethics support services as approaches to clinical ethics support that are more integrated into the development of good practice are in focus. In order to meet some of the shortcomings of the field of clinical ethics support services, a research project that aims to strengthen ethics support in the mental health services, including patients' and caregivers' views on ethical challenges, is presented.

  8. Bench-top to clinical therapies: A review of melanocortin ligands from 1954 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Mark D; Lensing, Cody J; Fleming, Katlyn A; Schlasner, Katherine N; Doering, Skye R; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2017-03-29

    The discovery of the endogenous melanocortin agonists in the 1950s have resulted in sixty years of melanocortin ligand research. Early efforts involved truncations or select modifications of the naturally occurring agonists leading to the development of many potent and selective ligands. With the identification and cloning of the five known melanocortin receptors, many ligands were improved upon through bench-top in vitro assays. Optimization of select properties resulted in ligands adopted as clinical candidates. A summary of every melanocortin ligand is outside the scope of this review. Instead, this review will focus on the following topics: classic melanocortin ligands, selective ligands, small molecule (non-peptide) ligands, ligands with sex-specific effects, bivalent and multivalent ligands, and ligands advanced to clinical trials. Each topic area will be summarized with current references to update the melanocortin field on recent progress. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Melanocortin Receptors - edited by Ya-Xiong Tao.

  9. Attentional bias toward infant faces - Review of the adaptive and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Lucion, Marta Knijnik; Oliveira, Vanessa; Bizarro, Lisiane; Bischoff, Adrianne Rahde; Silveira, Patricia Pelufo; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia

    2017-04-01

    Human survival depends on care received early in life. Infants need to capture adults' attention to have their basic needs met. Therefore, infant stimuli are prioritized by the attention system in adults, resulting in an attentional bias toward infant faces. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on behavioral measures of attentional bias toward infant faces. PubMed, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases were used. The review suggests the existence of a measurable attentional bias toward infant faces and a positive correlation between attentional bias toward infant distress and the quality of mother-infant relationship. Depressive symptoms and breastfeeding modulate this behavior in women. Parental status and sex also influence the attentional prioritization of infant faces. Evidence indicates that differences in attentional bias are associated with clinical symptoms and variations in maternal behavior, reinforcing the potential use of attentional bias as a behavioral marker of clinical outcomes.

  10. Yoga for low back pain: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Posadzki, Paul; Ernst, Edzard

    2011-09-01

    It has been suggested that yoga has a positive effect on low back pain and function. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment option for low back pain. Seven databases were searched from their inception to March 2011. Randomized clinical trials were considered if they investigated yoga in patients with low back pain and if they assessed pain as an outcome measure. The selection of studies, data extraction and validation were performed independently by two reviewers. Seven randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality ranged between 2 and 4 on the Jadad scale. Five RCTs suggested that yoga leads to a significantly greater reduction in low back pain than usual care, education or conventional therapeutic exercises. Two RCTs showed no between-group differences. It is concluded that yoga has the potential to alleviate low back pain. However, any definitive claims should be treated with caution.

  11. Assessing clinical trials of Internet addiction treatment: a systematic review and CONSORT evaluation.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel L; Delfabbro, Paul H; Griffiths, Mark D; Gradisar, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Although there is ongoing debate concerning the clinical status of Internet addiction, and the quality of the extant literature in this emerging field is not optimal, several clinical trials of both pharmacological and psychological treatments for Internet addiction have been published in recent years. A systematic review investigating the reporting quality of eight treatment studies is presented. Reporting quality was defined according to the 2010 Consolidating Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. An evaluation of the reviewed studies highlighted several key limitations, including (a) inconsistencies in the definition and diagnosis of Internet addiction, (b) a lack of randomization and blinding techniques, (c) a lack of adequate controls or other comparison groups, and (d) insufficient information concerning recruitment dates, sample characteristics, and treatment effect sizes. It is concluded that improvements in future studies' design and reporting would be of significant benefit to both researchers and clinicians, and to the overall positioning of Internet addiction in the behavioral addiction field.

  12. The Clinical Use of Robots for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Joshua J; Schmitt, Lauren M; Villano, Michael; Crowell, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    We examined peer-reviewed studies in order to understand the current status of empirically-based evidence on the clinical applications of robots in the diagnosis and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Studies are organized into four broad categories: (a) the response of individuals with ASD to robots or robot-like behavior in comparison to human behavior, (b) the use of robots to elicit behaviors, (c) the use of robots to model, teach, and/or practice a skill, and (d) the use of robots to provide feedback on performance. A critical review of the literature revealed that most of the findings are exploratory and have methodological limitations that make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the clinical utility of robots. Finally, we outline the research needed to determine the incremental validity of this technique.

  13. Dengue in children: a systematic review of clinical and laboratory factors associated with severity.

    PubMed

    Wakimoto, Mayumi Duarte; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; Guaraldo, Lusiele; Damasceno, Luana Santana; Brasil, Patrícia

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a potentially life-threatening illness, and children are at higher risk of severity. This review aimed to systematize the identified clinical and laboratory parameters associated with severe dengue in children, as monitoring these signs and fluid-replacement therapy are actually the cornerstones of dengue treatment. Of the 527 studies initially reviewed, 21 were selected as follows: three cohort studies, three case-control studies, 14 cross-sectional studies and one not defined. Eighteen studies were carried out in Asia and three in the Americas. Hepatomegaly, lethargy, abdominal pain, bleeding, hemoconcentration and thrombocytopenia, all referenced as warning signs in the WHO 2009 Guidelines, were the clinical and laboratory parameters independently associated with severity in more than one study. The recognition of these known warning signs associated to severe dengue disease underlines the usefulness of the WHO 2009 classification.

  14. Impact of biomedical imaging and data visualization technology on the clinical development and regulatory review process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, James J.; Robbins, William L.

    1994-12-01

    The determination of whether a drug or medical device is safe and effective requires statistical proof of valid clinical trial information. Quantitative biostatistical measures from anatomic and functional medical images are now providing objective and reproducible measures of drug and device effects. These highly precise biostatistical measures can be used to quantitatively analyze the efficacy and occasionally the safety of these drugs and devices. Since medical imaging information is digital, or is readily digitized, it can be visualized and measured in a variety of ways to evaluate the validity of the data. Moreover, with advanced image processing and data visualization tools, this information can be electronically organized and submitted directly to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reviewed. Biomedical imaging and computer-based data visualization technologies have the ability to substantially decrease the time required for clinical development and regulatory review while providing more valid data.

  15. A systematic review of strategies to address the clinical nursing faculty shortage.

    PubMed

    Wyte-Lake, Tamar; Tran, Kim; Bowman, Candice C; Needleman, Jack; Dobalian, Aram

    2013-05-01

    This systematic review provides a comprehensive assessment of models used to expand the ranks of clinical nursing faculty. Nursing faculty shortages constrict the pipeline for educating nurses and make addressing the projected nursing shortage more difficult. Schools of nursing have denied admission to qualified applicants, citing insufficient numbers of nursing faculty as one major reason. Using key search terms in PubMed(®) and CINAHL(®), we identified 14 peer-reviewed articles published between 1980 and 2010 about models for expanding clinical faculty. Partnership models (n = 11) and expanded use of faculty resources (n = 9) were the most common strategies. Few (n = 8) studies assessed program efficacy. A need was identified for studies to assess the effect of alternative models on educational capacity and student performance and to examine the subcomponents of academic-practice partnerships and other innovative approaches to understand the essential factors necessary to implement successful programs.

  16. Clinical review of treatment options for major depressive disorder in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; Baker, Brian

    2012-11-01

    It is established that the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) in coronary heart disease (CHD) populations is high and is associated with increased mortality. In this systematic review, we examined the evidence for the effective treatment of MDD in CHD patients by reviewing randomized control trials (RCTs) between 1980 and 2011 and then assessing whether these treatments were clinically meaningful. A total of 8 RCTs were retrieved. Sertraline, citalopram, and mirtazapine were safe from a cardiac perspective, but only sertraline and citalopram were clearly more effective than placebo in CHD patients with moderate-to-severe type, recurrent MDD, or MDD episode onset before the CHD event. Augmenting sertraline with omega-3 fatty acids did not result in superior depression outcomes. Cognitive-behavioral therapy was equivocally superior to usual care. Interpersonal psychotherapy was only superior to clinical management in patients with high baseline functional status. Exercise is a potential treatment for those with mild depression.

  17. The Clinical Use of Robots for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Joshua J.; Schmitt, Lauren M.; Villano, Michael; Crowell, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    We examined peer-reviewed studies in order to understand the current status of empirically-based evidence on the clinical applications of robots in the diagnosis and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Studies are organized into four broad categories: (a) the response of individuals with ASD to robots or robot-like behavior in comparison to human behavior, (b) the use of robots to elicit behaviors, (c) the use of robots to model, teach, and/or practice a skill, and (d) the use of robots to provide feedback on performance. A critical review of the literature revealed that most of the findings are exploratory and have methodological limitations that make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the clinical utility of robots. Finally, we outline the research needed to determine the incremental validity of this technique. PMID:22125579

  18. Animal experiments scrutinised: systematic reviews demonstrate poor human clinical and toxicological utility.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The assumption that animal models are reasonably predictive of human outcomes provides the basis for their widespread use in toxicity testing and in biomedical research aimed at developing cures for human diseases. To investigate the validity of this assumption, the comprehensive "Scopus" biomedical bibliographic databases were searched for published systematic reviews of the human clinical or toxicological utility of animal experiments. Of 20 reviews examining clinical utility, authors concluded that the animal models were substantially consistent with or useful in advancing clinical outcomes in only two cases, and the conclusion in one case was contentious. Included were reviews of the clinical utility of experiments expected by ethics committees to lead to medical advances, of highly-cited experiments published in major journals, and of chimpanzee experiments - the species most likely to be predictive of human outcomes. Seven additional reviews failed to clearly demonstrate utility in predicting human toxicological outcomes such as carcinogenicity and teratogenicity. Consequently, animal data may not generally be assumed to be substantially useful for these purposes. Possible causes include interspecies differences, the distortion of experimental outcomes arising from experimental environments and protocols, and the poor methodological quality of many animal experiments evident in at least 11 reviews. No reviews existed in which a majority of animal experiments were of good quality. While the latter problems might be minimised with concerted effort, given their widespread nature, the interspecies limitations are likely to be technically and theoretically impossible to overcome. Yet, unlike non-animal models, animal models are not normally subjected to formal scientific validation. Instead of simply assuming they are predictive of human outcomes, the consistent application of formal validation studies to all test models is clearly warranted, regardless of their

  19. Aetiology and clinical presentations of auditory processing disorders—a review

    PubMed Central

    Bamiou, D; Musiek, F; Luxon, L

    2001-01-01

    Auditory processing disorders may have detrimental consequences on a child's life, if undiagnosed and untreated. We review causes of auditory processing disorders in order to raise clinical awareness. Auditory processing disorders may present against a background of neurological disease or developmental disorders, as well as in isolation. Clinicians need to be aware of potential causes and implications of auditory processing disorders.

 PMID:11668093

  20. Eurycoma Longifolia as a potential adoptogen of male sexual health: a systematic review on clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Thu, Hnin Ei; Mohamed, Isa Naina; Hussain, Zahid; Jayusman, Putri Ayu; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2017-01-01

    Eurycoma longifolia (EL) has been well recognized as a booster of male sexual health. Over the past few decades, numerous in vivo animal studies and human clinical trials have been conducted across the globe to explore the promising role of EL in managing various male sexual disorders, which include erectile dysfunction, male infertility, low libido, and downregulated testosterone levels. The aim of the present review is to analyze and summarize the literature on human clinical trials which revealed the clinical significance and therapeutic feasibility of EL in improving male sexual health. This systematic review is focused on the following databases: Medline, Wiley Online Library, BioMed Central, Hindawi, Web of Knowledge, PubMed Central and Google Scholar, using search terms such as "Eurycoma longifolia", "EL", "Tongkat Ali", "male sexual health", "sexual infertility", "erectile dysfunction", "male libido", and "testosterone levels". Notably, only human clinical studies published between 2000 and 2014 were selected and thoroughly reviewed for relevant citations. Out of 150 articles, 11 met the inclusion criteria. The majority of articles included were randomized placebo-controlled trials, multiple cohort studies, or pilot trials. All these studies demonstrated considerable effects of EL on male sexual health disorders. Among them, 7 studies revealed remarkable association between the use of EL and the efficacy in the treatment of male sexual disorders, and remaining 4 studies failed to demonstrate sufficient effects on male sexual health. In summary, there is convincing evidence for the prominence of EL in improving the male sexual health. The review also substantiates the use of current methodology in the development of novel and more rationale natural herbal medicines for the management of male sexual disorders.

  1. Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical review and update*

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Thamy; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the diagnostic and classificatory concepts of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome in light of the latest normative publications. It describes the great variability of the clinical expression of mycosis fungoides in its early stages as well as the histopathological and immunohistochemical aspects that help with diagnosis. The diagnostic criteria required for characterizing Sézary syndrome and the staging system used for both mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are described. PMID:23197199

  2. Clinical applications of dynamic infrared thermography in plastic surgery: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    John, Hannah Eliza; Niumsawatt, Vachara; Whitaker, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infrared thermography (IRT) has become an increasingly utilized adjunct to more expensive and/or invasive investigations in a range of surgical fields, no more so than in plastic surgery. The combination of functional assessment, flow characteristics and anatomical localization has led to increasing applications of this technology. This article aims to perform a systematic review of the clinical applications of IRT in plastic surgery. Methods A systematic literature search using the keywords ‘IRT’ and ‘dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT)’ has been accomplished. A total of 147 papers were extracted from various medical databases, of which 34 articles were subjected to a full read by two independent reviewers, to ensure the papers satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies focusing on the use of IRT in breast cancer diagnosis were excluded. Results A systematic review of 29 publications demonstrated the clinical applications of IRT in plastic surgery today. They include preoperative planning of perforators for free flaps, post operative monitoring of free flaps, use of IRT as an adjunct in burns depth analysis, in assessment of response to treatment in hemangioma and as a diagnostic test for cutaneous melanoma and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Conclusions Modern infrared imaging technology with improved standardization protocols is now a credible, useful non-invasive tool in clinical practice. PMID:27047781

  3. The Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Tulsi in Humans: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Tulsi, also known as holy basil, is indigenous to the Indian continent and highly revered for its medicinal uses within the Ayurvedic and Siddha medical systems. Many in vitro, animal and human studies attest to tulsi having multiple therapeutic actions including adaptogenic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and immunomodulatory effects, yet to date there are no systematic reviews of human research on tulsi's clinical efficacy and safety. We conducted a comprehensive literature review of human studies that reported on a clinical outcome after ingestion of tulsi. We searched for studies published in books, theses, conference proceedings, and electronic databases including Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, Embase, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, and Indian Medical databases. A total of 24 studies were identified that reported therapeutic effects on metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, immunity, and neurocognition. All studies reported favourable clinical outcomes with no studies reporting any significant adverse events. The reviewed studies reinforce traditional uses and suggest tulsi is an effective treatment for lifestyle-related chronic diseases including diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and psychological stress. Further studies are required to explore mechanisms of action, clarify the dosage and dose form, and determine the populations most likely to benefit from tulsi's therapeutic effects.

  4. Effective Strategies for Global Health Research, Training and Clinical Care: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Rebekah J.; Campbell, Jennifer A.; Egede, Leonard E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations. PMID:25716404

  5. Effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rebekah J; Campbell, Jennifer A; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations.

  6. [Do you measure gait speed in your daily clinical practice? A review].

    PubMed

    Inzitari, Marco; Calle, Alicia; Esteve, Anna; Casas, Álvaro; Torrents, Núria; Martínez, Nicolás

    Gait speed (GS), measured at usual pace, is an easy, quick, reliable, non-expensive and informative measurement. With a standard chronometer, like those that currently found in mobile phones, and with two marks on the floor, trained health professionals obtain a more objective and quick measurement compared with many geriatric scales used in daily practice. GS is one of the pillars of the frailty phenotype, and is closely related to sarcopenia. It is a powerful marker of falls incidence, disability and death, mostly useful in the screening of older adults that live in the community. In recent years, the evidence is reinforcing the usefulness of GS in acute care and post-surgical patients. Its use in patients with cognitive impairment is suggested, due to the strong link between cognitive and physical function. Although GS meets the criteria for a good geriatric screening tool, it is not much used in clinical practice. Why? This review has different aims: (i)disentangling the relationship between GS and frailty; (ii)reviewing the protocols to measure GS and the reference values; (iii)reviewing the evidence in different clinical groups (older adults with frailty, with cognitive impairment, with cancer or other pathologies), and in different settings (community, acute care, rehabilitation), and (iv)speculating about the reasons for its poor use in clinical practice and about the gaps to be filled.

  7. Clinical guidelines of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin-Zhou; Hollis-Hansen, Kelseanna; Wan, Xing-Yong; Fei, Su-Juan; Pang, Xun-Lei; Meng, Fan-Dong; Yu, Chao-Hui; Li, You-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To perform a systematic review to grade guidelines and present recommendations for clinical management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS A database search was conducted on PubMed for guidelines published before May 2016, supplemented by reviewing relevant websites. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (ARGEE) Instrument II was a tool designed to appraise the methodological rigor and transparency in which a clinical guideline is developed and it is used internationally. It was used to appraise the quality of guidelines in this study. The inclusion criteria include: clinical NAFLD guidelines for adults, published in English, and released by governmental agencies or key organizations. RESULTS Eleven guidelines were included in this study. Since 2007, guidelines have been released in Asia (3 in China, 1 in South Korea, and 1 in Japan), Europe (1 in Italy), America (1 in United States and 1 in Chile) and three international agencies [European associations joint, Asia-Pacific Working Party and World Gastroenterology Organization (WGO)]. Using the ARGEE II instrument, we found US 2012 and Europe 2016 had the highest scores, especially in the areas of rigor of development and applicability. Additionally, Italy 2010 and Korea 2013 also presented comprehensive content, rigorous procedures and good applicability. And WGO 2014 offered various algorithms for clinical practice. Lastly, a practical algorithm for the clinical management was developed, based on the recommended guidelines. CONCLUSION This is the first systematic review of NAFLD guidelines. It may yield insights for physicians and policy-makers in the development and application of guidelines. PMID:27688665

  8. Bone marrow-derived cell therapy in chagasic cardiac disease: a review of pre-clinical and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Mello, Debora Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by a protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which infects people through blood sucking insects. It is endemic in Latin America and the disease is being spread to developed countries as a result of the migration of infected individuals. In its chronic stage, Chagas disease can lead to a severe cardiomyopathy for which there is currently no cure. End-stage patients require heart transplantation, thus demanding new therapeutic modalities. Cell-based therapy has been proposed as an alternative for various forms of heart disease. Here we review the experimental evidence that led to the use of bone marrow-derived cells in putative therapy for chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy in animal models and in clinical trials, discussing the reasons for failure of the translation of results from mice to men. PMID:24282718

  9. An Updated Review on the Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Clinical Trials of Salacia oblonga

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Priya Singh; Singh, Ashok K.; Keshari, Amit K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Salacia oblonga (S. oblonga), a perennial herb, has been used for thousands of years in ayurvedic medicine and is closely associated with prevention, treatment, and cure of various human ailments such as obesity and diabetes. A vast and wide range of chemical compounds such as polyphenols, friedelane-type triterpenes, norfriedelane-type triterpenes, eudesmane-type sesquiterpenes including various glycosides had been isolated from this plant. This review is aimed to survey the literature covering the phytochemistry and pharmacology of S. oblonga and to review the scientific data including active components and their multi-targeted mechanisms of action against various metabolic syndromes. We also included clinical trials related to this plant in this review. The overview would assist researchers to gather scientific information related to S. oblonga in future. PMID:28082793

  10. Stress and Primary Headache: Review of the Research and Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R

    2016-07-01

    This review begins with a discussion of the nature of stress and then presents the functional model of primary headache as a framework for conceptualizing the complex relationship between stress and headaches. Research is reviewed on stress as a trigger of headaches and how stress can play a role in the developmental and psychosocial context of headaches. Clinical management of headaches from a stress perspective is considered both at the level of trials of behavioral interventions that broadly fit into the stress management category and the additional strategies that might be useful for individual cases based on the research demonstrating associations between stress and headaches. The review concludes by suggesting that although some researchers have questioned whether stress can trigger headaches, overall, the literature is still supportive of such a link. Advances in methodology are discussed, the recent emphasis on protective factors is welcomed, and directions for future research suggested.

  11. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: A review of imagery measures and a guiding framework

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, David G.; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M.A.; Heyes, Stephanie Burnett; Holmes, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment. PMID:23123567

  12. Review of the regulations for clinical research in herbal medicines in USA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tony Yuqi; Li, Fang-Zhou; Afseth, Janyne

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved 39 new drugs, however, there are only two botanical drugs (one topical and one oral) approved by FDA since the publication of the FDA's industry guidelines for the botanical drug product in June 2004. The approval shows the Western guideline can be used for herbal medicines, authors investigate current regulation on herbal medicine clinical research, identify challenges conducting clinical trials, and seek to produce some guidance for potential investigators and sponsors considering a clinical trial in this area. Key words were formulated for searching on Medline and FDA website to locate relevant regulations for clinical research in herbal medicines to understand current environment for herbal medicine usage and examine the barriers affecting herbal medicine in clinical trials. Authors critically explore case study of the 1st FDA approved botanical drugs, Veregen (sinecatechins), green tea leaves extract, a topical cream for perianal and genital condyloma. In consideration of current regulation environment in USA, based on the findings and analysis through the literature review and Veregen case study, authors produce and propose a Checklist for New Drug Application of Herbal Medicines for potential investigators and sponsors considering in a herbal medicine clinical trial.

  13. Review: Current clinical applications of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-11-01

    The past several years have been marked by extraordinary advances in clinical applications of immunotherapy. In particular, adoptive cellular therapy utilizing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells targeted to CD19 has demonstrated substantial clinical efficacy in children and adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and durable clinical benefit in a smaller subset of patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Early-phase clinical trials are currently assessing CAR T-cell safety and efficacy in additional malignancies. Here, we discuss clinical results from the largest series to date investigating CD19-targeted CAR T cells in B-ALL, CLL, and B-NHL, including discussion of differences in CAR T-cell design and production and treatment approach, as well as clinical efficacy, nature of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurologic toxicities, and CAR T-cell expansion and persistence. We additionally review the current and forthcoming use of CAR T cells in multiple myeloma and several solid tumors and highlight challenges and opportunities afforded by the current state of CAR T-cell therapies, including strategies to overcome inhibitory aspects of the tumor microenvironment and enhance antitumor efficacy.

  14. Review of Clinical Studies of the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis Using Acupuncture and Moxibustion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Xia-Fei; Ma, Zhe; Im, Hyoyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background. Clinical studies suggest that acupuncture and moxibustion therapy in ulcerative colitis (UC) can regulate bowel inflammation, and these treatments have the advantages of low rates of adverse reactions and recurrence as well as good long-term efficacy. We reviewed the current status of clinical studies of the treatment. Methods. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using the therapy as the major intervention for treating UC were included from 1995 to 2015. The extracted data mainly included diagnostic standards, treatment methods, selection of acupoints, treatment times and courses, and efficacy determination criteria. Results. The use of diagnostic standards and efficacy criteria lacked unification and standardization. There were two main groups: acupuncture and moxibustion therapy combined with drug treatment and the use of all types of acupuncture and moxibustion therapy alone or in combination. The acupoint compositions included distal-proximal point combinations, back-shu point and front-mu point combinations, and acupuncture through meridians. The treatment courses in all the clinical trials had large variations. Conclusion. The treatment of UC in the examined articles was mainly based on the classical theory. However, many links of the clinical regimen design were still lacking, which affected the repeatability of the clinical studies and the accuracy of the clinical conclusions. PMID:27885326

  15. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: a review of imagery measures and a guiding framework.

    PubMed

    Pearson, David G; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M A; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Holmes, Emily A

    2013-02-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment.

  16. A systematic review of statin-induced muscle problems in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ganga, Harsha V; Slim, Hanna B; Thompson, Paul D

    2014-07-01

    Statin therapy is associated with muscle problems in approximately 10% to 25% of patients treated in clinical practice, but muscle problems have rarely been reported in controlled clinical trials. We performed a systematic search and review of statin clinical trials to examine how these studies evaluated muscle problems and to determine why there are apparent differences in muscle problems between clinical trials and practice. We initially identified 1,012 reports related to clinical trials of statin therapy, 42 of which qualified for analysis. Fifteen, 4, and 22 trials reported creatine kinase values only >10, 5, and 3 times the upper limits of normal, respectively, in both statin- and placebo-treated participants. Four trials reported average creatine kinase values, which increased with statin treatment in 3 instances. Twenty-six trials reported muscle problems, with an average incidence in statin- and placebo-treated participants of 13%, but only one trial specifically queried about muscle problems. Three trials used a run-in period to eliminate participants with statin intolerance and noncompliance. The percentage of muscle problems tended to be higher with statin treatment (12.7%) than with placebo group (12.4%, P = .06). This small difference probably reflects a high background rate of nonspecific muscle problems in both groups that could not be distinguished from statin-associated myalgia because most clinical trials did not use a standard definition for statin myalgia.

  17. Clinical evoked potentials in neurology: a review of techniques and indications.

    PubMed

    Lascano, Agustina M; Lalive, Patrice H; Hardmeier, Martin; Fuhr, Peter; Seeck, Margitta

    2017-02-24

    Evoked potentials (EPs) are a powerful and cost-effective tool for evaluating the integrity and function of the central nervous system. Although imaging techniques, such as MRI, have recently become increasingly important in the diagnosis of neurological diseases, over the past 30 years, many neurologists have continued to employ EPs in specific clinical applications. This review presents an overview of the recent evolution of 'classical' clinical applications of EPs in terms of early diagnosis and disease monitoring and is an extension of a previous review published in this journal in 2005 by Walsh and collaborators. We also provide an update on emerging EPs based on gustatory, olfactory and pain stimulation that may be used as clinically relevant markers of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and cortical or peripheral impaired pain perception. EPs based on multichannel electroencephalography recordings, known as high-density EPs, help to better differentiate between healthy subjects and patients and, moreover, they provide valuable spatial information regarding the site of the lesion. EPs are reliable disease-progression biomarkers of several neurological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating disorders. Overall, EPs are excellent neurophysiological tools that will expand standard clinical practice in modern neurology.

  18. A systematic review of the collaborative clinical education model to inform speech-language pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Briffa, Charmaine; Porter, Judi

    2013-12-01

    A shortage of clinical education placements for allied health students internationally has led to the need to explore innovative models of clinical education. The collaborative model where one clinical educator supervises two or more students completing a clinical placement concurrently is one model enabling expansion of student placements. The aims of this review were to investigate advantages and disadvantages of the collaborative model and to explore its implementation across allied health. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using three electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, and Embase). Two independent reviewers evaluated studies for methodological quality. Seventeen studies met inclusion/exclusion criteria. Advantages and disadvantages identified were consistent across disciplines. A key advantage of the model was the opportunity afforded for peer learning, whilst a frequently reported disadvantage was reduced time for individual supervision of students. The methodological quality of many included studies was poor, impacting on interpretation of the evidence base. Insufficient data were provided on how the model was implemented across studies. There is a need for high quality research to guide implementation of this model across a wider range of allied health disciplines and to determine educational outcomes using reliable and validated measures.

  19. Amyloid imaging in the differential diagnosis of dementia: review and potential clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, positron emission tomography (PET) with carbon-11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB) has revolutionized the neuroimaging of aging and dementia by enabling in vivo detection of amyloid plaques, a core pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Studies suggest that PIB-PET is sensitive for AD pathology, can distinguish AD from non-AD dementia (for example, frontotemporal lobar degeneration), and can help determine whether mild cognitive impairment is due to AD. Although the short half-life of the carbon-11 radiolabel has thus far limited the use of PIB to research, a second generation of tracers labeled with fluorine-18 has made it possible for amyloid PET to enter the clinical era. In the present review, we summarize the literature on amyloid imaging in a range of neurodegenerative conditions. We focus on potential clinical applications of amyloid PET and its role in the differential diagnosis of dementia. We suggest that amyloid imaging will be particularly useful in the evaluation of mildly affected, clinically atypical or early age-at-onset patients, and illustrate this with case vignettes from our practice. We emphasize that amyloid imaging should supplement (not replace) a detailed clinical evaluation. We caution against screening asymptomatic individuals, and discuss the limited positive predictive value in older populations. Finally, we review limitations and unresolved questions related to this exciting new technique. PMID:22071129

  20. Economic efficiency of countries' clinical review processes and competitiveness on the market of human experimentation.

    PubMed

    Ippoliti, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Clinical research is a specific phase of pharmaceutical industry's production process in which companies test candidate drugs on patients to collect clinical evidence about safety and effectiveness. Information is essential to obtain manufacturing authorization from the national drug agency and, in this way, make profits on the market. Considering this activity, however, the public stakeholder has to face a conflict of interests. On the one side, there is society's necessity to make advances in medicine and, of course, to promote pharmaceutical companies' investments in this specific phase (new generation). On the other side, there is the duty to protect patients involved in these experimental treatments (old generation). To abide by this moral duty, a protection system was developed through the years, based on two legal institutions: informed consent and institutional review board. How should an efficient protection system that would take human experimentation into account be shaped? Would it be possible for the national protection system of patients' rights to affect the choice of whether to develop a clinical trial in a given country or not? Looking at Europe and considering a protection system that is shaped around institutional review boards, this article is an empirical work that tries to give answers to these open questions. It shows how a protection system that can minimize the time necessary to start a trial can positively affect pharmaceutical clinical research, that is, the choice of pharmaceutical companies to start innovative medical treatments in a given country.

  1. A Review of the Efficacy, Safety, and Clinical Implications of Naturally Derived Dietary Supplements for Dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Thaipitakwong, Thanchanit; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2017-02-01

    Dyslipidemia is recognized as a major cause of cardiovascular disease. A number of evidence-based guidelines recommend conventional synthetic drugs as standard therapy for dyslipidemia in clinical practice. However, antihyperlipidemic drugs have some serious side effects. Naturally derived dietary supplements are becoming attractive as an alternative strategy because of their high efficacy and safety, as supported by numerous data. Moreover, they could be considered an initial treatment for dyslipidemia. The aims of this literature review were to demonstrate the efficacy, safety, and clinical implications of dietary supplements for treating dyslipidemia. We reviewed the literature, including data from in vitro, in vivo, and human studies, and clinical guideline recommendations. We classified dietary supplements by their proposed mechanisms of action on lipid metabolism and also collected daily dosage recommendations, interactions with concurrent drugs and/or foods, dosage forms, and examples of commercially available products. Various types of naturally derived dietary supplements exhibit lipid-improving properties. Efficacy and safety are acceptable; however, their use in clinical practice will require further well-designed investigations and the support of scientific data.

  2. Is Deqi an Indicator of Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Wei; Xiao, Lu; Zheng, Wen-Ke; Liu, Chun-Xiang; Zhang, Li; Shang, Hong-Cai

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Despite the systematic literature review of the current evidence, we aim to answer the question “ is Deqi an indicator of clinical effects in acupuncture treatment?” Methods. We systematically searched CNKI, VIP, Wanfang Data, PubMed, Embase, and the CENTRAL for three types of study: (1) empirical research probing into the role of Deqi in acupuncture; (2) mechanism studies examining the effect of Deqi on physiological parameters in animal models and human subjects; (3) clinical studies that compared the outcome of acupuncture with Deqi with that of acupuncture without Deqi. Two reviewers independently extracted data, undertook qualitative or quantitative analysis, and summarized findings. Results. The ancient Chinese acupuncturists valued the role of Deqi as a diagnostic tool, a prognosis predictor, and a necessary part of the therapeutic procedure. Findings from modern experimental research provided preliminary evidence for the physiological mechanism that produced Deqi. Few clinical studies generated conflicting evidence of the comparative effectiveness of acupuncture with Deqi versus acupuncture without Deqi for a variety of conditions. Conclusion. The current evidence base is not solid enough to draw any conclusion regarding the predicative value of natural Deqi for clinical efficacy or the therapeutic value of manipulation-facilitated Deqi. PMID:23983801

  3. Review of clinical studies of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. and its isolated bioactive compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bounda, Guy-Armel; Feng, YU

    2015-01-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (PMT), officially listed in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, is one of the most popular perennial Chinese traditional medicines known as He shou wu in China and East Asia, and as Fo-ti in North America. Mounting pharmacological studies have stressed out its key benefice for the treatment of various diseases and medical conditions such as liver injury, cancer, diabetes, alopecia, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases as well. International databases such as PubMed/Medline, Science citation Index and Google Scholar were searched for clinical studies recently published on P. multiflorum. Various clinical studies published articles were retrieved, providing information relevant to pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis, sleep disorders, dyslipidemia treatment, and neurodegenerative diseases. This review is an effort to update the clinical picture of investigations ever carried on PMT and/or its isolated bio-compounds and to enlighten its therapeutic assessment. PMID:26130933

  4. The clinical heterogeneity of drug-induced myoclonus: an illustrated review.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Sabine; Bloem, Bastiaan R; van de Warrenburg, Bart P

    2016-12-16

    A wide variety of drugs can cause myoclonus. To illustrate this, we first discuss two personally observed cases, one presenting with generalized, but facial-predominant, myoclonus that was induced by amantadine; and the other presenting with propriospinal myoclonus triggered by an antibiotic. We then review the literature on drugs that may cause myoclonus, extracting the corresponding clinical phenotype and suggested underlying pathophysiology. The most frequently reported classes of drugs causing myoclonus include opiates, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antibiotics. The distribution of myoclonus ranges from focal to generalized, even amongst patients using the same drug, which suggests various neuro-anatomical generators. Possible underlying pathophysiological alterations involve serotonin, dopamine, GABA, and glutamate-related processes at various levels of the neuraxis. The high number of cases of drug-induced myoclonus, together with their reported heterogeneous clinical characteristics, underscores the importance of considering drugs as a possible cause of myoclonus, regardless of its clinical characteristics.

  5. Non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities: review of clinical and ethical issues

    PubMed Central

    Gekas, Jean; Langlois, Sylvie; Ravitsky, Vardit; Audibert, François; van den Berg, David Gradus; Haidar, Hazar; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Genomics-based non-invasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA (cfDNA screening) was proposed to reduce the number of invasive procedures in current prenatal diagnosis for fetal aneuploidies. We review here the clinical and ethical issues of cfDNA screening. To date, it is not clear how cfDNA screening is going to impact the performances of clinical prenatal diagnosis and how it could be incorporated in real life. The direct marketing to users may have facilitated the early introduction of cfDNA screening into clinical practice despite limited evidence-based independent research data supporting this rapid shift. There is a need to address the most important ethical, legal, and social issues before its implementation in a mass setting. Its introduction might worsen current tendencies to neglect the reproductive autonomy of pregnant women. PMID:26893576

  6. Poststroke upper extremity rehabilitation: a review of robotic systems and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Bambi R; McDowell, Sharon K; Worthen-Chaudhari, Lise C

    2007-01-01

    Although the use of robotic devices to address neuromuscular rehabilitative goals represents a promising technological advance in medical care, the large number of systems being developed and varying levels of clinical study of the devices make it difficult to follow and interpret the results in this new field. This article is a review of the current state-of-the-art in robotic applications in poststroke therapy for the upper extremity, written specifically to help clinicians determine the differences between various systems. We concentrate primarily on systems that have been tested clinically. Robotic systems are grouped by rehabilitation application (e.g., gross motor movement, bilateral training, etc.), and, where possible, the neurorehabilitation strategies employed by each system are described. We close with a discussion of the benefits and concerns of using robotics in rehabilitation and an indication of challenges that must be addressed for therapeutic robots to be applied practically in the clinic.

  7. The clinical anatomy of the physical examination of the abdomen: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Muhammad; Voin, Vlad; Topale, Nitsa; Iwanaga, Joe; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-02-06

    Physical examination of the abdomen is an essential skill. Knowledge of its clinical anatomy and application is vital for making diagnoses. Misinterpretation of anatomy during examination can have serious consequences. This review addresses understanding of the anatomy, methodology and complications of abdominal physical examination. It includes particular reference to modern technology and investigations. Physical examination is performed for diagnostic purposes. However, the art of physical examination is declining as more and more clinicians rely on newer technology. This can have regrettable consequences: negligence, waste of time and resources, and deterioration of clinical skills. With a sound knowledge of clinical anatomy, and realization of the importance of physical examination of the abdomen, clinician and patients alike can benefit. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Volumetric modulated arc therapy: a review of current literature and clinical use in practice

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, M; Clark, C H; Wood, K; Whitaker, S; Nisbet, A

    2011-01-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel radiation technique, which can achieve highly conformal dose distributions with improved target volume coverage and sparing of normal tissues compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques. VMAT also has the potential to offer additional advantages, such as reduced treatment delivery time compared with conventional static field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The clinical worldwide use of VMAT is increasing significantly. Currently the majority of published data on VMAT are limited to planning and feasibility studies, although there is emerging clinical outcome data in several tumour sites. This article aims to discuss the current use of VMAT techniques in practice and review the available data from planning and clinical outcome studies in various tumour sites including prostate, pelvis (lower gastrointestinal, gynaecological), head and neck, thoracic, central nervous system, breast and other tumour sites. PMID:22011829

  9. Application of MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Virology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a diagnostic tool of microbial identification and characterization based on the detection of the mass of molecules. In the majority of clinical laboratories, this technology is currently being used mainly for bacterial diagnosis, but several approaches in the field of virology have been investigated. The introduction of this technology in clinical virology will improve the diagnosis of infections produced by viruses but also the discovery of mutations and variants of these microorganisms as well as the detection of antiviral resistance. This review is focused on the main current applications of MALDI-TOF MS techniques in clinical virology showing the state of the art with respect to this exciting new technology. PMID:24222805

  10. Application of maldi-tof mass spectrometry in clinical virology: a review.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a diagnostic tool of microbial identification and characterization based on the detection of the mass of molecules. In the majority of clinical laboratories, this technology is currently being used mainly for bacterial diagnosis, but several approaches in the field of virology have been investigated. The introduction of this technology in clinical virology will improve the diagnosis of infections produced by viruses but also the discovery of mutations and variants of these microorganisms as well as the detection of antiviral resistance. This review is focused on the main current applications of MALDI-TOF MS techniques in clinical virology showing the state of the art with respect to this exciting new technology.

  11. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer chemoprevention: a review of the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Ritesh; Takami, Akiyoshi; Espinoza, J. Luis

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention involves the use of different natural or biologic agents to inhibit or reverse tumor growth. Epidemiological and pre-clinical data suggest that various natural phytochemicals and dietary compounds possess chemopreventive properties, and in-vitro and animal studies support that these compounds may modulate signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in transformed cells, enhance the host immune system and sensitize malignant cells to cytotoxic agents. Despite promising results from experimental studies, only a limited number of these compounds have been tested in clinical trials and have shown variable results. In this review, we summarize the data regarding select phytochemicals including curcumin, resveratrol, lycopene, folates and tea polyphenols with emphasis on the clinical evidence supporting the efficacy of these compounds in high-risk populations. PMID:27232756

  12. Clinical features of ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumors: A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masanari G; Erkul, Evren; Brewer, Kendall S; Harruff, Emily E; Nguyen, Shaun A; Day, Terry A

    2017-04-01

    Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumors are rare, benign neoplasms of the head and neck most commonly found within the oral cavity. While histopathological evaluation has been the primary focus of prior studies, clinical characterization of this rare entity currently remains sparse. Thus, this study was performed to provide insights into the clinical characteristics of ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumors to aid clinicians in distinguishing the lesion from other benign and malignant processes for a more accurate diagnosis and treatment. Moreover, this study includes a unique case of ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumor arising in the base of tongue, now the fourth to arise at that anatomic site. Including this case, a systematic review of the literature identified only 60 individual cases reported thus far. This study provides a detailed analysis of all 60 cases including demographics, clinical presentation, radiographic imaging, follow-up, and recurrence rate.

  13. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer chemoprevention: a review of the clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Ritesh; Takami, Akiyoshi; Espinoza, J Luis

    2016-08-09

    Cancer chemoprevention involves the use of different natural or biologic agents to inhibit or reverse tumor growth. Epidemiological and pre-clinical data suggest that various natural phytochemicals and dietary compounds possess chemopreventive properties, and in-vitro and animal studies support that these compounds may modulate signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in transformed cells, enhance the host immune system and sensitize malignant cells to cytotoxic agents. Despite promising results from experimental studies, only a limited number of these compounds have been tested in clinical trials and have shown variable results. In this review, we summarize the data regarding select phytochemicals including curcumin, resveratrol, lycopene, folates and tea polyphenols with emphasis on the clinical evidence supporting the efficacy of these compounds in high-risk populations.

  14. Clinical pharmacology of lysergic acid diethylamide: case reports and review of the treatment of intoxication.

    PubMed

    Blaho, K; Merigian, K; Winbery, S; Geraci, S A; Smartt, C

    1997-01-01

    Intoxication and overdose are common presenting complaints to the emergency department. Acute intoxication with lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has become a relatively rare event, especially when compared with the incidence of ethanol and cocaine intoxication. We recently had an outbreak of presumed LSD intoxications occurring over one weekend. All patients had attended a performance by the musical group The Grateful Dead. At present, LSD intoxication or overdose can only be suspected based on clinical findings because there are no readily available rapid laboratory tests for detecting either the parent compound or the metabolites of the drug. The clinical findings and outcomes of five patients with suspected LSD intoxication are presented. The pharmacological effects of LSD and treatment modalities of intoxication are reviewed. All patients were treated conservatively based on clinical signs and symptoms. Only one patient required hospital admission for combative behavior that was initially refractory to pharmacological restraint.

  15. Clinical evidence on hemodiafiltration: a systematic review and a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mostovaya, Ira M; Blankestijn, Peter J; Bots, Michiel L; Covic, Adrian; Davenport, Andrew; Grooteman, Muriel P C; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Locatelli, Francesco; Vanholder, Raymond; Nubé, Menso J

    2014-03-01

    The general objective assigned to the European DIALysis (EUDIAL) Working Group by the European Renal Association – European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) was to enhance the quality of dialysis therapies in Europe in the broadest possible sense. Given the increasing interest in convective therapies, the Working Group has started by focusing on hemodiafiltration (HDF) therapies. A EUDIAL consensus conference was held in Paris on 13 October 2011 to discuss definitions, safety standards, clinical outcome and educational issues. Recently, the first report of the EUDIAL group was published, revisiting the definition, dose quantification, and safety of HDF. Since the meeting in Paris, new evidence has become available regarding the clinical benefits of HDF. This is the second report of the expert group in which the relation between HDF and clinical outcomes is systematically reviewed and analyzed, with emphasis on the relation between achieved convection volume and treatment effect.

  16. Tapentadol Prolonged Release for Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Trials and 5 Years of Routine Clinical Practice Data.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Eberhart, Leopold; Kern, Kai-Uwe; Regner, Stefan; Rolke, Roman; Simanski, Christian; Tölle, Thomas

    2016-09-09

    Tapentadol prolonged release (PR) for the treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain combines 2 modes of action. These are μ-opioid receptor agonism and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in a single molecule that allow higher analgesic potency through modulation of different pharmacological targets within the pain transmitting systems. At the same time, this can also serve as a clue for modulation of different pain-generating mechanisms according to nociceptive, neuropathic, or mixed pain conditions. Tapentadol PR has now been on the market for 5 years, with over 4.6 million people treated worldwide. A panel of pain specialists convened in Germany to review the clinical program and to discuss the role of tapentadol PR in the management of chronic pain. The clinical study program demonstrated effective and generally well-tolerated treatment for up to 2 years in a broad range of chronic pain conditions, including those with neuropathic pain components. This was confirmed in routine clinical practice observations. Head-to-head studies with World Health Organization (WHO) III opioids such as oxycodone controlled release and oxycodone/naloxone PR showed at least comparable pain relief in the treatment of moderate-to-severe musculoskeletal pain. Rotation from poorly tolerated WHO III opioids to tapentadol PR provided effective pain relief and better symptom control for musculoskeletal pain compared to previous medication. Functionality, health status and quality of life also improved under tapentadol PR treatment. The gastrointestinal tolerability profile was more favorable compared to other tested WHO III opioids. Tapentadol PR has a good safety profile and no evidence of acquired tolerance from the long-term data so far collected. Overall, tapentadol PR represents an effective and generally well-tolerated alternative to "classical" opioidergic drugs.

  17. Prescription Opioid Abuse: A Literature Review of the Clinical and Economic Burden in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anisha M.; Rattana, Stacy K.; Quock, Tiffany P.; Mody, Samir H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Between 2002 and 2007, the nonmedical use of prescription pain relievers grew from 11.0 million to 12.5 million people in the United States. Societal costs attributable to prescription opioid abuse were estimated at $55.7 billion in 2007. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively review the recent clinical and economic evaluations of prescription opioid abuse. A comprehensive literature search was conducted for studies published from 2002 to 2012. Articles were included if they were original research studies in English that reported the clinical and economic burden associated with prescription opioid abuse. A total of 23 studies (183 unique citations identified, 54 articles subjected to full text review) were included in this review and analysis. Findings from the review demonstrated that rates of opioid overdose-related deaths ranged from 5528 deaths in 2002 to 14,800 in 2008. Furthermore, overdose reportedly results in 830,652 years of potential life lost before age 65. Opioid abusers were generally more likely to utilize medical services, such as emergency department, physician outpatient visits, and inpatient hospital stays, relative to non-abusers. When compared to a matched control group (non-abusers), mean annual excess health care costs for opioid abusers with private insurance ranged from $14,054 to $20,546. Similarly, the mean annual excess health care costs for opioid abusers with Medicaid ranged from $5874 to $15,183. The issue of opioid abuse has significant clinical and economic consequences for patients, health care providers, commercial and government payers, and society as a whole. (Population Health Management 2014;17:372–387) PMID:25075734

  18. Pulmonary embolism in the elderly: a review on clinical, instrumental and laboratory presentation

    PubMed Central

    Masotti, Luca; Ray, Patrick; Righini, Marc; Le Gal, Gregoire; Antonelli, Fabio; Landini, Giancarlo; Cappelli, Roberto; Prisco, Domenico; Rottoli, Paola

    2008-01-01

    Objective Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) remains difficult and is often missed in the elderly due to nonspecific and atypical presentation. Diagnostic algorithms able to rule out PE and validated in young adult patients may have reduced applicability in elderly patients, which increases the number of diagnostic tools use and costs. The aim of the present study was to analyze the reported clinical presentation of PE in patients aged 65 and more. Materials and Methods Prospective and retrospective English language studies dealing with the clinical, instrumental and laboratory aspects of PE in patients more than 65 and published after January 1987 and indexed in MEDLINE using keywords as pulmonary embolism, elderly, old, venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the title, abstract or text, were reviewed. Results Dyspnea (range 59%–91.5%), tachypnea (46%–74%), tachycardia (29%–76%), and chest pain (26%–57%) represented the most common clinical symptoms and signs. Bed rest was the most frequent risk factor for VTE (15%–67%); deep vein thrombosis was detected in 15%–50% of cases. Sinus tachycardia, right bundle branch block, and ST-T abnormalities were the most frequent ECG findings. Abnormalities of chest X-ray varied (less than 50% in one-half of the studies and more than 70% in the other one-half). Arterial blood gas analysis revealed severe hypoxemia and mild hypocapnia as the main findings. D-Dimer was higher than cut-off in 100% of patients in 75% of studies. Clinical usefulness of D-Dimer measurement decreases with age, although the strategies based on D-Dimer seem to be cost-effective at least until 80 years. Conclusion Despite limitations due to pooling data of heterogeneous studies, our review could contribute to the knowledge of the presentation of PE in the elderly with its diagnostic difficulties. A diagnostic strategy based on reviewed data is proposed. PMID:18827912

  19. Sex, Gender, and Pain: A Review of Recent Clinical and Experimental Findings

    PubMed Central

    Fillingim, Roger B.; King, Christopher D.; Ribeiro-Dasilva, Margarete C.; Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Riley, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Sex-related influences on pain and analgesia have become a topic of tremendous scientific and clinical interest, especially in the last 10 to 15 years. Members of our research group published reviews of this literature more than a decade ago, and the intervening time period has witnessed robust growth in research regarding sex, gender, and pain. Therefore, it seems timely to revisit this literature. Abundant evidence from recent epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrates that women are at substantially greater risk for many clinical pain conditions, and there is some suggestion that postoperative and procedural pain may be more severe among women than men. Consistent with our previous reviews, current human findings regarding sex differences in experimental pain indicate greater pain sensitivity among females compared with males for most pain modalities, including more recently implemented clinically relevant pain models such as temporal summation of pain and intramuscular injection of algesic substances. The evidence regarding sex differences in laboratory measures of endogenous pain modulation is mixed, as are findings from studies using functional brain imaging to ascertain sex differences in pain-related cerebral activation. Also inconsistent are findings regarding sex differences in responses to pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic pain treatments. The article concludes with a discussion of potential biopsychosocial mechanisms that may underlie sex differences in pain, and considerations for future research are discussed. Perspective This article reviews the recent literature regarding sex, gender, and pain. The growing body of evidence that has accumulated in the past 10 to 15 years continues to indicate substantial sex differences in clinical and experimental pain responses, and some evidence suggests that pain treatment responses may differ for women versus men. PMID:19411059

  20. A systematic review of animal and clinical studies on the use of scaffolds for urethral repair.

    PubMed

    Qi, Na; Li, Wen-jiao; Tian, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Replacing urethral tissue with functional scaffolds has been one of the challenging problems in the field of urethra reconstruction or repair over the last several decades. Various scaffold materials have been used in animal studies, but clinical studies on use of scaffolds for urethral repair are scarce. The aim of this study was to review recent animal and clinical studies on the use of different scaffolds for urethral repair, and to evaluate these scaffolds based on the evidence from these studies. PubMed and OVID databases were searched to identify relevant studies, in conjunction with further manual search. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated. Of 555 identified studies, 38 were included for analysis. It was found that in both animal and clinical studies, scaffolds seeded with cells were used for repair of large segmental defects of the urethra, such as in tubular urethroplasty. When the defect area was small, cell-free scaffolds were more likely to be applied. A lot of pre-clinical and limited clinical evidence showed that natural or artificial materials could be used as scaffolds for urethral repair. Urinary tissue engineering is still in the immature stage, and the safety, efficacy, cost-effectiveness of the scaffolds are needed for further study.

  1. Review of Clinical Pharmacology of Aloe vera L. in the Treatment of Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Miroddi, Marco; Navarra, Michele; Calapai, Fabrizio; Mancari, Ferdinando; Giofrè, Salvatore Vincenzo; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2015-05-01

    Aloe vera L., is a plant used worldwide as folk remedy for the treatment of various ailments, including skin disorders. Its gel is present in cosmetics, medicinal products and food supplements. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease, involving mainly the skin, affects about the 2-3% of general population. Conventional pharmacological treatments for psoriasis can have limited effectiveness and can cause adverse reactions. For this reason often psoriatic patients look for alternative treatments based on natural products containing Aloe vera. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials assessing effectiveness and safety of aloe for the treatment of psoriasis. Clinical studies published in English were considered; a total of four clinical trials met inclusion criteria. Studies were also evaluated by using the Jadad scale and Consort Statement in Reporting Clinical trials of Herbal Medicine Intervention. Quality and methodological accuracy of considered studies varied considerably, and some crucial information to reproduce clinical results was missing. We conclude that administration of aloe as cutaneous treatment is generally well tolerated, as no serious side effects were reported. Results on the effectiveness of Aloe vera are contradictory; our analysis reveals the presence of methodological gaps preventing to reach final conclusions.

  2. Brain temperature and its fundamental properties: a review for clinical neuroscientists

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Bonnie; Normoyle, Kieran P.; Jackson, Kevin; Spitler, Kevin; Sharrock, Matthew F.; Miller, Claire M.; Best, Catherine; Llano, Daniel; Du, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Brain temperature, as an independent therapeutic target variable, has received increasingly intense clinical attention. To date, brain hypothermia represents the most potent neuroprotectant in laboratory studies. Although the impact of brain temperature is prevalent in a number of common human diseases including: head trauma, stroke, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, mood disorders, headaches, and neurodegenerative disorders, it is evident and well recognized that the therapeutic application of induced hypothermia is limited to a few highly selected clinical conditions such as cardiac arrest and hypoxic ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Efforts to understand the fundamental aspects of brain temperature regulation are therefore critical for the development of safe, effective, and pragmatic clinical treatments for patients with brain injuries. Although centrally-mediated mechanisms to maintain a stable body temperature are relatively well established, very little is clinically known about brain temperature's spatial and temporal distribution, its physiological and pathological fluctuations, and the mechanism underlying brain thermal homeostasis. The human brain, a metabolically “expensive” organ with intense heat production, is sensitive to fluctuations in temperature with regards to its functional activity and energy efficiency. In this review, we discuss several critical aspects concerning the fundamental properties of brain temperature from a clinical perspective. PMID:25339859

  3. Effectiveness and safety of natalizumab in real-world clinical practice: Review of observational studies.

    PubMed

    van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian J; Fernández, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    Clinical trials have shown that natalizumab is highly effective for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of this analysis was to conduct a targeted review of data from country-specific observational studies and registries of natalizumab-treated patients with relapsing MS in order to more fully investigate the longer-term effectiveness and safety of this disease-modifying therapy in real-world clinical practice settings. A PubMed search was conducted on March 13, 2014, using the terms (natalizumab AND multiple sclerosis) AND (observational OR registry OR post-marketing OR clinical practice). Only English-language papers that reported effectiveness (in terms of effects on relapses, disability progression, and magnetic resonance imaging findings) and/or safety results from studies were included. Data from 22 studies/registries were included. Annualized relapse rates decreased by 73%-94% from baseline across the studies, with improvement maintained for up to 5 years during natalizumab treatment. Natalizumab effectiveness was also demonstrated via assessment of disability progression (Expanded Disability Status Scale), radiological measures, and no-evidence-of-disease-activity measures (clinical, radiological, and overall). Results were similar among patient groups stratified by level of disease activity. Safety outcomes were consistent with natalizumab's known safety profile. Data from country-specific observational studies and registries varying in size and scope support the effectiveness and safety of natalizumab in a broad range of patients in clinical practice.

  4. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  5. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Grace; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  6. Adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy among breast cancer survivors in clinical practice: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Bartholomew, L Kay; Carpentier, Melissa Y; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Vernon, Sally W

    2012-07-01

    Adjuvant hormonal therapy significantly improves long-term survival of breast cancer patients with hormone receptor-positive disease. Despite the proven clinical efficacy of tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors, many breast cancer survivors either fail to take the correct dosage at the prescribed frequency (adherence) or discontinue therapy (persistence). This systematic review aims to: (1) determine the prevalence of adherence and persistence to adjuvant hormonal therapy among breast cancer survivors in clinical practice, and (2) identify correlates of adherence and persistence. We searched Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL for studies that measured rates and/or correlates of adherence and/or persistence to adjuvant hormonal therapy. Studies were reviewed in a multi-step process: (1) the lead author screened titles and abstracts of all potentially eligible studies; (2) each coauthor reviewed a random 5 % sample of abstracts; and (3) two sets of coauthors each reviewed half of all "maybe" abstracts. Any disagreements were discussed until consensus was reached. Twenty-nine studies met inclusion criteria. Prevalence of adherence ranged from 41 to 72 % and discontinuation (i.e., nonpersistence) ranged from 31 to 73 %, measured at the end of 5 years of treatment. Extremes of age (older or younger), increasing out-of-pocket costs, follow-up care with a general practitioner (vs. oncologist), higher CYP2D6 activity, switching from one form of therapy to another, and treatment side effects were negatively associated with adherence and/or persistence. Taking more medications at baseline, referral to an oncologist, and earlier year at diagnosis were positively associated with adherence and/or persistence. Adherence and persistence to adjuvant hormonal therapy among breast cancer survivors is suboptimal. Many of the correlates of adherence and persistence studied to date are not modifiable. Our review reveals a critical need for further research on modifiable factors

  7. Clinical impact of lifestyle interventions for the prevention of diabetes: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Howells, Lara; Musaddaq, Besma; McKay, Ailsa J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To review the clinical outcomes of combined diet and physical activity interventions for populations at high risk of type 2 diabetes. Design Overview of systematic reviews (search dates April–December 2015). Setting Any level of care; no geographical restriction. Participants Adults at high risk of diabetes (as per measures of glycaemia, risk assessment or presence of risk factors). Interventions Combined diet and physical activity interventions including ≥2 interactions with a healthcare professional, and ≥12 months follow-up. Outcome measures Primary: glycaemia, diabetes incidence. Secondary: behaviour change, measures of adiposity, vascular disease and mortality. Results 19 recent reviews were identified for inclusion; 5 with AMSTAR scores <8. Most considered only randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and RCTs were the major data source in the remainder. Five trials were included in most reviews. Almost all analyses reported that interventions were associated with net reductions in diabetes incidence, measures of glycaemia and adiposity, at follow-up durations of up to 23 years (typically <6). Small effect sizes and potentially transient effect were reported in some studies, and some reviewers noted that durability of intervention impact was potentially sensitive to duration of intervention and adherence to behaviour change. Behaviour change, vascular disease and mortality outcome data were infrequently reported, and evidence of the impact of intervention on these outcomes was minimal. Evidence for age effect was mixed, and sex and ethnicity effect were little considered. Conclusions Relatively long-duration lifestyle interventions can limit or delay progression to diabetes under trial conditions. However, outcomes from more time-limited interventions, and those applied in routine clinical settings, appear more variable, in keeping with the findings of recent pragmatic trials. There is little evidence of intervention impact on vascular

  8. Clinical utilization of musculoskeletal sonography involving non-physician rehabilitation providers: A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Asai, Christina; Tsai, Julieann

    2015-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal sonography use in point-of-care physical medicine and rehabilitation is rapidly expanding, not only by physiatrists, but also by non-physician rehabilitation providers. Aim To evaluate the current range, extent and nature of literature and to identify emerging areas of evidence for the use of musculoskeletal sonography involving non-physician rehabilitation providers to guide research and clinical practice. Design Scoping Review Setting Inpatient, Outpatient, Other Population Musculoskeletal conditions Methods Five databases were searched and 578 unique abstracts were identified and screened for eligibility. Three raters independently read 68 full texts and 36 articles that reported on applied uses of sonography by non-physician rehabilitation providers were included. Results Eighteen studies described direct clinical use, primarily for outcomes measurement (n=12) or as a biofeedback intervention (n=10). Twelve laboratory studies were included that related morphology to patient reports or validated clinical interventions. Six additional studies, although not involving non-physician providers, were included as they presented potential valuable uses that were not noted in the other included studies, such as monitoring bone healing, tendon repair, and evaluation of idiopathic symptom reports or non-specific primary diagnoses. Conclusion This review indicates that non-physician rehabilitation providers use sonography for outcomes measurement and biofeedback interventions. Research is needed to evaluate effects of these uses on patient outcomes and to explore additional potential uses for clinical reasoning, treatment planning, and monitoring of tissue healing related to intervention. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact Implementation of musculoskeletal sonography by non-physician rehabilitation providers has the potential to be a critically advantageous addition to improve care. PMID:26201705

  9. Internet addiction and problematic Internet use: A systematic review of clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Kuss, Daria J; Lopez-Fernandez, Olatz

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provide a comprehensive overview of clinical studies on the clinical picture of Internet-use related addictions from a holistic perspective. A literature search was conducted using the database Web of Science. METHODS: Over the last 15 years, the number of Internet users has increased by 1000%, and at the same time, research on addictive Internet use has proliferated. Internet addiction has not yet been understood very well, and research on its etiology and natural history is still in its infancy. In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association included Internet Gaming Disorder in the appendix of the updated version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as condition that requires further research prior to official inclusion in the main manual, with important repercussions for research and treatment. To date, reviews have focused on clinical and treatment studies of Internet addiction and Internet Gaming Disorder. This arguably limits the analysis to a specific diagnosis of a potential disorder that has not yet been officially recognised in the Western world, rather than a comprehensive and inclusive investigation of Internet-use related addictions (including problematic Internet use) more generally. RESULTS: The systematic literature review identified a total of 46 relevant studies. The included studies used clinical samples, and focused on characteristics of treatment seekers and online addiction treatment. Four main types of clinical research studies were identified, namely research involving (1) treatment seeker characteristics; (2) psychopharmacotherapy; (3) psychological therapy; and (4) combined treatment. CONCLUSION: A consensus regarding diagnostic criteria and measures is needed to improve reliability across studies and to develop effective and efficient treatment approaches for treatment seekers. PMID:27014605

  10. Clinical solid waste management practices and its impact on human health and environment--A review.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sohrab; Santhanam, Amutha; Nik Norulaini, N A; Omar, A K Mohd

    2011-04-01

    The management of clinical solid waste (CSW) continues to be a major challenge, particularly, in most healthcare facilities of the developing world. Poor conduct and inappropriate disposal methods exercised during handling and disposal of CSW is increasing significant health hazards and environmental pollution due to the infectious nature of the waste. This article summarises a literature review into existing CSW management practices in the healthcare centers. The information gathered in this paper has been derived from the desk study of open literature survey. Numerous researches have been conducted on the management of CSW. Although, significant steps have been taken on matters related to safe handling and disposal of the clinical waste, but improper management practice is evident from the point of initial collection to the final disposal. In most cases, the main reasons of the mismanagement of CSW are the lack of appropriate legislation, lack of specialized clinical staffs, lack of awareness and effective control. Furthermore, most of the healthcare centers of the developing world have faced financial difficulties and therefore looking for cost effective disposal methods of clinical waste. This paper emphasizes to continue the recycle-reuse program of CSW materials after sterilization by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) sterilization technology at the point of initial collection. Emphasis is on the priority to inactivate the infectious micro-organisms in CSW. In that case, waste would not pose any threat to healthcare workers. The recycling-reuse program would be carried out successfully with the non-specialized clinical staffs. Therefore, the adoption of SF-CO2 sterilization technology in management of clinical solid waste can reduce exposure to infectious waste, decrease labor, lower costs, and yield better compliance with regulatory. Thus healthcare facilities can both save money and provide a safe environment for patients, healthcare staffs

  11. Accelerometer measurement of upper extremity movement after stroke: a systematic review of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Noorkõiv, Marika; Rodgers, Helen; Price, Christopher I

    2014-10-09

    The aim of this review was to identify and summarise publications, which have reported clinical applications of upper limb accelerometry for stroke within free-living environments and make recommendations for future studies. Data was searched from MEDLINE, Scopus, IEEExplore and Compendex databases. The final search was 31st October 2013. Any study was included which reported clinical assessments in parallel with accelerometry in a free-living hospital or home setting. Study quality is reflected by participant numbers, methodological approach, technical details of the equipment used, blinding of clinical measures, whether safety and compliance data was collected. First author screened articles for inclusion and inclusion of full text articles and data extraction was confirmed by the third author. Out of 1375 initial abstracts, 8 articles were included. All participants were stroke patients. Accelerometers were worn for either 24 hours or 3 days. Data were collected as summed acceleration counts over a specified time or as the duration of active/inactive periods. Activity in both arms was reported by all studies and the ratio of impaired to unimpaired arm activity was calculated in six studies. The correlation between clinical assessments and accelerometry was tested in five studies and significant correlations were found. The efficacy of a rehabilitation intervention was assessed using accelerometry by three studies: in two studies both accelerometry and clinical test scores detected a post-treatment difference but in one study accelerometry data did not change despite clinical test scores showing motor and functional improvements. Further research is needed to understand the additional value of accelerometry as a measure of upper limb use and function in a clinical context. A simple and easily interpretable accelerometry approach is required.

  12. Escitalopram--translating molecular properties into clinical benefit: reviewing the evidence in major depression.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Brian; Taylor, David

    2010-08-01

    The majority of currently marketed drugs contain a mixture of enantiomers; however, recent evidence suggests that individual enantiomers can have pharmacological properties that differ importantly from enantiomer mixtures. Escitalopram, the S-enantiomer of citalopram, displays markedly different pharmacological activity to the R-enantiomer. This review aims to evaluate whether these differences confer any significant clinical advantage for escitalopram over either citalopram or other frequently used antidepressants. Searches were conducted using PubMed and EMBASE (up to January 2009). Abstracts of the retrieved studies were reviewed independently by both authors for inclusion. Only those studies relating to depression or major depressive disorder were included. The search identified over 250 citations, of which 21 studies and 18 pooled or meta-analyses studies were deemed suitable for inclusion. These studies reveal that escitalopram has some efficacy advantage over citalopram and paroxetine, but no consistent advantage over other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Escitalopram has at least comparable efficacy to available serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine XR and duloxetine, and may offer some tolerability advantages over these agents. This review suggests that the mechanistic advantages of escitalopram over citalopram translate into clinical efficacy advantages. Escitalopram may have a favourable benefit-risk ratio compared with citalopram and possibly with several other antidepressant agents.

  13. Thuja occidentalis (Arbor vitae): A Review of its Pharmaceutical, Pharmacological and Clinical Properties

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) is a native European tree widely used in homeopathy and evidence-based phytotherapy. Many reviews and monographs have been published on the herbal substance's description, mode of action and clinical use. However, no comprehensive evidence-based review is available. Therefore, our aim was to search MEDLINE databases and survey manufacturers for further details or unpublished data. This review presents the botany, ethnobotany and phytochemistry, especially the different contents of essential oil (Thujone) in relation to different extraction procedures of this medicinal plant. Thuja's antiviral action and immunopharmacological potential, such as stimulatory and co-stimulatory effects on cytokine and antibody production and activation of macrophages and other immunocompetent cells, have been evaluated in numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. Although no controlled trials have been conducted on Thuja occ alone, many clinical studies have been performed with a herbal medicinal product containing a special extract of Thuja occ and other immunostimulants, demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy and safety in respiratory tract infections. PMID:15841280

  14. Thrombin use in surgery: an evidence-based review of its clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Sung W; Lew, Wesley K; Weaver, Fred A

    2010-01-01

    When surgical ligation of bleeding fails, or is not possible, surgeons rely on a number of hemostatic aids, including thrombin. This review discusses the history, pharmacology and clinical application of thrombin as a surgical hemostat. The initial thrombin was bovine in origin, but its use has been complicated by the formation of antibodies that cross-react with human coagulation factors. This has been associated with life-threatening bleeding and in some circumstances anaphylaxis and death. Human thrombin, isolated from pooled plasma of donors, was developed in an effort to minimize these risks, but its downsides are its limited availability and the potential for transmitting blood-borne pathogens. Recently a recombinant thrombin has been developed, and approved for use by the FDA. It has the advantage of being minimally antigenic and devoid of the risk of viral transmission. Thrombin is often used in conjunction with other hemostatic aids, including absorbable agents such as Gelfoam, and with fibrinogen in fibrin glues. The last part of this review will discuss these agents in detail, and review their clinical applications. PMID:22282693

  15. Acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and prospective clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Dae; Heo, In; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Crawford, Cindy; Kang, Hyung-Won; Lim, Jung-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were "acupuncture" and "PTSD." No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional therapy control for PTSD, or without control. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 uncontrolled clinical trials (UCTs) out of 136 articles in total were systematically reviewed. One high-quality RCT reported that acupuncture was superior to waitlist control and therapeutic effects of acupuncture and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) were similar based on the effect sizes. One RCT showed no statistical difference between acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). One RCT reported a favorable effect of acupoint stimulation plus CBT against CBT alone. A meta-analysis of acupuncture plus moxibustion versus SSRI favored acupuncture plus moxibustion in three outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the evidence of effectiveness of acupuncture for PTSD is encouraging but not cogent. Further qualified trials are needed to confirm whether acupuncture is effective for PTSD.

  16. Clinimetric properties and clinical utility in rehabilitation of postsurgical scar rating scales: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, Stefano; Ferriero, Giorgio; Sartorio, Francesco; Cisari, Carlo; Bravini, Elisabetta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to review and critically assess the most used and clinimetrically sound outcome measures currently available for postsurgical scar assessment in rehabilitation. We performed a systematic review of the Medline and Embase databases to June 2015. All published peer-reviewed studies referring to the development, validation, or clinical use of scales or questionnaires in patients with linear scars were screened. Of 922 articles initially identified in the literature search, 48 full-text articles were retrieved for assessment. Of these, 16 fulfilled the inclusion criteria for data collection. Data were collected pertaining to instrument item domains, validity, reliability, and Rasch analysis. The eight outcome measures identified were as follows: Vancouver Scar Scale, Dermatology Life Quality Index, Manchester Scar Scale, Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale, Bock Quality of Life (Bock QoL) questionnaire, Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale, Patient-Reported Impact of Scars Measure, and Patient Scar Assessment Questionnaire. Scales were examined for their clinimetric properties, and recommendations for their clinical or research use and selection were made. There is currently no absolute gold standard to be used in rehabilitation for the assessment of postsurgical scars, although the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and the Patient-Reported Impact of Scars Measure emerged as the most robust scales.

  17. Clinical Decision Support Alert Appropriateness: A Review and Proposal for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Thomas, Eric J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Sittig, Dean F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many healthcare providers are adopting clinical decision support (CDS) systems to improve patient safety and meet meaningful use requirements. Computerized alerts that prompt clinicians about drug-allergy, drug-drug, and drug-disease warnings or provide dosing guidance are most commonly implemented. Alert overrides, which occur when clinicians do not follow the guidance presented by the alert, can hinder improved patient outcomes. Methods We present a review of CDS alerts and describe a proposal to develop novel methods for evaluating and improving CDS alerts that builds upon traditional informatics approaches. Our proposal incorporates previously described models for predicting alert overrides that utilize retrospective chart review to determine which alerts are clinically relevant and which overrides are justifiable. Results Despite increasing implementations of CDS alerts, detailed evaluations rarely occur because of the extensive labor involved in manual chart reviews to determine alert and response appropriateness. Further, most studies have solely evaluated alert overrides that are appropriate or justifiable. Our proposal expands the use of web-based monitoring tools with an interactive dashboard for evaluating CDS alert and response appropriateness that incorporates the predictive models. The dashboard provides 2 views, an alert detail view and a patient detail view, to provide a full history of alerts and help put the patient's events in context. Conclusion The proposed research introduces several innovations to address the challenges and gaps in alert evaluations. This research can transform alert evaluation processes across healthcare settings, leading to improved CDS, reduced alert fatigue, and increased patient safety. PMID:24940129

  18. Assessing Competencies in a Master of Science in Clinical Research Program: The Comprehensive Competency Review.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Moore, Charity G; McTigue, Kathleen M; Rubio, Doris M; Kapoor, Wishwa N

    2015-12-01

    Competencies in Master of Science Clinical Research programs are becoming increasingly common. However, students and programs can only benefit fully from competency-based education if students' competence is formally assessed. Prior to a summative assessment, students must have at least one formative, formal assessment to be sure they are developing competence appropriate for their stage of training. This paper describes the comprehensive competency review (CCR), a milestone for MS students in Clinical Research at the University of Pittsburgh's Institute for Clinical Research Education. The CCR involves metacognitive reflection of the student's learning as a whole, written evidence of each competency, a narrative explaining the choice of evidence for demonstrating competencies, and a meeting in which two faculty members review the evidence and solicit further oral evidence of competence. CCRs allow for individualized feedback at the midpoint in degree programs, providing students with confidence that they will have the means and strategies to develop competence in all areas by the summative assessment of competence at their thesis defense. CCRs have also provided programmatic insight on the need for curricular revisions and additions. These benefits outweigh the time cost on the part of students and faculty in the CCR process.

  19. Combinations of Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.

    2014-04-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiation therapy. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiation therapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiation therapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested that radiation therapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study.

  20. Biological Treatment Approaches for Degenerative Disc Disease: A Review of Clinical Trials and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, Yu; Hussain, Ibrahim; Bonssar, Lawrence; Härtl, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Biologic-based treatment strategies for musculoskeletal diseases have gained traction over the past 20 years as alternatives to invasive, costly, and complicated surgical interventions. Spinal degenerative disc disease (DDD) is among the anatomic areas being investigated among this group, notably due to its high incidence and functional debilitation. In this review, we report the literature encompassing the use of biologic-based therapies for DDD. Articles published between January 1995 and November 2015 were reviewed, with a subset meeting the primary and secondary inclusion criteria of clinical trial results that could be sub-classified into bimolecular, cell-based, or gene therapies, as well as studies investigating the utility of allogeneic and tissue-engineered intervertebral discs. Ongoing clinical trials that have not yet published results are also mentioned to present the current state of the field. This exciting area has demonstrated positive and encouraging results across multiple strategies; thus, future bimolecular and regenerative techniques and understanding will likely lead to an increase in the number of human clinical trials assessing these therapies. PMID:28018762

  1. A review of hyperprolactinaemia and severe mental illness: are there implications for clinical biochemistry?

    PubMed

    Bushe, Chris J; Bradley, Andrew; Pendlebury, John

    2010-07-01

    Hyperprolactinaemia is a common adverse event reported in association with treatments used in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Recent data are suggestive that hyperprolactinaemia may have a range of significant short-and long-term clinical consequences. The objective of this review is to examine the causes, frequency and clinical consequences of hyperprolactinaemia in the severely mentally ill (SMI) with a focus on patients taking antipsychotic medications. A Medline search was carried out to identify relevant publications. Reference lists from previous review articles were also examined to search for additional data. Hyperprolactinaemia may be one of the most common adverse events associated with some antipsychotic medications. Precise rates with individual drugs had however until recently been poorly categorized. The relationship between hyperprolactinaemia and adverse outcomes in the SMI population appears similar to that in the general population. Adverse outcomes (such as sexual dysfunction) can occur acutely and in the longer term (bone fractures and possibly breast cancer), but the precise link between degree and length of hyperprolactinaemia and adverse outcome remains to be established. In conclusion, hyperprolactinaemia is a common treatment-emergent adverse event of some antipsychotic medications and may have clinical consequences. Physicians must balance the benefits and risks of treatment when determining appropriate therapy for individual patients.

  2. Assessing Competencies in a Master of Science in Clinical Research Program: The Comprehensive Competency Review

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Georgeanna FWB; Moore, Charity G; McTigue, Kathleen M; Rubio, Doris M; Kapoor, Wishwa N

    2015-01-01

    Competencies in Master of Science Clinical Research programs are becoming increasingly common. However, students and programs can only benefit fully from competency-based education if students’ competence is formally assessed. Prior to a summative assessment, students must have at least one formative, formal assessment to be sure they are developing competence appropriate for their stage of training. This paper describes the Comprehensive Competency Review (CCR), a milestone for MS students in Clinical Research at the University of Pittsburgh’s Institute for Clinical Research Education. The CCR involves metacognitive reflection of the student’s learning as a whole, written evidence of each competency, a narrative explaining the choice of evidence for demonstrating competencies, and a meeting in which two faculty members review the evidence and solicit further oral evidence of competence. CCRs allow for individualized feedback at the midpoint in degree programs, providing students with confidence that they will have the means and strategies to develop competence in all areas by the summative assessment of competence at their thesis defense. CCRs have also provided programmatic insight on the need for curricular revisions and additions. These benefits outweigh the time cost on the part of students and faculty in the CCR process. PMID:26332763

  3. Physicians' perceptions of clinical supervision and educational support via videoconference: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Miriam Pl; Ray, Robin; Sabesan, Sabe

    2014-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the perceptions of physicians about clinical supervision and educational support via videoconferencing. A search of literature databases, reference lists and specific journals was performed for relevant articles published between 1990 and 2013. A total of 1288 studies were identified, of which 13 fulfilled the inclusion criteria for review. Six studies concerned education, six concerned clinical practice and one concerned supervision. The studies employed a wide variety of methodologies, including quantitative and qualitative techniques, so a meta-analysis was not practicable. Overall satisfaction and acceptance rates were reported in nine studies, mainly using Likert scales. Several positive aspects of videoconferencing were reported, including increased education and clinical practice support, and autonomy for rural areas. The main negative aspects related to the technology itself, poorer interaction and decreased rapport building when using videoconferencing. There is a paucity of literature regarding the perceptions of videoconferencing-based supervision of junior doctors in rural areas. No studies have considered measures of cost effectiveness. More rigorous study design in future research is recommended.

  4. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports.

    PubMed

    Park, Brian Y; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2016-08-05

    Traditional factors that once explained men's sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography's unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth.

  5. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Park, Brian Y.; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P.; Doan, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional factors that once explained men’s sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography’s unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth. PMID:27527226

  6. Clinical solid waste management practices and its impact on human health and environment - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Md. Sohrab; Santhanam, Amutha; Nik Norulaini, N.A.; Omar, A.K. Mohd

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: > Appropriate waste management technology for safe handling and disposal of clinical solid waste. > Infectious risk assessment on unsafe handling of clinical solid waste. > Recycling-reuse program of clinical solid waste materials. > Effective sterilization technology to reduce exposure of infectious risk. - Abstract: The management of clinical solid waste (CSW) continues to be a major challenge, particularly, in most healthcare facilities of the developing world. Poor conduct and inappropriate disposal methods exercised during handling and disposal of CSW is increasing significant health hazards and environmental pollution due to the infectious nature of the waste. This article summarises a literature review into existing CSW management practices in the healthcare centers. The information gathered in this paper has been derived from the desk study of open literature survey. Numerous researches have been conducted on the management of CSW. Although, significant steps have been taken on matters related to safe handling and disposal of the clinical waste, but improper management practice is evident from the point of initial collection to the final disposal. In most cases, the main reasons of the mismanagement of CSW are the lack of appropriate legislation, lack of specialized clinical staffs, lack of awareness and effective control. Furthermore, most of the healthcare centers of the developing world have faced financial difficulties and therefore looking for cost effective disposal methods of clinical waste. This paper emphasizes to continue the recycle-reuse program of CSW materials after sterilization by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) sterilization technology at the point of initial collection. Emphasis is on the priority to inactivate the infectious micro-organisms in CSW. In that case, waste would not pose any threat to healthcare workers. The recycling-reuse program would be carried out successfully with the non

  7. Application of the Six Sigma concept in clinical laboratories: a review.

    PubMed

    Gras, Jeremie M; Philippe, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    Six Sigma is a global management strategy introduced to the industrial world in the 1980s. This methodology has been widely implemented in companies such as Motorola, General Electric, Allied Signal and many others, with tremendous success in terms of customer satisfaction and global profitability. To achieve similar benefits in the healthcare field, Six Sigma is currently being deployed in several laboratories around the world. Despite this situation, few articles have been published in the peer-reviewed literature on this subject. The aim of this article is to clarify the different aspects of Six Sigma and their potential applications in clinical laboratories, as well as to systematically review articles and books discussing Six Sigma strategy implementation in the laboratory field.

  8. Bromelain as a Treatment for Osteoarthritis: a Review of Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Bromelain, an extract from the pineapple plant, has been demonstrated to show anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties and may provide a safer alternative or adjunctive treatment for osteoarthritis. All previous trials, which have been uncontrolled or comparative studies, indicate its potential use for the treatment of osteoarthritis. This paper reviews the mechanism of its putative therapeutic actions, those clinical trials that have assessed its use in osteoarthritis to date, as well as considering the safety implications of this supplement for osteoarthritis and reviewing the evidence to date regarding the dosage for treating this condition. The data available at present indicate the need for trials to establish the efficacy and optimum dosage for bromelain and the need for adequate prospective adverse event monitoring in such chronic conditions as osteoarthritis. PMID:15841258

  9. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    PubMed

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS.

  10. Perspectives from South and East Asia on clinical and research ethics: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Van, Cassandra; Cong, Yali; Rashid, Harun; Kumar, Nandini; Ahmad, Aasim; Upshur, Ross; Loff, Bebe

    2014-04-01

    A review was conducted of English-language peer-reviewed and gray literature on health and ethics written by authors from Bangladesh, China, India, and Pakistan. This was supplemented by the knowledge of co-authors who are involved in bioethics capacity building in these countries. Of the identified literature that focused on the application of Western principles, it largely discussed informed consent and revealed norms in clinical decision-making that include physician paternalism, family involvement in decision-making, and reluctance to provide information that might upset patients. It appears that Western ethical principles may be interpreted and applied in unexpected ways. The literature further indicates that, although there is some consistency with Western ideas, Islamic, Confucian, and Indian religious and philosophical traditions contain concepts not reflected in international guidance. Findings suggest scholars from these countries seek to enter into a bioethics dialogue with the potential to enrich and inform "international" frameworks.

  11. Health Economic Evaluation of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Practice Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Andreas; Khunti, Kamlesh; Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Yale, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a growing healthcare burden primarily due to long-term complications. Strict glycemic control helps in preventing complications, and early introduction of insulin may be more cost-effective than maintaining patients on multiple oral agents. This is an expert opinion review based on English peer-reviewed articles (2000–2012) to discuss the health economic consequences of T2D treatment intensification. T2D costs are driven by inpatient care for treatment of diabetes complications (40%–60% of total cost), with drug therapy for glycemic control representing 18% of the total cost. Insulin therapy provides the most improved glycemic control and reduction of complications, although hypoglycemia and weight gain may occur. Early treatment intensification with insulin analogs in patients with poor glycemic control appears to be cost-effective and improves clinical outcomes. PMID:25861233

  12. Preparing raw clinical data for publication: guidance for journal editors, authors, and peer reviewers.

    PubMed

    Hrynaszkiewicz, Iain; Norton, Melissa L; Vickers, Andrew J; Altman, Douglas G

    2010-01-29

    In recognition of the benefits of transparent reporting, many peer-reviewed journals require that their authors be prepared to share their raw, unprocessed data with other scientists and/or state the availability of raw data in published articles. But little information on how data should be prepared for publication - or sharing - has emerged. In clinical research patient privacy and consent for use of personal health information are key considerations, but agreed-upon definitions of what constitutes anonymised patient information do not appear to have been established. We aim to address this issue by providing practical guidance for those involved in the publication process, by proposing a minimum standard for de-identifying datasets for the purposes of publication in a peer-reviewed biomedical journal, or sharing with other researchers. Basic advice on file preparation is provided along with procedural guidance on prospective and retrospective publication of raw data, with an emphasis on randomised controlled trials.

  13. A review of the pharmacology and clinical application of alfaxalone in cats.

    PubMed

    Warne, Leon N; Beths, Thierry; Whittem, Ted; Carter, Jennifer E; Bauquier, Sébastien H

    2015-02-01

    Alfaxalone-2-hydroxpropyl-β-cyclodextrin (alfaxalone-HPCD) was first marketed for veterinary use in Australia in 2001 and has since progressively became available throughout the world, including the USA, where in 2012 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) registration was granted. Despite the growing body of published works and increasing global availability of alfaxalone-HPCD, the accumulating evidence for its use in cats has not been thoroughly reviewed. The purpose of this review is: (1) to detail the pharmacokinetic properties of alfaxalone-HPCD in cats; (2) to assess the pharmacodynamic properties of alfaxalone-HPCD, including its cardiovascular, respiratory, central nervous system, neuromuscular, hepatic, renal, haematological, blood-biochemical, analgesic and endocrine effects; and (3) to consider the clinical application of alfaxalone-HPCD for sedation, induction and maintenance of anaesthesia in cats. Based on the published literature, alfaxalone-HPCD provides a good alternative to the existing intravenous anaesthetic options for healthy cats.

  14. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Appropriateness of Blood Transfusion in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Qinyun; Gao, Zongshuai; Liao, Yanqiu; Deng, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    The issue of the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion has become a focus of transfusion medicine worldwide. In China, irrational uses of blood have often been reported in recent years. However, to date there lacks a systematic review of the rational uses of blood. This study aimed to determine the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion in China. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database, WanFang Database, and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the retrieval cut-off date was June 31, 2015. SPSS 17.0 and MetaAnalyst 3.13 were employed as the statistics tools in this review. A pooled rate of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion was analyzed by DerSimonian-Laird method. In this study, a total of 39 observational studies were included, which related to 75,132 cases of blood transfusion. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall incidence of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion in China was estimated to be 37.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] [32.1, 42.8]). The subgroup analyses revealed that the pooled rates of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion of plasma, red blood cells (RBCs), cryoprecipitate, and platelets were 56.3% (95% CI [45.8, 66.2]), 30.9% (95% CI [27.1, 35.0]), 25.2% (95% CI [13.2, 42.7]), and 14.1% (95% CI [8.8, 21.9]), respectively. However, the pooled incidence of inappropriateness of transfusion in operative departments was 47.5% (95% CI [36.8, 58.3]), which was significantly higher than that in nonoperative departments, 25.8% (95% CI [18.7, 34.4], P < 0.05). The overall rates of inappropriate use were 36.7% (95% CI [30.2, 43.6]) in major cities and 37.5% (95% CI [31.2, 44.3]) in other cities, respectively; there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In conclusion, China has suffered from a disadvantage in the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion, especially in

  15. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Appropriateness of Blood Transfusion in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Qinyun; Gao, Zongshuai; Liao, Yanqiu; Deng, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The issue of the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion has become a focus of transfusion medicine worldwide. In China, irrational uses of blood have often been reported in recent years. However, to date there lacks a systematic review of the rational uses of blood. This study aimed to determine the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion in China. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database, WanFang Database, and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the retrieval cut-off date was June 31, 2015. SPSS 17.0 and MetaAnalyst 3.13 were employed as the statistics tools in this review. A pooled rate of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion was analyzed by DerSimonian–Laird method. In this study, a total of 39 observational studies were included, which related to 75,132 cases of blood transfusion. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall incidence of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion in China was estimated to be 37.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] [32.1, 42.8]). The subgroup analyses revealed that the pooled rates of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion of plasma, red blood cells (RBCs), cryoprecipitate, and platelets were 56.3% (95% CI [45.8, 66.2]), 30.9% (95% CI [27.1, 35.0]), 25.2% (95% CI [13.2, 42.7]), and 14.1% (95% CI [8.8, 21.9]), respectively. However, the pooled incidence of inappropriateness of transfusion in operative departments was 47.5% (95% CI [36.8, 58.3]), which was significantly higher than that in nonoperative departments, 25.8% (95% CI [18.7, 34.4], P < 0.05). The overall rates of inappropriate use were 36.7% (95% CI [30.2, 43.6]) in major cities and 37.5% (95% CI [31.2, 44.3]) in other cities, respectively; there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In conclusion, China has suffered from a disadvantage in the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion

  16. The usefulness of systematic reviews of animal experiments for the design of preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Rob B M; Wever, Kimberley E; Avey, Marc T; Stephens, Martin L; Sena, Emily S; Leenaars, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    The question of how animal studies should be designed, conducted, and analyzed remains underexposed in societal debates on animal experimentation. This is not only a scientific but also a moral question. After all, if animal experiments are not appropriately designed, conducted, and analyzed, the results produced are unlikely to be reliable and the animals have in effect been wasted. In this article, we focus on one particular method to address this moral question, namely systematic reviews of previously performed animal experiments. We discuss how the design, conduct, and analysis of future (animal and human) experiments may be optimized through such systematic reviews. In particular, we illustrate how these reviews can help improve the methodological quality of animal experiments, make the choice of an animal model and the translation of animal data to the clinic more evidence-based, and implement the 3Rs. Moreover, we discuss which measures are being taken and which need to be taken in the future to ensure that systematic reviews will actually contribute to optimizing experimental design and thereby to meeting a necessary condition for making the use of animals in these experiments justified.

  17. Multimodality imaging in cranial blastomycosis, a great mimicker: Case-based illustration with review of clinical and imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, Puneet S; Lath, Chinar O; Klein, Andrew P; Ulmer, John L

    2016-01-01

    We describe the clinical, laboratory, and imaging data of three patients who are proven cases of blastomycosis with cranial involvement. In this review, we discuss the imaging features of cranial blastomycosis with relevant clinical case examples including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and advanced MR imaging techniques like magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Literature is reviewed for modern-day diagnosis and treatment of this fatal intracranial infection, if not diagnosed promptly and managed effectively. PMID:27081235

  18. Management of persistent anal canal carcinoma after combined-modality therapy: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anal canal carcinoma is a rare gastro-intestinal cancer. Radiochemotherapy is the recommended primary treatment for patients with non-metastatic carcinoma; surgery is generally reserved for persistent or recurrent disease. Follow-up and surveillance after primary treatment is paramount to classify patients in those with complete remission, persistent or progressive disease. Locally persistent disease represents a clinically significant problem and its management remains subject of some controversy. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise recommendations for the primary treatment of anal canal carcinoma, to focus on the optimal time to consider residual disease as genuine persistence to proceed with salvage treatment, and to discern how this analysis might inform future clinical trials in management in this class of patients. PMID:24472223

  19. Coreference resolution: A review of general methodologies and applications in the clinical domain

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaping; Chapman, Wendy W.; Crowley, Rebecca S.; Savova, Guergana K.

    2011-01-01

    Coreference resolution is the task of determining linguistic expressions that refer to the same real-world entity in natural language. Research on coreference resolution in the general English domain dates back to 1960s and 1970s. However, research on coreference resolution in the clinical free text has not seen major development. The recent US government initiatives that promote the use of electronic health records (EHRs) provide opportunities to mine patient notes as more and more health care institutions adopt EHR. Our goal was to review recent advances in general purpose coreference resolution to lay the foundation for methodologies in the clinical domain, facilitated by the availability of a shared lexical resource of gold standard coreference annotations, the Ontology Development and Information Extraction (ODIE) corpus. PMID:21856441

  20. Pain and placebo in pediatrics: A comprehensive review of laboratory and clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    Kossowsky, Joe; Krummenacher, Peter; Grillon, Christian; Pine, Daniel; Colloca, Luana

    2014-01-01

    Pain modulation by placebo mechanisms is one of the most robust and best-studied phenomena, yet almost all research investigating the mechanisms and implications of the placebo analgesia are based on adult research. After highlighting crucial aspects that need to be considered in studying pain modulation in children, this comprehensive review examines studies related to pain modulation with an emphasis on factors such as age, neural development and pain measures. Psychological mechanisms underlying placebo effects including: 1) verbally-induced expectations; 2) conditioning and learning mechanisms; 3) child-parent-physician interactions are critically discussed. Taken together, research suggests that placebo mechanisms can impact therapeutic outcomes and potentially be exploited clinically to improve clinical outcomes in pediatric population. Recommendations for further investigating the mechanistic bases and harnessing placebo effects for supportive therapeutic applications are given. PMID:25180010

  1. Vulvar nevi, melanosis, and melanoma: an epidemiologic, clinical, and histopathologic review.

    PubMed

    Murzaku, Era Caterina; Penn, Lauren A; Hale, Christopher S; Pomeranz, Miriam Keltz; Polsky, David

    2014-12-01

    Pigmented vulvar lesions are present in approximately 1 in 10 women and include melanocytic and nonmelanocytic proliferations. Vulvar nevi, melanosis, and melanoma are particularly challenging because of the similarity of their clinical and/or histopathological presentation. As a result, they are often difficult to diagnose, may result in patient and physician anxiety, and can lead to unneeded, potentially disfiguring surgical procedures. Because it is often detected late, vulvar melanoma carries a poor prognosis with associated significant morbidity and mortality, underscoring the importance of prompt recognition and treatment. In this review, we analyze the distinct epidemiologic, clinical, and histopathologic characteristics of vulvar nevi, melanosis, and melanoma, discuss treatment options, and propose a practical, systematic approach to facilitate formulation of a differential diagnosis and initiation of appropriate management.

  2. Evidence review and clinical guidance for the use of ziprasidone in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    While indicated for schizophrenia and acute mania, ziprasidone’s evidence base and use in clinical practice extends beyond these regulatory approvals. We, an invited panel of experts led by a working group of 3, critically examined the evidence and our collective experience regarding the effectiveness, tolerability and safety of ziprasidone across its clinical uses. There was no opportunity for manufacturer input into the content of the review. As anticipated, ziprasidone was found to be effective for its indicated uses, although its utility in mania and mixed states lacked comparative data. Beyond these uses, the available data were either unimpressive or were lacking. An attractive characteristic is its neutral effect on weight thereby providing patients with a non-obesogenic long-term treatment option. Key challenges in practice include the need for dosing on a full stomach and managing its early onset adverse effect of restlessness. Addressing these issues are critical to its long-term success PMID:23347694

  3. Melanoma of the oral mucosa. Clinical cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    González-García, Raúl; Naval-Gías, Luis; Martos, Pedro L; Nam-Cha, Syong Hyun; Rodríguez-Campo, Francisco J; Muñoz-Guerra, Mario F; Sastre-Pérez, Jesús

    2005-01-01

    The appearance of primary melanomas of the oral mucosa is uncommon. The aggressiveness of this entity and the absence of any standardized treatment protocol make the prognostic unfortunate. The difficulty to obtain free surgical margins, the elevated tendency to invade in depth and the early haematogenous metastasis have been referred as features which may explain its bad prognosis, even in comparison with cutaneous melanoma. However, no large clinical series exist and actually, clinical cases are the main source of information. Due to the absence of any treatment modality which may substantially increase long-term survival, we suggest the use of resective surgery with wide margins and early diagnosis by means of biopsy for suspicious melanotic-pigmented lesions. In this work we present 2 new cases of primary melanoma of the oral mucosa, with a follow-up period of 72 and 12 months respectively, and we make a review of the literature in relation with this rare entity.

  4. A review of the clinical experience in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Balgobind, Brian V; Koedooder, Kees; Ordoñez Zúñiga, Diego; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Rasch, Coen R N

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a treatment modality that combines physical advantages of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate brachytherapy. The aim of this review was to describe the effective clinical use of PDR brachytherapy worldwide in different tumour locations. We found 66 articles reporting on clinical PDR brachytherapy including the treatment procedure and outcome. Moreover, PDR brachytherapy has been applied in almost all tumour sites for which brachytherapy is indicated and with good local control and low toxicity. The main advantage of PDR is, because of the small pulse sizes used, the ability to spare normal tissue. In certain cases, HDR resembles PDR brachytherapy by the use of multifractionated low-fraction dose. PMID:26290399

  5. Magnesium Deficiency and Proton-Pump Inhibitor Use: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-06-01

    The association of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use and hypomagnesemia has garnered much attention over the last 5 years. A large body of observational data has linked chronic PPI use with hypomagnesemia, presumably due to decreased intestinal absorption and consequent magnesium deficiency. However, despite the increasing prevalence of this highly popular class of medicine, and despite potential significant risks associated with magnesium depletion, including cardiac arrhythmias and seizures, there are no well-designed studies to delineate the nature of this observed association. Consequently, providers must use best judgment to inform clinical decision making. This review summarizes the current body of evidence linking PPI use with hypomagnesemia, acknowledges the possibility of significant residual confounding in the observational data, explains potential physiologic mechanisms, and offers clinical recommendations.

  6. Desmosomes in the heart: a review of clinical and mechanistic analyses.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipal M; Green, Kathleen J

    2014-06-01

    Desmosomes have long been appreciated as intercellular junctions that are vital for maintaining the structural integrity of stratified epithelia. More recent clinical investigations of patients with diseases such as arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy have further highlighted the importance of desmosomes in cardiac tissue, where they help to maintain coordination of cardiac myocytes. Here, we review clinical and mechanistic studies that provide insight into the functions of desmosomal proteins in skin and heart during homeostasis and in disease. While intercellular junctions are organized differently in cardiac and epithelial tissues, studies conducted in epithelial systems may inform our understanding of cardiac desmosomes. We explore traditional and non-traditional roles of desmosomal proteins, ranging from adhesive capacities to nuclear functions. Finally, we discuss how these studies can guide future investigations focused on determining the molecular mechanisms by which desmosomal mutations promote the development of cardiac diseases.

  7. What do we know about pulmonary blastoma?: review of literature and clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Brodowska-Kania, Dorota; Kotwica, Ewa; Paturej, Aleksandra; Sośnicki, Witold; Patera, Janusz; Giżewska, Agnieszka; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pulmonary blastoma (PB) is a rare form of lung tumour and is accountable for 0.25–0.5% of primary pulmonary malignancies. Initially pulmonary blastoma was divided into three subtypes: biphasic pulmonary blastoma (BPB) consisting of an epithelial and mesenchymal component, well differentiated fetal adenocarcinoma (WDFA) built of well differentiated epithelium and a mesenchymal component and malignant pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). Prognosis in this type of cancer is really poor. We present a current review of literature and a clinical case report. Treatment of PB is very difficult. Data and recommendations about the treatment of pulmonary blastoma are still available therefore we should use only observations and clinical case reports. PMID:28008207

  8. Reflexology: an update of a systematic review of randomised clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Posadzki, P; Lee, M S

    2011-02-01

    Reflexology is a popular form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this update is to critically evaluate the evidence for or against the effectiveness of reflexology in patients with any type of medical condition. Six electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Their methodological quality was assessed independently by the two reviewers using the Jadad score. Overall, 23 studies met all inclusion criteria. They related to a wide range of medical conditions. The methodological quality of the RCTs was often poor. Nine high quality RCTs generated negative findings; and five generated positive findings. Eight RCTs suggested that reflexology is effective for the following conditions: diabetes, premenstrual syndrome, cancer patients, multiple sclerosis, symptomatic idiopathic detrusor over-activity and dementia yet important caveats remain. It is concluded that the best clinical evidence does not demonstrate convincingly reflexology to be an effective treatment for any medical condition.

  9. Utilization of the concentric circle model in clinical nursing: a review.

    PubMed

    Kazuma, K

    1999-12-01

    In this article, I review applications of the concentric circle model in clinical nursing. The concentric circle model is based on the cross-sectional shape of the body extremities at several points, and can be used in the areas of both kinesiology and nutritional science. This model makes it possible to calculate the cross-sectional area of muscles from measurement of the circumference of the extremities and the thickness of adipose (fatty) tissue. Then, changes in muscle strength or nutritional status can be inferred or assessed from these data. This model requires only simple and non-invasive measurements, and this is a significant and essential characteristic for its use by nurses, both in clinical and research applications.

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Specific Immunotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang; Xiao-Zhong, Guo; Qi, Xing-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Specific immunotherapies, including vaccines with autologous tumor cells and tumor antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies, are important treatments for PC patients. To evaluate the clinical outcomes of PC-specific immunotherapy, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relevant published clinical trials. The effects of specific immunotherapy were compared with those of nonspecific immunotherapy and the meta-analysis was executed with results regarding the overall survival (OS), immune responses data, and serum cancer markers data. The pooled analysis was performed by using the random-effects model. We found that significantly improved OS was noted for PC patients utilizing specific immunotherapy and an improved immune response was also observed. In conclusion, specific immunotherapy was superior in prolonging the survival time and enhancing immunological responses in PC patients.

  11. Review of technology development and clinical trials of transcranial laser therapy for acute ischemic stroke treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Brian E.; Streeter, Jackson; de Taboada, Luis

    2010-02-01

    Stroke is the one of the leading causes of mortality in the United States, claiming 600,000 lives each year. Evidence suggests that near infrared (NIR) illumination has a beneficial effect on a variety of cells when these cells are exposed to adverse conditions. Among these conditions is the hypoxic state produced by acute ischemic stroke (AIS). To demonstrate the impact NIR Transcranial Laser Therapy (TLT) has on AIS in humans, a series of double blind, placebo controlled clinical trials were designed using the NeuroThera(R) System (NTS). The NTS was designed and developed to treat subjects non-invasively using 808 nm NIR illumination. TLT, as it applies to stroke therapy, and the NTS will be described. The results of the two clinical trials: NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 1 (NEST-1) and NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 2 (NEST-2) will be reviewed and discussed.

  12. Immunology in the Clinic Review Series; focus on allergies: immunotherapy for food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Mousallem, T; Burks, A W

    2012-01-01

    OTHER THEMES PUBLISHED IN THIS IMMUNOLOGY IN THE CLINIC REVIEW SERIES Metabolic Diseases, Host Responses, Cancer, Autoinflammatory Diseases, Type 1 diabetes and viruses. There is no approved therapy for food allergy. The current standard of care is elimination of the triggering food from the diet and accessibility to epinephrine. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment approach. While desensitization to most foods seems feasible, it remains unclear if a permanent state of tolerance is achievable. The research team at Duke is pioneering immunotherapy for food allergies. Work here has evolved over time from small open-label pilot studies to larger randomized designs. Our data show that immunological changes associated with immunotherapy include reduction in mast cell reactivity, decreased basophil responses, decreased specific-immunoglobulin (Ig)E, increased IgG4 and induction of regulatory T cells. Immunotherapy has generated much excitement in the food allergy community; however, further studies are needed before it is ready for clinical use. PMID:22132881

  13. Niemann-Pick disease treatment: a systematic review of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Villamandos García, Diana; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Garatachea, Nuria; Nogales Gadea, Gisela; Lucia, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to analyse all the published clinical trials assessing treatments for Niemann-Pick (NP) disease. At present there are only trials investigating the treatment of NP disease type C. Furthermore, there is no uniformity among studies in treatment outcomes or in data analysis and presentation of results. Miglustat is able to delay neurodegeneration, with greater benefits in patients with a late onset of the disease and β-cyclodextrin-hydroxypropyl (HBP-CD) can attenuate clinical symptoms. As for cholesterol-lowering drugs, the combination of lovastatin, cholestyramine and nicotinic acid is the most effective one for lowering cholesterolemia. Further research is much needed, and ongoing trials using enzyme replacement therapy might hopefully show promising results in the foreseeable future. PMID:26807415

  14. Aspergillus thyroiditis: a review of the literature to highlight clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, J; Manera, R; Minutti, C

    2012-12-01

    Aspergillus involvement of the thyroid is the most commonly reported fungal thyroiditis. Aspergillus thyroiditis (AT) has primarily been a postmortem diagnosis in immunocompromised patients with diagnosed disseminated invasive Aspergillus or high suspicion of fungal infection during life. With better treatment modalities for the comorbidities that place patients at high risk for fungal infections, as well as better antifungal therapies for Aspergillus infections specifically, the spectrum of disease and presentation of AT may be shifting from what was primarily a postmortem finding to an antemortem diagnosis, necessitating a high index of clinical suspicion and timely intervention. We present a review of the literature to better clarify clinical features, diagnostic modalities, and management considerations pertaining to this disease.

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Specific Immunotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xing-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Specific immunotherapies, including vaccines with autologous tumor cells and tumor antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies, are important treatments for PC patients. To evaluate the clinical outcomes of PC-specific immunotherapy, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relevant published clinical trials. The effects of specific immunotherapy were compared with those of nonspecific immunotherapy and the meta-analysis was executed with results regarding the overall survival (OS), immune responses data, and serum cancer markers data. The pooled analysis was performed by using the random-effects model. We found that significantly improved OS was noted for PC patients utilizing specific immunotherapy and an improved immune response was also observed. In conclusion, specific immunotherapy was superior in prolonging the survival time and enhancing immunological responses in PC patients. PMID:28265583

  16. [On the clinical applications of logotherapy: a review of Victor Emil Frankl inheritance].

    PubMed

    Girmenia, E; Andrissi, L; Tambone, V

    2014-01-01

    The Viktor E. Frankl's thought has found wide application in many areas of the Clinic, not limited to the neuropsychiatric area. If the franklian work is known worldwide for being a theory and a practice within neurotic disorders, we must not forget how logotherapy has been put at the disposal of the sufferer in its broadest sense. Especially in the context of care and care of the chronically and evolutionary ill (cancer, heart disease, degenerative diseases, etc.), the thought and practice logotherapy have made and continue to make a valuable contribution. In this review we will cover in more detail the application of logotherapy in clinical-care, pausing to examine the international literature.

  17. A review of the clinical experience in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Balgobind, Brian V; Koedooder, Kees; Ordoñez Zúñiga, Diego; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Rasch, Coen R N; Pieters, Bradley R

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a treatment modality that combines physical advantages of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate brachytherapy. The aim of this review was to describe the effective clinical use of PDR brachytherapy worldwide in different tumour locations. We found 66 articles reporting on clinical PDR brachytherapy including the treatment procedure and outcome. Moreover, PDR brachytherapy has been applied in almost all tumour sites for which brachytherapy is indicated and with good local control and low toxicity. The main advantage of PDR is, because of the small pulse sizes used, the ability to spare normal tissue. In certain cases, HDR resembles PDR brachytherapy by the use of multifractionated low-fraction dose.

  18. Heparin in malignant glioma: review of preclinical studies and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Schnoor, Rosalie; Maas, Sybren L N; Broekman, Marike L D

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor that is invariably lethal. Novel treatments are desperately needed. In various cancers, heparin and its low molecular weight derivatives (LMWHs), commonly used for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis, have shown therapeutic potential. Here we systematically review preclinical and clinical studies of heparin and LMWHs as anti-tumor agents in GBM. Even though the number of studies is limited, there is suggestive evidence that heparin may have various effects on GBM. These effects include the inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and the blocking of uptake of extracellular vesicles. However, heparin can also block the uptake of (potential) anti-tumor agents. Clinical studies suggest a non-significant trend of prolonged survival of LMWH treated GBM patients, with some evidence of increased major bleedings. Heparin mimetics lacking anticoagulant effect are therefore a potential alternative to heparin/LMWH and are discussed as well.

  19. Acute Flaccid Myelitis: A Clinical Review of US Cases 2012–2015

    PubMed Central

    Messacar, Kevin; Schreiner, Teri L.; Van Haren, Keith; Yang, Michele; Glaser, Carol A.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights clinical features of the increasing cases of acute flaccid paralysis associated with anterior myelitis noted in the United States from 2012 to 2015. Acute flaccid myelitis refers to acute flaccid limb weakness with spinal cord gray matter lesions on imaging or evidence of spinal cord motor neuron injury on electrodiagnostic testing. Although some individuals demonstrated improvement in motor weakness and functional deficits, most have residual weakness a year or more after onset. Epidemiological evidence and biological plausibility support an association between enterovirus D68 and the recent increase in acute flaccid myelitis cases in the United States. PMID:27422805

  20. Expanding the PACS archive to support clinical review, research, and education missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Drane, Walter E.

    1999-07-01

    Designing an image archive and retrieval system that supports multiple users with many different requirements and patterns of use without compromising the performance and functionality required by diagnostic radiology is an intellectual and technical challenge. A diagnostic archive, optimized for performance when retrieving diagnostic images for radiologists needed to be expanded to support a growing clinical review network, the University of Florida Brain Institute's demands for neuro-imaging, Biomedical Engineering's imaging sciences, and an electronic teaching file. Each of the groups presented a different set of problems for the designers of the system. In addition, the radiologists did not want to see nay loss of performance as new users were added.

  1. Clinical and research implications of the evaluation of women's group therapy for anorgasmia: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuriansky, J B; Sharpe, L

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews some important clinical and research implications of studies which have evaluated the effectiveness of short-term behavioral group therapy for anorgasmia. Though formal research data on curative factors is very sparse, the experience of sharing within a group, and the focus on arousal seem consistent with treatment outcome; however, the emphasis on assertiveness and the woman-only approach may have countertherapeutic as well as therapeutic effects. A potentially important intervening variable is the woman's level of ego development. The use of certain assessment scales and criteria for success of treatment are critiqued, and recommendations made for further study.

  2. Alpha-mannosidosis - a review of genetic, clinical findings and options of treatment.

    PubMed

    Borgwardt, Line; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Dali, Christine I

    2014-09-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis (OMIM 248500) is a rare, autosomal recessive, multisystemic, progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-mannosidase. It has been described in humans, cattle, domestic cats, mice and guinea pigs. In humans, alpha-mannosidosis results in progressive facial- and skeletal abnormalities, motor impairment, hearing impairment, intellectual disability, recurrent infections and immune deficiency. This review provides detailed information regarding the variability of manifestations and a description of current treatment and treatment under investigation for alpha-mannosidosis. The pathology, genetics and clinical pictures, including impairments in the activity of daily living are discussed.

  3. Vitamin E and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a review of epidemiologic and clinical trial studies.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Zorabel; Drogan, Dagmar; Weikert, Cornelia; Boeing, Heiner

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of worldwide mortality. There is strong epidemiologic evidence for a beneficial effect of vitamin E on cardiovascular disease risk. However, conflicting results have been reported by intervention studies. To assess the potential benefit of vitamin E intake on the risk of cardiovascular diseases, fifty-nine published reports from observational studies, retrospective and prospective, randomised clinical trials, meta-analyses as well as pooling analyses were reviewed. The paper provides a detailed discussion about design, quality and limitations of these studies with regard to the evidence of the hypothesized relationship between vitamin E and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. The relationship between opioid and sugar intake: Review of evidence and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Mysels, David J; Sullivan, Maria A

    2011-01-01

    Opioid dependence poses significant public health risks arising from associated morbidity and mortality caused by accidents, infectious disease, and social ramifications of crime and unemployment, among other complications. Opioid use, acute and chronic, is also associated with weight gain, glycemic dysregulation, and dental pathology. The literature supporting the connection between opiate use and development of preference for sweet tastes is reviewed, and further association with dental pathology, weight gain, and loss of glycemic control are considered. We discuss the impact of sweet tastes on the endogenous opioid system as well as clinical implications for analgesia and treating the opiate-dependent patient. PMID:21269006

  5. Microplates in liquid chromatography--new solution in clinical research? A review.

    PubMed

    Krcmova, Lenka; Solichova, Dagmar; Solich, Petr

    2013-10-15

    Microplates are routinely used in Radio- or Immuno-assays. Recently, microplates have found use not only in analytical but also in the pre-analytical phase in bioanalyses (sample storage, sample preparation). New connection of this technology to liquid chromatography could be economical, fast and simple solution for many routine laboratories handling large sequences of biological samples. This review summarises the application of microplates in bioanalytical laboratories. Different types of sorbents, materials and shapes of microplates are discussed, and the main advantages and disadvantages of microplates used in clinical research are presented.

  6. Behavioural and Developmental Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Clinical Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ospina, Maria B.; Krebs Seida, Jennifer; Clark, Brenda; Karkhaneh, Mohammad; Hartling, Lisa; Tjosvold, Lisa; Vandermeer, Ben; Smith, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    Background Much controversy exists regarding the clinical efficacy of behavioural and developmental interventions for improving the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We conducted a systematic review to summarize the evidence on the effectiveness of behavioural and developmental interventions for ASD. Methods and Findings Comprehensive searches were conducted in 22 electronic databases through May 2007. Further information was obtained through hand searching journals, searching reference lists, databases of theses and dissertations, and contacting experts in the field. Experimental and observational analytic studies were included if they were written in English and reported the efficacy of any behavioural or developmental intervention for individuals with ASD. Two independent reviewers made the final study selection, extracted data, and reached consensus on study quality. Results were summarized descriptively and, where possible, meta-analyses of the study results were conducted. One-hundred-and-one studies at predominantly high risk of bias that reported inconsistent results across various interventions were included in the review. Meta-analyses of three controlled clinical trials showed that Lovaas treatment was superior to special education on measures of adaptive behaviour, communication and interaction, comprehensive language, daily living skills, expressive language, overall intellectual functioning and socialization. High-intensity Lovaas was superior to low-intensity Lovaas on measures of intellectual functioning in two retrospective cohort studies. Pooling the results of two randomized controlled trials favoured developmental approaches based on initiative interaction compared to contingency interaction in the amount of time spent in stereotyped behaviours and distal social behaviour, but the effect sizes were not clinically significant. No statistically significant differences were found for: Lovaas versus special education for non

  7. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative patients. A clinical review].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a method of ventilatory support that is increasing in importance day by day in the management of postoperative respiratory failure. Its role in the prevention and treatment of atelectasis is particularly important in the in the period after thoracic and abdominal surgeries. Similarly, in the transplanted patient, NIV can shorten the time of invasive mechanical ventilation, reducing the risk of infectious complications in these high-risk patients. It has been performed A systematic review of the literature has been performed, including examining the technical, clinical experiences and recommendations concerning the application of NIV in the postoperative period.

  8. Lipoedema: from clinical presentation to therapy. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Langendoen, S I; Habbema, L; Nijsten, T E C; Neumann, H A M

    2009-11-01

    Lipoedema is an infrequently recognized disorder in women. Lipoedema is characterized by bilateral enlargement of the legs due to abnormal depositions of subcutaneous fat associated with often mild oedema. There is substantial variability in disease severity. The diagnosis should be made as early as possible to prevent complications of the disorder, which is associated with increasing functional and cosmetic morbidity. This review describes clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, technical investigations, management and therapies of lipoedema, with the aim of optimizing management and care of patients with lipoedema.

  9. Titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint prosthesis: historical background and a six-year clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bütow, K W; Blackbeard, G A; van der Merwe, A E

    2001-08-01

    The titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint (TTN-TMJ) prosthesis, for the combined replacement of both the joint and the glenoid fossa, was developed in 1992 and introduced clinically in 1994. This joint prosthesis is manufactured from pure titanium and the condylar surfaces, as well as the fossa, are coated with titanium nitride for hardening of the contact surfaces. In two different research projects, the joint were first placed in experimental animals, before they were successfully placed in human subjects. Twenty seven joint prostheses used in human subjects have been analysed for this review.

  10. [EEG coherence analysis in depressive disorders and its possible use in clinical practice: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Varlamov, A A; Strelets, V B

    2013-01-01

    Recent reviews and meta-analyses of clinical data have revealed that there is a clear need in objective biomarkers of mental disorders and, in particular, of depression. There is a lot of evidence that EEG coherence can be an important marker of depressive disorders, and can predict response to different antidepressants. The most consistent finding is a decrease of frontal interhemispheric EEG coherence which is observed for most disorders related to depression. Methodological issues are discussed with a particular emphasis on use of statistical classifiers and on coupling EEG coherence with other methods of EEG analysis.

  11. Jugular thrombophlebitis in horses: A review of fibrinolysis, thrombus formation, and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Deborah Penteado Martins; de Lacerda Neto, José Corrêa

    2013-01-01

    Thrombophlebitis of the jugular vein is commonly observed in horses, particularly during intensive care, and leads to local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as head and neck circulatory impairment. Thrombolytic therapy is widely used in human practice with the aim of thrombus dissolution and recanalization of the injured vessels. There are similarities between human and horse coagulation and fibrinolytic processes. This review examines the fibrinolytic system, thrombus formation, and the clinical management of jugular thrombophlebitis, including thrombolytic therapy. There is evidence that early regional thrombolytic therapy for jugular thrombophlebitis in horses may be effective to achieve sustained recanalization. PMID:23814304

  12. Care of the Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Horton, William B.; Subauste, Jose S.

    2016-01-01

    Context Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from a highly specific immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β cells, resulting in chronic hyperglycemia. For many years, one of the mainstays of therapy for patients with T1DM has been exercise balanced with appropriate medications and medical nutrition. Compared to healthy peers, athletes with T1DM experience nearly all the same health-related benefits from exercise. Despite these benefits, effective management of the T1DM athlete is a constant challenge due to various concerns such as the increased risk of hypoglycemia. This review seeks to summarize the available literature and aid clinicians in clinical decision-making for this patient population. Evidence Acquisition PubMed searches were conducted for “type 1 diabetes mellitus AND athlete” along with “type 1 diabetes mellitus AND exercise” from database inception through November 2015. All articles identified by this search were reviewed if the article text was available in English and related to management of athletes with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Subsequent reference searches of retrieved articles yielded additional literature included in this review. Results The majority of current literature available exists as recommendations, review articles, or proposed societal guidelines, with less prospective or higher-order treatment studies available. The available literature is presented objectively with an attempt to describe clinically relevant trends and findings in the management of athletes living with T1DM. Conclusions Managing T1DM in the context of exercise or athletic competition is a challenging but important skill for athletes living with this disease. A proper understanding of the hormonal milieu during exercise, special nutritional needs, glycemic control, necessary insulin dosing adjustments, and prevention/management strategies for exercise-related complications can lead to successful care plans for these patients. Individualized

  13. Insights and clinical perspectives of daptomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus: A review of the available evidence.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Stefania; Campanile, Floriana; Santagati, Maria; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Cafiso, Viviana; Pacini, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    The emergence of glycopeptide reduced susceptibility and resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains is a growing clinical problem that poses significant clinical challenges in treatment. Its development is a complex and novel process involving many subtle physiological changes in the micro-organism. Daptomycin is the first cyclic lipopeptide approved for clinical use. Unlike most other antimicrobials, a trend towards increased daptomycin resistance has not been reported, although several cases of daptomycin non-susceptibility have been reported. The present review will present the available evidence on daptomycin resistance of S. aureus, with particular attention to its development. In addition to a literature overview, we have compiled the reported cases of daptomycin non-susceptibility to shed light on possible clinical mechanisms of resistance. In the 36 reports describing 62 clinical cases, infections caused by meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains with a vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) between 1mg/L and 2mg/L often led to vancomycin treatment failure, which may be associated with the development of non-susceptibility to daptomycin. Additional evidence suggests that underdosage of daptomycin is an important clinical aspect that merits further study. The current analysis highlights the importance of determining the MIC when using vancomycin to treat patients with severe S. aureus infections and that when failure is suspected, testing for heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) may also be necessary. Whilst further investigation is needed, it can be hypothesised that MRSA strains become hVISA during prolonged bacteraemia, which may predispose to the development of daptomycin resistance.

  14. Finite element modelling of the foot for clinical application: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Behforootan, Sara; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis; Naemi, Roozbeh; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2017-01-01

    Over the last two decades finite element modelling has been widely used to give new insight on foot and footwear biomechanics. However its actual contribution for the improvement of the therapeutic outcome of different pathological conditions of the foot, such as the diabetic foot, remains relatively limited. This is mainly because finite element modelling has only been used within the research domain. Clinically applicable finite element modelling can open the way for novel diagnostic techniques and novel methods for treatment planning/optimisation which would significantly enhance clinical practice. In this context this review aims to provide an overview of modelling techniques in the field of foot and footwear biomechanics and to investigate their applicability in a clinical setting. Even though no integrated modelling system exists that could be directly used in the clinic and considerable progress is still required, current literature includes a comprehensive toolbox for future work towards clinically applicable finite element modelling. The key challenges include collecting the information that is needed for geometry design, the assignment of material properties and loading on a patient-specific basis and in a cost-effective and non-invasive way. The ultimate challenge for the implementation of any computational system into clinical practice is to ensure that it can produce reliable results for any person that belongs in the population for which it was developed. Consequently this highlights the need for thorough and extensive validation of each individual step of the modelling process as well as for the overall validation of the final integrated system.

  15. Impact of early in-hospital medication review by clinical pharmacists on health services utilization

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Nilu; Ghement, Isabella; Wickham, Maeve E.; McGrail, Kimberlyn; Reddekopp, Lisa N.; Sobolev, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events are a leading cause of emergency department visits and unplanned admissions, and prolong hospital stays. Medication review interventions aim to identify adverse drug events and optimize medication use. Previous evaluations of in-hospital medication reviews have focused on interventions at discharge, with an unclear effect on health outcomes. We assessed the effect of early in-hospital pharmacist-led medication review on the health outcomes of high-risk patients. Methods We used a quasi-randomized design to evaluate a quality improvement project in three hospitals in British Columbia, Canada. We incorporated a clinical decision rule into emergency department triage pathways, allowing nurses to identify patients at high-risk for adverse drug events. After randomly selecting the first eligible patient for participation, clinical pharmacists systematically allocated subsequent high-risk patients to medication review or usual care. Medication review included obtaining a best possible medication history and reviewing the patient’s medications for appropriateness and adverse drug events. The primary outcome was the number of days spent in-hospital over 30 days, and was ascertained using administrative data. We used median and inverse propensity score weighted logistic regression modeling to determine the effect of pharmacist-led medication review on downstream health services use. Results Of 10,807 high-risk patients, 6,416 received early pharmacist-led medication review and 4,391 usual care. Their baseline characteristics were balanced. The median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.48 days (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.00 to 0.96; p = 0.058) in the medication review group compared to usual care, representing an 8% reduction in the median length of stay. Among patients under 80 years of age, the median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.60 days (95% CI = 0.06 to 1.17; p = 0.03), representing 11% reduction in the median

  16. Use of eye-tracking technology in clinical reasoning: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blondon, Katherine; Wipfli, Rolf; Lovis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Achieving a better understanding of the clinical reasoning process is an important approach to improve patient management and patient safety. Although clinical psychologists have used talk-aloud or stimulated recall approaches, these methods have biases. Recently, researchers have been exploring eye-tracking technology to gain "live" insight into clinicians' reasoning processes in certain fields of medicine (radiology, dermatology, etc.). We present a systematic review of eye-tracking literature used for clinical reasoning. We performed a literature search using the terms "eye" or "gaze tracking", "clinical" or "diagnostic reasoning", and "physician" in Pubmed, Embase, Psychinfo, Web of Science and ACM databases. Two investigators screened the abstracts, then full-text articles to select 10 pertinent studies. The studies evaluated medical decision making in four different medical domains using mostly experimental, observational approaches. A total of 208 participants were enrolled for the selected experiments. Paths for further studies are discussed that may extend the use of eye trackers in order to improve understanding of medical decision making.

  17. Material fundamentals and clinical performance of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings: a review.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Berndt, C C; Gross, K A; Kucuk, A

    2001-01-01

    The clinical use of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on metal implants has aroused as many controversies as interests over the last decade. Although faster and stronger fixation and more bone growth have been revealed, the performance of HA-coated implants has been doubted. This article will initially address the fundamentals of the material selection, design, and processing of the HA coating and show how the coating microstructure and properties can be a good predictor of the expected behavior in the body. Further discussion will clarify the major concerns with the clinical use of HA coatings and introduce a comprehensive review concerning the outcomes experienced with respect to clinical practice over the past 5 years. A reflection on the results indicates that HA coatings can promote earlier and stronger fixation but exhibit a durability that can be related to the coating quality. Specific relationships between coating quality and clinical performance are being established as characterization methods disclose more information about the coating.

  18. Febrile Infection-Related Epilepsy Syndrome: Clinical Review and Hypotheses of Epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    van Baalen, Andreas; Vezzani, Annamaria; Häusler, Martin; Kluger, Gerhard

    2017-02-01

    Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES, AERRPS, or DESC) is one of the most severe, mostly irreversible, and presumably immune-mediated epileptic encephalopathies affecting healthy children. Refractory status epilepticus or a cluster of seizures start a few days after the onset of an acute febrile illness; however, encephalitis cannot be proved. Sequelae of FIRES are drug-resistant epilepsy and neuropsychological impairments occurring without latency. Clinical knowledge is limited because FIRES is sporadic and extremely rare. Therefore, based on literature and our data, this review includes clinical features, terminology, epidemiology, diagnostic criteria and procedures, differential diagnoses, acute and chronic therapeutic options, and outcome data. Particular attention is paid to the epileptogenesis. We hypothesize that FIRES is an immune but not an autoimmune disease and discuss GABAergic therapy at high doses, avoidance of burst-suppression coma, and early introduction of enteral or even parenteral ketogenic diet as the most promising treatment. The lack of evidence requires both a network and a multinational web-based clinical registry to define the clinical spectrum for improving diagnosis and treatment and at the very least, to clarify the cause of FIRES. We conclude that the term "fulminant inflammatory response epilepsy syndrome" may be more appropriate.

  19. Clinical trials for authorized biosimilars in the European Union: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Johanna; Koenig, Franz; Jones, Byron

    2016-01-01

    Aim In 2006, Omnitrope (by Sandoz) was the first approved biosimilar in Europe. To date, 21 biosimilars for seven different biologics are on the market. The present study compared the clinical trials undertaken to obtain market authorization. Methods We summarized the findings of a comprehensive review of all clinical trials up to market authorization of approved biosimilars, using the European public assessment reports (EPARs) published by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The features compared were, among others, the number of patients enrolled, the number of trials, the types of trial design, choice of endpoints and equivalence margins for pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) and phase III trials. Results The variability between the clinical development strategies is high. Some differences are explainable by the characteristics of the product; if, for example, the PD marker can be assumed to predict the clinical outcome, no efficacy trials might be necessary. However, even for products with the same reference product, the sample size, endpoints and statistical models are not always the same. Conclusions There seems to be flexibility for sponsors regarding the decision as to how best to prove biosimilarity. PMID:27580073

  20. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Cortical Button Distal Biceps Repair: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical outcomes and complications of the cortical button distal biceps fixation method. Material and Methods. All methods followed the PRISMA guidelines. Included studies had to describe clinical outcomes and complications after acute distal biceps repair with cortical button fixation. Eligibility criteria also included English language, more than 5 cases with minimum follow-up of 6 months, and preferably usage of at least one relevant clinical score (MEPS, ASES, and/or DASH) for final outcome. A loss of at least 30° in motion—flexion, extension, pronation, or supination—and a loss of at least 30% of strength were considered an unsatisfactory result. Results. The review identified 7 articles including 105 patients (mean age 43.6 years) with 106 acute distal biceps ruptures. Mean follow-up was 26.3 months. Functional outcome of ROM regarding flexion/extension and pronation/supination was satisfactory in 94 (89.5%) and 86 (82%) patients in respect. Averaged flexion and supination strength had been reported in 6/7 studies (97 patients) and were satisfactory in 82.4% of them. The most common complication was transient nerve palsy (14.2%). The overall reoperation rate was 4.8% (5/105 cases). Conclusion. Cortical button fixation for acute distal biceps repair is a reproducible operation with good clinical results. Most of the complications can be avoided with appropriate surgical technique. PMID:27525303

  1. Fibrofog and fibromyalgia: a narrative review and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Howard M; Katz, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia often report forgetfulness as well as declines in cognitive function, memory, and mental alertness-symptoms that have been termed "fibrofog" in popular and electronic media as well as in professional literature. "Fibrofog" is the subjectively experienced cognitive dysfunction associated with fibromyalgia and is a clinically important yet comparatively less well-studied aspect of the disorder; it includes loss of mental clarity (mental fogginess) as well as attention and memory impairment. Although until recently cognitive symptoms have been largely ignored, these symptoms can be more disturbing than the widespread pain and can change these patients' lives, sometimes dramatically so. Whereas widespread musculoskeletal pain, tenderness, and fatigue may be the hallmark symptoms of fibromyalgia, patients rank cognitive dysfunction highly in terms of disease impact. This review addresses (1) the prevalence of self-reported cognitive disturbances in fibromyalgia, (2) the clinical presentation of fibrofog, (3) neuropsychological test performance, with particular attention to discrepancies between self-report and test results, (3) clinical correlates of impaired cognitive function in fibromyalgia, (4) neurobiology relevant to cognitive disturbances in fibromyalgia, and (5) clinical management of fibrofog. Although the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia remains an enigma, evidence suggests that it may be a brain disorder, with cognitive deficits ("fibrofog") reflecting disturbed centrally mediated processes.

  2. Spitz/Reed nevi: a review of clinical-dermatoscopic and histological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Ana F.; Lopes, Jose M.; Azevedo, Filomena; Mota, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spitz/Reed nevi are melanocytic lesions that may mimic melanoma at clinical, dermatoscopic and histopathological levels. Management strategies of these lesions remain controversial. Objectives: We aim a correlation among clinical-dermatoscopic and histological features of a series of Spitz/Reed nevi diagnosed during 7 years at the Department of Dermatology. Methods: Clinical, dermatoscopic and histological features of Spitz/Reed nevi diagnosed at our tertiary hospital from 2008 to 2014 were reviewed in order to seek correlation. Results: All described dermatoscopic patterns for Spitz/Reed nevi were found among the 47 enrolled patients; starburst and atypical/multicomponent patterns prevailed (57.4%). Reticular pattern predominated among children younger than 12 years, whereas homogeneous pattern was more frequent in patients older than 12 years, although these differences were not statistically significant (P=0.785). Among histological atypical lesions, all dermatoscopic patterns were represented, but the atypical/multicomponent predominated (56.3%). Two out of 11 dermatoscopically atypical lesions did not show histopathological counterpart. Conclusions: The excision of Spitz/Reed nevi in adults is supported, given the inability to accurately predict those with histopathological atypia, based on clinical and dermatoscopic features, which may raise concern about malignancy. PMID:27222770

  3. Genetics in endocrinology: genetic variation in deiodinases: a systematic review of potential clinical effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Verloop, Herman; Dekkers, Olaf M; Peeters, Robin P; Schoones, Jan W; Smit, Johannes W A

    2014-09-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases represent a family of selenoproteins involved in peripheral and local homeostasis of thyroid hormone action. Deiodinases are expressed in multiple organs and thyroid hormone affects numerous biological systems, thus genetic variation in deiodinases may affect multiple clinical endpoints. Interest in clinical effects of genetic variation in deiodinases has clearly increased. We aimed to provide an overview for the role of deiodinase polymorphisms in human physiology and morbidity. In this systematic review, studies evaluating the relationship between deiodinase polymorphisms and clinical parameters in humans were eligible. No restrictions on publication date were imposed. The following databases were searched up to August 2013: Pubmed, EMBASE (OVID-version), Web of Science, COCHRANE Library, CINAHL (EbscoHOST-version), Academic Search Premier (EbscoHOST-version), and ScienceDirect. Deiodinase physiology at molecular and tissue level is described, and finally the role of these polymorphisms in pathophysiological conditions is reviewed. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) polymorphisms particularly show moderate-to-strong relationships with thyroid hormone parameters, IGF1 production, and risk for depression. D2 variants correlate with thyroid hormone levels, insulin resistance, bipolar mood disorder, psychological well-being, mental retardation, hypertension, and risk for osteoarthritis. D3 polymorphisms showed no relationship with inter-individual variation in serum thyroid hormone parameters. One D3 polymorphism was associated with risk for osteoarthritis. Genetic deiodinase profiles only explain a small proportion of inter-individual variations in serum thyroid hormone levels. Evidence suggests a role of genetic deiodinase variants in certain pathophysiological conditions. The value for determination of deiodinase polymorphism in clinical practice needs further investigation.

  4. Osteoarthritis year in review 2014: mechanics--basic and clinical studies in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Moyer, R F; Ratneswaran, A; Beier, F; Birmingham, T B

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to highlight recent research in mechanics and osteoarthritis (OA) by summarizing results from selected studies spanning basic and clinical research methods. Databases were searched from January 2013 through to March 2014. Working in pairs, reviewers selected 67 studies categorized into four themes--mechanobiology, ambulatory mechanics, biomechanical interventions and mechanical risk factors. Novel developments in mechanobiology included the identification of cell signaling pathways that mediated cellular responses to loading of articular cartilage. Studies in ambulatory mechanics included an increased focus on instrumented knee implants and progress in computational models, both emphasizing the importance of muscular contributions to load. Several proposed biomechanical interventions (e.g., shoe insoles and knee braces) produced variable changes in external knee joint moments during walking, while meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials did not support the use of lateral wedge insoles for decreasing pain. Results from high quality randomized trials suggested diet with or without exercise decreased indicators of knee joint load during walking, whereas similar effects from exercise alone were not detected with the measures used. Data from longitudinal cohorts suggested mechanical alignment was a risk factor for incidence and progression of OA, with the mechanism involving damage to the meniscus. In combination, the basic and clinical studies highlight the importance of considering multiple contributors to joint loading that can evoke both protective and damaging responses. Although challenges clearly exist, future studies should strive to integrate basic and clinical research methods to gain a greater understanding of the interactions among mechanical factors in OA and to develop improved preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  5. McCune–Albright syndrome with craniofacial dysplasia: Clinical review and surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Belsuzarri, Telmo Augusto Barba; Araujo, João Flavio Mattos; Melro, Carlos Alberto Morassi; Neves, Maick Willen Fernandes; Navarro, Juliano Nery; Brito, Leandro Gomes; Pontelli, Luis Otavio Carneiro; de Abreu Mattos, Luis Gustavo; Gonçales, Tiago Fernandes; Zeviani, Wolnei Marques

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign fibro-osseous lesion related to an abnormal bone development and replacement by fibrous tissue. FD has three clinical patterns namely monostotic, polyostotic, and the McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS). MAS is a rare genetic disorder (about 3% of all FD's) that comprises a triad of polyostotic FD, café-au-lait skin macules, and precocious puberty. MAS can involve the orbit region and cause stenosis in the optic canal, leading the patient to a progressive visual loss. Methods: We reported a case of craniofacial FD in MAS in a 9-year-old male with progressive visual loss, submitted to optic nerve decompression by fronto-orbito-zygomatic approach, with total recovery. A research was made at Bireme, PubMed, Cochrane, LILACS, and MEDLINE with the keywords: FD/craniofacial/McCune–Albright/Optic compression for the clinical review. Results: A clinical review of the disease was made, the multiple, clinical, and surgical management options were presented, and the case report was reported. Conclusion: MAS is a rare disease with a progressive polyostotic FD. Whenever it affects the orbit region, the optic canal, and it is associated with a progressive visual loss, the urgent optic nerve decompression is mandatory, either manually or with a rapid drill. It is known that aggressive approach is associated with less recurrence; it is also associated with worsening of the visual loss in optic nerve decompression. In MAS cases, multiple and less aggressive surgeries seem to be more suitable. PMID:27057395

  6. Review of clinical brachytherapy uncertainties: Analysis guidelines of GEC-ESTRO and the AAPM☆

    PubMed Central

    Kirisits, Christian; Rivard, Mark J.; Baltas, Dimos; Ballester, Facundo; De Brabandere, Marisol; van der Laarse, Rob; Niatsetski, Yury; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Tanderup, Kari; Venselaar, Jack L.M.; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose A substantial reduction of uncertainties in clinical brachytherapy should result in improved outcome in terms of increased local control and reduced side effects. Types of uncertainties have to be identified, grouped, and quantified. Methods A detailed literature review was performed to identify uncertainty components and their relative importance to the combined overall uncertainty. Results Very few components (e.g., source strength and afterloader timer) are independent of clinical disease site and location of administered dose. While the influence of medium on dose calculation can be substantial for low energy sources or non-deeply seated implants, the influence of medium is of minor importance for high-energy sources in the pelvic region. The level of uncertainties due to target, organ, applicator, and/or source movement in relation to the geometry assumed for treatment planning is highly dependent on fractionation and the level of image guided adaptive treatment. Most studies to date report the results in a manner that allows no direct reproduction and further comparison with other studies. Often, no distinction is made between variations, uncertainties, and errors or mistakes. The literature review facilitated the drafting of recommendations for uniform uncertainty reporting in clinical BT, which are also provided. The recommended comprehensive uncertainty investigations are key to obtain a general impression of uncertainties, and may help to identify elements of the brachytherapy treatment process that need improvement in terms of diminishing their dosimetric uncertainties. It is recommended to present data on the analyzed parameters (distance shifts, volume changes, source or applicator position, etc.), and also their influence on absorbed dose for clinically-relevant dose parameters (e.g., target parameters such as D90 or OAR doses). Publications on brachytherapy should include a statement of total dose uncertainty for the entire

  7. Systematic review of the global epidemiology, clinical and laboratory profile of enteric fever

    PubMed Central

    Azmatullah, Asma; Qamar, Farah Naz; Thaver, Durrane; Zaidi, Anita KM; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-01-01

    Background Children suffer the highest burden of enteric fever among populations in South Asian countries. The clinical features are non–specific, vary in populations, and are often difficult to distinguish clinically from other febrile illnesses, leading to delayed or inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. We undertook a systematic review to assess the clinical profile and laboratory features of enteric fever across age groups, economic regions, level of care and antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Methods We searched PubMed (January 1964–December 2013) for studies describing clinical features in defined cohorts of patients over varying time periods. Studies with all culture–confirmed cases or those with at least 50% culture–confirmed cases were included. 242 reports were screened out of 4398 relevant articles and 180 reports were included for final review. Results 96% of studies were from an urban location, 96% were hospital–based studies, with 41% of studies were from South Asia. Common clinical features in hospitalized children include high–grade fever, coated tongue, anaemia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly neutrophilia, abdominal distension and GI bleeding. In adults’ nausea/vomiting, thrombocytopenia and GI perforation predominate. The case–fatality rate in children under 5 years is higher than school aged children and adolescents, and is highest in Sub Saharan Africa and North Africa/Middle East regions. Multi–drug resistant enteric fever has higher rates of complications than drug sensitive enteric fever, but case fatality rates were comparable in both. Conclusions Our findings indicate variability in disease presentation in adults compared to children, in different regions and in resistant vs sensitive cases. Majority of studies are from hospitalized cases, and are not disaggregated by age. Despite higher complications in MDR enteric fever, case fatality rate is comparable to sensitive cases, with an

  8. Methodological quality of systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health published in a Brazilian evidence-based health journal

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Riera, Rachel; Torloni, Maria Regina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the quality of systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health recently published in a Brazilian evidence-based health journal. METHOD: All systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health published in the last five years in the Brazilian Journal of Evidence-based Health were retrieved. Two independent reviewers critically assessed the methodological quality of reviews and trials using AMSTAR and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Table, respectively. RESULTS: Systematic reviews and clinical trials accounted for less than 10% of the 61 original studies on women's health published in the São Paulo Medical Journal over the last five years. All five reviews were considered to be of moderate quality; the worst domains were publication bias and the appropriate use of study quality in formulating conclusions. All three clinical trials were judged to have a high risk of bias. The participant blinding, personnel and outcome assessors and allocation concealment domains had the worst scores. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health recently published in a Brazilian evidence-based journal are of low to moderate quality. The quality of these types of studies needs improvement. PMID:23778332

  9. The Clinical Learning Environment Review as a model for impactful self-directed quality control initiatives in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Saul, Kenneth; Casamiquela, Kathleen; McCowan, Nancye; Jackson, Jeremy D; Brodell, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) program was designed to assess the learning environment in residencies and fellowships accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The program's focus is preventing harm to patients. This effort was purposely separated from the residency survey process so that training programs would be open to identifying and preventing errors without fear of jeopardizing their accreditation status. In our dermatology residency program, we established a resident-centered project for quality assessment/quality improvement (QA/QI). We identified areas of potential patient harm, designed methods to quantifiably assess the problems, and developed focused and cost-effective initiatives to improve patient safety. A new initiative was presented at each monthly faculty meeting. This project jump-started QA/QI efforts in our department and has improved patient safety. Our QA/QI project also has enhanced resident/faculty communication and provided trainees with experience in designing QA/QI efforts. It could serve as a model for postresidency efforts to prevent patient harm.

  10. Clinical review: Brain-body temperature differences in adults with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Childs, Charmaine; Lunn, Kueh Wern

    2013-04-22

    Surrogate or 'proxy' measures of brain temperature are used in the routine management of patients with brain damage. The prevailing view is that the brain is 'hotter' than the body. The polarity and magnitude of temperature differences between brain and body, however, remains unclear after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The focus of this systematic review is on the adult patient admitted to intensive/neurocritical care with a diagnosis of severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 8). The review considered studies that measured brain temperature and core body temperature. Articles published in English from the years 1980 to 2012 were searched in databases, CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid SP, Mednar and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database. For the review, publications of randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, before and after studies, cohort studies, case-control studies and descriptive studies were considered for inclusion. Of 2,391 records identified via the search strategies, 37 were retrieved for detailed examination (including two via hand searching). Fifteen were reviewed and assessed for methodological quality. Eleven studies were included in the systematic review providing 15 brain-core body temperature comparisons. The direction of mean brain-body temperature differences was positive (brain higher than body temperature) and negative (brain lower than body temperature). Hypothermia is associated with large brain-body temperature differences. Brain temperature cannot be predicted reliably from core body temperature. Concurrent monitoring of brain and body temperature is recommended in patients where risk of temperature-related neuronal damage is a cause for clinical concern and when deliberate induction of below-normal body temperature is instituted.

  11. Systematic Review of Outcome Measures Reported in Clinical Canine Osteoarthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Lucy; Dean, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To record and categorize the outcome measures used in dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA) by systematically reviewing the peer reviewed publications on OA in dogs. Study Design Systematic literature review. Study Population Peer reviewed literature on canine OA. Methods A computer‐based bibliographic search was performed on PubMed and CAB Abstracts in August 2013 to find peer reviewed publications relevant to canine OA. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The outcome measures reported within each publication were recorded and categorized for comparison. Adequately described outcome measures were assessed for uniqueness and evidence of prior validation. Results Of 3,697 publications identified and screened, 117 were deemed eligible for inclusion. Within eligible publications, outcome measures were used 618 times (median of 4 outcome measures per publication). Outcomes measured were divided into 5 groups containing 65 categories. The most frequently assessed outcomes were lameness assessment with no stated gait/mixed gaits (66 outcomes), radiography (58), and lameness single gait/lateral motion (55). Of 618 outcome measures reported, 491 were assessed for uniqueness and 348 (71%) were unique to a single publication. Ten outcome measures were reported to have been validated. Conclusion Many outcome measures have been used to assess canine OA. There is no consensus on which are the most useful outcomes or by which method they should be assessed. There is a pressing need for agreement on outcomes reporting in canine OA and for validation of outcome measures used for these assessments. Until consensus is reached, we recommend at least one validated outcome measure be used in every clinical study. PMID:27120270

  12. Clinical outcome of pediatric collagenous gastritis: case series and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hijaz, Nadia Mazen; Septer, Seth Steven; Degaetano, James; Attard, Thomas Mario

    2013-03-07

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) is characterized by patchy subepithelial collagen bands. Effective treatment and the clinical and histological outcome of CG in children are poorly defined. The aim of this study is to summarize the published literature on the clinical outcome and response to therapy of pediatric CG including two new cases. We performed a search in Pubmed, OVID for related terms; articles including management and clinical and/or endo-histologic follow up information were included and abstracted. Reported findings were pooled in a dedicated database including the corresponding data extracted from chart review in our patients with CG. Twenty-four patients were included (17 females) with a mean age of 11.7 years. The clinical presentation included iron deficiency anemia and dyspepsia. The reported duration of follow up (in 18 patients) ranged between 0.2-14 years. Despite most subjects presenting with anemia including one requiring blood transfusion, oral iron therapy was only documented in 12 patients. Other treatment modalities were antisecretory measures in 13 patients; proton pump inhibitors (12), or histamine-2 blockers (3), sucralfate (5), prednisolone (6), oral budesonide in 3 patients where one received it in fish oil and triple therapy (3). Three (13%) patients showed no clinical improvement despite therapy; conversely 19 out of 22 were reported with improved symptoms including 8 with complete symptom resolution. Spontaneous clinical resolution without antisecretory, anti-inflammatory or gastroprotective agents was noted in 5 patients (4 received only supplemental iron). Follow up endo-histopathologic data (17 patients) included persistent collagen band and stable Mononuclear cell infiltrate in 12 patients with histopathologic improvement in 5 patients. Neither collagen band thickness nor mononuclear cell infiltrate correlated with clinical course. Intestinal metaplasia and endocrine cell hyperplasia were reported (1) raising the concern of long

  13. Consideration of sex in clinical trials of transdermal nicotine patch: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Andrea H; Smith, Philip H; Kaufman, Mira; McKee, Sherry A

    2014-10-01

    Transdermal nicotine patch (TNP) is 1 of the most commonly used smoking cessation treatments; however, the efficacy of TNP by sex is not yet clear. The purpose of the current review was to synthesize how sex has been considered in published clinical trials of TNP for smoking cessation. The specific aims of the study were to examine the inclusion of sex in analyses of cessation outcomes, TNP-related variables (compliance, side effects), and quit-related variables (withdrawal, cravings); to review the consideration of sex-related variables (menstrual cycle phase, pregnancy); and to identify needs for future research. Potential articles published through December 31, 2013 were identified through a MEDLINE search of the terms "clinical trial," "nicotine patch," and "smoking cessation." Forty-two studies used all 3 terms and met the inclusion criteria. Approximately half of the studies reported that they considered sex in smoking cessation outcomes, with 15 studies finding no difference by sex and 7 studies finding better outcomes for men versus women. Only 5 studies reported data on outcomes by sex in their publications. No studies reported analysis of TNP compliance or withdrawal by sex. In the 1 study that examined side effects by sex, more women than men reported discontinuing TNP because of skin irritation. No study examined the association of cessation outcomes with menstrual cycle phase. There is a need to include sex in research on TNP, as well as other pharmacological and behavioral smoking treatments, to clarify the picture of treatment efficacy for women compared with men.

  14. A Review of Biomarkers in Mood and Psychotic Disorders: A Dissection of Clinical vs. Preclinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Sarel J.; Möller, Marisa; Harvey, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant research efforts aimed at understanding the neurobiological underpinnings of mood (depression, bipolar disorder) and psychotic disorders, the diagnosis and evaluation of treatment of these disorders are still based solely on relatively subjective assessment of symptoms as well as psychometric evaluations. Therefore, biological markers aimed at improving the current classification of psychotic and mood-related disorders, and that will enable patients to be stratified on a biological basis into more homogeneous clinically distinct subgroups, are urgently needed. The attainment of this goal can be facilitated by identifying biomarkers that accurately reflect pathophysiologic processes in these disorders. This review postulates that the field of psychotic and mood disorder research has advanced sufficiently to develop biochemical hypotheses of the etiopathology of the particular illness and to target the same for more effective disease modifying therapy. This implies that a “one-size fits all” paradigm in the treatment of psychotic and mood disorders is not a viable approach, but that a customized regime based on individual biological abnormalities would pave the way forward to more effective treatment. In reviewing the clinical and preclinical literature, this paper discusses the most highly regarded pathophysiologic processes in mood and psychotic disorders, thereby providing a scaffold for the selection of suitable biomarkers for future studies in this field, to develope biomarker panels, as well as to improve diagnosis and to customize treatment regimens for better therapeutic outcomes. PMID:26411964

  15. Cutaneous and Mucosal Lichen Planus: A Comprehensive Review of Clinical Subtypes, Risk Factors, Diagnosis, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that most often affects middle-aged adults. LP can involve the skin or mucous membranes including the oral, vulvovaginal, esophageal, laryngeal, and conjunctival mucosa. It has different variants based on the morphology of the lesions and the site of involvement. The literature suggests that certain presentations of the disease such as esophageal or ophthalmological involvement are underdiagnosed. The burden of the disease is higher in some variants including hypertrophic LP and erosive oral LP, which may have a more chronic pattern. LP can significantly affect the quality of life of patients as well. Drugs or contact allergens can cause lichenoid reactions as the main differential diagnosis of LP. LP is a T-cell mediated immunologic disease but the responsible antigen remains unidentified. In this paper, we review the history, epidemiology, and clinical subtypes of LP. We also review the histopathologic aspects of the disease, differential diagnoses, immunopathogenesis, and the clinical and genetic correlations. PMID:24672362

  16. Titanium: a review on exposure, release, penetration, allergy, epidemiology, and clinical reactivity.

    PubMed

    Fage, Simon W; Muris, Joris; Jakobsen, Stig S; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to titanium (Ti) from implants and from personal care products as nanoparticles (NPs) is common. This article reviews exposure sources, ion release, skin penetration, allergenic effects, and diagnostic possibilities. We conclude that human exposure to Ti mainly derives from dental and medical implants, personal care products, and foods. Despite being considered to be highly biocompatible relative to other metals, Ti is released in the presence of biological fluids and tissue, especially under certain circumstances, which seem to be more likely with regard to dental implants. Although most of the studies reviewed have important limitations, Ti seems not to penetrate a competent skin barrier, either as pure Ti, alloy, or as Ti oxide NPs. However, there are some indications of Ti penetration through the oral mucosa. We conclude that patch testing with the available Ti preparations for detection of type IV hypersensitivity is currently inadequate for Ti. Although several other methods for contact allergy detection have been suggested, including lymphocyte stimulation tests, none has yet been generally accepted, and the diagnosis of Ti allergy is therefore still based primarily on clinical evaluation. Reports on clinical allergy and adverse events have rarely been published. Whether this is because of unawareness of possible adverse reactions to this specific metal, difficulties in detection methods, or the metal actually being relatively safe to use, is still unresolved.

  17. Progress in the Discovery of Treatments for C. difficile Infection: A Clinical and Medicinal Chemistry Review

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Lissa S.; Owusu, Yaw B.; Hurdle, Julian G.; Sun, Dianqing

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes C. difficile infection, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of C. difficile infection in developed countries has become increasingly high due to the emergence of newer epidemic strains, a growing elderly population, extensive use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and limited therapies for this diarrheal disease. Because treatment options currently available for C. difficile infection have some drawbacks, including cost, promotion of resistance, and selectivity problems, new agents are urgently needed to address these challenges. This review article focuses on two parts: the first part summarizes current clinical treatment strategies and agents under clinical development for C. difficile infection; the second part reviews newly reported anti-difficile agents that have been evaluated or reevaluated in the last five years and are in the early stages of drug discovery and development. Antibiotics are divided into natural product inspired and synthetic small molecule compounds that may have the potential to be more efficacious than currently approved treatments. This includes potency, selectivity, reduced cytotoxicity, and novel modes of action to prevent resistance. PMID:24236721

  18. Impact analysis studies of clinical prediction rules relevant to primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Emma; Uijen, Maike J M; Clyne, Barbara; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Keogh, Claire; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Following appropriate validation, clinical prediction rules (CPRs) should undergo impact analysis to evaluate their effect on patient care. The aim of this systematic review is to narratively review and critically appraise CPR impact analysis studies relevant to primary care. Setting Primary care. Participants Adults and children. Intervention Studies that implemented the CPR compared to usual care were included. Study design Randomised controlled trial (RCT), controlled before–after, and interrupted time series. Primary outcome Physician behaviour and/or patient outcomes. Results A total of 18 studies, incorporating 14 unique CPRs, were included. The main study design was RCT (n=13). Overall, 10 studies reported an improvement in primary outcome with CPR implementation. Of 6 musculoskeletal studies, 5 were effective in altering targeted physician behaviour in ordering imaging for patients presenting with ankle, knee and neck musculoskeletal injuries. Of 6 cardiovascular studies, 4 implemented cardiovascular risk scores, and 3 reported no impact on physician behaviour outcomes, such as prescribing and referral, or patient outcomes, such as reduction in serum lipid levels. 2 studies examined CPRs in decision-making for patients presenting with chest pain and reduced inappropriate admissions. Of 5 respiratory studies, 2 were effective in reducing antibiotic prescribing for sore throat following CPR implementation. Overall, study methodological quality was often unclear due to incomplete reporting. Conclusions Despite increasing interest in developing and validating CPRs relevant to primary care, relatively few have gone through impact analysis. To date, research has focused on a small number of CPRs across few clinical domains only. PMID:27008685

  19. Hand hygiene-related clinical trials reported since 2010: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kingston, L; O'Connell, N H; Dunne, C P

    2016-04-01

    Considerable emphasis is currently placed on reducing healthcare-associated infection through improving hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals. There is also increasing discussion in the lay media of perceived poor hand hygiene compliance among healthcare staff. Our aim was to report the outcomes of a systematic search for peer-reviewed, published studies - especially clinical trials - that focused on hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals. Literature published between December 2009, after publication of the World Health Organization (WHO) hand hygiene guidelines, and February 2014, which was indexed in PubMed and CINAHL on the topic of hand hygiene compliance, was searched. Following examination of relevance and methodology of the 57 publications initially retrieved, 16 clinical trials were finally included in the review. The majority of studies were conducted in the USA and Europe. The intensive care unit emerged as the predominant focus of studies followed by facilities for care of the elderly. The category of healthcare worker most often the focus of the research was the nurse, followed by the healthcare assistant and the doctor. The unit of analysis reported for hand hygiene compliance was 'hand hygiene opportunity'; four studies adopted the 'my five moments for hand hygiene' framework, as set out in the WHO guidelines, whereas other papers focused on unique multimodal strategies of varying design. We concluded that adopting a multimodal approach to hand hygiene improvement intervention strategies, whether guided by the WHO framework or by another tested multimodal framework, results in moderate improvements in hand hygiene compliance.

  20. A Systematic Review of Experimental and Clinical Acupuncture in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Franconi, Giovanna; Schröder, Sven; Marchetti, Paolo; Robinson, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect that can be very disabling and can limit or delay the dose of chemotherapy that can be administered. Acupuncture may be effective for treating peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the use of acupuncture for CIPN. The systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Database, CINHAL, and ISI Proceedings. Hand searching was conducted, and consensus was reached on all extracted data. Only papers in the English language were included, irrespective of study design. From 3989 retrieved papers, 8 relevant papers were identified. One was an experimental study which showed that electroacupuncture suppressed CIPN pain in rats. In addition, there were 7 very heterogeneous clinical studies, 1 controlled randomised study using auricular acupuncture, 2 randomized controlled studies using somatic acupuncture, and 3 case series/case reports which suggested a positive effect of acupuncture in CIPN. Conclusions. Only one controlled randomised study demonstrated that acupuncture may be beneficial for CIPN. All the clinical studies reviewed had important methodological limitations. Further studies with robust methodology are needed to demonstrate the role of acupuncture for treating CIPN resulting from cancer treatment. PMID:23983788