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Sample records for hierarchical tesla wireless

  1. Time Synchronization in Hierarchical TESLA Wireless Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    Time synchronization and event time correlation are important in wireless sensor networks. In particular, time is used to create a sequence events or time line to answer questions of cause and effect. Time is also used as a basis for determining the freshness of received packets and the validity of cryptographic certificates. This paper presents secure method of time synchronization and event time correlation for TESLA-based hierarchical wireless sensor networks. The method demonstrates that events in a TESLA network can be accurately timestamped by adding only a few pieces of data to the existing protocol.

  2. Nikola Tesla and the wireless transmission of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marincic, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    Nikola Tesla, the inventor of the polyphase-current system, is best known for his contribution regarding induction and other types of alternating-current machines. His patents and his published and unpublished notes about wireless transmission of energy are less known and, if known to some extent, they are usually wrongly interpreted. For many years the author studied Tesla's works on wireless transmission of energy and that what is given here is a review of relevant documents, unpublished notes and letters from the archives of the Nikola Tesla Museum in Belgrade. An attempt is made to explain Tesla's physical model on the basis of which he concluded that the wireless transmission of energy on a global scale is possible. His model is critically examined in view of the present day knowledge of extremely low frequency propagation phenomena.

  3. Multi-mode clustering model for hierarchical wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiangdong; Li, Yongfu; Xu, Huifen

    2017-03-01

    The topology management, i.e., clusters maintenance, of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is still a challenge due to its numerous nodes, diverse application scenarios and limited resources as well as complex dynamics. To address this issue, a multi-mode clustering model (M2 CM) is proposed to maintain the clusters for hierarchical WSNs in this study. In particular, unlike the traditional time-trigger model based on the whole-network and periodic style, the M2 CM is proposed based on the local and event-trigger operations. In addition, an adaptive local maintenance algorithm is designed for the broken clusters in the WSNs using the spatial-temporal demand changes accordingly. Numerical experiments are performed using the NS2 network simulation platform. Results validate the effectiveness of the proposed model with respect to the network maintenance costs, node energy consumption and transmitted data as well as the network lifetime.

  4. Edison vs. Tesla

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2016-07-12

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  5. Edison vs. Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2013-11-20

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  6. Dynamic Hierarchical Sleep Scheduling for Wireless Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chih-Yu; Chen, Ying-Chih

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents two scheduling management schemes for wireless sensor networks, which manage the sensors by utilizing the hierarchical network structure and allocate network resources efficiently. A local criterion is used to simultaneously establish the sensing coverage and connectivity such that dynamic cluster-based sleep scheduling can be achieved. The proposed schemes are simulated and analyzed to abstract the network behaviors in a number of settings. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithms provide efficient network power control and can achieve high scalability in wireless sensor networks. PMID:22412343

  7. A Complete Hierarchical Key Management Scheme for Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xinying

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous cluster-based wireless sensor networks (WSN) attracted increasing attention recently. Obviously, the clustering makes the entire networks hierarchical; thus, several kinds of keys are required for hierarchical network topology. However, most existing key management schemes for it place more emphasis on pairwise key management schemes or key predistribution schemes and neglect the property of hierarchy. In this paper, we propose a complete hierarchical key management scheme which only utilizes symmetric cryptographic algorithms and low cost operations for heterogeneous cluster-based WSN. Our scheme considers four kinds of keys, which are an individual key, a cluster key, a master key, and pairwise keys, for each sensor node. Finally, the analysis and experiments demonstrate that the proposed scheme is secure and efficient; thus, it is suitable for heterogeneous cluster-based WSN. PMID:24983001

  8. An Intrusion Detection System Based on Multi-Level Clustering for Hierarchical Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Butun, Ismail; Ra, In-Ho; Sankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an intrusion detection system (IDS) framework based on multi-level clustering for hierarchical wireless sensor networks is proposed. The framework employs two types of intrusion detection approaches: (1) “downward-IDS (D-IDS)” to detect the abnormal behavior (intrusion) of the subordinate (member) nodes; and (2) “upward-IDS (U-IDS)” to detect the abnormal behavior of the cluster heads. By using analytical calculations, the optimum parameters for the D-IDS (number of maximum hops) and U-IDS (monitoring group size) of the framework are evaluated and presented. PMID:26593915

  9. An energy efficient cooperative hierarchical MIMO clustering scheme for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Nasim, Mehwish; Qaisar, Saad; Lee, Sungyoung

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present an energy efficient hierarchical cooperative clustering scheme for wireless sensor networks. Communication cost is a crucial factor in depleting the energy of sensor nodes. In the proposed scheme, nodes cooperate to form clusters at each level of network hierarchy ensuring maximal coverage and minimal energy expenditure with relatively uniform distribution of load within the network. Performance is enhanced by cooperative multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication ensuring energy efficiency for WSN deployments over large geographical areas. We test our scheme using TOSSIM and compare the proposed scheme with cooperative multiple-input multiple-output (CMIMO) clustering scheme and traditional multihop Single-Input-Single-Output (SISO) routing approach. Performance is evaluated on the basis of number of clusters, number of hops, energy consumption and network lifetime. Experimental results show significant energy conservation and increase in network lifetime as compared to existing schemes.

  10. Decentralized cooperative TOA/AOA target tracking for hierarchical wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chih; Wen, Chih-Yu

    2012-11-08

    This paper proposes a distributed method for cooperative target tracking in hierarchical wireless sensor networks. The concept of leader-based information processing is conducted to achieve object positioning, considering a cluster-based network topology. Random timers and local information are applied to adaptively select a sub-cluster for the localization task. The proposed energy-efficient tracking algorithm allows each sub-cluster member to locally estimate the target position with a Bayesian filtering framework and a neural networking model, and further performs estimation fusion in the leader node with the covariance intersection algorithm. This paper evaluates the merits and trade-offs of the protocol design towards developing more efficient and practical algorithms for object position estimation.

  11. Hierarchical Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks for Collaborative Hybrid Semi-Supervised Classifier Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Sheng; Bi, Daowei; Ding, Liang

    2007-01-01

    Wireless multimedia sensor networks (WMSN) have recently emerged as one of the most important technologies, driven by the powerful multimedia signal acquisition and processing abilities. Target classification is an important research issue addressed in WMSN, which has strict requirement in robustness, quickness and accuracy. This paper proposes a collaborative semi-supervised classifier learning algorithm to achieve durative online learning for support vector machine (SVM) based robust target classification. The proposed algorithm incrementally carries out the semi-supervised classifier learning process in hierarchical WMSN, with the collaboration of multiple sensor nodes in a hybrid computing paradigm. For decreasing the energy consumption and improving the performance, some metrics are introduced to evaluate the effectiveness of the samples in specific sensor nodes, and a sensor node selection strategy is also proposed to reduce the impact of inevitable missing detection and false detection. With the ant optimization routing, the learning process is implemented with the selected sensor nodes, which can decrease the energy consumption. Experimental results demonstrate that the collaborative hybrid semi-supervised classifier learning algorithm can effectively implement target classification in hierarchical WMSN. It has outstanding performance in terms of energy efficiency and time cost, which verifies the effectiveness of the sensor nodes selection and ant optimization routing.

  12. A Social Potential Fields Approach for Self-Deployment and Self-Healing in Hierarchical Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Aguilera, Francisco; Sandoval, Francisco; Urdiales, Cristina

    2017-01-09

    Autonomous mobile nodes in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN) allow self-deployment and self-healing. In both cases, the goals are: (i) to achieve adequate coverage; and (ii) to extend network life. In dynamic environments, nodes may use reactive algorithms so that each node locally decides when and where to move. This paper presents a behavior-based deployment and self-healing algorithm based on the social potential fields algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, nodes are attached to low cost robots to autonomously navigate in the coverage area. The proposed algorithm has been tested in environments with and without obstacles. Our study also analyzes the differences between non-hierarchical and hierarchical routing configurations in terms of network life and coverage.

  13. Prolonging the lifetime of wireless sensor networks interconnected to fixed network using hierarchical energy tree based routing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, M; Dhanalakshmi, R; Parthiban, P

    2014-01-01

    This research work proposes a mathematical model for the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSN). It also proposes an energy efficient routing algorithm for WSN called hierarchical energy tree based routing algorithm (HETRA) based on hierarchical energy tree constructed using the available energy in each node. The energy efficiency is further augmented by reducing the packet drops using exponential congestion control algorithm (TCP/EXP). The algorithms are evaluated in WSNs interconnected to fixed network with seven distribution patterns, simulated in ns2 and compared with the existing algorithms based on the parameters such as number of data packets, throughput, network lifetime, and data packets average network lifetime product. Evaluation and simulation results show that the combination of HETRA and TCP/EXP maximizes longer network lifetime in all the patterns. The lifetime of the network with HETRA algorithm has increased approximately 3.2 times that of the network implemented with AODV.

  14. A Social Potential Fields Approach for Self-Deployment and Self-Healing in Hierarchical Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Aguilera, Francisco; Sandoval, Francisco; Urdiales, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous mobile nodes in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN) allow self-deployment and self-healing. In both cases, the goals are: (i) to achieve adequate coverage; and (ii) to extend network life. In dynamic environments, nodes may use reactive algorithms so that each node locally decides when and where to move. This paper presents a behavior-based deployment and self-healing algorithm based on the social potential fields algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, nodes are attached to low cost robots to autonomously navigate in the coverage area. The proposed algorithm has been tested in environments with and without obstacles. Our study also analyzes the differences between non-hierarchical and hierarchical routing configurations in terms of network life and coverage. PMID:28075364

  15. TESLA Coil Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Sloan’s work was actually predated by the earlier work of Nikola Tesla . Sloan mistakenly identified " Tesla Coils" as lumped tuned resonators. The...Lefvw WsnJ L REPORT o]i 3. REPRT TYPE AND OATES COVEIRD May 1992 Special/Aug 1992 - May 1992 Z TITLE AND 5U§nUT S. FUNDING NUMIHRS Tesla Coil Research...STATEMENT 1211. ’ISTRIUUTION COOD Approved for public release; dis~ribution is unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Masrmum 200 worw) High repetition rate Tesla

  16. Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.

    PubMed

    Roguin, Ariel

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era.

  17. Bidirectional QoS support for novelty detection applications based on hierarchical wireless sensor network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Mark; Hu, Fei; Kumar, Sunil

    2004-10-01

    The research on the Novelty Detection System (NDS) (called as VENUS) at the authors' universities has generated exciting results. For example, we can detect an abnormal behavior (such as cars thefts from the parking lot) from a series of video frames based on the cognitively motivated theory of habituation. In this paper, we would like to describe the implementation strategies of lower layer protocols for using large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) to NDS with Quality-of-Service (QoS) support. Wireless data collection framework, consisting of small and low-power sensor nodes, provides an alternative mechanism to observe the physical world, by using various types of sensing capabilities that include images (and even videos using Panoptos), sound and basic physical measurements such as temperature. We do not want to lose any 'data query command' packets (in the downstream direction: sink-to-sensors) or have any bit-errors in them since they are so important to the whole sensor network. In the upstream direction (sensors-to-sink), we may tolerate the loss of some sensing data packets. But the 'interested' sensing flow should be assigned a higher priority in terms of multi-hop path choice, network bandwidth allocation, and sensing data packet generation frequency (we hope to generate more sensing data packet for that novel event in the specified network area). The focus of this paper is to investigate MAC-level Quality of Service (QoS) issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) for Novelty Detection applications. Although QoS has been widely studied in other types of networks including wired Internet, general ad hoc networks and mobile cellular networks, we argue that QoS in WSN has its own characteristics. In wired Internet, the main QoS parameters include delay, jitter and bandwidth. In mobile cellular networks, two most common QoS metrics are: handoff call dropping probability and new call blocking probability. Since the main task of WSN is to detect and report

  18. Sensor Deployment for Geographic, Load Balanced Hierarchical Organization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Amit Kr.; Gautam, Ajay Kr.; Patel, R. B.

    2010-11-01

    In order to provide load balancing in clustered sensor deployment, the upstream clusters (near the BS) are kept smaller in size as compared to downstream ones (away from BS). Moreover, geographic awareness is also desirable in order to further enhance energy efficiency. But, this must be cost effective, since most of current location awareness strategies are either cost and weight inefficient (GPS) or are complex, inaccurate and unreliable in operation. This paper presents design and implementation of a Geographic LOad BALanced (GLOBAL) Clustering Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks. A mathematical formulation is provided for determining the number of sensor nodes in each cluster. This enables uniform energy consumption after the multi-hop data transmission towards BS. Either the sensors can be manually deployed or the clusters be so formed that the sensor are efficiently distributed as per formulation. The latter strategy is elaborated in this contribution. Methods to provide static clustering and custom cluster sizes with location awareness are also provided in the given work. Finally, low mobility node applications can also implement the proposed work.

  19. Enhanced Deployment Strategy for Role-based Hierarchical Application Agents in Wireless Sensor Networks with Established Clusterheads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendreau, Audrey

    Efficient self-organizing virtual clusterheads that supervise data collection based on their wireless connectivity, risk, and overhead costs, are an important element of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). This function is especially critical during deployment when system resources are allocated to a subsequent application. In the presented research, a model used to deploy intrusion detection capability on a Local Area Network (LAN), in the literature, was extended to develop a role-based hierarchical agent deployment algorithm for a WSN. The resulting model took into consideration the monitoring capability, risk, deployment distribution cost, and monitoring cost associated with each node. Changing the original LAN methodology approach to model a cluster-based sensor network depended on the ability to duplicate a specific parameter that represented the monitoring capability. Furthermore, other parameters derived from a LAN can elevate costs and risk of deployment, as well as jeopardize the success of an application on a WSN. A key component of the approach presented in this research was to reduce the costs when established clusterheads in the network were found to be capable of hosting additional detection agents. In addition, another cost savings component of the study addressed the reduction of vulnerabilities associated with deployment of agents to high volume nodes. The effectiveness of the presented method was validated by comparing it against a type of a power-based scheme that used each node's remaining energy as the deployment value. While available energy is directly related to the model used in the presented method, the study deliberately sought out nodes that were identified with having superior monitoring capability, cost less to create and sustain, and are at low-risk of an attack. This work investigated improving the efficiency of an intrusion detection system (IDS) by using the proposed model to deploy monitoring agents after a temperature sensing

  20. Enhanced Deployment Strategy for Role-Based Hierarchical Application Agents in Wireless Sensor Networks with Established Clusterheads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gendreau, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Efficient self-organizing virtual clusterheads that supervise data collection based on their wireless connectivity, risk, and overhead costs, are an important element of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). This function is especially critical during deployment when system resources are allocated to a subsequent application. In the presented research,…

  1. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  2. TESLA & ILC Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T. J.; Weisend, II, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration developed a unique variant of SRF cryomodule designs, the chief feature being use of the large, low pressure helium vapor return pipe as the structural support backbone of the cryomodule. Additional innovative features include all cryogenic piping within the cryomodule (no parallel external cryogenic transfer line), long strings of RF cavities within a single cryomodule, and cryomodules connected in series. Several projects, including FLASH and XFEL at DESY, LCLS-II at SLAC, and the ILC technical design have adopted this general design concept. Advantages include saving space by eliminating the external transfer line, relatively tight packing of RF cavities along the beamline due to fewer warm-cold transitions, and potentially lower costs. However, a primary disadvantage is the relative lack of independence for warm-up, replacement, and cool-down of individual cryomodules.

  3. [70 years of Nikola Tesla studies].

    PubMed

    Juznic, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Nikola Tesla's studies of chemistry are described including his not very scholarly affair in Maribor. After almost a century and half of hypothesis at least usable scenario of Tesla's life and "work" in Maribor is provided. The chemistry achievements of Tesla's most influential professors Martin Sekulić and Tesla's Graz professors are put into the limelight. The fact that Tesla in Graz studied on the technological chemistry Faculty of Polytechnic is focused.

  4. Nikola Tesla: the Moon's rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, A.; Jovanović, B. S.

    1993-09-01

    The review of three articles by N. Tesla, published in the year 1919 in the journal "Electrical experimenter" is given, with special reference to the astronomical contents and to circumstances in which they appeared.

  5. An Improved Rectenna for Wireless Power Transmission for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    A. Background The concept of wireless power transmission (WPT) dates back to the days of Heinrich Hertz and Nikola Tesla [1], who discovered that...energy could be transported by electromagnetic waves in free space. Tesla considered the use of wireless power transmission employing low-frequency...his article, Brown wrote a description of the development of WPT and the milestones along the way. Previously, Tesla carried out numerous

  6. A Follow-up Study on Wireless Power Transmission for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Popovic, “Wireless Powering for Low-Power Distributed Sensors,” Sixth International Symposium Nikola Tesla , 18-20 October 2006. [32] Avago...1 I. INTRODUCTION A. MICROWAVE WIRELESS POWER TRANSMISSION The concept of power transmission dates back to Heinrich Hertz [1] and Nikola ... Tesla [2]. Tesla aimed to develop a high power transmitter to ascertain the law of propagation of current through the earth and the atmosphere. Although

  7. [Nikola Tesla in medicine, too].

    PubMed

    Hanzek, Branko; Jakobović, Zvonimir

    2007-12-01

    Using primary and secondary sources we have shown in this paper the influence of Nikola Tesla's work on the field of medicine. The description of his experiments conduced within secondary-school education programs aimed to present the popularization of his work in Croatia. Although Tesla was dedicated primarily to physics and was not directly involved in biomedical research, his work significantly contributed to paving the way of medical physics particularly radiology and high-frequency electrotherapy.

  8. Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the architectural design, costs, general description, and square footage data for the Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School in Colorado Springs, Colorado. A floor plan and photos are included along with a list of manufacturers and suppliers used for the project. (GR)

  9. Tesla - A Flash of a Genius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.

    2005-10-01

    This book, which is entirely dedicated to the inventions of scientist Nikola Tesla, is divided into three parts: a) all the most important innovative technological creations from the alternate current to the death ray, Tesla research in fundamental physics with a particular attention to the concept of "ether", ball lightning physics; b) the life and the bright mind of Nikola Tesla and the reasons why some of his most recent findings were not accepted by the establishment; c) a critical discussion of the most important work by Tesla followers.

  10. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions.

  11. Conduction-coupled Tesla transformer.

    PubMed

    Reed, J L

    2015-03-01

    A proof-of-principle Tesla transformer circuit is introduced. The new transformer exhibits the high voltage-high power output signal of shock-excited transformers. The circuit, with specification of proper circuit element values, is capable of obtaining extreme oscillatory voltages. The primary and secondary portions of the circuit communicate solely by conduction. The destructive arcing between the primary and secondary inductors in electromagnetically coupled transformers is ubiquitous. Flashover is eliminated in the new transformer as the high-voltage inductors do not interpenetrate and so do not possess an annular volume of electric field. The inductors are remote from one another. The high voltage secondary inductor is isolated in space, except for a base feed conductor, and obtains earth by its self-capacitance to the surroundings. Governing equations, for the ideal case of no damping, are developed from first principles. Experimental, theoretical, and circuit simulator data are presented for the new transformer. Commercial high-temperature superconductors are discussed as a means to eliminate the counter-intuitive damping due to small primary inductances in both the electromagnetic-coupled and new conduction-coupled transformers.

  12. Science up to 100 tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.

    1995-05-01

    100 Tesla is the highest attainable field that can be held for milli-sec in a non-destructive magnet. The strongest steels turn soft under stresses of 4GPa, which is the magnetic pressure of 100 T. Until there is a breakthrough in materials, magnets having all the low temperature and high pressure trimmings will be limited to about 100 T. Within the field range 1-100 T far more resources are now devoted to producing the highest possible continuous fields (40+5 T) than to producing longer pulsed fields above 50 T. This illustrates that the utility of the field can be more important than the strength of the field to researchers in condensed matter. Discoveries are typically made in new territory, but this can be new combinations of pressure, temperature, and magnetic field, or new probes and new materials. If any activity has kept up with the proliferation of new experiments and new facilities in high magnetic field research it is the listing of experiments that could and should be done in high fields. Part of the reason for the vitality of high field research is that high fields provide a generic environment. Compared to particle accelerators and plasma machines a high field laboratory is a setting for generic science, like synchrotron light sources or neutron scattering centers. Although the latter two installations probes states, while a magnetic field creates a state. Because it is unrealistic to try to list all the science opportunities at high fields, the author list sources for lists in the public domain and gives a few examples.

  13. Accelerator aspects of photon colliders at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Nicholas J.

    2001-10-01

    The TESLA linear collider is being primarily designed as a 500- 800 GeV centre of mass e +e - linear collider. However, a second interaction region is being incorporated into the design with a crossing angle of 32 mrad, which is suitable for use as a γγ collider. In this paper we will review those aspects of the current machine design which are critical to the operation of TESLA as a photon collider, paying particular attention to the preservation of small horizontal emittances, and—in the absence of beamstrahlung—limits on reduced horizontal beam cross-section at the interaction point.

  14. Hierarchical scheme for detecting the rotating MIMO transmission of the in-door RGB-LED visible light wireless communications using mobile-phone camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) scheme can extend the transmission capacity for the light-emitting-diode (LED) based visible light communication (VLC) systems. The MIMO VLC system that uses the mobile-phone camera as the optical receiver (Rx) to receive MIMO signal from the n×n Red-Green-Blue (RGB) LED array is desirable. The key step of decoding this signal is to detect the signal direction. If the LED transmitter (Tx) is rotated, the Rx may not realize the rotation and transmission error can occur. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a novel hierarchical transmission scheme which can reduce the computation complexity of rotation detection in LED array VLC system. We use the n×n RGB LED array as the MIMO Tx. In our study, a novel two dimensional Hadamard coding scheme is proposed. Using the different LED color layers to indicate the rotation, a low complexity rotation detection method can be used for improving the quality of received signal. The detection correction rate is above 95% in the indoor usage distance. Experimental results confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  15. Report on first TESLA window assembly test

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, D.; Koepke, K.

    1993-10-01

    RF input couplers for the superconducting cavities of the TESLA are under development at DESY and Fermilab. The coaxial part of the Fermilab input coupler has been tested up to 1.7 MW at Fermilab using 805 MHz rf power source. The test results, procedure and test setup are described.

  16. Nikola Tesla, the Ether and his Telautomaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milar, Kendall

    2014-03-01

    In the nineteenth century physicists' understanding of the ether changed dramatically. New developments in thermodynamics, energy physics, and electricity and magnetism dictated new properties of the ether. These have traditionally been examined from the perspective of the scientists re-conceptualizing the ether. However Nikola Tesla, a prolific inventor and writer, presents a different picture of nineteenth century physics. Alongside the displays that showcased his inventions he presented alternative interpretations of physical, physiological and even psychical research. This is particularly evident in his telautomaton, a radio remote controlled boat. This invention and Tesla's descriptions of it showcase some of his novel interpretations of physical theories. He offered a perspective on nineteenth century physics that focused on practical application instead of experiment. Sometimes the understanding of physical theories that Tesla reached was counterproductive to his own inventive work; other times he offered new insights. Tesla's utilitarian interpretation of physical theories suggests a more scientifically curious and invested inventor than previously described and a connection between the scientific and inventive communities.

  17. Design and scaling of microscale Tesla turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vedavalli G.; Romanin, Vince; Carey, Van P.; Maharbiz, Michel M.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the scaling properties and loss mechanisms of Tesla turbines and provide design recommendations for scaling such turbines to the millimeter scale. Specifically, we provide design, fabrication and experimental data for a low-pressure head hydro Tesla micro-turbine. We derive the analytical turbine performance for incompressible flow and then develop a more detailed model that predicts experimental performance by including a variety of loss mechanisms. We report the correlation between them and the experimental results. Turbines with 1 cm rotors, 36% peak efficiency (at 2 cm3 s-1 flow) and 45 mW unloaded peak power (at 12 cm3 s-1 flow) are demonstrated. We analyze the causes for head loss and shaft power loss and derive constraints on turbine design. We then analyze the effect of scaling down on turbine efficiency, power density and rotor revolutions/min. Based on the analysis, we make recommendations for the design of ˜1 mm microscale Tesla turbines.

  18. 76 FR 60124 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Grant of Petition for Temporary Exemption From the Electronic Stability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Tesla Motors, Inc.; Grant of Petition for Temporary... Stability Control Systems. SUMMARY: This notice grants the petition of Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla) for the....S.C. 30113 and the procedures in 49 CFR Part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla) submitted a...

  19. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko-Tesla ``Predecessor''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuilov, Vladimir; Kiselev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Prof. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko (1947-1905) is a bright figure in the history of science of the XIXth century. His major discoveries are: Electrography - the method of the visualization of electric discharge from the bodies due to the application of high strength and high frequency electric fields, and one of the first observations of the propagation of the electromagnetic waives and information transfer over the distances. We review Prof. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko's research results and explain our point why we consider him as the predecessor of Nikola Tesla.

  20. Neuromagnetic effects of pico-Tesla stimulation.

    PubMed

    Troebinger, Luzia; Anninos, Photios; Barnes, Gareth

    2015-09-01

    We used a double-blind experimental design to look for an effect of pico-Tesla magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects. Pico-Tesla stimulation is thought to increase the dominant frequency of 2-7 Hz oscillations in the human brain. We used magnetoencephalography to measure resting state brain activity. Each subject had two separate recording sessions consisting of three runs in between which they were given real or sham pT stimulation. We then tried to predict the real and sham stimulation sessions based on changes in the mean peak frequency in the 2-7 Hz band. Our predictions for these individual runs were 8 out of 14 at chance level (p = 0.39). After unblinding, we found no significant effect (p = 0.11) of an increase in the frequency range (2-7 Hz) across the subject group. Finally, we performed a Bayesian model comparison between the effect size predicted from previous clinical studies and a null model. Even though this study had a sensitivity advantage of at least one order of magnitude over previous work, we found the null model to be significantly (2000 times) more likely.

  1. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Bangerter, Neal K; Taylor, Meredith D; Tarbox, Grayson J; Palmer, Antony J; Park, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems.

  2. Progress toward 10 tesla accelerator dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Gilbert, G.; Taylor, C.; Meuser, R.

    1983-08-01

    A 9.1 T central field has been achieved in a Nb-Ti dipole operating in pressurized helium II at 1.8 K. Three different Nb-Ti dipoles, without iron yokes, have achieved central fields of 8.0, 8.6, and 9.1 T - all short sample performance for the conductors at 1.8 K. In helium I, at 4.3 K, the maximum central fields are from 1.5 to 2.0 T lower. Ten-tesla magnets have been designed for both Nb-Ti operating at 1.8 K and Nb/sub 3/Sn operating at 4.2 K. They are based on a very small beam aperture, (40 to 45 mm), very high current density in the superconductors (over 1000 A/mm/sup 2/), and a very low ratio of stabilizing copper to superconductor (about 1). Both layer and block designs have been developed that utilize Rutherford Cable. Magnet cycling from 0 to 6 T has been carried out for field change rate up to 1 T/s; the cyclic heating at 1 T/s is 36 W per meter. At a more representative rate of 0.2 T/s the heating rate is only 2 W/m. Progress in the program to use Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi superconductor, in 10 T accelerator magnets is also discussed.

  3. Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review

    SciTech Connect

    Cornuelle, John C.

    2002-08-30

    In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If the U.S. were to become

  4. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Meredith D.; Tarbox, Grayson J.; Palmer, Antony J.; Park, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems. PMID:28090448

  5. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  6. Three-dimensional flow measurements in a tesla turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thomas; Schosser, Constantin; Hain, Rainer; Kaehler, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Tesla turbines are fluid mechanical devices converting flow energy into rotation energy by two physical effects: friction and adhesion. The advantages of the tesla turbine are its simple and robust design, as well as its scalability, which makes it suitable for custom power supply solutions, and renewable energy applications. To this day, there is a lack of experimental data to validate theoretical studies, and CFD simulations of these turbines. This work presents a comprehensive analysis of the flow through a tesla turbine rotor gap, with a gap height of only 0.5 mm, by means of three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3D-PTV). For laminar flows, the experimental results match the theory very well, since the measured flow profiles show the predicted second order parabolic shape in radial direction and a fourth order behavior in circumferential direction. In addition to these laminar measurements, turbulent flows at higher mass flow rates were investigated.

  7. Challenges for picoTesla Magnetic-Tunnel-Junction Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egelhoff, William; Pong, Philip; McMichael, Robert; Nowak, Edmund; Edelstein, Alan; Burnett, James; Fisher, Greg

    2008-03-01

    The extension of small, inexpensive, low-power, low frequency, ultra-sensitive magnetic sensors to fields between 1 nanoTesla and 1 picoTesla, an area currently dominated by fluxgates, optically-pumped magnetometers, and SQUIDS, would be a paradigm shift for the field of magnetic sensors. The necessary elements for picoTesla MTJ sensors have been identified by modeling the noise characteristics. The results help identify the experimental challenges that exist in the integration of the necessary components of the sensor and illustrate the trade-offs that must be considered. For example, values of the TMR above 100% contribute very little, while lowering the saturation field of the free layer below 10 Oe is essential. These and other insights identify the critical issues than need attention and can guide research into productive directions.

  8. Optic Nerve Assessment Using 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun D.; Platt, Sean M.; Lystad, Lisa; Lowe, Mark; Oh, Sehong; Jones, Stephen E.; Alzahrani, Yahya; Plesec, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to correlate high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histologic findings in a case of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma with clinical evidence of optic nerve invasion. Methods With institutional review board approval, an enucleated globe with choroidal melanoma and optic nerve invasion was imaged using a 7-tesla MRI followed by histopathologic evaluation. Results Optical coherence tomography, B-scan ultrasonography, and 1.5-tesla MRI of the orbit (1-mm sections) could not detect optic disc invasion. Ex vivo, 7-tesla MRI detected optic nerve invasion, which correlated with histopathologic features. Conclusions Our case demonstrates the potential to document the existence of optic nerve invasion in the presence of an intraocular tumor, a feature that has a major bearing on decision making, particularly for consideration of enucleation. PMID:27239461

  9. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    PubMed Central

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  10. 77 FR 60672 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tesla Motors, Inc., (Electric Passenger Vehicles), Palo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tesla Motors, Inc., (Electric Passenger... establish a special-purpose subzone at the electric passenger vehicle manufacturing facilities of Tesla... electric passenger vehicles and related powertrain components at the Tesla Motors, Inc., facilities...

  11. Wireless Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A technology utilization project led to the commercial adaptation of a Space Shuttle Orbiter wireless infrared voice communications system. The technology was adapted to a LAN system by Wilton Industries, one of the participants. Because the system is cable-free, installation charges are saved, and it can be used where cable is impractical. Resultant products include the IRplex 6000. Transceivers can be located anywhere and can include mobile receivers. The system provides wireless LAN coverage up to 44,000 square feet. applications include stock exchange communications, trade shows, emergency communications, etc.

  12. Identifying Needed Technical Standards: The LITA TESLA Committee at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ruth C.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts of the Technical Standards for Library Automation Committee (TESLA), a division-wide committee of the Library Information and Technology Association (LITA) of the American Library Association, are described. The current status of suggested technical standards and recommended action are detailed. Five sources are given. (Author/EJS)

  13. Wireless Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2011

    2011-01-01

    One of the hottest areas in technology is invisible. Wireless communications allow people to transmit voice messages, data, and other signals through the air without physically connecting senders to receivers with cables or wires. And the technology is spreading at lightning speed. Cellular phones, personal digital assistants, and wireless…

  14. Wireless Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conforti, Fred

    2003-01-01

    Discusses wireless access-control equipment in the school and university setting, particularly the integrated reader lock at the door with a panel interface module at the control panel. Describes its benefits, how it works, and its reliability and security. (EV)

  15. Wireless Tots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Lee-Allison

    2003-01-01

    The first wireless technology program for preschoolers was implemented in January at the Primrose School at Bentwater in Atlanta, Georgia, a new corporate school operated by Primrose School Franchising Co. The new school serves as a testing and training facility for groundbreaking educational approaches, including emerging innovations in…

  16. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study.

  17. Hierarchical Multiagent Reinforcement Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-25

    In this paper, we investigate the use of hierarchical reinforcement learning (HRL) to speed up the acquisition of cooperative multiagent tasks. We...introduce a hierarchical multiagent reinforcement learning (RL) framework and propose a hierarchical multiagent RL algorithm called Cooperative HRL. In

  18. Bayesian Hierarchical Classes Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenen, Iwin; Van Mechelen, Iven; Gelman, Andrew; De Knop, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    Hierarchical classes models are models for "N"-way "N"-mode data that represent the association among the "N" modes and simultaneously yield, for each mode, a hierarchical classification of its elements. In this paper we present a stochastic extension of the hierarchical classes model for two-way two-mode binary data. In line with the original…

  19. 76 FR 33402 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Renewal of Temporary Exemption from the Advanced Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Renewal of... Part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc., has petitioned the agency for renewal of a temporary exemption from... procedures in 49 CFR Part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc., (Tesla) has submitted a petition asking the agency...

  20. Wireless Emergency Alerts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Main Content Frequently Asked Questions: Wireless Emergency Alerts This section contains answers to a list of frequently asked questions about Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs). Why are Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) important ...

  1. Wireless Cybersecurity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    circularly symmetric. We have investigated extensions to arbitrary Quadrature Amplitude Modulation ( QAM ) scheme. Notice that QPSK is a very special case...of QAM in that all constellation points are evenly distributed on a scaled unit circle whereas general QAM modulations do not have the constant modulo...operations in which secured wireless networks play an indispensable role. This project led to one PhD dissertation, one pending patent application , two

  2. A 10 tesla table-top controlled waveform magnet.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Aditya N; Venkataraman, V

    2012-04-01

    Controlled waveform magnets (CWMs) are a class of pulsed magnets whose pulse shape with time can be programmed by the user. With a CWM, the user gains control not only over the magnitude of the field but also over its rate of change. In this work we present a table-top CWM, driven by a capacitor bank, capable of producing virtually any user-shaped magnetic field waveform up to 10 tesla. Insulated gate bipolar transistor chips have been paralleled to form the high current switch and paralleled chips of SiC Schottky diodes form the crowbar diode module. Sample controlled waveforms including flat-tops up to 10 tesla and some triangular magnetic field pulses have been successfully generated for 10-20 ms with a ripple <1%.

  3. RHQT Nb3Al 15-Tesla magnet design study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Feasibility study of 15-Tesla dipole magnets wound with a new copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable is presented. A new practical long copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is presented, which is being developed and manufactured at the National Institute of Material Science (NIMS) in Japan. It has achieved a non-copper J{sub c} of 1000A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, with a copper over non-copper ratio of 1.04, and a filament size less than 50 microns. For this design study a short Rutherford cable with 28 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1 mm diameter will be fabricated late this year. The cosine theta magnet cross section is designed using ROXIE, and the stress and strain in the coil is estimated and studied with the characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. The advantages and disadvantages of the Nb{sub 3}Al cable are compared with the prevailing Nb{sub 3}Sn cable from the point of view of stress-strain, J{sub c}, and possible degradation of stabilizer due to cabling. The Nb{sub 3}Al coil of the magnet, which will be made by wind and react method, has to be heat treated at 800 degree C for 10 hours. As preparation for the 15 Tesla magnet, a series of tests on strand and Rutherford cables are considered.

  4. Connected Dominating Set Based Topology Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are now widely used for monitoring and controlling of systems where human intervention is not desirable or possible. Connected Dominating Sets (CDSs) based topology control in WSNs is one kind of hierarchical method to ensure sufficient coverage while reducing redundant connections in a relatively crowded network.…

  5. Comments on the New Tesla Electromagnetics. Part I. Discrepancies in Present EM Theory,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    new "superrelativity" to describe the expanded electromagnetic reality uncovered by Nikola Tesla . (14) "Charge" is assumed to be quantized, in addition...California, 94030, 1980. The present electromagnetics is just a special case of a much more fundamental electromagnetics discovered by Nikola Tesla , just...AD-RI27 574 COMMENTS ON THE NEW TESLA ELECTROMAGNET ICS PART I L/i DISCREPANCIES IN PRESENT EM THEORY(U) BEARDEN (THOMAS E) HUNTSVILLE AL T E BEARDEN

  6. Ultrametric Hierarchical Clustering Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Glenn W.

    1979-01-01

    Johnson has shown that the single linkage and complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms induce a metric on the data known as the ultrametric. Johnson's proof is extended to four other common clustering algorithms. Two additional methods also produce hierarchical structures which can violate the ultrametric inequality. (Author/CTM)

  7. Mobility management techniques for the next-generation wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junzhao; Howie, Douglas P.; Sauvola, Jaakko J.

    2001-10-01

    The tremendous demands from social market are pushing the booming development of mobile communications faster than ever before, leading to plenty of new advanced techniques emerging. With the converging of mobile and wireless communications with Internet services, the boundary between mobile personal telecommunications and wireless computer networks is disappearing. Wireless networks of the next generation need the support of all the advances on new architectures, standards, and protocols. Mobility management is an important issue in the area of mobile communications, which can be best solved at the network layer. One of the key features of the next generation wireless networks is all-IP infrastructure. This paper discusses the mobility management schemes for the next generation mobile networks through extending IP's functions with mobility support. A global hierarchical framework model for the mobility management of wireless networks is presented, in which the mobility management is divided into two complementary tasks: macro mobility and micro mobility. As the macro mobility solution, a basic principle of Mobile IP is introduced, together with the optimal schemes and the advances in IPv6. The disadvantages of the Mobile IP on solving the micro mobility problem are analyzed, on the basis of which three main proposals are discussed as the micro mobility solutions for mobile communications, including Hierarchical Mobile IP (HMIP), Cellular IP, and Handoff-Aware Wireless Access Internet Infrastructure (HAWAII). A unified model is also described in which the different micro mobility solutions can coexist simultaneously in mobile networks.

  8. Automated hippocampal subfield segmentation at 7 tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wisse, Laura E.M.; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Honingh, Anita M.; Wang, Hongzhi; Pluta, John B.; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Wolk, David A.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate an automated technique to segment hippocampal subfields and the entorhinal cortex (ERC) at 7 tesla MRI. Materials and Methods Cornu Ammonis (CA)1, CA2, CA3, dentate gyrus (DG), subiculum (SUB) and ERC were manually segmented, covering most of the long axis of the hippocampus, on 0.70 mm3 T2-weighted 7 tesla images of twenty-six participants (59±9 years, 46% men). The Automated Segmentation of Hippocampal Subfields (ASHS) approach was applied and evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results Comparison of automated segmentations with corresponding manual segmentation yielded a Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of >0.75 for CA1, DG, SUB and ERC; and >0.54 for CA2 and CA3. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were >0.74 for CA1, DG and SUB; and >0.43 for CA2, CA3 and the ERC. Restricting the comparison of the ERC segmentation to a smaller range along the anterior-posterior axis improved both ICCs (left: 0.71; right: 0.82) and DSCs (left: 0.78; right: 0.77). The accuracy of ASHS vs a manual rater was lower, though only slightly for most subfields, than the intra-rater reliability of an expert manual rater, but was similar or slightly higher than the accuracy of an expert vs. a manual rater with ~170h of training for almost all subfields. Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a computational technique to automatically label hippocampal subfields and the ERC at 7 tesla MRI, with a high accuracy for most subfields that is competitive with the labor intensive manual segmentation. The software and atlas are publicly available: http://www.nitrc.org/projects/ashs/. PMID:26846925

  9. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  10. A wireless sensor enabled by wireless power.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hong; Lin, Chii-Ruey

    2012-11-22

    Through harvesting energy by wireless charging and delivering data by wireless communication, this study proposes the concept of a wireless sensor enabled by wireless power (WPWS) and reports the fabrication of a prototype for functional tests. One WPWS node consists of wireless power module and sensor module with different chip-type sensors. Its main feature is the dual antenna structure. Following RFID system architecture, a power harvesting antenna was designed to gather power from a standard reader working in the 915 MHz band. Referring to the Modbus protocol, the other wireless communication antenna was integrated on a node to send sensor data in parallel. The dual antenna structure integrates both the advantages of an RFID system and a wireless sensor. Using a standard UHF RFID reader, WPWS can be enabled in a distributed area with a diameter up to 4 m. Working status is similar to that of a passive tag, except that a tag can only be queried statically, while the WPWS can send dynamic data from the sensors. The function is the same as a wireless sensor node. Different WPWSs equipped with temperature and humidity, optical and airflow velocity sensors are tested in this study. All sensors can send back detection data within 8 s. The accuracy is within 8% deviation compared with laboratory equipment. A wireless sensor network enabled by wireless power should be a totally wireless sensor network using WPWS. However, distributed WPWSs only can form a star topology, the simplest topology for constructing a sensor network. Because of shielding effects, it is difficult to apply other complex topologies. Despite this limitation, WPWS still can be used to extend sensor network applications in hazardous environments. Further research is needed to improve WPWS to realize a totally wireless sensor network.

  11. A Wireless Sensor Enabled by Wireless Power

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Da-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hong; Lin, Chii-Ruey

    2012-01-01

    Through harvesting energy by wireless charging and delivering data by wireless communication, this study proposes the concept of a wireless sensor enabled by wireless power (WPWS) and reports the fabrication of a prototype for functional tests. One WPWS node consists of wireless power module and sensor module with different chip-type sensors. Its main feature is the dual antenna structure. Following RFID system architecture, a power harvesting antenna was designed to gather power from a standard reader working in the 915 MHz band. Referring to the Modbus protocol, the other wireless communication antenna was integrated on a node to send sensor data in parallel. The dual antenna structure integrates both the advantages of an RFID system and a wireless sensor. Using a standard UHF RFID reader, WPWS can be enabled in a distributed area with a diameter up to 4 m. Working status is similar to that of a passive tag, except that a tag can only be queried statically, while the WPWS can send dynamic data from the sensors. The function is the same as a wireless sensor node. Different WPWSs equipped with temperature and humidity, optical and airflow velocity sensors are tested in this study. All sensors can send back detection data within 8 s. The accuracy is within 8% deviation compared with laboratory equipment. A wireless sensor network enabled by wireless power should be a totally wireless sensor network using WPWS. However, distributed WPWSs only can form a star topology, the simplest topology for constructing a sensor network. Because of shielding effects, it is difficult to apply other complex topologies. Despite this limitation, WPWS still can be used to extend sensor network applications in hazardous environments. Further research is needed to improve WPWS to realize a totally wireless sensor network. PMID:23443370

  12. 77 FR 22383 - Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; TESLA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor... full the petition of Tesla Motors Inc's. (Tesla) for an exemption of the Model S vehicle line in... is likely to be as effective in reducing and deterring motor vehicle theft as compliance with...

  13. Coaxial Coupling Scheme for TESLA/ILC-type Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports about our efforts to develop a flangeable coaxial coupler for both HOM and fundamental coupling for 9-cell TESLA/ILC-type cavities. The cavities were designed in early 90‘s for pulsed operation with a low duty factor, less than 1 %. The proposed design of the coupler has been done in a way, that the magnetic flux B at the flange connection is minimized and only a field of <5 mT would be present at the accelerating field Eacc of ~ 36 MV/m (B =150 mT in the cavity). Even though we achieved reasonably high Q-values at low field, the cavity/coupler combination was limited in the cw mode to only ~ 7 MV/m, where a thermally initiated degradation occurred. We have improved the cooling conditions by initially drilling radial channels every 30 degrees, then every 15 degrees into the shorting plate. The modified prototype performed well up to 9 MV/m in cw mode. This paper reports about our experiences with the further modified coaxial coupler and about test results in cw and low duty cycle pulsed mode, similar to the TESLA/ILC operation conditions.

  14. Hierarchical Auxetic Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatt, Ruben; Mizzi, Luke; Azzopardi, Joseph I.; Azzopardi, Keith M.; Attard, Daphne; Casha, Aaron; Briffa, Joseph; Grima, Joseph N.

    2015-02-01

    Auxetic mechanical metamaterials are engineered systems that exhibit the unusual macroscopic property of a negative Poisson's ratio due to sub-unit structure rather than chemical composition. Although their unique behaviour makes them superior to conventional materials in many practical applications, they are limited in availability. Here, we propose a new class of hierarchical auxetics based on the rotating rigid units mechanism. These systems retain the enhanced properties from having a negative Poisson's ratio with the added benefits of being a hierarchical system. Using simulations on typical hierarchical multi-level rotating squares, we show that, through design, one can control the extent of auxeticity, degree of aperture and size of the different pores in the system. This makes the system more versatile than similar non-hierarchical ones, making them promising candidates for industrial and biomedical applications, such as stents and skin grafts.

  15. Hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brandon M.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is a powerful technique for estimating the posterior distribution of a model’s parameters. It is especially important when the model to be fit has no explicit likelihood function, which happens for computational (or simulation-based) models such as those that are popular in cognitive neuroscience and other areas in psychology. However, ABC is usually applied only to models with few parameters. Extending ABC to hierarchical models has been difficult because high-dimensional hierarchical models add computational complexity that conventional ABC cannot accommodate. In this paper we summarize some current approaches for performing hierarchical ABC and introduce a new algorithm called Gibbs ABC. This new algorithm incorporates well-known Bayesian techniques to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the ABC approach for estimation of hierarchical models. We then use the Gibbs ABC algorithm to estimate the parameters of two models of signal detection, one with and one without a tractable likelihood function. PMID:24297436

  16. Perception and Hierarchical Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kiebel, Stefan J.; Daunizeau, Jean; Friston, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we suggest that perception could be modeled by assuming that sensory input is generated by a hierarchy of attractors in a dynamic system. We describe a mathematical model which exploits the temporal structure of rapid sensory dynamics to track the slower trajectories of their underlying causes. This model establishes a proof of concept that slowly changing neuronal states can encode the trajectories of faster sensory signals. We link this hierarchical account to recent developments in the perception of human action; in particular artificial speech recognition. We argue that these hierarchical models of dynamical systems are a plausible starting point to develop robust recognition schemes, because they capture critical temporal dependencies induced by deep hierarchical structure. We conclude by suggesting that a fruitful computational neuroscience approach may emerge from modeling perception as non-autonomous recognition dynamics enslaved by autonomous hierarchical dynamics in the sensorium. PMID:19649171

  17. Hierarchical Auxetic Mechanical Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gatt, Ruben; Mizzi, Luke; Azzopardi, Joseph I.; Azzopardi, Keith M.; Attard, Daphne; Casha, Aaron; Briffa, Joseph; Grima, Joseph N.

    2015-01-01

    Auxetic mechanical metamaterials are engineered systems that exhibit the unusual macroscopic property of a negative Poisson's ratio due to sub-unit structure rather than chemical composition. Although their unique behaviour makes them superior to conventional materials in many practical applications, they are limited in availability. Here, we propose a new class of hierarchical auxetics based on the rotating rigid units mechanism. These systems retain the enhanced properties from having a negative Poisson's ratio with the added benefits of being a hierarchical system. Using simulations on typical hierarchical multi-level rotating squares, we show that, through design, one can control the extent of auxeticity, degree of aperture and size of the different pores in the system. This makes the system more versatile than similar non-hierarchical ones, making them promising candidates for industrial and biomedical applications, such as stents and skin grafts. PMID:25670400

  18. Hierarchical auxetic mechanical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Gatt, Ruben; Mizzi, Luke; Azzopardi, Joseph I; Azzopardi, Keith M; Attard, Daphne; Casha, Aaron; Briffa, Joseph; Grima, Joseph N

    2015-02-11

    Auxetic mechanical metamaterials are engineered systems that exhibit the unusual macroscopic property of a negative Poisson's ratio due to sub-unit structure rather than chemical composition. Although their unique behaviour makes them superior to conventional materials in many practical applications, they are limited in availability. Here, we propose a new class of hierarchical auxetics based on the rotating rigid units mechanism. These systems retain the enhanced properties from having a negative Poisson's ratio with the added benefits of being a hierarchical system. Using simulations on typical hierarchical multi-level rotating squares, we show that, through design, one can control the extent of auxeticity, degree of aperture and size of the different pores in the system. This makes the system more versatile than similar non-hierarchical ones, making them promising candidates for industrial and biomedical applications, such as stents and skin grafts.

  19. 76 FR 60118 - Tesla Motors, Inc. Grant of Petition for Renewal of a Temporary Exemption From the Advanced Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Tesla Motors, Inc. Grant of Petition for Renewal of a... (FMVSS) No. 208, Occupant Crash Protection. SUMMARY: This notice grants the petition of Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla) for the renewal of a temporary exemption of its Roadster model from the advanced air...

  20. Adaptive hierarchical fuzzy controller

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, G.V.S.; Jun Zhou

    1993-07-01

    A methodology for designing adaptive hierarchical fuzzy controllers is presented. In order to evaluate this concept, several suitable performance indices were developed and converted to linguistic fuzzy variables. Based on those variables, a supervisory fuzzy rule set was constructed and used to change the parameters of a hierarchical fuzzy controller to accommodate the variations of system parameters. The proposed algorithm was used in feedwater flow control to a steam generator. Simulation studies are presented that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach

  1. Community Wireless Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feld, Harold

    2005-01-01

    With increasing frequency, communities are seeing the arrival of a new class of noncommercial broadband providers: community wireless networks (CWNs). Utilizing the same wireless technologies that many colleges and universities have used to create wireless networks on campus, CWNs are creating broadband access for free or at costs well below…

  2. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  3. Scalable Video Transcaling for the Wireless Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, Hayder; van der Schaar, Mihaela; Karande, Shirish

    2004-12-01

    The rapid and unprecedented increase in the heterogeneity of multimedia networks and devices emphasizes the need for scalable and adaptive video solutions both for coding and transmission purposes. However, in general, there is an inherent trade-off between the level of scalability and the quality of scalable video streams. In other words, the higher the bandwidth variation, the lower the overall video quality of the scalable stream that is needed to support the desired bandwidth range. In this paper, we introduce the notion of wireless video transcaling (TS), which is a generalization of (nonscalable) transcoding. With TS, a scalable video stream, that covers a given bandwidth range, is mapped into one or more scalable video streams covering different bandwidth ranges. Our proposed TS framework exploits the fact that the level of heterogeneity changes at different points of the video distribution tree over wireless and mobile Internet networks. This provides the opportunity to improve the video quality by performing the appropriate TS process. We argue that an Internet/wireless network gateway represents a good candidate for performing TS. Moreover, we describe hierarchical TS (HTS), which provides a "transcaler" with the option of choosing among different levels of TS processes with different complexities. We illustrate the benefits of TS by considering the recently developed MPEG-4 fine granularity scalability (FGS) video coding. Extensive simulation results of video TS over bit rate ranges supported by emerging wireless LANs are presented.

  4. The NHMFL 60 tesla, 100 millisecond pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.; Sims, J.R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.

    1992-11-09

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving. This report will discuss specifications and parameters of this magnet.

  5. Report on the TESLA engineering study/review

    SciTech Connect

    C. Boffo et al.

    2002-07-18

    A team from Argonne National Lab, Cornell, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and SLAC has studied the TESLA TDR and its associated cost and manpower estimates, concentrating on the five largest cost sub-systems (Main Linac Modules, Main Linac RF Systems, Civil Engineering, Machine Infrastructure, and XFEL Incremental). These elements were concerned mainly with providing energy reach. We did not study the lower cost, but still technically challenging elements providing luminosity and physics capability, namely damping rings, beam delivery system, beam injection system, positron production, polarized beams, etc. The study did not attempt to validate the TDR cost estimates, but rather its purpose was to understand the technology and status of the large cost items, and the methodology by which their estimated cost was determined. In addition, topics of project oversight were studied.

  6. Note on the SC Linear Collider TESLA Cavity Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekutowicz, J.; Proch, D.; Tang, C.

    1997-05-01

    The experience we have gained over the last few years from experiments with superconducting cavities for the TESLA test facility justifies a revision of the design decided almost five years ago. The proposed new design takes advantage of the high quality factor Q0 > 10^10 and the low electron emission as demonstrated by some tested cavities. The main aim of the new design is to simplify the production and preparation of sc cavities and thus to reduce the cost of the linear collider. The new cavity shape has an enlarged iris diameter with the following advantages: significant lower loss factors, simplified and less expensive scheme for the HOM damping, suitability of hydroforming and higher stability of the field profile.

  7. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Sui Seng; DiGialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength. PMID:27597137

  8. Operating nanoliter scale NMR microcoils in a 1 tesla field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Andrew F.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2007-09-01

    Microcoil probes enclosing sample volumes of 1.2, 3.3, 7.0, and 81 nanoliters are constructed as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detectors for operation in a 1 tesla permanent magnet. The probes for the three smallest volumes utilize a novel auxiliary tuning inductor for which the design criteria are given. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and line width of water samples are measured. Based on the measured DC resistance of the microcoils, together with the calculated radio frequency (RF) resistance of the tuning inductor, the SNR is calculated and shown to agree with the measured values. The details of the calculations indicate that the auxiliary inductor does not degrade the NMR probe performance. The diameter of the wire used to construct the microcoils is shown to affect the signal line widths.

  9. MRI at 7 Tesla and above: demonstrated and potential capabilities.

    PubMed

    Kraff, Oliver; Fischer, Anja; Nagel, Armin M; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Ladd, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    With more than 40 installed MR systems worldwide operating at 7 Tesla or higher, ultra-high-field (UHF) imaging has been established as a platform for clinically oriented research in recent years. Along with technical developments that, in part, have also been successfully transferred to lower field strengths, MR imaging and spectroscopy at UHF have demonstrated capabilities and potentials for clinical diagnostics in a variety of studies. In terms of applications, this overview article focuses on already achieved advantages for in vivo imaging, i.e., in imaging the brain and joints of the musculoskeletal system, but also considers developments in body imaging, which is particularly challenging. Furthermore, new applications for clinical diagnostics such as X-nuclei imaging and spectroscopy, which only really become feasible at ultra-high magnetic fields, will be presented.

  10. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Sui Seng; Digialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength.

  11. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid neon cooled magnet was designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors, tensile shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives, and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will consist of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  12. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC beam collimation performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I Drozhdin et al.

    2003-03-27

    This note describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible. The post-TRC plans of the Collimation Task Force are briefly outlined in closing.

  13. A Single Crystal Niobium RF Cavity of the TESLA Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Kneisel, P.

    2007-08-09

    A fabrication method for single crystal niobium cavities of the TESLA shape was proposed on the basis of metallographic investigations and electron beam welding tests on niobium single crystals. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. An appropriate annealing allows the outgassing of hydrogen and stress relaxation of the material without destruction of the single crystal. A prototype single crystal single cell cavity was build. An accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m was reached after approximately 110 {mu}m of Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) and in situ baking at 120 deg. C for 6 hrs with a quality factor exceeding 2x1010 at 1.8 K. The developed fabrication method can be extended to fabrication of multi cell cavities.

  14. A Single Crystal Niobium RF Cavity of the TESLA Shape

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; X. Singer; P. Kneisel

    2007-09-01

    A fabrication method for single crystal niobium cavities of the TESLA shape was proposed on the basis of metallographic investigations and electron beam welding tests on niobium single crystals. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. An appropriate annealing allows the outgassing of hydrogen and stress relaxation of the material without destruction of the single crystal. A prototype single crystal single cell cavity was built. An accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m was reached after approximately 110 mu-m of Buffered Chanical Polishing (BCP) and in situ baking at 120°C for 6 hrs with a quality factor exceeding 2x1010 at 1.8 K. The developed fabrication method can be extended to fabrication of multi cell cavities.

  15. A hierarchical artificial retina architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Alice C.; Azar, Adi N.

    2009-05-01

    Connectivity in the human retina is complex. Over one hundred million photoreceptors transduce light into electrical signals. These electrical signals are sent to the ganglion cells through amacrine and bipolar cells. Lateral connections involving horizontal and amacrine cells span throughout the outer plexiform layer and inner plexiform layer respectively. Horizontal cells are important for photoreceptor regulation by depolarizing them after an illumination occurs. Horizontal cells themselves form an electrical network that communicates by gap junctions, and these cells exhibit plasticity (change in behavior and structure) with respect to glycine receptors. The bipolar and amacrine cells transfer electrical signals from photoreceptors to the ganglion cells. Furthermore, amacrine cells are responsible for further processing the retinal image. Finally, the ganglion cells receive electrical signals from the bipolar and amacrine cells and will spike at a faster rate if there is a change in the overall intensity for a group of photoreceptors, sending a signal to the brain. Dramatic progress is being made with respect to retinal prostheses, raising hope for an entire synthetic retina in the future. We propose a bio-inspired 3D hierarchical pyramidal architecture for a synthetic retina that mimics the overall structure of the human retina. We chose to use a 3D architecture to facilitate connectivity among retinal cells, maintaining a hierarchical structure similar to that of the biological retina. The first layer of the architecture contains electronic circuits that model photoreceptors and horizontal cells. The second layer contains amacrine and bipolar electronic cells, and the third layer contains ganglion cells. Layer I has the highest number of cells, and layer III has the lowest number of cells, resulting in a pyramidal architecture. In our proposed architecture we intend to use photodetectors to transduce light into electrical signals. We propose to employ

  16. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  17. Energy Aware Clustering Algorithms for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhshan, Noushin; Rafsanjani, Marjan Kuchaki; Liu, Chenglian

    2011-09-01

    The sensor nodes deployed in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are extremely power constrained, so maximizing the lifetime of the entire networks is mainly considered in the design. In wireless sensor networks, hierarchical network structures have the advantage of providing scalable and energy efficient solutions. In this paper, we investigate different clustering algorithms for WSNs and also compare these clustering algorithms based on metrics such as clustering distribution, cluster's load balancing, Cluster Head's (CH) selection strategy, CH's role rotation, node mobility, clusters overlapping, intra-cluster communications, reliability, security and location awareness.

  18. Design, performance and production of the Fermilab TESLA RF input couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, M.

    1996-10-01

    The TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) requires as one of its technical components a radiofrequency (rf) input coupler that transfers 1.3 GHz rf energy from the rf distribution system to a nine-cell superconducting accelerating cavity operating at a temperature of 1.8 K. The input coupler design is driven by numerous design criteria, which result in a rather complicated implementation. The production of twelve input couplers for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is underway at Fermilab, with the first two couplers having been delivered late in 1995. This paper discusses the Fermilab TESLA rf input coupler design, recent test results, and production issues.

  19. Hierarchical Porous Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, Christopher John

    2016-06-07

    Materials Design is often at the forefront of technological innovation. While there has always been a push to generate increasingly low density materials, such as aero or hydrogels, more recently the idea of bicontinuous structures has gone more into play. This review will cover some of the methods and applications for generating both porous, and hierarchically porous structures.

  20. Microparticles with hierarchical porosity

    DOEpatents

    Petsev, Dimiter N; Atanassov, Plamen; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Carroll, Nick; Olson, Tim

    2012-12-18

    The present disclosure provides oxide microparticles with engineered hierarchical porosity and methods of manufacturing the same. Also described are structures that are formed by templating, impregnating, and/or precipitating the oxide microparticles and method for forming the same. Suitable applications include catalysts, electrocatalysts, electrocatalysts support materials, capacitors, drug delivery systems, sensors and chromatography.

  1. Wireless Mesh Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmael, Johnathan; Race, Nicholas

    Wireless Mesh Networks have emerged as an important technology in building next-generation networks. They are seen to have a range of benefits over traditional wired and wireless networks including low deployment costs, high scalability and resiliency to faults. Moreover, Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) are often described as being autonomic with self-* (healing and configuration) properties and their popularity has grown both as a research platform and as a commercially exploitable technology.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF THE TRANSVERSE BEAM DYNAMICS IN A TESLA-TYPE SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Eddy, N.; Edstrom, D.; Lunin, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.; Solyak, N.

    2016-09-26

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, ultra-stable, high-quality electron beams that have widespread applications in Science and Industry. Many project are based on the 1.3-GHz TESLA-type superconducting cavity. In this paper we provide an update on a recent experiment aimed at measuring the transfer matrix of a TESLA cavity at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The results are discussed and compared with analytical and numerical simulations.

  3. Beamstrahlung Photon Load on the TESLA Extraction Septum Blade(LCC-0104)

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A

    2003-10-02

    This note describes work performed in the framework of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee [1] to estimate the power load on the TESLA extraction septum blade due to beamstrahlung photons. It is shown, that under realistic conditions the photon load can be several orders of magnitude higher than what was estimated in the TESLA TDR [2] for the ideal Gaussian beams, potentially representing a serious limitation of the current design.

  4. Dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Kelle, S; Hamdan, A; Schnackenburg, B; Köhler, U; Klein, C; Nagel, E; Fleck, E

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The assessment of inducible wall motion abnormalities during high-dose dobutamine-stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DCMR) is well established for the identification of myocardial ischemia at 1.5 Tesla. Its feasibility at higher field strengths has not been reported. The present study was performed to prospectively determine the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of DCMR at 3 Tesla for depicting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis (≥ 50% diameter stenosis) in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods Thirty consecutive patients (6 women) (66 ± 9.3 years) were scheduled for DCMR between January and May 2007 for detection of coronary artery disease. Patients were examined with a Philips Achieva 3 Tesla system (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands), using a spoiled gradient echo cine sequence. Technical parameters were: spatial resolution 2 × 2 × 8 mm3, 30 heart phases, spoiled gradient echo TR/TE: 4.5/2.6 msec, flip angle 15°. Images were acquired at rest and stress in accordance with a standardized high-dose dobutamine-atropine protocol during short breath-holds in three short and three long-axis views. Dobutamine was administered using a standard protocol (10 μg increments every 3 minutes up to 40 μg dobutamine/kg body weight/minute plus atropine if required to reach target heart rate). The study protocol included administration of 0.1 mmol/kg/body weight Gd-DTPA before the cine images at rest were acquired to improve the image quality. The examination was terminated if new or worsening wall-motion abnormalities or chest pain occurred or when > 85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate was reached. Myocardial ischemia was defined as new onset of wall-motion abnormality in at least one segment. In addition, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was performed. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers. Diagnostic accuracy was determined with coronary angiography as the reference

  5. Wireless security in mobile health.

    PubMed

    Osunmuyiwa, Olufolabi; Ulusoy, Ali Hakan

    2012-12-01

    Mobile health (m-health) is an extremely broad term that embraces mobile communication in the health sector and data packaging. The four broad categories of wireless networks are wireless personal area network, wireless metropolitan area network, wireless wide area network, and wireless local area network. Wireless local area network is the most notable of the wireless networking tools obtainable in the health sector. Transfer of delicate and critical information on radio frequencies should be secure, and the right to use must be meticulous. This article covers the business opportunities in m-health, threats faced by wireless networks in hospitals, and methods of mitigating these threats.

  6. Wireless communication and spectrum sharing for public safety in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kapucu, Naim; Haupt, Brittany; Yuksel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    With the vast number of fragmented, independent public safety wireless communication systems, the United States is encountering major challenges with enhancing interoperability and effectively managing costs while sharing limited availability of critical spectrum. The traditional hierarchical approach of emergency management does not always allow for needed flexibility and is not a mandate. A national system would reduce equipment needs, increase effectiveness, and enrich quality and coordination of response; however, it is dependent on integrating the commercial market. This article discusses components of an ideal national wireless public safety system consists along with key policies in regulating wireless communication and spectrum sharing for public safety and challenges for implementation.

  7. Feasibility Study of a HOM IOT for TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, Petra; Weiland, Thomas; Gamp, Alexander; Lu, Fuhai

    1997-05-01

    For the TESLA linear collider 1.3 GHz RF sources with 10 MW peak power and about 70% efficiency are needed. As an alternative to the development of a Multibeam-Klystron, we investigate the feasibility of an IOT (Inductive Output Tube). This is a very compact RF source: The time structure of the beam is produced by a gated emission cathode and the output cavity is directly adjacent to the anode. Unlike IOTs, conventional klystrons lose some of their design efficiency when they are operated below saturation, because only the RF component of the beam is reduced and not the DC beam current. In contrast to this the cathode current of an IOT is controlled by the drive power. In order to keep the gun voltage low, we investigate a device with a hollow beam where the output cavity is excited in a higher order mode (HOM), as was recently suggested by CPI(E.Lien, H.Bohlen, US Patent Application Serial No. 08/413,034). Computer simulations are carried out with the CAD-system MAFIA. First, an existing Klystrode TM IOT built by CPI is analysed. Simulation results will be shown and compared to experimental data. Based upon this experience, a design strategy is discussed for the HOM IOT.

  8. Cascading Tesla Oscillating Flow Diode for Stirling Engine Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger

    2012-01-01

    Replacing the mechanical check-valve in a Stirling engine with a micromachined, non-moving-part flow diode eliminates moving parts and reduces the risk of microparticle clogging. At very small scales, helium gas has sufficient mass momentum that it can act as a flow controller in a similar way as a transistor can redirect electrical signals with a smaller bias signal. The innovation here forces helium gas to flow in predominantly one direction by offering a clear, straight-path microchannel in one direction of flow, but then through a sophisticated geometry, the reversed flow is forced through a tortuous path. This redirection is achieved by using microfluid channel flow to force the much larger main flow into this tortuous path. While microdiodes have been developed in the past, this innovation cascades Tesla diodes to create a much higher pressure in the gas bearing supply plenum. In addition, the special shape of the leaves captures loose particles that would otherwise clog the microchannel of the gas bearing pads.

  9. A passively suspended Tesla pump left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Izraelev, Valentin; Weiss, William J; Fritz, Bryan; Newswanger, Raymond K; Paterson, Eric G; Snyder, Alan; Medvitz, Richard B; Cysyk, Joshua; Pae, Walter E; Hicks, Dennis; Lukic, Branka; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2009-01-01

    The design and initial test results of a new passively suspended Tesla type left ventricular assist device blood pump are described. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used in the design of the pump. Overall size of the prototype device is 50 mm in diameter and 75 mm in length. The pump rotor has a density lower than that of blood and when spinning inside the stator in blood it creates a buoyant centering force that suspends the rotor in the radial direction. The axial magnetic force between the rotor and stator restrain the rotor in the axial direction. The pump is capable of pumping up to 10 L/min at a 70 mm Hg head rise at 8,000 revolutions per minute (RPM). The pump has demonstrated a normalized index of hemolysis level below 0.02 mg/dL for flows between 2 and 9.7 L/min. An inlet pressure sensor has also been incorporated into the inlet cannula wall and will be used for control purposes. One initial in vivo study showed an encouraging result. Further CFD modeling refinements are planned and endurance testing of the device.

  10. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-neon-cooled magnet has been designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. Its feasibility was established by a previously reported parametric study. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors; tensile-shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives; and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will be made of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll-bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock-up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  11. A Passively-Suspended Tesla Pump Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Izraelev, Valentin; Weiss, William J.; Fritz, Bryan; Newswanger, Raymond K.; Paterson, Eric G.; Snyder, Alan; Medvitz, Richard B.; Cysyk, Joshua; Pae, Walter E.; Hicks, Dennis; Lukic, Branka; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2009-01-01

    The design and initial test results of a new passively suspended Tesla type LAVD blood pump are described. CFD analysis was used in the design of the pump. Overall size of the prototype device is 50 mm in diameter and 75 mm in length. The pump rotor has a density lower than that of blood and when spinning inside the stator in blood it creates a buoyant centering force that suspends the rotor in the radial direction. The axial magnetic force between the rotor and stator restrain the rotor in the axial direction. The pump is capable of pumping up to 10 liters/min at a 70 mmHg head rise at 8000 RPM. The pump has demonstrated a normalized index of hemolysis level below .02 mg/dL for flows between 2 and 9.7 L/min. An inlet pressure sensor has also been incorporated into the inlet cannula wall and will be used for control purposes. One initial in vivo study showed an encouraging result. Further CFD modeling refinements are planned as well as endurance testing of the device. PMID:19770799

  12. Hierarchical manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Kanwal K; Rao, Anil; Price, Anthony N; Wolz, Robin; Hajnal, Jo; Rueckert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method of hierarchical manifold learning which aims to automatically discover regional variations within images. This involves constructing manifolds in a hierarchy of image patches of increasing granularity, while ensuring consistency between hierarchy levels. We demonstrate its utility in two very different settings: (1) to learn the regional correlations in motion within a sequence of time-resolved images of the thoracic cavity; (2) to find discriminative regions of 3D brain images in the classification of neurodegenerative disease,

  13. Hierarchical Pattern Classifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Gigi L.; Eberlein, Susan J.

    1992-01-01

    Hierarchical pattern classifier reduces number of comparisons between input and memory vectors without reducing detail of final classification by dividing classification process into coarse-to-fine hierarchy that comprises first "grouping" step and second classification step. Three-layer neural network reduces computation further by reducing number of vector dimensions in processing. Concept applicable to pattern-classification problems with need to reduce amount of computation necessary to classify, identify, or match patterns to desired degree of resolution.

  14. Debate: Wired versus Wireless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Glenn; Nair, Prakash

    2000-01-01

    Debates the issue of investing in wiring schools for desktop computer networks versus using laptops and wireless networks. Included are cost considerations and the value of technology for learning. Suggestions include using wireless networks for existing schools, hardwiring computers for new construction, and not using computers for elementary…

  15. Warming Up to Wireless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    In districts big and small across the U.S., students, teachers, and administrators alike have come to appreciate the benefits of wireless technology. Because the technology delivers Internet signals on airborne radio frequencies, wireless networking allows users of all portable devices to move freely on a school's campus and stay connected to the…

  16. HDS: Hierarchical Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Dave; Walter, Anton; Lupton, W. F.; Warren-Smith, Rodney F.; Lawden, Mike; McIlwrath, Brian; Peden, J. C. M.; Jenness, Tim; Draper, Peter W.

    2015-02-01

    The Hierarchical Data System (HDS) is a file-based hierarchical data system designed for the storage of a wide variety of information. It is particularly suited to the storage of large multi-dimensional arrays (with their ancillary data) where efficient access is needed. It is a key component of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012) and is used by the Starlink N-Dimensional Data Format (NDF) library (ascl:1411.023). HDS organizes data into hierarchies, broadly similar to the directory structure of a hierarchical filing system, but contained within a single HDS container file. The structures stored in these files are self-describing and flexible; HDS supports modification and extension of structures previously created, as well as functions such as deletion, copying, and renaming. All information stored in HDS files is portable between the machines on which HDS is implemented. Thus, there are no format conversion problems when moving between machines. HDS can write files in a private binary format (version 4), or be layered on top of HDF5 (version 5).

  17. Wireless communication with chaos.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hai-Peng; Baptista, Murilo S; Grebogi, Celso

    2013-05-03

    The modern world fully relies on wireless communication. Because of intrinsic physical constraints of the wireless physical media (multipath, damping, and filtering), signals carrying information are strongly modified, preventing information from being transmitted with a high bit rate. We show that, though a chaotic signal is strongly modified by the wireless physical media, its Lyapunov exponents remain unaltered, suggesting that the information transmitted is not modified by the channel. For some particular chaotic signals, we have indeed proved that the dynamic description of both the transmitted and the received signals is identical and shown that the capacity of the chaos-based wireless channel is unaffected by the multipath propagation of the physical media. These physical properties of chaotic signals warrant an effective chaos-based wireless communication system.

  18. Multimedia wireless networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajeev; Alwan, Abeer; Gerla, Mario; Kleinrock, Leonard; Villasenor, John D.; Belzer, Ben; Boring, Walter; Molloy, Stephen; Nazareth, Sean; Siqueira, Marcio; Short, Joel; Tsai, Jack

    1996-03-01

    Current wireless network systems (e.g. metropolitan cellular) are constrained by fixed bandwidth allocations and support only a narrow range of services (voice and low bit-rate data). To overcome these constraints and advance the state of the art in wireless multimedia communications, we are developing variable-rate video and speech compression algorithms, and wireless node architectures that will enable peer-to-peer multimedia networking even with very low bandwidth. To support this objective, each wireless node must support new applications (for multimedia), advances in networking and source coding to support multimedia under limited bandwidth conditions (wireless), advances in physical layer design to support robust, low power, high packet throughput links, low power DSP for multimedia compression, and an architectural strategy to integrate these components into an efficient node. The algorithms and architectures to support this functionality are presented here, together with some preliminary results on network performance.

  19. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    PubMed

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  20. The pioneers of interplanetary communication: From Gauss to Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin-Cerceau, Florence

    2010-12-01

    The present overview covers the period from 1820 to the beginning of the 20th century. Emphasis is laid on the latter half of the 19th century because many efforts have been done at that time to elaborate schemes for contacting our neighboring planets by interplanetary telegraphy. This period knew many advances not only in planetary studies but also in the nascent field of telecommunications. Such a context led astronomers who were also interested in the problem of planetary habitability, to envisage that other planets could be contacted, especially the planet Mars. Interplanetary communication using a celestial telegraphy was planned during this period of great speculations about life on Mars. This paper focuses on four authors: the Frenchmen C. Flammarion, Ch. Cros, A. Mercier and the Serbian N. Tesla, who formulated early proposals to communicate with Mars or Venus. The first proposals (which remained only theoretical) showed that an initial reflection had started as early as the second part of the 19th century on the type of language that could be both universal and distinguishable from a natural signal. Literary history of interplanetary communication preceded by far the scientific one. Authors of the 1900s were very prolific on this topic. French fictions are mentioned in this paper as examples of such a literature. This incursion into selected texts stresses the fact that the problem of techniques and messages employed to communicate with other planets goes beyond the strict scientific framework. Finally, this paper aims to highlight the similarities as well as the differences between the different proposals and to underline what that could possibly help present SETI research to define messages supposed to be sent to other planetary systems.

  1. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-11-23

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications.

  2. Diagnostic usefulness of 3 tesla MRI of the brain for cushing disease in a child.

    PubMed

    Ono, Erina; Ozawa, Ayako; Matoba, Kaori; Motoki, Takanori; Tajima, Asako; Miyata, Ichiro; Ito, Junko; Inoshita, Naoko; Yamada, Syozo; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    It is sometimes difficult to confirm the location of a microadenoma in Cushing disease. Recently, we experienced an 11-yr-old female case of Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. She was referred to our hospital because of decrease of height velocity with body weight gain. On admission, she had typical symptoms of Cushing syndrome. Although no pituitary microadenomas were detected on 1.5 Tesla MRI of the brain, endocrinological examinations including IPS and CS sampling were consistent with Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. Oral administration of methyrapone instead of neurosurgery was started after discharge, but subsequent 3 Tesla MRI of the brain clearly demonstrated a 3-mm less-enhanced lesion in the left side of the pituitary gland. Finally, transsphenoidal surgery was performed, and a 3.5-mm left-sided microadenoma was resected. Compared with 1.5 Tesla MRI, 3 Tesla MRI offers the advantage of a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR), which provides higher resolution and proper image quality. Therefore, 3 Tesla MRI is a very useful tool to localize microadenomas in Cushing disease in children as well as in adults. It will be the first choice of radiological examinations in suspected cases of Cushing disease.

  3. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing

    PubMed Central

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-01-01

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:27886051

  4. Wireless nanosensor network system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyukjun; Kegley, Lauren; Yoon, Hargsoon; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2009-03-01

    Many types of wireless modules are being developed to enhance wireless performance with low power consumption, compact size, high data rates, and wide range coverage. However trade-offs must be taken into consideration in order to satisfy all aspects of wireless performance. For example, in order to increase the data rate and wide range coverage, power consumption should be sacrificed. To overcome these drawbacks, the paper presents a wireless client module which offers low power consumption along with a wireless receiver module that has the strength to provide high data rates and wide range coverage. Adopting Zigbee protocol in the wireless client module, the power consumption performance is enhanced so that it plays a part of the mobile device. On the other hand, the wireless receiver module, as adopting Zigbee and Wi-Fi protocol, provides high data rate, wide range coverage, and easy connection to the existing Internet network so that it plays a part of the portable device. This module demonstrates monitoring of gait analysis. The results show that the sensing data being measured can be monitored in any remote place with access to the Internet network.

  5. Hierarchical Safety Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen W.; Whiteside, Iain J.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce hierarchical safety cases (or hicases) as a technique to overcome some of the difficulties that arise creating and maintaining industrial-size safety cases. Our approach extends the existing Goal Structuring Notation with abstraction structures, which allow the safety case to be viewed at different levels of detail. We motivate hicases and give a mathematical account of them as well as an intuition, relating them to other related concepts. We give a second definition which corresponds closely to our implementation of hicases in the AdvoCATE Assurance Case Editor and prove the correspondence between the two. Finally, we suggest areas of future enhancement, both theoretically and practically.

  6. Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Patel, J.; Saurabh, K.; Shyam, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results.

  7. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Since superconducting magnets cooled by liquid helium are limited to magnetic fields of about 18 teslas, the design of a 30 tesla cryomagnet necessitates forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. As these channels are too small to handle the vapor flow if the coolant were to boil, the design philosophy calls for suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures. Forced convection heat transfer data are obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid vertically through a resistance-heated instrumented tube. The data are obtained at inlet temperatures between 28 and 34 K and system pressures between 28 to 29 bars. Data correlation is limited to a very narrow range of test conditions, since the tests were designed to simulate the heat transfer characteristics in the coolant channels of the 30 tesla cryomagnet concerned. The results can therefore be applied directly to the design of the magnet system.-

  8. Nikola Tesla: Why was he so much resisted and forgotten? [Retrospectroscope].

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Ortiz, Martin Hill; Cervantes, Daniel; Leder, Ron S

    2016-01-01

    Recently, during the Christmas season, a friend of mine visited me and, sneaking a look at my bookshelves, found two rather old Nikola Tesla biographies, which I had used to prepare a "Retrospectroscope" column for the then-named IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine when our dear friend Alvin Wald was its editor-inchief [2]. Eighteen years have elapsed since then; soon, the idea came up of revamping the article. Cynthia Weber, the magazine's current associate editor, considered it acceptable, and here is the new note divided in two parts: that is, a slightly revised version of the original article followed by new material, including some quite interesting information regarding Tesla's homes and laboratories. On top of this, Tesla is not devoid of a science fiction touch, as mentioned at the end.

  9. Wireless Sensor Networks: Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Ponoum, Ratcharit; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    The article discusses wireless sensor technologies for building energy monitoring and control. This article, also, addresses wireless sensor networks as well as benefits and challenges of using wireless sensors. The energy savings and market potential of wireless sensors are reviewed.

  10. GOTHIC: Gravitational oct-tree code accelerated by hierarchical time step controlling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Yohei; Umemura, Masayuki

    2017-04-01

    The tree method is a widely implemented algorithm for collisionless N-body simulations in astrophysics well suited for GPU(s). Adopting hierarchical time stepping can accelerate N-body simulations; however, it is infrequently implemented and its potential remains untested in GPU implementations. We have developed a Gravitational Oct-Tree code accelerated by HIerarchical time step Controlling named GOTHIC, which adopts both the tree method and the hierarchical time step. The code adopts some adaptive optimizations by monitoring the execution time of each function on-the-fly and minimizes the time-to-solution by balancing the measured time of multiple functions. Results of performance measurements with realistic particle distribution performed on NVIDIA Tesla M2090, K20X, and GeForce GTX TITAN X, which are representative GPUs of the Fermi, Kepler, and Maxwell generation of GPUs, show that the hierarchical time step achieves a speedup by a factor of around 3-5 times compared to the shared time step. The measured elapsed time per step of GOTHIC is 0.30 s or 0.44 s on GTX TITAN X when the particle distribution represents the Andromeda galaxy or the NFW sphere, respectively, with 224 = 16,777,216 particles. The averaged performance of the code corresponds to 10-30% of the theoretical single precision peak performance of the GPU.

  11. Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells in High Fields to 60 Tesla: Photoluminescence Linewidth Annealing at Magnetization Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, D.D.; Crooker, S.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Rickel, D.G.; Samarth, N.

    1999-05-24

    Magnetic semiconductors offer a unique possibility for strongly tuning the intrinsic alloy disorder potential with applied magnetic field. We report the direct observation of a series of step-like reductions in the magnetic alloy disorder potential in single ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se quantum wells between O and 60 Tesla. This disorder, measured through the linewidth of low temperature photoluminescence spectra drops abruptly at -19, 36, and 53 Tesla, in concert with observed magnetization steps. Conventional models of alloy disorder (developed for nonmagnetic semiconductors) reproduce the general shape of the data, but markedly underestimate the size of the linewidth reduction.

  12. Wireless Networks: New Meaning to Ubiquitous Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Wilfred, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the use of wireless technology in academic libraries. Topics include wireless networks; standards (IEEE 802.11); wired versus wireless; why libraries implement wireless technology; wireless local area networks (WLANs); WLAN security; examples of wireless use at Indiana State University and Morrisville College (New York); and useful…

  13. How hierarchical is language use?

    PubMed

    Frank, Stefan L; Bod, Rens; Christiansen, Morten H

    2012-11-22

    It is generally assumed that hierarchical phrase structure plays a central role in human language. However, considerations of simplicity and evolutionary continuity suggest that hierarchical structure should not be invoked too hastily. Indeed, recent neurophysiological, behavioural and computational studies show that sequential sentence structure has considerable explanatory power and that hierarchical processing is often not involved. In this paper, we review evidence from the recent literature supporting the hypothesis that sequential structure may be fundamental to the comprehension, production and acquisition of human language. Moreover, we provide a preliminary sketch outlining a non-hierarchical model of language use and discuss its implications and testable predictions. If linguistic phenomena can be explained by sequential rather than hierarchical structure, this will have considerable impact in a wide range of fields, such as linguistics, ethology, cognitive neuroscience, psychology and computer science.

  14. How hierarchical is language use?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Stefan L.; Bod, Rens; Christiansen, Morten H.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that hierarchical phrase structure plays a central role in human language. However, considerations of simplicity and evolutionary continuity suggest that hierarchical structure should not be invoked too hastily. Indeed, recent neurophysiological, behavioural and computational studies show that sequential sentence structure has considerable explanatory power and that hierarchical processing is often not involved. In this paper, we review evidence from the recent literature supporting the hypothesis that sequential structure may be fundamental to the comprehension, production and acquisition of human language. Moreover, we provide a preliminary sketch outlining a non-hierarchical model of language use and discuss its implications and testable predictions. If linguistic phenomena can be explained by sequential rather than hierarchical structure, this will have considerable impact in a wide range of fields, such as linguistics, ethology, cognitive neuroscience, psychology and computer science. PMID:22977157

  15. 3.0 Tesla vs 1.5 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Reni S; Chen, Christine; Vashi, Reena; Hooley, Regina J; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare 3.0 Tesla (T) vs 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. METHODS: Upon Institutional Review Board approval, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of 147 consecutive 3.0T MR examinations and 98 consecutive 1.5T MR examinations in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 7/2009 and 5/2010 was performed. Eleven patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the 3.0T group were excluded. Mammographically occult suspicious lesions (BIRADS Code 4 and 5) additional to the index cancer in the ipsilateral and contralateral breast were identified. Lesion characteristics and pathologic diagnoses were recorded, and results achieved with both systems compared. Statistical significance was analyzed using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: In the 3.0T group, 206 suspicious lesions were identified in 55% (75/136) of patients and 96% (198/206) of these lesions were biopsied. In the 1.5T group, 98 suspicious lesions were identified in 53% (52/98) of patients and 90% (88/98) of these lesions were biopsied. Biopsy results yielded additional malignancies in 24% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 14% of patients in the 1.5T group (33/136 vs 14/98, P = 0.07). Average size and histology of the additional cancers was comparable. Of patients who had a suspicious MR imaging study, additional cancers were found in 44% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 27% in the 1.5T group (33/75 vs 14/52, P = 0.06), yielding a higher positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. CONCLUSION: 3.0T MR imaging detected more additional malignancies in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and yielded a higher PPV for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. PMID:24003354

  16. Hierarchical partial order ranking.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-09-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritization of polluted sites is given.

  17. Associative Hierarchical Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Ladický, L'ubor; Russell, Chris; Kohli, Pushmeet; Torr, Philip H S

    2014-06-01

    This paper makes two contributions: the first is the proposal of a new model-The associative hierarchical random field (AHRF), and a novel algorithm for its optimization; the second is the application of this model to the problem of semantic segmentation. Most methods for semantic segmentation are formulated as a labeling problem for variables that might correspond to either pixels or segments such as super-pixels. It is well known that the generation of super pixel segmentations is not unique. This has motivated many researchers to use multiple super pixel segmentations for problems such as semantic segmentation or single view reconstruction. These super-pixels have not yet been combined in a principled manner, this is a difficult problem, as they may overlap, or be nested in such a way that the segmentations form a segmentation tree. Our new hierarchical random field model allows information from all of the multiple segmentations to contribute to a global energy. MAP inference in this model can be performed efficiently using powerful graph cut based move making algorithms. Our framework generalizes much of the previous work based on pixels or segments, and the resulting labelings can be viewed both as a detailed segmentation at the pixel level, or at the other extreme, as a segment selector that pieces together a solution like a jigsaw, selecting the best segments from different segmentations as pieces. We evaluate its performance on some of the most challenging data sets for object class segmentation, and show that this ability to perform inference using multiple overlapping segmentations leads to state-of-the-art results.

  18. [3 Tesla MRI: successful results with higher field strengths].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, F; Grosu, D; Mohr, C; Purdy, D; Salem, K; Scott, K T; Stoeckel, B

    2004-01-01

    The recent development of 3 Tesla MRI (3T MRI) has been fueled by promise of increased signal-to-noise ratio(SNR). Many are excited about the opportunity to not only use the increased SNR for clearer images, but also the chance to exchange it for better resolution or faster scans. These possibilities have caused a rapid increase in the market for 3T MRI, where the faster scanning tips an already advantageous economic outlook in favor of the user. As a result, the global market for 3T has grown from a research only market just a few years ago to an ever-increasing clinically oriented customer base. There are, however, significant obstacles to 3T MRI presented by the physics at higher field strengths. For example, the T1 relaxation times are prolonged with increasing magnet field strength. Further, the increased RF-energy deposition (SAR), the larger the chemical shift and the stronger susceptibility effect have to be considered as challenges. It is critical that one looks at both the advantages and disadvantages of using 3T. While there are many issues to address aand a number of different methods for doing so, to properly tackle each of these concerns will take time and effort on the part od researchers and clinicians. The optimization of 3T MRI scanning will have to be a combined effort, though much of the work to date has been in neuroimaging. Multiple applications have been explored in addition to clinical anatomical imaging, where resolution is improved showing structure in the brain never seen before in human MRI. Body and cardiac imaging provide a great challenge but are also achievable at 3T. As an example, the full range of clinical applications currently achieved on today's state-of-the-art 1.5T cardiac MR scanners has also been demonstrated at 3T. In the body, the full range of contrast is available over large fields of view allowing whole liver studies in the clinic or, as needed, one may choose a smaller field of view for high-resolution imaging of the

  19. Shot noise startup of the 6 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.

    1996-02-01

    We present here the results of an extensive simulation activity for the TESLA SASE FEL. We have used the program GINGER to determine the FEL saturation length and the power fluctuations from shot to shot. The spectral properties of the output power and the correlation functions are investigated and compared with available theoretical models.

  20. Prospects for 6 to 10 tesla magnets for a TEVATRON upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, Paul M.

    1988-07-08

    The first SSC physics is at least 10 years away. An upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron will ensure the continuity of a vigorous high-energy physics program until the SSC turns on. Three basic proposals are under consideration: /bar p/p at 3 /times/ 10/sup 31/ --Increase luminosity by improvements to the p source. pp at 1 TeV and 2 /times/ 10/sup 32/--Move the main ring to a new tunnel, build a second Tevatron ring, and /bar p/p > 1.5 TeV and 7 /times/ 10/sup 30/--Replace the tevatron with a higher energy ring. The last two options requires about a hundred 6.6-tesla dipoles in addition to a ring of Tevatron strength (4.4 T) magnets. These higher-field magnets are necessary in both rings to lengthen the straight sections in order to realize the collision optics. The third option requires a ring of magnets of 6.6 T or slightly higher to replace the present Tevatron plus a number of special 8--9 tesla magnets. The viability of the high-energy option then depends on the practicality of sizable numbers of reliable 8--9 tesla dipoles as well as 800 6.6-tesla dipoles. The following develops a specification for an 8.8 T dipole, examines the design considerations and reviews the current state of high-field magnet development. 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. A laser system for the TESLA photon collider based on an external ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, I.; Quast, T.; Redlin, H.; Sandner, W.

    2001-10-01

    We present a concept of a laser system for a photon collider at the TESLA linac. It is based on an external optical ring cavity which is pumped by a short-pulse laser. A detailed discussion of the geometry of the external cavity is given.

  2. 76 FR 47639 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Temporary Exemption From the Electronic Stability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... determine how best to optimize its battery design and vehicle software for future vehicle offerings such as... database of information for its future vehicle offerings. Tesla states that it cannot replicate this data... long range, highway-capable, battery-powered electric vehicle in the United States will lead to...

  3. Design study of 15-Tesla RHQT Nb3Al block type dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    The design study of the block type 15-Tesla RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al dipole magnet, and its merits over Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets are presented. The copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is now becoming commercially available for the application to the accelerator magnets. A 1 mm diameter RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand with filament size about 50 {mu}, non-copper Jc about 1000 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, copper ratio of 50%, can now be produced over several hundred meters. The stress and strain characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand are superior to the Nb{sub 3}Sn strand. Another advantage is that it can tolerate a longitudinal strain up to 0.55%. The RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable will have less chance of contamination of the stabilizer, compared to Nb{sub 3}Sn cable. These characteristics of the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al will be beneficial for designing and producing 15-Tesla dipole magnets. An example 15-Tesla magnet cross section, utilizing the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Sn strand is presented. A systematic investigation on RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strands, its Rutherford cables, and building a small racetrack magnet for cable testing are proposed.

  4. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of…

  5. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  6. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  7. Wireless Communications in Reverberant Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Drexel Wireless Systems Laboratory (DWSL) have been instrumental in my studies, research, and growth as an academic . In particular, I would like to...Experimental Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.2 Contribution 2: Wireless Performance in Reverberation Chambers...8 1.2.3 Contribution 3: Wireless Performance in Below-Deck Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.2.4 Contribution 4: Empirical Evaluation of Pre

  8. Wireless Network Security Using Randomness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-19

    REPORT WIRELESS NETWORK SECURITY USING RANDOMNESS 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The present invention provides systems and methods for... securing communications in a wireless network by utilizing the inherent randomness of propagation errors to enable legitimate users to dynamically...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Patent, security , wireless networks, randomness Sheng Xiao, Weibo Gong

  9. Wireless physical layer security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poor, H. Vincent; Schaefer, Rafael F.

    2017-01-01

    Security in wireless networks has traditionally been considered to be an issue to be addressed separately from the physical radio transmission aspects of wireless systems. However, with the emergence of new networking architectures that are not amenable to traditional methods of secure communication such as data encryption, there has been an increase in interest in the potential of the physical properties of the radio channel itself to provide communications security. Information theory provides a natural framework for the study of this issue, and there has been considerable recent research devoted to using this framework to develop a greater understanding of the fundamental ability of the so-called physical layer to provide security in wireless networks. Moreover, this approach is also suggestive in many cases of coding techniques that can approach fundamental limits in practice and of techniques for other security tasks such as authentication. This paper provides an overview of these developments.

  10. Wireless physical layer security

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Rafael F.

    2017-01-01

    Security in wireless networks has traditionally been considered to be an issue to be addressed separately from the physical radio transmission aspects of wireless systems. However, with the emergence of new networking architectures that are not amenable to traditional methods of secure communication such as data encryption, there has been an increase in interest in the potential of the physical properties of the radio channel itself to provide communications security. Information theory provides a natural framework for the study of this issue, and there has been considerable recent research devoted to using this framework to develop a greater understanding of the fundamental ability of the so-called physical layer to provide security in wireless networks. Moreover, this approach is also suggestive in many cases of coding techniques that can approach fundamental limits in practice and of techniques for other security tasks such as authentication. This paper provides an overview of these developments. PMID:28028211

  11. Wireless physical layer security.

    PubMed

    Poor, H Vincent; Schaefer, Rafael F

    2017-01-03

    Security in wireless networks has traditionally been considered to be an issue to be addressed separately from the physical radio transmission aspects of wireless systems. However, with the emergence of new networking architectures that are not amenable to traditional methods of secure communication such as data encryption, there has been an increase in interest in the potential of the physical properties of the radio channel itself to provide communications security. Information theory provides a natural framework for the study of this issue, and there has been considerable recent research devoted to using this framework to develop a greater understanding of the fundamental ability of the so-called physical layer to provide security in wireless networks. Moreover, this approach is also suggestive in many cases of coding techniques that can approach fundamental limits in practice and of techniques for other security tasks such as authentication. This paper provides an overview of these developments.

  12. Onboard hierarchical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunesi, Luca; Armbruster, Philippe

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a suitable hierarchical networking solution to improve capabilities and performances of space systems, with significant recurrent costs saving and more efficient design & manufacturing flows. Classically, a satellite can be split in two functional sub-systems: the platform and the payload complement. The platform is in charge of providing power, attitude & orbit control and up/down-link services, whereas the payload represents the scientific and/or operational instruments/transponders and embodies the objectives of the mission. One major possibility to improve the performance of payloads, by limiting the data return to pertinent information, is to process data on board thanks to a proper implementation of the payload data system. In this way, it is possible to share non-recurring development costs by exploiting a system that can be adopted by the majority of space missions. It is believed that the Modular and Scalable Payload Data System, under development by ESA, provides a suitable solution to fulfil a large range of future mission requirements. The backbone of the system is the standardised high data rate SpaceWire network http://www.ecss.nl/. As complement, a lower speed command and control bus connecting peripherals is required. For instance, at instrument level, there is a need for a "local" low complexity bus, which gives the possibility to command and control sensors and actuators. Moreover, most of the connections at sub-system level are related to discrete signals management or simple telemetry acquisitions, which can easily and efficiently be handled by a local bus. An on-board hierarchical network can therefore be defined by interconnecting high-speed links and local buses. Additionally, it is worth stressing another important aspect of the design process: Agencies and ESA in particular are frequently confronted with a big consortium of geographically spread companies located in different countries, each one

  13. Terabit Wireless Communication Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation briefly discusses a research effort on Terabit Wireless communication systems for possible space applications. Recently, terahertz (THz) technology (300-3000 GHz frequency) has attracted a great deal of interest from academia and industry. This is due to a number of interesting features of THz waves, including the nearly unlimited bandwidths available, and the non-ionizing radiation nature which does not damage human tissues and DNA with minimum health threat. Also, as millimeter-wave communication systems mature, the focus of research is, naturally, moving to the THz range. Many scientists regard THz as the last great frontier of the electromagnetic spectrum, but finding new applications outside the traditional niches of radio astronomy, Earth and planetary remote sensing, and molecular spectroscopy particularly in biomedical imaging and wireless communications has been relatively slow. Radiologists find this area of study so attractive because t-rays are non-ionizing, which suggests no harm is done to tissue or DNA. They also offer the possibility of performing spectroscopic measurements over a very wide frequency range, and can even capture signatures from liquids and solids. According to Shannon theory, the broad bandwidth of the THz frequency bands can be used for terabit-per-second (Tb/s) wireless communication systems. This enables several new applications, such as cell phones with 360 degrees autostereoscopic displays, optic-fiber replacement, and wireless Tb/s file transferring. Although THz technology could satisfy the demand for an extremely high data rate, a number of technical challenges need to be overcome before its development. This presentation provides an overview the state-of-the- art in THz wireless communication and the technical challenges for an emerging application in Terabit wireless systems. The main issue for THz wave propagation is the high atmospheric attenuation, which is dominated by water vapor absorption in the THz

  14. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  15. An Integrated Intrusion Detection Model of Cluster-Based Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuemei; Yan, Bo; Zhang, Xinzhong; Rong, Chuitian

    2015-01-01

    Considering wireless sensor network characteristics, this paper combines anomaly and mis-use detection and proposes an integrated detection model of cluster-based wireless sensor network, aiming at enhancing detection rate and reducing false rate. Adaboost algorithm with hierarchical structures is used for anomaly detection of sensor nodes, cluster-head nodes and Sink nodes. Cultural-Algorithm and Artificial-Fish–Swarm-Algorithm optimized Back Propagation is applied to mis-use detection of Sink node. Plenty of simulation demonstrates that this integrated model has a strong performance of intrusion detection. PMID:26447696

  16. An Integrated Intrusion Detection Model of Cluster-Based Wireless Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuemei; Yan, Bo; Zhang, Xinzhong; Rong, Chuitian

    2015-01-01

    Considering wireless sensor network characteristics, this paper combines anomaly and mis-use detection and proposes an integrated detection model of cluster-based wireless sensor network, aiming at enhancing detection rate and reducing false rate. Adaboost algorithm with hierarchical structures is used for anomaly detection of sensor nodes, cluster-head nodes and Sink nodes. Cultural-Algorithm and Artificial-Fish-Swarm-Algorithm optimized Back Propagation is applied to mis-use detection of Sink node. Plenty of simulation demonstrates that this integrated model has a strong performance of intrusion detection.

  17. Advanced hierarchical distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we cover a number of important extensions of the basic hierarchical distance-sampling (HDS) framework from Chapter 8. First, we discuss the inclusion of “individual covariates,” such as group size, in the HDS model. This is important in many surveys where animals form natural groups that are the primary observation unit, with the size of the group expected to have some influence on detectability. We also discuss HDS integrated with time-removal and double-observer or capture-recapture sampling. These “combined protocols” can be formulated as HDS models with individual covariates, and thus they have a commonality with HDS models involving group structure (group size being just another individual covariate). We cover several varieties of open-population HDS models that accommodate population dynamics. On one end of the spectrum, we cover models that allow replicate distance sampling surveys within a year, which estimate abundance relative to availability and temporary emigration through time. We consider a robust design version of that model. We then consider models with explicit dynamics based on the Dail and Madsen (2011) model and the work of Sollmann et al. (2015). The final major theme of this chapter is relatively newly developed spatial distance sampling models that accommodate explicit models describing the spatial distribution of individuals known as Point Process models. We provide novel formulations of spatial DS and HDS models in this chapter, including implementations of those models in the unmarked package using a hack of the pcount function for N-mixture models.

  18. Channel allocation and load balancing in totally mobile wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei; Bassiouni, Mostafa A.

    2000-07-01

    Previous studies on totally mobile wireless networks (TMWN) have been limited to non-hierarchical architectures. In this paper, we study a two-tier cellular architecture for TMWN. Under the constraints of equal power consumption, the two tier system achieves improvement over the one-tier system, especially at light and medium load levels. Performance tests have also shown that handoff prioritization can be achieved by restricting the use of the umbrella channels. Further improvement for the two-tier system was obtained by load balancing strategies with respect to the allocation of channels to the different cells.

  19. Building the Wireless Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerraughty, James F.; Shanafelt, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    This prototype is a continuation of a series of wireless prototypes which began in August 2001 and was reported on again in August 2002. This is the final year of this prototype. This continuation allowed Saint Francis University's Center of Excellence for Remote and Medically Under-Served Areas (CERMUSA) to refine the existing WLAN for the Saint…

  20. Insecurity of Wireless Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, Frederick T; Weber, John Mark; Yoo, Seong-Moo; Pan, W. David

    2012-01-01

    Wireless is a powerful core technology enabling our global digital infrastructure. Wi-Fi networks are susceptible to attacks on Wired Equivalency Privacy, Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), and WPA2. These attack signatures can be profiled into a system that defends against such attacks on the basis of their inherent characteristics. Wi-Fi is the standard protocol for wireless networks used extensively in US critical infrastructures. Since the Wired Equivalency Privacy (WEP) security protocol was broken, the Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) protocol has been considered the secure alternative compatible with hardware developed for WEP. However, in November 2008, researchers developed an attack on WPA, allowing forgery of Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) packets. Subsequent enhancements have enabled ARP poisoning, cryptosystem denial of service, and man-in-the-middle attacks. Open source systems and methods (OSSM) have long been used to secure networks against such attacks. This article reviews OSSMs and the results of experimental attacks on WPA. These experiments re-created current attacks in a laboratory setting, recording both wired and wireless traffic. The article discusses methods of intrusion detection and prevention in the context of cyber physical protection of critical Internet infrastructure. The basis for this research is a specialized (and undoubtedly incomplete) taxonomy of Wi-Fi attacks and their adaptations to existing countermeasures and protocol revisions. Ultimately, this article aims to provide a clearer picture of how and why wireless protection protocols and encryption must achieve a more scientific basis for detecting and preventing such attacks.

  1. Wireless Sensors Network (Sensornet)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Wireless Sensor Network System presented in this paper provides a flexible reconfigurable architecture that could be used in a broad range of applications. It also provides a sensor network with increased reliability; decreased maintainability costs, and assured data availability by autonomously and automatically reconfiguring to overcome communication interferences.

  2. Wireless ferroelectric resonating sensor.

    PubMed

    Viikari, Ville; Seppa, Heikki; Mattila, Tomi; Alastalo, Ari

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a passive wireless resonating sensor that is based on a ferroelectric varactor. The sensor replies with its data at an intermodulation frequency when a reader device illuminates it at 2 closely located frequencies. The paper derives a theoretical equation for the response of such a sensor, verifies the theory by simulations, and demonstrates a temperature sensor based on a ferroelectric varactor.

  3. NASA Bluetooth Wireless Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has been interested in wireless communications for many years, especially when the crew size of the International Space Station (ISS) was reduced to two members. NASA began a study to find ways to improve crew efficiency to make sure the ISS could be maintained with limited crew capacity and still be a valuable research testbed in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO). Currently the ISS audio system requires astronauts to be tethered to the audio system, specifically a device called the Audio Terminal Unit (ATU). Wireless communications would remove the tether and allow astronauts to freely float from experiment to experiment without having to worry about moving and reconnecting the associated cabling or finding the space equivalent of an extension cord. A wireless communication system would also improve safety and reduce system susceptibility to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). Safety would be improved because a crewmember could quickly escape a fire while maintaining communications with the ground and other crewmembers at any location. In addition, it would allow the crew to overcome the volume limitations of the ISS ATU. This is especially important to the Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBA). The next generation of space vehicles and habitats also demand wireless attention. Orion will carry up to six crewmembers in a relatively small cabin. Yet, wireless could become a driving factor to reduce launch weight and increase habitable volume. Six crewmembers, each tethered to a panel, could result in a wiring mess even in nominal operations. In addition to Orion, research is being conducted to determine if Bluetooth is appropriate for Lunar Habitat applications.

  4. Design study of steady-state 30-tesla liquid-neon-cooled magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    A design for a 30-tesla, liquid-neon-cooled magnet was reported which is capable of continuous operation. Cooled by nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer to liquid neon flowing at 2.8 cu m/min in a closed, pressurized heat-transfer loop and structurally supported by a tapered structural ribbon, the tape-wound coils with a high-purity-aluminum conductor will produce over 30 teslas for 1 minute at 850 kilowatts. The magnet will have an inside diameter of 7.5 centimeters and an outside diameter of 54 centimeters. The minimum current density at design field will be 15.7 kA/sq cm.

  5. Rapid Parametric Mapping of the Longitudinal Relaxation Time T1 Using Two-Dimensional Variable Flip Angle Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Dieringer, Matthias A.; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. Methods T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Results Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of

  6. Programmable infusion pump and catheter: evaluation using 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shellock, Frank G; Crivelli, Rocco; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2008-07-01

    Objective.  This study assessed 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for a programmable infusion pump and associated catheters. Methods.  A programmable infusion pump and associated catheters (MedStream Programmable Infusion Pump, 40 mL; SureStream TI Coil-Reinforced Intraspinal Catheter; SureStream TI Connector; and SureStream Silicone Catheter; Codman and Shurtleff Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA, USA) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (deflection angle and torque), heating (transmit/receive body radiofrequency coil; whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, 3 W/kg for 15 min), functional changes (before and after MRI using eight different MRI conditions), and artifacts (T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences) at 3-Tesla. Results.  The programmable infusion pump and associated catheters exhibited minor magnetic field interactions. Heating was not excessive (≤ 1.9°), especially considering the experimental conditions used for this evaluation (ie, relatively high radiofrequency power/specific absorption rate level and use of a nonperfused phantom). The function of three out of six pumps was temporarily altered by exposures to 3-Tesla MRI conditions. Reset was achieved in each case. Artifacts were relatively large for the pump and minor for the catheter. Conclusions.  The programmable infusion pump and catheters will not pose increased risk to a patient examined using 3-Tesla MRI as long as specific safety guidelines are followed, which includes interrogation of the pump post-MRI to ensure proper settings. Artifacts for the programmable infusion pump may impact the diagnostic use of MRI if the area of interest is in the same area or near the device.

  7. A modified post damping ring bunch compressor beamline for the TESLA linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe R.-G. Piot; Winfried Decking

    2004-03-23

    We propose a modified bunch compressor beamline, downstream of the damping ring, for the TESLA linear collider. This modified beamline uses a third harmonic radio-frequency section based on the 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity under development at Fermilab. In our design the beam deceleration is about {approx}50 MeV instead of {approx}450 MeV in the original design proposed.

  8. A Sensible Approach to Wireless Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, S. Faruq

    2002-01-01

    Discusses radio frequency (R.F.) wireless technology, including industry standards, range (coverage) and throughput (data rate), wireless compared to wired networks, and considerations before embarking on a large-scale wireless project. (EV)

  9. Efficient Rectenna Design for Wireless Power Transmission for MAV Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    to the days of Hertz and Tesla , when it was discovered that energy could be transported in electromagnetic waves in free space. Nikola Tesla was the...electromagnetic fields in the air. His work was further explored by Tesla [3, 4] who noted that the earth had its own resonance that could be used to...

  10. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, Paulus S.; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders. PMID:26106306

  11. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-01

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  12. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-15

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  13. Assessment of MRI Issues at 3 Tesla for a New Metallic Tissue Marker.

    PubMed

    Cronenweth, Charlotte M; Shellock, Frank G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MRI issues at 3 Tesla for a metallic tissue marker used to localize removal areas of tissue abnormalities. Materials and Methods. A newly designed, metallic tissue marker (Achieve Marker, CareFusion, Vernon Hills, IL) used to mark biopsy sites, particularly in breasts, was assessed for MRI issues which included standardized tests to determine magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts at 3 Tesla. Temperature changes were determined for the marker using a gelled-saline-filled phantom. MRI was performed at a relatively high specific absorption rate (whole body averaged SAR, 2.9-W/kg). MRI artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. Results. The marker displayed minimal magnetic field interactions (2-degree deflection angle and no torque). MRI-related heating was only 0.1°C above background heating (i.e., the heating without the tissue marker present). Artifacts seen as localized signal loss were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the marker. Conclusions. Based on the findings, the new metallic tissue marker is acceptable or "MR Conditional" (using current labeling terminology) for a patient undergoing an MRI procedure at 3 Tesla or less.

  14. Focused tight dressing does not prevent cochlear implant magnet migration under 1.5 Tesla MRI.

    PubMed

    Cuda, D; Murri, A; Succo, G

    2013-04-01

    We report a retrospective case of inner magnet migration, which occurred after 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning in an adult recipient of a bilateral cochlear implant (CI) despite a focused head dressing. The patient, bilaterally implanted with Nucleus 5 CIs (Cochlear LTD, Sydney, Australia), underwent a 1.5 Tesla cholangio-MRI scan for biliary duct pathology. In subsequent days, a focal skin alteration appeared over the left inner coil. Plain skull radiographs showed partial magnet migration on the left side. Surgical exploration confirmed magnet twisting; the magnet was effectively repositioned. Left CI performance was restored to pre-migration level. The wound healed without complications. Thus, focused dressing does not prevent magnet migration in CI recipients undergoing 1.5 Tesla MRI. All patients should be counselled on this potential complication. A minor surgical procedure is required to reposition the magnet. Nevertheless, timely diagnosis is necessary to prevent skin breakdown and subsequent device contamination. Plain skull radiograph is very effective in identifying magnet twisting; it should be performed systematically after MRI or minimally on all suspected cases.

  15. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia.

    PubMed

    Rommer, Paulus S; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders.

  16. A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator for solid dielectric breakdown research.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Pan, Ya Feng; Su, Jian Cang; Zhang, Xi Bo; Wang, Li Min; Fang, Jin Peng; Sun, Xu; Lui, Rui

    2013-10-01

    A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator including a pair of electrode and a matched absorption resistor is established for the application of solid dielectric breakdown research. As major components, a built-in Tesla transformer and a gas-gap switch are designed to boost and shape the output pulse, respectively; the electrode is to form the anticipated electric field; the resistor is parallel to the electrode to absorb the reflected energy from the test sample. The parameters of the generator are a pulse width of 10 ns, a rise and fall time of 3 ns, and a maximum amplitude of 300 kV. By modifying the primary circuit of the Tesla transformer, the generator can produce both positive and negative pulses at a repetition rate of 1-50 Hz. In addition, a real-time measurement and control system is established based on the solid dielectric breakdown requirements for this generator. With this system, experiments on test samples made of common insulation materials in pulsed power systems are conducted. The preliminary experimental results show that the constructed generator is capable to research the solid dielectric breakdown phenomenon on a nanosecond time scale.

  17. Wireless local area network security.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan P

    2004-01-01

    Wireless local area networks (WLANs) are increasingly popular in clinical settings because they facilitate the use of wireless PDAs, laptops, and other pervasive computing devices at the point of care. However, because of the relative immaturity of wireless network technology and evolving standards, WLANs, if improperly configured, can present significant security risks. Understanding the security limitations of the technology and available fixes can help minimize the risks of clinical data loss and maintain compliance with HIPAA guidelines.

  18. Advanced Wireless Integrated Navy Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Basing visualization of wireless technologies, Ad Hoc networks , network protocols, real-time resource allocation, Ultra Wideband (UWB) communications...4.1 TIP #1: Distributed MIMO UWB sensor networks incorporating software radio 67 4.2 TIP #2: Close-in UWB wireless with applications to Sea- Basing 68...4.3 TIP #3: Secure Ad Hoc Networks 73 4.4 TIP #4: Integration of Close-in UWB wireless with ESM crane for Sea Basing applications 75 5. FINANCIAL REPORT

  19. Application of an automated wireless structural monitoring system for long-span suspension bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, M.; Lynch, J. P.; Linden, G. W. van der; Hipley, P.; Sheng, L.-H.

    2011-06-23

    This paper describes an automated wireless structural monitoring system installed at the New Carquinez Bridge (NCB). The designed system utilizes a dense network of wireless sensors installed in the bridge but remotely controlled by a hierarchically designed cyber-environment. The early efforts have included performance verification of a dense network of wireless sensors installed on the bridge and the establishment of a cellular gateway to the system for remote access from the internet. Acceleration of the main bridge span was the primary focus of the initial field deployment of the wireless monitoring system. An additional focus of the study is on ensuring wireless sensors can survive for long periods without human intervention. Toward this end, the life-expectancy of the wireless sensors has been enhanced by embedding efficient power management schemes in the sensors while integrating solar panels for power harvesting. The dynamic characteristics of the NCB under daily traffic and wind loads were extracted from the vibration response of the bridge deck and towers. These results have been compared to a high-fidelity finite element model of the bridge.

  20. Application of AN Automated Wireless Structural Monitoring System for Long-Span Suspension Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, M.; Lynch, J. P.; van der Linden, G. W.; Hipley, P.; Sheng, L.-H.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes an automated wireless structural monitoring system installed at the New Carquinez Bridge (NCB). The designed system utilizes a dense network of wireless sensors installed in the bridge but remotely controlled by a hierarchically designed cyber-environment. The early efforts have included performance verification of a dense network of wireless sensors installed on the bridge and the establishment of a cellular gateway to the system for remote access from the internet. Acceleration of the main bridge span was the primary focus of the initial field deployment of the wireless monitoring system. An additional focus of the study is on ensuring wireless sensors can survive for long periods without human intervention. Toward this end, the life-expectancy of the wireless sensors has been enhanced by embedding efficient power management schemes in the sensors while integrating solar panels for power harvesting. The dynamic characteristics of the NCB under daily traffic and wind loads were extracted from the vibration response of the bridge deck and towers. These results have been compared to a high-fidelity finite element model of the bridge.

  1. Wireless Seismometer for Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Taylor, Brandt; Beard, Steve; Clougherty, Brian; Meredith, Roger D.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the seismic activity of Venus is critical to understanding its composition and interior dynamics. Because Venus has an average surface temperature of 462 C and the challenge of providing cooling to multiple seismometers, a high temperature, wireless sensor using a wide bandgap semiconductor is an attractive option. This paper presents progress towards a seismometer sensor with wireless capabilities for Venus applications. A variation in inductance of a coil caused by a 1 cm movement of a ferrite probe held in the coil and attached to a balanced leaf-spring seismometer causes a variation of 80 MHz in the transmitted signal from the oscillator sensor system at 420 C, which correlates to a 10 kHz mm sensitivity when the ferrite probe is located at the optimum location in the coil.

  2. Wireless Computing Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    mechanisms are relevant to a broad spectrum of applications , but are particularly important to data broadcast in wireless distributed computing...significantly improve applications where reliable data broadcast is required. For example, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) may use Rainbow to distribute ...68-74. 8. Dean, J., Ghemawat, S., “ MapReduce : simplified data processing on large clusters ”, Communications of the ACM, 51, 1, 2008, pp. 107-113

  3. Wearable wireless photoplethysmography sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis; Erts, Renars; Nikiforovs, Vladimirs; Kviesis-Kipge, Edgars

    2008-04-01

    Wearable health monitoring sensors may support early detection of abnormal conditions and prevention of their consequences. Recent designs of three wireless photoplethysmography monitoring devices embedded in hat, glove and sock, and connected to PC or mobile phone by means of the Bluetooth technology, are described. First results of distant monitoring of heart rate and pulse wave transit time using the newly developed devices are presented.

  4. Prospective Real Time Head Motion Correction Using Inductively Coupled Wireless NMR Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat; Tadanki, Sasidhar; Gore, John C.; Welch, E. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Head motion continues to be a major source of artifacts and data quality degradation in MRI. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate a novel technique for prospective, 6 degrees of freedom (6DOF) rigid body motion estimation and real time motion correction using inductively coupled wireless nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe markers. Methods Three wireless probes that are inductively coupled with the scanner’s RF setup serve as fiducials on the subject’s head. A 12 ms linear navigator module is interleaved with the imaging sequence for head position estimation, and scan geometry is updated in real time for motion compensation. Flip angle amplification in the markers allows the use of extremely small navigator flip angles (~1°). A novel algorithm is presented to identify marker positions in the absence of marker specific receive channels. The method is demonstrated for motion correction in 1 mm3 gradient recalled echo experiments in phantoms and humans. Results Significant improvement of image quality is demonstrated in phantoms and human volunteers under different motion conditions. Conclusion A novel real time 6 DOF head motion correction technique based on wireless NMR probes is demonstrated in high resolution imaging at 7 Tesla. PMID:24243810

  5. Reasons for Hierarchical Linear Modeling: A Reminder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jianjun

    1999-01-01

    Uses examples of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) at local and national levels to illustrate proper applications of HLM and dummy variable regression. Raises cautions about the circumstances under which hierarchical data do not need HLM. (SLD)

  6. From early wireless to Everest.

    PubMed

    Allen, A

    1998-01-01

    Medical information has been transmitted using wireless technologies for almost 80 years. A "wired wireless" electronic stethoscope was developed by the U.S. Army Signal Corps in the early 1920's, for potential use in ship-to-shore transmission of cardiac sounds. [Winters SR. Diagnosis by wireless. Scientific American June 11, 1921, p. 465] Today, wireless is used in a wide range of medical applications and at sites from transoceanic air flights to offshore oil platforms to Mt. Everest. 'Wireless LANs' are often used in medical environments. Typically, nurses and physicians in a hospital or clinic use hand-held "wireless thin client" pen computers that exchange patient information and images with the hospital server. Numerous companies, such as Fujitsu (article below) and Cruise Technologies (www.cruisetech.com) manufacture handheld pen-entry computers. One company, LXE, integrates radio-frequency (RF) enhanced hand-held computers specifically designed for production use within a wireless LAN (www.lxe.com). Other companies (Proxim, Symbol, and others) supply the wireless RF LAN infrastructure for the enterprise. Unfortunately, there have been problems with widespread deployment of wireless LANs. Perhaps the biggest impediment has been the lack of standards. Although an international standard (IEEE 802.11) was adopted in 1997, most wireless LAN products still are not compatible with the equipment of competing companies. A problem with the current standard for LAN adapters is that throughput is limited to 3 Mbps--compared to at least 10 Mbps, and often 100 Mbps, in a hard-wired Ethernet LAN. An II Mbps standard is due out in the next year or so, but it will be at least 2 years before standards-compliant products are available. This story profiles some of the ways that wireless is being used to overcome gaps in terrestrial and within-enterprise communication.

  7. Hierarchical Microaggressions in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kathryn; Anderson, Myron; Stewart, Saran

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been substantial research examining the effects of microaggressions in the public sphere, there has been little research that examines microaggressions in the workplace. This study explores the types of microaggressions that affect employees at universities. We coin the term "hierarchical microaggression" to represent…

  8. Sensory Hierarchical Organization and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skapof, Jerome

    The purpose of this study was to judge the viability of an operational approach aimed at assessing response styles in reading using the hypothesis of sensory hierarchical organization. A sample of 103 middle-class children from a New York City public school, between the ages of five and seven, took part in a three phase experiment. Phase one…

  9. Decentralized system identification using stochastic subspace identification for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han

    2015-04-08

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) facilitate a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional structural monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition systems are costly for installation as well as maintenance. WSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. In this paper, the stochastic subspace identification (SSI) technique is selected for system identification, and SSI-based decentralized system identification (SDSI) is proposed to be implemented in a WSN composed of Imote2 wireless sensors that measure acceleration. The SDSI is tightly scheduled in the hierarchical WSN, and its performance is experimentally verified in a laboratory test using a 5-story shear building model.

  10. Developing a New Wireless Sensor Network Platform and Its Application in Precision Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Aquino-Santos, Raúl; González-Potes, Apolinar; Edwards-Block, Arthur; Virgen-Ortiz, Raúl Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are gaining greater attention from the research community and industrial professionals because these small pieces of “smart dust” offer great advantages due to their small size, low power consumption, easy integration and support for “green” applications. Green applications are considered a hot topic in intelligent environments, ubiquitous and pervasive computing. This work evaluates a new wireless sensor network platform and its application in precision agriculture, including its embedded operating system and its routing algorithm. To validate the technological platform and the embedded operating system, two different routing strategies were compared: hierarchical and flat. Both of these routing algorithms were tested in a small-scale network applied to a watermelon field. However, we strongly believe that this technological platform can be also applied to precision agriculture because it incorporates a modified version of LORA-CBF, a wireless location-based routing algorithm that uses cluster-based flooding. Cluster-based flooding addresses the scalability concerns of wireless sensor networks, while the modified LORA-CBF routing algorithm includes a metric to monitor residual battery energy. Furthermore, results show that the modified version of LORA-CBF functions well with both the flat and hierarchical algorithms, although it functions better with the flat algorithm in a small-scale agricultural network. PMID:22346622

  11. Developing a new wireless sensor network platform and its application in precision agriculture.

    PubMed

    Aquino-Santos, Raúl; González-Potes, Apolinar; Edwards-Block, Arthur; Virgen-Ortiz, Raúl Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are gaining greater attention from the research community and industrial professionals because these small pieces of "smart dust" offer great advantages due to their small size, low power consumption, easy integration and support for "green" applications. Green applications are considered a hot topic in intelligent environments, ubiquitous and pervasive computing. This work evaluates a new wireless sensor network platform and its application in precision agriculture, including its embedded operating system and its routing algorithm. To validate the technological platform and the embedded operating system, two different routing strategies were compared: hierarchical and flat. Both of these routing algorithms were tested in a small-scale network applied to a watermelon field. However, we strongly believe that this technological platform can be also applied to precision agriculture because it incorporates a modified version of LORA-CBF, a wireless location-based routing algorithm that uses cluster-based flooding. Cluster-based flooding addresses the scalability concerns of wireless sensor networks, while the modified LORA-CBF routing algorithm includes a metric to monitor residual battery energy. Furthermore, results show that the modified version of LORA-CBF functions well with both the flat and hierarchical algorithms, although it functions better with the flat algorithm in a small-scale agricultural network.

  12. Image Information Mining Utilizing Hierarchical Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Marchisio, Giovanni; Koperski, Krzysztof; Datcu, Mihai

    2002-01-01

    The Hierarchical Segmentation (HSEG) algorithm is an approach for producing high quality, hierarchically related image segmentations. The VisiMine image information mining system utilizes clustering and segmentation algorithms for reducing visual information in multispectral images to a manageable size. The project discussed herein seeks to enhance the VisiMine system through incorporating hierarchical segmentations from HSEG into the VisiMine system.

  13. Launching a Wireless Laptop Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grignano, Domenic

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, as a technology director for East Rock Magnet School in New Haven, Connecticut, a federal government test site for laptop learning, shares his secrets to a successful implementation of a wireless laptop program: (1) Build a wireless foundation; (2) Do not choose the cheapest model just because of budget; (3) A sturdy…

  14. Unpowered wireless ultrasound tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Farshad; Huang, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an unpowered wireless ultrasound tomography system is presented. The system consists of two subsystems; the wireless interrogation unit (WIU) and three wireless nodes installed on the structure. Each node is designed to work in generation and sensing modes, but operates at a specific microwave frequency. Wireless transmission of the ultrasound signals between the WIU and the wireless nodes is achieved by converting ultrasound signals to microwave signals and vice versa, using a microwave carrier signal. In the generation mode, both a carrier signal and an ultrasound modulated microwave signal are transmitted to the sensor nodes. Only the node whose operating frequency matches the carrier signal will receive these signals and demodulate them to recover the original ultrasound signal. In the sensing mode, a microwave carrier signal with two different frequency components matching the operating frequencies of the sensor nodes is broadcasted by the WIU. The sensor nodes, in turn, receive the corresponding carrier signals, modulate it with the ultrasound sensing signal, and wirelessly transmit the modulated signal back to the WIU. The demodulation of the sensing signals is performed in the WIU using a digital signal processing. Implementing a software receiver significantly reduces the complexity and the cost of the WIU. A wireless ultrasound tomography system is realized by interchanging the carrier frequencies so that the wireless transducers can take turn to serve as the actuator and sensors.

  15. 75 FR 8400 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld Devices... server software, wireless handheld devices and battery packs by reason of infringement of certain claims... importation of certain wireless communications system server software, wireless handheld devices or...

  16. Source Authentication for Code Dissemination Supporting Dynamic Packet Size in Wireless Sensor Networks †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daehee; Kim, Dongwan; An, Sunshin

    2016-01-01

    Code dissemination in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is a procedure for distributing a new code image over the air in order to update programs. Due to the fact that WSNs are mostly deployed in unattended and hostile environments, secure code dissemination ensuring authenticity and integrity is essential. Recent works on dynamic packet size control in WSNs allow enhancing the energy efficiency of code dissemination by dynamically changing the packet size on the basis of link quality. However, the authentication tokens attached by the base station become useless in the next hop where the packet size can vary according to the link quality of the next hop. In this paper, we propose three source authentication schemes for code dissemination supporting dynamic packet size. Compared to traditional source authentication schemes such as μTESLA and digital signatures, our schemes provide secure source authentication under the environment, where the packet size changes in each hop, with smaller energy consumption. PMID:27409616

  17. Views of wireless network systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, William Frederick; Duggan, David Patrick

    2003-10-01

    Wireless networking is becoming a common element of industrial, corporate, and home networks. Commercial wireless network systems have become reliable, while the cost of these solutions has become more affordable than equivalent wired network solutions. The security risks of wireless systems are higher than wired and have not been studied in depth. This report starts to bring together information on wireless architectures and their connection to wired networks. We detail information contained on the many different views of a wireless network system. The method of using multiple views of a system to assist in the determination of vulnerabilities comes from the Information Design Assurance Red Team (IDART{trademark}) Methodology of system analysis developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  18. Wireless Technology in K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    Many schools begin implementing wireless technology slowly by creating wireless "hotspots" on the fly. This is accomplished by putting a wireless access point on a cart along with a set of wireless laptop computers. A teacher can then wheel the cart anywhere in the school that has a network drop, plug the access point in and have an…

  19. Wireless Headset Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Wilfred K.; Swanson, Richard; Christensen, Kurt K.

    1995-01-01

    System combines features of pagers, walkie-talkies, and cordless telephones. Wireless headset communication system uses digital modulation on spread spectrum to avoid interference among units. Consists of base station, 4 radio/antenna modules, and as many as 16 remote units with headsets. Base station serves as network controller, audio-mixing network, and interface to such outside services as computers, telephone networks, and other base stations. Developed for use at Kennedy Space Center, system also useful in industrial maintenance, emergency operations, construction, and airport operations. Also, digital capabilities exploited; by adding bar-code readers for use in taking inventories.

  20. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  1. Deployable wireless Fresnel lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for enhancing the gain of a wireless signal are provided. In at least one specific embodiment, the apparatus can include a screen comprised of one or more electrically conductive regions for reflecting electromagnetic radiation and one or more non-conductive regions for permitting electromagnetic radiation therethrough. The one or more electrically conductive regions can be disposed adjacent to at least one of the one or more non-conductive regions. The apparatus can also include a support member disposed about at least a portion of the screen. The screen can be capable of collapsing by twisting the support member in opposite screw senses to form interleaved concentric sections.

  2. Design and Development of Wireless Power Transmission for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    by radio waves can be traced back to Heinrich Hertz [9] and Nikola Tesla [10–12]. In 1899, Tesla was the first to carry out experiments on power...The Life of Nikola Tesla . New York: Washburn, 1944. [11] Margaret Cheney, Tesla : Man Out of Time. Mattituck, New York: Amereon House, 1981. 60...

  3. Tesla: An application for real-time data analysis in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Amato, S.; Anderlini, L.; Benson, S.; Cattaneo, M.; Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.; Frank, M.; Gligorov, V. V.; Head, T.; Jones, C.; Komarov, I.; Lupton, O.; Matev, R.; Raven, G.; Sciascia, B.; Skwarnicki, T.; Spradlin, P.; Stahl, S.; Storaci, B.; Vesterinen, M.

    2016-11-01

    Upgrades to the LHCb computing infrastructure in the first long shutdown of the LHC have allowed for high quality decay information to be calculated by the software trigger making a separate offline event reconstruction unnecessary. Furthermore, the storage space of the triggered candidate is an order of magnitude smaller than the entire raw event that would otherwise need to be persisted. Tesla is an application designed to process the information calculated by the trigger, with the resulting output used to directly perform physics measurements.

  4. Poly-coil design for a 60 tesla quasi-stationary magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boenig, H. J.; Campbell, L. J.; Hodgdon, M. L.; Lopez, E. A.; Rickel, D. G.; Rogers, J. D.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    1993-02-01

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving.

  5. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  6. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. ); Sikes, W.C. )

    1992-01-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  7. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D.; Sikes, W. C.

    1992-08-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. Finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  8. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw.

  9. Science and Technology of the TESLA Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Albrecht

    2002-07-01

    Recent analyses of the long term future of particles physics in Asia, Europe, and the U.S.A. have led to the consensus that the next major facility to be built to unravel the secrets of the micro-cosmos is an electron-positron linear collider in the energy range of 500 to 1000 GeV. This collider should be constructed in an as timely fashion as possible to overlap with the Large Hadron Collider, under construction at CERN. Here, the scientific potential and the technological aspects of the TESLA projects, a superconducting collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory, are summarised.

  10. 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A new standard in liver imaging?

    PubMed

    Girometti, Rossano

    2015-07-28

    An ever-increasing number of 3.0 Tesla (T) magnets are installed worldwide. Moving from the standard of 1.5 T to higher field strength implies a number of potential advantage and drawbacks, requiring careful optimization of imaging protocols or implementation of novel hardware components. Clinical practice and literature review suggest that state-of-the-art 3.0 T is equivalent to 1.5 T in the assessment of focal liver lesions and diffuse liver disease. Therefore, further technical improvements are needed in order to fully exploit the potential of higher field strength.

  11. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 30-tesla magnet design is studied which calls for forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. The design also requires suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures through use of magnet coils enclosed in a pressure vessel which is maintained at the critical pressure of liquid neon. This high pressure reduces the possibility of the system flow instabilities which may occur at low pressures. The forced convection heat transfer data presented were obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid to flow vertically through a resistance heated, instrumented tube.

  12. COMPARISON OF THE TESLA, NLC AND CLIC BEAM-COLLIMATION SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-28

    This report describes studies performed in the frame-work of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the second International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible.

  13. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC beam-collimation system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I Drozhdin; Grahame Blair; Lewis P Keller

    2003-05-28

    This report describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible.

  14. Assessment of the immune responsiveness of mice exposed to a 1. 5-Tesla stationary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Shifrine, M.

    1984-01-01

    Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were assayed following a 6-day exposure of LAF1/J mice to a 1.50 Tesla (1 T . 10(4) Gauss) stationary magnetic field. In tests of the immune response to sheep erythrocytes, the number of Jerne plaques formed by spleen lymphocytes and the level of serum IgM were not significantly different for the exposed mice in comparison with control animals. Tests for mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation also demonstrated no significant differences in the response of spleen lymphocytes from exposed and control groups of mice.

  15. 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A new standard in liver imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Rossano

    2015-01-01

    An ever-increasing number of 3.0 Tesla (T) magnets are installed worldwide. Moving from the standard of 1.5 T to higher field strength implies a number of potential advantage and drawbacks, requiring careful optimization of imaging protocols or implementation of novel hardware components. Clinical practice and literature review suggest that state-of-the-art 3.0 T is equivalent to 1.5 T in the assessment of focal liver lesions and diffuse liver disease. Therefore, further technical improvements are needed in order to fully exploit the potential of higher field strength. PMID:26244063

  16. Parallel hierarchical method in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinochka, Olha; Tymchenko, Leonid

    2007-09-01

    This method of parallel-hierarchical Q-transformation offers new approach to the creation of computing medium - of parallel -hierarchical (PH) networks, being investigated in the form of model of neurolike scheme of data processing [1-5]. The approach has a number of advantages as compared with other methods of formation of neurolike media (for example, already known methods of formation of artificial neural networks). The main advantage of the approach is the usage of multilevel parallel interaction dynamics of information signals at different hierarchy levels of computer networks, that enables to use such known natural features of computations organization as: topographic nature of mapping, simultaneity (parallelism) of signals operation, inlaid cortex, structure, rough hierarchy of the cortex, spatially correlated in time mechanism of perception and training [5].

  17. Hierarchical Theme and Topic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jen-Tzung

    2016-03-01

    Considering the hierarchical data groupings in text corpus, e.g., words, sentences, and documents, we conduct the structural learning and infer the latent themes and topics for sentences and words from a collection of documents, respectively. The relation between themes and topics under different data groupings is explored through an unsupervised procedure without limiting the number of clusters. A tree stick-breaking process is presented to draw theme proportions for different sentences. We build a hierarchical theme and topic model, which flexibly represents the heterogeneous documents using Bayesian nonparametrics. Thematic sentences and topical words are extracted. In the experiments, the proposed method is evaluated to be effective to build semantic tree structure for sentences and the corresponding words. The superiority of using tree model for selection of expressive sentences for document summarization is illustrated.

  18. Hierarchical structure of biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Alcocer-Cuarón, Carlos; Rivera, Ana L; Castaño, Victor M

    2014-01-01

    A general theory of biological systems, based on few fundamental propositions, allows a generalization of both Wierner and Berthalanffy approaches to theoretical biology. Here, a biological system is defined as a set of self-organized, differentiated elements that interact pair-wise through various networks and media, isolated from other sets by boundaries. Their relation to other systems can be described as a closed loop in a steady-state, which leads to a hierarchical structure and functioning of the biological system. Our thermodynamical approach of hierarchical character can be applied to biological systems of varying sizes through some general principles, based on the exchange of energy information and/or mass from and within the systems. PMID:24145961

  19. Multicast Routing of Hierarchical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shacham, Nachum

    1992-01-01

    The issue of multicast of broadband, real-time data in a heterogeneous environment, in which the data recipients differ in their reception abilities, is considered. Traditional multicast schemes, which are designed to deliver all the source data to all recipients, offer limited performance in such an environment, since they must either force the source to overcompress its signal or restrict the destination population to those who can receive the full signal. We present an approach for resolving this issue by combining hierarchical source coding techniques, which allow recipients to trade off reception bandwidth for signal quality, and sophisticated routing algorithms that deliver to each destination the maximum possible signal quality. The field of hierarchical coding is briefly surveyed and new multicast routing algorithms are presented. The algorithms are compared in terms of network utilization efficiency, lengths of paths, and the required mechanisms for forwarding packets on the resulting paths.

  20. Hierarchical Molecular Modelling with Ellipsoids

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    2004-03-29

    Protein and DNA structures are represented at varying levels of details using ellipsoidal RGBA textured splats. The splat texture at each level is generated by rendering its children in a hierarchical model, from a distribution of viewing directions, and averaging the result. For rendering, the ellipsoids to be used are chosen adaptively, depending on the distance to the viewpoint. This technique is applied to visualize DNA coiling around nucleosomes in chromosomes.

  1. Treatment Protocols as Hierarchical Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Bassat, Moshe; Carlson, Richard W.; Puri, Vinod K.; Weil, Max Harry

    1978-01-01

    We view a treatment protocol as a hierarchical structure of therapeutic modules. The lowest level of this structure consists of individual therapeutic actions. Combinations of individual actions define higher level modules, which we call routines. Routines are designed to manage limited clinical problems, such as the routine for fluid loading to correct hypovolemia. Combinations of routines and additional actions, together with comments, questions, or precautions organized in a branching logic, in turn, define the treatment protocol for a given disorder. Adoption of this modular approach may facilitate the formulation of treatment protocols, since the physician is not required to prepare complex flowcharts. This hierarchical approach also allows protocols to be updated and modified in a flexible manner. By use of such a standard format, individual components may be fitted together to create protocols for multiple disorders. The technique is suited for computer implementation. We believe that this hierarchical approach may facilitate standarization of patient care as well as aid in clinical teaching. A protocol for acute pancreatitis is used to illustrate this technique.

  2. Personality Traits: Hierarchically Organized Systems.

    PubMed

    Fajkowska, Małgorzata

    2017-03-13

    Personality science has always been and is still ready for new theorizing on traits. Accordingly, this paper presents the recently proposed Traits as Hierarchical Systems (THS) model, where personality traits are not only the emergent properties of the three-level hierarchy of the personality system, but are also hierarchical per se. As hierarchical systems, they are organized into three levels: mechanisms and processes, structures, and behavioral markers. In this approach trait denotes the underlying, recurrent mechanisms that pattern its structure and account for the stability/variability of individual characteristics. Here, traits might be described as processes with a slow rate of change that can be substituted for structure. The main function of personality traits, within the personality system, is stimulation processing. Three dominant functions of stimulation processing in traits are proposed: reactive, regulative, and self-regulative. Some important questions regarding the concept of trait remain, e.g. concerning trait stability, determinacy, measurement, their relation to overt behaviors, personality type or state, differentiation between temperament traits and other-than-temperament personality traits. All of these topics are discussed in this paper, as well as the compatible and distinctive features of this approach in relation to selected, modern trait theories. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Household wireless electroencephalogram hat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Moon, Gyu; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Tran, Binh

    2012-06-01

    We applied Compressive Sensing to design an affordable, convenient Brain Machine Interface (BMI) measuring the high spatial density, and real-time process of Electroencephalogram (EEG) brainwaves by a Smartphone. It is useful for therapeutic and mental health monitoring, learning disability biofeedback, handicap interfaces, and war gaming. Its spec is adequate for a biomedical laboratory, without the cables hanging over the head and tethered to a fixed computer terminal. Our improved the intrinsic signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using the non-uniform placement of the measuring electrodes to create the proximity of measurement to the source effect. We computing a spatiotemporal average the larger magnitude of EEG data centers in 0.3 second taking on tethered laboratory data, using fuzzy logic, and computing the inside brainwave sources, by Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Consequently, we can overlay them together by non-uniform electrode distribution enhancing the signal noise ratio and therefore the degree of sparseness by threshold. We overcame the conflicting requirements between a high spatial electrode density and precise temporal resolution (beyond Event Related Potential (ERP) P300 brainwave at 0.3 sec), and Smartphone wireless bottleneck of spatiotemporal throughput rate. Our main contribution in this paper is the quality and the speed of iterative compressed image recovery algorithm based on a Block Sparse Code (Baranuick et al, IEEE/IT 2008). As a result, we achieved real-time wireless dynamic measurement of EEG brainwaves, matching well with traditionally tethered high density EEG.

  4. [Remote wireless monitoring].

    PubMed

    Villar-Montini, Alex

    2009-12-01

    The increasing device implantations to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arrhytmias and heart failures, aging of the population, and the growing number of patients with access to new therapies as well as the wider access to health systems are the reasons why the number of new implantations carried out each year is rising. Hence, we should have an equipment that can control these patients at a distance, making the follow-up closer. The answer to this enormous challenge is the remote monitoring of these devices. Biotronik is a pioneer in this task and since 2001 it has been comercializing pacemakers and portable wireless monitors (CardioMessenger). Currently, there are more than 100,000 installed systems. Thanks to the continuous and completely automatized follow-up, as well as the wireless net, the system integrity can be confirmed, and then proceed to adjust the therapies in an optimized manner according to each patient's needs; also take action to prevent the development of some arrhytmias, or even the evolution of a heart failure. Likewise, the system can improve the clynical efficiency of the treatment and help to economize to the Ministry of Healthcare.

  5. Biomonitoring with Wireless Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-03-01

    This review is divided into three sections: technologies for monitoring physiological parameters; biosensors for chemical assays and wireless communications technologies including image transmissions. Applications range from monitoring high risk patients for heart, respiratory activity and falls to sensing levels of physical activity in military, rescue, and sports personnel. The range of measurements include, heart rate, pulse wave form, respiratory rate, blood oxygen, tissue pCO2, exhaled carbon dioxide and physical activity. Other feasible measurements will employ miniature chemical laboratories on silicon or plastic chips. The measurements can be extended to clinical chemical assays ranging from common blood assays to protein or specialized protein measurements (e.g., troponin, creatine, and cytokines such as TNF and IL6). Though the feasibility of using wireless technology to communicate vital signs has been demonstrated 32 years ago (1) it has been only recently that practical and portable devices and communications net works have become generally available for inexpensive deployment of comfortable and affordable devices and systems.

  6. Smart programmable wireless microaccelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Subramanian, Hareesh; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1998-07-01

    The integration of MEMS, SAW devices and required microelectronics and conformal antenna to realize a programmable wireless accelerometer is presented in this paper. This unique combination of technologies results in a novel accelerometer that can be remotely sensed by a microwave system with the advantage of no power requirements at the sensor site. The microaccelerometer presented is simple in construction and easy to manufacture with existing silicon micromachining techniques. Programmable accelerometers can be achieved with splitfinger interdigital transducers (IDTs) as reflecting structures. If IDTs are short circuited or capacitively loaded, the wave propagates without any reflection whereas in an open circuit configuration, the IDTs reflect the incoming SAW signal. The programmable accelerometers can thus be achieved by using an external circuitry on a semiconductor chip using hybrid technology. The relatively small size of the sensor makes it an ideal conformal sensor. The accelerometer finds application as air bag deployment sensors, vibration sensors for noise control, deflection and strain sensors, inertial and dimensional positioning systems, ABS/traction control, smart suspension, active roll stabilization and four wheel steering. The wireless accelerometer is very attractive to study the response of a `dummy' in automobile crash test.

  7. Radio Relays Improve Wireless Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Signal Hill, California-based XCOM Wireless Inc. developed radio frequency micromachine (RF MEMS) relays with a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract through NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In order to improve satellite communication systems, XCOM produced wireless RF MEMS relays and tunable capacitors that use metal-to-metal contact and have the potential to outperform most semiconductor technologies while using less power. These relays are used in high-frequency test equipment and instrumentation, where increased speed can mean significant cost savings. Applications now also include mainstream wireless applications and greatly improved tactical radios.

  8. Wireless Communications in Smart Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkovic, Zoran; Bakmaz, Bojan

    Communication networks play a crucial role in smart grid, as the intelligence of this complex system is built based on information exchange across the power grid. Wireless communications and networking are among the most economical ways to build the essential part of the scalable communication infrastructure for smart grid. In particular, wireless networks will be deployed widely in the smart grid for automatic meter reading, remote system and customer site monitoring, as well as equipment fault diagnosing. With an increasing interest from both the academic and industrial communities, this chapter systematically investigates recent advances in wireless communication technology for the smart grid.

  9. Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven H [Rigby, ID; Derr, Kurt W [Idaho Falls, ID; Rohde, Kenneth W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-05-08

    Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

  10. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson’s disease at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen; Zhao, Xuna; Zhou, Jinyuan; Chen, Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson’s disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Methods Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54–77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55–73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (−6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Results Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P=0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P<0.001, P=0.003, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. PMID:25038850

  11. 3D calculations of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 3 Tesla magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proton accelerator is being proposed by the High Energy Physics Community. One proposal would consist of a ring of magnets 164 km in circumference with a field strength of 3 Tesla and would cost 2.7 billion dollars. The magnet consists of stacked steel laminations with superconducting coils. The desired field uniformity is obtained for all fields from 0.2 to 3 Tesla by using three (or more) different pole shapes. These three different laminations are stacked in the order 1-2-3-1-2-3-... creating a truly three dimensional geometry. A three laminated stack 1-2-3 with periodic boundary conditions at 1 and 3 was assigned about 5000 finite elements per lamination and solved using the computer program TOSCA. To check the TOSCA results, the field of each of the three different shaped laminations was calculated separately using periodic boundary conditions and compared to the two dimensional field calculations using TRIM. This was done for a constant permeability of 2000 and using the B-H table for fully annealed 1010 steel. The difference of the field calculations in the region of interest was always less than +-.2%

  12. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1(-)) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI.

  13. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  14. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of the story are the humanization of meaning, an association with heroes and heroic qualities, the limits of reality and extremes of experience, a sense of wonder, and a contesting of conventions and conventional ideas. The study demonstrates the learning benefits of encouraging a romantic understanding through a story that is structured explicitly around the identified features, in this instance in the context of the production and transmission of alternating current electricity. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of journal entries showed that the group of students who were encouraged to understand the concept of alternating current romantically (the experimental group) became more involved with both the content and the context of the story than a comparison group of students who were taught the concept explicitly, without a context (the control group). The students in the experimental group also performed statistically better on a science-content test taken 1 week and again 8 weeks after the indicated teaching intervention. This finding, along with the content analyses of students' journals, provided evidence of romantic understanding of the science content for those students who listened to the Tesla story.

  15. Ultrasonic wireless health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Lionel; Lefeuvre, Elie; Guyomar, Daniel; Richard, Claude; Guy, Philippe; Yuse, Kaori; Monnier, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The integration of autonomous wireless elements in health monitoring network increases the reliability by suppressing power supplies and data transmission wiring. Micro-power piezoelectric generators are an attractive alternative to primary batteries which are limited by a finite amount of energy, a limited capacity retention and a short shelf life (few years). Our goal is to implement such an energy harvesting system for powering a single AWT (Autonomous Wireless Transmitter) using our SSH (Synchronized Switch Harvesting) method. Based on a non linear process of the piezoelement voltage, this SSH method optimizes the energy extraction from the mechanical vibrations. This AWT has two main functions : The generation of an identifier code by RF transmission to the central receiver and the Lamb wave generation for the health monitoring of the host structure. A damage index is derived from the variation between the transmitted wave spectrum and a reference spectrum. The same piezoelements are used for the energy harvesting function and the Lamb wave generation, thus reducing mass and cost. A micro-controller drives the energy balance and synchronizes the functions. Such an autonomous transmitter has been evaluated on a 300x50x2 mm 3 composite cantilever beam. Four 33x11x0.3 mm 3 piezoelements are used for the energy harvesting and for the wave lamb generation. A piezoelectric sensor is placed at the free end of the beam to track the transmitted Lamb wave. In this configuration, the needed energy for the RF emission is 0.1 mJ for a 1 byte-information and the Lamb wave emission requires less than 0.1mJ. The AWT can harvested an energy quantity of approximately 20 mJ (for a 1.5 Mpa lateral stress) with a 470 μF storage capacitor. This corresponds to a power density near to 6mW/cm 3. The experimental AWT energy abilities are presented and the damage detection process is discussed. Finally, some envisaged solutions are introduced for the implementation of the required data

  16. A Survey on Routing Protocols for Large-Scale Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changle; Zhang, Hanxiao; Hao, Binbin; Li, Jiandong

    2011-01-01

    With the advances in micro-electronics, wireless sensor devices have been made much smaller and more integrated, and large-scale wireless sensor networks (WSNs) based the cooperation among the significant amount of nodes have become a hot topic. “Large-scale” means mainly large area or high density of a network. Accordingly the routing protocols must scale well to the network scope extension and node density increases. A sensor node is normally energy-limited and cannot be recharged, and thus its energy consumption has a quite significant effect on the scalability of the protocol. To the best of our knowledge, currently the mainstream methods to solve the energy problem in large-scale WSNs are the hierarchical routing protocols. In a hierarchical routing protocol, all the nodes are divided into several groups with different assignment levels. The nodes within the high level are responsible for data aggregation and management work, and the low level nodes for sensing their surroundings and collecting information. The hierarchical routing protocols are proved to be more energy-efficient than flat ones in which all the nodes play the same role, especially in terms of the data aggregation and the flooding of the control packets. With focus on the hierarchical structure, in this paper we provide an insight into routing protocols designed specifically for large-scale WSNs. According to the different objectives, the protocols are generally classified based on different criteria such as control overhead reduction, energy consumption mitigation and energy balance. In order to gain a comprehensive understanding of each protocol, we highlight their innovative ideas, describe the underlying principles in detail and analyze their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover a comparison of each routing protocol is conducted to demonstrate the differences between the protocols in terms of message complexity, memory requirements, localization, data aggregation, clustering manner

  17. Wireless Damage Location Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant Douglas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A wireless damage location sensing system uses a geometric-patterned wireless sensor that resonates in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field to generate a harmonic response that will experience a change when the sensor experiences a change in its geometric pattern. The sensing system also includes a magnetic field response recorder for wirelessly transmitting the time-varying magnetic field and for wirelessly detecting the harmonic response. The sensing system compares the actual harmonic response to a plurality of predetermined harmonic responses. Each predetermined harmonic response is associated with a severing of the sensor at a corresponding known location thereof so that a match between the actual harmonic response and one of the predetermined harmonic responses defines the known location of the severing that is associated therewith.

  18. Wireless Josephson amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Hatridge, M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-06-09

    Josephson junction parametric amplifiers are playing a crucial role in the readout chain in superconducting quantum information experiments. However, their integration with current 3D cavity implementations poses the problem of transitioning between waveguide, coax cables, and planar circuits. Moreover, Josephson amplifiers require auxiliary microwave components, like directional couplers and/or hybrids, that are sources of spurious losses and impedance mismatches that limit measurement efficiency and amplifier tunability. We have developed a wireless architecture for these parametric amplifiers that eliminates superfluous microwave components and interconnects. This greatly simplifies their assembly and integration into experiments. We present an experimental realization of such a device operating in the 9–11 GHz band with about 100 MHz of amplitude gain-bandwidth product, on par with devices mounted in conventional sample holders. The simpler impedance environment presented to the amplifier also results in increased amplifier tunability.

  19. Towards biodegradable wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Clémentine M; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Streit, Patrick; Schinhammer, Michael; Hänzi, Anja C; Hierold, Christofer

    2012-05-28

    A new generation of partially or even fully biodegradable implants is emerging. The idea of using temporary devices is to avoid a second surgery to remove the implant after its period of use, thereby improving considerably the patient's comfort and safety. This paper provides a state-of-the-art overview and an experimental section that describes the key technological challenges for making biodegradable devices. The general considerations for the design and synthesis of biodegradable components are illustrated with radiofrequency-driven resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) resonators made of biodegradable metals (Mg, Mg alloy, Fe, Fe alloys) and biodegradable conductive polymer composites (polycaprolactone-polypyrrole, polylactide-polypyrrole). Two concepts for partially/fully biodegradable wireless implants are discussed, the ultimate goal being to obtain a fully biodegradable sensor for in vivo sensing.

  20. Wireless power transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2016-02-23

    A system includes a first stage of an inductive power transfer system with an LCL load resonant converter with a switching section, an LCL tuning circuit, and a primary receiver pad. The IPT system includes a second stage with a secondary receiver pad, a secondary resonant circuit, a secondary rectification circuit, and a secondary decoupling converter. The secondary receiver pad connects to the secondary resonant circuit. The secondary resonant circuit connects to the secondary rectification circuit. The secondary rectification circuit connects to the secondary decoupling converter. The second stage connects to a load. The load includes an energy storage element. The second stage and load are located on a vehicle and the first stage is located at a fixed location. The primary receiver pad wirelessly transfers power to the secondary receiver pad across a gap when the vehicle positions the secondary receiver pad with respect to the primary receiver pad.

  1. Wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, Jose M.; Lucena, Angel R.; Mullenix, Pamela A.; Mata, Carlos T.

    2006-05-01

    Current and future requirements of aerospace sensors and transducers demand the design and development of a new family of sensing devices, with emphasis on reduced weight, power consumption, and physical size. This new generation of sensors and transducers will possess a certain degree of intelligence in order to provide the end user with critical data in a more efficient manner. Communication between networks of traditional or next-generation sensors can be accomplished by a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) developed by NASA's Instrumentation Branch and ASRC Aerospace Corporation at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), consisting of at least one central station and several remote stations and their associated software. The central station is application-dependent and can be implemented on different computer hardware, including industrial, handheld, or PC-104 single-board computers, on a variety of operating systems: embedded Windows, Linux, VxWorks, etc. The central stations and remote stations share a similar radio frequency (RF) core module hardware that is modular in design. The main components of the remote stations are an RF core module, a sensor interface module, batteries, and a power management module. These modules are stackable, and a common bus provides the flexibility to stack other modules for additional memory, increased processing, etc. WSN can automatically reconfigure to an alternate frequency if interference is encountered during operation. In addition, the base station will autonomously search for a remote station that was perceived to be lost, using relay stations and alternate frequencies. Several wireless remote-station types were developed and tested in the laboratory to support different sensing technologies, such as resistive temperature devices, silicon diodes, strain gauges, pressure transducers, and hydrogen leak detectors.

  2. Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-22

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the

  3. Wireless Power Transfer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the

  4. Some physical applications of random hierarchical matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Avetisov, V. A.; Bikulov, A. Kh.; Vasilyev, O. A.; Nechaev, S. K.; Chertovich, A. V.

    2009-09-15

    The investigation of spectral properties of random block-hierarchical matrices as applied to dynamic and structural characteristics of complex hierarchical systems with disorder is proposed for the first time. Peculiarities of dynamics on random ultrametric energy landscapes are discussed and the statistical properties of scale-free and polyscale (depending on the topological characteristics under investigation) random hierarchical networks (graphs) obtained by multiple mapping are considered.

  5. Wireless Instrumentation Use on Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the results of a study on the use of wireless instrumentation and sensors on future launch vehicles. The use of wireless technologies would if feasible would allow for fewer wires, and allow for more flexibility. However, it was generally concluded that wireless solutions are not currently ready to replace wired technologies for launch vehicles. The recommendations of the study were to continue to use wired sensors as the primary choice for vehicle instrumentation, and to continue to assess needs and use wireless instrumentation where appropriate. The future work includes support efforts for wireless technologies, and continue to monitor the development of wireless solutions.

  6. 77 FR 2269 - Foreign-Trade Zone 18-San Jose, CA, Application for Subzone, Tesla Motors, Inc. (Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... the foreign components used in export production. The company anticipates that 40 to 65 percent of the... procedures. Customs duties also could possibly be deferred or reduced on foreign status production equipment. Tesla would also be exempt from duty payments on foreign inputs that become scrap during the...

  7. Comparison of different undulator schemes with superimposed alternating gradients for the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pflueger, J.; Nikitina, Y.M.

    1995-12-31

    For the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility an undulator with a total length of 30 m is needed. In this study three different approaches to realize an undulator with a sinusoidal plus a superimposed quadrupolar field were studied with the 3D code MAFIA.

  8. Recurrent ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow: Correlation of surgical findings and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S; Carrino, John A; Dellon, A Lee

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the correlation between 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) and surgical findings in two patients who underwent multiple previous failed ulnar nerve surgeries. MRN correctly localized the site of the abnormality. Prospectively observed MRN findings of perineural fibrosis, ulnar nerve re-entrapment abnormalities, medial antebrachial cutaneous neuroma and additional median nerve entrapment were confirmed surgically.

  9. Human in vivo cardiac phosphorus NMR spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Angela Properzio

    One of the newest methods with great potential for use in clinical diagnosis of heart disease is human, cardiac, phosphorus NMR spectroscopy (cardiac p 31 MRS). Cardiac p31 MRS is able to provide quantitative, non-invasive, functional information about the myocardial energy metabolites such as pH, phosphocreatine (PCr), and adenosinetriphosphate (ATP). In addition to the use of cardiac p3l MRS for other types of cardiac problems, studies have shown that the ratio of PCr/ATP and pH are sensitive and specific markers of ischemia at the myocardial level. In human studies, typically performed at 1.5 Tesla, PCr/ATP has been relatively easy to measure but often requires long scan times to provide adequate signal-to-noise (SNR). In addition, pH which relies on identification of inorganic phosphate (Pi), has rarely been obtained. Significant improvement in the quality of cardiac p31 MRS was achieved through the use of the General Electric SIGNATM 3.0 Tesla whole body magnet, improved coil designs and optimized pulse sequences. Phantom and human studies performed on many types of imaging and spectroscopy sequences, identified breathhold gradient-echo imaging and oblique DRESS p31 spectroscopy as the best compromises between SNR, flexibility and quality localization. Both single-turn and quadrature 10-cm diameter, p31 radiofrequency coils, were tested with the quadrature coil providing greater SNR, but at a greater depth to avoid skeletal muscle contamination. Cardiac p31 MRS obtained in just 6 to 8 minutes, gated, showed both improved SNR and discernment of Pi allowing for pH measurement. A handgrip, in-magnet exerciser was designed, created and tested at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla on volunteers and patients. In ischemic patients, this exercise was adequate to cause a repeated drop in PCr/ATP and pH with approximately eight minutes of isometric exercise at 30% maximum effort. As expected from literature, this exercise did not cause a drop in PCr/ATP for reference volunteers.

  10. Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary.

    PubMed

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Trattnig, Siegfried; Graninger, Winfried B; Amoyo, Love; Tuerk, Birgit; Steiner, Carl-Walter; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left unexposed. Synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) was measured by using [35S]sulfate incorporation; mRNA encoding the cartilage markers aggrecan and type II collagen, as well as IL-1beta, were analyzed by RT-PCR. Furthermore, effects of the 3-tesla EMF were determined over the course of time directly after exposure (day 0) and at days 3 and 6. In addition, the influence of a 1.5-tesla EMF on cartilage sGAG synthesis was evaluated. Chondrocyte cell death was assessed by staining with Annexin V and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Exposure to the EMF resulted in a significant decrease in cartilage macromolecule synthesis. Gene expression of both aggrecan and IL-1beta, but not of collagen type II, was reduced in comparison with controls. Staining with Annexin V and TUNEL revealed no evidence of cell death. Interestingly, chondrocytes regained their biosynthetic activity within 3 days after exposure, as shown by proteoglycan synthesis rate and mRNA expression levels. Cartilage samples exposed to a 1.5-tesla EMF remained unaffected. Although MRI devices with a field strength of more than 1.5 T provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and thereby higher spatial resolution, their high field strength impairs the biosynthetic activity of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Although this decrease in biosynthetic activity seems to be transient, articular cartilage exposed to high-energy EMF may become vulnerable to damage.

  11. Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Gilbert, Ronald W [Morgan Hill, CA

    2011-02-01

    Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a communications device identification method includes providing identification information regarding a group of wireless identification devices within a wireless communications range of a reader, using the provided identification information, selecting one of a plurality of different search procedures for identifying unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices within the wireless communications range, and identifying at least some of the unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices using the selected one of the search procedures.

  12. A Survey on Clustering Routing Protocols in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuxun

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed increased interest in the potential use of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in a wide range of applications and it has become a hot research area. Based on network structure, routing protocols in WSNs can be divided into two categories: flat routing and hierarchical or clustering routing. Owing to a variety of advantages, clustering is becoming an active branch of routing technology in WSNs. In this paper, we present a comprehensive and fine grained survey on clustering routing protocols proposed in the literature for WSNs. We outline the advantages and objectives of clustering for WSNs, and develop a novel taxonomy of WSN clustering routing methods based on complete and detailed clustering attributes. In particular, we systematically analyze a few prominent WSN clustering routing protocols and compare these different approaches according to our taxonomy and several significant metrics. Finally, we summarize and conclude the paper with some future directions. PMID:23112649

  13. Preliminary Measurement of the Transfer Matrix of a TESLA-type Cavity at FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, Aliaksei; Eddy, Nathan; Edstrom, Dean; Lunin, Andrei; Piot, Philippe; Ruan, Jinhao; Santucci, James; Solyak, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, ultra-stable, high-quality electron beams that have widespread application in Science and Industry. Many current and planned projects employ 1.3-GHz 9-cell superconducting cavities of the TESLA design*. In the present paper we discuss the transverse-focusing properties of such a cavity and non-ideal transverse-map effects introduced by field asymmetries in the vicinity of the input and high-order-mode radiofrequency (RF) couplers**. We especially consider the case of a cavity located downstream of an RF-gun in a setup similar to the photoinjector of the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. Preliminary experimental measurements of the CC2 cavity transverse matrix were carried out at the FAST facility. The results are discussed and compared with analytical and numerical simulations.

  14. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  15. First Operating Experiences of Beam Position Monitors in the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schreiber, H. J.; Tonisch, F.; Castellano, M.; Patteri, P.; Tazzioli, F.; Catani, L.

    1997-05-01

    Different types of monitors where installed in the TESLA Test Facility Linac to measure the beam position. At each superconducting quadrupole, the transverse beam position will be measured with a resolution of better than 10 μm, using a cylindrical cavity excited in the TM_110-mode by an off-center beam. In addition, two 'warm' cavities working at room temperature were built for the Injector I and the Bunch Compressor. The amplitude of the TM_110-mode and its phase are measured in a homodyne receiver. For the experimental area, stripline monitors having a resolution of better than 100 μm were built, tested and installed. The averaged position of the whole bunch train of Injector I is measured in a narrowband receiver using the amplitude-to-phase conversion. This paper summarizes the designs, cold tests and first operating experiences of both monitor types.

  16. D-zero rototrack: first stage of D-zero 2 Tesla solenoid field mapping device

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Korienek, J.; Krider, J.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Miksa, D.; Miksa, R.

    1997-09-01

    A simple and portable field mapping device was developed at Fermilab and successfully used to test the D0 2 Tesla solenoid at Toshiba Works in Japan. A description of the mechanical structure, electric driving and control system, and software of the field mapping device is given. Four Hall probe elements of Group3 Digital Gaussmeters are mounted on the radial extension arm of a carriage, which is mounted on a central rotating beam. The system gives two dimensional motions (axial and rotational) to the Hall probes. To make the system compact and portable, we used a laptop computer with PCMCIA cards. For the control system we used commercially available software LabVIEW and Motion Toolbox, and for the data analysis we used Microsoft Excel.

  17. A test of a 2 Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Carcagno, Ruben; Claypool, Brad; Foster, George W.; Hays, Steven L.; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Malamud, Ernest; Mazur, Peter O.; Nehring, Roger; Oleck, Andrew; Rabehl, Roger; Schlabach, Phil; Sylvester, Cosmore; Velev, Gueorgui; Volk, James; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Superconducting transmission line magnet test system for an injector accelerator of a staged VLHC proton-proton colliding beam accelerator has been built and operated at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, twin-aperture, combined function dipole magnet of 2 Tesla field is excited by a single turn 100 kA transmission line superconductor. The 100 kA dc current is generated using dc-dc switching converters powered by a bulk 240 kW supply. A pair of horizontally placed conventional leads facilitates transfer of this current to the magnet transmission line superconductor operating at liquid helium temperature. Fabrication of magnet components and magnet assembly work are described. The magnet test system and its operation are presented, and the performance is summarized.

  18. Preattentive mechanisms of change detection in early auditory cortex: a 7 Tesla fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Szycik, G R; Stadler, J; Brechmann, A; Münte, T F

    2013-12-03

    The auditory system continuously monitors the environment for irregularities in an automatic, preattentive fashion. This is presumably accomplished by two mechanisms: a sensory mechanism detects a deviant sound on the basis of differential refractoriness of neural populations sensitive to the standard and deviant sounds, whereas the cognitive mechanism reveals deviance by comparing incoming auditory information with a template derived from previous input. Using fast event-related high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla we show that both mechanisms can be mapped to different parts of the auditory cortex both at the group level and the single-subject level. The sensory mechanism is supported by primary auditory areas in Heschl's gyrus whereas the cognitive mechanism is implemented in more anterior secondary auditory areas. Both mechanisms are equally engaged by simple sine-wave tones and speech-related phonemes indicating that streams of speech and non-speech stimuli are processed in a similar fashion.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of a MEMS nano-Tesla ferromagnetic-piezoelectric magnetic sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Peng; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Bidthanapally, Rao; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Petrov, Vladimir; Qu, Hongwei

    2016-06-01

    A self-biased MEMS magnetic sensor array with ferromagnetic-piezoelectric composites has been fabricated and characterized. The array with two Quartz-Nickel-Metglas cantilevers with nano-tesla sensitivity was fabricated by MEMS processes including silicon-quartz low temperature bonding, quartz wafer thinning, and electroplating of thick nickel thin films. Under self-biasing due to magnetization grading of ferromagnetic layer, magnetoelectric coefficients of 6.6 and 5.6 V/cm Oe and resolutions of ˜0.58 and ˜0.75 nT are obtained at the mechanical resonant frequencies of 191.5 and 184.8 Hz for the two sensors in the array, respectively. Such arrays have the potential for applications in biomagnetic imaging technologies including magneto-cardiography.

  20. Shot noise startup of the 6 NM SASE FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W.M.

    1995-12-31

    We present here an analysis of the shot noise startup of the 6 nm SASE FEI proposal at the TESLA Test Facility in DESY The statistical of the saturation length and output power due to the intrinsic randomness of the noise startup are investigated with the use of the 2D time dependent code GINGER, that takes into account propagation effects and models shot noise. We then provide estimates for the spectral contents and linewidth of the emitted radiation and describe its spiking characteristics. The output radiation will develop superradiant spikes seeded by the shot noise in the electron beam, which can entrance the average emitted power at the expense of some spectral broadening.

  1. Current Progress in Fabrication of a 14 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie, III; Benson, Christopher; Damborsky, Kyle; Diaczenko, Nick; Elliott, Tim; Garrison, Ray; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, Alfred; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Dior

    2012-03-01

    The Accelerator Technology Laboratory at Texas A&M is fabricating a model dipole magnet, TAMU3, designed to operate at a 14 Tesla bore field. The dipole employs an advanced internal-tin Nb3Sn/Cu composite strand with enhanced current density. The coils must be processed through a heat treatment after winding, during which the Sn within the heterogeneous strands diffuse into the Cu/Nb matrix to form high-performance superconducting layers. Heat treatment of the first coil assembly revealed tin leakage from the Sn cores that was caused by omission of a pre-anneal step in the heat treatment. We are evaluating the electrical properties of the coil, the microstructure and short-sample superconducting performance of cut-off samples of current leads to determine the extent of damage to the performance of the windings. Results of those tests and plans for construction of TAMU3 will be presented.

  2. Steering and focusing effects in TESLA cavity due to high order mode and input couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Dohlus, M.; Flottmann, K.; Marx, M.; Wipf, S.G.; /DESY

    2005-05-01

    Many state-of-art electron accelerator proposals incorporate TESLA-type superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities [1]. These standing wave rf cavities include rf input couplers and a pair of high order mode (HOM) couplers to absorb the energy associated to HOM field excited as the bunch passes through the cavity. In the present paper we investigate, using numerical simulations, the impact of the input and HOM couplers on the beam dynamics to zeroth and first order in initial position, and present parametric studies of the strength of these effects for various incoming beam energies. We finally study the impact of this asymmetric field on the beam dynamics, taking as an example the low energy section of the X-ray FEL injector.

  3. Parameter study of the VUV-FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brefeld, W.; Faatz, B.

    1995-12-31

    In this contribution we present a detailed study of the influence of the electron beam and machine parameters on the performance of the TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY. The TTF FEL will be a 6 nm SASE device operating with the beam provided by the Tesla Test Facility superconducting linac, driven by an rf photcathode gun. The FEL output power and saturation length have been assessed with the use of different 2D3-D steady state simulation codes. The parameter range over which the FEL would reach saturation within the specified undulator length of 25 to 30 m have been determined and checked against semi-analytical expressions.

  4. GRASE imaging at 3 Tesla with template interactive phase-encoding.

    PubMed

    Jovicich, J; Norris, D G

    1998-06-01

    A new method for ordering the phase-encoding gradient is proposed, and an application for short effective TE gradient- and spin-echo (GRASE) imaging is demonstrated. The proposed method calculates the phase-encoding order from the signal decay of a template scan (hence "template interactive phase-encoding" or TIPE). Computer simulations are used to compare the point spread functions of different phase-encoding orders giving short effective echo times (kb centric GRASE, centric GRASE, centric TIPE). The conventional centric phase-encoding order is also considered for GRASE. The conventional centric method is sensitive to both amplitude and phase modulation of the signal in k-space. The centric TIPE method gives the least amplitude modulation artifacts but is vulnerable to phase artifacts. The TIPE experiment was implemented on a 3 Tesla system. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first in vivo GRASE images at this field strength.

  5. Design of the superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wang, Q.; Dai, Y.; Ni, Z.; Zhu, X.; Li, L.; Zhao, B.; Chen, S.

    2017-02-01

    A superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is designed and fabricated in Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the electromagnetic design methods of the main coils and compensating coils are presented. Sensitivity analysis is performed for all superconducting coils. The design of the superconducting shimming coils is also presented and the design of electromagnetic decoupling of the Z2 coils from the main coils is introduced. Stress and strain analysis with both averaged and detailed models is performed with finite element method. A quench simulation code with anisotropic continuum model and control volume method is developed by us and is verified by experimental study. By means of the quench simulation code, the quench protection system for the 9.4 T magnet is designed for the main coils, the compensating coils and the shimming coils. The magnet cryostat design with zero helium boiling-off technology is also introduced.

  6. LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569 TWINS.

    PubMed

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Dennis, Emily L; Toga, Arthur W; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Hickie, Ian B; Thompson, Paul M

    2012-05-01

    Diffusion imaging can map anatomical connectivity in the living brain, offering new insights into fundamental questions such as how the left and right brain hemispheres differ. Anatomical brain asymmetries are related to speech and language abilities, but less is known about left/right hemisphere differences in brain wiring. To assess this, we scanned 457 young adults (age 23.4±2.0 SD years) and 112 adolescents (age 12-16) with 4-Tesla 105-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging. We extracted fiber tracts throughout the brain with a Hough transform method. A 70×70 connectivity matrix was created, for each subject, based on the proportion of fibers intersecting 70 cortical regions. We identified significant differences in the proportions of fibers intersecting left and right hemisphere cortical regions. The degree of asymmetry in the connectivity matrices varied with age, as did the asymmetry in network topology measures such as the small-world effect.

  7. Wake fields in 9-cell TESLA accelerating structures : Spectral Element Discontinuous Galerkin (SEDG) simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Fischer, P. F.; Chae, Y.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Using our recently developed high-order accurate Maxwell solver, NEKCEM, we carried out longitudinal wakefield calculations for a 9-cell TESLA cavity structure in 3D. Indirect method is used for wake potential calculations. Computational results with NEKCEM are compared with those of GdfidL. NEKCEM uses a spectral element discontinuous Galerkin (SEDG) method based on a domain decomposition approach using spectral-element discretizations on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids with body-conforming hexahedral meshes. The numerical scheme is designed to ensure high-order spectral accuracy, using the discontinuous Galerkin form with boundary conditions weakly enforced through a flux term between elements. Concerns related to implementation on wake potential calculations are discussed, and wake potential calculations with indirect method by NEKCEM compared with the results of the finite difference time-domain code GdfidL.

  8. Magnet Design and Analysis of a 40 Tesla Long Pulse System Energized by a Battery Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y. L.; Peng, T.; Wang, G. B.; Ding, T. H.; Han, X. T.; Pan, Y.; Li, L.

    2013-03-01

    A 40 tesla long pulse magnet and a battery bank as the power supply have been designed. This is now under construction at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The 22 mm bore magnet will generate smooth pulses with duration 1 s and rise time 0.5 s. The battery bank consists of 945 12V/200 Ah lead-acid battery cells. The magnet and battery bank were optimized by codes developed in-house and by ANSYS. The coil was made from soft copper with internal reinforcement by fiber-epoxy composite; it is divided into two sections connected in series. The inner section consists of helix coils with each layer reinforced by Zylon composite. The outer section will be wound from copper sheet and externally reinforced by carbon fiber composite.

  9. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC Beam Collimation Systems Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Lewis P

    2003-03-27

    This note describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects and does not always meet the original design goals. However, these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible. The post-TRC plans of the Collimation Task Force are outlined briefly in closing.

  10. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets.

  11. Magnetic Texture & Frustration in Quantum Magnets via Strain Measurements to 100 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Marcelo

    2014-03-01

    Strong geometrical frustration in magnets leads to exotic states, such as spin liquids, spin supersolids, magnetic solitons, and complex magnetic textures. SrCu2(BO3)2 , a spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in the archetypical Shastry-Sutherland lattice, exhibits a rich spectrum of magnetization plateaus and stripe-like magnetic textures in applied fields. We observed new magnetic textures via optical FBG magnetostriction and magnetocaloric measurements in fields up to 100.75 Tesla at 73.6 T and at 82 T which we attribute, using a controlled density matrix renormalization group approach, to a 2/5 plateau and to the long-predicted 1/2-saturation plateau. The plateau predicted at 2/5 saturation is particularly interesting since strain appears to be the only experimental probe with enough sensitivity to reveal it as magnetization probes see a much more gradual change in the same field range. BiCu2PO6 is a frustrated two-leg spin ladder compound with a spin gap that can be closed with a magnetic field of approximately 20T to induce a soliton lattice. Time permitting, I will also discuss magnetization, magnetostriction and specific heat vs magnetic fields to 65 T used to obtain the anisotropic (H,T) phase diagram in BiCu2PO6 single crystal samples. Work at the NHMFL was supported by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Science through the project ``Science at 100 Tesla,'' and the State of Florida.

  12. A 10 Kelvin 3 Tesla Magnet for Space Flight ADR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Riall, Sara; Pourrahimi, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    Many future space flight missions are expected to use adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs) to reach detector operating temperatures well below one Kelvin. The goal is to operate each ADR with a mechanical cooler as its heat sink, thus avoiding the use of liquid cryogens. Although mechanical coolers are being developed to operate at temperatures of 6 Kelvin and below, there is a large efficiency cost associated with operating them at the bottom of their temperature range. For the multi-stage ADR system being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, the goal is to operate with a 10 Kelvin mechanical cooler heat sink. With currently available paramagnetic materials, the highest temperature ADR stage in such a system will require a magnetic field of approximately three Tesla. Thus the goal is to develop a small, lightweight three Tesla superconducting magnet for operation at 10 Kelvin. It is important that this magnet have a low current/field ratio. Because traditional NbTi magnets do not operate safely above about six Kelvin, a magnet with a higher Tc is required. The primary focus has been on Nb3Sn magnets. Since standard Nb3Sn wire must be coated with thick insulation, wound on a magnet mandrel and then reacted, standard Nb,Sn magnets are quite heavy and require high currents Superconducting Systems developed a Nb3Sn wire which can be drawn down to small diameter, reacted, coated with thin insulation and then wound on a small diameter coil form. By using this smaller wire and operating closer to the wire s critical current, it should be possible to reduce the mass and operating current of 10 Kelvin magnets. Using this "react-then-wind" technology, Superconducting Systems has produced prototype 10 Kelvin magnets. This paper describes the development and testing of these magnets and discusses the outlook for including 10 Kelvin magnets on space-flight missions.

  13. Review: Security in Wireless Technologies in Business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattarova, F. Y.; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    Wireless technology seems to be everywhere now - but it is still relatively in its infancy. New standards and protocols continue to emerge and problems and bugs are discovered. Nevertheless, wireless networks make many things much more convenient and it appears that wireless networks are here to stay. The differences and similarities of wireless and wired security, the new threats brought by mobility, the security of networks and devices and effects of security, or lack of it are shortly discussed in this review paper.

  14. The Case for a Hierarchical Cosmology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaucouleurs, G. de

    1970-01-01

    The development of modern theoretical cosmology is presented and some questionable assumptions of orthodox cosmology are pointed out. Suggests that recent observations indicate that hierarchical clustering is a basic factor in cosmology. The implications of hierarchical models of the universe are considered. Bibliography. (LC)

  15. Discursive Hierarchical Patterning in Economics Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lung, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to apply Lung's (2008) model of the discursive hierarchical patterning of cases to a closer and more specific study of Economics cases and proposes a model of the distinct discursive hierarchical patterning of the same. It examines a corpus of 150 Economics cases with a view to uncovering the patterns of discourse construction.…

  16. Genetic Network Inference Using Hierarchical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shuhei; Tokuhisa, Masato; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Many methods for inferring genetic networks have been proposed, but the regulations they infer often include false-positives. Several researchers have attempted to reduce these erroneous regulations by proposing the use of a priori knowledge about the properties of genetic networks such as their sparseness, scale-free structure, and so on. This study focuses on another piece of a priori knowledge, namely, that biochemical networks exhibit hierarchical structures. Based on this idea, we propose an inference approach that uses the hierarchical structure in a target genetic network. To obtain a reasonable hierarchical structure, the first step of the proposed approach is to infer multiple genetic networks from the observed gene expression data. We take this step using an existing method that combines a genetic network inference method with a bootstrap method. The next step is to extract a hierarchical structure from the inferred networks that is consistent with most of the networks. Third, we use the hierarchical structure obtained to assign confidence values to all candidate regulations. Numerical experiments are also performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of using the hierarchical structure in the genetic network inference. The improvement accomplished by the use of the hierarchical structure is small. However, the hierarchical structure could be used to improve the performances of many existing inference methods. PMID:26941653

  17. Proposal of Wireless Traffic Control Schemes for Wireless LANs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraguri, Takefumi; Ichikawa, Takeo; Iizuka, Masataka; Kubota, Shuji

    This paper proposes two traffic control schemes to support the communication quality of multimedia streaming services such as VoIP and audio/video over IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN systems. The main features of the proposed scheme are bandwidth control for each flow of the multimedia streaming service and load balancing between access points (APs) of the wireless LAN by using information of data link, network and transport layers. The proposed schemes are implemented on a Linux machine which is called the wireless traffic controller (WTC). The WTC connects a high capacity backbone network and an access network to which the APs are attached. We evaluated the performance of the proposed WTC and confirmed that the communication quality of the multimedia streaming would be greatly improved by using this technique.

  18. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  19. Hierarchically nanostructured materials for sustainable environmental applications

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions, and multiple functionalities toward water remediation, biosensing, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing, and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology. PMID:24790946

  20. A neural signature of hierarchical reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Fernandes, José J F; Solway, Alec; Diuk, Carlos; McGuire, Joseph T; Barto, Andrew G; Niv, Yael; Botvinick, Matthew M

    2011-07-28

    Human behavior displays hierarchical structure: simple actions cohere into subtask sequences, which work together to accomplish overall task goals. Although the neural substrates of such hierarchy have been the target of increasing research, they remain poorly understood. We propose that the computations supporting hierarchical behavior may relate to those in hierarchical reinforcement learning (HRL), a machine-learning framework that extends reinforcement-learning mechanisms into hierarchical domains. To test this, we leveraged a distinctive prediction arising from HRL. In ordinary reinforcement learning, reward prediction errors are computed when there is an unanticipated change in the prospects for accomplishing overall task goals. HRL entails that prediction errors should also occur in relation to task subgoals. In three neuroimaging studies we observed neural responses consistent with such subgoal-related reward prediction errors, within structures previously implicated in reinforcement learning. The results reported support the relevance of HRL to the neural processes underlying hierarchical behavior.

  1. Wireless Andrew: Everywhere You Want To Be.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futhey, Tracy

    2000-01-01

    Describes the wireless local area network at Carnegie Mellon University. Highlights include classroom applications, particularly in the Business School; the use of laptop computers configured with wireless technology; handheld computers, including use for testing; and assuring appropriate uses of wireless technology. (LRW)

  2. Adaptive Protocols for Mobile Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-22

    frequency-hop wireless networks," International Journal of Wireless Information Networks , vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 147-159, July 2004. [PRW04c] M. B. Pursley...efficient routing of multimedia traffic in frequency-hop packet radio networks," submitted for publication in the International Journal of Wireless Information Networks , August

  3. A Wireless Communications Systems Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzelgoz, Sabih; Arslan, Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    A novel wireless communications systems laboratory course is introduced. The course teaches students how to design, test, and simulate wireless systems using modern instrumentation and computer-aided design (CAD) software. One of the objectives of the course is to help students understand the theoretical concepts behind wireless communication…

  4. Quantum transport through hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, S; Varghese, C; Novotny, M A

    2011-04-01

    The transport of quantum electrons through hierarchical lattices is of interest because such lattices have some properties of both regular lattices and random systems. We calculate the electron transmission as a function of energy in the tight-binding approximation for two related Hanoi networks. HN3 is a Hanoi network with every site having three bonds. HN5 has additional bonds added to HN3 to make the average number of bonds per site equal to five. We present a renormalization group approach to solve the matrix equation involved in this quantum transport calculation. We observe band gaps in HN3, while no such band gaps are observed in linear networks or in HN5. We provide a detailed scaling analysis near the edges of these band gaps.

  5. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  6. Galaxy formation through hierarchical clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods for studying the formation of galaxies by gas condensation within massive dark halos are presented. The present scheme applies to cosmogonies where structure grows through hierarchical clustering of a mixture of gas and dissipationless dark matter. The simplest models consistent with the current understanding of N-body work on dissipationless clustering, and that of numerical and analytic work on gas evolution and cooling are adopted. Standard models for the evolution of the stellar population are also employed, and new models for the way star formation heats and enriches the surrounding gas are constructed. Detailed results are presented for a cold dark matter universe with Omega = 1 and H(0) = 50 km/s/Mpc, but the present methods are applicable to other models. The present luminosity functions contain significantly more faint galaxies than are observed.

  7. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  8. Core Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James

    2011-01-01

    The Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation (RHSEG) software has been repackaged to provide a version of the RHSEG software that is not subject to patent restrictions and that can be released to the general public through NASA GSFC's Open Source release process. Like the Core HSEG Software Package, this Core RHSEG Software Package also includes a visualization program called HSEGViewer along with a utility program HSEGReader. It also includes an additional utility program called HSEGExtract. The unique feature of the Core RHSEG package is that it is a repackaging of the RHSEG technology designed to specifically avoid the inclusion of the certain software technology. Unlike the Core HSEG package, it includes the recursive portions of the technology, but does not include processing window artifact elimination technology.

  9. Hierarchical modeling for image classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likens, W.; Maw, K.

    1982-01-01

    As part of the California Integrated Remote Sensing System's (CIRSS) San Bernardino County Project, the use of data layers from a geographic information system (GIS) as an integral part of the Landsat image classification process was investigated. Through a hierarchical modeling technique, elevation, aspect, land use, vegetation, and growth management data from the project's data base were used to guide class labeling decisions in a 1976 Landsat MSS land cover classification. A similar model, incorporating 1976-1979 Landsat spectral change data in addition to other data base elements, was used in the classification of a 1979 Landsat image. The resultant Landsat products were integrated as additional layers into the data base for use in growth management, fire hazard, and hydrological modeling.

  10. Cluster assembly of hierarchical nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    In the past few years, atom clusters with diameters in the range of 2--20 nm of a variety of materials, including both metals and ceramics, have been synthesized by evaporation and condensation in high-purity gases and subsequently consolidated in situ under ultrahigh vacuum conditions to create nanophase materials. These new utlrafine-grained materials have properties that are often significantly different and considerably improved relative to those of their coarser-grained counterparts owing to both their small grain-size scale and the large percentage of their atoms in grain boundary environments. Since their properties can be engineered during the synthesis and processing steps, cluster-assembled materials appear to have significant potential for the introduction of a hierarchy of both structure and properties. Some of the recent research on nanophase materials related to properties and scale are reviewed and some of the possibilities for synthesizing hierarchical nanostructures via cluster assembly are considered.

  11. Hierarchical modeling of protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kurcinski, Mateusz; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2007-07-01

    A novel approach to hierarchical peptide-protein and protein-protein docking is described and evaluated. Modeling procedure starts from a reduced space representation of proteins and peptides. Polypeptide chains are represented by strings of alpha-carbon beads restricted to a fine-mesh cubic lattice. Side chains are represented by up to two centers of interactions, corresponding to beta-carbons and the centers of mass of the remaining portions of the side groups, respectively. Additional pseudoatoms are located in the centers of the virtual bonds connecting consecutive alpha carbons. These pseudoatoms support a model of main-chain hydrogen bonds. Docking starts from a collection of random configurations of modeled molecules. Interacting molecules are flexible; however, higher accuracy models are obtained when the conformational freedom of one (the larger one) of the assembling molecules is limited by a set of weak distance restraints extracted from the experimental (or theoretically predicted) structures. Sampling is done by means of Replica Exchange Monte Carlo method. Afterwards, the set of obtained structures is subject to a hierarchical clustering. Then, the centroids of the resulting clusters are used as scaffolds for the reconstruction of the atomic details. Finally, the all-atom models are energy minimized and scored using classical tools of molecular mechanics. The method is tested on a set of macromolecular assemblies consisting of proteins and peptides. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach to the flexible docking could be successfully applied to prediction of protein-peptide and protein-protein interactions. The obtained models are almost always qualitatively correct, although usually of relatively low (or moderate) resolution. In spite of this limitation, the proposed method opens new possibilities of computational studies of macromolecular recognition and mechanisms of assembly of macromolecular complexes.

  12. Evolutionary games in wireless networks.

    PubMed

    Tembine, Hamidou; Altman, Eitan; El-Azouzi, Rachid; Hayel, Yezekael

    2010-06-01

    We consider a noncooperative interaction among a large population of mobiles that interfere with each other through many local interactions. The first objective of this paper is to extend the evolutionary game framework to allow an arbitrary number of mobiles that are involved in a local interaction. We allow for interactions between mobiles that are not necessarily reciprocal. We study 1) multiple-access control in a slotted Aloha-based wireless network and 2) power control in wideband code-division multiple-access wireless networks. We define and characterize the equilibrium (called evolutionarily stable strategy) for these games and study the influence of wireless channels and pricing on the evolution of dynamics and the equilibrium.

  13. [Development of Bluetooth wireless sensors].

    PubMed

    Moor, C; Schwaibold, M; Roth, H; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    Wireless communication could help to overcome current obstacles in medical devices and could enable medical services to offer completely new scenarios in health care. The Bluetooth technology which is the upcoming global market leader in wireless communication turned out to be perfectly suited not only for consumer market products but also in the medical environment [1]. It offers a low power, low cost connection in the medium range of 1-100 m with a bandwidth of currently 723.2 kbaud. This paper describes the development of a wireless ECG device and a Pulse Oximeter. Equipped with a Bluetooth port, the measurement devices are enabled to transmit data between the sensor and a Bluetooth-monitor. Therefore, CSR's Bluetooth protocol embedded two-processor and embedded single-processor architecture has been used.

  14. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  15. Wireless Augmented Reality Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, Ann (Inventor); Jedrey, Thomas (Inventor); Agan, Martin (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A portable unit is for video communication to select a user name in a user name network. A transceiver wirelessly accesses a communication network through a wireless connection to a general purpose node coupled to the communication network. A user interface can receive user input to log on to a user name network through the communication network. The user name network has a plurality of user names, at least one of the plurality of user names is associated with a remote portable unit, logged on to the user name network and available for video communication.

  16. WIRELESS FOR A NUCLEAR FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, D; Joe Cordaro, J

    2007-03-28

    The introduction of wireless technology into a government site where nuclear material is processed and stored brings new meaning to the term ''harsh environment''. At SRNL, we are attempting to address not only the harsh RF and harsh physical environment common to industrial facilities, but also the ''harsh'' regulatory environment necessitated by the nature of the business at our site. We will discuss our concepts, processes, and expected outcomes in our attempts to surmount the roadblocks and reap the benefits of wireless in our ''factory''.

  17. Wireless technology for integrated manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Manges, W.W.; Allgood, G.O.; Shourbaji, A.A.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the ground breaking work in Oak Ridge facilities that now leads us to the brink of the wireless revolution in manufacturing. The focus is on solving tough technological problems necessary for success and addressing the critical issues of throughput, security, reliability, and robustness in applying wireless technology to manufacturing processes. Innovative solutions to these problems are highlighted through detailed designs and testbed implementations that demonstrate key concepts. The DOE-Oak Ridge complex represented by the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technologies (ORCMT) continues to develop these technologies and will continue to focus on solving tough manufacturing problems.

  18. Wireless Technologies Implications for Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhr, Peter L; Manges, Wayne W; Schweitzer, Patrick; Kagan, Hesh

    2010-01-01

    Wireless technologies have advanced well beyond simple SCADA radio systems and point-to-point links. The current applications supported by industrial-grade wireless sensors and systems range from field measurements (classic I/O) to voice, video, asset tracking, mobile operators, etc. Which such a wide array of supported applications, the belief that wireless technology will only impact power systems in terms of wireless sensors is shortsighted. This paper, coauthored by a group of individuals intimately involved in the general realm of industrial wireless , presents a simple snapshot of current radio technologies that are used (or seriously contemplated for use) in power systems.

  19. Secure Adaptive Topology Control for Wireless Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Ching-Tsung; Li, Yu-Wei; Wen, Chih-Yu; Ouyang, Yen-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a secure decentralized clustering algorithm for wireless ad-hoc sensor networks. The algorithm operates without a centralized controller, operates asynchronously, and does not require that the location of the sensors be known a priori. Based on the cluster-based topology, secure hierarchical communication protocols and dynamic quarantine strategies are introduced to defend against spam attacks, since this type of attacks can exhaust the energy of sensor nodes and will shorten the lifetime of a sensor network drastically. By adjusting the threshold of infected percentage of the cluster coverage, our scheme can dynamically coordinate the proportion of the quarantine region and adaptively achieve the cluster control and the neighborhood control of attacks. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is feasible and cost effective for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22205866

  20. Wireless Ways: Business and Personal Applications of Wireless Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Joe

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Art Technology Group (ATG), an electronic business and customer management company, and the work they have done with wireless technology. Highlights include designing virtual offices and supporting the resulting virtual community; the mobility it allows; problems with bandwidth; and display issues. (LRW)

  1. NASA thesaurus. Volume 1: Hierarchical Listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    There are over 17,000 postable terms and nearly 4,000 nonpostable terms approved for use in the NASA scientific and technical information system in the Hierarchical Listing of the NASA Thesaurus. The generic structure is presented for many terms. The broader term and narrower term relationships are shown in an indented fashion that illustrates the generic structure better than the more widely used BT and NT listings. Related terms are generously applied, thus enhancing the usefulness of the Hierarchical Listing. Greater access to the Hierarchical Listing may be achieved with the collateral use of Volume 2 - Access Vocabulary and Volume 3 - Definitions.

  2. NASA thesaurus. Volume 1: Hierarchical listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    There are 16,835 postable terms and 3,765 nonpostable terms approved for use in the NASA scientific and technical information system in the Hierarchical Listing of the NASA Thesaurus. The generic structure is presented for many terms. The broader term and narrower term relationships are shown in an indented fashion that illustrates the generic structure better than the more widely used BT and NT listings. Related terms are generously applied, thus enhancing the usefulness of the Hierarchical Listing. Greater access to the Hierarchical Listing may be achieved with the collateral use of Volume 2 - Access Vocabulary.

  3. NASA Thesaurus. Volume 1: Hierarchical listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    There are 16,713 postable terms and 3,716 nonpostable terms approved for use in the NASA scientific and technical information system in the Hierarchical Listing of the NASA Thesaurus. The generic structure is presented for many terms. The broader term and narrower term relationships are shown in an indented fashion that illustrates the generic structure better than the more widely used BT and NT listings. Related terms are generously applied, thus enhancing the usefulness of the Hierarchical Listing. Greater access to the Hierarchical Listing may be achieved with the collateral use of Volume 2 - Access Vocabulary.

  4. Wireless communication and their mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaki, Shozo

    2015-05-01

    Mobile phone and smart phone are penetrating into social use. To develop these system, various type of theoretical works based on mathematics are done, such as radio propagation theory, traffic theory, security coding and wireless device etc. In this speech, I will mention about the related mathematics and problems in it.

  5. Gigabit Wireless for Network Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoedel, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Uninterrupted, high-bandwidth network connectivity is crucial for higher education. Colleges and universities increasingly adopt gigabit wireless solutions because of their fiber-equivalent performance, quick implementation, and significant return on investment. For just those reasons, Rush University Medical Center switched from free space optics…

  6. Breaking Free with Wireless Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischman, John

    2002-01-01

    Discusses wireless local area networks (LANs) which typically consist of laptop computers that connect to fixed access points via infrared or radio signals. Topics include wide area networks; personal area networks; problems, including limitations of available bandwidth, interference, and security concerns; use in education; interoperability;…

  7. Wireless Crew Communication Feasibility Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, Ronald D.; Romero, Andy; Juge, David

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing discussions with crew currently onboard the ISS as well as the crew debriefs from completed ISS missions indicate that issues associated with the lack of wireless crew communication results in increased crew task completion times and lower productivity, creates cable management issues, and increases crew frustration.

  8. Underwater optical wireless communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2010-01-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and subsea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, biogeochemical, evolutionary, and ecological changes in the sea, ocean, and lake environments, and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. Models are presented for three kinds of optical wireless communication links: (a) a line-of-sight link, (b) a modulating retroreflector link, and (c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered light it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. It is concluded from the analysis that a high-data-rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV-to-UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  9. Modules for 6.0 Tesla, vertically separated, clustered or distributed lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1985-10-01

    A total of four lattices have been designed for distributed and (3,3) clustered versions of the SSC, and are available in the SSC database, SSCDB. These lattices are constructed of the same four basic modules, which with only minor tuning can be re-organised to form many conceivable realistic geometries. One module is trivial, consisting of regular cells in a long main arc. The description of the other three modules is the central theme of this report. Potential improvements in both the modules and their implementation are also mentioned. The lattices, with the generic name VSDlbnn.DAT, are in MAD/standard input format in the [SSCDB.LATTICES] directory of the database. Lower case letters in the generic name represent variable characters, where {open_quotes}b{close_quotes} is either C or D, according to whether the lattice is (3,3) Clustered or Distributed, and where {open_quotes}nn{close_quotes} is 01 or 10, according to whether the collision beta is {beta}{sup *} = 1.0 or 10.0 metres, in luminosity or injection lattices. The general title {open_quotes}VS{close_quotes} stands for the Vertical Separation of the two beam lines, with a (total) separation in the main arcs of 0.70 metres, while the notation {open_quotes}Dl{close_quotes} reflects the regular cell dipoles of 6.0 Tesla ({open_quotes}D{close_quotes}), with a phase advance per cell of 60 degrees ({open_quotes}1{close_quotes}). The half cell length is 100 metres. It would be useful for lattice designers and users in the SSC design community to agree on some such lattice naming convention, even if the agreement is merely informal. Two criticisms of the above convention are first, that since the magnet selection for the SSC has fixed the dipole field to be close to 6.4 Tesla, the {open_quotes}D{close_quotes} definition of dipole strength is redundant, and second, that collision betas of less than 1.0 metre can not be handled unless three digits, {open_quotes}nnn{close_quotes}, are included.

  10. Hierarchically nanostructured barium sulfate fibers.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ibarra, Issis C; Rodríguez-Gattorno, Geonel; García-Sánchez, Mario F; Sánchez-Solís, Antonio; Manero, Octavio

    2010-05-18

    BaSO(4) nanostructures with controlled morphologies were successfully produced via one-step process through precipitation of BaSO(4) in aqueous and organic media. The synthesis is carried out by mixing solutions of BaCl(2) and Na(2)SO(4) in presence of EDTA (disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) at room temperature. The influence of the reaction conditions such as initial reactants concentration, pH, EDTA/[Ba(2+)] ratio and aging on the BaSO(4) nanoparticles organization is studied. Using EDTA in aqueous media, spherical secondary particles of 500 nm diameter are obtained, which are formed by 4 nm size primary particles. With dimethyl sulfoxide and small amounts of water (5%) and EDTA, the aging process allows the production of long homogeneous fibers, related to hierarchical organization of BaSO(4) nanoparticles. Direct observation of self-assembling of primary particles by HRTEM allows proposing a mechanism for fiber formation, which is based on multipolar attractions that lead to a brick-by-brick organization along a preferential orientation. Results evidence the role of EDTA as controlling agent of the morphology and primary and secondary mean particle size.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  12. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  13. Hierarchically UVO patterned elastomeric and thermoplastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Kulkarni, Manish; Marshall, Allan; Karim, Alamgir

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple yet versatile method to fabricate tunable hierarchical micro-nanostructures on flexible Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer and thermoplastic polymer surface by a two-step process. Nanoscale patterned PDMS was obtained by imprinting compact disc (CD)/digital video disc (DVD) patterns. The second micro pattern was superposed by selective densification of PDMS by exposing to ultraviolet-ozone radiation (UVO) through micro-patterned TEM grid as a mask. The nanoscale patterns are preserved through UVO exposure step leading to formation of deep hierarchical patterns, so that for a 19 um square mesh, the micro pattern has a depth of 600nm with 6h PDMS UVO exposure time. This simple method can be promoted to fabricate hierarchical structures of thermoplastic materials (such as polystyrene), from which the mechanism of capillary imprinting and thermal stability of hierarchical patterns are investigated. This study is potentially important to various applications ranging from biomimetic scaffolds to solar cell.

  14. Zeolitic materials with hierarchical porous structures.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Orozco, Sofia; Inayat, Amer; Schwab, Andreas; Selvam, Thangaraj; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2011-06-17

    During the past several years, different kinds of hierarchical structured zeolitic materials have been synthesized due to their highly attractive properties, such as superior mass/heat transfer characteristics, lower restriction of the diffusion of reactants in the mesopores, and low pressure drop. Our contribution provides general information regarding types and preparation methods of hierarchical zeolitic materials and their relative advantages and disadvantages. Thereafter, recent advances in the preparation and characterization of hierarchical zeolitic structures within the crystallites by post-synthetic treatment methods, such as dealumination or desilication; and structured devices by in situ and ex situ zeolite coatings on open-cellular ceramic foams as (non-reactive as well as reactive) supports are highlighted. Specific advantages of using hierarchical zeolitic catalysts/structures in selected catalytic reactions, such as benzene to phenol (BTOP) and methanol to olefins (MTO) are presented.

  15. Hazmat Cam Wireless Video System

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Young

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the Hazmat Cam Wireless Video System and its application to emergency response involving chemical, biological or radiological contamination. The Idaho National Laboratory designed the Hazmat Cam Wireless Video System to assist the National Guard Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Teams during their mission of emergency response to incidents involving weapons of mass destruction. The lightweight, handheld camera transmits encrypted, real-time video from inside a contaminated area, or hot-zone, to a command post located a safe distance away. The system includes a small wireless video camera, a true-diversity receiver, viewing console, and an optional extension link that allows the command post to be placed up to five miles from danger. It can be fully deployed by one person in a standalone configuration in less than 10 minutes. The complete system is battery powered. Each rechargeable camera battery powers the camera for 3 hours with the receiver and video monitor battery lasting 22 hours on a single charge. The camera transmits encrypted, low frequency analog video signals to a true-diversity receiver with three antennas. This unique combination of encryption and transmission technologies delivers encrypted, interference-free images to the command post under conditions where other wireless systems fail. The lightweight camera is completely waterproof for quick and easy decontamination after use. The Hazmat Cam Wireless Video System is currently being used by several National Guard Teams, the US Army, and by fire fighters. The system has been proven to greatly enhance situational awareness during the crucial, initial phase of a hazardous response allowing commanders to make better, faster, safer decisions.

  16. Sex hormone status in male rats after exposure to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, R M; Moustafa, Y M; Ali, F M; Shafik, A

    2006-01-01

    The question of whether extremely low frequency magnetic fields can affect biological system has attracted attention. The theoretical possibility of such an interaction is often questioned and the site of interaction is unknown. The influence of extremely low frequency magnetic field of 50 Hz, 5 mTesla on sex hormone status was studied. 60 male albino rats were divided into 6 groups and were continuously exposed to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field generated by magnetic field chamber for periods of 1, 2 and 4 weeks. For each experimental point, sham treated group was used as a control. Assay of serum testosterone LH, FSH, and prolactin were performed. Serum testosterone showed no significant changes. FSH showed significant increase than sham exposed group after 1 week magnetic field exposure. LH showed significant increase than sham exposed group only after 4 weeks magnetic field exposure, while serum prolactin hormone level showed a significant increase in all magnetic field exposed groups than sham exposed animals. Exposure to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field for periods of 1, 2 and 4 weeks has no effect on testosterone level, some changes on FSH and LH serum levels and increase in serum prolactin level.

  17. Is the Ellipsoid Formula the New Standard for 3-Tesla MRI Prostate Volume Calculation without Endorectal Coil?

    PubMed

    Haas, Matthias; Günzel, Karsten; Miller, Kurt; Hamm, Bernd; Cash, Hannes; Asbach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Prostate volume in multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) is of clinical importance. For 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil, there is no distinctive standard for volume calculation. We tested the accuracy of the ellipsoid formula with planimetric volume measurements as reference and investigated the correlation of gland volume and cancer detection rate on MRI/ultrasound (MRI/US) fusion-guided biopsy. One hundred forty-three patients with findings on 3-Tesla mpMRI suspicious of cancer and subsequent MRI/US fusion-guided targeted biopsy and additional systematic biopsy were analyzed. T2-weighted images were used for measuring the prostate diameters and for planimetric volume measurement by a segmentation software. Planimetric and calculated prostate volumes were compared with clinical data. The median prostate volume was 48.1 ml (interquartile range (IQR) 36.9-62.1 ml). Volume calculated by the ellipsoid formula showed a strong concordance with planimetric volume, with a tendency to underestimate prostate volume (median volume 43.1 ml (IQR 31.2-58.8 ml); r = 0.903, p < 0.001). There was a moderate, significant inverse correlation of prostate volume to a positive biopsy result (r = -0.24, p = 0.004). The ellipsoid formula gives sufficient approximation of prostate volume on 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil. It allows a fast, valid volume calculation in prostate MRI datasets.

  18. Hierarchical mutual information for the comparison of hierarchical community structures in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, Juan Ignacio; Tessone, Claudio Juan; Caldarelli, Guido

    2015-12-01

    The quest for a quantitative characterization of community and modular structure of complex networks produced a variety of methods and algorithms to classify different networks. However, it is not clear if such methods provide consistent, robust, and meaningful results when considering hierarchies as a whole. Part of the problem is the lack of a similarity measure for the comparison of hierarchical community structures. In this work we give a contribution by introducing the hierarchical mutual information, which is a generalization of the traditional mutual information and makes it possible to compare hierarchical partitions and hierarchical community structures. The normalized version of the hierarchical mutual information should behave analogously to the traditional normalized mutual information. Here the correct behavior of the hierarchical mutual information is corroborated on an extensive battery of numerical experiments. The experiments are performed on artificial hierarchies and on the hierarchical community structure of artificial and empirical networks. Furthermore, the experiments illustrate some of the practical applications of the hierarchical mutual information, namely the comparison of different community detection methods and the study of the consistency, robustness, and temporal evolution of the hierarchical modular structure of networks.

  19. Hierarchical Models of the Nearshore Complex System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    unclassified unclassified /,andard Form 7 7Qien. -pii Prescrbed by ANS Sid 239-18 zgB -10z Hierarchical Models of the Nearshore Complex System: Final...TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Hierarchical Models of the Nearshore Complex System N00014-02-1-0358 6. AUTHOR(S) Brad Werner 7. PERFORMING...8217 ........... The long-term goal of this reasearch was to develop and test predictive models for nearshore processes. This grant was terminaton funding for the

  20. Hierarchical Nanoceramics for Industrial Process Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, James, A.; Brosnan, Kristen, H.; Striker, Todd; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Aceto, Steven, C.; Gao, Yan; Willson, Patrick, D.; Manoharan, Mohan; Armstrong, Eric, N., Wachsman, Eric, D.; Kao, Chi-Chang

    2011-07-15

    This project developed a robust, tunable, hierarchical nanoceramics materials platform for industrial process sensors in harsh-environments. Control of material structure at multiple length scales from nano to macro increased the sensing response of the materials to combustion gases. These materials operated at relatively high temperatures, enabling detection close to the source of combustion. It is anticipated that these materials can form the basis for a new class of sensors enabling widespread use of efficient combustion processes with closed loop feedback control in the energy-intensive industries. The first phase of the project focused on materials selection and process development, leading to hierarchical nanoceramics that were evaluated for sensing performance. The second phase focused on optimizing the materials processes and microstructures, followed by validation of performance of a prototype sensor in a laboratory combustion environment. The objectives of this project were achieved by: (1) synthesizing and optimizing hierarchical nanostructures; (2) synthesizing and optimizing sensing nanomaterials; (3) integrating sensing functionality into hierarchical nanostructures; (4) demonstrating material performance in a sensing element; and (5) validating material performance in a simulated service environment. The project developed hierarchical nanoceramic electrodes for mixed potential zirconia gas sensors with increased surface area and demonstrated tailored electrocatalytic activity operable at high temperatures enabling detection of products of combustion such as NOx close to the source of combustion. Methods were developed for synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures with high, stable surface area, integrated catalytic functionality within the structures for gas sensing, and demonstrated materials performance in harsh lab and combustion gas environments.

  1. Performance Analysis of Memory Transfers and GEMM Subroutines on NVIDIA Tesla GPU Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Allada, Veerendra, Benjegerdes, Troy; Bode, Brett

    2009-08-31

    Commodity clusters augmented with application accelerators are evolving as competitive high performance computing systems. The Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) with a very high arithmetic density and performance per price ratio is a good platform for the scientific application acceleration. In addition to the interconnect bottlenecks among the cluster compute nodes, the cost of memory copies between the host and the GPU device have to be carefully amortized to improve the overall efficiency of the application. Scientific applications also rely on efficient implementation of the BAsic Linear Algebra Subroutines (BLAS), among which the General Matrix Multiply (GEMM) is considered as the workhorse subroutine. In this paper, they study the performance of the memory copies and GEMM subroutines that are critical to port the computational chemistry algorithms to the GPU clusters. To that end, a benchmark based on the NetPIPE framework is developed to evaluate the latency and bandwidth of the memory copies between the host and the GPU device. The performance of the single and double precision GEMM subroutines from the NVIDIA CUBLAS 2.0 library are studied. The results have been compared with that of the BLAS routines from the Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL) to understand the computational trade-offs. The test bed is a Intel Xeon cluster equipped with NVIDIA Tesla GPUs.

  2. MEG evaluation of pico-Tesla external TMS on multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P; Adamopoulos, A; Kotini, A; Tsagas, N

    2016-07-01

    Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of 10 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients (2 men, 8 women, mean 41.3±9.5 years, mean disease duration 12.7±7.2 years) were obtained using a whole-head 122 - channel MEG system in a magnetically shielded room of low magnetic noise. Our experimental design was double-blind in order to look for possible effect of external pico - Tesla Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (pT-TMS). The external pT-TMS was applied on the MS patients with proper field characteristics (magnetic field amplitude: 1-7.5pT, frequency: the alpha-rhythm of the patient 8-13Hz) which were obtained prior to the application of pT-TMS. Each MS patient had two separate recording sessions consisting of 3 runs in between where were given real or sham pT-TMS. It was then tried to predict the real and sham stimulation sessions based on the changes in the mean peak frequency difference (MPFD) observed in the brain of the patients in the 2-7Hz frequency band. After unblinding it was found a significant effect of an increase of frequencies in the range of 2-7Hz across the subjects followed by an improvement and normalization of the MEG.

  3. New microwave beam position monitors for the TESLA test facility—FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamps, T.; Lorenz, R.

    1998-12-01

    Beam-based alignment is essential for the operation of the SASE-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility Linac. In order to ensure the overlap of the photon beam and the electron beam, the position of the electron beam has to be measured along the undulator beamline with a high resolution. Due to the severe space limitations, a new microwave concept is being considered. It is based on special ridged waveguides coupling by small slots to the magnetic field of the electron beam. The four waveguides and slots of each monitor were split into two symmetric pairs separated in beam direction. All waveguides are about 35 degrees apart in azimuth from the horizontal axis and will be fabricated using electro-discharge machining (EDM). Waveguide-to-coax adaptors were designed to couple the signal of each waveguide into a coaxial cable. The goal is to measure the averaged position of a bunch train in a narrowband receiver with a center frequency of 12 GHz. A prototype of this monitor was built and tested on a testbench, as well as at the CLIC Test Facility at CERN. The paper summarizes the concept, the design, and further improvements of the waveguide monitor.

  4. Constructing a 4-TESLA Large Thin Solenoid at the Limit of what can BE Safely Operated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.

    The 4-tesla, 6 m free bore CMS solenoid has been successfully tested, operated and mapped at CERN during the autumn of 2006 in a surface hall and fully recommissioned in the underground experimental area in the autumn of 2008. The conceptual design started in 1990, the R&D studies in 1993, and the construction was approved in 1997. At the time the main parameters of this project were considered beyond what was thought possible as, in particular, the total stored magnetic energy reaches 2.6 GJ for a specific magnetic energy density exceeding 11 kJ/kg of cold mass. During this period, the international design and construction team had to make several important technical choices, particularly mechanical ones, to maximize the chances of reaching the nominal induction of 4 T. These design choices are explained and critically reviewed in the light of what is presently known to determine if better solutions would be possible today for constructing a new large high-field thin solenoid for a future detector magnet.

  5. Constructing a 4-Tesla Large Thin Solenoid at the Limit of what can BE Safely Operated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.

    The 4-tesla, 6m free bore CMS solenoid has been successfully tested, operated and mapped at CERN during the autumn of 2006 in a surface hall and fully recommissioned in the underground experimental area in the autumn of 2008. The conceptual design started in 1990, the R&D studies in 1993, and the construction was approved in 1997. At the time the main parameters of this project were considered beyond what was thought possible as, in particular, the total stored magnetic energy reaches 2.6GJ for a specific magnetic energy density exceeding 11 kJ/kg of cold mass. During this period, the international design and construction team had to make several important technical choices, particularly mechanical ones, to maximize the chances of reaching the nominal induction of 4T. These design choices are explained and critically reviewed in the light of what is presently known to determine if better solutions would be possible today for constructing a new large high-field thin solenoid for a future detector magnet.

  6. Imaging islets labeled with magnetic nanoparticles at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Tai, Joo Ho; Foster, Paula; Rosales, Alma; Feng, Biao; Hasilo, Craig; Martinez, Violetta; Ramadan, Soha; Snir, Jonatan; Melling, C W James; Dhanvantari, Savita; Rutt, Brian; White, David J G

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for imaging Feridex (superparamagnetic iron oxide [SPIO])-labeled islets of Langerhans using a standard clinical 1.5-Tesla (T) scanner and employing steady-state acquisition imaging sequence (3DFIESTA). Both porcine and rat islets were labeled with SPIO by a transfection technique using a combination of poly-l-lysine and electroporation. Electron microscopy demonstrated presence of SPIO particles within the individual islet cells, including beta-cells and particles trapped between cell membranes. Our labeling method produced a transfection rate of 860 pg to 3.4 ng iron per islet, dependent on the size of the islet. The labeling procedure did not disrupt either the function or viability of the islets. In vitro 3DFIESTA magnetic resonance images of single-labeled islets corresponded with their optical images. In vivo T2*-weighted scan using 1.5 T detected as few as 200 SPIO-labeled islets transplanted under rat kidney capsule, which correlated with immunohistochemistry of the transplant for insulin and iron. Ex vivo 3DFIESTA images of kidneys containing 200, 800 or 2,000 SPIO-labeled islet isografts showed good correlation between signal loss and increasing numbers of islets. These data provide evidence that islets can be labeled with SPIO and imaged using clinically available 1.5- T MRI.

  7. Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, Scott A; Samarth, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

  8. An inverted-microstrip resonator for human head proton MR imaging at 7 tesla.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Sainati, Robert; Chen, Wei

    2005-03-01

    As an extension of the previously developed microstrip transmission line (MTL) RF coil design, a high-frequency RF volume coil using multiple inverted MTL (iMTL) resonators for human head imaging at high magnetic field strength of 7 tesla (T) is reported. Compared to conventional MTL resonators, iMTL resonators can operate at higher frequency with lower losses and, thus, are suitable for designs of high-frequency RF volume coils with large coil size for human MR imaging and spectroscopy at high fields. An approach using capacitive terminations was analyzed and applied to the design of the iMTL volume coil for improving RF field homogeneity and broadening frequency-tuning range. A performance-comparison study was conducted between the prototype iMTL volume coil and a custom-built TEM volume coil at 7 T. The iMTL volume coil presents a comparable SNR and intrinsic B1 homogeneity to the TEM volume coil. Phantom and the human head images acquired using the iMTL volume coil are also presented. The proposed iMTL volume coil provides an efficient and alternative solution to design high-frequency and large-size volume coils for human MR applications at very high fields.

  9. Human brain diffusion tensor imaging at submillimeter isotropic resolution on a 3Tesla clinical MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Sundman, Mark; Petit, Laurent; Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chu, Mei-Lan; Petty, Christopher; Song, Allen W; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-09-01

    The advantages of high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been demonstrated in a recent post-mortem human brain study (Miller et al., NeuroImage 2011;57(1):167-181), showing that white matter fiber tracts can be much more accurately detected in data at a submillimeter isotropic resolution. To our knowledge, in vivo human brain DTI at a submillimeter isotropic resolution has not been routinely achieved yet because of the difficulty in simultaneously achieving high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in DTI scans. Here we report a 3D multi-slab interleaved EPI acquisition integrated with multiplexed sensitivity encoded (MUSE) reconstruction, to achieve high-quality, high-SNR and submillimeter isotropic resolution (0.85×0.85×0.85mm(3)) in vivo human brain DTI on a 3Tesla clinical MRI scanner. In agreement with the previously reported post-mortem human brain DTI study, our in vivo data show that the structural connectivity networks of human brains can be mapped more accurately and completely with high-resolution DTI as compared with conventional DTI (e.g., 2×2×2mm(3)).

  10. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-12-01

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged Substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with root-mean-square (RMS) error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apo-transferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g., 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1 M at m/z = 2700).

  11. 7 Tesla fMRI Reveals Systematic Functional Organization for Binocular Disparity in Dorsal Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Nuno R.; Ban, Hiroshi; Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa M.; Francis, Susan T.; Schluppeck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    The binocular disparity between the views of the world registered by the left and right eyes provides a powerful signal about the depth structure of the environment. Despite increasing knowledge of the cortical areas that process disparity from animal models, comparatively little is known about the local architecture of stereoscopic processing in the human brain. Here, we take advantage of the high spatial specificity and image contrast offered by 7 tesla fMRI to test for systematic organization of disparity representations in the human brain. Participants viewed random dot stereogram stimuli depicting different depth positions while we recorded fMRI responses from dorsomedial visual cortex. We repeated measurements across three separate imaging sessions. Using a series of computational modeling approaches, we report three main advances in understanding disparity organization in the human brain. First, we show that disparity preferences are clustered and that this organization persists across imaging sessions, particularly in area V3A. Second, we observe differences between the local distribution of voxel responses in early and dorsomedial visual areas, suggesting different cortical organization. Third, using modeling of voxel responses, we show that higher dorsal areas (V3A, V3B/KO) have properties that are characteristic of human depth judgments: a simple model that uses tuning parameters estimated from fMRI data captures known variations in human psychophysical performance. Together, these findings indicate that human dorsal visual cortex contains selective cortical structures for disparity that may support the neural computations that underlie depth perception. PMID:25698743

  12. A Tesla-pulse forming line-plasma opening switch pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novac, B. M.; Kumar, R.; Smith, I. R.

    2010-10-01

    A pulsed power generator based on a high-voltage Tesla transformer which charges a 3.85 Ω/55 ns water-filled pulse forming line to 300 kV has been developed at Loughborough University as a training tool for pulsed power students. The generator uses all forms of insulation specific to pulsed power technology, liquid (oil and water), gas (SF6), and magnetic insulation in vacuum, and a number of fast voltage and current sensors are implemented for diagnostic purposes. A miniature (centimeter-size) plasma opening switch has recently been coupled to the output of the pulse forming line, with the overall system comprising the first phase of a program aimed at the development of a novel repetitive, table-top generator capable of producing 15 GW pulses for high power microwave loads. Technical details of all the generator components and the main experimental results obtained during the program and demonstrations of their performance are presented in the paper, together with a description of the various diagnostic tools involved. In particular, it is shown that the miniature plasma opening switch is capable of reducing the rise time of the input current while significantly increasing the load power. Future plans are outlined in the conclusions.

  13. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  14. An efficient tensor transpose algorithm for multicore CPU, Intel Xeon Phi, and NVidia Tesla GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Lyakh, Dmitry I.

    2015-01-05

    An efficient parallel tensor transpose algorithm is suggested for shared-memory computing units, namely, multicore CPU, Intel Xeon Phi, and NVidia GPU. The algorithm operates on dense tensors (multidimensional arrays) and is based on the optimization of cache utilization on x86 CPU and the use of shared memory on NVidia GPU. From the applied side, the ultimate goal is to minimize the overhead encountered in the transformation of tensor contractions into matrix multiplications in computer implementations of advanced methods of quantum many-body theory (e.g., in electronic structure theory and nuclear physics). A particular accent is made on higher-dimensional tensors that typically appear in the so-called multireference correlated methods of electronic structure theory. Depending on tensor dimensionality, the presented optimized algorithms can achieve an order of magnitude speedup on x86 CPUs and 2-3 times speedup on NVidia Tesla K20X GPU with respect to the na ve scattering algorithm (no memory access optimization). Furthermore, the tensor transpose routines developed in this work have been incorporated into a general-purpose tensor algebra library (TAL-SH).

  15. An efficient tensor transpose algorithm for multicore CPU, Intel Xeon Phi, and NVidia Tesla GPU

    DOE PAGES

    Lyakh, Dmitry I.

    2015-01-05

    An efficient parallel tensor transpose algorithm is suggested for shared-memory computing units, namely, multicore CPU, Intel Xeon Phi, and NVidia GPU. The algorithm operates on dense tensors (multidimensional arrays) and is based on the optimization of cache utilization on x86 CPU and the use of shared memory on NVidia GPU. From the applied side, the ultimate goal is to minimize the overhead encountered in the transformation of tensor contractions into matrix multiplications in computer implementations of advanced methods of quantum many-body theory (e.g., in electronic structure theory and nuclear physics). A particular accent is made on higher-dimensional tensors that typicallymore » appear in the so-called multireference correlated methods of electronic structure theory. Depending on tensor dimensionality, the presented optimized algorithms can achieve an order of magnitude speedup on x86 CPUs and 2-3 times speedup on NVidia Tesla K20X GPU with respect to the na ve scattering algorithm (no memory access optimization). Furthermore, the tensor transpose routines developed in this work have been incorporated into a general-purpose tensor algebra library (TAL-SH).« less

  16. A combined study of MEG and pico-Tesla TMS on children with autism disorder.

    PubMed

    Anninos, Photios; Chatzimichael, Athanasios; Adamopoulos, Adam; Kotini, Athanasia; Tsagas, Nicolaos

    2016-12-01

    Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings from the brain of 10 children with autism (6 boys and 4 girls, with ages range from 5-12 years, mean[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]SD: 8.3[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]2.1) were obtained using a whole-head 122-channel MEG system in a magnetically shielded room of low magnetic noise. A double-blind experimental design was used in order to look for possible effect of external pico-Tesla Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (pT-TMS). The pT-TMS was applied on the brain of the autistic children with proper field characteristics (magnetic field amplitude: 1-7.5[Formula: see text]pT, frequency: the alpha - rhythm of the patient 8-13[Formula: see text]Hz). After unblinding it was found a significant effect of an increase of frequencies in the range of 2-7[Formula: see text]Hz across the subjects followed by an improvement and normalization of their MEG recordings. The statistical analysis of our results showed a statistical significance at 6 out of 10 patients (60%). It is also observed an increase of alpha activity in autistic children at the end of one month after pT-TMS treatment at home. In conclusion, the application of pT-TMS has the prospective to be a noninvasive, safe and important modality in the management of autism children.

  17. Dynamic Multi-Coil Shimming of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Boer, Vincent O.; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    High quality magnetic field homogenization of the human brain (i.e. shimming) for MR imaging and spectroscopy is a demanding task. The susceptibility differences between air and tissue are a longstanding problem as they induce complex field distortions in the prefrontal cortex and the temporal lobes. To date, the theoretical gains of high field MR have only been realized partially in the human brain due to limited magnetic field homogeneity. A novel shimming technique for the human brain is presented that is based on the combination of non-orthogonal basis fields from 48 individual, circular coils. Custom-built amplifier electronics enabled the dynamic application of the multi-coil shim fields in a slice-specific fashion. Dynamic multi-coil (DMC) shimming is shown to eliminate most of the magnetic field inhomogeneity apparent in the human brain at 7 Tesla and provided improved performance compared to state-of-the-art dynamic shim updating with zero through third order spherical harmonic functions. The novel technique paves the way for high field MR applications of the human brain for which excellent magnetic field homogeneity is a prerequisite. PMID:21824794

  18. The Safety of MR Conditional Cochlear Implant at 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Ogura, Akio; Hayashi, Norio; Seino, Shinya; Kawai, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the patients with the cochlear implant, only limited data have a mention for safety information in the instruction manual supplied by the manufacturers. Therefore, imaging operators require more detailed safety information for implant device. We conducted detailed examination about displacement force, torque, and demagnetizing of the cochlear implant magnet based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard using the PULSAR and CONCERTO (MED-EL) with 1.5 tesla MRI system. As a result, the displacement force and the torque of the implant magnet were less than the numerical values descried in the manual. Therefore, these have almost no effect on the body under the condition described in a manual. In addition, the demagnetizing factor of the cochlear implant magnet occurred by a change magnetic field. The demagnetization depended on the direction of a line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field and the implant magnet. In conclusion, the operator must warn the position of the patients on inducing in the magnet room.

  19. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Rossbach, J.

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  20. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-08-11

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics design and analysis of a passively suspended Tesla pump left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Medvitz, Richard B; Boger, David A; Izraelev, Valentin; Rosenberg, Gerson; Paterson, Eric G

    2011-05-01

    This article summarizes the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design a novel suspended Tesla left ventricular assist device. Several design variants were analyzed to study the parameters affecting device performance. CFD was performed at pump speeds of 6500, 6750, and 7000 rpm and at flow rates varying from 3 to 7 liters per minute (LPM). The CFD showed that shortening the plates nearest the pump inlet reduced the separations formed beneath the upper plate leading edges and provided a more uniform flow distribution through the rotor gaps, both of which positively affected the device hydrodynamic performance. The final pump design was found to produce a head rise of 77 mm Hg with a hydraulic efficiency of 16% at the design conditions of 6 LPM through flow and a 6750 rpm rotation rate. To assess the device hemodynamics the strain rate fields were evaluated. The wall shear stresses demonstrated that the pump wall shear stresses were likely adequate to inhibit thrombus deposition. Finally, an integrated field hemolysis model was applied to the CFD results to assess the effects of design variation and operating conditions on the device hemolytic performance.

  2. Mapping quantal touch using 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging and single-unit intraneural microstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Panchuelo, Rosa Maria; Ackerley, Rochelle; Glover, Paul M; Bowtell, Richard W; Wessberg, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Using ultra-high field 7 Tesla (7T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we map the cortical and perceptual responses elicited by intraneural microstimulation (INMS) of single mechanoreceptive afferent units in the median nerve, in humans. Activations are compared to those produced by applying vibrotactile stimulation to the unit’s receptive field, and unit-type perceptual reports are analyzed. We show that INMS and vibrotactile stimulation engage overlapping areas within the topographically appropriate digit representation in the primary somatosensory cortex. Additional brain regions in bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex, premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, insula and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in contralateral prefrontal cortex are also shown to be activated in response to INMS. The combination of INMS and 7T fMRI opens up an unprecedented opportunity to bridge the gap between first-order mechanoreceptive afferent input codes and their spatial, dynamic and perceptual representations in human cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12812.001 PMID:27154626

  3. Practical Methods for Improving B1+ Homogeneity in 3 Tesla Breast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Simone A.; Rutt, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To improve image contrast and B1+ field homogeneity in 3 Tesla (T) breast MR. Materials and Methods Two practical B1+ shimming methods for 3T breast MR are presented; low-cost passive shimming using local pads of high dielectric permittivity (εr from 0 to 100), and two-channel radiofrequency (RF) shimming (adjusting Q-I amplitude ratios and phase differences of 0 to −4 dB and 90 to 45 degrees), as well as a combination of both methods. The technique has been studied both in simulation using a numerical body model with added mammary tissue and in vivo in six subjects. Results Large improvements are observed with both methods, leading to a decrease in left–right B1+ asymmetry ratio of 1.24 to 1.00 (simulation) and from 1.26 to 1.01 (in vivo). RF safety was not adversely affected. Conclusion Both RF shimming and dielectric shimming were shown to improve inhomogeneity in the B1+ field in 3T breast MR. PMID:24723508

  4. Electromagnetic perspective on the operation of RF coils at 1.5-11.7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Mitchell, Chad; Schmalbrock, Petra; Lee, Robert; Chakeres, Donald W

    2005-09-01

    In this work experimental and numerical studies of the MR signal were performed at frequencies ranging from 64 MHz to 485 MHz, utilizing three different MRI coils: a single-strut transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-based coil, a TEM resonator, and a high-pass birdcage coil. The experimental analyses were conducted using 1.5 and 8 Tesla whole-body systems and volume RF head coils. The simulation data were obtained utilizing an in-house-developed finite difference time domain (FDTD) model. Pertinent data from the numerical and experimental setups were compared, and a remarkable agreement between the two methods was found that clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the FDTD method when it is applied rigorously. The numerical and experimental studies demonstrate the complexity of the electromagnetic (EM) fields and their role in the MR signal. These studies also reveal unique similarities and differences between the transmit and receive field distributions at various field strengths. Finally, for ultra high-field operations, it was demonstrated mathematically, numerically, and experimentally that highly asymmetric inhomogeneous images can be acquired even for linear excitation, symmetrical load geometries, and symmetrical load positioning within the coil.

  5. Comparison of 3 and 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Obstructive Hydrocephalus Caused by Tectal Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyeong Cheol; Baek, Hyeon-Man

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive hydrocephalus caused by tectal glioma, which relived by neuroendoscopy, have been described using 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) so far, we present the results obtained from 3T and 7T MRI in this patient. A 21-year-old woman presented at our hospital with gait disturbance, hormonal insufficiency, and urinary incontinence that began prior to 6 years of age. 3.0T MRI revealed a non-enhancing tectal mass along with obstructive hydrocephalus. The mass measured approximately 1.1×1.0×1.2 cm. An endoscopic third ventriculostomy was performed to relieve the hydrocephalus. We compared hydrocephalus and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow findings from 3T and 7T MRI, both preoperative and postoperative at 1, 6 months. Intraventricular CSF voiding on T2-weighted images obtained with 7T MRI showed greater fluid inversion than those obtained with 3T MRI. This study shows that 7T brain MRI can provide detailed information on hydrocephalus caused by tectal glioma. Further studies are needed to develop refined 7T MRI protocols for better images of hydrocephalus. PMID:27867929

  6. Examining the McGurk illusion using high-field 7 Tesla functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Szycik, Gregor R.; Stadler, Jörg; Tempelmann, Claus; Münte, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    In natural communication speech perception is profoundly influenced by observable mouth movements. The additional visual information can greatly facilitate intelligibility but incongruent visual information may also lead to novel percepts that neither match the auditory nor the visual information as evidenced by the McGurk effect. Recent models of audiovisual (AV) speech perception accentuate the role of speech motor areas and the integrative brain sites in the vicinity of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) for speech perception. In this event-related 7 Tesla fMRI study we used three naturally spoken syllable pairs with matching AV information and one syllable pair designed to elicit the McGurk illusion. The data analysis focused on brain sites involved in processing and fusing of AV speech and engaged in the analysis of auditory and visual differences within AV presented speech. Successful fusion of AV speech is related to activity within the STS of both hemispheres. Our data supports and extends the audio-visual-motor model of speech perception by dissociating areas involved in perceptual fusion from areas more generally related to the processing of AV incongruence. PMID:22529797

  7. Effect of 1. 5 tesla nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scanner on implanted permanent pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.L.; Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    Patients with a permanent pacemaker are currently restricted from diagnostic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging because of potential adverse effects on the pacemaker by the magnet. Previous work has shown that NMR imaging will result in asynchronous pacing of the pulse generator within a given distance of the magnet. The radiofrequency signal generated by the system may also result in rapid cardiac pacing, which may have deleterious effects. This study utilized a 1.5 tesla unit in an in vivo laboratory animal to evaluate the unit's effects on eight different pulse generators from two manufacturers. All pacemakers functioned in an asynchronous mode when placed within a certain distance of the magnet. In addition, transient reed switch inhibition was observed. Seven of the eight pulse generators paced rapidly when exposed to the radiofrequency signal and there was a dramatic decrease in arterial blood pressure. Whether effective rapid cardiac pacing would occur could not be predicted before exposure to the magnetic resonance unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields in patients with a pacemaker should continue to be avoided until the mechanism of the rapid cardiac pacing can be further delineated and either predicted or prevented.

  8. CFD Design and Analysis of a Passively Suspended Tesla Pump Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Medvitz, Richard B.; Boger, David A.; Izraelev, Valentin; Rosenberg, Gerson; Paterson, Eric G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design a novelly suspended Tesla LVAD. Several design variants were analyzed to study the parameters affecting device performance. CFD was performed at pump speeds of 6500, 6750 and 7000 RPM and at flow rates varying from 3 to 7 liter-per-minute (LPM). The CFD showed that shortening the plates nearest the pump inlet reduced the separations formed beneath the upper plate leading edges and provided a more uniform flow distribution through the rotor gaps, both of which positively affected the device hydrodynamic performance. The final pump design was found to produce a head rise of 77 mmHg with a hydraulic efficiency of 16% at the design conditions of 6 LPM throughflow and a 6750 RPM rotation rate. To assess the device hemodynamics the strain rate fields were evaluated. The wall shear stresses demonstrated that the pump wall shear stresses were likely adequate to inhibit thrombus deposition. Finally, an integrated field hemolysis model was applied to the CFD results to assess the effects of design variation and operating conditions on the device hemolytic performance. PMID:21595722

  9. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-10-12

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8,158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with RMS error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apotransferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g. 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1M at m/z =2,700).

  10. Partial epilepsy: A pictorial review of 3 TESLA magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Lucas Giansante; Thivard, Lionel; Abud, Thiago Giansante; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Dormont, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with serious consequences for patients and society. In many cases seizures are sufficiently disabling to justify surgical evaluation. In this context, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is one of the most valuable tools for the preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci. Because these lesions show a large variety of presentations (including subtle imaging characteristics), their analysis requires careful and systematic interpretation of MRI data. Several studies have shown that 3 Tesla (T) MRI provides a better image quality than 1.5 T MRI regarding the detection and characterization of structural lesions, indicating that high-field-strength imaging should be considered for patients with intractable epilepsy who might benefit from surgery. Likewise, advanced MRI postprocessing and quantitative analysis techniques such as thickness and volume measurements of cortical gray matter have emerged and in the near future, these techniques will routinely enable more precise evaluations of such patients. Finally, the familiarity with radiologic findings of the potential epileptogenic substrates in association with combined use of higher field strengths (3 T, 7 T, and greater) and new quantitative analytical post-processing techniques will lead to improvements regarding the clinical imaging of these patients. We present a pictorial review of the major pathologies related to partial epilepsy, highlighting the key findings of 3 T MRI. PMID:26375569

  11. 7 tesla FMRI reveals systematic functional organization for binocular disparity in dorsal visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Nuno R; Ban, Hiroshi; Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa M; Francis, Susan T; Schluppeck, Denis; Welchman, Andrew E

    2015-02-18

    The binocular disparity between the views of the world registered by the left and right eyes provides a powerful signal about the depth structure of the environment. Despite increasing knowledge of the cortical areas that process disparity from animal models, comparatively little is known about the local architecture of stereoscopic processing in the human brain. Here, we take advantage of the high spatial specificity and image contrast offered by 7 tesla fMRI to test for systematic organization of disparity representations in the human brain. Participants viewed random dot stereogram stimuli depicting different depth positions while we recorded fMRI responses from dorsomedial visual cortex. We repeated measurements across three separate imaging sessions. Using a series of computational modeling approaches, we report three main advances in understanding disparity organization in the human brain. First, we show that disparity preferences are clustered and that this organization persists across imaging sessions, particularly in area V3A. Second, we observe differences between the local distribution of voxel responses in early and dorsomedial visual areas, suggesting different cortical organization. Third, using modeling of voxel responses, we show that higher dorsal areas (V3A, V3B/KO) have properties that are characteristic of human depth judgments: a simple model that uses tuning parameters estimated from fMRI data captures known variations in human psychophysical performance. Together, these findings indicate that human dorsal visual cortex contains selective cortical structures for disparity that may support the neural computations that underlie depth perception.

  12. Measurement and evaluation of the acoustic noise of a 3 Tesla MR scanner.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    We measured the sound level and frequencies of the acoustic noise generated by a 3 Tesla (T) MR scanner, and investigated the subjective sound level for 30 healthy volunteers with either earplugs, headphones or both. The sound level of 3T was found to be higher than that of 1.5T in all sequences. The peak sound pressure level of 3T ranged from 125.7 dB for MR angiography to 130.7 dB for single shot EPI on the linear scale. The equivalent noise level was from 110.0 dB for FLAIR to 115.8 dB for T1-IR on the A-weighted scale, which exceeded 99 dB, the level regulated by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The study of the subjective sound level showed that the effect of noise reduction was not significantly different between earplugs and headphones. However, the use of both devices could reduce the subjective sound level significantly better than either one alone (P < 0.01). Thus we propose wearing both devices for ear-protection during 3T examinations.

  13. Wireless sap flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.; Davis, T. W.; Tseng, C.; Cheng, C.; Liang, X.; Yu, P.

    2010-12-01

    This study exhibits a measurement system for wireless sensor networks to measure sap flow in multiple locations simultaneously. Transpiration is a major component of the land-surface system because it is indicative of the water movement between the soil and the air. Sap flow can be used to approximate transpiration. In forests, transpiration cannot be represented by the sap flow from a single tree. Multi-location sap flow measurements are required to show the heterogeneity caused by different trees or soil conditions. Traditional multi-location measurements require manpower and capital for data collection and instrument maintenance. Fortunately, multi-location measurements can be achieved by using the new technology of wireless sensor networks. With multi-hop communication protocol, data can be forwarded to the base station via multiple sensor nodes. This communication protocol can provide reliable data collection with the least power consumption. This study encountered two major problems. The first problem was signal amplification. The Crossbow IRIS mote was selected as the sensor node that receives the temperature data of the sap flow probe (thermocouple) through a MDA300 data acquisition board. However, the wireless sensor node could not directly receive any data from the thermocouples since the least significant bit value of the MDA300, 0.6 mV, is much higher than the voltage signal generated. Thus, the signal from the thermocouple must be amplified to exceed this threshold. The second problem is power management. A specific heat differential is required for the thermal dissipation method of measuring sap flow. Thus, an adjustable DC power supply is necessary for calibrating the heater's temperature settings. A circuit was designed to combine the signal amplifier and power regulator. The regulator has been designed to also provide power to the IRIS mote to extend battery life. This design enables wireless sap flow measurements in the forest. With the

  14. Scaling Laws for Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    implementation. 210 Bibliography [1] Shuchin Aeron and Venkatesh Saligrama. Wireless ad hoc networks: Strategies and scaling laws for the fixed SNR...Aleksandar Jovičić, and Pramod Viswanath . On outer bounds to the capacity region of wireless networks. IEEE Transactions on In- formation Theory, 52...Aleksandar Jovičić, Pramod Viswanath , and Sanjeev R. Kulkarni. Upper bounds to transport capacity of wireless networks. IEEE Transactions on

  15. [A wireless communication system for interventional MRI].

    PubMed

    Güttler, F V; Rump, J; Seebauer, C; Teichgräber, U

    2011-01-01

    The available MR-compatible communication systems, which are typically designed for diagnostic exams, are mostly based on tubular sound transmission. In other settings, modern commercially available communication systems with ear protection allow wireless communication in noisy environments. The application of MR-compatible wireless headsets in interventional radiology precludes tube contact with sterile surfaces and hindrance of the interventionalist's range of motion. The system introduced here allows wireless communication within the scanner room without influencing MR image quality.

  16. UWIN: a universal wireless infrared network system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved, David B.; Halpern, Ron

    1995-09-01

    Wireless data communications are currently being implemented by the complementary technologies of RF and IR. The RF options provide larger area coverage than wireless optical communications but are limited in full bandwidth throughput to about 5 Mbps whereas infrared systems using IR-LED have achieved data rates up to 125 Mbps which makes them suitable for use in FDDI, Fast Ethernet and ATM wireless connectivity as well as Token Ring, Ethernet and PABX (voice).

  17. Wireless Sensor Needs Defined by SBIR Topics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studor, George F.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the needs for wireless sensor technology from various U.S. government agencies as exhibited by an analysis of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) solicitations. It would appear that a multi-agency group looking at overlapping wireless sensor needs and technology projects is desired. Included in this presentation is a review of the NASA SBIR process, and an examination of some of the SBIR projects from NASA, and other agencies that involve wireless sensor development

  18. Wireless augmented reality communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, Ann (Inventor); Jedrey, Thomas (Inventor); Agan, Martin (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The system of the present invention is a highly integrated radio communication system with a multimedia co-processor which allows true two-way multimedia (video, audio, data) access as well as real-time biomedical monitoring in a pager-sized portable access unit. The system is integrated in a network structure including one or more general purpose nodes for providing a wireless-to-wired interface. The network architecture allows video, audio and data (including biomedical data) streams to be connected directly to external users and devices. The portable access units may also be mated to various non-personal devices such as cameras or environmental sensors for providing a method for setting up wireless sensor nets from which reported data may be accessed through the portable access unit. The reported data may alternatively be automatically logged at a remote computer for access and viewing through a portable access unit, including the user's own.

  19. Wireless Augmented Reality Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, Ann (Inventor); Jedrey, Thomas (Inventor); Agan, Martin (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The system of the present invention is a highly integrated radio communication system with a multimedia co-processor which allows true two-way multimedia (video, audio, data) access as well as real-time biomedical monitoring in a pager-sized portable access unit. The system is integrated in a network structure including one or more general purpose nodes for providing a wireless-to-wired interface. The network architecture allows video, audio and data (including biomedical data) streams to be connected directly to external users and devices. The portable access units may also be mated to various non-personal devices such as cameras or environmental sensors for providing a method for setting up wireless sensor nets from which reported data may be accessed through the portable access unit. The reported data may alternatively be automatically logged at a remote computer for access and viewing through a portable access unit, including the user's own.

  20. Wireless Augmented Reality Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, Ann (Inventor); Jedrey, Thomas (Inventor); Agan, Martin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The system of the present invention is a highly integrated radio communication system with a multimedia co-processor which allows true two-way multimedia (video, audio, data) access as well as real-time biomedical monitoring in a pager-sized portable access unit. The system is integrated in a network structure including one or more general purpose nodes for providing a wireless-to-wired interface. The network architecture allows video, audio and data (including biomedical data) streams to be connected directly to external users and devices. The portable access units may also be mated to various non-personal devices such as cameras or environmental sensors for providing a method for setting up wireless sensor nets from which reported data may be accessed through the portable access unit. The reported data may alternatively be automatically logged at a remote computer for access and viewing through a portable access unit, including the user's own.

  1. [Wireless human body communication technology].

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2014-12-01

    The Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) is a key part of the wearable monitoring technologies, which has many communication technologies to choose from, like Bluetooth, ZigBee, Ultra Wideband, and Wireless Human Body Communication (WHBC). As for the WHBC developed in recent years, it is worthy to be further studied. The WHBC has a strong momentum of growth and a natural advantage in the formation of WBAN. In this paper, we first briefly describe the technical background of WHBC, then introduce theoretical model of human-channel communication and digital transmission machine based on human channel. And finally we analyze various of the interference of the WHBC and show the AFH (Adaptive Frequency Hopping) technology which can effectively deal with the interference.

  2. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  3. Self-Powered Wireless Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Sayir, Ali

    2008-01-01

    NASA's integrated vehicle health management (IVHM) program offers the potential to improve aeronautical safety, reduce cost and improve performance by utilizing networks of wireless sensors. Development of sensor systems for engine hot sections will provide real-time data for prognostics and health management of turbo-engines. Sustainable power to embedded wireless sensors is a key challenge for prolong operation. Harvesting energy from the environment has emerged as a viable technique for power generation. Thermoelectric generators provide a direct conversion of heat energy to electrical energy. Micro-power sources derived from thermoelectric films are desired for applications in harsh thermal environments. Silicon based alloys are being explored for applications in high temperature environments containing oxygen. Chromium based p-type Si/Ge alloys exhibit Seebeck coefficients on the order of 160 micro V/K and low thermal conductance of 2.5 to 5 W/mK. Thermoelectric properties of bulk and thin film silicides will be discussed

  4. Wireless autonomous device data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammel, Jr., David W. (Inventor); Cain, James T. (Inventor); Mickle, Marlin H. (Inventor); Mi, Minhong (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of communicating information from a wireless autonomous device (WAD) to a base station. The WAD has a data element having a predetermined profile having a total number of sequenced possible data element combinations. The method includes receiving at the WAD an RF profile transmitted by the base station that includes a triggering portion having a number of pulses, wherein the number is at least equal to the total number of possible data element combinations. The method further includes keeping a count of received pulses and wirelessly transmitting a piece of data, preferably one bit, to the base station when the count reaches a value equal to the stored data element's particular number in the sequence. Finally, the method includes receiving the piece of data at the base station and using the receipt thereof to determine which of the possible data element combinations the stored data element is.

  5. Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods

    DOEpatents

    Skorpik, James R.

    2006-10-31

    Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods are described. In one aspect, a wireless communication device includes a housing, wireless communication circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to communicate wireless signals, movement circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to provide movement data regarding movement sensed by the movement circuitry, and event processing circuitry coupled with the housing and the movement circuitry, wherein the event processing circuitry is configured to process the movement data, and wherein at least a portion of the event processing circuitry is configured to operate in a first operational state having a different power consumption rate compared with a second operational state.

  6. Wireless vibration sensor using frequency modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minhyuck; Yoon, Hwan-Sik; Kim, Sehun; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, wireless strain sensors have received attention as an efficient method to measure response of a structure in a remote location. Wireless sensors developed for remote measurement include RF wireless sensor modules and microstrip antenna-based sensors. In this paper, a simple wireless vibration sensor based on a piezoelectric sensor and the Frequency Modulation (FM) technique is developed for remote measurement of vibrating structures. The piezoelectric sensor can generate a voltage signal proportional to dynamic strain of the host structure. The voltage signal is then frequency modulated and transmitted wirelessly to a remote station by a simple FM transmitter circuit. Finally, the received signal is demodulated by a conventional FM radio circuit, and the vibration measurement data can be recovered. Since this type of wireless sensor employs a simple FM circuit, they do not require any wireless data transmission protocols allowing a low-cost wireless sensor in compact format. The proposed concept of the wireless vibration measurement is experimentally verified by measuring vibration of an aluminum cantilever beam. The proposed sensor could potentially be an efficient and cost effective method for measuring vibration of remote structures for dynamic testing or structural health monitoring.

  7. Space Shuttle Wireless Crew Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, R. W.; Doe, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The design, development, and performance characteristics of the Space Shuttle's Wireless Crew Communications System are discussed. This system allows Space Shuttle crews to interface with the onboard audio distribution system without the need for communications umbilicals, and has been designed through the adaptation of commercially available hardware in order to minimize development time. Testing aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia has revealed no failures or design deficiencies.

  8. An Affordable Wireless Microcolor Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetherhold, Jeffrey M.

    2005-04-01

    Readily available low-cost wireless microcolor cam systems are now small enough to mount in or on small toys and they are durable enough to withstand typical radio-controlled airplane crashes. These cams are an invaluable tool for the physics classroom in that they allow students to visually place themselves in the "shoes" of the bodies physics teachers describe and use everyday in the physics classroom.

  9. Monitoring Churn in Wireless Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Stephan; Pignolet, Yvonne Anne; Smula, Jasmin; Wattenhofer, Roger

    Wireless networks often experience a significant amount of churn, the arrival and departure of nodes. In this paper we propose a distributed algorithm for single-hop networks that detects churn and is resilient to a worst-case adversary. The nodes of the network are notified about changes quickly, in asymptotically optimal time up to an additive logarithmic overhead. We establish a trade-off between saving energy and minimizing the delay until notification for single- and multi-channel networks.

  10. Statistical label fusion with hierarchical performance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asman, Andrew J.; Dagley, Alexander S.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-01

    Label fusion is a critical step in many image segmentation frameworks (e.g., multi-atlas segmentation) as it provides a mechanism for generalizing a collection of labeled examples into a single estimate of the underlying segmentation. In the multi-label case, typical label fusion algorithms treat all labels equally - fully neglecting the known, yet complex, anatomical relationships exhibited in the data. To address this problem, we propose a generalized statistical fusion framework using hierarchical models of rater performance. Building on the seminal work in statistical fusion, we reformulate the traditional rater performance model from a multi-tiered hierarchical perspective. This new approach provides a natural framework for leveraging known anatomical relationships and accurately modeling the types of errors that raters (or atlases) make within a hierarchically consistent formulation. Herein, we describe several contributions. First, we derive a theoretical advancement to the statistical fusion framework that enables the simultaneous estimation of multiple (hierarchical) performance models within the statistical fusion context. Second, we demonstrate that the proposed hierarchical formulation is highly amenable to the state-of-the-art advancements that have been made to the statistical fusion framework. Lastly, in an empirical whole-brain segmentation task we demonstrate substantial qualitative and significant quantitative improvement in overall segmentation accuracy.

  11. Hierarchical Ensemble Methods for Protein Function Prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein function prediction is a complex multiclass multilabel classification problem, characterized by multiple issues such as the incompleteness of the available annotations, the integration of multiple sources of high dimensional biomolecular data, the unbalance of several functional classes, and the difficulty of univocally determining negative examples. Moreover, the hierarchical relationships between functional classes that characterize both the Gene Ontology and FunCat taxonomies motivate the development of hierarchy-aware prediction methods that showed significantly better performances than hierarchical-unaware “flat” prediction methods. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review of hierarchical methods for protein function prediction based on ensembles of learning machines. According to this general approach, a separate learning machine is trained to learn a specific functional term and then the resulting predictions are assembled in a “consensus” ensemble decision, taking into account the hierarchical relationships between classes. The main hierarchical ensemble methods proposed in the literature are discussed in the context of existing computational methods for protein function prediction, highlighting their characteristics, advantages, and limitations. Open problems of this exciting research area of computational biology are finally considered, outlining novel perspectives for future research. PMID:25937954

  12. Analysis hierarchical model for discrete event systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciortea, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    The This paper presents the hierarchical model based on discrete event network for robotic systems. Based on the hierarchical approach, Petri network is analysed as a network of the highest conceptual level and the lowest level of local control. For modelling and control of complex robotic systems using extended Petri nets. Such a system is structured, controlled and analysed in this paper by using Visual Object Net ++ package that is relatively simple and easy to use, and the results are shown as representations easy to interpret. The hierarchical structure of the robotic system is implemented on computers analysed using specialized programs. Implementation of hierarchical model discrete event systems, as a real-time operating system on a computer network connected via a serial bus is possible, where each computer is dedicated to local and Petri model of a subsystem global robotic system. Since Petri models are simplified to apply general computers, analysis, modelling, complex manufacturing systems control can be achieved using Petri nets. Discrete event systems is a pragmatic tool for modelling industrial systems. For system modelling using Petri nets because we have our system where discrete event. To highlight the auxiliary time Petri model using transport stream divided into hierarchical levels and sections are analysed successively. Proposed robotic system simulation using timed Petri, offers the opportunity to view the robotic time. Application of goods or robotic and transmission times obtained by measuring spot is obtained graphics showing the average time for transport activity, using the parameters sets of finished products. individually.

  13. High resolution MRI anatomy of the cat brain at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L.; Salibi, Nouha; Josephson, Eleanor M.; Hudson, Judith A.; Cox, Nancy R.; Randle, Ashley N.; McCurdy, Victoria J.; Bradbury, Allison M.; Wilson, Diane U.; Beyers, Ronald J.; Denney, Thomas S.; Martin, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Feline models of neurologic diseases, such as lysosomal storage diseases, leukodystrophies, Parkinson’s disease, stroke and NeuroAIDS, accurately recreate many aspects of human disease allowing for comparative study of neuropathology and the testing of novel therapeutics. Here we describe in vivo visualization of fine structures within the feline brain that were previously only visible post mortem. New Method 3 Tesla MR images were acquired using T1-weighted (T1w) 3D magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) sequence (0.4mm isotropic resolution) and T2-weighted (T2w) turbo spin echo (TSE) images (0.3×0.3×1 mm3 resolution). Anatomic structures were identified based on feline and canine histology. Results T2w high resolution MR images with detailed structural identification are provided in transverse, sagittal and dorsal planes. T1w MR images are provided electronically in three dimensions for unrestricted spatial evaluation. Comparison with Existing Methods Many areas of the feline brain previously unresolvable on MRI are clearly visible in three orientations, including the dentate, interpositus and fastigial cerebellar nuclei, cranial nerves, lateral geniculate nucleus, optic radiation, cochlea, caudal colliculus, temporal lobe, precuneus, spinocerebellar tract, vestibular nuclei, reticular formation, pyramids and rostral and middle cerebral arteries. Additionally, the feline brain is represented in 3 dimensions for the first time. Conclusions These data establish normal appearance of detailed anatomical structures of the feline brain, which provide reference when evaluating neurologic disease or testing efficacy of novel therapeutics in animal models. PMID:24525327

  14. Axonal diameter and density estimated with 7-Tesla hybrid diffusion imaging in transgenic Alzheimer rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jacobs, Russell E.; Town, Terrence; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) is a powerful tool to study brain tissue microstructure. DWI is sensitive to subtle changes in the white matter (WM), and can provide insight into abnormal brain changes in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we used 7-Tesla hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI) to scan 3 transgenic rats (line TgF344-AD; that model the full clinico-pathological spectrum of the human disease) ex vivo at 10, 15 and 24 months. We acquired 300 DWI volumes across 5 q-sampling shells (b=1000, 3000, 4000, 8000, 12000 s/mm2). From the top three b-value shells with highest signal-to-noise ratios, we reconstructed markers of WM disease, including indices of axon density and diameter in the corpus callosum (CC) - directly quantifying processes that occur in AD. As expected, apparent anisotropy progressively decreased with age; there were also decreases in the intra- and extra-axonal MR signal along axons. Axonal diameters were larger in segments of the CC (splenium and body, but not genu), possibly indicating neuritic dystrophy - characterized by enlarged axons and dendrites as previously observed at the ultrastructural level (see Cohen et al., J. Neurosci. 2013). This was further supported by increases in MR signals trapped in glial cells, CSF and possibly other small compartments in WM structures. Finally, tractography detected fewer fibers in the CC at 10 versus 24 months of age. These novel findings offer great potential to provide technical and scientific insight into the biology of brain disease.

  15. In vivo 7 Tesla imaging of the dentate granule cell layer in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Ivan I.; Hardy, Caitlin J.; Matsuda, Kant; Messinger, Julie; Cankurtaran, Ceylan Z.; Warren, Melina; Wiggins, Graham C.; Perry, Nissa N.; Babb, James S.; Goetz, Raymond R.; George, Ajax; Malaspina, Dolores; Gonen, Oded

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The hippocampus is central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Histology shows abnormalities in the dentate granule cell layer (DGCL), but its small size (~100 micron thickness) has precluded in vivo human studies. We used ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare DGCL morphology of schizophrenic patients to matched controls’. METHOD Bilateral hippocampi of 16 schizophrenia patients (10 male) 40.7±10.6 years old (mean ±standard deviation) were imaged at 7 Tesla MRI with heavily T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequence at 232 micron in-plane resolution (0.08 μL image voxels). Fifteen matched controls (8 male, 35.6±9.4 years old) and one ex vivo post mortem hippocampus (that also underwent histopathology) were scanned with same protocol. Three blinded neuroradiologists rated each DGCL on a qualitative scale of 1 to 6 (from “not discernible” to “easily visible, appearing dark gray or black”) and mean left and right DGCL scores were compared using a non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS MRI identification of the DGCL was validated with histopathology. Mean right and left DGCL ratings in patients (3.2±1.0 and 3.5±1.2) were not statistically different from controls’ (3.9±1.1 and 3.8±0.8), but patients’ had a trend for lower right DGCL score (p=0.07), which was significantly associated with patient diagnosis (p=0.05). The optimal 48% sensitivity and 80% specificity for schizophrenia was achieved with a DGCL rating of ≤2. CONCLUSION Decreased contrast in the right DGCL in schizophrenia was predictive of schizophrenia diagnosis. Better utility of this metric as a schizophrenia biomarker may be achieved in future studies of patients with homogeneous disease subtypes and progression rates. PMID:23664589

  16. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Sebastian; Schlendorf, Kelly; Hirsch, Glenn A; Gerstenblith, Gary; Fleck, Eckart; Weiss, Robert G; Stuber, Matthias

    2010-10-11

    Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE) detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29 ± 3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61 ± 10 years) were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T) whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands). T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd) (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA). Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3%) segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0%) and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4%) were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30-45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  17. Prostate cancer detection using multiparametric 3 – tesla MRI and fusion biopsy: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Mussi, Thais Caldara; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; de Queiroz, Marcos Roberto Gomes; Lemos, Gustavo Caserta; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of transrectal ultrasonography (US) biopsy with imaging fusion using multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa), with an emphasis on clinically significant tumors according to histological criteria. Materials and Methods: A total of 189 consecutive US/MRI fusion biopsies were performed obtaining systematic and guided samples of suspicious areas on mpMRI using a 3 Tesla magnet without endorectal coil. Clinical significance for prostate cancer was established based on Epstein criteria. Results: In our casuistic, the average Gleason score was 7 and the average PSA was 5.0ng/mL. Of the 189 patients that received US/MRI biopsies, 110 (58.2%) were positive for PCa. Of those cases, 88 (80%) were clinically significant, accounting for 46.6% of all patients. We divided the MRI findings into 5 Likert scales of probability of having clinically significant PCa. The positivity of US/MRI biopsy for clinically significant PCa was 0%, 17.6% 23.5%, 53.4% and 84.4% for Likert scores 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of biopsy results between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI and also when biopsy results were divided into groups of clinically non-significant versus clinically significant between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI (p-value <0.05 in both analyzes). Conclusion: We found that there is a significant difference in cancer detection using US/MRI fusion biopsy between low-probability and intermediate/high probability Likert scores using mpMRI. PMID:27532112

  18. A 0.5 Tesla Transverse-Field Alternating Magnetic Field Demagnetizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, W. E.; Morris, E. R.; Finn, D. R.; Coe, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    We have built an alternating field demagnetizer that can routinely achieve a maximum field of 0.5 Tesla. It uses an amorphous magnetic core with an air-cooled coil. We have started with a 0.5 T design, which satisfies most of our immediate needs, but we can certainly achieve higher fields. In our design, the magnetic field is transverse to the bore and uniform to 1% over a standard (25 mm) paleomagnetic sample. It is powered by a 1 kW power amplifier and is compatible with our existing sample handler for automated demagnetization and measurement (Morris et al., 2009). It's much higher peak field has enabled us to completely demagnetize many of the samples that previously we could not with commercial equipment. This capability is especially needed for high-coercivity sedimentary and igneous rocks that contain magnetic minerals that alter during thermal demagnetization. It will also enable detailed automated demagnetization of high coercivity phases in extraterrestrial samples, such as native iron, iron-alloy and sulfide minerals that are common in lunar rocks and meteorites. Furthermore, it has opened the door for us to use the rock-magnetic technique of component analysis, using coercivity distributions derived from very detailed AF demagnetization of NRM and remanence produced in the laboratory to characterize the magnetic mineralogy of sedimentary rocks. In addition to the many benefits this instrument has brought to our own research, a much broader potential impact is to replace the transverse coils in automated AF demagnetization systems, which typically are limited to peak fields around 0.1 T.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Stereotactic Target Localization Using 3-Tesla MRI for Radiosurgery Planning

    SciTech Connect

    MacFadden, Derek; Zhang Beibei; Brock, Kristy K.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Laperriere, Normand; Schwartz, Michael; Tsao, May; Stainsby, Jeffrey; Lockwood, Gina; Mikulis, David; Menard, Cynthia

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Increasing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strength can improve image resolution and quality, but concerns remain regarding the influence on geometric fidelity. The objectives of the present study were to spatially investigate the effect of 3-Tesla (3T) MRI on clinical target localization for stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 39 patients were enrolled in a research ethics board-approved prospective clinical trial. Imaging (1.5T and 3T MRI and computed tomography) was performed after stereotactic frame placement. Stereotactic target localization at 1.5T vs. 3T was retrospectively analyzed in a representative cohort of patients with tumor (n = 4) and functional (n = 5) radiosurgical targets. The spatial congruency of the tumor gross target volumes was determined by the mean discrepancy between the average gross target volume surfaces at 1.5T and 3T. Reproducibility was assessed by the displacement from an averaged surface and volume congruency. Spatial congruency and the reproducibility of functional radiosurgical targets was determined by comparing the mean and standard deviation of the isocenter coordinates. Results: Overall, the mean absolute discrepancy across all patients was 0.67 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.83), significantly <1 mm (p < .010). No differences were found in the overall interuser target volume congruence (mean, 84% for 1.5T vs. 84% for 3T, p > .4), and the gross target volume surface mean displacements were similar within and between users. The overall average isocenter coordinate discrepancy for the functional targets at 1.5T and 3T was 0.33 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.48), with no patient-specific differences between the mean values (p >.2) or standard deviations (p >.1). Conclusion: Our results have provided clinically relevant evidence supporting the spatial validity of 3T MRI for use in stereotactic radiosurgery under the imaging conditions used.

  20. Freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol over WHMS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsung

    2014-12-10

    The digitization of patient health information (PHI) for wireless health monitoring systems (WHMSs) has brought many benefits and challenges for both patients and physicians. However, security, privacy and robustness have remained important challenges for WHMSs. Since the patient's PHI is sensitive and the communication channel, i.e., the Internet, is insecure, it is important to protect them against unauthorized entities, i.e., attackers. Otherwise, failure to do so will not only lead to the compromise of a patient's privacy, but will also put his/her life at risk. This paper proposes a freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol (FNKAP) for WHMSs. The FNKAP is based on the concept of the non-interactive identity-based key agreement for communication efficiency. It achieves patient anonymity between a patient and physician, session key secrecy and resistance against various security attacks, especially including replay attacks.

  1. Freshness-Preserving Non-Interactive Hierarchical Key Agreement Protocol over WHMS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsung

    2014-01-01

    The digitization of patient health information (PHI) for wireless health monitoring systems (WHMSs) has brought many benefits and challenges for both patients and physicians. However, security, privacy and robustness have remained important challenges for WHMSs. Since the patient's PHI is sensitive and the communication channel, i.e., the Internet, is insecure, it is important to protect them against unauthorized entities, i.e., attackers. Otherwise, failure to do so will not only lead to the compromise of a patient's privacy, but will also put his/her life at risk. This paper proposes a freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol (FNKAP) for WHMSs. The FNKAP is based on the concept of the non-interactive identity-based key agreement for communication efficiency. It achieves patient anonymity between a patient and physician, session key secrecy and resistance against various security attacks, especially including replay attacks. PMID:25513824

  2. Towards a sustainable manufacture of hierarchical zeolites.

    PubMed

    Verboekend, Danny; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-03-01

    Hierarchical zeolites have been established as a superior type of aluminosilicate catalysts compared to their conventional (purely microporous) counterparts. An impressive array of bottom-up and top-down approaches has been developed during the last decade to design and subsequently exploit these exciting materials catalytically. However, the sustainability of the developed synthetic methods has rarely been addressed. This paper highlights important criteria to ensure the ecological and economic viability of the manufacture of hierarchical zeolites. Moreover, by using base leaching as a promising case study, we verify a variety of approaches to increase reactor productivity, recycle waste streams, prevent the combustion of organic compounds, and minimize separation efforts. By reducing their synthetic footprint, hierarchical zeolites are positioned as an integral part of sustainable chemistry.

  3. Hierarchical Micro-Nano Coatings by Painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirveslahti, Anna; Korhonen, Tuulia; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the wettability properties of coatings with hierarchical surface structures and low surface energy were studied. Hierarchically structured coatings were produced by using hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microparticles as additives in polyester (PES) and polyvinyldifluoride (PVDF). These particles created hierarchical micro-nano structures on the paint surfaces and lowered or supported the already low surface energy of the paint. Two standard application techniques for paint application were employed and the presented coatings are suitable for mass production and use in large surface areas. By regulating the particle concentrations, it was possible to modify wettability properties gradually. Highly hydrophobic surfaces were achieved with the highest contact angle of 165∘. Dynamic contact angle measurements were carried out for a set of selected samples and low hysteresis was obtained. Produced coatings possessed long lasting durability in the air and in underwater conditions.

  4. Static and dynamic friction of hierarchical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costagliola, Gianluca; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-12-01

    Hierarchical structures are very common in nature, but only recently have they been systematically studied in materials science, in order to understand the specific effects they can have on the mechanical properties of various systems. Structural hierarchy provides a way to tune and optimize macroscopic mechanical properties starting from simple base constituents and new materials are nowadays designed exploiting this possibility. This can be true also in the field of tribology. In this paper we study the effect of hierarchical patterned surfaces on the static and dynamic friction coefficients of an elastic material. Our results are obtained by means of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional spring-block model, which has previously been used to investigate various aspects of friction. Despite the simplicity of the model, we highlight some possible mechanisms that explain how hierarchical structures can significantly modify the friction coefficients of a material, providing a means to achieve tunability.

  5. Intelligent controllers as hierarchical stochastic automata.

    PubMed

    Lima, P U; Saridis, G N

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces a design methodology for intelligent controllers, based on a hierarchical linguistic model of command translation by tasks-primitive tasks-primitive actions, and on a two-stage hierarchical learning stochastic automaton that models the translation interfaces of a three-level hierarchical intelligent controller. The methodology relies on the designer's a priori knowledge on how to implement by primitive actions the different primitive tasks which define the intelligent controller. A cost function applicable to any primitive task is introduced and used to learn on-line the optimal choices from the corresponding predesigned sets of primitive actions. The same concept applies to the optimal tasks for each command, whose choice is based on conflict sets of stochastic grammar productions. Optional designs can be compared using this performance measure. A particular design evolves towards the command translation (by tasks-primitive tasks-primitive actions) that minimizes the cost function.

  6. Static and dynamic friction of hierarchical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Costagliola, Gianluca; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-12-01

    Hierarchical structures are very common in nature, but only recently have they been systematically studied in materials science, in order to understand the specific effects they can have on the mechanical properties of various systems. Structural hierarchy provides a way to tune and optimize macroscopic mechanical properties starting from simple base constituents and new materials are nowadays designed exploiting this possibility. This can be true also in the field of tribology. In this paper we study the effect of hierarchical patterned surfaces on the static and dynamic friction coefficients of an elastic material. Our results are obtained by means of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional spring-block model, which has previously been used to investigate various aspects of friction. Despite the simplicity of the model, we highlight some possible mechanisms that explain how hierarchical structures can significantly modify the friction coefficients of a material, providing a means to achieve tunability.

  7. A hierarchical cellular logic for pyramid computers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, S.L.

    1984-11-01

    Hierarchical structure occurs in biological vision systems and there is good reason to incorporate it into a model of computation for processing binary images. A mathematical formalism is presented which can describe a wide variety of operations useful in image processing and graphics. The formalism allows for two kinds of simple transformations on the values (called pyramids) of a set of cells called a hierarchical domain: the first are binary operations on boolean values, and the second are neighborhood-matching operations. The implied model of computation is more structured than previously discussed pyramidal models, and is more readily realized in parallel hardware, while it remains sufficiently rich to provide efficient solutions to a wide variety of problems. The model has a simplicity which is due to the restricted nature of the operations and the implied synchronization across the hierarchical domain. A corresponding algebraic simplicity in the logic makes possible the concise representation of many cellular-data operations.

  8. [Comparative hierarchic structure of the genetic language].

    PubMed

    Ratner, V A

    1993-05-01

    The genetical texts and genetic language are built according to hierarchic principle and contain no less than 6 levels of coding sequences, separated by marks of punctuation, separation and indication: codons, cistrons, scriptons, replicons, linkage groups, genomes. Each level has all the attributes of the language. This hierarchic system expresses some general properties and regularities. The rules of genetic language being determined, the variability of genetical texts is generated by block-modular combinatorics on each level. Between levels there are some intermediate sublevels and module types capable of being combined. The genetic language is compared with two different independent linguistic systems: human natural languages and artificial programming languages. Genetic language is a natural one by its origin, but it is a typical technical language of the functioning genetic regulatory system--by its predestination. All three linguistic systems under comparison have evident similarity of the organization principles and hierarchical structures. This argues for similarity of their principles of appearance and evolution.

  9. Anisotropic wettability on imprinted hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengxiang; Low, Hong Yee

    2007-07-03

    A series of two-level hierarchical structures on polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were fabricated using sequential nanoimprinting lithography (NIL). The hierarchical structures consist of micrometer and sub-micrometer scale grating imprinted with varying orientations. Through water contact angle measurements, these surface hierarchical structures showed a wide range of anisotropic wettabilities on PMMA and PS, with PMMA having an anisotropic wettability from 6 degrees to 54 degrees and PS having an anisotropic wettability from 8 degrees to 32 degrees. At the same time, the water contact angle of PMMA and PS can be tuned to nearly 120 degrees without modifying the surface chemistry. A tunable anisotropic wettability is beneficial for applications where controlling the direction of liquid flow is important, such as in microfluidic devices.

  10. Wireless Communications. Wireless Network Integration Technology: MIRAI Architecture for Heterogeneous Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Mitsuhiko; Wu, Gang; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2001-12-01

    One of the keywords that describe next generation wireless communications is "seamless." As part of the e-Japan Plan promoted by the Japanese Government, the MIRAI (Multimedia Integrated network by Radio Access Innovation) project has, as its goal, the development of new technologies to enable seamless integration of various wireless access systems for practical use by the year 2005. This paper describes a heterogeneous network architecture including a common tool, a common platform, and a common access. In particular, software-defined radio technologies are used to develop a multi-service user terminal to access different wireless networks. The common platform for various wireless networks is based on a wireless supporting IPv6 network. A basic access network, separated from other wireless access networks, is used as a means for wireless system discovery, signaling, and paging. A proof-concept experimental demonstration system will be available in March, 2002.

  11. Hierarchical Analysis of the Omega Ontology

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Paulson, Patrick R.

    2009-12-01

    Initial delivery for mathematical analysis of the Omega Ontology. We provide an analysis of the hierarchical structure of a version of the Omega Ontology currently in use within the US Government. After providing an initial statistical analysis of the distribution of all link types in the ontology, we then provide a detailed order theoretical analysis of each of the four main hierarchical links present. This order theoretical analysis includes the distribution of components and their properties, their parent/child and multiple inheritance structure, and the distribution of their vertical ranks.

  12. A hierarchical clustering algorithm for MIMD architecture.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhihua; Lin, Feng

    2004-12-01

    Hierarchical clustering is the most often used method for grouping similar patterns of gene expression data. A fundamental problem with existing implementations of this clustering method is the inability to handle large data sets within a reasonable time and memory resources. We propose a parallelized algorithm of hierarchical clustering to solve this problem. Our implementation on a multiple instruction multiple data (MIMD) architecture shows considerable reduction in computational time and inter-node communication overhead, especially for large data sets. We use the standard message passing library, message passing interface (MPI) for any MIMD systems.

  13. Hierarchical social networks and information flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Luis; F. F. Mendes, Jose; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2002-12-01

    Using a simple model for the information flow on social networks, we show that the traditional hierarchical topologies frequently used by companies and organizations, are poorly designed in terms of efficiency. Moreover, we prove that this type of structures are the result of the individual aim of monopolizing as much information as possible within the network. As the information is an appropriate measurement of centrality, we conclude that this kind of topology is so attractive for leaders, because the global influence each actor has within the network is completely determined by the hierarchical level occupied.

  14. Wireless power transfer to a cardiac implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghoek; Ho, John S.; Chen, Lisa Y.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2012-08-01

    We analyze wireless power transfer between a source and a weakly coupled implant on the heart. Numerical studies show that mid-field wireless powering achieves much higher power transfer efficiency than traditional inductively coupled systems. With proper system design, power sufficient to operate typical cardiac implants can be received by millimeter-sized coils.

  15. Securing a Medical Wireless LAN System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    radiate the unencrypted wireless message or a subliminal channel could be added to make the cards leak the keys onto the wireless link. These attacks...or the A&E room. The people sending and receiving messages can be bribed and so forth. However, the hospital cannot reasonably expect the secure

  16. Wireless Laptops and Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolson, Stephanie Diane

    2001-01-01

    Describes experiences at St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley (Missouri) with the use of wireless technology and a local area network for library bibliographic instruction. Discusses faculty input and attitudes; technical challenges; and experiences at other community colleges that have found wireless connections more economical than…

  17. DAWN: Dynamic Ad-hoc Wireless Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-19

    none) (c) Presentations 03/15/2007 03/15/2007 27.00 28.00 Received Paper Ning Li, Jennifer C. Hou. A Scalable, Power-Efficient Broadcast Algorithm for...Wireless Networks, , ( ): . doi: Ning Li, Jennifer C. Hou. Localized Topology Control Algorithms for Heterogeneous Wireless Networks, IEEE

  18. Tips for Implementing a Wireless Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Darrell

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a quick start guide to provide educators with the basic points to consider before installing a wireless network in the school. Since many school districts have already implemented wireless networks, there is a lot of information available online to assist in the process.

  19. Vulnerability of Wireless Networks to Interception

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    S. and Yoshida, S. (1995) Propagation measurements and models for wireless communications channels, IEEE Communications Magazine , 33, 1:42 − 49...Proceedings-H, 138,1:61-73. Pahlavan, K. (1995) Trends in Local Wireless Networks, IEEE Communications Magazine , 33, 3:88-95. Science

  20. Home and School Technology: Wired versus Wireless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of informal research on smart homes and appliances, structured home wiring, whole-house audio/video distribution, hybrid cable, and wireless networks. Computer network wiring is tricky to install unless all-in-one jacketed cable is used. Wireless phones help installers avoid pre-wiring problems in homes and schools. (MLH)

  1. Wireless Technology for Command Control and Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    700, Washington D.C., 20039. 6. T. Haug, "Overview of GSM: Philosophy and Results," International Journal of Wireless Information Networks , Vol. 1, No...1, 1994. 7. P. A. Ramsdale, "Personal Communication in the UK --Implementation of PCN using DCS 1800," International Journal of Wireless Information Networks , Vol

  2. Single-Bunch Electron Cloud Effects in the GLC/NLC, US-Cold and TESLA Low Emittance Transport Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.

    2005-04-12

    This paper examines the severity of the electron cloud effects in the Low Emittance Transport (LET) of linear colliders including the Bunch-Compressor System (BCS) and Beam Delivery System (BDS). We examine the electron cloud effects in the normal-conducting GLC/NLC or X-Band, and the super-conducting US-Cold and TESLA linear collider designs through the use of specially developed computer simulation codes. An estimate of the critical cloud density is given for the BDS and BCS of the X-Band collider.

  3. Instability Thresholds And Generation of the Electron-Cloud in the GLC/NLC And Tesla Damping Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.

    2005-04-11

    In the beam pipe of the Damping Ring (DR) of a linear collider, an electron cloud may be produced by ionization of residual gas or photoelectrons and develop by the secondary emission process [1]. Coupling between the electrons and the circulating beam can cause coupled-bunch instabilities, coherent single-bunch instabilities or incoherent tune spreads that may lead to increased emittance, beam blow-up and ultimately to beam losses. We present recent computer simulation results for the electron cloud instability thresholds in the GLC/NLC (X-Band) main DR and for the TESLA DR.

  4. On the Feasibility of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks over IEEE 802.15.5 Mesh Topologies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier; Losilla, Fernando; Rodenas-Herraiz, David; Cruz-Martinez, Felipe; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) are a special type of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) where large amounts of multimedia data are transmitted over networks composed of low power devices. Hierarchical routing protocols typically used in WSNs for multi-path communication tend to overload nodes located within radio communication range of the data collection unit or data sink. The battery life of these nodes is therefore reduced considerably, requiring frequent battery replacement work to extend the operational life of the WSN system. In a wireless sensor network with mesh topology, any node may act as a forwarder node, thereby enabling multiple routing paths toward any other node or collection unit. In addition, mesh topologies have proven advantages, such as data transmission reliability, network robustness against node failures, and potential reduction in energy consumption. This work studies the feasibility of implementing WMSNs in mesh topologies and their limitations by means of exhaustive computer simulation experiments. To this end, a module developed for the Synchronous Energy Saving (SES) mode of the IEEE 802.15.5 mesh standard has been integrated with multimedia tools to thoroughly test video sequences encoded using H.264 in mesh networks. PMID:27164106

  5. On the Feasibility of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks over IEEE 802.15.5 Mesh Topologies.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier; Losilla, Fernando; Rodenas-Herraiz, David; Cruz-Martinez, Felipe; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe

    2016-05-05

    Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) are a special type of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) where large amounts of multimedia data are transmitted over networks composed of low power devices. Hierarchical routing protocols typically used in WSNs for multi-path communication tend to overload nodes located within radio communication range of the data collection unit or data sink. The battery life of these nodes is therefore reduced considerably, requiring frequent battery replacement work to extend the operational life of the WSN system. In a wireless sensor network with mesh topology, any node may act as a forwarder node, thereby enabling multiple routing paths toward any other node or collection unit. In addition, mesh topologies have proven advantages, such as data transmission reliability, network robustness against node failures, and potential reduction in energy consumption. This work studies the feasibility of implementing WMSNs in mesh topologies and their limitations by means of exhaustive computer simulation experiments. To this end, a module developed for the Synchronous Energy Saving (SES) mode of the IEEE 802.15.5 mesh standard has been integrated with multimedia tools to thoroughly test video sequences encoded using H.264 in mesh networks.

  6. Decentralized System Identification Using Stochastic Subspace Identification for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) facilitate a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional structural monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition systems are costly for installation as well as maintenance. WSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. In this paper, the stochastic subspace identification (SSI) technique is selected for system identification, and SSI-based decentralized system identification (SDSI) is proposed to be implemented in a WSN composed of Imote2 wireless sensors that measure acceleration. The SDSI is tightly scheduled in the hierarchical WSN, and its performance is experimentally verified in a laboratory test using a 5-story shear building model. PMID:25856325

  7. A decentralized receptance-based damage detection strategy for wireless smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shinae; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.; Sim, Sung-Han

    2012-05-01

    Various structural health monitoring strategies have been proposed recently that can be implemented in the decentralized computing environment intrinsic to wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN). Many are based on changes in the experimentally determined flexibility matrix for the structure under consideration. However, the flexibility matrix contains only static information; much richer information is available by considering the dynamic flexibility, or receptance, of the structure. Recently, the stochastic dynamic damage locating vector (SDDLV) method was proposed based on changes of dynamic flexibility matrices employing centrally collected output-only measurements. This paper investigates the potential of the SDDLV method for implementation on a network of wireless smart sensors, where a decentralized, hierarchical, in-network processing approach is used to address issues of scalability of the SDDLV algorithm. Two approaches to aggregate results are proposed that provide robust estimates of damage locations. The efficacy of the developed strategy is first verified using wired sensors emulating a wireless sensor network. Subsequently, the decentralized damage detection strategy is implemented on MEMSIC’s Imote2 smart sensor platform and validated experimentally on a laboratory scale truss bridge.

  8. Autonomous management of a recursive area hierarchy for large scale wireless sensor networks using multiple parents

    SciTech Connect

    Cree, Johnathan Vee; Delgado-Frias, Jose

    2016-03-01

    Large scale wireless sensor networks have been proposed for applications ranging from anomaly detection in an environment to vehicle tracking. Many of these applications require the networks to be distributed across a large geographic area while supporting three to five year network lifetimes. In order to support these requirements large scale wireless sensor networks of duty-cycled devices need a method of efficient and effective autonomous configuration/maintenance. This method should gracefully handle the synchronization tasks duty-cycled networks. Further, an effective configuration solution needs to recognize that in-network data aggregation and analysis presents significant benefits to wireless sensor network and should configure the network in a way such that said higher level functions benefit from the logically imposed structure. NOA, the proposed configuration and maintenance protocol, provides a multi-parent hierarchical logical structure for the network that reduces the synchronization workload. It also provides higher level functions with significant inherent benefits such as but not limited to: removing network divisions that are created by single-parent hierarchies, guarantees for when data will be compared in the hierarchy, and redundancies for communication as well as in-network data aggregation/analysis/storage.

  9. Evaluation of wireless data communications at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra R.

    1995-01-01

    This project is motivated by the need for temporary or emergency provisioning of LAN service at KSC. The main goal of the project was to evaluate existing wireless bridge equipment in the KSC environment. Wireless bridge equipment can be used to make a wireless connection between two remotely located LAN segments. This report describes the experimental setup used to evaluate the equipment, including antenna connections, workstation connections, bridge software and workstation software The rangefinder program on the bridge was used to gather data about how the RF propagation environment at KSC affects the performance of the wireless bridge. Data was gathered for indoor as well as outdoor propagation. The report concludes with recommendations on how to take into account the particular terrain and building structures at KSC to design future applications of wireless bridges.

  10. Long-term assessment of an autonomous wireless structural health monitoring system at the new Carquinez Suspension Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Masahiro; Kim, Junhee; Zhang, Yilan; Lynch, Jerome P.; van der Linden, G. W.; Jacob, Vince; Thometz, Ed; Hipley, Pat; Sheng, Li-Hong

    2011-04-01

    A dense network of sensors installed in a bridge can continuously generate response data from which the health and condition of the bridge can be analyzed. This approach to structural health monitoring the efforts associated with periodic bridge inspections and can provide timely insight to regions of the bridge suspected of degradation or damage. Nevertheless, the deployment of fine sensor grids on large-scale structures is not feasible using wired monitoring systems because of the rapidly increasing installation labor and costs required. Moreover, the enormous size of raw sensor data, if not translated into meaningful forms of information, can paralyze the bridge manager's decision making. This paper reports the development of a large-scale wireless structural monitoring system for long-span bridges; the system is entirely wireless which renders it low-cost and easy to install. Unlike central tethered data acquisition systems where data processing occurs in the central server, the distributed network of wireless sensors supports data processing. In-network data processing reduces raw data streams into actionable information of immediate value to the bridge manager. The proposed wireless monitoring system has been deployed on the New Carquinez Suspension Bridge in California. Current efforts on the bridge site include: 1) long-term assessment of a dense wireless sensor network; 2) implementation of a sustainable power management solution using solar power; 3) performance evaluation of an internet-enabled cyber-environment; 4) system identification of the bridge; and 5) the development of data mining tools. A hierarchical cyber-environment supports peer-to-peer communication between wireless sensors deployed on the bridge and allows for the connection between sensors and remote database systems via the internet. At the remote server, model calibration and damage detection analyses that employ a reduced-order finite element bridge model are implemented.

  11. World Without Wires: Is Your District Ready to Go Wireless?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the latest wireless equipments available in market. For starters, wireless networks offer mobility and flexibility: users of laptops, PDAs, tablet PCs, and wireless Voice over IP telephones can move freely about campus while staying connected to the Internet. There are two kinds of wireless networks: ad-hoc, or…

  12. Capacity Limit, Link Scheduling and Power Control in Wireless Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Shan

    2013-01-01

    The rapid advancement of wireless technology has instigated the broad deployment of wireless networks. Different types of networks have been developed, including wireless sensor networks, mobile ad hoc networks, wireless local area networks, and cellular networks. These networks have different structures and applications, and require different…

  13. Wireless Luminescence Integrated Sensors (WLIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Sayler, G.S.

    2003-11-10

    The goal of this project was the development of a family of wireless, single-chip, luminescence-sensing devices to solve a number of difficult distributed measurement problems in areas ranging from environmental monitoring and assessment to high-throughput screening of combinatorial chemistry libraries. These wireless luminescence integrated sensors (WLIS) consist of a microluminometer, wireless data transmitter, and RF power input circuit all realized in a standard integrated circuit (IC) process with genetically engineered, whole-cell, bioluminescent bioreporters encapsulated and deposited on the IC. The end product is a family of compact, low-power, rugged, low-cost sensors. As part of this program they developed an integrated photodiode/signal-processing scheme with an rms noise level of 175 electrons/second for a 13-minute integration time, and a quantum efficiency of 66% at the 490-nm bioluminescent wavelength. this performance provided a detection limit of < 1000 photons/second. Although sol-gel has previously been used to encapsulate yeast cells, the reaction conditions necessary for polymerization (primarily low pH) have beforehand proven too harsh for bacterial cell immobilizations. Utilizing sonication methods, they have were able to initiate polymerization under pH conditions conductive to cell survival. both a toluene bioreporter (Pseudomonas putida TVA8) and a naphthalene bioreporter (Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44) were successfully encapsulated in sol-gel and shown to produce a fairly significant bioluminescent response. In addition to the previously developed naphthalene- and toluene-sensitive bioreporters, they developed a yeast-based xenoestrogen reporter. This technology has been licensed by Micro Systems Technologies, a startup company in Dayton, Ohio for applications in environmental containments monitoring, and for detecting weapons of mass destruction (i.e. homeland security).

  14. Rehabilitation Goals: Their Hierarchical and Multifaceted Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch

    1988-01-01

    Rehabilitation goals are analyzed from a hierarchical, multifaceted perspective, illustrating reduction of the ultimate goal of life adjustment to smaller goals. Addressed are: the contexts within which rehabilitation takes place, the activity levels defining human performance, and the functional levels achieved. A matrix of 12 sets of goals is…

  15. Cognitive Diagnostic Analysis Using Hierarchically Structured Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yu-Lan

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation proposes two modified cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs), the deterministic, inputs, noisy, "and" gate with hierarchy (DINA-H) model and the deterministic, inputs, noisy, "or" gate with hierarchy (DINO-H) model. Both models incorporate the hierarchical structures of the cognitive skills in the model estimation…

  16. Types of Online Hierarchical Repository Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Azran, Ronit; Hardof-Jaffe, Sharon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2011-01-01

    This study presents an empirical investigation of online hierarchical repositories of items presented to university students in Web-supported course websites, using Web mining methods. To this end, data from 1747 courses were collected, and the use of online repositories of content items in these courses was examined. At a later stage, courses…

  17. Transforming Hierarchical Relationships in Student Conduct Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict transformation theory provided a philosophical lens for this critical cultural, constructivist study, wherein four student conduct administrators who engage in leveling hierarchical relationships with students in conduct processes shared ways they make meaning of their professional practice. Through informal, unstructured interviews, a…

  18. The Lyman Alpha Forest in hierarchical cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P; Bryan, G L; Machacek, M; Moiksin, A; Norman, M L; Zhang, Y

    1999-07-02

    The comparison of quasar absorption spectra with numerically simulated spectra from hierarchical cosmological models of structure formation promises to be a valuable tool to discriminate among these models. We present simulation results for the column density, Doppler b parameter, and optical depth probability distributions for five popular cosmological models.

  19. A Hierarchical Grouping of Great Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Donald G.

    1977-01-01

    Great educators of history were categorized on the basis of their: aims of education, fundamental ideas, and educational theories. They were classed by Ward's method of hierarchical analysis into six groupings: Socrates, Ausonius, Jerome, Abelard; Quintilian, Origen, Melanchthon, Ascham, Loyola; Alciun, Comenius; Vittorino, Basedow, Pestalozzi,…

  20. Parallel Temporal Dynamics in Hierarchical Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Ranti, Carolyn; Chatham, Christopher H.; Badre, David

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive control allows us to follow abstract rules in order to choose appropriate responses given our desired outcomes. Cognitive control is often conceptualized as a hierarchical decision process, wherein decisions made at higher, more abstract levels of control asymmetrically influence lower-level decisions. These influences could evolve sequentially across multiple levels of a hierarchical decision, consistent with much prior evidence for central bottlenecks and seriality in decision-making processes. However, here, we show that multiple levels of hierarchical cognitive control are processed primarily in parallel. Human participants selected responses to stimuli using a complex, multiply contingent (third order) rule structure. A response deadline procedure allowed assessment of the accuracy and timing of decisions made at each level of the hierarchy. In contrast to a serial decision process, error rates across levels of the decision mostly declined simultaneously and at identical rates, with only a slight tendency to complete the highest level decision first. Simulations with a biologically plausible neural network model demonstrate how such parallel processing could emerge from a previously developed hierarchically nested frontostriatal architecture. Our results support a parallel processing model of cognitive control, in which uncertainty on multiple levels of a decision is reduced simultaneously. PMID:26051820

  1. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lao, Jing Yu; Banerjee, Debasish

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  2. Arbitrary Order Hierarchical Bases for Computational Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; White, D; Rodrigue, G

    2002-12-20

    We present a clear and general method for constructing hierarchical vector bases of arbitrary polynomial degree for use in the finite element solution of Maxwell's equations. Hierarchical bases enable p-refinement methods, where elements in a mesh can have different degrees of approximation, to be easily implemented. This can prove to be quite useful as sections of a computational domain can be selectively refined in order to achieve a greater error tolerance without the cost of refining the entire domain. While there are hierarchical formulations of vector finite elements in publication (e.g. [1]), they are defined for tetrahedral elements only, and are not generalized for arbitrary polynomial degree. Recently, Hiptmair, motivated by the theory of exterior algebra and differential forms presented a unified mathematical framework for the construction of conforming finite element spaces [2]. In [2], both 1-form (also called H(curl)) and 2-form (also called H(div)) conforming finite element spaces and the definition of their degrees of freedom are presented. These degrees of freedom are weighted integrals where the weighting function determines the character of the bases, i.e. interpolatory, hierarchical, etc.

  3. The Hierarchical Structure of Formal Operational Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, William M.; Mertens, Donna M.

    1979-01-01

    The hierarchical structure of the formal operational period of Piaget's theory of cognitive development was explored through the application of ordering theoretical methods to a set of data that systematically utilized the various formal operational schemes. Results suggested a common structure underlying task performance. (Author/BH)

  4. A Hierarchical Process-Dissociation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Lu, Jun; Morey, Richard D.; Sun, Dongchu; Speckman, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    In fitting the process-dissociation model (L. L. Jacoby, 1991) to observed data, researchers aggregate outcomes across participant, items, or both. T. Curran and D. L. Hintzman (1995) demonstrated how biases from aggregation may lead to artifactual support for the model. The authors develop a hierarchical process-dissociation model that does not…

  5. Managing Clustered Data Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warne, Russell T.; Li, Yan; McKyer, E. Lisako J.; Condie, Rachel; Diep, Cassandra S.; Murano, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in nutrition research often use cluster or multistage sampling to gather participants for their studies. These sampling methods often produce violations of the assumption of data independence that most traditional statistics share. Hierarchical linear modeling is a statistical method that can overcome violations of the independence…

  6. Hierarchical Context Modeling for Video Event Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Ji, Qiang

    2016-10-11

    Current video event recognition research remains largely target-centered. For real-world surveillance videos, targetcentered event recognition faces great challenges due to large intra-class target variation, limited image resolution, and poor detection and tracking results. To mitigate these challenges, we introduced a context-augmented video event recognition approach. Specifically, we explicitly capture different types of contexts from three levels including image level, semantic level, and prior level. At the image level, we introduce two types of contextual features including the appearance context features and interaction context features to capture the appearance of context objects and their interactions with the target objects. At the semantic level, we propose a deep model based on deep Boltzmann machine to learn event object representations and their interactions. At the prior level, we utilize two types of prior-level contexts including scene priming and dynamic cueing. Finally, we introduce a hierarchical context model that systematically integrates the contextual information at different levels. Through the hierarchical context model, contexts at different levels jointly contribute to the event recognition. We evaluate the hierarchical context model for event recognition on benchmark surveillance video datasets. Results show that incorporating contexts in each level can improve event recognition performance, and jointly integrating three levels of contexts through our hierarchical model achieves the best performance.

  7. Bone hierarchical structure in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Natalie; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Bone is a complex hierarchically structured family of materials that includes a network of cells and their interconnected cell processes. New insights into the 3-D structure of various bone materials (mainly rat and human lamellar bone and minipig fibrolamellar bone) were obtained using a focused ion beam electron microscope and the serial surface view method. These studies revealed the presence of two different materials, the major material being the well-known ordered arrays of mineralized collagen fibrils and associated macromolecules, and the minor component being a relatively disordered material composed of individual collagen fibrils with no preferred orientation, with crystals inside and possibly between fibrils, and extensive ground mass. Significantly, the canaliculi and their cell processes are confined within the disordered material. Here we present a new hierarchical scheme for several bone tissue types that incorporates these two materials. The new scheme updates the hierarchical scheme presented by Weiner and Wagner (1998). We discuss the structures at different hierarchical levels with the aim of obtaining further insights into structure-function-related questions, as well as defining some remaining unanswered questions.

  8. Hierarchical Bayesian Models of Subtask Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anglim, Jeromy; Wynton, Sarah K. A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study used Bayesian hierarchical methods to challenge and extend previous work on subtask learning consistency. A general model of individual-level subtask learning was proposed focusing on power and exponential functions with constraints to test for inconsistency. To study subtask learning, we developed a novel computer-based booking…

  9. Information Transfer Ion Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    conferences with proceed- ings to be made available online in the IEEE Xplore database, namely IFIP Wireless Days (WD 2008) at Dubai, UAE, and the...Poland, May 2008, pp. 61-64, IEEE Xplore , DOI = 10.1109/INFTECH. 2008.4621591. 2. J. Konorski, IEEE 802.11 LAN Capacity: Incentives and Incentive...2008, Dubai, UAE, Nov. 2008, IEEE Xplore DOI = 10.1109/WD.2008.4812857. 4. J. Konorski, QoS Provision in an Ad Hoc IEEE 802.11 WLAN: A Bayesian War

  10. Information Transfer in Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    conferences with proceed- ings to be made available online in the IEEE Xplore database, namely IFIP Wireless Days (WD 2008) at Dubai, UAE, and the...Poland, May 2008, pp. 61-64, IEEE Xplore , DOI = 10.1109/INFTECH. 2008.4621591. 2. J. Konorski, IEEE 802.11 LAN Capacity: Incentives and Incentive...2008, Dubai, UAE, Nov. 2008, IEEE Xplore DOI = 10.1109/WD.2008.4812857. 4. J. Konorski, QoS Provision in an Ad Hoc IEEE 802.11 WLAN: A Bayesian War

  11. Fly-by-Wireless Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studor, George

    2010-01-01

    The presentation reviews what is meant by the term 'fly-by-wireless', common problems and motivation, provides recent examples, and examines NASA's future and basis for collaboration. The vision is to minimize cables and connectors and increase functionality across the aerospace industry by providing reliable, lower cost, modular, and higher performance alternatives to wired data connectivity to benefit the entire vehicle/program life-cycle. Focus areas are system engineering and integration methods to reduce cables and connectors, vehicle provisions for modularity and accessibility, and a 'tool box' of alternatives to wired connectivity.

  12. Passive wireless ultrasonic transducer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C. H.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-02-01

    Inductive coupling and capacitive coupling both offer simple solutions to wirelessly probe ultrasonic transducers. This paper investigates the theory and feasibility of such system in the context of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications. Firstly, the physical principles and construction of an inductively coupled transducer system (ICTS) and a capacitively coupled transducer system (CCTS) are introduced. Then the development of a transmission line model with the measured impedance of a bonded piezoelectric ceramic disc representing a sensor attached to an arbitrary solid substrate for both systems is described. The models are validated experimentally. Several applications of CCTS are presented, such CCTS for the underwater and through-composite testing.

  13. Wireless power transfer magnetic couplers

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Gilchrist, Aaron; Sealy, Kylee

    2016-01-19

    A magnetic coupler is disclosed for wireless power transfer systems. A ferrimagnetic component is capable of guiding a magnetic field. A wire coil is wrapped around at least a portion of the ferrimagnetic component. A screen is capable of blocking leakage magnetic fields. The screen may be positioned to cover at least one side of the ferrimagnetic component and the coil. A distance across the screen may be at least six times an air gap distance between the ferrimagnetic component and a receiving magnetic coupler.

  14. WSNs Data Acquisition by Combining Hierarchical Routing Method and Compressive Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhiqiang; Hu, Cunchen; Zhang, Fei; Zhao, Hao; Shen, Shu

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of data acquisition in large distributed wireless sensor networks (WSNs). We propose a method for data acquisition using the hierarchical routing method and compressive sensing for WSNs. Only a few samples are needed to recover the original signal with high probability since sparse representation technology is exploited to capture the similarities and differences of the original signal. To collect samples effectively in WSNs, a framework for the use of the hierarchical routing method and compressive sensing is proposed, using a randomized rotation of cluster-heads to evenly distribute the energy load among the sensors in the network. Furthermore, L1-minimization and Bayesian compressed sensing are used to approximate the recovery of the original signal from the smaller number of samples with a lower signal reconstruction error. We also give an extensive validation regarding coherence, compression rate, and lifetime, based on an analysis of the theory and experiments in the environment with real world signals. The results show that our solution is effective in a large distributed network, especially for energy constrained WSNs. PMID:25207873

  15. Generic hierarchical engine for mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalus, Christian K.; Roessl, Wolfgang; Schnitker, Uwe; Simecek, Michal

    2002-07-01

    Electronic layouts are usually flattened on their path from the hierarchical source downstream to the wafer. Mask data preparation has certainly been identified as a severe bottleneck since long. Data volumes are not only doubling every year along the ITRS roadmap. With the advent of optical proximity correction and phase-shifting masks data volumes are escalating up to non-manageable heights. Hierarchical treatment is one of the most powerful means to keep memory and CPU consumption in reasonable ranges. Only recently, however, has this technique acquired more public attention. Mask data preparation is the most critical area calling for a sound infrastructure to reduce the handling problem. Gaining more and more attention though, are other applications such as large area simulation and manufacturing rule checking (MRC). They all would profit from a generic engine capable to efficiently treat hierarchical data. In this paper we will present a generic engine for hierarchical treatment which solves the major problem, steady transitions along cell borders. Several alternatives exist how to walk through the hierarchy tree. They have, to date, not been thoroughly investigated. One is a bottom-up attempt to treat cells starting with the most elementary cells. The other one is a top-down approach which lends itself to creating a new hierarchy tree. In addition, since the variety, degree of hierarchy and quality of layouts extends over a wide range a generic engine has to take intelligent decisions when exploding the hierarchy tree. Several applications will be shown, in particular how far the limits can be pushed with the current hierarchical engine.

  16. Hierarchical organisation in perception of orientation.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, D; Antonucci, G; Daini, R; Martelli, M L; Zoccolotti, P

    1999-01-01

    According to Rock [1990, in The Legacy of Solomon Asch (Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates)], hierarchical organisation of perception describes cases in which the orientation of an object is affected by the immediately surrounding elements in the visual field. Various experiments were performed to study the hierarchical organisation of orientation perception. In most of them the rod-and-frame-illusion (RFI: change of the apparent vertical measured on a central rod surrounded by a tilted frame) was measured in the presence/absence of a second inner frame. The first three experiments showed that, when the inner frame is vertical, the direction and size of the illusion are consistent with expectancies based on the hierarchical organisation hypothesis. An analysis of published and unpublished data collected on a large number of subjects showed that orientational hierarchical effects are independent from the absolute size of the RFI. In experiments 4 to 7 we examined the perceptual conditions of the inner stimulus (enclosure, orientation, and presence of luminance borders) critical for obtaining a hierarchical organisation effect. Although an inner vertical square was effective in reducing the illusion (experiment 3), an inner circle enclosing the rod was ineffective (experiment 4). This indicates that definite orientation is necessary to modulate the illusion. However, orientational information provided by a vertical or horizontal rectangle presented near the rod, but not enclosing it, did not modulate the RFI (experiment 5). This suggests that the presence of a figure with oriented contours enclosing the rod is critical. In experiments 6 and 7 we studied whether the presence of luminance borders is important or whether the inner upright square might be effective also if made of subjective contours. When the subjective contour figure was salient and the observers perceived it clearly, its effectiveness in modulating the RFI was comparable to that observed with

  17. Nanotribological and wetting performance of hierarchical patterns.

    PubMed

    Grewal, H S; Piao, Shuxue; Cho, Il-Joo; Jhang, Kyung-Young; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2016-01-21

    Surface modification is a promising method to solve the tribological problems in microsystems. To modify the surface, we fabricated hierarchical patterns with different pitches of nano-scale features and different surface chemistries. Micro- and nano-patterns with similar geometrical configurations were also fabricated for comparison. The nano-tribological behavior of the patterns was investigated using an atomic force microscope at different relative humidity levels (5% to 80%) and applied normal loads (40 nN to 120 nN) under a constant sliding velocity. The results showed significant enhancement in the de-wetting and tribological performance of the hierarchical patterns compared with those of flat and micro- and nano-patterned surfaces. The PTFE-coated hierarchical patterns showed similar dynamic contact angles (advancing and receding) to those of the real lotus leaf. The influence of relative humidity on adhesion and friction behavior was found to be significant for all the tested surfaces. The tribological performance was improved as the pitch of the nano-scale geometry of the hierarchical pattern increased, even though the wetting property was not influenced significantly. A model was proposed based on the role of intermolecular force to explain the effect of the pitch of the hierarchical patterns on the adhesion and friction behavior. According to the model based on the molecular force, the contact between a ball and the patterned surface was a multi-asperity contact, contrary to the single-asperity contact predicted by the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) and Maugis-Dugdale (MD) models. The strong intermolecular forces, which are activated in the confined spaces between the adjacent nano-pillars and the ball, contributed to the contact area and hence the adhesion and friction forces.

  18. A Study of Hierarchical Classification in Concrete and Formal Thought.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowell, Walter E.

    This researcher investigated the relationship of hierarchical classification processes in subjects categorized as to developmental level as defined by Piaget's theory, and explored the validity of the hierarchical model and test used in the study. A hierarchical classification test and a battery of four Piaget-type tasks were administered…

  19. Incorporating Usability Criteria into the Development of Animated Hierarchical Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Pei-Ren; Chen, Sherry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, Web-based learning systems have become popular because they can provide multiple tools, among which hierarchical maps are widely used to support teaching and learning. However, traditional hierarchical maps may let learners easily get lost within large information space. This study proposes an animated hierarchical map to address this…

  20. Inference and Hierarchical Modeling in the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, David

    1995-01-01

    The use of hierarchical models in social science research is discussed, with emphasis on causal inference and consideration of the limitations of hierarchical models. The increased use of Gibbs sampling and other Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods in the application of hierarchical models is recommended. (SLD)

  1. Application of a hierarchical structure stochastic learning automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, R. G.; Chrystall, M. S.; Mars, P.

    1979-01-01

    A hierarchical structure automaton was developed using a two state stochastic learning automato (SLA) in a time shared model. Application of the hierarchical SLA to systems with multidimensional, multimodal performance criteria is described. Results of experiments performed with the hierarchical SLA using a performance index with a superimposed noise component of ? or - delta distributed uniformly over the surface are discussed.

  2. Partnership Opportunities with AFRC for Wireless Systems Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will overview the flight test capabilities at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC), to open up partnership collaboration opportunities for Wireless Community to conduct flight testing of aerospace wireless technologies. Also, it will brief the current activities on wireless sensor system at AFRC through SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) proposals, and it will show the current areas of interest on wireless technologies that AFRC would like collaborate with Wireless Community to further and testing.

  3. Wireless sensors for wildfire monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doolin, David M.; Sitar, Nicholas

    2005-05-01

    We describe the design of a system for wildfire monitoring incorporating wireless sensors, and report results from field testing during prescribed test burns near San Francisco, California. The system is composed of environmental sensors collecting temperature, relative humidity and barometric pressure with an on-board GPS unit attached to a wireless, networked mote. The motes communicate with a base station, which communicates the collected data to software running on a database server. The data can be accessed using a browser-based web application or any other application capable of communicating with the database server. Performance of the monitoring system during two prescribed burns at Pinole Point Regional Park (Contra Costa County, California, near San Francisco) is promising. Sensors within the burn zone recorded the passage of the flame front before being scorched, with temperature increasing, and barometric pressure and humidity decreasing as the flame front advanced. Temperature gradients up to 5 C per second were recorded. The data also show that the temperature slightly decreases and the relative humidity slightly increases from ambient values immediately preceding the flame front, indicating that locally significant weather conditions develop even during relatively cool, slow moving grass fires. The maximum temperature recorded was 95 C, the minimum relative humidity 9%, and barometric pressure dropped by as much as 25 mbar.

  4. Wireless Microstimulators for Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Mesut; Pikov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    One of the roadblocks in the field of neural prosthetics is the lack of microelectronic devices for neural stimulation that can last a lifetime in the central nervous system. Wireless multi-electrode arrays are being developed to improve the longevity of implants by eliminating the wire interconnects as well as the chronic tissue reactions due to the tethering forces generated by these wires. An area of research that has not been sufficiently investigated is a simple single-channel passive microstimulator that can collect the stimulus energy that is transmitted wirelessly through the tissue and immediately convert it into the stimulus pulse. For example, many neural prosthetic approaches to intraspinal microstimulation require only a few channels of stimulation. Wired spinal cord implants are not practical for human subjects because of the extensive flexions and rotations that the spinal cord experiences. Thus, intraspinal microstimulation may be a pioneering application that can benefit from submillimetersize floating stimulators. Possible means of energizing such a floating microstimulator, such as optical, acoustic, and electromagnetic waves, are discussed. PMID:21488815

  5. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  6. The Challenge of Wireless Reliability and Coexistence.

    PubMed

    Berger, H Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Wireless communication plays an increasingly important role in healthcare delivery. This further heightens the importance of wireless reliability, but quantifying wireless reliability is a complex and difficult challenge. Understanding the risks that accompany the many benefits of wireless communication should be a component of overall risk management. The emerging trend of using sensors and other device-to-device communications, as part of the emerging Internet of Things concept, is evident in healthcare delivery. The trend increases both the importance and complexity of this challenge. As with most system problems, finding a solution requires breaking down the problem into manageable steps. Understanding the operational reliability of a new wireless device and its supporting system requires developing solid, quantified answers to three questions: 1) How well can this new device and its system operate in a spectral environment where many other wireless devices are also operating? 2) What is the spectral environment in which this device and its system are expected to operate? Are the risks and reliability in its operating environment acceptable? 3) How might the new device and its system affect other devices and systems already in use? When operated under an insightful risk management process, wireless technology can be safely implemented, resulting in improved delivery of care.

  7. On the geostatistical characterization of hierarchical media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Shlomo P.; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2008-02-01

    The subsurface consists of porous and fractured materials exhibiting a hierarchical geologic structure, which gives rise to systematic and random spatial and directional variations in hydraulic and transport properties on a multiplicity of scales. Traditional geostatistical moment analysis allows one to infer the spatial covariance structure of such hierarchical, multiscale geologic materials on the basis of numerous measurements on a given support scale across a domain or "window" of a given length scale. The resultant sample variogram often appears to fit a stationary variogram model with constant variance (sill) and integral (spatial correlation) scale. In fact, some authors, who recognize that hierarchical sedimentary architecture and associated log hydraulic conductivity fields tend to be nonstationary, nevertheless associate them with stationary "exponential-like" transition probabilities and variograms, respectively, the latter being a consequence of the former. We propose that (1) the apparent ability of stationary spatial statistics to characterize the covariance structure of nonstationary hierarchical media is an artifact stemming from the finite size of the windows within which geologic and hydrologic variables are ubiquitously sampled, and (2) the artifact is eliminated upon characterizing the covariance structure of such media with the aid of truncated power variograms, which represent stationary random fields obtained upon sampling a nonstationary fractal over finite windows. To support our opinion, we note that truncated power variograms arise formally when a hierarchical medium is sampled jointly across all geologic categories and scales within a window; cite direct evidence that geostatistical parameters (variance and integral scale) inferred on the basis of traditional variograms vary systematically with support and window scales; demonstrate the ability of truncated power models to capture these variations in terms of a few scaling parameters

  8. EM threat analysis for wireless systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Burkholder, R. J. (Ohio State University Electroscience Laboratory); Mariano, Robert J.; Schniter, P. (Ohio State University Electroscience Laboratory); Gupta, I. J. (Ohio State University Electroscience Laboratory)

    2006-06-01

    Modern digital radio systems are complex and must be carefully designed, especially when expected to operate in harsh propagation environments. The ability to accurately predict the effects of propagation on wireless radio performance could lead to more efficient radio designs as well as the ability to perform vulnerability analyses before and after system deployment. In this report, the authors--experts in electromagnetic (EM) modeling and wireless communication theory--describe the construction of a simulation environment that is capable of quantifying the effects of wireless propagation on the performance of digital communication.

  9. [Mobile phone based wireless microscopy imaging technology].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yucheng; Liu, Jing

    2011-03-01

    This article proposes a new device named "Wireless Cellscope" that combining mobile phone and optical microscope together. The established wireless microscope platform consists of mobile phone, network monitor, miniaturized microscope or high resolution microscope etc. A series of conceptual experiments were performed on microscopic observation of ordinary objects and mice tumor tissue slices. It was demonstrated that, the new method could acquire microscopy images via a wireless way, which is spatially independent. With small size and low cost, the device thus developed has rather wide applicability in non-disturbing investigation of cell/tissue culture and long distance observation of dangerous biological sample etc.

  10. Sleep Deprivation Attack Detection in Wireless Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattasali, Tapalina; Chaki, Rituparna; Sanyal, Sugata

    2012-02-01

    Deployment of sensor network in hostile environment makes it mainly vulnerable to battery drainage attacks because it is impossible to recharge or replace the battery power of sensor nodes. Among different types of security threats, low power sensor nodes are immensely affected by the attacks which cause random drainage of the energy level of sensors, leading to death of the nodes. The most dangerous type of attack in this category is sleep deprivation, where target of the intruder is to maximize the power consumption of sensor nodes, so that their lifetime is minimized. Most of the existing works on sleep deprivation attack detection involve a lot of overhead, leading to poor throughput. The need of the day is to design a model for detecting intrusions accurately in an energy efficient manner. This paper proposes a hierarchical framework based on distributed collaborative mechanism for detecting sleep deprivation torture in wireless sensor network efficiently. Proposed model uses anomaly detection technique in two steps to reduce the probability of false intrusion.

  11. Particle swarm optimization for the clustering of wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillett, Jason C.; Rao, Raghuveer M.; Sahin, Ferat; Rao, T. M.

    2003-07-01

    Clustering is necessary for data aggregation, hierarchical routing, optimizing sleep patterns, election of extremal sensors, optimizing coverage and resource allocation, reuse of frequency bands and codes, and conserving energy. Optimal clustering is typically an NP-hard problem. Solutions to NP-hard problems involve searches through vast spaces of possible solutions. Evolutionary algorithms have been applied successfully to a variety of NP-hard problems. We explore one such approach, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), an evolutionary programming technique where a 'swarm' of test solutions, analogous to a natural swarm of bees, ants or termites, is allowed to interact and cooperate to find the best solution to the given problem. We use the PSO approach to cluster sensors in a sensor network. The energy efficiency of our clustering in a data-aggregation type sensor network deployment is tested using a modified LEACH-C code. The PSO technique with a recursive bisection algorithm is tested against random search and simulated annealing; the PSO technique is shown to be robust. We further investigate developing a distributed version of the PSO algorithm for clustering optimally a wireless sensor network.

  12. 75 FR 43206 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... and Battery Packs: Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review An Initial Determination... communications system server software, wireless handheld devices and battery packs by reason of infringement...

  13. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they be achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and bovine bone may be replaced by amorphous silica, using an approach that simulates what is utilized by phylogenetically ancient glass sponges. The structural hierarchy of these collagen-based biomaterials is replicated by the infiltration and condensation of fluidic polymer-stabilized silicic acid precursors within the intrafibrillar milieu of type I collagen fibrils. This facile biomimetic silicification strategy may be used for fabricating silica-based, three-dimensional functional materials with specific morphological and hierarchical requirements. PMID:23586938

  14. Design of Hierarchical Structures for Synchronized Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Hamed; Javan, Anooshe Rezaee; Ghaedizadeh, Arash; Shen, Jianhu; Xu, Shanqing; Xie, Yi Min

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a general method for creating a new type of hierarchical structures at any level in both 2D and 3D. A simple rule based on a rotate-and-mirror procedure is introduced to achieve multi-level hierarchies. These new hierarchical structures have remarkably few degrees of freedom compared to existing designs by other methods. More importantly, these structures exhibit synchronized motions during opening or closure, resulting in uniform and easily-controllable deformations. Furthermore, a simple analytical formula is found which can be used to avoid collision of units of the structure during the closing process. The novel design concept is verified by mathematical analyses, computational simulations and physical experiments. PMID:28117427

  15. Hierarchical model of vulnerabilities for emotional disorders.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peter J; Mehta, Paras D

    2007-01-01

    Clark and Watson's (1991) tripartite model of anxiety and depression has had a dramatic impact on our understanding of the dispositional variables underlying emotional disorders. More recently, calls have been made to examine not simply the influence of negative affectivity (NA) but also mediating factors that might better explain how NA influences anxious and depressive syndromes (e.g. Taylor, 1998; Watson, 2005). Extending preliminary projects, this study evaluated two hierarchical models of NA, mediating factors of anxiety sensitivity and intolerance of uncertainty, and specific emotional manifestations. Data provided a very good fit to a model elaborated from preliminary studies, lending further support to hierarchical models of emotional vulnerabilities. Implications for classification and diagnosis are discussed.

  16. Contour detection and hierarchical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Arbeláez, Pablo; Maire, Michael; Fowlkes, Charless; Malik, Jitendra

    2011-05-01

    This paper investigates two fundamental problems in computer vision: contour detection and image segmentation. We present state-of-the-art algorithms for both of these tasks. Our contour detector combines multiple local cues into a globalization framework based on spectral clustering. Our segmentation algorithm consists of generic machinery for transforming the output of any contour detector into a hierarchical region tree. In this manner, we reduce the problem of image segmentation to that of contour detection. Extensive experimental evaluation demonstrates that both our contour detection and segmentation methods significantly outperform competing algorithms. The automatically generated hierarchical segmentations can be interactively refined by user-specified annotations. Computation at multiple image resolutions provides a means of coupling our system to recognition applications.

  17. Multiple sequence alignment with hierarchical clustering.

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, F

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the multiple alignment of sequences, either proteins or nucleic acids, that is both accurate and easy to use on microcomputers. The approach is based on the conventional dynamic-programming method of pairwise alignment. Initially, a hierarchical clustering of the sequences is performed using the matrix of the pairwise alignment scores. The closest sequences are aligned creating groups of aligned sequences. Then close groups are aligned until all sequences are aligned in one group. The pairwise alignments included in the multiple alignment form a new matrix that is used to produce a hierarchical clustering. If it is different from the first one, iteration of the process can be performed. The method is illustrated by an example: a global alignment of 39 sequences of cytochrome c. PMID:2849754

  18. An Hierarchical approach to Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark G.; Fernique, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    The increasing volumes of astronomical data require practical methods for data access, visualisation and analysis. Hierarchical methods based on sky tessellation techniques enable a multi-resolution approach to astronomy data from the individual pixels up to the whole sky. The Hierarchical Progressive Survey (HiPS) scheme based on the HEALPix is able to describe images, catalogues and 3-dimensional data cubes and is a practical solution for managing large volumes of heterogeneous data. We present the development of HiPS, and its implementation for ~200 diverse data sets at the CDS and other data centres. We highlight the ease of implementation and the use of HiPS with Aladin Lite and other applications.

  19. Hierarchical clustering in minimum spanning trees.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meichen; Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; Meier, Jil; van Dijk, Bob; Van Mieghem, Piet; Stam, Cornelis Jan

    2015-02-01

    The identification of clusters or communities in complex networks is a reappearing problem. The minimum spanning tree (MST), the tree connecting all nodes with minimum total weight, is regarded as an important transport backbone of the original weighted graph. We hypothesize that the clustering of the MST reveals insight in the hierarchical structure of weighted graphs. However, existing theories and algorithms have difficulties to define and identify clusters in trees. Here, we first define clustering in trees and then propose a tree agglomerative hierarchical clustering (TAHC) method for the detection of clusters in MSTs. We then demonstrate that the TAHC method can detect clusters in artificial trees, and also in MSTs of weighted social networks, for which the clusters are in agreement with the previously reported clusters of the original weighted networks. Our results therefore not only indicate that clusters can be found in MSTs, but also that the MSTs contain information about the underlying clusters of the original weighted network.

  20. Design of Hierarchical Structures for Synchronized Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Hamed; Javan, Anooshe Rezaee; Ghaedizadeh, Arash; Shen, Jianhu; Xu, Shanqing; Xie, Yi Min

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a general method for creating a new type of hierarchical structures at any level in both 2D and 3D. A simple rule based on a rotate-and-mirror procedure is introduced to achieve multi-level hierarchies. These new hierarchical structures have remarkably few degrees of freedom compared to existing designs by other methods. More importantly, these structures exhibit synchronized motions during opening or closure, resulting in uniform and easily-controllable deformations. Furthermore, a simple analytical formula is found which can be used to avoid collision of units of the structure during the closing process. The novel design concept is verified by mathematical analyses, computational simulations and physical experiments.

  1. Noise enhances information transfer in hierarchical networks.

    PubMed

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Holyst, Janusz A; Sloot, Peter M A

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of noise on information transmission in the form of packages shipped between nodes of hierarchical networks. Numerical simulations are performed for artificial tree networks, scale-free Ravasz-Barabási networks as well for a real network formed by email addresses of former Enron employees. Two types of noise are considered. One is related to packet dynamics and is responsible for a random part of packets paths. The second one originates from random changes in initial network topology. We find that the information transfer can be enhanced by the noise. The system possesses optimal performance when both kinds of noise are tuned to specific values, this corresponds to the Stochastic Resonance phenomenon. There is a non-trivial synergy present for both noisy components. We found also that hierarchical networks built of nodes of various degrees are more efficient in information transfer than trees with a fixed branching factor.

  2. Noise enhances information transfer in hierarchical networks

    PubMed Central

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Holyst, Janusz A.; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of noise on information transmission in the form of packages shipped between nodes of hierarchical networks. Numerical simulations are performed for artificial tree networks, scale-free Ravasz-Barabási networks as well for a real network formed by email addresses of former Enron employees. Two types of noise are considered. One is related to packet dynamics and is responsible for a random part of packets paths. The second one originates from random changes in initial network topology. We find that the information transfer can be enhanced by the noise. The system possesses optimal performance when both kinds of noise are tuned to specific values, this corresponds to the Stochastic Resonance phenomenon. There is a non-trivial synergy present for both noisy components. We found also that hierarchical networks built of nodes of various degrees are more efficient in information transfer than trees with a fixed branching factor. PMID:23390574

  3. Object tracking with hierarchical multiview learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Zhang, Shunli; Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Building a robust appearance model is useful to improve tracking performance. We propose a hierarchical multiview learning framework to construct the appearance model, which has two layers for tracking. On the top layer, two different views of features, grayscale value and histogram of oriented gradients, are adopted for representation under the cotraining framework. On the bottom layer, for each view of each feature, three different random subspaces are generated to represent the appearance from multiple views. For each random view submodel, the least squares support vector machine is employed to improve the discriminability for concrete and efficient realization. These two layers are combined to construct the final appearance model for tracking. The proposed hierarchical model assembles two types of multiview learning strategies, in which the appearance can be described more accurately and robustly. Experimental results in the benchmark dataset demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve better performance than many existing state-of-the-art algorithms.

  4. Hierarchical networks, power laws, and neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Eric J; Landsberg, Adam S

    2013-03-01

    We show that in networks with a hierarchical architecture, critical dynamical behaviors can emerge even when the underlying dynamical processes are not critical. This finding provides explicit insight into current studies of the brain's neuronal network showing power-law avalanches in neural recordings, and provides a theoretical justification of recent numerical findings. Our analysis shows how the hierarchical organization of a network can itself lead to power-law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, scaling laws between anomalous exponents, and universal functions-even in the absence of self-organized criticality or critical points. This hierarchy-induced phenomenon is independent of, though can potentially operate in conjunction with, standard dynamical mechanisms for generating power laws.

  5. Hierarchical clustering in minimum spanning trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meichen; Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; Meier, Jil; van Dijk, Bob; Van Mieghem, Piet; Stam, Cornelis Jan

    2015-02-01

    The identification of clusters or communities in complex networks is a reappearing problem. The minimum spanning tree (MST), the tree connecting all nodes with minimum total weight, is regarded as an important transport backbone of the original weighted graph. We hypothesize that the clustering of the MST reveals insight in the hierarchical structure of weighted graphs. However, existing theories and algorithms have difficulties to define and identify clusters in trees. Here, we first define clustering in trees and then propose a tree agglomerative hierarchical clustering (TAHC) method for the detection of clusters in MSTs. We then demonstrate that the TAHC method can detect clusters in artificial trees, and also in MSTs of weighted social networks, for which the clusters are in agreement with the previously reported clusters of the original weighted networks. Our results therefore not only indicate that clusters can be found in MSTs, but also that the MSTs contain information about the underlying clusters of the original weighted network.

  6. Hierarchical Robot Control In A Multisensor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanu, Bir; Thune, Nils; Lee, Jih Kun; Thune, Mari

    1987-03-01

    Automatic recognition, inspection, manipulation and assembly of objects will be a common denominator in most of tomorrow's highly automated factories. These tasks will be handled by intelligent computer controlled robots with multisensor capabilities which contribute to desired flexibility and adaptability. The control of a robot in such a multisensor environment becomes of crucial importance as the complexity of the problem grows exponentially with the number of sensors, tasks, commands and objects. In this paper we present an approach which uses CAD (Computer-Aided Design) based geometric and functional models of objects together with action oriented neuroschemas to recognize and manipulate objects by a robot in a multisensor environment. The hierarchical robot control system is being implemented on a BBN Butterfly multi processor. Index terms: CAD, Hierarchical Control, Hypothesis Generation and Verification, Parallel Processing, Schemas

  7. Hierarchical abstract semantic model for image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhipeng; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Xianglong

    2015-09-01

    Semantic gap limits the performance of bag-of-visual-words. To deal with this problem, a hierarchical abstract semantics method that builds abstract semantic layers, generates semantic visual vocabularies, measures semantic gap, and constructs classifiers using the Adaboost strategy is proposed. First, abstract semantic layers are proposed to narrow the semantic gap between visual features and their interpretation. Then semantic visual words are extracted as features to train semantic classifiers. One popular form of measurement is used to quantify the semantic gap. The Adaboost training strategy is used to combine weak classifiers into strong ones to further improve performance. For a testing image, the category is estimated layer-by-layer. Corresponding abstract hierarchical structures for popular datasets, including Caltech-101 and MSRC, are proposed for evaluation. The experimental results show that the proposed method is capable of narrowing semantic gaps effectively and performs better than other categorization methods.

  8. Hierarchical structure of the logical Internet graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zihui; Figueiredo, Daniel R.; Jaiswal, Sharad; Gao, Lixin

    2001-07-01

    The study of the Internet topology has recently received much attention from the research community. In particular, the observation that the network graph has interesting properties, such as power laws, that might be explored in a myriad of ways. Most of the work in characterizing the Internet graph is based on the physical network graph, i.e., the connectivity graph. In this paper we investigate how logical relationships between nodes of the AS graph can be used to gain insight to its structure. We characterize the logical graph using various metrics and identify the presence of power laws in the number of customers that a provider has. Using these logical relationships we define a structural model of the AS graph. The model highlights the hierarchical nature of logical relationships and the preferential connection to larger providers. We also investigate the consistency of this model over time and observe interesting properties of the hierarchical structure.

  9. Hierarchical porous polymer scaffolds from block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Sai, Hiroaki; Tan, Kwan Wee; Hur, Kahyun; Asenath-Smith, Emily; Hovden, Robert; Jiang, Yi; Riccio, Mark; Muller, David A; Elser, Veit; Estroff, Lara A; Gruner, Sol M; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2013-08-02

    Hierarchical porous polymer materials are of increasing importance because of their potential application in catalysis, separation technology, or bioengineering. Examples for their synthesis exist, but there is a need for a facile yet versatile conceptual approach to such hierarchical scaffolds and quantitative characterization of their nonperiodic pore systems. Here, we introduce a synthesis method combining well-established concepts of macroscale spinodal decomposition and nanoscale block copolymer self-assembly with porosity formation on both length scales via rinsing with protic solvents. We used scanning electron microscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, transmission electron tomography, and nanoscale x-ray computed tomography for quantitative pore-structure characterization. The method was demonstrated for AB- and ABC-type block copolymers, and resulting materials were used as scaffolds for calcite crystal growth.

  10. Neural decoding with hierarchical generative models.

    PubMed

    van Gerven, Marcel A J; de Lange, Floris P; Heskes, Tom

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has shown that reconstruction of perceived images based on hemodynamic response as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is starting to become feasible. In this letter, we explore reconstruction based on a learned hierarchy of features by employing a hierarchical generative model that consists of conditional restricted Boltzmann machines. In an unsupervised phase, we learn a hierarchy of features from data, and in a supervised phase, we learn how brain activity predicts the states of those features. Reconstruction is achieved by sampling from the model, conditioned on brain activity. We show that by using the hierarchical generative model, we can obtain good-quality reconstructions of visual images of handwritten digits presented during an fMRI scanning session.

  11. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    DOE PAGES

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; ...

    2016-03-14

    In this study, we present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  12. Hierarchical Bayesian Approach to Locating Seismic Events

    SciTech Connect

    Johannesson, G; Myers, S C; Hanley, W G

    2005-11-09

    We propose a hierarchical Bayesian model for conducting inference on the location of multiple seismic events (earthquakes) given data on the arrival of various seismic phases to sensor locations. The model explicitly accounts for the uncertainty associated with a theoretical seismic-wave travel-time model used along with the uncertainty of the arrival data. Posterior inferences is carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC).

  13. Megavariate analysis of hierarchical QSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Lennart; Johansson, Erik; Lindgren, Fredrik; Sjöström, Michael; Wold, Svante

    2002-10-01

    Multivariate PCA- and PLS-models involving many variables are often difficult to interpret, because plots and lists of loadings, coefficients, VIPs, etc, rapidly become messy and hard to overview. There may then be a strong temptation to eliminate variables to obtain a smaller data set. Such a reduction of variables, however, often removes information and makes the modelling efforts less reliable. Model interpretation may be misleading and predictive power may deteriorate. A better alternative is usually to partition the variables into blocks of logically related variables and apply hierarchical data analysis. Such blocked data may be analyzed by PCA and PLS. This modelling forms the base-level of the hierarchical modelling set-up. On the base-level in-depth information is extracted for the different blocks. The score vectors formed on the base-level, here called `super variables', may be linked together in new matrices on the top-level. On the top-level superficial relationships between the X- and the Y-data are investigated. In this paper the basic principles of hierarchical modelling by means of PCA and PLS are reviewed. One objective of the paper is to disseminate this concept to a broader QSAR audience. The hierarchical methods are used to analyze a set of 10 haloalkanes for which K = 30 chemical descriptors and M = 255 biological responses have been gathered. Due to the complexity of the biological data, they are sub-divided in four blocks. All the modelling steps on the base-level and the top-level are reported and the final QSAR model is interpreted thoroughly.

  14. Hierarchical video summarization based on context clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Belle L.; Smith, John R.

    2003-11-01

    A personalized video summary is dynamically generated in our video personalization and summarization system based on user preference and usage environment. The three-tier personalization system adopts the server-middleware-client architecture in order to maintain, select, adapt, and deliver rich media content to the user. The server stores the content sources along with their corresponding MPEG-7 metadata descriptions. In this paper, the metadata includes visual semantic annotations and automatic speech transcriptions. Our personalization and summarization engine in the middleware selects the optimal set of desired video segments by matching shot annotations and sentence transcripts with user preferences. Besides finding the desired contents, the objective is to present a coherent summary. There are diverse methods for creating summaries, and we focus on the challenges of generating a hierarchical video summary based on context information. In our summarization algorithm, three inputs are used to generate the hierarchical video summary output. These inputs are (1) MPEG-7 metadata descriptions of the contents in the server, (2) user preference and usage environment declarations from the user client, and (3) context information including MPEG-7 controlled term list and classification scheme. In a video sequence, descriptions and relevance scores are assigned to each shot. Based on these shot descriptions, context clustering is performed to collect consecutively similar shots to correspond to hierarchical scene representations. The context clustering is based on the available context information, and may be derived from domain knowledge or rules engines. Finally, the selection of structured video segments to generate the hierarchical summary efficiently balances between scene representation and shot selection.

  15. Angelic Hierarchical Planning: Optimal and Online Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-06

    describe an alternative “satisficing” algorithm, AHSS . 4.1 Abstract Lookahead Trees Our ALT data structures support our search algorithms by efficiently...Angelic Hierarchical Satisficing Search ( AHSS ), which at- tempts to find a plan that reaches the goal with at most some pre-specified cost α. AHSS can be...much more efficient than AHA*, since it can commit to a plan without first proving its optimality. At each step, AHSS (see Algorithm 3) begins by

  16. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-06-15

    We present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  17. Modular, Hierarchical Learning By Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldi, Pierre F.; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1996-01-01

    Modular and hierarchical approach to supervised learning by artificial neural networks leads to neural networks more structured than neural networks in which all neurons fully interconnected. These networks utilize general feedforward flow of information and sparse recurrent connections to achieve dynamical effects. The modular organization, sparsity of modular units and connections, and fact that learning is much more circumscribed are all attractive features for designing neural-network hardware. Learning streamlined by imitating some aspects of biological neural networks.

  18. System and method for time synchronization in a wireless network

    SciTech Connect

    Gonia, Patrick S.; Kolavennu, Soumitri N.; Mahasenan, Arun V.; Budampati, Ramakrishna S.

    2010-03-30

    A system includes multiple wireless nodes forming a cluster in a wireless network, where each wireless node is configured to communicate and exchange data wirelessly based on a clock. One of the wireless nodes is configured to operate as a cluster master. Each of the other wireless nodes is configured to (i) receive time synchronization information from a parent node, (ii) adjust its clock based on the received time synchronization information, and (iii) broadcast time synchronization information based on the time synchronization information received by that wireless node. The time synchronization information received by each of the other wireless nodes is based on time synchronization information provided by the cluster master so that the other wireless nodes substantially synchronize their clocks with the clock of the cluster master.

  19. Hierarchical structure of Turkey's foreign trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, Ersin; Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa

    2011-10-01

    We examine the hierarchical structures of Turkey's foreign trade by using real prices of their commodity export and import move together over time. We obtain the topological properties among the countries based on Turkey's foreign trade during the 1996-2010 period by using the concept of hierarchical structure methods (minimal spanning tree, (MST) and hierarchical tree, (HT)). These periods are divided into two subperiods, such as 1996-2002 and 2003-2010, in order to test various time-window and observe the temporal evolution. We perform the bootstrap techniques to investigate a value of the statistical reliability to the links of the MSTs and HTs. We also use a clustering linkage procedure in order to observe the cluster structure much better. From the structural topologies of these trees, we identify different clusters of countries according to their geographical location and economic ties. Our results show that the DE (Germany), UK (United Kingdom), FR (France), IT (Italy) and RU (Russia) are more important within the network, due to a tighter connection with other countries. We have also found that these countries play a significant role for Turkey's foreign trade and have important implications for the design of portfolio and investment strategies.

  20. Resilient 3D hierarchical architected metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Meza, Lucas R; Zelhofer, Alex J; Clarke, Nigel; Mateos, Arturo J; Kochmann, Dennis M; Greer, Julia R

    2015-09-15

    Hierarchically designed structures with architectural features that span across multiple length scales are found in numerous hard biomaterials, like bone, wood, and glass sponge skeletons, as well as manmade structures, like the Eiffel Tower. It has been hypothesized that their mechanical robustness and damage tolerance stem from sophisticated ordering within the constituents, but the specific role of hierarchy remains to be fully described and understood. We apply the principles of hierarchical design to create structural metamaterials from three material systems: (i) polymer, (ii) hollow ceramic, and (iii) ceramic-polymer composites that are patterned into self-similar unit cells in a fractal-like geometry. In situ nanomechanical experiments revealed (i) a nearly theoretical scaling of structural strength and stiffness with relative density, which outperforms existing nonhierarchical nanolattices; (ii) recoverability, with hollow alumina samples recovering up to 98% of their original height after compression to ≥ 50% strain; (iii) suppression of brittle failure and structural instabilities in hollow ceramic hierarchical nanolattices; and (iv) a range of deformation mechanisms that can be tuned by changing the slenderness ratios of the beams. Additional levels of hierarchy beyond a second order did not increase the strength or stiffness, which suggests the existence of an optimal degree of hierarchy to amplify resilience. We developed a computational model that captures local stress distributions within the nanolattices under compression and explains some of the underlying deformation mechanisms as well as validates the measured effective stiffness to be interpreted as a metamaterial property.

  1. Exploring hierarchical visualization designs using phylogenetic trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaomeng; Crouser, R. Jordan; Griffin, Garth; Gramazio, Connor; Schulz, Hans-Jörg; Childs, Hank; Chang, Remco

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing research on information visualization has produced an ever-increasing number of visualization designs. Despite this activity, limited progress has been made in categorizing this large number of information visualizations. This makes understanding their common design features challenging, and obscures the yet unexplored areas of novel designs. With this work, we provide categorization from an evolutionary perspective, leveraging a computational model to represent evolutionary processes, the phylogenetic tree. The result - a phylogenetic tree of a design corpus of hierarchical visualizations - enables better understanding of the various design features of hierarchical information visualizations, and further illuminates the space in which the visualizations lie, through support for interactive clustering and novel design suggestions. We demonstrate these benefits with our software system, where a corpus of two-dimensional hierarchical visualization designs is constructed into a phylogenetic tree. This software system supports visual interactive clustering and suggesting for novel designs; the latter capacity is also demonstrated via collaboration with an artist who sketched new designs using our system.

  2. Cluster assembly in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    I will discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds. Recent evidence, both observational and numerical, suggests that molecular clouds (MCs) may be undergoing global, hierarchical gravitational collapse. The "hierarchical" regime consists of small-scale collapses within larger-scale ones. The former occur in a more scattered fashion and at slightly earlier times, and are themselves falling into the larger potential well of the still-ongoing large-scale collapse. Instead, the large-scale collapse culminates a few Myr later, in a highly focused region, of higher density, mass, and velocity dispersion. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall velocity of their parent clumps towards the larger potential trough, while those formed later, in the aforementioned trough, form from gas that has already dissipated some of its kinetic energy, and thus have a lower velocity dispersion. This leads to a radial age gradient in the stellar population, in agreement with recent observations.

  3. A Hierarchical Approach to Buckling Load Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbocz, Johann; Starnes, James H.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    The advantages of using a hierarchical analysis approach to calculate the buckling load of an axially compressed composite cylindrical shell is demonstrated using an example taken from a recent experimental program. The Delft Interactive Shell DEsign COde (DISDECO) shell design code is used for this hierarchical analysis approach to provide an accurate prediction of the critical buckling load of the actual shell structure. DISDECO includes the influence of the boundary conditions, initial geometric imperfections, the effects of stiffener and load eccentricities, and the effects of prebuckling deformations caused by edge constraints in the analysis. It is shown that the use of DISDECO makes it relatively simple to proceed step by step from simple to more complex models and solution procedures. As a final step in the hierarchical analysis approach, the critical buckling load and the estimated imperfection sensitivity of the shell are verified by conducting an analysis of a large finite element model with one of the current generation two-dimensional shell analysis codes with advanced capabilities needed to represent both geometric and material nonlinearities.

  4. Hierarchically Structured Materials for Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-09-25

    Lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles (EV), including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electrical vehicles. With the increasing demand on devices of high energy densities (>500 Wh/kg) , new energy storage systems, such as lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB also attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performances of these energy storage systems depend not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performances characteristics of batteries often have conflict requirements on the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflict requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li-O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate 1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and 2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties, prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime.

  5. Anisotropic and Hierarchical Porosity in Multifunctional Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtner, Aaron Zev

    The performance of multifunctional porous ceramics is often hindered by the seemingly contradictory effects of porosity on both mechanical and non-structural properties and yet a sufficient body of knowledge linking microstructure to these properties does not exist. Using a combination of tailored anisotropic and hierarchical materials, these disparate effects may be reconciled. In this project, a systematic investigation of the processing, characterization and properties of anisotropic and isotropic hierarchically porous ceramics was conducted. The system chosen was a composite ceramic intended as the cathode for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Comprehensive processing investigations led to the development of approaches to make hierarchical, anisotropic porous microstructures using directional freeze-casting of well dispersed slurries. The effect of all the important processing parameters was investigated. This resulted in an ability to tailor and control the important microstructural features including the scale of the microstructure, the macropore size and total porosity. Comparable isotropic porous ceramics were also processed using fugitive pore formers. A suite of characterization techniques including x-ray tomography and 3-D sectional scanning electron micrographs (FIB-SEM) was used to characterize and quantify the green and partially sintered microstructures. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure was quantified and discrete element simulations (DEM) were used to explain the experimental observations. Finally, the comprehensive mechanical properties, at room temperature, were investigated, experimentally and using DEM, for the different microstructures.

  6. Hierarchical Bayesian model updating for structural identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmanesh, Iman; Moaveni, Babak; Lombaert, Geert; Papadimitriou, Costas

    2015-12-01

    A new probabilistic finite element (FE) model updating technique based on Hierarchical Bayesian modeling is proposed for identification of civil structural systems under changing ambient/environmental conditions. The performance of the proposed technique is investigated for (1) uncertainty quantification of model updating parameters, and (2) probabilistic damage identification of the structural systems. Accurate estimation of the uncertainty in modeling parameters such as mass or stiffness is a challenging task. Several Bayesian model updating frameworks have been proposed in the literature that can successfully provide the "parameter estimation uncertainty" of model parameters with the assumption that there is no underlying inherent variability in the updating parameters. However, this assumption may not be valid for civil structures where structural mass and stiffness have inherent variability due to different sources of uncertainty such as changing ambient temperature, temperature gradient, wind speed, and traffic loads. Hierarchical Bayesian model updating is capable of predicting the overall uncertainty/variability of updating parameters by assuming time-variability of the underlying linear system. A general solution based on Gibbs Sampler is proposed to estimate the joint probability distributions of the updating parameters. The performance of the proposed Hierarchical approach is evaluated numerically for uncertainty quantification and damage identification of a 3-story shear building model. Effects of modeling errors and incomplete modal data are considered in the numerical study.

  7. Resilient 3D hierarchical architected metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Lucas R.; Zelhofer, Alex J.; Clarke, Nigel; Mateos, Arturo J.; Kochmann, Dennis M.; Greer, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchically designed structures with architectural features that span across multiple length scales are found in numerous hard biomaterials, like bone, wood, and glass sponge skeletons, as well as manmade structures, like the Eiffel Tower. It has been hypothesized that their mechanical robustness and damage tolerance stem from sophisticated ordering within the constituents, but the specific role of hierarchy remains to be fully described and understood. We apply the principles of hierarchical design to create structural metamaterials from three material systems: (i) polymer, (ii) hollow ceramic, and (iii) ceramic–polymer composites that are patterned into self-similar unit cells in a fractal-like geometry. In situ nanomechanical experiments revealed (i) a nearly theoretical scaling of structural strength and stiffness with relative density, which outperforms existing nonhierarchical nanolattices; (ii) recoverability, with hollow alumina samples recovering up to 98% of their original height after compression to ≥50% strain; (iii) suppression of brittle failure and structural instabilities in hollow ceramic hierarchical nanolattices; and (iv) a range of deformation mechanisms that can be tuned by changing the slenderness ratios of the beams. Additional levels of hierarchy beyond a second order did not increase the strength or stiffness, which suggests the existence of an optimal degree of hierarchy to amplify resilience. We developed a computational model that captures local stress distributions within the nanolattices under compression and explains some of the underlying deformation mechanisms as well as validates the measured effective stiffness to be interpreted as a metamaterial property. PMID:26330605

  8. Hierarchical image classification in the bioscience literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehyun; Yu, Hong

    2009-11-14

    Our previous work has shown that images appearing in bioscience articles can be classified into five types: Gel-Image, Image-of-Thing, Graph, Model, and Mix. For this paper, we explored and analyzed features strongly associated with each image type and developed a hierarchical image classification approach for classifying an image into one of the five types. First, we applied texture features to separate images into two groups: 1) a texture group comprising Gel Image, Image-of-Thing, and Mix, and 2) a non-texture group comprising Graph and Model. We then applied entropy, skewness, and uniformity for the first group, and edge difference, uniformity, and smoothness for the second group to classify images into specific types. Our results show that hierarchical image classification accurately divided images into the two groups during the initial classification and that the overall accuracy of the image classification was higher than that of our previous approach. In particular, the recall of hierarchical image classification was greatly improved due to the high accuracy of the initial classification.

  9. Metal hierarchical patterning by direct nanoimprint lithography

    PubMed Central

    Radha, Boya; Lim, Su Hui; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional hierarchical patterning of metals is of paramount importance in diverse fields involving photonics, controlling surface wettability and wearable electronics. Conventionally, this type of structuring is tedious and usually involves layer-by-layer lithographic patterning. Here, we describe a simple process of direct nanoimprint lithography using palladium benzylthiolate, a versatile metal-organic ink, which not only leads to the formation of hierarchical patterns but also is amenable to layer-by-layer stacking of the metal over large areas. The key to achieving such multi-faceted patterning is hysteretic melting of ink, enabling its shaping. It undergoes transformation to metallic palladium under gentle thermal conditions without affecting the integrity of the hierarchical patterns on micro- as well as nanoscale. A metallic rice leaf structure showing anisotropic wetting behavior and woodpile-like structures were thus fabricated. Furthermore, this method is extendable for transferring imprinted structures to a flexible substrate to make them robust enough to sustain numerous bending cycles. PMID:23446801

  10. Hierarchical models of animal abundance and occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Dorazio, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Much of animal ecology is devoted to studies of abundance and occurrence of species, based on surveys of spatially referenced sample units. These surveys frequently yield sparse counts that are contaminated by imperfect detection, making direct inference about abundance or occurrence based on observational data infeasible. This article describes a flexible hierarchical modeling framework for estimation and inference about animal abundance and occurrence from survey data that are subject to imperfect detection. Within this framework, we specify models of abundance and detectability of animals at the level of the local populations defined by the sample units. Information at the level of the local population is aggregated by specifying models that describe variation in abundance and detection among sites. We describe likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for estimation and inference under the resulting hierarchical model. We provide two examples of the application of hierarchical models to animal survey data, the first based on removal counts of stream fish and the second based on avian quadrat counts. For both examples, we provide a Bayesian analysis of the models using the software WinBUGS.

  11. Hierarchically structured materials for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2013-10-01

    The lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles, including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles. With the increasing demand for devices of high-energy densities (>500 Wh kg-1), new energy storage systems, such as lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB, have attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performance of these energy storage systems depends not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of the electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performance characteristics of batteries often have conflicting requirements with the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflicting requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li-O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate (1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and (2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties and prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime.

  12. Epidemic Propagation In Overlaid Wireless Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yanmaz, Evsen

    2008-01-01

    Witb tbe emergence of computer worms tbat can spread over air interfaces, wireless ad boc and sensor networks can be vulnerable to node compromises even if the deployed network is not connected to the backbone. Depending on the physical topology of the wireless network, even a single infected node can compromise the whole network. In this work, epidemic (e.g., worm) propagation in a static wireless network is studied, where a number of inCected mobile nodes are injected over the existing network. It is shown that the epidemic spread threshold and size depend on the physical topology of the underlying static wireless network as well as the mobility model employed by the infected mobile nodes. More specifically, results show that in a Cully-connected static wirelessnctwork targeted attacks are more effective, wbereas Cor a random topology random attacks can be sufficient to compromise the whole network.

  13. On computer vision in wireless sensor networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nina M.; Ko, Teresa H.

    2004-09-01

    Wireless sensor networks allow detailed sensing of otherwise unknown and inaccessible environments. While it would be beneficial to include cameras in a wireless sensor network because images are so rich in information, the power cost of transmitting an image across the wireless network can dramatically shorten the lifespan of the sensor nodes. This paper describe a new paradigm for the incorporation of imaging into wireless networks. Rather than focusing on transmitting images across the network, we show how an image can be processed locally for key features using simple detectors. Contrasted with traditional event detection systems that trigger an image capture, this enables a new class of sensors which uses a low power imaging sensor to detect a variety of visual cues. Sharing these features among relevant nodes cues specific actions to better provide information about the environment. We report on various existing techniques developed for traditional computer vision research which can aid in this work.

  14. Feasibility study of wireless power transmission systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, W. J., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Wireless microwave or laser energy transfers power from a manned earth-orbiting central station to unmanned astronomical substations. More efficient systems are required for the microwave power transmission.

  15. Wireless technology in disease management and medicine.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Gari D; Clifton, David

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare information, and to some extent patient management, is progressing toward a wireless digital future. This change is driven partly by a desire to improve the current state of medicine using new technologies, partly by supply-and-demand economics, and partly by the utility of wireless devices. Wired technology can be cumbersome for patient monitoring and can restrict the behavior of the monitored patients, introducing bias or artifacts. However, wireless technologies, while mitigating some of these issues, have introduced new problems such as data dropout and "information overload" for the clinical team. This review provides an overview of current wireless technology used for patient monitoring and disease management. We identify some of the major related issues and describe some existing and possible solutions. In particular, we discuss the rapidly evolving fields of telemedicine and mHealth in the context of increasingly resource-constrained healthcare systems.

  16. 77 FR 64446 - Wireless Microphones Proceeding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... Commission noted, most other radio communications services have shifted from analog to digital technology to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 15, 74, and 90 Wireless Microphones Proceeding AGENCY: Federal...

  17. Terahertz wireless communications based on photonics technologies.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuma, Tadao; Horiguchi, Shogo; Minamikata, Yusuke; Yoshimizu, Yasuyuki; Hisatake, Shintaro; Kuwano, Shigeru; Yoshimoto, Naoto; Terada, Jun; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-07

    There has been an increasing interest in the application of terahertz (THz) waves to broadband wireless communications. In particular, use of frequencies above 275 GHz is one of the strong concerns among radio scientists and engineers, because these frequency bands have not yet been allocated at specific active services, and there is a possibility to employ extremely large bandwidths for ultra-broadband wireless communications. Introduction of photonics technologies for signal generation, modulation and detection is effective not only to enhance the bandwidth and/or the data rate, but also to combine fiber-optic (wired) and wireless networks. This paper reviews recent progress in THz wireless communications using telecom-based photonics technologies towards 100 Gbit/s.

  18. Wireless Sensing Opportunities for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Wireless sensors and sensor networks is an emerging technology area with many applications within the aerospace industry. Integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace vehicles is needed to ensure the safety of the crew and the vehicle, yet often high costs, weight, size and other constraints prevent the incorporation of instrumentation onto spacecraft. This paper presents a few of the areas such as IVHM, where new wireless sensing technology is needed on both existing vehicles as well as future spacecraft. From ground tests to inflatable structures to the International Space Station, many applications could receive benefits from small, low power, wireless sensors. This paper also highlights some of the challenges that need to overcome when implementing wireless sensor networks for aerospace vehicles.

  19. Wireless technologies and patient safety in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Justin

    2006-06-01

    In the development of policies for wireless technologies, it is important for healthcare organizations to reduce risks to patients from use of wireless devices. Policy should be devised for instructing hospital staff, visitors, and patients, avoiding unwarranted restrictions but not ignoring evidence regarding potential interference problems, and allowing comparison with other clinical facilities of benefits of policy. To inform policy developers and a general audience of hospital personnel, a review was conducted on the safety of wireless devices for communication within hospitals. This review targeted electromagnetic interference effects of devices on medical devices and summarises key recommendations from published reports and international standards. There is consensus that the highest risk of interference occurs with two-way radios used by emergency crews, followed by mobile phones, while radio local area networks produce negligible interference. Wireless technologies are deemed suitable for use throughout hospital areas including intensive care units and operating rooms, given that recommended separation distances from medical equipment are observed.

  20. Wireless powering of e -swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Jérome; Carrara, Serena; Sanchez, Julien; Lannelongue, Jérémy; Loget, Gabriel; Bouffier, Laurent; Fischer, Peer; Kuhn, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized structures that can move in a controlled way in solution and integrate various functionalities are attracting considerable attention due to the potential applications in fields ranging from autonomous micromotors to roving sensors. Here we introduce a concept which allows, depending on their specific design, the controlled directional motion of objects in water, combined with electronic functionalities such as the emission of light, sensing, signal conversion, treatment and transmission. The approach is based on electric field-induced polarization, which triggers different chemical reactions at the surface of the object and thereby its propulsion. This results in a localized electric current that can power in a wireless way electronic devices in water, leading to a new class of electronic swimmers (e-swimmers). PMID:25330809