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  1. Absolute Value Inequalities: High School Students' Solutions and Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almog, Nava; Ilany, Bat-Sheva

    2012-01-01

    Inequalities are one of the foundational subjects in high school math curricula, but there is a lack of academic research into how students learn certain types of inequalities. This article fills part of the research gap by presenting the findings of a study that examined high school students' methods of approaching absolute value inequalities,…

  2. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted.

  3. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted. PMID:27245647

  4. A high-precision mechanical absolute-rotation sensor.

    PubMed

    Venkateswara, Krishna; Hagedorn, Charles A; Turner, Matthew D; Arp, Trevor; Gundlach, Jens H

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a mechanical absolute-rotation sensor capable of resolving ground rotation angle of less than 1 nrad/√Hz above 30 mHz and 0.2 nrad/√Hz above 100 mHz about a single horizontal axis. The device consists of a meter-scale beam balance, suspended by a pair of flexures, with a resonance frequency of 10.8 mHz. The center of mass is located 3 μm above the pivot, giving an excellent horizontal displacement rejection of better than 3 × 10(-5) rad/m. The angle of the beam is read out optically using a high-sensitivity autocollimator. We have also built a tiltmeter with better than 1 nrad/√Hz sensitivity above 30 mHz. Co-located measurements using the two instruments allowed us to distinguish between background rotation signal at low frequencies and intrinsic instrument noise. The rotation sensor is useful for rotational seismology and for rejecting background rotation signal from seismometers in experiments demanding high levels of seismic isolation, such as Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. PMID:24517804

  5. A high-precision mechanical absolute-rotation sensor.

    PubMed

    Venkateswara, Krishna; Hagedorn, Charles A; Turner, Matthew D; Arp, Trevor; Gundlach, Jens H

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a mechanical absolute-rotation sensor capable of resolving ground rotation angle of less than 1 nrad/√Hz above 30 mHz and 0.2 nrad/√Hz above 100 mHz about a single horizontal axis. The device consists of a meter-scale beam balance, suspended by a pair of flexures, with a resonance frequency of 10.8 mHz. The center of mass is located 3 μm above the pivot, giving an excellent horizontal displacement rejection of better than 3 × 10(-5) rad/m. The angle of the beam is read out optically using a high-sensitivity autocollimator. We have also built a tiltmeter with better than 1 nrad/√Hz sensitivity above 30 mHz. Co-located measurements using the two instruments allowed us to distinguish between background rotation signal at low frequencies and intrinsic instrument noise. The rotation sensor is useful for rotational seismology and for rejecting background rotation signal from seismometers in experiments demanding high levels of seismic isolation, such as Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

  6. A high-precision mechanical absolute-rotation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara, Krishna; Hagedorn, Charles A.; Turner, Matthew D.; Arp, Trevor; Gundlach, Jens H.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a mechanical absolute-rotation sensor capable of resolving ground rotation angle of less than 1 nrad/sqrt{Hz} above 30 mHz and 0.2 nrad/sqrt{Hz} above 100 mHz about a single horizontal axis. The device consists of a meter-scale beam balance, suspended by a pair of flexures, with a resonance frequency of 10.8 mHz. The center of mass is located 3 μm above the pivot, giving an excellent horizontal displacement rejection of better than 3 × 10-5 rad/m. The angle of the beam is read out optically using a high-sensitivity autocollimator. We have also built a tiltmeter with better than 1 nrad/sqrt{Hz} sensitivity above 30 mHz. Co-located measurements using the two instruments allowed us to distinguish between background rotation signal at low frequencies and intrinsic instrument noise. The rotation sensor is useful for rotational seismology and for rejecting background rotation signal from seismometers in experiments demanding high levels of seismic isolation, such as Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

  7. Persistent high fever and systemic inflammation induced by percutaneous coronary intervention-related periaortitis

    PubMed Central

    Kakino, Takamori; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    After coronary catheterization, fever sometimes occurs, usually transiently. We report a very rare case that suggests persistent high fever and systemic inflammation might be caused by periaortitis induced by coronary catheterization including percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:20057898

  8. Hypoplastic coronary arteries and high takeoff position of the right coronary ostium. A fatal combination of congenital coronary artery anomalies in an amateur athlete.

    PubMed

    Menke, D M; Waller, B F; Pless, J E

    1985-08-01

    This report describes a previously unrecognized combination of congenital coronary artery abnormalities in the heart of a 30-year-old amateur athlete who died suddenly during a basketball game. Both right and left circumflex coronary arteries were half of their normal length (hypoplastic) decreasing posterior ventricular myocardial perfusion. In addition, the right coronary ostium rose 5 mm above the sinotubular junction (high takeoff position), which also contributed to decreased right coronary artery perfusion. This combination of congenital coronary arterial lesions should be added to the list of structural cardiac defects associated with exercise-related sudden death.

  9. [High altitude stay and air travel in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Allemann, Y; Saner, H; Meier, B

    1998-04-25

    Acute exposure to high altitude produces hypoxia-associated stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. This response is further enhanced by physical activity and induces an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Consequently, cardiac work, myocardial oxygen consumption, and coronary blood flow are also increased. During the first 4 days of acute exposure to moderate or high altitude, coronary patients are at greatest risk of untoward events. Gradual ascent, early limitation of activity to a lower level than tolerated at low altitude, pre-ascent physical conditioning and rigorous blood pressure control should all help to minimise the cardiac risk. At altitudes of 2500 to 3000 m or lower, an asymptomatic coronary patient with good exercise tolerance, without exercise induced signs or symptoms of ischemia, and with an ejection fraction of the left ventricle > 50%, is at very low risk. However, several days' acclimatization before high-level activity at moderate or high altitude is recommended. High risk coronary patients should be investigated more carefully and precautionary measures should be more stringent. Left and right cardiac function and pulmonary artery pressure are the most helpful parameters for evaluation and counselling of patients with non-ischemic heart disease who plan to ascend to moderate or high altitudes. When advising patients who intend to fly as passengers in commercial aircraft, it is important to know that in-flight atmospheric pressure conditions in commercial jet aircraft approach altitude equivalents of 1500 to 2400 m. Propeller-driven planes are rarely pressurized but usually fly at altitudes below 3300 m. Relatively strict contraindications for air travel by coronary patients are uncomplicated myocardial infarction within the last 2 weeks, complicated myocardial infarction within the last 6 weeks, unstable angina, thoracic surgery within the last 3 weeks, and poorly controlled congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, or hypertension.

  10. [Artificial circulation in high-risk percutaneous coronary interventions].

    PubMed

    Bazylev, V V; Evdokimov, M E; Pantiukhina, M A; Morozov, Z A

    2016-01-01

    In their everyday practical clinical work cardiovascular surgeons sometimes have to deal with patients at extremely high risk of both percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) and direct myocardial revascularization. A method of choice in such situations may become a PCI supported by artificial circulation (AC), for which foreign and Russian authors propose using systems of prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The present work was aimed at sharing our experience with using standard systems of AC and their modifications (mini-circuit systems) for performing high-risk PCIs. Between October 2011 and November 2014, PCIs supported by artificial circulation were performed in a total of ten patients. All had extremely high risk of PCI due to coronary artery lesions [subocclusion of the trunk of the left coronary artery (LCA) combined with occlusion or significant stenosis of the right coronary artery (RCA)], concomitant pathology (obesity, diabetes mellitus, age, etc.) or critical state (circulatory arrest, resuscitating measures). Three patients during PCI developed ventricular fibrillation and one patient suffered an episode of asystole. All cardiac arrhythmias after restoration of the coronary blood flow disappeared spontaneously on the background of extracorporeal support. The only lethal outcome was registered during emergency PCI in a female patient admitted to the roentgen-operating room in the state of clinical death, on the background of continuing resuscitation measures. The presented methods of assisted circulation based on the standard AC systems and modification thereof (mini-circuit system) proved efficient. They make it possible to perform high-risk PCIs, including in clinics having neither appropriate equipment nor experience in ECMO. PMID:27626258

  11. High quality absolute paleointensity data from Santa Fe, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. A.; Tauxe, L.; Blinman, E.; Genevey, A.

    2015-12-01

    Preliminary paleointensity experiments were conducted using the IZZI protocol on one hundred and fourteen specimens from fifty-seven baked pottery fragments collected from nine archaeological sites near Santa Fe, New Mexico. Twenty of these fragments passed our weakest selection criteria. Seven additional specimens were made from each passing fragment for further paleointensity experiments. The results of these second experiments indicate that the samples are mildly anisotropic, so anisotropy experiments were conducted to correct for this behavior. Experiments to determine the cooling rate correction will be completed to ensure the robustness of the dataset. Stylistic evidence, historical documentation, dendrochronology, and 14C analyses provide age constraints with up to decade resolution for the VADM results. The twenty pottery fragments analyzed span five distinct time periods between 1300 and 1900 AD. Our new results for each fragment differ slightly from those predicted by the cals3k.4b and arch3k models, suggesting the models require refinement. This is expected because there are few archaeomagnetic constraints on the models from this region. Future pottery fragments and burned adobe fragments from the New Mexico area will be analyzed for paleointensity and combined with our pottery fragment data set to create a high-resolution paleointensity curve for the recent archaeological time in the American Southwest.

  12. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  13. Misconceptions of High School Students Related to the Conceptions of Absolutism and Constitutionalism in History Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Mehmet Suat

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to analyze the 10th grade high school students' misconceptions related to the sense of ruling in the Ottoman State during the absolutist and constitutional periods and to investigate the causes of these misconceptions. The data were collected through eight open-ended questions related to the concepts of absolutism and…

  14. A highly accurate absolute gravimetric network for Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Christian; Ruess, Diethard; Butta, Hubert; Qirko, Kristaq; Pavicevic, Bozidar; Murat, Meha

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a basic gravity network in Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro to enable further investigations in geodetic and geophysical issues. Therefore the first time in history absolute gravity measurements were performed in these countries. The Norwegian mapping authority Kartverket is assisting the national mapping authorities in Kosovo (KCA) (Kosovo Cadastral Agency - Agjencia Kadastrale e Kosovës), Albania (ASIG) (Autoriteti Shtetëror i Informacionit Gjeohapësinor) and in Montenegro (REA) (Real Estate Administration of Montenegro - Uprava za nekretnine Crne Gore) in improving the geodetic frameworks. The gravity measurements are funded by Kartverket. The absolute gravimetric measurements were performed from BEV (Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying) with the absolute gravimeter FG5-242. As a national metrology institute (NMI) the Metrology Service of the BEV maintains the national standards for the realisation of the legal units of measurement and ensures their international equivalence and recognition. Laser and clock of the absolute gravimeter were calibrated before and after the measurements. The absolute gravimetric survey was carried out from September to October 2015. Finally all 8 scheduled stations were successfully measured: there are three stations located in Montenegro, two stations in Kosovo and three stations in Albania. The stations are distributed over the countries to establish a gravity network for each country. The vertical gradients were measured at all 8 stations with the relative gravimeter Scintrex CG5. The high class quality of some absolute gravity stations can be used for gravity monitoring activities in future. The measurement uncertainties of the absolute gravity measurements range around 2.5 micro Gal at all stations (1 microgal = 10-8 m/s2). In Montenegro the large gravity difference of 200 MilliGal between station Zabljak and Podgorica can be even used for calibration of relative gravimeters

  15. Can patients with coronary heart disease go to high altitude?

    PubMed

    Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tourism to high altitude is very popular and includes elderly people with both manifest and subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). Thus, risk assessment regarding high altitude exposure of patients with CHD is of increasing interest, and individual recommendations are expected despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence. The major factor increasing cardiac stress is hypoxia. At rest and for a given external workload, myocardial oxygen demand is increased at altitude, particularly in nonacclimatized individuals, and there is some evidence that blood-flow reserve is reduced in atherosclerotic coronary arteries even in the absence of severe stenosis. Despite a possible imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen delivery, studies on selected patients have shown that exposure and exercise at altitudes of 3000 to 3500 m is generally safe for patients with stable CHD and sufficient work capacity. During the first days at altitude, patients with stable angina may develop symptoms of myocardial ischemia at slightly lower heart rate x  blood-pressure products. Adverse cardiac events, however, such as unstable angina coronary syndromes, do not occur more frequently compared with sea level except for those who are unaccustomed to exercise. Therefore, training should start before going to altitude, and the altitude-related decrease in exercise capacity should be considered. Travel to 3500 m should be avoided unless patients have stable disease, preserved left ventricular function without residual capacity, and above-normal exercise capacity. CHD patients should avoid travel to elevations above 4500 m owing to severe hypoxia at these altitudes. The risk assessment of CHD patients at altitude should always consider a possible absence of medical support and that cardiovascular events may turn into disaster. PMID:20919884

  16. High-density lipoprotein functionality in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kosmas, Constantine E; Christodoulidis, Georgios; Cheng, Jeh-wei; Vittorio, Timothy J; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    The role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in cardiovascular atheroprotection is well established. Epidemiological data have clearly demonstrated an inverse relationship between HDL levels and the risk for coronary artery disease, which is independent of the low-density lipoprotein levels. However, more recent data provide evidence that high HDL levels are not always protective and that under certain conditions may even confer an increased risk. Thus, a new concept has arisen, which stresses the importance of HDL functionality, rather than HDL concentration per se, in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. HDL functionality is genetically defined but can also be modified by several environmental and lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking or certain pharmacologic interventions. Furthermore, HDL is consisted of a heterogeneous group of particles with major differences in their structural, biological and functional properties. Recently, the cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages was proven to be an excellent metric of HDL functionality, because it was shown to have a strong inverse relationship with the risk of angiographically documented coronary artery disease, independent of the HDL and apolipoprotein A-1 levels, although it may not actually predict the prospective risk for cardiovascular events. Thus, improving the quality of HDL may represent a better therapeutic target than simply raising the HDL level, and assessment of HDL function may prove informative in refining our understanding of HDL-mediated atheroprotection.

  17. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  18. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  19. Measuring Absolute RNA Copy Numbers at High Temporal Resolution Reveals Transcriptome Kinetics in Development.

    PubMed

    Owens, Nick D L; Blitz, Ira L; Lane, Maura A; Patrushev, Ilya; Overton, John D; Gilchrist, Michael J; Cho, Ken W Y; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-01-26

    Transcript regulation is essential for cell function, and misregulation can lead to disease. Despite technologies to survey the transcriptome, we lack a comprehensive understanding of transcript kinetics, which limits quantitative biology. This is an acute challenge in embryonic development, where rapid changes in gene expression dictate cell fate decisions. By ultra-high-frequency sampling of Xenopus embryos and absolute normalization of sequence reads, we present smooth gene expression trajectories in absolute transcript numbers. During a developmental period approximating the first 8 weeks of human gestation, transcript kinetics vary by eight orders of magnitude. Ordering genes by expression dynamics, we find that "temporal synexpression" predicts common gene function. Remarkably, a single parameter, the characteristic timescale, can classify transcript kinetics globally and distinguish genes regulating development from those involved in cellular metabolism. Overall, our analysis provides unprecedented insight into the reorganization of maternal and embryonic transcripts and redefines our ability to perform quantitative biology.

  20. A targeted proteomics toolkit for high-throughput absolute quantification of Escherichia coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Batth, Tanveer S; Singh, Pragya; Ramakrishnan, Vikram R; Sousa, Mirta M L; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Tran, Huu M; Luning, Eric G; Pan, Eva H Y; Vuu, Khanh M; Keasling, Jay D; Adams, Paul D; Petzold, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Transformation of engineered Escherichia coli into a robust microbial factory is contingent on precise control of metabolism. Yet, the throughput of omics technologies used to characterize cell components has lagged far behind our ability to engineer novel strains. To expand the utility of quantitative proteomics for metabolic engineering, we validated and optimized targeted proteomics methods for over 400 proteins from more than 20 major pathways in E. coli metabolism. Complementing these methods, we constructed a series of synthetic genes to produce concatenated peptides (QconCAT) for absolute quantification of the proteins and made them available through the Addgene plasmid repository (www.addgene.org). To facilitate high sample throughput, we developed a fast, analytical-flow chromatography method using a 5.5-min gradient (10 min total run time). Overall this toolkit provides an invaluable resource for metabolic engineering by increasing sample throughput, minimizing development time and providing peptide standards for absolute quantification of E. coli proteins.

  1. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. II. Absolute density dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. The present, second, paper of the study is related to the discharge characterization in terms of the absolute density of species using resonant absorption spectroscopy. The results on the time-resolved density evolution of the neutral and singly-ionized Ti ground state atoms as well as the metastable Ti and Ar atoms during the discharge on- and off-time are presented. Among the others, the questions related to the inversion of population of the Ti energy sublevels, as well as to re-normalization of the two-dimensional density maps in terms of the absolute density of species, are stressed.

  2. Prognostic Value of Coronary Computed Tomography Imaging in Patients at High Risk Without Symptoms of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Dedic, Admir; Ten Kate, Gert-Jan R; Roos, Cornelis J; Neefjes, Lisan A; de Graaf, Michiel A; Spronk, Angela; Delgado, Victoria; van Lennep, Jeanine E Roeters; Moelker, Adriaan; Ouhlous, Mohamed; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Boersma, Eric; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Nieman, Koen; Bax, Jeroen J; de Feijter, Pim J

    2016-03-01

    At present, traditional risk factors are used to guide cardiovascular management of asymptomatic subjects. Intensified surveillance may be warranted in those identified as high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aims to determine the prognostic value of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography (CCTA) next to the coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in patients at high CVD risk without symptoms suspect for coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 665 patients at high risk (mean age 56 ± 9 years, 417 men), having at least one important CVD risk factor (diabetes mellitus, familial hypercholesterolemia, peripheral artery disease, or severe hypertension) or a calculated European systematic coronary risk evaluation of >10% were included from outpatient clinics at 2 academic centers. Follow-up was performed for the occurrence of adverse events including all-cause mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or coronary revascularization. During a median follow-up of 3.0 (interquartile range 1.3 to 4.1) years, adverse events occurred in 40 subjects (6.0%). By multivariate analysis, adjusted for age, gender, and CACS, obstructive CAD on CCTA (≥50% luminal stenosis) was a significant predictor of adverse events (hazard ratio 5.9 [CI 1.3 to 26.1]). Addition of CCTA to age, gender, plus CACS, increased the C statistic from 0.81 to 0.84 and resulted in a total net reclassification index of 0.19 (p <0.01). In conclusion, CCTA has incremental prognostic value and risk reclassification benefit beyond CACS in patients without CAD symptoms but with high risk of developing CVD.

  3. Prognostic Value of Coronary Computed Tomography Imaging in Patients at High Risk Without Symptoms of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Dedic, Admir; Ten Kate, Gert-Jan R; Roos, Cornelis J; Neefjes, Lisan A; de Graaf, Michiel A; Spronk, Angela; Delgado, Victoria; van Lennep, Jeanine E Roeters; Moelker, Adriaan; Ouhlous, Mohamed; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Boersma, Eric; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Nieman, Koen; Bax, Jeroen J; de Feijter, Pim J

    2016-03-01

    At present, traditional risk factors are used to guide cardiovascular management of asymptomatic subjects. Intensified surveillance may be warranted in those identified as high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aims to determine the prognostic value of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography (CCTA) next to the coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in patients at high CVD risk without symptoms suspect for coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 665 patients at high risk (mean age 56 ± 9 years, 417 men), having at least one important CVD risk factor (diabetes mellitus, familial hypercholesterolemia, peripheral artery disease, or severe hypertension) or a calculated European systematic coronary risk evaluation of >10% were included from outpatient clinics at 2 academic centers. Follow-up was performed for the occurrence of adverse events including all-cause mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or coronary revascularization. During a median follow-up of 3.0 (interquartile range 1.3 to 4.1) years, adverse events occurred in 40 subjects (6.0%). By multivariate analysis, adjusted for age, gender, and CACS, obstructive CAD on CCTA (≥50% luminal stenosis) was a significant predictor of adverse events (hazard ratio 5.9 [CI 1.3 to 26.1]). Addition of CCTA to age, gender, plus CACS, increased the C statistic from 0.81 to 0.84 and resulted in a total net reclassification index of 0.19 (p <0.01). In conclusion, CCTA has incremental prognostic value and risk reclassification benefit beyond CACS in patients without CAD symptoms but with high risk of developing CVD. PMID:26754124

  4. High-resolution measurement of absolute {alpha}-decay widths in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2011-06-15

    By using a large-acceptance position-sensitive silicon detector array in coincidence with the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph, unambiguous measurements have been made of the absolute {alpha}-particle decay widths from excited states in {sup 16}O* in the energy range 13.85 to 15.87 MeV. Carbon targets have been bombarded with 42-MeV {sup 6}Li beams to induce {sub 6}{sup 12}C({sub 3}{sup 6}Li, d){sub 8}{sup 16}O* reactions. The deuteron ejectiles were measured in the Q3D and the results gated by {sup 4}He+{sup 12}C breakup products detected in the silicon array, the efficiency of which was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. By comparing total population and breakup-gated spectra, the following absolute {alpha}-decay widths have been measured with high resolution: {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}0/{Gamma}{sub tot} = 0.87{+-}0.11 (13.980 MeV), 1.04{+-}0.15 (14.302 MeV), 0.92{+-}0.10 (14.399 MeV), 0.59{+-}0.04 (14.815 MeV), 0.88{+-}0.18 (15.785 MeV), and {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}1/{Gamma}{sub tot}=1.14{+-}0.08 (14.660 MeV), 0.46{+-}0.06 (14.815 MeV).

  5. Normal incidence spectrophotometer using high density transmission grating technology and highly efficiency silicon photodiodes for absolute solar EUV irradiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Korde, R.

    1992-01-01

    New developments in transmission grating and photodiode technology now make it possible to realize spectrometers in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (wavelengths less than 1000 A) which are expected to be virtually constant in their diffraction and detector properties. Time dependent effects associated with reflection gratings are eliminated through the use of free standing transmission gratings. These gratings together with recently developed and highly stable EUV photodiodes have been utilized to construct a highly stable normal incidence spectrophotometer to monitor the variability and absolute intensity of the solar 304 A line. Owing to its low weight and compactness, such a spectrometer will be a valuable tool for providing absolute solar irradiance throughout the EUV. This novel instrument will also be useful for cross-calibrating other EUV flight instruments and will be flown on a series of Hitchhiker Shuttle Flights and on SOHO. A preliminary version of this instrument has been fabricated and characterized, and the results are described.

  6. Duration of eptifibatide infusion after percutaneous coronary intervention and outcomes among high-risk patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome: insights from EARLY ACS

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Connie N; Schulte, Phillip J; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Dalby, Anthony J; Schweiger, Marc J; Lewis, Basil S; Armstrong, Paul W; Califf, Robert M; van de Werf, Frans; Harrington, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Eptifibatide is indicated during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with continuation for 18–24 hours post procedure but is associated with bleeding. We examined the efficacy and safety of shorter post-PCI eptifibatide infusions in high-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE ACS) patients. Methods: EARLY ACS patients treated with PCI and eptifibatide were grouped by post-procedure infusion duration: <10, 10–13, 13–17, and 17–25 (per protocol) hours. Adjusted estimated event rates for 96-hour death/myocardial infarction (MI)/recurrent ischaemia requiring urgent revascularization (RIUR), 30-day death/MI, post-PCI packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion, and GUSTO (Global Utilization of Streptokinase and Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Occluded Coronary Arteries) moderate/severe bleeding were obtained using inverse-propensity weighting to account for informative censoring of infusions. Results: Among 3271 eptifibatide-treated PCI patients, there were 66 96-hour death/MI/RIUR events, 94 30-day death/MI events, 127 PRBC transfusions, and 115 GUSTO moderate/severe bleeds. Compared with per protocol, patients receiving post-PCI infusions <10 hours had similar adjusted estimated rates of 96-hour death/MI/RIUR (absolute difference 0.021 higher; 0.040 vs. 0.019, 95% CI −0.023 to 0.064; p=0.35) and 30-day death/MI (0.020 higher; 0.046 vs. 0.026, 95% CI −0.021 to 0.062; p=0.34). There were also no differences in ischaemic outcomes between infusions of 10–17 hours and per-protocol infusions. Adjusted estimated rates of PRBC transfusion were higher for the <10-hour infusion group compared with per protocol (0.048 higher; 0.079 vs. 0.031, 95% CI 0.005 to 0.091, p=0.03) but were similar for other groups. Adjusted GUSTO moderate/severe bleeding rates were similar to per-protocol rates for all groups. Conclusions: In high-risk NSTE ACS patients, post-PCI eptifibatide infusions <18 hours were not associated with

  7. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

  8. Miniature high-throughput chemosensing of yield, ee, and absolute configuration from crude reaction mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Keith W.; Zhang, Peng; Wolf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimentation (HTE) has emerged as a widely used technology that accelerates discovery and optimization processes with parallel small-scale reaction setups. A high-throughput screening (HTS) method capable of comprehensive analysis of crude asymmetric reaction mixtures (eliminating product derivatization or isolation) would provide transformative impact by matching the pace of HTE. We report how spontaneous in situ construction of stereodynamic metal probes from readily available, inexpensive starting materials can be applied to chiroptical chemosensing of the total amount, enantiomeric excess (ee), and absolute configuration of a wide variety of amines, diamines, amino alcohols, amino acids, carboxylic acids, α-hydroxy acids, and diols. This advance and HTS potential are highlighted with the analysis of 1 mg of crude reaction mixtures of a catalytic asymmetric reaction. This operationally simple assay uses a robust mix-and-measure protocol, is amenable to microscale platforms and automation, and provides critical time efficiency and sustainability advantages over traditional serial methods. PMID:26933684

  9. Relation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level with coronary vasospastic angina pectoris in patients without hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Jui; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yang, Ning-I; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Li, Li-Fu

    2005-12-01

    We prospectively investigated the relation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to coronary vasospasm and no hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in a sample of 428 patients who underwent coronary angiography. These patients were assigned to 1 of 3 groups. The control group consisted of 66 patients who had no coronary vasospasm and no hemodynamically significant CAD. The vasospasm group consisted of 116 patients who had coronary vasospasm and no hemodynamically significant CAD. The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) group consisted of 246 patients who had ACS and hemodynamically significant CAD. Serum hs-CRP was measured immediately before coronary angiography. Patients were followed for subsequent cardiac events and mortality. Median hs-CRP levels in the control, vasospasm, and ACS groups were 1.0, 5.5, and 8.2 mg/L, respectively. The proportion of hs-CRP increased from the lowest to the highest tertile in the control, vasospasm, and ACS groups, respectively. In the control and vasospasm groups, multivariate analysis showed that hs-CRP was independently associated with a diagnosis of coronary vasospastic angina pectoris (odds ratio 68.74, 95% confidence interval 8.03 to 588.71, p<0.001). During a median follow-up period of 26 months (range 0.4 to 48), 27 cardiac deaths occurred in the ACS group, whereas no cardiac death occurred in the control and vasospasm groups. In conclusion, serum hs-CRP level measured immediately before coronary angiography was an independent marker of coronary vasospasm in patients who had no hemodynamically significant CAD.

  10. An absolute dose determination of helical tomotherapy accelerator, TomoTherapy High-Art II

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Buchillier, Thierry; Pachoud, Marc; Moeckli, Raphaeel; Bochud, Francois O.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: A helical tomotherapy accelerator presents a dosimetric challenge because, to this day, there is no internationally accepted protocol for the determination of the absolute dose. Because of this reality, we investigated the different alternatives for characterizing and measuring the absolute dose of such an accelerator. We tested several dosimetric techniques with various metrological traceabilities as well as using a number of phantoms in static and helical modes. Methods: Firstly, the relationship between the reading of ionization chambers and the absorbed dose is dependent on the beam quality value of the photon beam. For high energy photons, the beam quality is specified by the tissue phantom ratio (TPR{sub 20,10}) and it is therefore necessary to know the TPR{sub 20,10} to calculate the dose delivered by a given accelerator. This parameter is obtained through the ratio of the absorbed dose at 20 and 10 cm depths in water and was measured in the particular conditions of the tomotherapy accelerator. Afterward, measurements were performed using the ionization chamber (model A1SL) delivered as a reference instrument by the vendor. This chamber is traceable in absorbed dose to water in a Co-60 beam to a water calorimeter of the American metrology institute (NIST). Similarly, in Switzerland, each radiotherapy department is directly traceable to the Swiss metrology institute (METAS) in absorbed dose to water based on a water calorimeter. For our research, this traceability was obtained by using an ionization chamber traceable to METAS (model NE 2611A), which is the secondary standard of our institute. Furthermore, in order to have another fully independent measurement method, we determined the dose using alanine dosimeters provided by and traceable to the British metrology institute (NPL); they are calibrated in absorbed dose to water using a graphite calorimeter. And finally, we wanted to take into account the type of chamber routinely used in clinical

  11. Absolute Effective Area of the Chandra High-Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; David, L. P.; Donnelly, R. H.; Edgar, R. J.; Gaetz, T. J.; Jerius, D.; Juda, M.; Kellogg, E. M.; McNamara, B. R.; Dewey, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched in July 1999, and is returning exquisite sub-arcsecond x-ray images of star groups, supernova remnants, galaxies, quasars, and clusters of galaxies. In addition to being the premier X-ray observatory in terms of angular and spectral resolution, Chandra is the best calibrated X-ray facility ever flown. We discuss here the calibration of the effective area of the High Resolution Mirror Assembly. Because we do not know the absolute X-ray flux density of any celestial source, this must be based primarily on ground measurements and on modeling. In particular, we must remove the calibrated modeled responses of the detectors and gratings to obtain the mirror area. For celestial sources which may be assumed to have smoothly varying spectra, such as the Crab Nebula, we may verify the continuity of the area calibration as a function of energy. This is of significance in energy regions such as the Ir M-edges, or near the critical grazing angle cutoff of the various mirror shells.

  12. Investigations of high-speed optical transmission systems employing Absolute Added Correlative Coding (AACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Nhat, Nguyen; Elsherif, Mohamed A.; Malekmohammadi, Amin

    2016-07-01

    A novel multilevel modulation format based on partial-response signaling called Absolute Added Correlative Coding (AACC) is proposed and numerically demonstrated for high-speed fiber-optic communication systems. A bit error rate (BER) estimation model for the proposed multilevel format has also been developed. The performance of AACC is examined and compared against other prevailing On-Off-Keying and multilevel modulation formats e.g. non-return-to-zero (NRZ), 50% return-to-zero (RZ), 67% carrier-suppressed return-to-zero (CS-RZ), duobinary and four-level pulse-amplitude modulation (4-PAM) in terms of receiver sensitivity, spectral efficiency and dispersion tolerance. Calculated receiver sensitivity at a BER of 10-9 and chromatic dispersion tolerance of the proposed system are ∼-28.3 dBm and ∼336 ps/nm, respectively. The performance of AACC is delineated to be improved by 7.8 dB in terms of receiver sensitivity compared to 4-PAM in back-to-back scenario. The comparison results also show a clear advantage of AACC in achieving longer fiber transmission distance due to the higher dispersion tolerance in optical access networks.

  13. Investigations of high-speed optical transmission systems employing Absolute Added Correlative Coding (AACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Nhat, Nguyen; Elsherif, Mohamed A.; Malekmohammadi, Amin

    2016-07-01

    A novel multilevel modulation format based on partial-response signaling called Absolute Added Correlative Coding (AACC) is proposed and numerically demonstrated for high-speed fiber-optic communication systems. A bit error rate (BER) estimation model for the proposed multilevel format has also been developed. The performance of AACC is examined and compared against other prevailing On-Off-Keying and multilevel modulation formats e.g. non-return-to-zero (NRZ), 50% return-to-zero (RZ), 67% carrier-suppressed return-to-zero (CS-RZ), duobinary and four-level pulse-amplitude modulation (4-PAM) in terms of receiver sensitivity, spectral efficiency and dispersion tolerance. Calculated receiver sensitivity at a BER of 10-9 and chromatic dispersion tolerance of the proposed system are ˜-28.3 dBm and ˜336 ps/nm, respectively. The performance of AACC is delineated to be improved by 7.8 dB in terms of receiver sensitivity compared to 4-PAM in back-to-back scenario. The comparison results also show a clear advantage of AACC in achieving longer fiber transmission distance due to the higher dispersion tolerance in optical access networks.

  14. Reproducibility of coronary atherosclerotic plaque characteristics in populations with low, intermediate, and high prevalence of coronary artery disease by multidetector computer tomography: a guide to reliable visual coronary plaque assessments.

    PubMed

    de Knegt, Martina C; Linde, Jesper J; Fuchs, Andreas; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Køber, Lars V; Hove, Jens D; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the interobserver agreement of visual coronary plaque characteristics by 320-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in three populations with low, intermediate and high CAD prevalence and to identify determinants for the reproducible assessment of these plaque characteristics. 150 patients, 50 asymptomatic subjects from the general population (low CAD prevalence), 50 symptomatic non-acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS) patients (intermediate CAD prevalence), and 50 ACS patients (high CAD prevalence), matched according to age and gender, were retrospectively enrolled. All coronary segments were evaluated for overall image quality, evaluability, presence of CAD, coronary stenosis, plaque composition, plaque focality, and spotty calcification by four readers. Interobserver agreement was assessed using Fleiss' Kappa (κ) and intra-class correlation (ICC). Widely used clinical parameters (overall scan quality, presence of CAD, and determination of coronary stenosis) showed good agreement among the four readers, (ICC = 0.66, κ = 0.73, ICC = 0.74, respectively). When accounting for heart rate, body mass index, plaque location, and coronary stenosis above/below 50 %, interobserver agreement for plaque composition, presence of CAD, and coronary stenosis improved to either good or excellent, (κ = 0.61, κ = 0.81, ICC = 0.78, respectively). Spotty calcification was the least reproducible parameter investigated (κ = 0.33). Across subpopulations, reproducibility of coronary plaque characteristics generally decreased with increasing CAD prevalence except for plaque composition, (limits of agreement: ±2.03, ±1.96, ±1.79 for low, intermediate and high CAD prevalence, respectively). 320-slice MDCT can be used to assess coronary plaque characteristics, except for spotty calcification. Reproducibility estimates are influenced by heart rate, body size, plaque location, and degree of luminal stenosis.

  15. Enantiomeric high-performance liquid chromatography resolution and absolute configuration of 6β-benzoyloxy-3α-tropanol.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Marcelo A; González, Natalia; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2016-07-01

    The absolute configuration of the naturally occurring isomers of 6β-benzoyloxy-3α-tropanol (1) has been established by the combined use of chiral high-performance liquid chromatography with electronic circular dichroism detection and optical rotation detection. For this purpose (±)-1, prepared in two steps from racemic 6-hydroxytropinone (4), was subjected to chiral high-performance liquid chromatography with electronic circular dichroism and optical rotation detection allowing the online measurement of both chiroptical properties for each enantiomer, which in turn were compared with the corresponding values obtained from density functional theory calculations. In an independent approach, preparative high-performance liquid chromatography separation using an automatic fraction collector, yielded an enantiopure sample of OR (+)-1 whose vibrational circular dichroism spectrum allowed its absolute configuration assignment when the bands in the 1100-950 cm(-1) region were compared with those of the enantiomers of esters derived from 3α,6β-tropanediol. In addition, an enantiomerically enriched sample of 4, instead of OR (±)-4, was used for the same transformation sequence, whose high-performance liquid chromatography follow-up allowed their spectroscopic correlation. All evidences lead to the OR (+)-(1S,3R,5S,6R) and OR (-)-(1R,3S,5R,6S) absolute configurations, from where it follows that samples of 1 isolated from Knightia strobilina and Erythroxylum zambesiacum have the OR (+)-(1S,3R,5S,6R) absolute configuration, while the sample obtained from E. rotundifolium has the OR (-)-(1R,3S,5R,6S) absolute configuration.

  16. Ground-based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertical resolution absolute humidity profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Verdejo, María; Crewell, Susanne; Löhnert, Ulrich; Orlandi, Emiliano; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity profiles is important for many applications, e.g., assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. Nowadays there are a wide variety of ground-based sensors for atmospheric humidity profiling. Unfortunately there is no single instrument able to provide a measurement with complete vertical coverage, high vertical and temporal resolution and good performance under all weather conditions, simultaneously. For example, Raman lidar (RL) measurements can provide water vapor with a high vertical resolution, albeit with limited vertical coverage, due to sunlight contamination and the presence of clouds. Microwave radiometers (MWRs) receive water vapor information throughout the troposphere, though their vertical resolution is poor. In this work, we present an MWR and RL system synergy, which aims to overcome the specific sensor limitations. The retrieval algorithm combining these two instruments is an optimal estimation method (OEM), which allows for an uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information, taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied to a 2-month field campaign around Jülich (Germany), focusing on clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyze the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity uncertainty is reduced above the last usable lidar range by a factor of ˜ 2 with respect to the case where only RL measurements are used. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom per signal reveal that most information is gained above the usable lidar range, especially important during daytime when the lidar vertical coverage is limited. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using

  17. Optimal Design of the Absolute Positioning Sensor for a High-Speed Maglev Train and Research on Its Fault Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dapeng; Long, Zhiqiang; Xue, Song; Zhang, Junge

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies an absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and its fault diagnosis method. The absolute positioning sensor is an important sensor for the high-speed maglev train to accomplish its synchronous traction. It is used to calibrate the error of the relative positioning sensor which is used to provide the magnetic phase signal. On the basis of the analysis for the principle of the absolute positioning sensor, the paper describes the design of the sending and receiving coils and realizes the hardware and the software for the sensor. In order to enhance the reliability of the sensor, a support vector machine is used to recognize the fault characters, and the signal flow method is used to locate the faulty parts. The diagnosis information not only can be sent to an upper center control computer to evaluate the reliability of the sensors, but also can realize on-line diagnosis for debugging and the quick detection when the maglev train is off-line. The absolute positioning sensor we study has been used in the actual project. PMID:23112619

  18. Optimal design of the absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and research on its fault diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Long, Zhiqiang; Xue, Song; Zhang, Junge

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies an absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and its fault diagnosis method. The absolute positioning sensor is an important sensor for the high-speed maglev train to accomplish its synchronous traction. It is used to calibrate the error of the relative positioning sensor which is used to provide the magnetic phase signal. On the basis of the analysis for the principle of the absolute positioning sensor, the paper describes the design of the sending and receiving coils and realizes the hardware and the software for the sensor. In order to enhance the reliability of the sensor, a support vector machine is used to recognize the fault characters, and the signal flow method is used to locate the faulty parts. The diagnosis information not only can be sent to an upper center control computer to evaluate the reliability of the sensors, but also can realize on-line diagnosis for debugging and the quick detection when the maglev train is off-line. The absolute positioning sensor we study has been used in the actual project.

  19. High precision absolute distance measurement with the fiber femtosecond optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiashuai; Wu, Tengfei; Liang, Zhiguo; Wang, Yu; Han, Jibo

    2016-01-01

    The absolute distance measurement was experimentally demonstrated by using the fiber femtosecond optical frequency comb in air. The technique is based on the measurement of cross correlation between reference and measurement optical pulses. This method can achieve accuracy better than the commercial laser interferometer. It is attained sub-micrometer resolution in large scale measurement by using the fiber femtosecond optical frequency comb. It will be benefit for future laser lidar and satellite formation flying mission.

  20. [Ultrasound imaging of coronary artery].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Shigeto

    2014-09-01

    Coronary arterial anatomy and the terminology were reviewed. There is a specific portion of coronary artery aneurysm in Kawasaki disease. To investigate coronary arterial lesion, ultrasound imaging is useful because of non-invasive, high special and time resolu tion method. I explained the patient posture, the approaching method to the coronary arter ies, ultrasound setting, measurement of coronary arterial diameter and diastolic measurement.

  1. Possibility of the effect of absolute negative conductivity in quantum superlattice exposed to the high-frequency electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryuchkov, S. V.; Kukhar', E. I.

    2015-07-01

    Current density in superlattice placed in quantizing electric field and in high-frequency field of electromagnetic wave was calculated. The calculations were performed by taking into account an inelastic scattering of charge carriers by phonons. Possibility of the effect of absolute negative conductivity, i.e. the effect of appearance of electric current flowing in opposite direction than that of vector of quantizing electric field intensity, was shown. Such effect in graphene superlattices was discussed.

  2. High correlation between absolute psychophysical threshold and the scotopic threshold response to the same stimulus.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, S. L.; Vaegan

    1991-01-01

    The scotopic threshold response (STR) is a negative potential to low intensity light recorded from the dark-adapted retina. It reflects inner retinal function. The STR is now recorded routinely as part of our electroretinography protocol. The projected absolute threshold calculated from the amplitude versus intensity function for the STR has been found to correlate well (r = 0.59) with the absolute subjective threshold to the same stimulus. The correlation holds for about 1.5 log units above normal. With further elevation the STR is usually abnormal or absent as b wave threshold is approached. The correlation would have been much greater were it not for this truncated range over which both are recordable. This report includes our findings in 127 patients and examines several disease groups. When the STR had a reduced and abnormal intensity series or was absent, the subjective threshold was elevated in almost all cases (92.2%). The converse relationship also held. When there was a discrepancy, recording problems were usually identified. Since the STR requires difficult, time consuming signal averaging for reliable recording, it may be adequate to record the subjective threshold alone to provide a relatively easily recordable indicator of inner retinal function. Additional STR recording will seldom be warranted. PMID:1954209

  3. Method and apparatus for ultra-high-sensitivity, incremental and absolute optical encoding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An absolute optical linear or rotary encoder which encodes the motion of an object (3) with increased resolution and encoding range and decreased sensitivity to damage to the scale includes a scale (5), which moves with the object and is illuminated by a light source (11). The scale carries a pattern (9) which is imaged by a microscope optical system (13) on a CCD array (17) in a camera head (15). The pattern includes both fiducial markings (31) which are identical for each period of the pattern and code areas (33) which include binary codings of numbers identifying the individual periods of the pattern. The image of the pattern formed on the CCD array is analyzed by an image processor (23) to locate the fiducial marking, decode the information encoded in the code area, and thereby determine the position of the object.

  4. High angular resolution absolute intensity of the solar continuum from 1400 to 1790 A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Moe, O. K.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute intensities of the solar UV continuum from 1400 to 1790 A have been measured from rocket spectra taken on August 13, 1970. The spectra had an angular resolution of 2 arc sec by 1 arc min, and the pointing accuracy of the instrument was plus or minus 2 arc sec. This permits us to study the center-to-limb variation of the intensity with a spatial resolution of 2 arc sec. Four positions on the solar disk have been studied corresponding to values of cos theta = 0.12, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.72, where theta is the heliocentric position angle. The measurements give higher values for the intensity than recent photoelectric measurement, but are in good agreement with the intensities of Widing et al.

  5. Different Treatment Strategies for Patients with Multivessel Coronary Disease and High SYNTAX Score.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Jia, Dalin; Han, Yang; Wang, Shaojun; Wang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    We sought to evaluate the prognosis of different treatment strategies on patients with multivessel coronary disease and high SYNTAX score. 171 patients with multivessel coronary disease and SYNTAX score ε33, who underwent coronary angiography between July 2009 and July 2010 at our hospital were retrospectively selected and divided into incomplete and complete revascularization intervention groups (IR), a coronary artery bypass surgery group (CABG), a conservative drug therapy group according to treatment strategies chosen and agreed by the patients. These patients were followed up for 19.44 ± 5.73 months by telephone or outpatient service. We found the medical treatment group has a lower overall survival than the IR, CR group, and CABG group (P log-rank values are 0.03, 0.03, and 0.02, respectively). The medical treatment group also has a lower survival than the IR group, CR group, and CABG group in cerebral stroke and recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) (P log-rank values are 0.004, 0.03, and 0.001, respectively) and MACE events (P log-rank values are 0.003, 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The medical treatment group and IR group have lower survival in recurrent angina pectoris than the CR group and CABG group (P log-rank values are 0.02, 0.02 and 0.03, 0.008, respectively). There are no significant differences between the CR group and the CABG group in number of deaths, strokes and recurrent MIs, MACE events, angina pectoris (P log-rank values are 0.69, 0.53, and 0.86, respectively). The IR group shows a lower survival than the CR group and CABG group only in angina pectoris (P log-rank values are 0.03 and 0.008, respectively). For the patients with a high SYNTAX score, medical treatment is still inferior to revascularization therapy (interventional therapy or coronary artery bypass surgery). It appears that the CABG is not obviously superior to the coronary intervention therapy. Complete revascularization and coronary artery bypass grafting

  6. Going High with Heart Disease: The Effect of High Altitude Exposure in Older Individuals and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, Benjamin D

    2015-06-01

    Levine, Benjamin D. Going high with heart disease: The effect of high altitude exposure in older individuals and patients with coronary artery disease. High Alt Med Biol 16:89-96, 2015.--Ischemic heart disease is the largest cause of death in older men and women in the western world (Lozano et al., 2012 ; Roth et al., 2015). Atherosclerosis progresses with age, and thus age is the dominant risk factor for coronary heart disease in any algorithm used to assess risk for cardiovascular events. Subclinical atherosclerosis also increases with age, providing the substrate for precipitation of acute coronary syndromes. Thus the risk of high altitude exposure in older individuals is linked closely with both subclinical and manifest coronary heart disease (CHD). There are several considerations associated with taking patients with CHD to high altitude: a) The reduced oxygen availability may cause or exacerbate symptoms; b) The hypoxia and other associated environmental conditions (exercise, dehydration, change in diet, thermal stress, emotional stress from personal danger or conflict) may precipitate acute coronary events; c) If an event occurs and the patient is far from advanced medical care, then the outcome of an acute coronary event may be poor; and d) Sudden death may occur. Physicians caring for older patients who want to sojourn to high altitude should keep in mind the following four key points: 1). Altitude may exacerbate ischemic heart disease because of both reduced O2 delivery and paradoxical vasoconstriction; 2). Adverse events, including acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death, are most common in older unfit men, within the first few days of altitude exposure; 3). Ensuring optimal fitness, allowing for sufficient acclimatization (at least 5 days), and optimizing medical therapy (especially statins and aspirin) are prudent recommendations that may reduce the risk of adverse events; 4). A graded exercise test at sea level is probably sufficient for

  7. Candidate genetic analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and severity of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Suet Nee; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Todd, Josh; Lombardi, Raffaella; Willerson, James T; Gotto, Antonio M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Marian, AJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Plasma level of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), a heritable trait, is an important determinant of susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Non-synonymous and regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes implicated in HDL-C synthesis and metabolism are likely to influence plasma HDL-C, apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) levels and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods We genotyped 784 unrelated Caucasian individuals from two sets of populations (Lipoprotein and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study- LCAS, N = 333 and TexGen, N = 451) for 94 SNPs in 42 candidate genes by 5' nuclease assays. We tested the distribution of the phenotypes by the Shapiro-Wilk normality test. We used Box-Cox regression to analyze associations of the non-normally distributed phenotypes (plasma HDL-C and apo A-I levels) with the genotypes. We included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cigarette smoking as covariates. We calculated the q values as indicators of the false positive discovery rate (FDR). Results Plasma HDL-C levels were associated with sex (higher in females), BMI (inversely), smoking (lower in smokers), DM (lower in those with DM) and SNPs in APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL and LIPC (each q ≤0.01). Likewise, plasma apo A-I levels, available in the LCAS subset, were associated with SNPs in CETP, APOA5, and APOC2 as well as with BMI, sex and age (all q values ≤0.03). The APOA5 variant S19W was also associated with minimal lumen diameter (MLD) of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, a quantitative index of severity of coronary atherosclerosis (q = 0.018); mean number of coronary artery occlusions (p = 0.034) at the baseline and progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as indicated by the loss of MLD. Conclusion Putatively functional variants of APOA2, APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL, LIPC and SOAT2 are independent genetic determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. The non-synonymous S19W SNP in APOA5 is also an independent determinant of plasma

  8. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Mao, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The early results of an absolute radiometric calibration of the NOAA-9 AVHRR sensor indicate significant degradations in the response of bands 1 and 2 compared to prelaunch values. The results are currently in the process of being verified and it may be that refinements of the methodology will be in order as additional data sets are analyzed. The LANDSAT TM calibration used in this approach is known to be very precise and the Herman radiative transfer code, supplemented by the 5-S code for gaseous transmission, is reliable as well. The extent to which other steps in the analysis procedure give rise to uncertainties in the results is currently under investigation. Particular attention is being given to the geometric matching of the AVHRR and TM imagery, as well as to the spectral redistribution procedure. By taking advantage of a reasonably precise calibration of TM imagery acquired on the same day as the AVHRR data at White Sands, a promising approach to the in-orbit calibration of AVHRR sensors is being developed. Current efforts involve primarily the examination of additional test cases and the investigation of possible simplifications in the procedure through judicious use of atmospheric models.

  9. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Mao, Y.

    1987-09-01

    The early results of an absolute radiometric calibration of the NOAA-9 AVHRR sensor indicate significant degradations in the response of bands 1 and 2 compared to prelaunch values. The results are currently in the process of being verified and it may be that refinements of the methodology will be in order as additional data sets are analyzed. The LANDSAT TM calibration used in this approach is known to be very precise and the Herman radiative transfer code, supplemented by the 5-S code for gaseous transmission, is reliable as well. The extent to which other steps in the analysis procedure give rise to uncertainties in the results is currently under investigation. Particular attention is being given to the geometric matching of the AVHRR and TM imagery, as well as to the spectral redistribution procedure. By taking advantage of a reasonably precise calibration of TM imagery acquired on the same day as the AVHRR data at White Sands, a promising approach to the in-orbit calibration of AVHRR sensors is being developed. Current efforts involve primarily the examination of additional test cases and the investigation of possible simplifications in the procedure through judicious use of atmospheric models.

  10. High-intensity statin therapy and regression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Katsiki, Niki; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-01-01

    Recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels for patients with documented cardiovascular disease (CVD) are <100mg/dL (2.6mmol/l) with further reduction to <70mg/dL (1.8mmol/l) for higher-risk patients. High-intensity statin treatment may halt the progression as well as stabilize and induce regression of coronary atheromatous plaques while lowering CVD event rates. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major negative determinant of coronary artery plaque regression during statin therapy. However, regression of coronary atherosclerosis in DM patients is feasible to the same degree as in those without DM when very low LDL-C values (<70mg/dL; 1.8mmol/l) are achieved with high intensity statin treatment. The recent 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults suggest to abandon specific LDL-C treatment targets. This strategy may deprive high risk patients, such as those with DM, from very high intensity statin treatment or drug combinations aiming to achieve very low LDL-C levels in order to reduce clinical events.

  11. Relationship between coronary calcium score and high-risk plaque/significant stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kohichiro; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between coronary calcium score (CCS) and vulnerable plaque/significant stenosis using coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). METHODS CCTA was performed in 651 patients and these patients were divided into the four groups (CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400). We studied the incidence of high-risk plaque, including positive remodeling, low attenuation plaque, spotty calcification, and napkin-ring sign, and significant stenosis in each group. RESULTS High-risk plaque was found in 1.3%, 10.1%, 13.3% and 13.4% of patients with CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400, respectively (P < 0.001). The difference was only significant for patients with zero CCS. The incidence of significant stenosis was 0.6%, 7.6%, 13.3% and 26.9% for each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), which represented a significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. The combined incidence of high-risk plaque and significant stenosis was 1.9%, 17.7%, 26.9% and 40.3% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), again representing a significant stepwise increase with CCS. The rate of major coronary event was 0%, 4.0%, 7.9% and 17.2% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), another significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. CONCLUSION Stepwise increased risk of coronary events associated with increasing CCS is caused by increasing incidence of significant stenosis, while that of high-risk plaque remains the same.

  12. Relationship between coronary calcium score and high-risk plaque/significant stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kohichiro; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between coronary calcium score (CCS) and vulnerable plaque/significant stenosis using coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). METHODS CCTA was performed in 651 patients and these patients were divided into the four groups (CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400). We studied the incidence of high-risk plaque, including positive remodeling, low attenuation plaque, spotty calcification, and napkin-ring sign, and significant stenosis in each group. RESULTS High-risk plaque was found in 1.3%, 10.1%, 13.3% and 13.4% of patients with CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400, respectively (P < 0.001). The difference was only significant for patients with zero CCS. The incidence of significant stenosis was 0.6%, 7.6%, 13.3% and 26.9% for each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), which represented a significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. The combined incidence of high-risk plaque and significant stenosis was 1.9%, 17.7%, 26.9% and 40.3% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), again representing a significant stepwise increase with CCS. The rate of major coronary event was 0%, 4.0%, 7.9% and 17.2% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), another significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. CONCLUSION Stepwise increased risk of coronary events associated with increasing CCS is caused by increasing incidence of significant stenosis, while that of high-risk plaque remains the same. PMID:27621776

  13. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael; Ginsberg, Henry N; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2008-04-01

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) include atherogenic TG-rich lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester-enriched remnants of TG-rich lipoproteins, and lipoprotein(a). Recent observational and intervention studies suggest that the predictive value of non-HDL-C for cardiovascular risk and mortality is better than low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and that non-HDL-C correlates highly with plasma apolipoprotein B levels. Currently, the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines identify non-HDL-C as a secondary target of therapy in patients with TG elevation (> or =200 mg/dl) after the attainment of LDL-C target goals. In patients with coronary heart disease or coronary heart disease risk equivalents, an optional non-HDL-C goal is <100 mg/dl. To achieve the non-HDL-C goal, statin therapy may be intensified or combined with ezetimibe, niacin, a fibrate, or omega-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, non-HDL-C remains an important target of therapy for patients with elevated TGs, although its widespread adoption has yet to gain a foothold among health care professionals treating patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:18359322

  14. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  15. Coronary Plaque Characteristics Assessed by 256-Slice Coronary CT Angiography and Association with High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Symptomatic Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinling; Lv, Zhehao; Zhao, Deli; Liu, Lili; Wan, Yong; Fan, Tingting; Li, Huimin; Guan, Ying; Liu, Bailu

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding plaque distribution, composition, and the association with inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This study aimed to assess the relationship between coronary plaque subtypes and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels. Coronary CTA were performed in 98 symptomatic DM2 patients and 107 non-DM2 patients using a 256-slice CT. The extent and types of plaque as well as luminal narrowing were evaluated. Patients with DM2 were more likely to have significant stenosis (>50%) with calcified plaques in at least one coronary segment (p < 0.01); the prevalence rates of diffuse calcified plaques in the DM2 and non-DM2 groups were 31.6% and 4.7%, respectively (p < 0.01). Plasma hs-CRP levels in DM2 with calcified plaques were higher compared with values obtained for the non-DM2 group (p < 0.01). In conclusion, combination of coronary CTA and hs-CRP might improve risk stratification in symptomatic DM2 patients. PMID:27579325

  16. Effect of antispastic agents (calcium antagonists and/or isosorbide dinitrate) on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with coronary vasospastic angina pectoris and no hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Jui; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Yang, Ning-I

    2005-01-01

    Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured before and after 3 months of treatment with antispastic agents (calcium antagonists and/or isosorbide dinitrate) in 27 patients who had coronary vasospastic angina pectoris and no hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein decreased after treatment with antispastic agents.

  17. Erectile dysfunction precedes coronary artery endothelial dysfunction in rats fed a high-fat, high-sucrose, Western pattern diet.

    PubMed

    La Favor, Justin D; Anderson, Ethan J; Hickner, Robert C; Wingard, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    synthase uncoupling is a key mechanism in diet-induced ED. La Favor JD, Anderson EJ, Hickner RC, and Wingard CJ. Erectile dysfunction precedes coronary artery endothelial dysfunction in rats fed a high-fat, high-sucrose, Western pattern diet. J Sex Med 2013;10:694-703.

  18. High-density lipoprotein particles, coronary heart disease, and niacin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In clinical trials, the use of statins in patients with high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) has resulted in a 25% to 40% decrease in major clinical events. However, despite a marked reduction (up to 60%) in LDL-C, approximately 50% (or more) of patients continue to have CVD events. This high ...

  19. Absolute monocyte count trichotomizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia into high risk patients with immune dysregulation, disease progression and poor survival.

    PubMed

    Herishanu, Yair; Kay, Sigi; Sarid, Nadav; Kohan, Pedram; Braunstein, Rony; Rotman, Rachel; Deutsch, Varda; Ben-Ezra, Jonathan; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Perry, Chava; Katz, Ben-Zion

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral absolute monocyte count (AMC) has been reported to correlate with clinical outcome in different types of cancers. This association may relate to alteration in circulating monocytic subpopulations and tumor infiltrating macrophages. In this study we evaluated the clinical significance of peripheral AMC in 80 treatment naive patients with CLL. Measurement of AMC was based on direct morphological enumeration, due to our findings that complete blood count data may yield incorrect monocytes enumeration values in CLL. The median AMC in patients with CLL was within normal limits, however the AMC range exceeded the values of healthy individuals. The AMC trichotomized patients into 3 distinct sub-groups with different characteristics and outcomes. High AMC patients were younger and had higher absolute lymphocytes count, while patients with low AMC had prominent immune dysregulation (lower serum IgA levels, susceptibility to infections and a tendency for positive direct anti-globulin test). The low and high AMC patients had a shorter time to treatment compared to the intermediates AMC subgroups, whereas low AMC was associated with increased mortality caused by infectious complications. In conclusion, AMC quantification during the disease course classifies CLL patients into subgroups with unique clinical features and outcomes.

  20. Identification of atranorin and related potential allergens in oakmoss absolute by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using negative ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Hiserodt, R D; Swijter, D F; Mussinan, C J

    2000-08-01

    This paper describes the first high-performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method for the identification of atranorin and related potential allergens in oakmoss absolute. Oakmoss absolute is ubiquitous in the fragrance industry and is a key component in many fine perfumes. However, oakmoss absolute causes an allergic response in some individuals. Research is focused toward establishing the identity of the compounds causing the allergic response so a quality controlled oakmoss with reduced allergenic potential can be prepared. Consequently a highly selective and specific analytical method is necessary to support this effort. This is not available with the existing HPLC methods using UV detection. PMID:10949477

  1. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the electronic excitation of atoms at high resolution: Experimental methods and measurements for helium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.F.; Cooper, G.; Brion, C.E. )

    1991-07-01

    An alternative method is described for the measurement of absolute optical oscillator strengths (cross sections) for electronic excitation of free atoms and molecules throughout the discrete region of the valence-shell spectrum at high energy resolution (full width at half maximum of 0.048 eV). The technique, utilizing the virtual-photon field of a fast electron inelastically scattered at negligible momentum transfer, avoids many of the difficulties associated with the various direct optical techniques that have traditionally been used for absolute optical oscillator strength measurements. The method is also free of the bandwidth (line saturation) effects that can seriously limit the accuracy of photoabsorption cross-section measurements for discrete transitions of narrow linewidth obtained using the Beer-Lambert law ({ital I}{sub 0}/{ital I}=exp({ital nl}{sigma}{sub {ital p}})). Since the line-saturation effects are not widely appreciated and are only usually considered in the context of peak heights, a detailed analysis of this problem is presented, with consideration of the integrated cross section (oscillator strength) over the profile of each discrete peak.

  2. High-Efficiency SPECT MPI: Comparison of Automated Quantification, Visual Interpretation, and Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, W. Lane; Slomka, Piotr J.; Gerlach, Jim R.; Sweeny, Joseph M.; Baber, Usman; Croft, Lori B.; Guma, Krista A.; George, Titus; Henzlova, Milena J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently introduced high-efficiency (HE) SPECT cameras with solid-state CZT detectors have been shown to decrease imaging time and reduce radiation exposure to patients. An automated, computer derived quantification of HE MPI has been shown to correlate well with coronary angiography on one HE SPECT camera system (D-SPECT), but has not been compared to visual interpretation on any of the HE SPECT platforms. Methods Patients undergoing a clinically indicated Tc-99m sestamibi HE SPECT (GE Discovery 530c with supine and prone imaging) study over a one year period followed by a coronary angiogram within 2 months were included. Only patients with a history of CABG surgery were excluded. Both MPI studies and coronary angiograms were reinterpreted by blinded readers. One hundred and twenty two very low (risk of CAD < 5%) or low (risk of CAD < 10%) likelihood subjects with normal myocardial perfusion were used to create normal reference limits. Computer derived quantification of the total perfusion deficit (TPD) at stress and rest was obtained with QPS software. The visual and automated MPI quantification were compared to coronary angiography (≥ 70% luminal stenosis) by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. Results Of the 3,111 patients who underwent HE SPECT over a one year period, 160 patients qualified for the correlation study (66% male, 52% with a history of CAD). The ROC area under the curve (AUC) was similar for both the automated and visual interpretations using both supine only and combined supine and prone images (0.69-0.74). Using thresholds determined from sensitivity and specificity curves, the automated reads showed higher specificity (59-67% versus 27-60%) and lower sensitivity (71-72% versus 79-93%) than the visual reads. By including prone images sensitivity decreased slightly but specificity increased for both. By excluding patients with known CAD and cardiomyopathies, AUC and specificity increased for both techniques (0.72-0.82). The use

  3. Absolute Photoionization Cross Section with an Ultra-high Energy Resolution for Ne in the Region of 1s Rydberg States

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Morishita, Y.; Suzuki, I. H.; Saito, N.; Oura, M.; Yamaoka, H.; Okada, K.; Matsudo, T.; Gejo, T.

    2007-01-19

    The high-resolution absolute photoabsorption cross section with an absolute photon energy scale for Ne in the energy region of 864-872 eV (1s-1np Rydberg states) has been measured using a multi-electrode ionization chamber and monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The natural lifetime width of Ne 1s-13p resonance state has been obtained to be 252 {+-} 5 meV. The Ne+ (1s-1) ionization potential is determined to be 870.16 {+-} 0.04 eV by using the Rydberg formula. These absolute values are supposed to be more reliable than those previously reported.

  4. The Clinical Value of High-Intensity Signals on the Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaques: Noncontrast T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ehara, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Shimada, Kenei

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, significant progress has been made in the pathohistological assessment of vulnerable plaques and in invasive intravascular imaging techniques. However, the assessment of plaque morphology by invasive modalities is of limited value for the detection of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and the subsequent prediction or prevention of acute cardiovascular events. Recently, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technology has reached a sufficient level of spatial resolution, which allowed the plaque visualization of large and static arteries such as the carotids and aorta. However, coronary wall imaging by MR is still challenging due to the small size of coronary arteries, cardiac and respiratory motion, and the low contrast-to-noise ratio between the coronary artery wall and the surrounding structures. Following the introduction of carotid plaque imaging with noncontrast T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), some investigators have reported that coronary artery high-intensity signals on T1WI are associated with vulnerable plaque morphology and an increased risk of future cardiac events. Although there are several limitations and issues that need to be resolved, this novel MR technique for coronary plaque imaging could influence treatment strategies for atherothrombotic disease and may be useful for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of atherothrombotic plaque formation. PMID:27455243

  5. The use of percutaneous left ventricular assist device in high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Akhondi, Andre Babak; Lee, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with high-risk coronary lesions may be denied coronary artery bypass grafting due to excessive comorbidities. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may be a feasible revascularization strategy in high-risk patients who present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. Historically, the use if intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) has been used in high-risk PCI and cardiogenic shock. However, recent data has shown that elective IABP insertion did not reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events following PCI. The use of a left ventricular assist device is a reasonable and safe alternative compared with IABP counterpulsation, giving greater cardiac output and hemodynamic support in patients undergoing high-risk PCI and in those with severe cardiogenic shock. This review outlines a case of severe cardiogenic shock and hemodynamic instability where high-risk PCI is a reasonable option.

  6. The orbital motion, absolute mass and high-altitude winds of exoplanet HD 209458b.

    PubMed

    Snellen, Ignas A G; de Kok, Remco J; de Mooij, Ernst J W; Albrecht, Simon

    2010-06-24

    For extrasolar planets discovered using the radial velocity method, the spectral characterization of the host star leads to a mass estimate of the star and subsequently of the orbiting planet. If the orbital velocity of the planet could be determined, the masses of both star and planet could be calculated using Newton's law of gravity, just as in the case of stellar double-line eclipsing binaries. Here we report high-dispersion ground-based spectroscopy of a transit of the extrasolar planet HD 209458b. We see a significant wavelength shift in absorption lines from carbon monoxide in the planet's atmosphere, which we conclude arises from a change in the radial component of the planet's orbital velocity. The masses of the star and planet are 1.00 +/- 0.22M(Sun) and 0.64 +/- 0.09M(Jup) respectively. A blueshift of the carbon monoxide signal of approximately 2 km s(-1) with respect to the systemic velocity of the host star suggests the presence of a strong wind flowing from the irradiated dayside to the non-irradiated nightside of the planet within the 0.01-0.1 mbar atmospheric pressure range probed by these observations. The strength of the carbon monoxide signal suggests a carbon monoxide mixing ratio of (1-3) x 10(-3) in this planet's upper atmosphere.

  7. The orbital motion, absolute mass and high-altitude winds of exoplanet HD 209458b.

    PubMed

    Snellen, Ignas A G; de Kok, Remco J; de Mooij, Ernst J W; Albrecht, Simon

    2010-06-24

    For extrasolar planets discovered using the radial velocity method, the spectral characterization of the host star leads to a mass estimate of the star and subsequently of the orbiting planet. If the orbital velocity of the planet could be determined, the masses of both star and planet could be calculated using Newton's law of gravity, just as in the case of stellar double-line eclipsing binaries. Here we report high-dispersion ground-based spectroscopy of a transit of the extrasolar planet HD 209458b. We see a significant wavelength shift in absorption lines from carbon monoxide in the planet's atmosphere, which we conclude arises from a change in the radial component of the planet's orbital velocity. The masses of the star and planet are 1.00 +/- 0.22M(Sun) and 0.64 +/- 0.09M(Jup) respectively. A blueshift of the carbon monoxide signal of approximately 2 km s(-1) with respect to the systemic velocity of the host star suggests the presence of a strong wind flowing from the irradiated dayside to the non-irradiated nightside of the planet within the 0.01-0.1 mbar atmospheric pressure range probed by these observations. The strength of the carbon monoxide signal suggests a carbon monoxide mixing ratio of (1-3) x 10(-3) in this planet's upper atmosphere. PMID:20577209

  8. Two- and three-dimensional quantitative image analysis of coronary arteries from high-resolution histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    The study of coronary arteries has evolved from examining gross anatomy and morphology to scrutinizing micro-anatomy and cellular composition. Technological advances such as high-powered digital microscopes and high precision cutting devices have allowed clinicians to examine coronary artery morphology and pathology at micron resolution. Our work explores the composition of normal coronary arteries in order to provide the foundation for further study of remodeled tissue. The first of two coronary arteries was sliced into 442 sections with 4 micron inter-slice spacing. Each slice was stained for elastin and collagen. The second coronary artery was sectioned into 283 slices, also with 4 micron resolution. These slices were stained for cellular nuclei and smooth muscle. High sectioned into 283 slices, also with 4 micron resolution. These slices were stained for cellular nuclei and smooth muscle. High resolution light microscopy was used to image the sections. The data was analyzed for collagen/elastin content and nuclei density, respectively. Processing of this type of data is challenging in the areas of segmentation, visualization and quantification. Segmentation was confounded by variation in image quality as well as complexity of the coronary tissue. These problems were overcome by the development of 'smart' thresholding algorithms for segmentation. In addition, morphology and image statistics were used to further refine the result of the segmentation. Specificity/sensitivity analysis suggests that automatic segmentation can be very effective. 3D visualization of coronary arteries is challenging due to multiple tissue layers. Method such as summed voxel projection and maximum intensity projection appear to be effective. Shading methods also provide adequate visualization, however it is important to incorporate combined 2D and 3D displays. Surface rendering techniques are useful tools for visualizing parametric data. Quantification in 3D is simple in practice but

  9. High-resolution imaging spectrometer for recording absolutely calibrated far ultraviolet spectra from laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Charles M.; Seely, John F.; Feldman, Uri; Holland, Glenn E.; Weaver, James L.; Obenschain, Steven P.; Kjornrattanawanich, Benjawan; Fielding, Drew

    2008-10-15

    An imaging spectrometer was designed and fabricated for recording far ultraviolet spectra from laser-produced plasmas with wavelengths as short as 155 nm. The spectrometer implements a Cassegrain telescope and two gratings in a tandem Wadsworth optical configuration that provides diffraction limited resolution. Spectral images were recorded from plasmas produced by the irradiation of various target materials by intense KrF laser radiation with 248 nm wavelength. Two pairs of high-resolution gratings can be selected for the coverage of two wavebands, one grating pair with 1800 grooves/mm and covering approximately 155-175 nm and another grating pair with 1200 grooves/mm covering 230-260 nm. The latter waveband includes the 248 nm KrF laser wavelength, and the former waveband includes the wavelength of the two-plasmon decay instability at (2/3) the KrF laser wavelength (165 nm). The detection media consist of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor imager, photostimulable phosphor image plates, and a linear array of 1 mm{sup 2} square silicon photodiodes with 0.4 ns rise time. The telescope mirrors, spectrometer gratings, and 1 mm{sup 2} photodiode were calibrated using synchrotron radiation, and this enables the measurement of the absolute emission from the laser-produced plasmas with temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions. The spectrometer is capable of measuring absolute spectral emissions at 165 nm wavelength as small as 5x10{sup -7} J/nm from a plasma source area of 0.37 mm{sup 2} and with 0.4 ns time resolution.

  10. High-resolution imaging spectrometer for recording absolutely calibrated far ultraviolet spectra from laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Brown, Charles M; Seely, John F; Feldman, Uri; Holland, Glenn E; Weaver, James L; Obenschain, Steven P; Kjornrattanawanich, Benjawan; Fielding, Drew

    2008-10-01

    An imaging spectrometer was designed and fabricated for recording far ultraviolet spectra from laser-produced plasmas with wavelengths as short as 155 nm. The spectrometer implements a Cassegrain telescope and two gratings in a tandem Wadsworth optical configuration that provides diffraction limited resolution. Spectral images were recorded from plasmas produced by the irradiation of various target materials by intense KrF laser radiation with 248 nm wavelength. Two pairs of high-resolution gratings can be selected for the coverage of two wavebands, one grating pair with 1800 grooves/mm and covering approximately 155-175 nm and another grating pair with 1200 grooves/mm covering 230-260 nm. The latter waveband includes the 248 nm KrF laser wavelength, and the former waveband includes the wavelength of the two-plasmon decay instability at 23 the KrF laser wavelength (165 nm). The detection media consist of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor imager, photostimulable phosphor image plates, and a linear array of 1 mm(2) square silicon photodiodes with 0.4 ns rise time. The telescope mirrors, spectrometer gratings, and 1 mm(2) photodiode were calibrated using synchrotron radiation, and this enables the measurement of the absolute emission from the laser-produced plasmas with temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions. The spectrometer is capable of measuring absolute spectral emissions at 165 nm wavelength as small as 5x10(-7) J/nm from a plasma source area of 0.37 mm(2) and with 0.4 ns time resolution.

  11. Functional impact of high clopidogrel maintenance dosing in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary interventions. Results of a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Angiolillo, Dominick J; Bernardo, Esther; Palazuelos, Jorge; Desai, Bhaloo; Weisberg, Ian; Alfonso, Fernando; Guzman, Luis A; Hernández-Antolin, Rosana; Zenni, Martin Z; Macaya, Carlos; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Bass, Theodore A

    2008-01-01

    The currently recommended maintenance dose of clopidogrel is often associated with inadequate platelet inhibition, suggesting the need for a higher dose. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the functional impact of a high (150 mg/day) maintenance dose of clopidogrel in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This is a prospective, randomized, platelet function study which was performed in elective PCI patients assigned to treatment with either a 75 mg (n = 20) or 150 mg (n = 20) daily maintenance dose of clopidogrel for 30 days; afterwards, all patients resumed standard dosing. Platelet aggregation was performed using light transmittance aggregometry following 20 microM and 5 microM adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimuli 30 days after randomization and 30 days after resuming standard dosing. Patients treated with 150 mg/day clopidogrel had lower 20 microM ADP-induced platelet aggregation compared to patients on 75 mg/day (52.1 +/- 9% vs. 64.0 +/- 8%; p < 0.001; primary endpoint). The dose-dependent effect was confirmed by the absolute and relative increase in platelet aggregation after resuming standard dosing (p < 0.001). No changes were observed in patients randomized to standard dosing. Parallel findings were observed following 5 microM ADP stimuli for all assessments. A broad variability in clopidogrel-induced antiplatelet effects was observed irrespective of dosing. In conclusion, a 150 mg/day maintenance dose regimen of clopidogrel is associated with reduced platelet reactivity and enhanced platelet inhibition compared to that achieved with the currently recommended 75 mg/day in patients undergoing elective PCI.

  12. High-Resolution Variable-Density 3D Cones Coronary MRA

    PubMed Central

    Addy, Nii Okai; Ingle, R. Reeve; Wu, Holden H.; Hu, Bob S.; Nishimura, Dwight G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To improve the spatial/temporal resolution of whole-heart coronary MR angiography (CMRA) by developing a variable-density (VD) 3D cones acquisition suitable for image reconstruction with parallel imaging and compressed sensing techniques. Methods A VD 3D cones trajectory design incorporates both radial and spiral trajectory undersampling techniques to achieve higher resolution. This design is used to generate a VD cones trajectory with 0.8 mm/66 ms isotropic spatial/temporal resolution, using a similar number of readouts as our previous fully sampled cones trajectory (1.2 mm/100 ms). Scans of volunteers and patients are performed to evaluate the performance of the VD trajectory, using non-Cartesian L1-ESPIRiT for high-resolution image reconstruction. Results With gridding reconstruction, the high-resolution scans experience an expected drop in signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, but with L1-ESPIRiT, the apparent noise is substantially reduced. Compared to 1.2 mm images, in each volunteer, the L1-ESPIRiT 0.8 mm images exhibit higher vessel sharpness values in the right and left anterior descending arteries. Conclusion CMRA with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution and high temporal resolution can be performed with VD 3D cones to improve the depiction of coronary arteries. PMID:26172829

  13. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention.

  14. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:25795261

  15. Usefulness of Serum Albumin Concentration to Predict High Coronary SYNTAX Score and In-Hospital Mortality in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurtul, Alparslan; Murat, Sani Namik; Yarlioglues, Mikail; Duran, Mustafa; Ocek, Adil Hakan; Koseoglu, Cemal; Celık, Ibrahim Etem; Kilic, Alparslan; Aksoy, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    High SYNTAX score is a predictor of adverse cardiovascular events, including mortality, in acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). Decreased serum albumin (SA) concentration is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. We aimed to investigate whether SA levels at admission are associated with high SYNTAX score and in-hospital mortality in patients with ACS. The study included 1303 patients with ACS who underwent coronary angiography (CA). The patients were divided into 2 groups as high SYNTAX score (≥33) and lower SYNTAX score (≤32). Baseline SA levels were significantly lower in patients with high SYNTAX score than with lower SYNTAX score (3.46 ± 0.42 mg/dL vs 3.97±0.37 mg/dL, respectively; P < .001). On multivariate logistic regression, SA (<3.65 mg/dL) was an independent predictor of high SYNTAX score (odds ratio 4.329, 95% confidence interval 2.028-8.264; P < .001) together with admission glucose, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and left ventricular ejection fraction. In Cox regression analyses, systolic blood pressure, high SYNTAX score, and SA (<3.65 mg/dL) were found as independent predictors of in-hospital all-cause mortality. In conclusion, SA concentration on admission is inversely associated with high SYNTAX score and in-hospital mortality in ACS.

  16. High prevalence of hypertriglyceridaemia and apolipoprotein abnormalities in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Barbir, M; Wile, D; Trayner, I; Aber, V R; Thompson, G R

    1988-01-01

    Serum lipids and apolipoproteins A-I and B were measured in 174 men aged less than 60 with angiographically confirmed coronary artery disease and in 572 healthy control men. Two thirds of the patients had raised age-corrected values of fasting serum cholesterol and/or triglyceride and/or a low high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol compared with the controls. Eighteen (30%) of the 61 normolipidaemic patients had a concentration of serum apolipoprotein A-I below the 5th percentile of 233 controls. In normolipidaemic patients on beta blockers the relative prevalence of serum low density lipoprotein (LDL)-apolipoprotein B values above the 95th percentile of 339 controls was significantly increased. Discriminant function analysis showed that a raised concentration of serum triglyceride was the best discriminant between patients and controls, with raised LDL-apolipoprotein B and reduced apolipoprotein A-I coming second only to triglyceride in analyses where each was separately compared with all the lipid variables. These associations were highly significant and were independent of other influences, including beta blockade. These findings re-emphasise the importance of hypertriglyceridaemia as a risk factor and confirm that apolipoprotein abnormalities occur frequently in coronary disease, even in normolipidaemic patients. PMID:3203033

  17. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis during this decade on understanding energy balance and phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS 011 XMM-Newton are just beginning. Line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, 0, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. The Constellation-X mission will provide X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV) where primary line emitters will be HCIs. A variety of atomic parameters are required to model the stellar and solar plasma. These include cross sections for excitation, ionization, charge-exchange, X-ray emission, direct and indirect recombination, lifetimes and branching ratios, and dependences on l, m mixing by external E and B fields. In almost all cases the atomic quantities are calculated, and few comparisons to experiment have been carried out. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged beam approach has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparison made to the best available theories.

  18. Diet and the role of lipoproteins, lipases, and thyroid hormones in coronary lesion growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Jacques D.; Jansen, Hans; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Birkenhager, Jan C.; Kromhout, Daan

    1987-01-01

    The relationships between the coronary lesion growth and the blood contents of lipoprotein fractions, thyroic hormones, and the lipoprotein lipase activity were investigated in male patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis, who participated in a lipid-lowering dietary intervention program. A quantitative computer-assisted image-processing technique was used to assess the severity of coronary obstructions at the beginning of the program and at its termination two years later. Based on absolute coronary scores, patients were divided into a no-lesion growth group (14 patients) and a progression group (21 paients). At the end of the trial, the very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were found to be significantly higher, while the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hepatic lipase (HL) were lower in the progression group. Multivariate regression analysis showed HL to be the most important determinant of changes in coronary atherosclerotic lesions.

  19. High Parathyroid Hormone Level and Osteoporosis Predict Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Patients on Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Malluche, Hartmut H; Blomquist, Gustav; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Cantor, Thomas L; Davenport, Daniel L

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery calcifications (CACs) are observed in most patients with CKD on dialysis (CKD-5D). CACs frequently progress and are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular events, the major cause of death in these patients. A link between bone and vascular calcification has been shown. This prospective study was designed to identify noninvasive tests for predicting CAC progression, including measurements of bone mineral density (BMD) and novel bone markers in adult patients with CKD-5D. At baseline and after 1 year, patients underwent routine blood tests and measurement of CAC, BMD, and novel serum bone markers. A total of 213 patients received baseline measurements, of whom about 80% had measurable CAC and almost 50% had CAC Agatston scores>400, conferring high risk for cardiovascular events. Independent positive predictors of baseline CAC included coronary artery disease, diabetes, dialysis vintage, fibroblast growth factor-23 concentration, and age, whereas BMD of the spine measured by quantitative computed tomography was an inverse predictor. Hypertension, HDL level, and smoking were not baseline predictors in these patients. Three quarters of 122 patients completing the study had CAC increases at 1 year. Independent risk factors for CAC progression were age, baseline total or whole parathyroid hormone level greater than nine times the normal value, and osteoporosis by t scores. Our results confirm a role for bone in CKD-associated CAC prevalence and progression. PMID:25838468

  20. The diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography in asymptomatic high-risk patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Fabian; Friedrich, Guy; Dichtl, Wolfgang; Klauser, Andrea; Jaschke, Werner; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Feuchtner, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess the value of coronary CT angiography (CTA) in asymptomatic patients with high ‘a priori’ risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods 711 consecutive asymptomatic patients (61.8 years; 40.1% female) with high ‘a priori’ risk of CAD were prospectively examined with a coronary calcium score (CCS) and CTA. Coronary arteries were evaluated for atherosclerotic plaque (non-calcified and calcified) and stenosis (mild <50%, intermediate 50–70% or high-grade >70%). Coronary Segment Involvement Score (SIS, total number of segments with plaque) and nc (non-calcified) SIS were calculated. Primary end points were major adverse cardiac events (ST-elevation MI, non-ST-elevation MI and cardiac death); secondary end points were coronary revascularisation and >50% stenosis by invasive angiography. Results Of 711 patients, 28.3% were negative for CAD and 71.7% positive (CAD+) by CTA (15.6% had plaques without stenosis, 23.9% mild, 10.7% intermediate and 21.5% high-grade stenosis). CCS zero prevalence was 306 (43%), out of those 100 (32.7%) had non-calcified plaque only. Mean follow-up period was 2.65 years. MACE rate was 0% in CAD negative and higher (1.2%) in CAD positive by CTA. Coronary revascularisation rate was 5.5%. Patients with SIS ≥5 had an HR of 6.5 (95% CI 1.6 to 25.8, p<0.013) for MACE, patients with ncSIS ≥1 had an HR of 2.4 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.6, p<0.01) for secondary end point. The sensitivity of CTA for stenosis >50% compared with invasive angiography was 92.9% (95% CI 83.0% to 98.1%). Negative predictive value of CTA was 99.4% (95% CI 98.3% to 99.8%) for combined end points. Conclusions CAD prevalence by CTA in asymptomatic high-risk patients is high. CCS zero does not exclude CAD. CTA is highly accurate to exclude CAD. Total coronary plaque burden and nc plaques, even if only one segment is involved, are associated with an increased risk of adverse outcome. PMID:25332810

  1. Dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography: image quality and stenosis diagnosis in patients with high heart rates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minwen; Li, Jiayi; Xu, Jian; Chen, Kang; Zhao, Hongliang; Huan, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate prospectively the effects of heart rate and heart-rate variability on dual-source computed tomographic coronary image quality in patients whose heart rates were high, and to determine retrospectively the accuracy of dual-source computed tomographic diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis in the same patients.We compared image quality and diagnostic accuracy in 40 patients whose heart rates exceeded 70 beats/min with the same data in 40 patients whose heart rates were 70 beats/min or slower. In both groups, we analyzed 1,133 coronary arterial segments. Five hundred forty-five segments (97.7%) in low-heart-rate patients and 539 segments (93.7%) in high-heart-rate patients were of diagnostic image quality. We considered P < 0.05 to be statistically significant. No statistically significant differences between the groups were found in diagnostic-image quality scores of total segments or of any coronary artery, nor were any significant differences found between the groups in the accurate diagnosis of angiographically significant stenosis.Calcification was the chief factor that affected diagnostic accuracy. In high-heart-rate patients, heart-rate variability was significantly related to the diagnostic image quality of all segments (P = 0.001) and of the left circumflex coronary artery (P = 0.016). Heart-rate variability of more than 5 beats/min most strongly contributed to an inability to evaluate segments in both groups. When heart rates rose, the optimal reconstruction window shifted from diastole to systole.The image quality of dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography at high heart rates enables sufficient diagnosis of stenosis, although variability of heart rates significantly deteriorates image quality. PMID:19436804

  2. Coronary Angioplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Percutaneous Coronary Intervention? Español Percutaneous (per-ku-TA-ne-us) coronary intervention (PCI), commonly known as coronary angioplasty (AN-jee- ...

  3. Drugs targeting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary artery disease management.

    PubMed

    Katz, Pamela M; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    Many patients remain at high risk for future cardiovascular events despite levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at, or below, target while taking statin therapy. Much effort is therefore being focused on strategies to reduce this residual risk. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a strong, independent, inverse predictor of coronary heart disease risk and is therefore an attractive therapeutic target. Currently available agents that raise HDL-C have only modest effects and there is limited evidence of additional cardiovascular risk reduction on top of background statin therapy associated with their use. It was hoped that the use of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors would provide additional benefit, but the results of clinical outcome studies to date have been disappointing. The results of ongoing trials with other CETP inhibitors that raise HDL-C to a greater degree and also lower LDL-C, as well as with other emerging therapies are awaited.

  4. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J. A.

    2002-11-01

    There is increasing emphasis within this decade on understanding energy balance and new phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, and the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS on XMM-Newton are just beginning. The line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. In addition, the Constellation-X mission, currently in the planning stages, will provide high-throughput X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV), where the primary line emitters will again be the HCIs. This array of space instruments is providing an overwhelming return of HCI spectral data from a variety of astrophysical objects. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma [1]. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged-beams approach [2] has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparisons to the best available theories. Experimental methods will be reviewed, and results presented on experimental comparisons to R-Matrix and Breit-Pauli theoretical results in C3+[3], O2+[4], O5+[5], S2+[6], and Fe9+ [7]. Work is planned for comparisons in Mgq+, and higher charge states Fe(10-15)+. J. Lozano thanks the National Research Council for a fellowship though the NASA- NRC program. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and was supported under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  6. High-pitch coronary CT angiography with third generation dual-source CT: limits of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Gordic, Sonja; Husarik, Daniela B; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2014-08-01

    To determine the average heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) required for diagnostic imaging of the coronary arteries in patients undergoing high-pitch CT-angiography (CTA) with third-generation dual-source CT. Fifty consecutive patients underwent CTA of the thoracic (n = 8) and thoracoabdominal (n = 42) aorta with third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT with prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gating at a pitch of 3.2. No β-blockers were administered. Motion artifacts of coronary arteries were graded on a 4-point scale. Average HR and HRV were noted. The average HR was 66 ± 11 beats per minute (bpm) (range 45-96 bpm); the HRV was 7.3 ± 4.4 bpm (range 3-20 bpm). Interobserver agreement on grade of image quality for the 642 coronary segments evaluated by both observers was good (κ = 0.71). Diagnostic image quality was found for 608 of the 642 segments (95%) in 43 of 50 patients (86%). In 14% of the patients, image quality was nondiagnostic for at least one segment. HR (p = 0.001) was significantly higher in patients with at least one non-diagnostic segment compared to those without. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in HRV between patients with nondiagnostic segments and those with diagnostic images of all segments. All patients with a HR < 70 bpm had diagnostic image quality in all coronary segments. The effective radiation dose and scan time for the heart were 0.4 ± 0.1 mSv and 0.17 ± 0.02 s, respectively. Third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT allows for coronary angiography in the prospectively ECG-gated high-pitch mode with diagnostic image quality at HR up to 70 bpm. HRV is not significantly related to image quality of coronary CTA.

  7. Effects of the high-density lipoprotein mimetic agent CER-001 on coronary atherosclerosis in patients with acute coronary syndromes: a randomized trial†

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Jean-Claude; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Barter, Philip; Dasseux, Jean-Louis; Fayad, Zahi A.; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Kastelein, John J. P.; Keyserling, Constance; Klepp, Heather; Koenig, Wolfgang; L'Allier, Philippe L.; Lespérance, Jacques; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Paolini, John F.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Waters, David D.; Pfeffer, M.; Brown, V.; Rouleau, J.; Watkins, P.; Wei, L.J.; Gosselin, G.; Chayer, C.; Lanthier, S.; Pelletier, G.B.; Racine, N.; Agarwal, H.; Brilakis, E.; Cannon, L.; Carrié, D.; Corbelli, J.; Coste, P.; de Winter, R.; Diaz, A.; Eisenberg, S.; Ennis, B.; Fajadet, J.; Fam, N.; Fortuin, D.; Gessler, C.; Grines, C.; Guerra, D.; Gum, H.; Haldis, T.; Heestermans, T.; Herrman, J.P.; Huynh, T.; Kedhi, E.; Koren, M.; Kouz, S.; Krolick, M.; Kumkumian, G.; Lavi, S.; Li, R.J.; Masud, ARZ; McAlhany, C.; McGrew, F.A.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Oude Ophuis, A.J.M.; Parr, K.; Penny, W.; Pesant, Y.; Post, H.; Robinson, S.; Rodes-Cabau, J.; Roy, A.; Schulman, S.; Spence, F.; Stouffer, G.; Stys, T.; Sussex, B.; Tahirkheli, N.; Tardif, J-C.; Grégoire, J.; ten Berg, J.; van Boven, A.J.; von Birgelen, C.; Weinstein, D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) have several potentially protective vascular effects. Most clinical studies of therapies targeting HDL have failed to show benefits vs. placebo. Objective To investigate the effects of an HDL-mimetic agent on atherosclerosis by intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS) and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Design and setting A prospective, double-blinded, randomized trial was conducted at 51 centres in the USA, the Netherlands, Canada, and France. Intravascular ultrasonography and QCA were performed to assess coronary atherosclerosis at baseline and 3 (2–5) weeks after the last study infusion. Patients Five hundred and seven patients were randomized; 417 and 461 had paired IVUS and QCA measurements, respectively. Intervention Patients were randomized to receive 6 weekly infusions of placebo, 3 mg/kg, 6 mg/kg, or 12 mg/kg CER-001. Main outcome measures The primary efficacy parameter was the nominal change in the total atheroma volume. Nominal changes in per cent atheroma volume on IVUS and coronary scores on QCA were also pre-specified endpoints. Results The nominal change in the total atheroma volume (adjusted means) was −2.71, −3.13, −1.50, and −3.05 mm3 with placebo, CER-001 3 mg/kg, 6 mg/kg, and 12 mg/kg, respectively (primary analysis of 12 mg/kg vs. placebo: P = 0.81). There was also no difference among groups for the nominal change in per cent atheroma volume (0.02, −0.02, 0.01, and 0.19%; nominal P = 0.53 for 12 mg/kg vs. placebo). Change in the coronary artery score was −0.022, −0.036, −0.022, and −0.015 mm (nominal P = 0.25, 0.99, 0.55), and change in the cumulative coronary stenosis score was −0.51, 2.65, 0.71, and −0.77% (compared with placebo, nominal P = 0.85 for 12 mg/kg and nominal P = 0.01 for 3 mg/kg). The number of patients with major cardiovascular events was 10 (8.3%), 16 (13.3%), 17 (13.7%), and 12 (9.8%) in the four groups. Conclusion CER-001 infusions did not reduce coronary

  8. Impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels on coronary atheroma regression following high-intensity statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Nissen, Steven E; Shao, Mingyuan; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-11-15

    Guidelines now recommend high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with proven atherosclerotic disease. Yet the impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels on measures of disease regression to this therapy are unknown. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that high-intensity statin therapy causes equivalent degrees of coronary atheroma regression irrespective of baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. In 8 prospective randomized trials using serial coronary intravascular ultrasound, 1,881 patients who maintained or switched to 18- to 24 months of high-intensity statin therapy (rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg) were stratified according to baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. Changes in coronary percentage atheroma volume (PAV) and total atheroma volume (TAV) were evaluated. High-intensity statin therapy produced significant reductions from baseline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 38.4%, non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 33.6%, triglycerides by 13.1%, and CRP by 33.3%, while increasing HDL cholesterol by 11.7% (p <0.001 for all). This was associated with regression of PAV by 0.7% and of TAV by 8.2 mm(3) (p <0.001 for both). No significant differences of changes in PAV and TAV were observed across baseline quintiles of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or CRP. Moreover, across all measured lipoproteins and CRP, most patients demonstrated plaque regression (defined as any change from baseline in PAV or TAV <0). In conclusion, high-intensity statin therapy attenuated the natural progression of coronary atherosclerosis in all strata of patients with coronary artery disease irrespective of baseline lipoprotein or CRP levels. These findings provide support for the latest United States guideline recommendations for the broad use of high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with atherosclerosis, regardless of baseline lipid status.

  9. Does Pre-Treatment with High Dose Atorvastatin Prevent Microvascular Dysfunction after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong-Ki; Nam, Chang-Wook; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Chung, Woo-Young; Cho, Byung-Ryul; Fearon, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is controversy surrounding whether or not high dose statin administration before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) decreases peri-procedural microvascular injury. We performed a prospective randomized study to investigate the mechanisms and effects of pre-treatment high dose atorvastatin on myocardial damage in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) undergoing PCI. Subjects and Methods Seventy seven patients with NSTE-ACS were randomly assigned to either the high dose group (atorvastatin 80 mg loading 12 to 24 h before PCI with a further 40 mg loading 2 h before PCI, n=39) or low dose group (atorvastatin 10 mg administration 12 to 24 h before PCI, n=38). Index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was measured after stent implantation. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after PCI. Results The baseline characteristics were not different between the two patient groups. Compared to the low dose group, the high dose group had lower post PCI IMR (14.1±5.0 vs. 19.2±9.3 U, p=0.003). Post PCI CK-MB was also lower in the high dose group (median: 1.40 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR: 0.75 to 3.45] vs. 4.00 [IQR: 1.70 to 7.37], p=0.002) as was the post-PCI CRP level (0.09 mg/dL [IQR: 0.04 to 0.16] vs. 0.22 [IQR: 0.08 to 0.60], p=0.001). Conclusion Pre-treatment with high dose atorvastatin reduces peri-PCI microvascular dysfunction verified by post-PCI IMR and exerts an immediate anti-inflammatory effect in patients with NSTE-ACS. PMID:27482255

  10. High platelet reactivity after P2Y12-inhibition in patients with atrial fibrillation and coronary stenting.

    PubMed

    Rilinger, Jonathan; Meyer, Melanie; Schnabel, Katharina; Weik, Patrick; Charlet, Anne; Esser, Jennifer S; Zhou, Qian; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Diehl, Philipp; Olivier, Christoph B

    2016-11-01

    High platelet reactivity (HPR) after P2Y12-inhibition in patients undergoing coronary stenting is associated with an increased risk for thromboembolic events and coronary death. So far it is not known how HPR affects the clinical outcome of different treatment strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing coronary stenting. In this single centre, observational study the antiplatelet effect of P2Y12-inhibitors in AF patients undergoing coronary stenting was investigated using impedance aggregometry. Patients received either dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) or triple therapy (TT). HPR was defined as the ratio of ADP-to TRAP-induced aggregation (r-ADP-agg) ≥50 %. Thromboembolic and bleeding events were assessed within the first 30 days after stenting. Out of 910 screened patients 167 patients were available for the present analysis. HPR was found in 5 of 43 (12 %) patients treated with DAPT and in 18 of 124 (15 %) patients treated with TT. In patients receiving TT, HPR was not a risk factor for thromboembolic events compared to patients with adequate response to P2Y12-inhibitors (6 vs. 8 %, p = 0.712). There was a trend for less bleeding events in patients with HPR compared to r-ADP-agg <50 % in the TT group (0 vs. 16 %, p = 0.077). Our data suggest that HPR after P2Y12-antagonism in patients receiving TT due to AF and coronary stenting might protect from bleeding without increasing thromboembolic risk. Future studies will need to investigate if patients with AF receiving coronary stenting benefit from a reduction of antithrombotic therapy.

  11. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  12. High-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Hansis, Eberhard; Carroll, John D.; Schaefer, Dirk; Doessel, Olaf; Grass, Michael

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the coronary arteries during a cardiac catheter-based intervention can be performed from a C-arm based rotational x-ray angiography sequence. It can support the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, treatment planning, and intervention guidance. 3-D reconstruction also enables quantitative vessel analysis, including vessel dynamics from a time-series of reconstructions. Methods: The strong angular undersampling and motion effects present in gated cardiac reconstruction necessitate the development of special reconstruction methods. This contribution presents a fully automatic method for creating high-quality coronary artery reconstructions. It employs a sparseness-prior based iterative reconstruction technique in combination with projection-based motion compensation. Results: The method is tested on a dynamic software phantom, assessing reconstruction accuracy with respect to vessel radii and attenuation coefficients. Reconstructions from clinical cases are presented, displaying high contrast, sharpness, and level of detail. Conclusions: The presented method enables high-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm system.

  13. Nonalcoholic Hepatic Steatosis Is a Strong Predictor of High-Risk Coronary-Artery Plaques as Determined by Multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Toru; Yamauchi, Kentarou; Koyama, Yasushi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Sato, Shuhei; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with a risk of coronary artery disease (e.g., diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome). We evaluated whether nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis is associated with high-risk plaques as assessed by multidetector computed tomography (CT). Methods This retrospective study involved 414 participants suspected of having coronary artery disease. Nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was defined as a liver-to-spleen fat ratio of <1.0 and the presence and appropriate characteristics of coronary-artery plaques as assessed by coronary CT angiography. High-risk plaques were identified, as were low-density plaques, positive remodeling, and spotty calcification. Results Compared with patients who did not have nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis had more low-density plaques (21% vs. 44%, p<0.01), positive remodeling (41% vs. 58%, p = 0.01), and spotty calcification (12% vs. 36%, p<0.01). The number of high-risk plaques in patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was greater than in those without nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis (p<0.01). Patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis were more likely to have high-risk plaques than were those with only an elevated level of visceral adipose tissue (≥86 cm2; 35% vs. 16%, p<0.01). Multivariate analyses that included nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, amount of visceral adipose tissue, and the presence/absence of traditional risk factors demonstrated that nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was an independent predictor of high-risk plaques (odds ratio: 4.60; 95% confidence interval: 1.94–9.07, p<0.01). Conclusions Diagnosis of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis may be of value when assessing the risk of coronary artery disease. PMID:26125952

  14. Coronary Artery Imaging in Children

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery problems in children usually have a significant impact on both short-term and long-term outcomes. Early and accurate diagnosis, therefore, is crucial but technically challenging due to the small size of the coronary artery, high heart rates, and limited cooperation of children. Coronary artery visibility on CT and MRI in children is considerably improved with recent technical advancements. Consequently, CT and MRI are increasingly used for evaluating various congenital and acquired coronary artery abnormalities in children, such as coronary artery anomalies, aberrant coronary artery anatomy specific to congenital heart disease, Kawasaki disease, Williams syndrome, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:25741188

  15. Optimal Cutoff Points of Anthropometric Parameters to Identify High Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several published studies have reported the need to change the cutoff points of anthropometric indices for obesity. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate anthropometric cutoff points predicting high coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in Korean adults. We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2007 to 2010. A total of 21,399 subjects aged 20 to 79 yr were included in this study (9,204 men and 12,195 women). We calculated the 10-yr Framingham coronary heart disease risk score for all individuals. We then estimated receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio to predict a 10-yr CHD risk of 20% or more. For sensitivity analysis, we conducted the same analysis for a 10-yr CHD risk of 10% or more. For a CHD risk of 20% or more, the area under the curve of waist-to-height ratio was the highest, followed by waist circumference and BMI. The optimal cutoff points in men and women were 22.7 kg/m2 and 23.3 kg/m2 for BMI, 83.2 cm and 79.7 cm for waist circumference, and 0.50 and 0.52 for waist-to-height ratio, respectively. In sensitivity analysis, the results were the same as those reported above except for BMI in women. Our results support the re-classification of anthropometric indices and suggest the clinical use of waist-to-height ratio as a marker for obesity in Korean adults. PMID:26770039

  16. Optimal Cutoff Points of Anthropometric Parameters to Identify High Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Korean Adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Choi, Hyunrim; Won, Chang Won; Kim, Byung-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Several published studies have reported the need to change the cutoff points of anthropometric indices for obesity. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate anthropometric cutoff points predicting high coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in Korean adults. We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2007 to 2010. A total of 21,399 subjects aged 20 to 79 yr were included in this study (9,204 men and 12,195 women). We calculated the 10-yr Framingham coronary heart disease risk score for all individuals. We then estimated receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio to predict a 10-yr CHD risk of 20% or more. For sensitivity analysis, we conducted the same analysis for a 10-yr CHD risk of 10% or more. For a CHD risk of 20% or more, the area under the curve of waist-to-height ratio was the highest, followed by waist circumference and BMI. The optimal cutoff points in men and women were 22.7 kg/m(2) and 23.3 kg/m(2) for BMI, 83.2 cm and 79.7 cm for waist circumference, and 0.50 and 0.52 for waist-to-height ratio, respectively. In sensitivity analysis, the results were the same as those reported above except for BMI in women. Our results support the re-classification of anthropometric indices and suggest the clinical use of waist-to-height ratio as a marker for obesity in Korean adults.

  17. Prevalence of Coronary Risk Factors, Clinical Presentation, and Complications in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients Living at High vs Low Altitudes in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Huthi, Mohamed Ali; Ahmed Raja'a, Yahia; Al-Noami, Mohammed; Rahman, Abdul Rashid Abdul

    2006-01-01

    Background A comparative retrospective study was performed to compare the distribution of risk factors and complications in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) at high-altitude vs low-altitude areas in Yemen. Methods The records of 768 patients from Sana'a (high altitude) and Aden (low altitude) were reviewed. Risk factors assessed were age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and reported history and family history of coronary artery disease (CAD). Complications of ACS of interest were heart failure, arrhythmias, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and death. Results The mean age of ACS patients at high altitude was significantly lower than those at low altitude (55.3 years [SD = 8.2] vs 56.8 years [SD = 7.1]; P = .007). History of hyperlipidemia was significantly higher in high-altitude patients than in low-altitude patients (49.2% vs 38.3%; odds ratio [OR] = 1.563; P = .002). Reported history of CAD was also significantly higher at higher altitudes (16.7% vs 9.4%; OR = 1.933; P = .003). Previous history of diabetes mellitus and tobacco smoking was slightly higher with borderline significance. Hypertension and reported family history of CAD were comparable among high- and low-altitude patients. In terms of in-hospital complications, CVAs were significantly higher in high-altitude patients than in low-altitude patients (7.8% vs 4.4%; P = .0001). Heart failure, arrhythmias, and death rates were comparable in both groups of patients. Wall motion abnormalities were comparable, whereas the ejection fraction was lower in the high-altitude patients (49.8% [SD = 16.08] vs 54.8% [SD = 16.23]; P = .0001). Conclusions ACS occurs at a younger age at high altitudes. Patients who live in high-altitude regions are also more likely to have hyperlipidemia and a previous history of CAD. Stroke and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) occur more commonly in high-altitude ACS patients. High altitude may generally be a risk factor for

  18. High-accuracy interferometer with a prism pair for measurement of the absolute refractive index of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Yasuaki; Hirai, Akiko; Minoshima, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2009-04-10

    We propose a variable-path interferometric technique for the measurement of the absolute refractive index of optical glasses. We use two interferometers to decide the ratio between changes in the optical path in a prism-shaped sample glass and in air resulting from displacement of the sample. The method allows precise measurements to be made without prior knowledge of the properties of the sample. The combined standard uncertainty of the proposed method is 1.6x10{sup -6}.

  19. Coronary magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Matthias; Weiss, Robert G

    2007-08-01

    Coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a powerful noninvasive technique with high soft-tissue contrast for the visualization of the coronary anatomy without X-ray exposure. Due to the small dimensions and tortuous nature of the coronary arteries, a high spatial resolution and sufficient volumetric coverage have to be obtained. However, this necessitates scanning times that are typically much longer than one cardiac cycle. By collecting image data during multiple RR intervals, one can successfully acquire coronary MR angiograms. However, constant cardiac contraction and relaxation, as well as respiratory motion, adversely affect image quality. Therefore, sophisticated motion-compensation strategies are needed. Furthermore, a high contrast between the coronary arteries and the surrounding tissue is mandatory. In the present article, challenges and solutions of coronary imaging are discussed, and results obtained in both healthy and diseased states are reviewed. This includes preliminary data obtained with state-of-the-art techniques such as steady-state free precession (SSFP), whole-heart imaging, intravascular contrast agents, coronary vessel wall imaging, and high-field imaging. Simultaneously, the utility of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for the visualization of the coronary arteries is discussed. PMID:17610288

  20. Ethnicity and coronary artery disease: the role of high-density lipoprotein - a change in paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Katia; Velarde, Gladys P

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer of men and women across ethnic groups in the USA. Health disparities in CVD, especially coronary artery disease (CAD), are well documented in the diverse American population. Despite efforts taken toward reducing cardiovascular health disparities, there are still gaps in its diagnosis and management. Current risk assessment guidelines consider high high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels a protective factor against CAD, although its significance across races remains poorly understood. Recent clinical trials focused on increasing HDL levels have been disappointing. In this article, the authors have explored the role of HDL in CAD, have analyzed its significance across gender and ethnic groups and have challenged the broad application of widely used HDL level cutoffs in CAD risk assessment tools across these vulnerable groups. The current evidence suggests a paradigm change from HDL quantity to quality and function in future CVD risk research. This may better explain why some ethnic minority groups with a seemingly more benign lipid profile experience a higher CAD burden.

  1. Virtual coaching for the high-intensity training of a powerlifter following coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard; Adams, Jenny; Qin, Huanying; Bilbrey, Tim; Schussler, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old powerlifter in Tennessee learned about the sport-specific, high-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training available in Dallas, Texas, and contacted the staff by phone. He was recovering from quadruple coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and had completed several weeks of traditional cardiac rehabilitation in his hometown, but the exercise program no longer met his needs. He wanted help in returning both to his normal training regimen and to powerlifting competition but was unable to attend the Dallas program in person. An exercise physiologist with the program devised a virtual coaching model in which the patient was sent a wrist blood pressure cuff for self-monitoring and was advised about exercises that would not harm his healing sternum, even as the weight loads were gradually increased. After 17 weeks of symptom-limited, high-intensity training that was complemented by phone and e-mail support, the patient was lifting heavier loads than he had before CABG. At a powerlifting competition 10 months after CABG, he placed first in his age group. This case report exemplifies the need for alternative approaches to the delivery of cardiac rehabilitation services.

  2. Virtual coaching for the high-intensity training of a powerlifter following coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Richard; Qin, Huanying; Bilbrey, Tim; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old powerlifter in Tennessee learned about the sport-specific, high-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training available in Dallas, Texas, and contacted the staff by phone. He was recovering from quadruple coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and had completed several weeks of traditional cardiac rehabilitation in his hometown, but the exercise program no longer met his needs. He wanted help in returning both to his normal training regimen and to powerlifting competition but was unable to attend the Dallas program in person. An exercise physiologist with the program devised a virtual coaching model in which the patient was sent a wrist blood pressure cuff for self-monitoring and was advised about exercises that would not harm his healing sternum, even as the weight loads were gradually increased. After 17 weeks of symptom-limited, high-intensity training that was complemented by phone and e-mail support, the patient was lifting heavier loads than he had before CABG. At a powerlifting competition 10 months after CABG, he placed first in his age group. This case report exemplifies the need for alternative approaches to the delivery of cardiac rehabilitation services. PMID:25552808

  3. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of atherosclerosis: toward coronary arterial visualization of biologically high-risk plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calfon, Marcella A.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2010-01-01

    New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics.

  4. Integrative physiology of coronary microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, F; Goto, M

    1999-06-01

    Coronary microvessels play a crucial role for mechanoenergetic interaction between blood flow and myocardial function, which is not uniform transmurally. Thus, highly organized vascular regulations are required for matching local blood flow with myocardial energy requirement. Recently, new technologies to investigate in vivo coronary microcirculation with new knowledge of the signaling molecules for vascular regulation have revolutionized our abilities to understand the integrative regulation of coronary microcirculation. In this review, the mechanical aspects of the interaction between coronary blood flow and myocardium, coronary arte-rial tree and its roles in myocardial blood flow regulation, hierarchical and dynamic control of coronary flow, capillary network and function, function of venous drainage system, and molecular and cellular aspects of integrative coronary blood flow regulation are discussed, focusing on their integrational roles in maintaining coronary microvascular function and cell signaling.

  5. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  6. Hospital transfer for primary coronary angioplasty in high risk patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Straumann, E; Yoon, S; Naegeli, B; Frielingsdorf, J; Gerber, A; Schuiki, E; Bertel, O

    1999-01-01

    , respectively. Only one hospital survivor (group A) died during follow up.
CONCLUSION—Interhospital transport for primary PTCA in high risk patients with acute myocardial infarction is safe and feasible within a reasonable period of time. Short and medium term outcome is favourable. Optimising the decision process and transport logistics may further improve outcome by reducing the total time of ischaemia.


Keywords: acute myocardial infarction; primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; hospital transfer; time delay PMID:10490552

  7. Identifying relatively high-risk group of coronary artery calcification based on progression rate: statistical and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Young; Yoo, Sanghyun; Lee, Jihyun; Kam, Hye Jin; Woo, Kyoung-Gu; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Sung, Jidong; Kang, Mira

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) score is an important predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD), which is the primary cause of death in advanced countries. Early prediction of high-risk of CAC based on progression rate enables people to prevent CAD from developing into severe symptoms and diseases. In this study, we developed various classifiers to identify patients in high risk of CAC using statistical and machine learning methods, and compared them with performance accuracy. For statistical approaches, linear regression based classifier and logistic regression model were developed. For machine learning approaches, we suggested three kinds of ensemble-based classifiers (best, top-k, and voting method) to deal with imbalanced distribution of our data set. Ensemble voting method outperformed all other methods including regression methods as AUC was 0.781. PMID:23366360

  8. High density lipoprotein cholesterol as a determinant factor in coronary heart disease in Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Adebonojo, S. A.; Ogunnaike, H. O.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the lipid profile of 200 normal Nigerian subjects (Group A) shows a steady increase in the total cholesterol and triglyceride values with increasing age in both sexes, while the high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and percent HDL cholesterol values show a steady decrease with increasing age in both sexes. A similar study of 160 patients with high-risk factors (Group B), ie, patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smokers, and obese patients, shows significantly higher values of mean triglyceride than in the normal subjects (P less than 0.001). The HDL cholesterol and percent HDL cholesterol values are significantly lower in the high risk patients than in the normal subjects (P less than 0.001). A study of the lipid profile of 15 Nigerian patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) (Group C) shows significantly lower in the high-risk patients than in the percent HDL cholesterol than normal subjects (P less than 0.001). These values were also found to be significantly lower in Group C patients than in Group B patients (P less than 0.01). A comparison of the lipid profile of normal Nigerian subjects with those of black Americans shows that the total cholesterol values of normal black Americans are significantly higher than those of normal Nigerians of comparable age and sex (P less than 0.001). Although there is no significant difference in the HDL cholesterol values of both black American and Nigerian males and females, the values of the percent HDL cholesterol of black Americans are significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than those of Nigerians of comparable age and sex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2746678

  9. Impaired protection against diabetes and coronary heart disease by high-density lipoproteins in Turks.

    PubMed

    Onat, Altan; Can, Günay; Ayhan, Erkan; Kaya, Zekeriya; Hergenç, Gülay

    2009-10-01

    The issue of whether or not incident type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease (CHD) can be predicted by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in both sexes needs investigation. A representative sample of 3035 middle-aged Turkish adults free of CHD at baseline was studied with this purpose prospectively over a mean of 7.8 years. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were found to be correlated in women positively with plasma fibrinogen and weakly with waist girth and C-reactive protein, and to be not correlated with fasting insulin. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol protected men against future CHD risk (for a 12-mg/dL increment: relative risk = 0.80 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.95]) after multivariable adjustment in logistic regression analyses for age, smoking status, physical activity grade, hypertension, abdominal obesity, diabetes, and lipid-lowering drugs. However, men were not protected against risk of diabetes. In women, HDL cholesterol was not associated with risk for CHD, whereas intermediate (40-60 mg/dL) compared with lower HDL cholesterol levels proved protective against risk of diabetes (relative risk = 0.57 [95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.90]) after adjustments that included apolipoprotein A-I tertiles. Yet higher serum concentrations failed to yield protection against diabetes. It was concluded that HDL particles confer partially lacking protection against cardiometabolic risk among Turks, and this impairment is modulated by sex. This highly important observation may result from a setting of prevailing chronic subclinical inflammation.

  10. Absolute cross sections for the dissociation of hydrogen cluster ions in high-energy collisions with helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, S.; Tabet, J.; Samraoui, K.; Louc, S.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2006-02-15

    Absolute dissociation cross sections are reported for H{sub n}{sup +} clusters of varied mass (n=3,5,...,35) following collisions with He atoms at 60 keV/amu. Initial results have been published previously for a smaller range of cluster sizes [Ouaskit et al., Phys. Rev. A 49, 1484 (1994)]. The present extended study includes further experimental results, reducing the statistical errors associated with the absolute cross sections. The previously suggested quasilinear dependence of the H{sub n}{sup +} dissociation cross sections upon n is developed with reference to expected series of geometrical shells of H{sub 2} molecules surrounding a H{sub 3}{sup +} core. Recent calculations identify n=9 as corresponding to the first closed H{sub 2} shell [e.g., Stich et al., J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9482 (1997)]. Recurrence of the distinct characteristics observed in the dissociation-cross-section dependence upon cluster size around n=9 provides the basis for the presently proposed subsequent closed shells at n=15, 21, 27, and 33, in agreement with the calculations of Nagashima et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 96, 4294 (1992)].

  11. The prognostic value of high sensitivity troponin T 7 weeks after an acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Michelle P C; Dow, Ellie; Lang, Chim; Struthers, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Objective The role of high sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) in the convalescence phase after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is unknown. The authors aim to assess the prognostic utility of a single hs-TnT level at 7-week post-ACS. Second, the authors evaluated whether any serial changes in hs-TnT between the index admission and 7 weeks post-ACS had any link with the prognosis. Third, the authors assessed whether the prognostic utility of hs-TnT is independent of various echocardiographic abnormalities. Methods The authors measured hs-TnT levels in 326 consecutive patients at 7 weeks after an ACS event. The composite end point of death from any cause or acute myocardial infarction was evaluated over a median duration of 30 months. Results A high 7-week hs-TnT (>14 ng/l) predicted adverse clinical outcomes independent of conventional risk factors, left ventricular dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiography (adjusted RR: 2.69 (95% CI 1.45 to 5.00)). Patients with persistent hs-TnT elevation at 7 weeks were also at an increased risk of cardiovascular events compared with those with an initial high hs-TnT which then normalised (unadjusted RR 3.39 (95% CI 2.02 to 5.68)). Conclusion The authors have demonstrated the prognostic utility of a single 7-week hs-TnT measurement in routine ACS patients and that it could be used to assist medium term risk stratification in this patient cohort. In addition, the authors also showed that hs-TnT predicted long-term adverse prognosis independent of various echo parameters. Future studies should evaluate whether tailoring specific treatment interventions to higher risk individuals as identified by an elevated hs-TnT during the convalescence phase of ACS would improve clinical outcomes. PMID:22689713

  12. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease Using 12-Lead High-Frequency Electrocardiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian

    2006-01-01

    A noninvasive, sensitive method of diagnosing certain pathological conditions of the human heart involves computational processing of digitized electrocardiographic (ECG) signals acquired from a patient at all 12 conventional ECG electrode positions. In the processing, attention is focused on low-amplitude, high-frequency components of those portions of the ECG signals known in the art as QRS complexes. The unique contribution of this method lies in the utilization of signal features and combinations of signal features from various combinations of electrode positions, not reported previously, that have been found to be helpful in diagnosing coronary artery disease and such related pathological conditions as myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. The electronic hardware and software used to acquire the QRS complexes and perform some preliminary analyses of their high-frequency components were summarized in Real-Time, High-Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph (MSC- 23154), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 7 (July 2003), pp. 26-28. To recapitulate, signals from standard electrocardiograph electrodes are preamplified, then digitized at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz, then analyzed by the software that detects R waves and QRS complexes and analyzes them from several perspectives. The software includes provisions for averaging signals over multiple beats and for special-purpose nonrecursive digital filters with specific low- and high-frequency cutoffs. These filters, applied to the averaged signal, effect a band-pass operation in the frequency range from 150 to 250 Hz. The output of the bandpass filter is the desired high-frequency QRS signal. Further processing is then performed in real time to obtain the beat-to-beat root mean square (RMS) voltage amplitude of the filtered signal, certain variations of the RMS voltage, and such standard measures as the heart rate and R-R interval at any given time. A key signal feature analyzed in the present

  13. Absence of Bacteria on Coronary Angioplasty Balloons from Unselected Patients: Results with Use of a High Sensitivity Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gorm Mørk; Nilsson, Martin; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Holmstrup, Palle; Helqvist, Steffen; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic, bacterially-induced inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, which may result in transient bacteremia and a systemic inflammatory response. Periodontitis is associated with coronary artery disease independently of established cardiovascular risk factors, and translocation of bacteria from the oral cavity to the coronary arteries may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. Very few studies have used angioplasty balloons for in vivo sampling from diseased coronary arteries, and with varying results. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess if bacterial DNA from primarily oral bacteria could be detected on coronary angioplasty balloons by use of an optimized sampling process combined with an internally validated sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Coronary angioplasty balloons and control samples from a total of 45 unselected patients with stable angina, unstable angina/non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (n = 15 in each group) were collected and analyzed using a PCR assay with high sensitivity and specificity for 16S rRNA genes of the oral microbiome. Despite elimination of extraction and purification steps, and demonstration of sensitivity levels of 25-125 colony forming units (CFU), we did not detect bacterial DNA from any of the coronary angioplasty balloons. A subsequent questionnaire indicated that the prevalence of periodontitis in the study cohort was at least 39.5%. Although coronary angioplasty balloons are unlikely to be useful for detection of bacteria with current PCR techniques in unselected patients with coronary artery disease, more studies are warranted to determine the extent to which bacteria contribute to atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations and whether the presence of bacteria in the arteries is a transient phenomenon.

  14. Absence of Bacteria on Coronary Angioplasty Balloons from Unselected Patients: Results with Use of a High Sensitivity Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gorm Mørk; Nilsson, Martin; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Holmstrup, Palle; Helqvist, Steffen; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic, bacterially-induced inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, which may result in transient bacteremia and a systemic inflammatory response. Periodontitis is associated with coronary artery disease independently of established cardiovascular risk factors, and translocation of bacteria from the oral cavity to the coronary arteries may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. Very few studies have used angioplasty balloons for in vivo sampling from diseased coronary arteries, and with varying results. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess if bacterial DNA from primarily oral bacteria could be detected on coronary angioplasty balloons by use of an optimized sampling process combined with an internally validated sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Coronary angioplasty balloons and control samples from a total of 45 unselected patients with stable angina, unstable angina/non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (n = 15 in each group) were collected and analyzed using a PCR assay with high sensitivity and specificity for 16S rRNA genes of the oral microbiome. Despite elimination of extraction and purification steps, and demonstration of sensitivity levels of 25-125 colony forming units (CFU), we did not detect bacterial DNA from any of the coronary angioplasty balloons. A subsequent questionnaire indicated that the prevalence of periodontitis in the study cohort was at least 39.5%. Although coronary angioplasty balloons are unlikely to be useful for detection of bacteria with current PCR techniques in unselected patients with coronary artery disease, more studies are warranted to determine the extent to which bacteria contribute to atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations and whether the presence of bacteria in the arteries is a transient phenomenon. PMID:26695491

  15. Absence of Bacteria on Coronary Angioplasty Balloons from Unselected Patients: Results with Use of a High Sensitivity Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Gorm Mørk; Nilsson, Martin; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Holmstrup, Palle; Helqvist, Steffen; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic, bacterially-induced inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, which may result in transient bacteremia and a systemic inflammatory response. Periodontitis is associated with coronary artery disease independently of established cardiovascular risk factors, and translocation of bacteria from the oral cavity to the coronary arteries may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. Very few studies have used angioplasty balloons for in vivo sampling from diseased coronary arteries, and with varying results. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess if bacterial DNA from primarily oral bacteria could be detected on coronary angioplasty balloons by use of an optimized sampling process combined with an internally validated sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Coronary angioplasty balloons and control samples from a total of 45 unselected patients with stable angina, unstable angina/non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (n = 15 in each group) were collected and analyzed using a PCR assay with high sensitivity and specificity for 16S rRNA genes of the oral microbiome. Despite elimination of extraction and purification steps, and demonstration of sensitivity levels of 25–125 colony forming units (CFU), we did not detect bacterial DNA from any of the coronary angioplasty balloons. A subsequent questionnaire indicated that the prevalence of periodontitis in the study cohort was at least 39.5%. Although coronary angioplasty balloons are unlikely to be useful for detection of bacteria with current PCR techniques in unselected patients with coronary artery disease, more studies are warranted to determine the extent to which bacteria contribute to atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations and whether the presence of bacteria in the arteries is a transient phenomenon. PMID:26695491

  16. [Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Reports of randomized controlled trials and prospective observational studies provide the most reliable data on the association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease (CHD). The totality of the evidence indicate a strong association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease, which is continuous at levels of less than 115 mm Hg of systolic. In general, 60 to 69 years of age, 10 lower mm Hg systolic blood pressure is associated with lower risk of one-fifth of a coronary heart disease event. The size and shape of this Association are consistent in all regions, for men and women and life-threatening events such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Trials that compared active treatment with placebo or no treatment have shown that the benefits of reducing blood pressure with different classes of drugs (e.g., diuretics, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) are quite similar, with about a fifth of reduction in coronary heart disease. The important points in this review are: First, that the relative benefit to the decline in blood pressure for the prevention of coronary heart disease appears to be constant in a range of different populations. Second, it is likely that considerable benefit with blood pressure low below thresholds of "traditional" blood pressure (140/90 mm Hg), especially in those with high absolute risk. Third, start, reduce with caution -especially in adult- and keep the maximum tolerance of blood pressure reduction is an issue more important than the choice of the initial agent. PMID:27428346

  17. [Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Reports of randomized controlled trials and prospective observational studies provide the most reliable data on the association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease (CHD). The totality of the evidence indicate a strong association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease, which is continuous at levels of less than 115 mm Hg of systolic. In general, 60 to 69 years of age, 10 lower mm Hg systolic blood pressure is associated with lower risk of one-fifth of a coronary heart disease event. The size and shape of this Association are consistent in all regions, for men and women and life-threatening events such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Trials that compared active treatment with placebo or no treatment have shown that the benefits of reducing blood pressure with different classes of drugs (e.g., diuretics, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) are quite similar, with about a fifth of reduction in coronary heart disease. The important points in this review are: First, that the relative benefit to the decline in blood pressure for the prevention of coronary heart disease appears to be constant in a range of different populations. Second, it is likely that considerable benefit with blood pressure low below thresholds of "traditional" blood pressure (140/90 mm Hg), especially in those with high absolute risk. Third, start, reduce with caution -especially in adult- and keep the maximum tolerance of blood pressure reduction is an issue more important than the choice of the initial agent.

  18. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Prism-pair interferometry by homodyne interferometers with a common light source for high-accuracy measurement of the absolute refractive index of glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Yasuaki; Hirai, Akiko; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2011-03-10

    A prism-pair interferometer comprising two homodyne interferometers with a common light source was developed for high-precision measurements of the refractive index of optical glasses with an uncertainty of the order of 10{sup -6}. The two interferometers measure changes in the optical path length in the glass sample and in air, respectively. Uncertainties in the absolute wavelength of the common light source are cancelled out by calculating a ratio between the results from the interferometers. Uncertainties in phase measurement are suppressed by a quadrature detection system. The combined standard uncertainty of the developed system is evaluated as 1.1x10{sup -6}.

  1. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Hidden Coronary Artery-Unusual Type of Isolated Single Coronary Artery.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shivanand; Rachaiah, Jayasheelan Mambally; Ramalingam, Rangaraj; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa; Subramanyam, Kasamsetty

    2016-08-01

    Single coronary artery is a rare congenital coronary artery anomaly, the incidence of which is 0.024-0.066% as described in literature. Report of cases having single coronary artery along with acute myocardial infarction are scanty and reports of percutaneous intervention in such a situation are even fewer, technically challenging and potentially cataclysmic. As single coronary artery supplies the entire myocardium, occlusion of this can result in significant ischemic insult, resulting in severe biventricular dysfunction. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) of single coronary artery is technically challenging and carries high risk which may be equated to left main intervention. We report a rare interesting case of L1 variety of single coronary artery which presented as acute inferoposterior myocardial infarction with successful rescue PCI to Left Circumflex Artery (LCx). PMID:27656488

  2. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Hidden Coronary Artery-Unusual Type of Isolated Single Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shivanand; Ramalingam, Rangaraj; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa; Subramanyam, Kasamsetty

    2016-01-01

    Single coronary artery is a rare congenital coronary artery anomaly, the incidence of which is 0.024-0.066% as described in literature. Report of cases having single coronary artery along with acute myocardial infarction are scanty and reports of percutaneous intervention in such a situation are even fewer, technically challenging and potentially cataclysmic. As single coronary artery supplies the entire myocardium, occlusion of this can result in significant ischemic insult, resulting in severe biventricular dysfunction. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) of single coronary artery is technically challenging and carries high risk which may be equated to left main intervention. We report a rare interesting case of L1 variety of single coronary artery which presented as acute inferoposterior myocardial infarction with successful rescue PCI to Left Circumflex Artery (LCx). PMID:27656488

  3. Eosinophilic coronary monoarteritis.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Chrystalle Katte; Esposito, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    Eosinophilic coronary monoarteritis is an unfamiliar cause of acute myocardial ischemia. Most commonly, it presents as a left-sided chest pain or sudden death in middle-aged women with no traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease. Because the abrupt onset leaves almost no time for intervention, the symptoms readily lead to death, and most cases are diagnosed at necropsy. Dissection of the coronary artery wall with resultant occlusion of the lumen, which commonly affects the left anterior descending artery, is a consistent gross finding. An inflammatory infiltrate, which is predominantly composed of eosinophils in the tunica adventitia and tunica media and is often accompanied by a hematoma in between these 2 layers, is observed histologically. The etiology remains unclear, but an increase in the activity of eosinophils because of hormonal interactions during pregnancy has been suggested. Interplay of hormones is thought to culminate in the release of histolytic agents by the eosinophils, which initiate the dissection process. Currently, there is no specific treatment for eosinophilic coronary monoarteritis, but cyclophosphamide and prednisone have shown positive results in the treatment of spontaneous coronary artery dissection with unspecified periadventitial inflammation. Percutaneous coronary procedures have also resulted in favorable outcomes in a subset of patients. Because of the high, sudden death rate in eosinophilic coronary monoarteritis, deciphering the underlying pathophysiology of this almost invariably fatal disease remains both a challenge and a key to developing screening methods that will allow timely detection and thus treatment.

  4. Prevalence of high risk Tl-201 scintigraphic findings in patients with coronary artery disease: Relation to coronary anatomy and ECG stress test findings

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.M.; Nygaard, T.W.; Gibson, R.S.; Gascho, J.A.; Watson, D.D.; Beller, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of a high risk exercise (Ex) Tl-201 (Tl) scintigram (scint) was determined in 295 consecutive patients (pts) with angiographic (angio) (>50% stenosis) coronary artery disease (CAD) and correlated with extent of CAD and Ex stress test findings. A high risk scint by quantitative criteria was defined as either: 1) a typical left main (LM) CAD pattern showing greater than or equal to 25% homogenous disease in Tl activity in septal and posterolateral walls; 2) a multivessel disease (MVD) pattern showing abnormal Tl uptake and/or washout in multiple vascular scan segments; 3) increased lung Tl uptake. The typical LMCAD pattern was observed in 6 of 43 pts (14%) with LMCAD compared to 2% of 53 pts with 3VD (p=0.03), 3% of 99 pts with 2VD (p=0.02) and 2% of 100 pts with 1VD (p-0.01). The MVD scint pattern was seen in 67% of pts with LMCAD compared to 49% (p=0.05) in 3VD pts, 41% (p=0.004) in 2VD pts and 24% (p=<0.0001) in 1VD pts. Prevalence of abnormal lung Tl was comparable in LMCAD (42%), 3VD (38%) and 2VD (34%) pts, but greater than observed in 1VD pts (26%; p=0.05). High risk ECG stress test was defined as 2 or more of: 1) >2.0 mm of ST decreasing; 2) greater than or equal to1.0 mm ST decreasing persisting >5 min post-EX; 3) ST decreasing at less than or equal to5 METS; 4) greater than or equal to10 mm Hg decreasing in Ex blood pressure. A high risk ECG stress test was observed in 58% of LMCAD pts compared to 32% of 3VD pts (p=0.009), 31% of 2VD pts (p=0.003) and 16% of 1VD pts (p<0.0001). Eighty-six % of LMCAD and 70% of 2 and 3VD pts had either a high risk Ex scint or stress test. Thus, EX Tl-201 scint appears useful in identifying high risk CAD pts.

  5. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  6. Comparison of high energy gamma rays from absolute value of b greater than 30 deg with the galactic neutral hydrogen distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozel, M. E.; Ogelman, H.; Tumer, T.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    High-energy gamma-ray (energy above 35 MeV) data from the SAS 2 satellite have been used to compare the intensity distribution of gamma rays with that of neutral hydrogen (H I) density along the line of sight, at high galactic latitudes (absolute values greater than 30 deg). A model has been constructed for the case where the observed gamma-ray intensity has been assumed to be the sum of a galactic component proportional to the H I distribution plus an isotropic extragalactic emission. A chi-squared test of the model parameters indicates that about 30% of the total high-latitude emission may originate within the Galaxy.

  7. Coronary blood flow in rats native to simulated high altitude and in rats exposed to it later in life.

    PubMed

    Turek, Z; Turek-Maischeider, M; Claessens, R A; Ringnalda, B E; Kreuzer, F

    1975-03-22

    In rats exposed to a simulated high altitude of 3500 m for their whole prenatal and postnatal life a severe cardiac hypertrophy develops. In rats born and first staying 5 weeks at sea level and then being exposed to simulated high altitude, only a unilateral right cardiac hypertrophy occurs. In both groups nutritional coronary blood flow was estimated in left ventricle, right ventricle, and septum and was compared with control animals of similar age. Coronary blood flow was measured at hypoxia in all groups. At first cardiac output was determined by the Fick principle, then 86Rb was applied and the animals were killed after 55 sec. Activity of 86Rb was measured in both cardiac ventricles and septum and the fractional uptake was calculated. According to Sapirstein (1956, 1958) the distribution of 86-RB follows the distribution of cardiac output and from both these data the nutritional blood flow to the parts of the heart may be estimated. Cardiac output was similar in rats exposed to simulated high altitude later in life ('newcomers') and in control animals, but it was significantly lower in rats born in the low pressure chamber ('natives'). Fractions of cardiac output supplying cardiac ventricles and septum in rats from both hypoxic groups were significantly higher than in control animals. In the 'natives' they were significantly higher than in the 'newcomers'. The fractions of cardiac output in both 'newcomers' and 'natives' remained significantly higher than those of the control animals, also when calculated per gram of heart tissue. Nutritional coronary blood flow (in ml/min) was higher in both ventricles and septum of the 'newcomers' and in the right ventricle of the 'natives', and lower in the septum of the 'natives', when compared with control animals. Coronary blood flow per gram of heart tissue (in ml/min.g) was significantly higher in all cardiac parts of the 'newcomers', but it was about the same in all cardiac parts of the 'natives' when compared with

  8. Trypsin immobilization on hairy polymer chains hybrid magnetic nanoparticles for ultra fast, highly efficient proteome digestion, facile 18O labeling and absolute protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weijie; Song, Zifeng; Fan, Chao; Zhang, Wanjun; Cai, Yun; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, quantitative proteomic research attracts great attention because of the urgent needs in biological and clinical research, such as biomarker discovery and verification. Currently, mass spectrometry (MS) based bottom up strategy has become the method of choice for proteomic quantification. In this strategy, the amount of proteins is determined by quantifying the corresponding proteolytic peptides of the proteins, therefore highly efficient and complete protein digestion is crucial for achieving accurate quantification results. However, the digestion efficiency and completeness obtained using conventional free protease digestion is not satisfactory for highly complex proteomic samples. In this work, we developed a new type of immobilized trypsin using hairy noncross-linked polymer chains hybrid magnetic nanoparticle as the matrix aiming at ultra fast, highly efficient proteomic digestion and facile (18)O labeling for absolution protein quantification. The hybrid nanoparticle is synthesized by in situ growth of hairy polymer chains from the magnetic nanoparticle surface using surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization technique. The flexible noncross-linked polymer chains not only provide large amount of binding sites but also work as scaffolds to support three-dimensional trypsin immobilization which leads to increased loading amount and improved accessibility of the immobilized trypsin. For complex proteomic samples, obviously increased digestion efficiency and completeness was demonstrated by 27.2% and 40.8% increase in the number of identified proteins and peptides as well as remarkably reduced undigested proteins residues compared with that obtained using conventional free trypsin digestion. The successful application in absolute protein quantification of enolase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis protein extracts using (18)O labeling and MRM strategy further demonstrated the potential of this hybrid nanoparticle immobilized trypsin

  9. Absolute OH concentration profiles measurements in high pressure counterflow flames by coupling LIF, PLIF, and absorption techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matynia, A.; Idir, M.; Molet, J.; Roche, C.; de Persis, S.; Pillier, L.

    2012-08-01

    A high-pressure combustion chamber enclosing counterflow burners was set-up at ICARE-CNRS laboratory. It allows the stabilization of flat twin premixed flames at atmospheric and high pressure. In this study, lean and stoichiometric methane/air counterflow premixed flames were studied at various pressures (0.1 MPa to 0.7 MPa). Relative OH concentration profiles were measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence. Great care was attached to the determination of the fluorescence signal by taking into account the line broadening and deexcitation by quenching which both arise at high pressure. Subsequently, OH profiles were calibrated in concentration by laser absorption technique associated with planar laser induced fluorescence. Results are successfully compared with literature. The good quality of the results attests of the experimental set-up ability to allow the study of flame structure at high pressure.

  10. [Coronary surgery on the beating heart under extracorporeal circulation in high-risk patients. An acceptable compromise?].

    PubMed

    Bel, A; Menasché, P; Faris, B; Perrault, L P; Peynet, J; de Chaumaray, T; Gatecel, C; Touchot, B; Moalic, J M; Bloch, G

    1998-07-01

    Coronary artery surgery with cardioplegia in high risk patients carries a risk of myocardial ischaemia and, without cardiopulmonary bypass, is not always technically feasible. The authors assessed an alternative, surgery on the beating heart with haemodynamic assist by cardiopulmonary bypass in 43 consecutive patients with poor left ventricular function (mean ejection fraction: 0.26), evolving myocardial ischaemia or acute myocardial infarction, old age (mean: 79.5 years) and comorbid conditions. Results were assessed mainly on clinical criteria. In addition, 9 patients had pre- and post-cardiopulmonary bypass measurements of markers of myocardial ischaemia (troponine Ic) and systemic inflammation (interleukines 6 and 10, elastase). In 6 cases, right atrial biopsy was analysed for expression of messenger ribonucleic acid coding for heat shock protein (HSP) 70; the data were compared with those of patients operated under warm blood cardioplegia. There was one cardiac death and one myocardial infarction. Myocardial conservation was confirmed by the minimal increase in troponine Ic levels and the significant increase in HSP 70 in RNA suggesting myocardial adaptation to stress. On the other hand, the minimal concentrations of mediators of inflammation were not significantly changed. In selected high risk patients, coronary revascularisation on the beating heart under cardiopulmonary bypass could be a valuable alternative. It conserves the potentially deleterious effects of cardiopulmonary bypass but peroperative global myocardial ischaemia, an important factor in the aggressivity of cardiac surgery, is eliminated.

  11. Rescue coronary stenting in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Enrico; Meneghetti, Paolo; Molinari, Gionata; Zardini, Piero

    1996-01-01

    Failed rescue coronary angioplasty is a high risk situation because of high mortality. Coronary stent has given us the chance of improving and maintaining the patency of the artery. We report our preliminary experience of rescue stenting after unsuccessful coronary angioplasty.

  12. Diabetes as an independent predictor of high atherosclerotic burden assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography: the coronary artery disease equivalent revisited.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Gonçalves, Pedro; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Carvalho, Maria Salomé; Dores, Helder; Sousa, Pedro Jeronimo; Marques, Hugo; Ferreira, Antonio; Cardim, Nuno; Teles, Rui Campante; Raposo, Luís; Gabriel, Henrique Mesquita; Almeida, Manuel; Aleixo, Ana; Carmo, Miguel Mota; Machado, Francisco Pereira; Mendes, Miguel

    2013-06-01

    (1) To study the prevalence and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients. (2) To provide a detailed characterization of the coronary atherosclerotic burden, including the localization, degree of stenosis and plaque composition by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Single center prospective registry including a total of 581 consecutive stable patients (April 2011-March 2012) undergoing CCTA (Dual-source CT) for the evaluation of suspected CAD without previous myocardial infarction or revascularization procedures. Different coronary plaque burden indexes and plaque type and distribution patterns were compared between patients with (n = 85) and without diabetes (n = 496). The prevalence of CAD (any plaque; 74.1 vs. 56%; p = 0.002) and obstructive CAD (≥50% stenosis; 31.8 vs. 10.3%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in diabetic patients. The remaining coronary atherosclerotic burden indexes evaluated (plaque in LM-3v-2v with prox. LAD; SIS; SSS; CT-LeSc) were also significantly higher in diabetic patients. In the per segment analysis, diabetics had a higher percentage of segments with plaque in every vessel (2.6/13.1/7.5/10.5% for diabetics vs. 1.4/7.1/3.3/4.4% for nondiabetics for LM, LAD, LCx, RCA respectively; p < 0.001 for all) and of both calcified (19.3 vs. 9.2%, p < 0.001) and noncalcified or mixed types (14.4 vs. 7.0%; p < 0.001); the ratio of proximal-to-distal relative plaque distribution (calculated as LM/proximal vs. mid/distal/branches) was lower for diabetics (0.75 vs. 1.04; p = 0.009). Diabetes was an independent predictor of CAD and was also associated with more advanced CAD, evaluated by indexes of coronary atherosclerotic burden. Diabetics had a significantly higher prevalence of plaques in every anatomical subset and for the different plaque composition. In this report, the relative geographic distribution of the plaques within each subgroup, favored a more mid-to-distal localization in the diabetic patients

  13. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  14. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses.

  15. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  16. Absolute rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene from 198 to 320 K at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the H+C2H4 reaction has been measured as a function of temperature. Experiments were performed with high pressures of Ar heat bath gas at seven temperatures from 198 to 320 K with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique. Pressures were chosen so as to isolate the addition rate constant k1. The results are well represented by an Arrhenius expression. The results are compared with other studies and are theoretically discussed.

  17. Focal wall overstretching after high-pressure coronary stent implantation does not influence restenosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Di Francesco, L; Finci, L; Reimers, B; Adamian, M; Di Mario, C; Colombo, A

    1999-09-01

    To determine if vessel wall overstretching during coronary stenting is associated with a higher restenosis rate, the intravascular ultrasound morphological evaluation was performed following ultrasound criteria. A total of 468 lesions with successful coronary Palmaz-Schatz stenting guided by intravascular ultrasound were classified into the no overstretching group (n = 295) and the overstretching group (n = 147). There were 26 lesions not classifiable due to the poststent morphology. Balloon-to-vessel ratio was 1.12 +/- 0.17 in the no focal overstretching group and 1. 20 +/- 0.20 in the overstretching group (P < 0.0002). Follow-up angiogram was performed in 77% of no focal overstretching group and in 75% of the focal overstretching group. The restenosis rate of the no focal overstretching group was 19.8% and 20.9% in the focal overstretching group, respectively (P = 0.65). Focal overstretching was more frequent following balloon oversizing. No increase in restenosis rate, found in focal overstretched stented lesions, leads us to the hypothesis of a regulation of smooth-muscle-cell proliferation activated by the normalization of blood flow and of shear stress, when stent implantation succeeds in optimally improving the lumen. Cathet. Cardiovasc. Intervent. 48:24-30, 1999.

  18. Absolute concentrations of highly vibrationally excited OH(υ = 9 + 8) in the mesopause region derived from the TIMED/SABER instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Jeffrey; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Hunt, Linda A.; Marshall, B. Thomas; Mertens, Christoper J.; Russell, James M.; Thompson, R. Earl; Gordley, Larry L.

    2013-02-01

    Abstract <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> concentrations (cm-3) of <span class="hlt">highly</span> vibrationally excited hydroxyl (OH) are derived from measurements of the volume emission rate of the υ = 9 + 8 states of the OH radical made by the SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite. SABER has exceptionally sensitive measurement precision that corresponds to an ability to detect changes in volume emission rate on the order of ~5 excited OH molecules per cm3. Peak zonal annual mean concentrations observed by SABER exceed 1000 cm-3 at night and 225 cm-3 during the day. Measurements since 2002 show an apparent altitude-dependent variation of the night OH(υ = 9 + 8) concentrations with the 11 year solar cycle, with concentrations decreasing below ~ 95 km from 2002 to 2008. These observations provide a global database for evaluating photochemical model computations of OH abundance, reaction kinetics, and rates and mechanisms responsible for maintaining vibrationally excited OH in the mesopause region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7548E..3RY','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7548E..3RY"><span id="translatedtitle">Optically based quantification of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with <span class="hlt">high</span> spatial resolution in rodents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with <span class="hlt">high</span> spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with <span class="hlt">high</span> spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1261596','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1261596"><span id="translatedtitle">Monolithically integrated <span class="hlt">absolute</span> frequency comb laser system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Wanke, Michael C.</p> <p>2016-07-12</p> <p>Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution broad band spectroscopy.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060044287&hterms=metrology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmetrology','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060044287&hterms=metrology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmetrology"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We provide and overview of the developments in the field of <span class="hlt">high</span>-accuracy <span class="hlt">absolute</span> optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26272344','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26272344"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Highly</span> antiplasmodial non-natural oxidative products of dioncophylline A: synthesis, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> configuration, and conformational stability.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hemberger, Yasmin; Zhang, Guoliang; Brun, Reto; Kaiser, Marcel; Bringmann, Gerhard</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Four new compounds, the monomeric dioncotetralones A (6 a) and B (6 b) and the dimeric compounds jozimine A3 (7) and jozimine A4 (9), were semi-synthesized from the natural product dioncophylline A (4) and its 5'-O-demethylated derivative (5), respectively, under phenol oxidative reaction conditions. Dioncotetralones A (6 a) and B (6 b) possess an unprecedented Z-configured double bond, in contrast to the classic biaryl axis that is present in the precursor dioncophylline A (4), and an additional stereogenic center at the C2' atom was generated due to the dearomatization. The resulting steric repulsion forced the expected planar double bond into a helical distorted conformation. The homocoupling of 5 yielded compounds 7 and 9, the latter of which is the first sp(3) -sp(2) coupled product of a monomeric naphthylisoquinoline with a reduced one and, thus, contains a newly generated stereogenic center. The full stereostructures of 6 a, 6 b, 7, and 9 were successfully elucidated by the interplay of spectroscopic methods (1D/2D NMR and electronic circular-dichroism spectroscopy) in combination with quantum-chemical calculations. In addition, compounds 6 a and 7 exhibited <span class="hlt">high</span> antiplasmodial activities with excellent half-maximal inhibitory concentration values.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15191780','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15191780"><span id="translatedtitle">Terminology for <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk and vulnerable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery plaques. Report of a meeting on the vulnerable plaque, June 17 and 18, 2003, Santorini, Greece.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schaar, Johannes A; Muller, James E; Falk, Erling; Virmani, Renu; Fuster, Valentin; Serruys, Patrick W; Colombo, Antonio; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Ward Casscells, S; Moreno, Pedro R; Maseri, Attilio; van der Steen, Anton F W</p> <p>2004-06-01</p> <p>A group of investigators met for two days in Santorini, Greece, to discuss progress in the field of identification and treatment of <span class="hlt">high</span> risk/vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and patients. Many differences in the manner in which terms are being utilized were noted. It was recognized that increased understanding of the pathophysiology of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> thrombosis and onset of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes has created the need for agreement on nomenclature. The participants spent considerable time discussing the topic and reached agreement on their own usage of the terms as described below. It is the hope that this usage might be of value to the larger community of scientists working in this field, and that widespread adoption of a common nomenclature would accelerate progress in the prevention of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25170586','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25170586"><span id="translatedtitle">Short-, mid-, and long-term benefits of peri-procedural <span class="hlt">high</span>-intensity statin administration in patients undergoing percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Athyros, Vasilios G; Katsiki, Niki; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Administration of <span class="hlt">high</span> intensity statins prior to percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI) for acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) or stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease has been shown to reduce short-, mid-, and long-term cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality as well as overall mortality compared with lower intensity statins or no statin treatment. The mechanisms involved are probably related to the pleiotropic effects of statins. Improved endothelial function, reduced low grade inflammation and decreased thrombotic diathesis might reduce cardiac injury, diffuse cardiac necrosis, myocardial infarction and no-reflow phenomenon. A decreased risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) post-PCI might be an extracardiac mechanism that contributes to the reduction in all cause and CVD mortality. These results support the need for the administration of statins before PCI. PMID:25170586</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231575-absolute-path-command','SCIGOV-ESTSC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231575-absolute-path-command"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> path command</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href=""></a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-05-11</p> <p>The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final <span class="hlt">absolute</span> path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231575','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231575"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> path command</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Moody, A.</p> <p>2012-05-11</p> <p>The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final <span class="hlt">absolute</span> path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> path to a relative directory from the current working directory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cscan','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cscan"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Calcium Scan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Calcium Scan? A <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cabg','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cabg"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Bypass Grafting</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Rehabilitation <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Surgery Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... include lifestyle changes, medicines, and a procedure called percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI), also known as <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty. PCI is ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4161409','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4161409"><span id="translatedtitle">Cost-utility analysis of genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy in patients with moderate-to-<span class="hlt">high</span> risk acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome and planned percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Patel, Vardhaman; Lin, Fang-Ju; Ojo, Olaitan; Rao, Sapna; Yu, Shengsheng; Zhan, Lin; Touchette, Daniel R.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Prasugrel is recommended over clopidogrel in poor/intermediate CYP2C19 metabolizers with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) and planned percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI), reducing the risk of ischemic events. CYP2C19 genetic testing can guide antiplatelet therapy in ACS patients. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-utility of genotype-guided treatment, compared with prasugrel or generic clopidogrel treatment without genotyping, from the US healthcare provider’s perspective. Methods A decision model was developed to project lifetime economic and humanistic burden associated with clinical outcomes (myocardial infarction [MI], stroke and major bleeding) for the three strategies in patients with ACS. Probabilities, costs and age-adjusted quality of life were identified through systematic literature review. Incremental cost-utility ratios (ICURs) were calculated for the treatment strategies, with quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) as the primary effectiveness outcome. Relative risk of developing myocardial infarction and stroke between patients with and without variant CYP2C19 when receiving clopidogrel were estimated to be 1.34 and 3.66, respectively. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results Clopidogrel cost USD19,147 and provided 10.03 QALYs versus prasugrel (USD21,425, 10.04 QALYs) and genotype-guided therapy (USD19,231, 10.05 QALYs). The ICUR of genotype-guided therapy compared with clopidogrel was USD4,200. Genotype-guided therapy provided more QALYs at lower costs compared with prasugrel. Results were sensitive to the cost of clopidogrel and relative risk of myocardial infarction and stroke between CYP2C19 variant vs. non-variant. Net monetary benefit curves showed that genotype-guided therapy had at least 70% likelihood of being the most cost-effective alternative at a willingness-to-pay of USD100,000/QALY. In comparison with clopidogrel, prasugrel therapy was more cost-effective with <21</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=235748','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=235748"><span id="translatedtitle">Changes in remnant and <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoproteins associated with hormone therapy and progression of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease in postmenopausal women</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The effect of hormone therapy (HT) on the plasma concentration of remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C) and <span class="hlt">high</span> density lipoprotein (HDL) subpopulations and the contribution of HT-related changes in these lipoproteins to the progression of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) were examined in 256 postmen...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24582039','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24582039"><span id="translatedtitle">Technical note: Electrocardiogram electrode repositioning for 320-row <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography in patients with regular and recurrent premature ventricular contractions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kondo, Takeshi; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Groarke, John; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Rybicki, Frank J; Kumamaru, Kanako K</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Arrhythmias can compromise image quality and increase radiation exposure during <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography (CTA). However, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) can occur in a predictable recurrent and regular pattern (ie, bigeminy, trigeminy, quadrigeminy) with post-PVC compensatory pauses. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrode repositioning can achieve relative amplification of the R waves of PVCs compared with R waves of sinus beats. This technical note describes how simple ECG electrode repositioning, combined with an <span class="hlt">absolute</span>-delay strategy, facilitated selective R waves of PVC ECG triggering of image acquisition in 6 patients with PVC bigeminy or quadrigeminy at the time of 320-row <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CTA. All 6 studies were single heartbeat acquisition scans with excellent image quality and a median effective radiation dose of 2.9 mSv (interquartile range, 2.1-3.8 mSv). Standard ECG electrode positions used for 2 patients with PVC bigeminy undergoing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CTA were associated with an acquisition over 2 heartbeats and effective radiation doses of 6.8 and 10.3 mSv, respectively. In conclusion, ECG electrode repositioning combined with an <span class="hlt">absolute</span>-delay strategy for regularly recurring PVCs, such as ventricular bigeminy, facilitates <span class="hlt">high</span> image quality and lower radiation dose during <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CTA. This simple and straightforward technique can be considered for all patients with regular and recurrent PVCs undergoing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CTA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24935432','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24935432"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-density lipoproteins as modulators of endothelial cell functions: alterations in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kratzer, Adelheid; Giral, Hector; Landmesser, Ulf</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Alteration of endothelial cell functions, including reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO) availability, increased endothelial cell apoptosis, adhesion molecule/chemokine expression and pro-thrombotic activation are thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and <span class="hlt">coronary</span>-artery-disease (CAD) with its clinical complications, such as acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes. <span class="hlt">High</span>-density lipoproteins (HDL) from healthy subjects or reconstituted HDL have been observed to exert potential direct anti-atherogenic effects by modulating these endothelial cell functions. Importantly, endothelial effects of HDL have now been reported to be <span class="hlt">highly</span> heterogeneous, and are modulated as part of immune responses. More recently, this has also been observed for HDL of patients with CAD, where HDL becomes potentially pro-inflammatory and endothelial-protective properties are markedly altered. Several mechanisms may lead to these altered endothelial effects of HDL in patients with CAD, including oxidative modification of HDL-associated lipids and proteins, such as apoA-I and paraoxonase-1, and alterations of HDL-proteome. These findings have to be considered with respect to interpretation of recent clinical studies failing to demonstrate reduced cardiovascular events by HDL-cholesterol raising strategies in patients with CAD. Both clinical and genetic studies suggest that HDL-cholesterol levels alone are not a sufficient therapeutic target in patients with CAD. The focus of this review is to summarize the role of HDL onto endothelial homeostasis and to describe recently characterized molecular pathways involved. We highlight how structural and functional modifications of HDL particles in patients with CAD may perturb the physiological homeostasis and lead to a loss of endothelial-protective properties of HDL in patients with CAD.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23809628','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23809628"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous left main dissection treated by percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sousa, Alexandra; Lopes, Ricardo; Silva, João Carlos; Maciel, M Júlia</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection is a rare cause of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> events or sudden cardiac death. The clinical presentation is <span class="hlt">highly</span> variable and prognosis varies widely, depending mainly on how rapidly it is diagnosed. Prompt treatment is also essential, and includes medical management, percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention and surgical revascularization. We describe the case of a young woman presenting with spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection of the left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery, first diagnosed as <span class="hlt">coronary</span> thrombus, who underwent successful percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenting. This report highlights the need to include spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection in differential diagnosis of chest pain in young women and that distinguishing between <span class="hlt">coronary</span> thrombus and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection is not always straightforward. To our knowledge this is the fourth case of left main stenting in a patient with spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection described in the literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22314288','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22314288"><span id="translatedtitle">New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very <span class="hlt">high</span> temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Gasser, J. G.</p> <p>2014-09-15</p> <p>In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power, also called <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermopower or <span class="hlt">absolute</span> Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very <span class="hlt">high</span> temperatures. But resistivity and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25273786','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25273786"><span id="translatedtitle">New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very <span class="hlt">high</span> temperatures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abadlia, L; Gasser, F; Khalouk, K; Mayoufi, M; Gasser, J G</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power, also called <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermopower or <span class="hlt">absolute</span> Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very <span class="hlt">high</span> temperatures. But resistivity and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=high+AND+pressure+AND+food&pg=4&id=ED161839','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=high+AND+pressure+AND+food&pg=4&id=ED161839"><span id="translatedtitle">A Health Education Program for Parents and Children Who Exhibit <span class="hlt">High</span> Risk Factors of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hopp, Joyce W.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>This study demonstrated the feasibility of joint parent-child education to change the behaviors known to be associated with increased risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease. Earlier studies have shown that parents who are at increased risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease can be identified by studying certain factors in the children. Utilizing a combined risk…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25514506','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25514506"><span id="translatedtitle">Intake of cooked tomato sauce preserves <span class="hlt">coronary</span> endothelial function and improves apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein J protein profile in <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoproteins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vilahur, Gemma; Cubedo, Judit; Padró, Teresa; Casaní, Laura; Mendieta, Guiomar; González, Alicia; Badimon, Lina</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Intake of tomatoes has been linked with healthy diets (eg, Mediterranean diet). However, it remains unknown whether tomato intake exerts protective effects on the vasculature. The aim of this study was to determine whether medium-term supplementation with cooked tomato sauce (CTS) Mediterranean style (sofrito) attenuates diet-induced <span class="hlt">coronary</span> endothelial dysfunction in an animal model with clinical impact and explore the mechanisms behind the effects. Pigs (N = 18) were fed a 10-day hypercholesterolemic diet. Half of the animals were given a supplement of 100 g/d of CTS (21.5 mg lycopene per day). <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> responses to escalating doses of vasoactive drugs (acetylcholine, calcium ionophore, and sodium nitroprusside) and L-NG-monomethylarginine (endothelial nitric oxide synthase [eNOS] inhibitor) were measured using flow Doppler. In the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries, we investigated eNOS gene expression and activation, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) expression, and oxidative DNA damage. In the circulation, we investigated lipoprotein resistance to oxidation and the differential proteomic protein profile. In dyslipidemic animals, CTS intake prevented diet-induced impairment of receptor-operated and nonreceptor-operated endothelial-dependent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasodilation. These beneficial effects were associated with enhanced eNOS transcription and activation and diminished DNA damage in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. CTS-fed animals showed lower lipid peroxidation, higher <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein (HDL) antioxidant potential and plasma lycopene levels of 0.16 mg/L. Interestingly, improved HDL functionality was associated with protein profile changes in apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein J. Lipids levels and MCP-1 expression were not affected by CTS. We report that CTS intake protects against low-density lipoprotein-induced <span class="hlt">coronary</span> endothelial dysfunction by reducing oxidative damage, enhancing eNOS expression and activity, and improving HDL functionality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19265396','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19265396"><span id="translatedtitle">Structural reassignment, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> configuration, and conformation of hypurticin, a <span class="hlt">highly</span> flexible polyacyloxy-6-heptenyl-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mendoza-Espinoza, José Alberto; López-Vallejo, Fabian; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>The structural reassignment, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> configuration, and conformational behavior of the <span class="hlt">highly</span> flexible natural product hypurticin (pectinolide E), 6S-[3'S,5'R,6'S-triacetoxy-1Z-heptenyl]-5S-acetoxy-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one (1), were ascertained by a molecular modeling protocol, which includes extensive conformational searching, geometry optimization by DFT B3LYP/DGDZVP calculations, and comparison between the theoretical (DFT) and experimental (1)H-(1)H NMR coupling constants. Hyptolide (2), a related cytotoxic 5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one that increased the S phase of the HeLa cell cycle, was employed as a reference substance to validate the theoretical protocol designed to characterize the 3D properties of compound 1. The related synthetic derivative, tri-O-acetyl-3,6-dideoxy-d-glucose diphenyldithioacetal (14), was prepared by a six-step reaction sequence starting from d-glucose and served as an enantiopure building block to reinforce the structural and configurational assignment of 1. This protocol proved to be an important tool for the structural characterization of <span class="hlt">highly</span> flexible bioactive polyoxygenated natural products. PMID:19265396</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5067038','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5067038"><span id="translatedtitle">Staged <span class="hlt">High</span>-Risk Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention with Impella Support after On-Pump Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bahekar, Amol A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The management of concomitant obstructive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease and severe aortic stenosis in poor surgical candidates is an evolving topic. Although the typical current practice is to perform percutaneous revascularization before transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), some data have emerged regarding revascularization after performing TAVR. We present the case of a 90-year-old man with multivessel <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease who was at prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. We first performed TAVR with use of hemodynamic support, then Impella-assisted multivessel percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention on the patient's unprotected left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. We describe this complex case and review the medical literature on percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention after TAVR PMID:27777528</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4560933','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4560933"><span id="translatedtitle">HDL phospholipid content and cholesterol efflux capacity are reduced in patients with very <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Agarwala, Anandita P.; Rodrigues, Amrith; Risman, Marjorie; McCoy, Mary; Trindade, Kevin; Qu, Liming; Cuchel, Marina; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Rader, Daniel J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective Plasma levels of <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are strongly inversely associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD), and <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C is generally associated with reduced risk of CAD. Extremely <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C with CAD is an unusual phenotype, and we hypothesized that the HDL in such individuals may have an altered composition and reduced function when compared to controls with similarly <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C and no CAD. Approach 55 subjects with very <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C (mean 86 mg/dL) and onset of CAD around age 60 with no known risk factors for CAD (‘cases’) were identified through systematic recruitment. 120 control subjects without CAD, matched for race, gender, and HDL-C level (‘controls’), were identified. In all subjects, HDL composition was analyzed and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was assessed. Results HDL phospholipid composition was significantly lower in cases (92 ± 37 mg/dL) than in controls (109 ± 43 mg/dL, p= 0.0095). HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly lower in cases (1.96 ± 0.39) compared with controls (2.11 ± 0.43, p= 0.04). Conclusions In persons with very <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C, reduced HDL phospholipid content and cholesterol efflux capacity is associated with the paradoxical development of CAD. PMID:25838421</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2896567','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2896567"><span id="translatedtitle">Adults with type 1 diabetes eat a <span class="hlt">high</span> fat, atherogenic diet which is associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Snell-Bergeon, JK; Chartier-Logan, C; Maahs, DM; Ogden, LG; Hokanson, JE; Kinney, GL; Eckel, RH; Ehrlich, J; Rewers, M</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Aims/Hypotheses <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality among people with type 1 diabetes. Diet is an important lifestyle factor related to CHD. The aim of this study was to examine how diet and adherence to dietary guidelines differ between adults with and without type 1 diabetes, and their correlation with CHD risk factors and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium (CAC). Methods 571 people with type 1 diabetes and 696 controls 19 to 56 years old who were asymptomatic for CHD were studied. CAC was measured by electron beam CT. Results Adults with type 1 diabetes reported a diet higher in fat, saturated fat, and protein but lower in carbohydrates than controls. Less than half those with type 1 diabetes met dietary guidelines for fat and carbohydrate intake, and only 16% restricted saturated fat to <10% of daily calories. Adults with type 1 diabetes were significantly less likely to meet dietary guidelines than controls. Fat and saturated fat intake were positively correlated but carbohydrate intake was negatively correlated with CHD risk factors and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). A <span class="hlt">high</span> fat diet and higher protein intake were associated with greater odds of CAC, while higher carbohydrate intake was associated with reduced odds of CAC. Conclusions/Interpretation Adults with type 1 diabetes reported consuming higher than recommended fat and saturated fat. Fat intake was associated with increased CHD risk factors, worse glycaemic control, and CAC. An atherogenic diet may contribute to the risk of CHD in adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:19219420</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/40205336','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/40205336"><span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value of the penetration depth in <span class="hlt">high</span>-T{sub c} superconductors using a low-T{sub c} superconductive coating</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Prozorov, R.; Giannetta, R. W.; Carrington, A.; Fournier, P.; Greene, R. L.; Guptasarma, P.; Hinks, D. G.; Banks, A. R.</p> <p>2000-12-18</p> <p>A method is presented to measure the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value of the London penetration depth, {lambda}(T=0), from the frequency shift of a resonator. The technique involves coating a <span class="hlt">high</span>-T{sub c} superconductor with film of low-T{sub c} material of known thickness and penetration depth. The method is applied to obtain {lambda}(YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}){approx}1460{+-}150Aa, {lambda}(Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}){approx}2690{+-}150Aa and {lambda}(Pr{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}){approx}2790{+-}150Aa. {lambda}(YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}) from this method is very close to that obtained by several other techniques. For both Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} and Pr{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4-{delta}} the values exceed those obtained by other methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011AGUFMSA41A1834M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011AGUFMSA41A1834M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Populations of <span class="hlt">Highly</span> Vibrationally Excited OH(υ=8 + υ=9) in the Night Mesopause Region Derived from the TIMED/SABER Instrument from 2002 to 2010</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mast, J. C.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Marshall, B. T.; Thompson, R. E.; Mertens, C. J.; Hunt, L. A.; Russell, J. M.; Gordley, L. L.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>We present global distributions of v = 9 + v = 8 nighttime vibrationally excited hydroxyl concentrations as measured by the SABER instrument on board the TIMED spacecraft. These states are formed directly by the reaction of atomic hydrogen and ozone in the terrestrial mesopause region. SABER measures the limb radiance from the delta-v = 2 transitions in a channel centered near 2.0 um, specifically the sum of the 9 -> 7 and 8 -> 6 transitions. The limb radiances are inverted to yield the volume emission rates from the sum of the v = 8 and 9 states of the hydroxyl molecule. The Einstein coefficients for spontaneous emission for these two transitions are essentially identical. Thus dividing the derived volume emission rate by the Einstein coefficient yields the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> populations of these states (molecules per cubic cm). Nine full years of data are presented in this paper. Over this time the globally averaged OH(v = 8 + v = 9) populations have varied relative to the nine year mean by only a few percent. We conclude that despite substantial solar variability over this time period, the apparently small variation of the <span class="hlt">highly</span> vibrationally excited hydroxyl populations implies that atomic hydrogen, atomic oxygen, temperature, and density adjust in such a way so as to keep the product of the atomic hydrogen concentration, the ozone concentration, and the rate coefficient for their reaction essentially constant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4816913','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4816913"><span id="translatedtitle">The Incremental Diagnostic Performance of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Computed Tomography Angiography Added to Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients with Intermediate-to-<span class="hlt">High</span> Cardiovascular Risk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hsu, Pei-Ying; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Wu, Yen-Wen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose Several studies have suggested that a combined approach of stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomography angiography (CCTA) can provide diagnostic results with excellent accuracy. We aimed to explore whether the addition of CCTA to stress MPI provides incremental diagnostic value in intermediate-to-<span class="hlt">high</span> cardiovascular risk patients. Methods A total of 106 consecutive patients (93 male, 65 ± 10.4 years) underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium scoring (CACS), CCTA and 201Thallium stress MPI before <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography was reviewed. Thirty-seven patients (34.9%) had a history of proven <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) or revascularization procedures, and four had documented non-significant CAD (3.8%). The remaining patients consisted of 17 (16.0%) classified as intermediate, and 48 (45.3%) as the <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk groups. Results Obstructive CAD was diagnosed by invasive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography in 88 patients with 161 vessels. The sensitivity and specificity in a patient-based analysis for obstructive CAD were 99% and 17% for CCTA, 80% and 50% for MPI and 91% and 67% for the combined method, respectively. The per-vessel diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 95% and 54% for CCTA, 59% and 75% for MPI and 84% and 76% for the combined method. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) when comparing the combined method with MPI or CCTA by areas under the curve in a patient- or vessel-based analysis. However, CACS of 400 or more could not further stratify the patients with obstructive CAD. Conclusions CCTA, not CACS, provided additional diagnostic values to stress MPI in patients with intermediate-to-<span class="hlt">high</span> cardiovascular risk. PMID:27122945</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23096223','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23096223"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span> serum apolipoprotein E determines hypertriglyceridemic dyslipidemias, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease and apoA-I dysfunctionality.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Onat, Altan; Can, Günay; Ornek, Ender; Ayhan, Erkan; Erginel-Ünaltuna, Nihan; Murat, Sani N</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The relevance of serum apolipoprotein E (apoE) levels to two hypertriglyceridemic dyslipidemias has not been clarified. We explored, in a cross-sectional (and short-term prospective) evaluation, the independent relationship of serum apoE to the atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia with elevated apoB (HtgB) and to apoA-I dysfunctionality, previously shown in Turkish adults to be independent of apoE genotype. Serum apoE concentrations were measured by immunonephelometry in 1,127 middle-aged adults. In multivariable regression analysis, apoE concentrations showed log-linear associations with apoB and apoA-I levels, waist circumference, independent of C-reactive protein (CRP), homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index and other confounders. The likelihood of atherogenic dyslipidemia and of HtgB roughly tripled per 1-SD increment in apoE concentrations, additively to apoE genotype, HOMA, apoA-I, CRP concentrations and waist circumference; yet apoA-I, protective against atherogenic dyslipidemia, appeared to promote HtgB, a finding consistent with apoA-I dysfunctionality in this setting. Each 1-SD increment in the apoE level was moreover, associated in both genders with MetS (at OR 1.5), after adjustment for sex, age, apoB, apoA-I and CRP, or for apoE genotypes. Circulating apoE predicted in both genders age-adjusted prevalent and incident <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD), independent of apoE genotype and CRP (OR 1.32 [95 % CI 1.11; 1.58]). To conclude, in a general population prone to MetS, elevated apoE concentrations are strongly linked to HtgB and atherogenic dyslipidemia, irrespective of apoE genotype, are associated with MetS and CHD. Excess apoE reflects pro-inflammatory state and likely autoimmune activation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26938857','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26938857"><span id="translatedtitle">Successful management of grade III <span class="hlt">coronary</span> perforation after percutaneous angioplasty in a <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patient: a case report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Coloma Araniya, Ricardo; Beas, Renato; Maticorena-Quevedo, Jesús; Anduaga-Beramendi, Alexander; Pastrana Castillo, Marco Antonio</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> perforation is a rare complication in patients undergoing percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty. The mortality of this complication varies depending on factors related to the patient and the procedure performed, reaching 44% in patients with Ellis type III perforation. We report the case of an 81 year old male with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, who underwent percutaneous angioplasty for unstable angina management. The patient developed grade III <span class="hlt">coronary</span> perforation in the anterior descending artery, which was successfully managed with balloon inflation to 6 atmospheres for 10 minutes twice in the affected area, with an interval of 5 minutes between each dilatation. The patient improved and was discharged. PMID:26938857</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1877475','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1877475"><span id="translatedtitle">Usefulness of technetium-99m-MIBI and thallium-201 in tomographic imaging combined with <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose dipyridamole and handgrip exercise for detecting <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kettunen, R; Huikuri, H V; Heikkilä, J; Takkunen, J T</p> <p>1991-09-01</p> <p>Forty-two patients with known stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease, referred for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, were examined with technetium-99m-hexakis-2-methoxy-2-methylpropyl-isonitrile (MIBI) tomography combined with a <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose dipyridamole infusion (0.7 mg/kg) and handgrip stress. MIBI tomography was unable to show <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease only in 2 patients, thus yielding a sensitivity figure of 95%. MIBI tomography correctly identified 27 (82%) of 33 stenotic lesions (greater than or equal to 50% diameter stenosis) of the left anterior descending artery, 17 (61%) of 28 of those of the left circumflex artery, and 28 (90%) of 31 of those of the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. The overall vessel sensitivity was 78%. The computed lumen diameter stenoses were more advanced in cases detected than in those not detected with MIBI tomography: 87 +/- 14 vs 76 +/- 14% (p less than 0.01). The 50 to 69% stenoses did not show any tendency to produce less positive findings than those with greater than or equal to 70% stenoses. In the subgroup of 21 patients who also presented for thallium scintigraphy, the overall diseased vessel identification rate was 76% for thallium tomography and 83% for MIBI tomography (p = not significant). Minor noncardiac side effects related to the dipyridamole-handgrip test occurred only in 5% of 63 study sessions. A <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose dipyridamole combined with isometric exercise is a safe stress method, and when used during scintigraphy, MIBI tomography is at least as efficient a tool as thallium tomography in detecting diseased vessel territories in patients in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5161541','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5161541"><span id="translatedtitle">Usefulness of technetium-99m-MIBI and thallium-201 in tomographic imaging combined with <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose dipyridamole and handgrip exercise for detecting <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kettunen, R.; Huikuri, H.V.; Heikkilae, J.T.; Takkunen, J.T. )</p> <p>1991-09-01</p> <p>Forty-two patients with known stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease, referred for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, were examined with technetium-99m-hexakis-2-methoxy-2-methylpropyl-isonitrile (MIBI) tomography combined with a <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose dipyridamole infusion (0.7 mg/kg) and handgrip stress. MIBI tomography was unable to show <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease only in 2 patients, thus yielding a sensitivity figure of 95%. MIBI tomography correctly identified 27 (82%) of 33 stenotic lesions (greater than or equal to 50% diameter stenosis) of the left anterior descending artery, 17 (61%) of 28 of those of the left circumflex artery, and 28 (90%) of 31 of those of the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. The overall vessel sensitivity was 78%. The computed lumen diameter stenoses were more advanced in cases detected than in those not detected with MIBI tomography: 87 {plus minus} 14 vs 76 {plus minus} 14% (p less than 0.01). The 50 to 69% stenoses did not show any tendency to produce less positive findings than those with greater than or equal to 70% stenoses. In the subgroup of 21 patients who also presented for thallium scintigraphy, the overall diseased vessel identification rate was 76% for thallium tomography and 83% for MIBI tomography (p = not significant). Minor noncardiac side effects related to the dipyridamole-handgrip test occurred only in 5% of 63 study sessions. A <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose dipyridamole combined with isometric exercise is a safe stress method, and when used during scintigraphy, MIBI tomography is at least as efficient a tool as thallium tomography in detecting diseased vessel territories in patients in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ams..book..145K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ams..book..145K"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> <span class="hlt">High</span>-Precision Localisation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle by Using Real-Time Aerial Video Imagery for Geo-referenced Orthophoto Registration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuhnert, Lars; Ax, Markus; Langer, Matthias; Nguyen van, Duong; Kuhnert, Klaus-Dieter</p> <p></p> <p>This paper describes an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> localisation method for an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) if GPS is unavailable for the vehicle. The basic idea is to combine an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to the ground vehicle and use it as an external sensor platform to achieve an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> localisation of the robotic team. Beside the discussion of the rather naive method directly using the GPS position of the aerial robot to deduce the ground robot's position the main focus of this paper lies on the indirect usage of the telemetry data of the aerial robot combined with live video images of an onboard camera to realise a registration of local video images with apriori registered orthophotos. This yields to a precise driftless <span class="hlt">absolute</span> localisation of the unmanned ground vehicle. Experiments with our robotic team (AMOR and PSYCHE) successfully verify this approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1531416','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1531416"><span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow using <span class="hlt">high</span>-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler velocimetry: in vitro feasibility studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grayburn, P A; Willard, J E; Haagen, D R; Brickner, M E; Alvarez, L G; Eichhorn, E J</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The recent development of intravascular ultrasound imaging offers the potential to measure blood flow as the product of vessel cross-sectional area and mean velocity derived from pulsed Doppler velocimetry. To determine the feasibility of this approach for measuring <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery flow, we constructed a flow model of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> circulation that allowed flow to be varied by adjusting downstream resistance and aortic driving pressure. Assessment of intracoronary flow velocity was accomplished using a commercially available end-mounted pulsed Doppler catheter. Cross-sectional area of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery was measured using a 20 MHz mechanical imaging transducer mounted on a 4.8 F catheter. The product of mean velocity and cross-sectional area was compared with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow measured by timed collection in a graduated cylinder by linear regression analysis. Excellent correlations were obtained between <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow calculated by the ultrasound method and measured <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow at both ostial (r = 0.99, standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 13.9 ml/min) and distal (r = 0.98, SEE = 23.0 ml/min) vessel locations under steady flow conditions. During pulsatile flow, calculated and measured <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow also correlated well for ostial (r = 0.98, SEE = 12.7 ml/min) and downstream (r = 0.99, SEE = 9.3 ml/min) locations. That the SEE was lower for pulsatile as compared with steady flow may be explained by the blunting of the flow profile across the vessel lumen by the acceleration phase of pulsatile flow. These data establish the feasibility of measuring <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery blood flow using intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler techniques. PMID:1531416</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21197580','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21197580"><span id="translatedtitle">Correlation between <span class="hlt">high</span> density lipoprotein-cholesterol and remodeling index in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease: IDEAS (IVUS diagnostic evaluation of atherosclerosis in Singapore)-HDL study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Chi-Hang; Tai, Bee-Choo; Lim, Gek-Hsiang; Chan, Mark Y; Low, Adrian F; Tan, Kathryn C; Chia, Boon-Lock; Tan, Huay-Cheem</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Serum level of <span class="hlt">high</span> density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol is associated with risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. We correlated the serum level of cholesterol with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery remodeling index of patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. A total of 120 patients with de novo lesions located in native <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery were studied. Remodeling index was based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) interrogation of the lesions using the static approach, and was defined as external elastic membrane (EEM) area at lesion/average EEM area at proximal and distal reference segments. The average remodeling index was 0.9 (SD: 0.2). The remodeling index was not associated with any of the demographic and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factors. Stable angina was associated with a low remodeling index. Remodeling index correlated with white blood cell count and HDL-cholesterol, but not with total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride. In the multiple linear regression analysis, HDL-cholesterol and procedure indication were the only 2 significant predictors of remodeling index. An increase of 1 mg/dL of HDL-cholesterol resulted in a decrease of 0.003 (95% CI: 0.0001, 0.007; P = 0.046) in remodeling index, after adjusting for procedural indications. When stratified according to diabetic status, the negative correlation persisted in non-diabetic (P = 0.023), but not in diabetic, patients (P = 0.707). We found a negative correlation between HDL-cholesterol level and remodeling index. Diabetic status may have an influence on the observed relationship. PMID:21197580</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3581777','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3581777"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of ulinastatin on coagulation in <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients undergoing off-pump <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass graft surgery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Na-Young; Shim, Jae-Kwang; Bang, Seo-Ouk; Sim, Jee-Suk; Kwak, Young-Lan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Both systemic inflammatory reaction and regional myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury may elicit hypercoagulability after off-pump <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). We investigated the influence of ulinastatin, which suppresses the activity of polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, on coagulation in patients with elevated <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) undergoing OPCAB. Methods Fifty patients whose preoperative hsCRP > 3.0 mg/L were randomly allocated into the ulinastatin (600,000 U) or control group. Serum concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) and prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2) were measured preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and at 24 h after surgery, respectively. Secondary endpoints included platelet factor (PF)-4, amount of blood loss, and transfusion requirement. Results All baseline values of TAT, F1+2, and PF-4 were higher than the normal range in both groups. F1+2 was elevated in both groups at immediate, and at 24 h after surgery as compared to baseline value, without any significant intergroup differences. Remaining coagulation parameters, transfusion requirement and blood loss during operation and postoperative 24 h were not different between the two groups. Conclusions Intraoperative administration of ulinastatin did not convey beneficial influence in terms of coagulation and blood loss in <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients with elevated hsCRP undergoing multivessel OPCAB, who already exhibited hypercoagulability before surgery. PMID:23459312</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mathematics+AND+inequalities&pg=7&id=EJ920859','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mathematics+AND+inequalities&pg=7&id=EJ920859"><span id="translatedtitle">A Conceptual Approach to <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Value Equations and Inequalities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value learning objective in <span class="hlt">high</span> school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value equations and inequalities. When <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9783E..43L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9783E..43L"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced diagnostic value for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography of calcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries using dual energy and a novel <span class="hlt">high</span>-Z contrast material: a phantom study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lambert, Jack W.; Ordovas, Karen G.; Sun, Yuxin; Yeh, Benjamin M.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Dual-energy CT is emerging as a dose-saving tool for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography that allows calcium-scoring without the need for a separate unenhanced scan acquisition. Unfortunately the similar attenuation coefficient profiles of iodine and calcium limits the accuracy of their decomposition in the material basis images. We evaluate a tungsten-based contrast material with a more distinct attenuation profile from calcium, and compare its performance to a conventional iodinated agent. We constructed a custom thorax phantom containing simulated sets of vessels 3, 6 and 9 mm in diameter. The vessel sets were walled with concentric and eccentric calcifications ("plaque") with concentrations of 0, 20, 30 and 40% weight calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP). The phantom was filled sequentially with iodine and tungsten contrast material, and scanned helically using a fast-kV-switching DECT scanner. At material decomposition, both iodine and tungsten vessel lumens were separable from the HAP vessel walls, but separation was superior with tungsten which showed minimal false positive signal in the HAP image. Assessing their relative performance using line profiles, the HAP signal was greater in the tungsten separation in 6/9 of the vessel sets, and within 15% of the iodine separation for the remaining 3/9 sets. The robust phantom design enabled systematic evaluation of dual-energy material separation for calcium and a candidate non-iodinated vascular contrast element. This approach can be used to screen further agents and also refine dual energy CT material decomposition approaches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/921934','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/921934"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ABSOLUTE</span> POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.</p> <p>2007-09-10</p> <p>Precise and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19926755','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19926755"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery aneurysms and ectasia: role of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Díaz-Zamudio, Mariana; Bacilio-Pérez, Ulises; Herrera-Zarza, Mary C; Meave-González, Aloha; Alexanderson-Rosas, Erick; Zambrana-Balta, Greby F; Kimura-Hayama, Eric T</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery dilatations-aneurysms and ectasia-are an uncommon and frequently unrecognized incidental finding in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. Aneurysms and ectasia are associated with a vast group of disorders, and the evaluation and characterization of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysms and ectasia represent a great diagnostic task with clinical and therapeutic implications. The underlying etiology is variable and includes degenerative, congenital, inflammatory, infectious, toxic, and traumatic causes. Unlike aneurysms, ectasia is more frequently seen in association with atherosclerosis or as a compensatory mechanism in those cases in which a proximal stenosis is noted in the opposite <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery; ectasia is also seen in some <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery anomalies, such as anomalous origin from the pulmonary artery, or as a result of a <span class="hlt">high</span>-flow state, as seen in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistulas. The diagnostic approach depends on the clinical scenario, and nowadays, noninvasive evaluation with multidetector computed tomography is possible. Imaging assessment should include evaluation of (a) the distribution, (b) maximal diameter, (c) presence or absence of intraluminal thrombi, (d) number, (e) extension, and (f) associated complications such as myocardial infarction. This article presents an overview of the definition, classification, etiology, clinical manifestations, and potential complications of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysms and ectasia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4902146','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4902146"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous administration of <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose atorvastatin and clopidogrel does not interfere with platelet inhibition during percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kreutz, Rolf P; Breall, Jeffrey A; Sinha, Anjan; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Kovacs, Richard J; Flockhart, David A</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Reloading with <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose atorvastatin shortly before percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> interventions (PCIs) has been proposed as a strategy to reduce periprocedural myonecrosis. There has been a concern that statins that are metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4 may interfere with clopidogrel metabolism at <span class="hlt">high</span> doses. The impact of simultaneous administration of <span class="hlt">high</span> doses of atorvastatin and clopidogrel on the efficacy of platelet inhibition has not been established. Methods Subjects (n=60) were randomized to receive atorvastatin 80 mg together with clopidogrel 600 mg loading dose (n=28) versus clopidogrel 600 mg alone (n=32) at the time of PCI. Platelet aggregation was measured at baseline, 4 hours after clopidogrel loading dose, and 16–24 hours after clopidogrel loading dose by light transmittance aggregometry using adenosine diphosphate as agonist. Results Platelet aggregation was similar at baseline in both the atorvastatin and the control groups (adenosine diphosphate 10 µM: 57%±19% vs 61%±21%; P=0.52). There was no significant difference in platelet aggregation between the atorvastatin and the control groups at 4 hours (37%±18% vs 39%±21%; P=0.72) and 16–24 hours post-clopidogrel loading dose (35%±17% vs 37%±18%; P=0.75). No significant difference in incidence of periprocedural myonecrosis was observed between the atorvastatin and control groups (odds ratio: 1.02; 95% confidence interval 0.37–2.8). Conclusion <span class="hlt">High</span>-dose atorvastatin given simultaneously with clopidogrel loading dose at the time of PCI does not significantly alter platelet inhibition by clopidogrel. Statin reloading with <span class="hlt">high</span> doses of atorvastatin at the time of PCI appears to be safe without adverse effects on platelet inhibition by clopidogrel (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00979940). PMID:27350760</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4956782','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4956782"><span id="translatedtitle">Associations of <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL cholesterol level with all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure complicating <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cai, Anping; Li, Xida; Zhong, Qi; Li, Minming; Wang, Rui; Liang, Yingcong; Chen, Wenzhong; Huang, Tehui; Li, Xiaohong; Zhou, Yingling; Li, Liwen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in patients with ejection fraction reduced heart failure (EFrHF) complicating <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD). A total of 323 patients were retrospectively recruited. Patients were divided into low and <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL cholesterol groups. Between-group differences and associations between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality were assessed. Patients in the <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL cholesterol group had higher HDL cholesterol level and other lipid components (P <0.05 for all comparison). Lower levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and higher albumin (ALB) level were observed in the <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL cholesterol group (P <0.05 for all comparison). Although left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were comparable (28.8 ± 4.5% vs 28.4 ± 4.6%, P = 0.358), mean mortality rate in the <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL cholesterol group was significantly lower (43.5% vs 59.1%, P = 0.007). HDL cholesterol level was positively correlated with ALB level, while inversely correlated with ALT, Hs-CRP, and NYHA classification. Logistic regression analysis revealed that after extensively adjusted for confounding variates, HDL cholesterol level remained significantly associated with all-cause mortality although the magnitude of association was gradually attenuated with odds ratio of 0.007 (95% confidence interval 0.001–0.327, P = 0.012). Higher HDL cholesterol level is associated with better survival in patients with EFrHF complicating CHD, and future studies are necessary to demonstrate whether increasing HDL cholesterol level will confer survival benefit in these populations of patients. PMID:27428188</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4765710','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4765710"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-sensitivity cardiac troponin I at presentation in patients with suspected acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome: a cohort study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shah, Anoop S V; Anand, Atul; Sandoval, Yader; Lee, Kuan Ken; Smith, Stephen W; Adamson, Philip D; Chapman, Andrew R; Langdon, Timothy; Sandeman, Dennis; Vaswani, Amar; Strachan, Fiona E; Ferry, Amy; Stirzaker, Alexandra G; Reid, Alan; Gray, Alasdair J; Collinson, Paul O; McAllister, David A; Apple, Fred S; Newby, David E; Mills, Nicholas L</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Summary Background Suspected acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome is the commonest reason for emergency admission to hospital and is a large burden on health-care resources. Strategies to identify low-risk patients suitable for immediate discharge would have major benefits. Methods We did a prospective cohort study of 6304 consecutively enrolled patients with suspected acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome presenting to four secondary and tertiary care hospitals in Scotland. We measured plasma troponin concentrations at presentation using a <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay. In derivation and validation cohorts, we evaluated the negative predictive value of a range of troponin concentrations for the primary outcome of index myocardial infarction, or subsequent myocardial infarction or cardiac death at 30 days. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT01852123). Findings 782 (16%) of 4870 patients in the derivation cohort had index myocardial infarction, with a further 32 (1%) re-presenting with myocardial infarction and 75 (2%) cardiac deaths at 30 days. In patients without myocardial infarction at presentation, troponin concentrations were less than 5 ng/L in 2311 (61%) of 3799 patients, with a negative predictive value of 99·6% (95% CI 99·3–99·8) for the primary outcome. The negative predictive value was consistent across groups stratified by age, sex, risk factors, and previous cardiovascular disease. In two independent validation cohorts, troponin concentrations were less than 5 ng/L in 594 (56%) of 1061 patients, with an overall negative predictive value of 99·4% (98·8–99·9). At 1 year, these patients had a lower risk of myocardial infarction and cardiac death than did those with a troponin concentration of 5 ng/L or more (0·6% vs 3·3%; adjusted hazard ratio 0·41, 95% CI 0·21–0·80; p<0·0001). Interpretation Low plasma troponin concentrations identify two-thirds of patients at very low risk of cardiac events who could be discharged from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMEP13D3549L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMEP13D3549L"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> age constraints on rapid, axial progradation of a <span class="hlt">high</span>-relief clinoform depositional system in the Colville foreland basin, Arctic Alaska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lease, R. O.; Houseknecht, D. W.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Lower Cretaceous strata of the Alaska North Slope contain the world's most voluminous (1.2 million km3), highest relief (>1 km thick), and longest (600 km west-east) foreland clinoform depositional sequence. Although the regional stratigraphic framework of the Torok-Nanushuk clinoform sequence is well known, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> age constraints are lacking. Existing, relatively imprecise "Aptian-Albian" biostratigraphy has hindered a quantitative understanding of clinoform depositional processes. We establish chronostratigraphy for the Torok-Nanushuk clinoform sequence with detrital zircon U/Pb geochronology from 9 localities from exploration well cores and outcrop samples (n=1666 grains). Maximum depositional ages defined by young detrital zircon U/Pb age populations, likely derived from coeval volcanism in Russian Chukotka, become progressively younger in the direction of eastward progradation. These data reveal a major progradational surge between 116 and 104 Ma when the shelf margin prograded more than 525 km. The rapid progradation (~45 km/m.y.) and sediment flux (~100,000 km3/m.y.) of this <span class="hlt">high</span>-relief clinoform deposystem was sustained for 12 m.y. and suggests a supply-dominated system. This deposystem filled relict Colville basin accommodation that had developed as a flexural response to earlier Brooks Range tectonic loading. Clinoform dip directions and detrital zircon provenance indicate that the sediment was derived primarily from Russian Chukotka during longitudinal, eastward sediment dispersal. Progradation slowed after 104 Ma when seismic stratigraphy shows a shift from progradational to aggradational shelf-margin trajectories. The shelf margin prograded only another 60 km eastward before a sequence-bounding retrogradation occurred at 96 Ma. Our chronostratigraphy quantifies that rates of progradation and sediment flux were three times greater than previously believed during the major phase of basin filling. These rates are among the highest in the world for a</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=capacity+AND+read&pg=3&id=EJ792567','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=capacity+AND+read&pg=3&id=EJ792567"><span id="translatedtitle">The Impact of Strategy Instruction and Timing of Estimates on Low and <span class="hlt">High</span> Working-Memory Capacity Readers' <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Monitoring Accuracy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Linderholm, Tracy; Zhao, Qin</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Working-memory capacity, strategy instruction, and timing of estimates were investigated for their effects on <span class="hlt">absolute</span> monitoring accuracy, which is the difference between estimated and actual reading comprehension test performance. Participants read two expository texts under one of two randomly assigned reading strategy instruction conditions…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040087402&hterms=electrocardiography&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Delectrocardiography','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040087402&hterms=electrocardiography&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Delectrocardiography"><span id="translatedtitle">Real-Time 12-Lead <span class="hlt">High</span>-Frequency QRS Electrocardiography for Enhanced Detection of Myocardial Ischemia and <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schlegel, Todd T.; Kulecz, Walter B.; DePalma, Jude L.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Wilson, John S.; Rahman, M. Atiar; Bungo, Michael W.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Several studies have shown that diminution of the <span class="hlt">high</span>-frequency (HF; 150-250 Hz) components present within the central portion of the QRS complex of an electrocardiogram (ECG) is a more sensitive indicator for the presence of myocardial ischemia than are changes in the ST segments of the conventional low-frequency ECG. However, until now, no device has been capable of displaying, in real time on a beat-to-beat basis, changes in these HF QRS ECG components in a continuously monitored patient. Although several software programs have been designed to acquire the HF components over the entire QRS interval, such programs have involved laborious off-line calculations and postprocessing, limiting their clinical utility. We describe a personal computer-based ECG software program developed recently at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) that acquires, analyzes, and displays HF QRS components in each of the 12 conventional ECG leads in real time. The system also updates these signals and their related derived parameters in real time on a beat-to-beat basis for any chosen monitoring period and simultaneously displays the diagnostic information from the conventional (low-frequency) 12-lead ECG. The real-time NASA HF QRS ECG software is being evaluated currently in multiple clinical settings in North America. We describe its potential usefulness in the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2663479','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2663479"><span id="translatedtitle">Targeting C-reactive protein levels using <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose atorvastatin before <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass graft surgery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Krivoy, Norberto; Adler, Zvi; Saloma, Ronen; Hawadie, Ashraf; Azzam, Zaher S</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND: Statin medication exhibits pleiotropic properties, such as improvement of endothelial function. AIM: To determine whether a <span class="hlt">high</span> loading dose of atorvastatin prescribed before and after <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery will attenuate the inflammatory response reflected in kinetic concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). METHODS: The individual area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of CRP concentration was calculated for the first five days after CABG surgery and compared among three groups of patients: group A patients (n=16), who were on chronic statin therapy, were switched to an equivalent therapy of 20 mg atorvastatin daily for 120 h; group B patients (n=15), who were on chronic statin therapy, were switched to 80 mg atorvastatin daily (one dose 24 h before CABG surgery, one on the day of surgery and two further doses after surgery) followed by 40 mg/day up to 120 h after surgery; and group C patients (n=10), who were naive to statin therapy, underwent elective CABG surgery. RESULTS: The three groups were comparable according to measurements of their intra- and postoperative variables, except for their mean weight. The mean (± SEM) AUC-CRP for group B was 13,545±959.9 mg/L·h, significantly smaller (P=0.01) than that for group A (17,085±858.4 mg/L·h). In group C (statin-naïve patients), the AUC-CRP was 16,191±1447 mg/L·h, which was not significantly different from groups A and B, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: <span class="hlt">High</span> loading doses of atorvastatin before CABG surgery reduced CRP concentration, expressed as AUC-CRP. This effect supports the idea that a <span class="hlt">high</span> dose of atorvastatin is needed to attenuate the ‘negative’ inflammatory response. The present study also lends support to the possibility that <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose atorvastatin positively improves post-open-heart surgery results. PMID:19343161</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4538037','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4538037"><span id="translatedtitle">Diagnostic accuracy of myocardial deformation indices for detecting <span class="hlt">high</span> risk <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease in patients without regional wall motion abnormality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rostamzadeh, Alireza; Shojaeifard, Maryam; Rezaei, Yousef; Dehghan, Kasra</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: The prediction of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) by conventional echocardiographic measurements is principally based on the estimation of ejection fraction and regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA). This study aimed to determine whether strain echocardiography of left ventricle measured by velocity vector imaging (VVI) method could detect patients with a <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk CAD. Methods: In a prospective study, a total of 119 consecutive patients who were assessed for eligibility were categorized into three groups: (1) without CAD as normal (n=59), (2) 1- or 2-vessel disease as low-risk (n=29), and (3) left main and/or 3-vessel disease as <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk (n=31). The peaks of systolic strain and strain rate from 18 curves of apical views were averaged as global longitudinal strain and strain rate (GLS and GLSR), respectively; the 6 systolic peaks of strain and strain rate at base- and mid-ventricular of short axis views were averaged as mean radial strain rate (MRSR). Results: GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of left ventricle were significantly lower in the <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk group (P=0.047, P=0.004 and P=0.030, respectively). Receiver operating characteristics curve showed that the optimal values of GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR for detecting the severe CAD were -17%, -1 s-1, and 1.45 s-1 with the sensitivities of 77%, 71%, and 71% and the specificities of 63%, 67%, and 62%, respectively. Conclusion: Decrements in the GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of the left ventricle can detect the <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk CAD cases among patients without RWMA at rest. PMID:26309603</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos/000037.htm','SCIGOVIMAGE-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos/000037.htm"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery unimpeded. However, a ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4669058','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4669058"><span id="translatedtitle">Relation of Black Race between <span class="hlt">High</span> Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Content, <span class="hlt">High</span> Density Lipoprotein Particles and <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Events (From the Dallas Heart Study)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chandra, Alvin; Neeland, Ian J.; Das, Sandeep R.; Khera, Amit; Turer, Aslan T.; Ayers, Colby R.; McGuire, Darren K.; Rohatgi, Anand</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Therapies targeting <span class="hlt">high</span> density lipoprotein cholesterol content (HDL-C) have not improved <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) outcomes. HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) may better predict CHD. However, the impact of race/ethnicity on the relations between HDL-P and subclinical atherosclerosis/ incident CHD events has not been described. Participants from the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic, probability-based, population cohort of Dallas County adults had the following baseline measurements: HDL-C, HDL-P by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR), and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium (CAC) by electron beam computed tomography. Participants were followed for a median of 9.3 years for incident CHD events (composite of first myocardial infarction, stroke, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> revascularization, or cardiovascular death). The study comprised 1977 participants free from CHD (51% women, 46% Black). In adjusted models, HDL-C was not associated with prevalent CAC (p=0.13) or incident CHD overall (HR per 1SD: 0.89, 95% CI 0.76–1.05). However, HDL-C was inversely associated with incident CHD among non-Black (adjusted HR per 1SD 0.67, 95% CI 0.46–0.97) but not Black participants (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78–1.13, pinteraction = 0.05). Conversely, HDL-P, adjusted for risk factors and HDL-C, was inversely associated with prevalent CAC (p=0.009) and with incident CHD overall (adjusted HR per 1SD: 0.73, 95% CI 0.62–0.86) with no interaction by Black race/ethnicity (pinteraction = 0.57). In conclusion, in contrast to HDL-C, the inverse relationship between HDL-P and incident CHD events is consistent across ethnicities. These findings suggest that HDL-P is superior to HDL-C in predicting both prevalent atherosclerosis as well as incident CHD events across a diverse population and should be considered as a therapeutic target. PMID:25661572</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040110742','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040110742"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Equilibrium Entropy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shebalin, John V.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>The entropy associated with <span class="hlt">absolute</span> equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24154863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24154863"><span id="translatedtitle">Pharmacodynamic effects of standard dose prasugrel versus <span class="hlt">high</span> dose clopidogrel in non-diabetic obese patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Darlington, Andrew; Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Rollini, Fabiana; Ueno, Masafumi; Ferreiro, José Luis; Patel, Ronakkumar; Desai, Bhaloo; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Angiolillo, Dominick J</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Increased body weight is independently associated with impaired clopidogrel pharmacodynamic (PD) response. Prasugrel has more potent PD effects compared with clopidogrel, although its PD effects in obese patients are unknown. The aim of this prospective, randomised, study was to compare the PD effects of standard-dose prasugrel [60 mg loading dose (LD)/10 mg daily maintenance dose (MD)] with <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose clopidogrel (900 mg LD/150 mg daily MD) in non-diabetic obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m²] patients, with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) on aspirin therapy. PD assessments (baseline, 2 hours post-LD and 6 ± 2 days after MD) were conducted using four platelet function assays, and the platelet reactivity index (PRI) assessed by VASP was used for sample size estimation. A total of 42 patients with a BMI of 36.42 ± 5.6 kg/m² completed the study. There were no differences in baseline PD measures between groups. At 2 hours post-LD, prasugrel was associated with lower PRI compared with clopidogrel (24.3 ± 5.5 vs 58.7 ± 5.7, p≤0.001), with consistent findings for all assays. At one-week, PRI values on prasugrel MD were lower than clopidogrel MD without reaching statistical significance (34.7 ± 5.8 vs 42.9 ± 5.8, p=0.32), with consistent findings for all assays. Accordingly, rates of <span class="hlt">high</span> on-treatment platelet reactivity were markedly reduced after prasugrel LD, but not after MD. In conclusion, in non-diabetic obese patients with CAD, standard prasugrel dosing achieved more potent PD effects than <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose clopidogrel in the acute phase of treatment, but this was not sustained during maintenance phase treatment. Whether an intensified prasugrel regimen is required in obese patients warrants investigation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23382610','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23382610"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a police officer for his return to work and sports after <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Adams, Jenny; Berbarie, Rafic F</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A 39-year-old male police officer with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease enrolled in our cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program after <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting. He wanted to return not only to his job but also to playing ice hockey and outdoor soccer, and his responses to a self-assessment scale confirmed that he identified strongly as an athlete. On the basis of this unique profile, the CR staff designed an occupation- and sport-specific exercise program that was symptom limited and enabled the patient to train safely, but earlier and at a higher intensity than is typically allowed in conventional CR programs. The exercises were selected to replicate the various combinations of muscular strength, agility, and cardiovascular endurance required by the patient's police work and two competitive team sports. He completed the <span class="hlt">high</span>-intensity training with no clinically significant adverse symptoms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=482086','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=482086"><span id="translatedtitle">Patients treated in a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> care unit without acute myocardial infarction: identification of <span class="hlt">high</span> risk subgroup for subsequent myocardial infarction and/or cardiovascular death.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nordlander, R; Nyquist, O</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Consecutive patients admitted to a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> care unit (CCU) during one year were studied. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was not substantiated by our criteria in 206 of the patients discharged from the CCU. Of these, 193 were retrospectively followed up during one year. Seventeen of the patients (9%) died from cardiovascular causes during the 1-year period. Another 14 patients (7%) had a subsequent non-fatal acute myocardial infarction during the same period. The majority of the patients had <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. Only 32 (17%) could be classified as non-<span class="hlt">coronary</span> cases, and these had an excellent prognosis without any subsequent acute myocardial infarctions or deaths. The occurrence of transient ST-T shifts in serial electrocardiograms obtained during the first 3 days in hospital selected a subgroup of patients who had a <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for subsequent non-fatal acute myocardial infarction and/or cardiovascular death. This <span class="hlt">high</span> risk subgroup provides a basis for more aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Images PMID:465239</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18681694','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18681694"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> calibration of photostimulable image plate detectors used as (0.5-20 MeV) <span class="hlt">high</span>-energy proton detectors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mancić, A; Fuchs, J; Antici, P; Gaillard, S A; Audebert, P</p> <p>2008-07-01</p> <p>In this paper, the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration of photostimulable image plates (IPs) used as proton detectors is presented. The calibration is performed in a wide range of proton energies (0.5-20 MeV) by exposing simultaneously the IP and calibrated detectors (radiochromic films and solid state detector CR39) to a source of broadband laser-accelerated protons, which are spectrally resolved. The final result is a calibration curve that enables retrieving the proton number from the IP signal. PMID:18681694</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24763965','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24763965"><span id="translatedtitle">Statin therapy and thromboxane generation in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease treated with <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose aspirin.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bliden, K P; Singla, A; Gesheff, M G; Toth, P P; Tabrizchi, A; Ens, G; Guyer, K; Singh, M; Franzese, C J; Stapleton, D; Tantry, U S; Gurbel, P A</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Aspirin and statin therapy are mainstay treatments in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD). The relation between statin therapy, in vivo thromboxane (Tx) generation; a marker of inflammation, and blood thrombogenicity has never been explored. Urinary 11-dehydro (dh) TxB2 was determined in patients with suspected CAD on 325 mg daily aspirin therapy prior to undergoing cardiac catheterisation (n=281). Thrombogenicity was estimated by thrombelastographic measurement of thrombin-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength (TIP-FCS) and lipids/lipoproteins were determined by vertical density gradient ultracentrifugation/ELISA. The influence of statin therapy and dose was analysed by the atorvastatin equivalent dose (5-10 mg, 20-40 mg, or 80 mg daily). Statin therapy (n=186) was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in urinary 11-dh TxB2 (p=0.046) that was independent of LDL and apo B100 levels but was strongly related to TIP-FCS (p=0.006). By multivariate analysis, no statin therapy (n=95) and female gender were independently associated with <span class="hlt">high</span> urinary 11-dh TxB2 [OR=2.95 (0.1.57-5.50, p=0.0007); OR=2.25 (1.24-4.05, p=0.007)], respectively. In aspirin-treated patients, statin therapy was independently and inversely associated with inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Elevated 11-dh TxB2 was associated with a prothrombotic state indicated by <span class="hlt">high</span> TIP-FCS. Our data suggest that measurement of urinary 11-dTxB2 may be a useful method to optimise statin dosing in order to reduce thrombotic risk. PMID:24763965</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3879695','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3879695"><span id="translatedtitle">Radiation dose measurements in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with <span class="hlt">high</span> radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5013351','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5013351"><span id="translatedtitle">Study to Improve Cardiovascular Outcomes in <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk older patieNts (ICON1) with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome: study design and protocol of a prospective observational study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kunadian, Vijay; Neely, R Dermot G; Sinclair, Hannah; Batty, Jonathan A; Veerasamy, Murugapathy; Ford, Gary A; Qiu, Weiliang</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Introduction The ICON1 study (a study to Improve Cardiovascular Outcomes in <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk older patieNts with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome) is a prospective observational study of older patients (≥75 years old) with non-ST-elevation acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome managed by contemporary treatment (pharmacological and invasive). The aim of the study was to determine the predictors of poor cardiovascular outcomes in this age group and to generate a risk prediction tool. Methods and analysis Participants are recruited from 2 tertiary hospitals in the UK. Baseline evaluation includes frailty, comorbidity, cognition and quality-of-life measures, inflammatory status assessed by a biomarker panel, including microRNAs, senescence assessed by telomere length and telomerase activity, cardiovascular status assessed by arterial stiffness, endothelial function, carotid intima media thickness and left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque assessed by virtual histology intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography. The patients are followed-up at 30 days and at 1 year for primary outcome measures of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, unplanned revascularisation, bleeding and rehospitalisation. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the regional ethics committee (REC 12/NE/016). Findings of the study will be presented in scientific sessions and will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT01933581: Pre-results. PMID:27554105</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10762808','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10762808"><span id="translatedtitle">Persistent <span class="hlt">High</span> Restenosis After Local Intrawall Delivery of Long-Acting Steroids Before <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Stent Implantation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reimers; Moussa; Akiyama; Kobayashi; Albiero; Di Francesco L; Di Mario C; Colombo</p> <p>1998-07-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVE: This pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intrawall delivery of long acting steroids before stent implantation, testing the efficacy of this treatment in reducing intimal hyperplasia in lesions at <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for restenosis. METHODS: In 24 patients (40 lesions) local intrawall drug delivery of methylprednisolone acetate, using a new catheter device, was attempted before elective stent implantation. Treated lesions were compared to a matched control group. RESULTS: Lesions were classified AHA/ACC type C in 47% of cases, had a mean lesion length of 13.6 +/- 9.1 mm, and a mean vessel diameter of 2.85 +/- 0.44 mm. In 9 cases (25%) chronic total occlusions were treated. Methylprednisolone acetate (mean 60 +/- 23 mg) was delivered in 36 lesions (21 patients; delivery success 90%) in the remaining 4 lesions (10%) the delivery device did not cross the lesion. After drug delivery 46 stents were implanted (1.2 stent/lesion; stented segment length 30.1 +/- 18.8 mm) using <span class="hlt">high</span> pressure for stent expansion (mean 16.4 +/- 3.1 atm). Intracoronary ultrasound guidance was used in 64% of cases. Procedural and in-hospital complications were: Two non Q wave myocardial infarctions (8%) and one (3%) subacute stent thrombosis. Angiographic follow-up was obtained in all 36 treated lesions (100%) and the angiographic restenosis rate (³ 50% diameter stenosis) was 39%. A reduction of the incidence of restenosis compared to the matched control group was not observed. CONCLUSIONS: Long acting steroids could be delivered locally with <span class="hlt">high</span> success and low complication rates. The restenosis rate remained <span class="hlt">high</span> in a subset of unfavorable lesions with <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for restenosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139e5104B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139e5104B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> cross section for loss of supercoiled topology induced by 10 eV electrons in <span class="hlt">highly</span> uniform /DNA/1,3-diaminopropane films deposited on <span class="hlt">highly</span> ordered pyrolitic graphite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>It was recently shown that the affinity of doubly charged, 1-3 diaminopropane (Dap2+) for DNA permits the growth on <span class="hlt">highly</span> ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) substrates, of plasmid DNA films, of known uniform thickness [O. Boulanouar, A. Khatyr, G. Herlem, F. Palmino, L. Sanche, and M. Fromm, J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 21291-21298 (2011)]. Post-irradiation analysis by electrophoresis of such targets confirms that electron impact at 10 eV produces a maximum in the yield of single strand breaks that can be associated with the formation of a DNA- transient anion. Using a well-adapted deterministic survival model for the variation of electron damage with fluence and film thickness, we have determined an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> cross section for strand-break damage by 10 eV electrons and inelastic scattering attenuation length in DNA-Dap complex films.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22220489','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22220489"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> cross section for loss of supercoiled topology induced by 10 eV electrons in <span class="hlt">highly</span> uniform /DNA/1,3-diaminopropane films deposited on <span class="hlt">highly</span> ordered pyrolitic graphite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon</p> <p>2013-08-07</p> <p>It was recently shown that the affinity of doubly charged, 1-3 diaminopropane (Dap{sup 2+}) for DNA permits the growth on <span class="hlt">highly</span> ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) substrates, of plasmid DNA films, of known uniform thickness [O. Boulanouar, A. Khatyr, G. Herlem, F. Palmino, L. Sanche, and M. Fromm, J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 21291–21298 (2011)]. Post-irradiation analysis by electrophoresis of such targets confirms that electron impact at 10 eV produces a maximum in the yield of single strand breaks that can be associated with the formation of a DNA{sup −} transient anion. Using a well-adapted deterministic survival model for the variation of electron damage with fluence and film thickness, we have determined an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> cross section for strand-break damage by 10 eV electrons and inelastic scattering attenuation length in DNA-Dap complex films.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2687093','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2687093"><span id="translatedtitle">Interethnic differences in the accuracy of anthropometric indicators of obesity in screening for <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Herrera, VM; Casas, JP; Miranda, JJ; Perel, P; Pichardo, R; González, A; Sanchez, JR; Ferreccio, C; Aguilera, X; Silva, E; Oróstegui, M; Gómez, LF; Chirinos, JA; Medina-Lezama, J; Pérez, CM; Suárez, E; Ortiz, AP; Rosero, L; Schapochnik, N; Ortiz, Z; Ferrante, D; Diaz, M; Bautista, LE</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background Cut points for defining obesity have been derived from mortality data among Whites from Europe and the United States and their accuracy to screen for <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) in other ethnic groups has been questioned. Objective To compare the accuracy and to define ethnic and gender-specific optimal cut points for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) when they are used in screening for <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of CHD in the Latin-American and the US populations. Methods We estimated the accuracy and optimal cut points for BMI, WC and WHR to screen for CHD risk in Latin Americans (n=18 976), non-Hispanic Whites (Whites; n=8956), non-Hispanic Blacks (Blacks; n=5205) and Hispanics (n=5803). <span class="hlt">High</span> risk of CHD was defined as a 10-year risk ≥20% (Framingham equation). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) and the misclassification-cost term were used to assess accuracy and to identify optimal cut points. Results WHR had the highest AUC in all ethnic groups (from 0.75 to 0.82) and BMI had the lowest (from 0.50 to 0.59). Optimal cut point for BMI was similar across ethnic/gender groups (27 kg/m2). In women, cut points for WC (94 cm) and WHR (0.91) were consistent by ethnicity. In men, cut points for WC and WHR varied significantly with ethnicity: from 91 cm in Latin Americans to 102 cm in Whites, and from 0.94 in Latin Americans to 0.99 in Hispanics, respectively. Conclusion WHR is the most accurate anthropometric indicator to screen for <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of CHD, whereas BMI is almost uninformative. The same BMI cut point should be used in all men and women. Unique cut points for WC and WHR should be used in all women, but ethnic-specific cut points seem warranted among men. PMID:19238159</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18185683','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18185683"><span id="translatedtitle">Dispersive white light combined with a frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometer for <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution <span class="hlt">absolute</span> measurements of distance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rovati, L; Minoni, U; Docchio, F</p> <p>1997-06-15</p> <p>A nonincremental interferometer for the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> measurement of distances is presented. The measuring technique is based on both dispersive white-light (DWL) interferometry and frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interferometry. The proposed configuration integrates both techniques in the same interferometer by use of a single laser diode. This solution enables the results from the coarse measurements from the FMCW interferometer to be combined with the fine readouts from the DWL interferometer. Preliminary experimental results confirm the capability of the system to combine the advantages of the two techniques. PMID:18185683</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25137323','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25137323"><span id="translatedtitle">[Pediatric case of congenital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula; surgical result and late changes in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysm].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sugawara, Masaaki; Oguma, Fumiaki; Hirahara, Hiroyuki</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Congenital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula is an uncommon heart anomaly involving the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. We report here a case of a 4-year-old boy who had a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> fistula from the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery to the right ventricle, with a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysm. He was asymptomatic, but the calculated ratio of pulmonary blood flow to systemic blood flow was shown to be <span class="hlt">high</span> [pulmonary flow (Qp)/systemic flow(Qs)=1.78]. The <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography showed that the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery was dilated beginning at the ostium and had an aneurysm at the acute marginal portion. A large spherical aneurysm approximately 20 mm in diameter was found to have been connected with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> fistula opening into the right ventricle. Surgical repair by closure of the fistula under direct vision, partial resection and suture closure of the aneurysm was performed. Plication of the proximal portion of the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery was not performed, and the diffusely dilated artery was left untouched. After this operation, he recovered well under anticoagulant treatment with warfarin and aspirin. Postoperative angiography was performed 17 months after the surgery to evaluate morphological changes in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. The angiography confirmed the closure of the fistula and the regression of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dilatation.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMPP33B0938C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMPP33B0938C"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">High</span>-Resolution <span class="hlt">Absolute</span>-Dated Penultimate Glacial Monsoon Record From Hulu and Dongge Caves, China and Global Correlations of Events Surrounding Termination II</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cheng, H.; Kelly, M. J.; Edwards, R. L.; Wang, Y.; Kong, X.; Ming, Y.; Liu, W.; Cai, Y.; An, Z.; Yuan, D.; Zhang, M.; Lin, Y.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>We have obtained the oxygen isotope record of three stalagmites from Hulu Cave (eastern China, 32° 30'N, 119° 10'E), offering a <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution <span class="hlt">absolute</span>-dated record of Asian monsoon climate over much of the penultimate glacial period. Previously, stalagmites were analyzed from Dongge Cave (southern China, 25° 17'N, 108° 5'E), located approximately 1200 km to the southwest of Hulu Cave, providing a detailed account of δ 18O variations over about the same time period (Yuan et al., 2004; Kelly et al., in review). The δ 18O patterns from the Hulu and Dongge stalagmites appear to be broadly similar across the overlapping portions of the records, indicating that the stalagmites are recording a regional climate signal. Asian Monsoon climate during the penultimate glacial period follows orbitally induced insolation changes, though it is punctuated by numerous sub-orbital scale climate events. The heaviest δ 18O values during the penultimate glacial period were initiated at ˜136 ka B.P. in both records, and are largely maintained for the next ˜6 kyr until abrupt strengthening of the monsoon at Monsoon Termination II. This interval is generally characterized by less variability than seen during the earlier portions of MIS 6, with δ 18O values remaining around -5‰ . Kelly et al. (in review) have called this extended interval of time the "Weak Monsoon Interval" (WMI). The WMI, however, is punctuated by one distinct climate event, occurring at 134.5 ± 1.0 ka B.P. in the Hulu record and 133.6 ± 1.0 ka B.P. in the Dongge record. This event may correlate with warming in the Alps at 135 ± 1.2 ka B.P., as indicated by an interval of speleothem growth from Spannagel Cave (Spötl et al., 2002). We also demonstrate that the monsoon intensity correlates well with atmospheric CH4 concentrations over the last two glacial cycles. In particular, we correlate the abrupt jump in CH4 concentrations at ˜129 ka B.P. with our Monsoon Termination II. Based upon this correlation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=484313','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=484313"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> haemodynamics in left ventricular hypertrophy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wallbridge, D. R.; Cobbe, S. M.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have shown that patients with left ventricular hypertrophy develop electrocardiographic changes and left ventricular dysfunction during acute hypotension, and suggest that the lower end of autoregulation may be shifted upwards. AIM: To measure <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow (velocity) and flow reserve during acute hypotension in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. PATIENTS: Eight patients with atypical chest pain and seven with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy; all with angiographically normal epicardial vessels. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre. METHODS: The physiological range of blood pressure was determined by previous ambulatory monitoring. Left ventricular mass was determined by echocardiography. At cardiac catheterisation, left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow velocity was measured using a Judkins style Doppler tipped catheter. During acute hypotension with sodium nitroprusside, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow velocity was recorded at rest and during maximal hyperaemia induced by intracoronary injection of adenosine. Quantitative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography was performed manually. RESULTS: For both groups <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow velocity remained relatively constant over a range of physiological diastolic blood pressures and showed a steep relation with diastolic blood pressure during maximal hyperaemia with intracoronary adenosine. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow (calculated from quantitative angiographic data), standardised for left ventricular mass, showed reduced flow in the hypertensive group at rest and during maximal vasodilatation. CONCLUSION: The results are consistent with an inadequate blood supply to the hypertrophied heart, but no upward shift of the lower end of the autoregulatory range was observed. PMID:8705764</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=serial+AND+position+AND+effect&id=EJ735377','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=serial+AND+position+AND+effect&id=EJ735377"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Identification by Relative Judgment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>In unidimensional <span class="hlt">absolute</span> identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=VALUE+AND+ABSOLUTE&id=EJ765743','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=VALUE+AND+ABSOLUTE&id=EJ765743"><span id="translatedtitle">Be Resolute about <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Value</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kidd, Margaret L.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This article explores how conceptualization of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26243577','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26243577"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of Combined C-Reactive Protein and <span class="hlt">High</span>-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels on Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease After a First Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Tsuboi, Shuta; Shitara, Jun; Endo, Hirohisa; Wada, Hideki; Doi, Shinichiro; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Shinya; Suwa, Satoru; Daida, Hiroyuki</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Cardiovascular risk persists despite intensive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction using statins. <span class="hlt">High</span>-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) is inversely associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) that is independent of LDL-C levels. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an established marker of inflammation that can impair the protective function of HDL-C: however, the impact of inflammation on the association between HDL-C and long-term outcomes in patients with CAD under statin therapy remains uncertain. We prospectively enrolled 3,507 consecutive patients with CAD who underwent a first percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI) from 1997 to 2011 at our institution. We stratified 1,682 patients (48%) who had been treated with statin at the time of PCI into 4 groups according to HDL-C levels (cutoffs of 40 and 50 mg/dl for men and women, respectively) and a CRP cutoff of 2 mg/dl: (1) <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C/low CRP, (2) <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C/<span class="hlt">high</span> CRP, (3) low HDL-C/low CRP, and (4) low HDL-C/<span class="hlt">high</span> CRP comparing the rates of all-cause death among them. The median follow-up period was 1,985 days (interquartile range 916 to 3,183 days). During this period, 197 patients (11.7%) died because of cardiac death (n = 58), carcinoma (n = 61), stroke (n = 10), and other causes (n = 69). The rates of all-cause death significantly differed among the groups (log-rank test, p <0.0001). In multivariate Cox hazard regression analyses, low HDL-C with <span class="hlt">high</span> CRP levels remained significantly associated with a higher rate of all-cause death even after adjustment for other co-variates (hazard ratio 2.38, 1.59 to 3.61, p <0.0001). Low HDL-C together with elevated CRP levels is significantly associated with long-term outcomes in patients who received statin therapy after PCI.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26478959','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26478959"><span id="translatedtitle">Stimulus probability effects in <span class="hlt">absolute</span> identification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively <span class="hlt">high</span>, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in <span class="hlt">absolute</span> identification. Implications for other theories of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/371207','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/371207"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular iodine <span class="hlt">absolute</span> frequencies. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sansonetti, C.J.</p> <p>1990-06-25</p> <p>Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its <span class="hlt">absolute</span> frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a <span class="hlt">high</span>-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12173900','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12173900"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of viable myocardium using <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography and ventriculography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Conti, C Richard</p> <p>2002-08-01</p> <p>In 2002, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography is the only way to assess precisely the combination of proximal stenoses, distal target vessels, collaterals, microcirculation, and TIMI antegrade flow. At the time of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, global LV function is best determined using biplane ventriculography in order to correlate wall motion with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenoses, distal target vessels, microcirculation, collaterals, and antegrade TIMI flow. This can be done under resting conditions after nitrates or after postextrasystolic potentiation. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> diagnosis of viability can only be made retrospectively. Large areas of ischemic viable myocardium should improve contraction after revascularization, decrease symptoms, and prolong survival.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17952374','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17952374"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery calcium score: has anything changed?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marano, R; Bonomo, L</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>Calcium deposition along the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery walls is a surrogate biomarker for atherosclerosis, and its presence in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries could reflect the severity of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) <span class="hlt">High</span> <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium score (CACS) correlates with advanced disease and a higher likelihood of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenoses. Many studies have supported the role of CACS as a screening tool for CAD. Historically, CACS was introduced with electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), but in the last 30 years, many changes have occurred in CT, where the development of multidetector spiral technology has made reliable the noninvasive study of the heart and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. Correlation studies with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and histology have demonstrated the capability of multidetector CT (MDCT) to provide information useful for characterising atherosclerotic plaque in a noninvasive manner. This has shifted the interest from heavily calcified deposits to plaque with a low-density core and small, superficial calcified nodules, features more frequently present in atherosclerotic plaque prone to rupture and responsible for acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> events (culprit lesions). The purpose of this review article is to summarise the recent evolution and revolution in the field of CT, strengthen the importance of a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT study not limited to CACS evaluation and CAD grading but also used to obtain information about plaque composition, and to improve stratification of the patient at risk for acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> events. PMID:17952374</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22122828','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22122828"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.</p> <p>2013-07-15</p> <p>Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22066279','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22066279"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> intensity calibration of flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectrometer using radial profiles of visible and extreme ultraviolet bremsstrahlung continuum emitted from <span class="hlt">high</span>-density plasmas in Large Helical Device</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dong Chunfeng; Wang Erhui; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi</p> <p>2011-11-15</p> <p>A precise <span class="hlt">absolute</span> intensity calibration of a flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in wavelength range of 60-400 A is carried out using a new calibration technique based on radial profile measurement of the bremsstrahlung continuum in Large Helical Device. A peaked vertical profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum has been successfully observed in <span class="hlt">high</span>-density plasmas (n{sub e}{>=} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) with hydrogen ice pellet injection. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration can be done by comparing the EUV bremsstrahlung profile with the visible bremsstrahlung profile of which the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value has been already calibrated using a standard lamp. The line-integrated profile of measured visible bremsstrahlung continuum is firstly converted into the local emissivity profile by considering a magnetic surface distortion due to the plasma pressure, and the local emissivity profile of EUV bremsstrahlung is secondly calculated by taking into account the electron temperature profile and free-free gaunt factor. The line-integrated profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum is finally calculated from the local emissivity profile in order to compare with measured EUV bremsstrahlung profile. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> intensity calibration can be done by comparing measured and calculated EUV bremsstrahlung profiles. The calibration factor is thus obtained as a function of wavelength with excellent accuracy. It is also found in the profile analysis that the grating reflectivity of EUV emissions is constant along the direction perpendicular to the wavelength dispersion. Uncertainties on the calibration factor determined with the present method are discussed including charge-coupled device operation modes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2966970','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2966970"><span id="translatedtitle">Double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase II studies of the protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist E5555 (atopaxar) in Japanese patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome or <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Goto, Shinya; Ogawa, Hisao; Takeuchi, Masaru; Flather, Marcus D.; Bhatt, Deepak L.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Aims Two multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase II studies assessed the safety and efficacy of the oral protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist E5555 in addition to standard therapy in Japanese patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) or <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD). Methods and results Patients with ACS (n = 241) or <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk CAD (n = 263) received E5555 (50, 100, or 200 mg) or placebo once daily for 12 (ACS patients) or 24 weeks (CAD patients). The incidence of TIMI major, minor, and minimal bleeds requiring medical attention was similar in the placebo and combined E5555 (atopaxar) groups (ACS: 6.6% placebo vs. 5.0% E5555; CAD: 1.5% placebo vs. 1.5% E5555). There were no TIMI major bleeds and three CURE major bleeds (two with placebo; one with 100 mg E5555). There was a numerical increase in ‘any’ TIMI bleeding with the E5555 200 mg dose (ACS: 16.4% placebo vs. 23.0% E5555, P = 0.398; CAD: 4.5% placebo vs. 13.2% E5555, P = 0.081). The rate of major cardiovascular adverse events in the combined E5555 group was not different from placebo (ACS: 6.6% placebo vs. 5.0% E5555, P = 0.73; CAD: 4.5% placebo vs. 1.0% E5555, P = 0.066). There was a statistically significant dose-dependent increase in liver function abnormalities and QTcF with E5555. At trough dosing levels in both populations, mean inhibition of platelet aggregation was >90% with 100 and 200 mg E5555, and 20–60% with 50 mg E5555. Conclusion E5555 (50, 100, and 200 mg) did not increase clinically significant bleeding, although there was a higher rate of any TIMI bleeding with the highest two doses. All doses tested achieved a significant level of platelet inhibition. There was a significant dose-dependent increase in liver function abnormalities and QTcF. Although further study is needed, PAR-1 antagonism may have the potential to be a novel pathway for platelet inhibition to add on to the current standard of care therapy. PMID:20805115</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965992','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965992"><span id="translatedtitle">Tolerability and feasibility of eptifibatide in acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome in patients at <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for cardiovascular disease: A retrospective analysis*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Azzam, Zaher S.; Sa'ad, Elias; Jabareen, Amal; Eilam, Oron; Bartha, Petru; Hadad, Salim; Krivoy, Norberto</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Background: Despite the beneficial effects of glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa antagonists in patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI), GP IIb/IIIa antagonists are rarely administered in general internal medicine wards in Israel, where most patients with UA/ NSTEMI are admitted, due to lack of adequate monitoring and safety concerns. Objective: The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of bleeding complications in patients with UA/NSTEMI receiving combination treatment with eptifibatide (a GP IIb/IIIa antagonist), the low-molecular-weight heparin enoxaparin, and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) versus that in patients receiving enoxaparin and ASA in internal medicine wards in Israel, and to identify risk factors for bleeding complications. Methods: This retrospective analysis included information from the database at Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel. The database provided information from 4 of the 5 wards (the ward from which data were unavailable did not routinely use eptifibatide). Data were included from patients aged ≥l.8 years who were admitted to the center with a diagnosis of UA/NSTEMI, were at <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for death and/or nonfatal ischemic events based on American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, were to undergo <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention, and who had a Thrombosis in Myocardial Infarction risk score ≥3 (moderate to <span class="hlt">high</span> risk). Patients in the eptifibatide group received eptifibatide IV (180-μg/kg bolus followed by a continuous infusion of 2 μg/kg · min up to 72 hours), enoxaparin SC (2 mg/kg · d), and ASA (100 mg/d). Patients in the control group received enoxaparin SC (2 mg/kg - d up to 96 hours) and ASA (100 mg/d). The prevalence of bleeding events was assessed using data up to 24 hours after the end of study drug administration. Major bleeding was defined as life-threatening bleeding at any site, intracranial hemorrhage, or bleeding accompanied by a decrease in plasma</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720059878&hterms=rights+author&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Drights%2Bauthor','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720059878&hterms=rights+author&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Drights%2Bauthor"><span id="translatedtitle">Singular perturbation of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> stability.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Siljak, D. D.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>It was previously shown (author, 1969) that the regions of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> stability in the parameter space can be determined when the parameters appear on the right-hand side of the system equations, i.e., the regular case. Here, the effect on <span class="hlt">absolute</span> stability of a small parameter attached to higher derivatives in the equations (the singular case) is studied. The Lur'e-Postnikov class of nonlinear systems is considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4929377','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4929377"><span id="translatedtitle">Dietary patterns and the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in a global study of <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients with stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stewart, Ralph A. H.; Wallentin, Lars; Benatar, Jocelyne; Danchin, Nicolas; Hagström, Emil; Held, Claes; Husted, Steen; Lonn, Eva; Stebbins, Amanda; Chiswell, Karen; Vedin, Ola; Watson, David; White, Harvey D.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objectives To determine whether dietary pattern assessed by a simple self-administered food frequency questionnaire is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients with stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. Background A Mediterranean dietary pattern has been associated with lower cardiovascular (CV) mortality. It is less certain whether foods common in western diets are associated with CV risk. Methods At baseline, 15 482 (97.8%) patients (mean age 67 ± 9 years) with stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease from 39 countries who participated in the Stabilisation of atherosclerotic plaque by initiation of darapladib therapy (STABILITY) trial completed a life style questionnaire which included questions on common foods. A Mediterranean diet score (MDS) was calculated for increasing consumption of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, fish, and alcohol, and for less meat, and a ‘Western diet score’ (WDS) for increasing consumption of refined grains, sweets and deserts, sugared drinks, and deep fried foods. A multi-variable Cox proportional hazards models assessed associations between MDS or WDS and MACE, defined as CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or non-fatal stroke. Results After a median follow-up of 3.7 years MACE occurred in 7.3% of 2885 subjects with an MDS ≥15, 10.5% of 4018 subjects with an MDS of 13–14, and 10.8% of 8579 subjects with an MDS ≤12. A one unit increase in MDS >12 was associated with lower MACE after adjusting for all covariates (+1 category HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91, 0.98, P = 0.002). There was no association between WDS (adjusted model +1 category HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.97, 1.01) and MACE. Conclusion Greater consumption of healthy foods may be more important for secondary prevention of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease than avoidance of less healthy foods typical of Western diets. PMID:27109584</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21647583','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21647583"><span id="translatedtitle">Low <span class="hlt">absolute</span> lymphocyte count and addition of rituximab confer <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for interstitial pneumonia in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huang, Yu-Chung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Liu, Chun-Yu; Pai, Jih-Tung; Hong, Ying-Chung; Teng, Hao-Wei; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chao, Ta-Chung; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chen, Po-Min; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>Several small-scale studies have reported pulmonary toxicity among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy, though whether the use of rituximab predisposes to interstitial pneumonia (IP) remains unclear. This retrospective study was intended to identify the characteristics and risk factors of IP in patients with DLBCL. Between 2000 and 2009, 529 consecutive patients with DLBCL receiving first-line tri-weekly COP- or CHOP-based chemotherapy with or without rituximab were enrolled as subjects. IP was defined as diffuse pulmonary interstitial infiltrates found on computed tomography scans in conjunction with respiratory symptoms. IP was observed in 26 patients (4.9%), six of whom were confirmed with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The median number of chemotherapy courses before IP was four cycles. Using multivariate analysis, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> lymphocyte count less than 1×10(9)/l at diagnosis [odds ratio (OR) 2.75, p=0.014] and the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy (OR 4.56, p=0.003) were identified as independent risk factors for IP. In conclusion, the incidence of IP is increased in patients with DLBCL receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy. Specific subgroups with lymphopenia at diagnosis may justify close scrutiny to detect pulmonary complications. PMID:21647583</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26595457','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26595457"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span> resolution <span class="hlt">absolute</span> absorption cross sections of the B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' transition of the CH2OO biradical.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Jou, YiTien; Kalinowski, Jarosław; Feng, David; Gerber, R Benny; Murray, Craig</p> <p>2015-12-28</p> <p>Carbonyl oxides, or Criegee intermediates, are formed from the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes and play a pivotal role in night-time and urban area atmospheric chemistry. Significant discrepancies exist among measurements of the strong B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' electronic transition of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO in the visible/near-UV. We report room temperature spectra of the B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' electronic absorption band of CH2OO acquired at higher resolution using both single-pass broadband absorption and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The new absorption spectra confirm the vibrational structure on the red edge of the band that is absent from ionization depletion measurements. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> absorption cross sections over the 362-470 nm range are in good agreement with those reported by Ting et al. Broadband absorption spectra recorded over the temperature range of 276-357 K were identical within their mutual uncertainties, confirming that the vibrational structure is not due to hot bands.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3373154','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3373154"><span id="translatedtitle">Long-Term Prospective Study of the Influence of Estrone Levels on Events in Postmenopausal Women with or at <span class="hlt">High</span> Risk for <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mansur, Antonio de Padua; Silva, Tereza Cristina B. F.; Takada, Julio Yoshio; Avakian, Solange Desirée; Strunz, Célia Maria C.; César, Luiz Antonio Machado; Aldrighi, José Mendes; Ramires, José Antonio F.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background. The link between endogenous estrogen, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD), and death in postmenopausal women is uncertain. We analyzed the association between death and blood levels of estrone in postmenopausal women with known <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) or with a <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk factor score for CAD. Methods. 251 postmenopausal women age 50–90 years not on estrogen therapy. Fasting blood for estrone and heart disease risk factors were collected at baseline. Women were grouped according to their estrone levels (<15 and ≥15 pg/mL). Fatal events were recorded after 5.8 ± 1.4 years of followup. Results. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed a significant trend (P = 0.039) of greater all-cause mortality in women with low estrone levels (<15 pg/mL). Cox multivariate regression analysis model adjusted for body mass index, diabetes, dyslipidemia, family history, and estrone showed estrone (OR = 0.45; P = 0.038) as the only independent variable for all-cause mortality. Multivariate regression model adjusted for age, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, family history, and estrone showed that only age (OR = 1.06; P = 0.017) was an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Conclusions. Postmenopausal women with known CAD or with a <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk factor score for CAD and low estrone levels (<15 pg/mL) had increased all-cause mortality. PMID:22701354</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3991663','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3991663"><span id="translatedtitle">Coexistence of Low Vitamin D and <span class="hlt">High</span> Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 Plasma Levels Predicts an Adverse Outcome in Patients with <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tuñón, José; Cristóbal, Carmen; Tarín, Nieves; Aceña, Álvaro; González-Casaus, María Luisa; Huelmos, Ana; Alonso, Joaquín; Lorenzo, Óscar; González-Parra, Emilio; Mahíllo-Fernández, Ignacio; Pello, Ana María; Carda, Rocío; Farré, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective Vitamin D and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) are related with cardiovascular disorders. We have investigated the relationship of calcidiol (vitamin D metabolite) and FGF-23 plasma levels with the incidence of adverse outcomes in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. Methods Prospective follow-up study of 704 outpatients, attending the departments of Cardiology of four hospitals in Spain, 6–12 months after an acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> event. Baseline calcidiol, FGF-23, parathormone, and phosphate plasma levels were assessed. The outcome was the development of acute ischemic events (any acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome, stroke, or transient ischemic attack), heart failure, or death. Cox regression adjusted for the main confounders was performed. Results Calcidiol levels showed a moderate-severe decrease in 57.3% of cases. Parathormone, FGF-23, and phosphate levels were increased in 30.0%, 11.5% and 0.9% of patients, respectively. Only 22.4% of patients had glomerular filtration rate<60 ml/min1.73 m2. After a mean follow-up was 2.15±0.99 years, 77 patients developed the outcome. Calcidiol (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.48–0.94; p = 0.021) and FGF-23 (HR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.04–1.23; p = 0.005) plasma levels predicted independently the outcome. There was a significant interaction between calcidiol and FGF-23 levels (p = 0.025). When the population was divided according to FGF-23 levels, calcidiol still predicted the outcome independently in patients with FGF-23 levels higher than the median (HR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.31–0.80; p = 0.003) but not in those with FGF-23 levels below this value (HR = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.62–1.71; p = 0.904). Conclusions Abnormalities in mineral metabolism are frequent in patients with stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. In this population, low calcidiol plasma levels predict an adverse prognosis in the presence of <span class="hlt">high</span> FGF-23 levels. PMID:24748388</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4628469','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4628469"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultra-low-dose dual-source CT <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography with <span class="hlt">high</span> pitch: diagnostic yield of a volumetric planning scan and effects on dose reduction and imaging strategy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hamm, B; Huppertz, A; Lembcke, A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To evaluate the role of an ultra-low-dose dual-source CT <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (CTCA) scan with <span class="hlt">high</span> pitch for delimiting the range of the subsequent standard CTCA scan. Methods: 30 patients with an indication for CTCA were prospectively examined using a two-scan dual-source CTCA protocol (2.0 × 64.0 × 0.6 mm; pitch, 3.4; rotation time of 280 ms; 100 kV): Scan 1 was acquired with one-fifth of the tube current suggested by the automatic exposure control software [CareDose 4D™ (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using 100 kV and 370 mAs as a reference] with the scan length from the tracheal bifurcation to the diaphragmatic border. Scan 2 was acquired with standard tube current extending with reduced scan length based on Scan 1. Nine central <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery segments were analysed qualitatively on both scans. Results: Scan 2 (105.1 ± 10.1 mm) was significantly shorter than Scan 1 (127.0 ± 8.7 mm). Image quality scores were significantly better for Scan 2. However, in 5 of 6 (83%) patients with stenotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease, a stenosis was already detected in Scan 1 and in 13 of 24 (54%) patients with non-stenotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries, a stenosis was already excluded by Scan 1. Using Scan 2 as reference, the positive- and negative-predictive value of Scan 1 was 83% (5 of 6 patients) and 100% (13 of 13 patients), respectively. Conclusion: An ultra-low-dose CTCA planning scan enables a reliable scan length reduction of the following standard CTCA scan and allows for correct diagnosis in a substantial proportion of patients. Advances in knowledge: Further dose reductions are possible owing to a change in the individual patient's imaging strategy as a prior ultra-low-dose CTCA scan may already rule out the presence of a stenosis or may lead to a direct transferal to an invasive catheter procedure. PMID:25710210</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26442976','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26442976"><span id="translatedtitle">[Treatment of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome in older adults and <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients."When the going gets tough…"].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bassanelli, Giorgio; Morici, Nuccia; De Luca, Leonardo; De Servi, Stefano; Savonitto, Stefano</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>The increasing life expectancy in older adults and the better survival of patients with multiple pathologies require the capability to treat complex clinical conditions with an increased risk of iatrogenic complications. Nevertheless, recent improvements in the pharmacological and interventional treatment of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) have promoted a shift from therapeutic nihilism to a more active management of complex ACS cases. Despite the paucity of specific randomized clinical trials, observational studies seem to show benefit of an early invasive treatment in these patients. This approach requires close cooperation of clinical intensivists, interventional cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons either in a specialized heart center or in a network of hospitals. PMID:26442976</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007315.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007315.htm"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery fistula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Congenital heart defect - <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula; Birth defect heart - <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula ... attaches to one of the chambers of the heart (the atrium or ventricle) or another blood vessel ( ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007115.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007115.htm"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> heart disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Heart disease, <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> heart disease, <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=heart+AND+attack&pg=7&id=EJ115143','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=heart+AND+attack&pg=7&id=EJ115143"><span id="translatedtitle">Counseling the <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Patient</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Semmler, Caryl; Semmler, Maynard</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The article discusses counseling sessions designed to a) help the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> patient adjust to cardiovascular disease, b) diminish patient anxieties and fears, and c) educate the patient and family members on controlling risk factors to deter another <span class="hlt">coronary</span> attack. (JS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3979653','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3979653"><span id="translatedtitle">When Do We Really Need <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Calcium Scoring Prior to Contrast-Enhanced <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Computed Tomography Angiography? Analysis by Age, Gender and <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Risk Factors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Iwan, Johannes; Voss, Andreas; Atsiatorme, Edem; Hofmann, Nina P.; Buss, Sebastian J.; Siebert, Stefan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A.; Korosoglou, Grigorios</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Aims To investigate the value of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium scoring (CCS) as a filter scan prior to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods and Results Between February 2008 and April 2011, 732 consecutive patients underwent clinically indicated CCTA. During this ‘control phase’, CCS was performed in all patients. In patients with CCS≥800, CCTA was not performed. During a subsequent ‘CCTA phase’ (May 2011–May 2012) another 200 consecutive patients underwent CCTA, and CCS was performed only in patients with increased probability for severe calcification according to age, gender and atherogenic risk factors. In patients where CCS was not performed, calcium scoring was performed in contrast-enhanced CCTA images. Significant associations were noted between CCS and age (r = 0.30, p<0.001) and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factors (χ2 = 37.9; HR = 2.2; 95%CI = 1.7–2.9, p<0.001). Based on these associations, a ≤3% pre-test probability for CCS≥800 was observed for males <61 yrs. and females <79 yrs. According to these criteria, CCS was not performed in 106 of 200 (53%) patients during the ‘CCTA phase’, including 47 (42%) males and 59 (67%) females. This resulted in <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiation saving of ∼1 mSv in 75% of patients younger than 60 yrs. Of 106 patients where CCS was not performed, estimated calcium scoring was indeed <800 in 101 (95%) cases. Non-diagnostic image quality due to calcification was similar between the ‘control phase’ and the ‘CCTA’ group (0.25% versus 0.40%, p = NS). Conclusion The value of CCS as a filter for identification of a <span class="hlt">high</span> calcium score is limited in younger patients with intermediate risk profile. Omitting CCS in such patients can contribute to further dose reduction with cardiac CT studies. PMID:24714677</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5757063','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5757063"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> number density calibration of the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonance line from a <span class="hlt">high</span>-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp and the calculated effect of argon pressures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Simons, J.W.; McClean, R.E. ); Oldenborg, R.C. )</p> <p>1991-03-21</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> number density calibration for the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonance line from a <span class="hlt">high</span>-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp (Photron superlamp) is determined and found to be the same as that of a standard hollow cathode lamp. Comparisons of the calibrations to theoretical calculations are found to be quite satisfactory. The effects of argon pressures in the absorption cell on the calibration are examined theoretically by using a simple Lorentzian broadening and shifting model. These calculations show the expected reduction in sensitivity and increasing linearity of Beer-Lambert plots with increasing argon pressure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED175683.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED175683.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Supplementary and Enrichment Series: <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Value. Teachers' Commentary. SP-25.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This is one in a series of manuals for teachers using SMSG <span class="hlt">high</span> school supplementary materials. The pamphlet includes commentaries on the sections of the student's booklet, answers to the exercises, and sample test questions. Topics covered include addition and multiplication in terms of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value, graphs of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value in the Cartesian…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED175682.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED175682.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Supplementary and Enrichment Series: <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Value. SP-24.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This is one in a series of SMSG supplementary and enrichment pamphlets for <span class="hlt">high</span> school students. This series is designed to make material for the study of topics of special interest to students readily accessible in classroom quantity. Topics covered include <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value, addition and multiplication in terms of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value, graphs of absolute…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21088330','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21088330"><span id="translatedtitle">Single <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery with Aortic Regurgitation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Katsetos, Manny C. Toce, Dale T.</p> <p>2003-11-15</p> <p>An isolated single <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery can be associated with normal life expectancy; however, patients are at an increased risk of sudden death. A case is reported of a 54-year-old man with several months of chest pressure with activity. On exercise Sestamibi stress testing, the patient developed a hypotensive response with no symptoms and minimal electrocardiographic changes. Nuclear scanning demonstrated reversible septal and lateral perfusion defects consistent with severe ischemia. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angiography revealed a single <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery with the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery arising from the left main. There were <span class="hlt">high</span>-grade stenotic lesions in the left anterior descending and circumflex arteries with only moderate atherosclerotic disease in the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. An aortogram showed 2-3+ aortic regurgitation, with an ejection fraction of 45% on ventriculography. The patient underwent four-vessel revascularization and aortic valve replacement and did well postoperatively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24392188','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24392188"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> CT angiography: Beyond morphological stenosis analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sun, Zhonghua</p> <p>2013-12-26</p> <p>Rapid technological developments in computed tomography (CT) imaging technique have made <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography an attractive imaging tool in the detection of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. Despite visualization of excellent anatomical details of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lumen changes, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography does not provide hemodynamic changes caused by presence of plaques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a widely used method in the mechanical engineering field to solve complex problems through analysing fluid flow, heat transfer and associated phenomena by using computer simulations. In recent years, CFD is increasingly used in biomedical research due to <span class="hlt">high</span> performance hardware and software. CFD techniques have been used to study cardiovascular hemodynamics through simulation tools to assist in predicting the behaviour of circulatory blood flow inside the human body. Blood flow plays a key role in the localization and progression of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. CFD simulation based on 3D luminal reconstructions can be used to analyse the local flow fields and flow profiling due to changes of vascular geometry, thus, identifying risk factors for development of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT-derived CFD applications in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMPP21D..06D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMPP21D..06D"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">High</span> Resolution <span class="hlt">Absolute</span>-dated Oxygen Isotope Record of the Past 7000 Years from Spring Valley Caverns, Southeastern MN, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dasgupta, S.; Edwards, R. L.; Alexander, E. C.; Cheng, H.; Dorale, J. A.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Two stalagmites, SV982 (3 thousand years (kyr)-present) and SV983 (7.8 kyr-present), from Spring Valley Caverns, southeastern Minnesota, USA contain records of oxygen isotopic variation in that cave for the past 7 kyr, which have been measured with an average time resolution of 10 years. The two stalagmites show similar patterns of stable isotopic variations for the overlapping portions of the records. An <span class="hlt">absolute</span> chronology was constructed for stalagmite SV983 using 36 230Th dates (typical 2σ relative error of 2%) coupled with annual band counting. For SV982, only the past 270 years were studied and part of the record from 1998 to 1900 A.D. was compared with instrumental climate record from the nearby town of Spring Valley, Minnesota. The δ 18 values correlate positively with the local mean annual temperature but show no apparent correlation with mean annual precipitation. The δ 18 agree closely with other climate records from the region (Dorale J.A. et al. 1992 Science 258, 1626-1630; Laird K.R. et al. 1996 LO 41, 890-902) demonstrating their significance as regional palaeoclimatic indicators. Several abrupt decadal to centennial scale shifts in δ 18 values are found ranging in magnitude from 0.6‰ to 2.7‰. Preliminary dating shows that these abrupt shifts in δ 18 values are centered at 6.5 (2.7‰), 4.6 (1.9‰), 3.4 (1.8‰) and 0.5 kyr (1.3‰). The 3.4 kyr event shows heavier δ 18 values corresponding to increase in temperature while all the other events are associated with decrease in δ 18 values and hence, decrease in temperature. The 6.5 kyr event was a shift from a several-century long cooling trend to an equally long warming trend. Comparing our record with the GISP2 δ 18 record (Grootes, P.M. et al. 1997 JGR 102, 26455-26470) from Greenland we find notable similarities in the decadal and centennial scale events, while the long term trends are more pronounced in our record. The δ 18 record from Spring Valley Caverns appears to be the best</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7023362','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7023362"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> flux scale for radioastronomy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ivanov, V.P.; Stankevich, K.S.</p> <p>1986-07-01</p> <p>The authors propose and provide support for a new <span class="hlt">absolute</span> flux scale for radio astronomy, which is not encumbered with the inadequacies of the previous scales. In constructing it the method of relative spectra was used (a powerful tool for choosing reference spectra). A review is given of previous flux scales. The authors compare the AIS scale with the scale they propose. Both scales are based on <span class="hlt">absolute</span> measurements by the ''artificial moon'' method, and they are practically coincident in the range from 0.96 to 6 GHz. At frequencies above 6 GHz, 0.96 GHz, the AIS scale is overestimated because of incorrect extrapolation of the spectra of the primary and secondary standards. The major results which have emerged from this review of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> scales in radio astronomy are summarized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27393479','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27393479"><span id="translatedtitle">Novel Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention Techniques for Revascularizing Chronically Occluded Giant <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Aneurysms in a Patient with Kawasaki Disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Steinberg, Zachary L; Jones, Thomas K; Lombardi, William L</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Kawasaki disease is a self-limiting vasculitis presenting in childhood that can lead to aneurysms of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. Patients who develop giant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysms have a <span class="hlt">high</span> incidence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenoses and occlusions resulting in myocardial ischemia. The mainstay of treatment for these lesions is surgical bypass due to complex <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anatomy and a <span class="hlt">high</span> rate of chronic total occlusions precluding traditional percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention techniques. We report the first successful percutaneous revascularization of two chronically occluded giant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysms using the Hybrid Interventional Strategy for approaching chronic total occlusions. Both antegrade and retrograde dissection-reentry techniques were employed to fully revascularize two major epicardial arteries. Despite procedural success, longer-term vessel patency was not maintained following stent deployment highlighting the difficulty in maintaining durable results with percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention in this patient population. PMID:27393479</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25396334','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25396334"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-pitch <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography at 70 kVp with low contrast medium volume: comparison of 80 and 100 kVp <span class="hlt">high</span>-pitch protocols.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Long Jiang; Qi, Li; De Cecco, Carlo N; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Spearman, James V; Schoepf, U Joseph; Lu, Guang Ming</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The purpose of this article is to evaluate image quality and radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered <span class="hlt">high</span>-pitch <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomography angiography (CCTA) at 70 kVp and 30 mL contrast medium.One hundred fifty patients with a heart rate ≤70 beats per minute (bpm) underwent CCTA using a second-generation dual-source computed tomography (CT) scanner and were randomized into 3 groups according to tube voltage and contrast medium volume (370 mg/mL iodine concentration) (100 kVp group, 100 kVp/60 mL, n = 55; 80 kVp group, 80 kVp/60 mL, n = 44; 70 kVp group, 70 kVp/30 mL, n = 51). Objective and subjective image quality along with the effect of heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI) was evaluated and compared between the groups. Radiation dose was estimated for each patient.CT attenuation and image noise were higher in the 80 and 70 kVp groups than in the 100 kVp group (all P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were lower in the 70 kVp group than in the 80 and 100 kVp groups (all P < 0.05). There was no difference for subjective image quality between the groups (P > 0.05). HR did not affect subjective image quality (all P > 0.05), while patients with BMI <23 kg/m had higher image quality than patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m (P < 0.05). Compared with the 100 kVp group, the radiation dose of the 70 kVp group was reduced by 75%.In conclusion, prospectively ECG-triggered <span class="hlt">high</span>-pitch 70 kVp/30 mL CCTA can obtain diagnostic image quality with lower radiation dose in selected patients with BMI <23 kg/m compared with 80/100 kVp/60 mL CCTA. PMID:25396334</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847961','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847961"><span id="translatedtitle">Minimally Invasive Multivessel <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Surgery and Hybrid <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Revascularization: Can We Routinely Achieve Less Invasive <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Surgery?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rodriguez, Maria; Ruel, Marc</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery bypass grafting (CABG) is the gold standard in managing severe <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. However, it is associated with prolonged recovery and potential complications, in part due to the invasiveness of the procedure. Less invasive CABG techniques attempt to improve the quality and quantity of life in the same way as surgical revascularization but with fewer complications. Minimally invasive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> surgery (MICS) through a small thoracotomy allows for complete revascularization with good results in graft patency. Perioperative mortality is low, and there is decreased need for blood transfusion, lower surgical site infection rates, and an earlier return to full physical function. Hybrid <span class="hlt">coronary</span> revascularization (HCR) attempts to combine the advantages of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting with those of percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention. Several studies have shown that HCR provides better short-term outcomes with regard to decreased ventilation and ICU time, reduced need for blood transfusion, and shortened hospital stay. However, the rates for major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality are comparable to conventional CABG, except for patients with a <span class="hlt">high</span> SYNTAX score who displayed increased mortality rates. There is also strong evidence of a higher need for repeat revascularization with HCR compared to CABG. Overall, MICS and HCR appear to be viable alternatives to conventional CABG, offering a less invasive approach to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> revascularization, which may be especially beneficial to <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients. This article discusses approaches that deliver the advantages of minimally invasive surgical revascularization that can be adapted by surgeons with minimal investment with regards to training and infrastructure. PMID:27127557</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27612891','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27612891"><span id="translatedtitle">Apolipoprotein B versus Non- <span class="hlt">High</span> Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol as a Discriminating Factor for Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndrome in Young People.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aditya, G P; Bari, M A</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>This study aimed to compare Apolipoprotein B(Apo B) with non-HDL-C as a predictor and discriminating factor of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS). This is a case control study among 50 cases of first attack of ACS among 18-45 years of age of both sex, admitted in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> care unit of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh from June 2009 to May 2010. Data was recently reanalyzed. Apo B is more sensitive than non-HDL C (84% vs. 62%) as well with more negative predictive value (NPV) (76.5% vs. 62.7%) but with similar positive predictive value (PPV) (63%). Specificity was more for non HDL C than Apo B (64% vs. 52%). Highest specificity and PPV observed for HDL- C, 88% and 71.4% respectively but with low sensitivity (30%). In this study diagnostic value of LDL-C, TC and TG was low. Apo B was a more discriminating factor as well predictor for ACS cases than non-HDL-C (OR: 5.678, 95% CI 2.227 - 14.528, P=0.001) vs. (OR: 2.901, 95% CI 1.288 - 6.534, P=0.01). Area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was greater for Apo B than non-HDL-C (0.680 vs. 0.630). Though ApoB and non-HDL-C theoretically often equally reflects the atherogenic burden, Apo B was a more discriminating factor for ACS cases than non-HDL-C. PMID:27612891</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20062936','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20062936"><span id="translatedtitle">Prasugrel compared with <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose clopidogrel in acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome. The randomised, double-blind ACAPULCO study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Montalescot, Gilles; Sideris, Georgios; Cohen, Remy; Meuleman, Catherine; Bal dit Sollier, Claire; Barthélémy, Olivier; Henry, Patrick; Lim, Pascal; Beygui, Farzin; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Marshall, Debra; Luo, Junxiang; Petitjean, Helene; Drouet, Ludovic</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Compared with the approved dose regimen of clopidogrel (300-mg loading dose [LD], 75-mg maintenance dose [MD]), prasugrel has been demonstrated to reduce ischaemic events in patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI). In ACS, antiplatelet effects of a prasugrel MD regimen have not been previously compared with either a higher clopidogrel MD or after switching from a higher clopidogrel LD. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antiplatelet effect of a prasugrel 10-mg MD versus a clopidogrel 150-mg MD in patients with ACS who had received a clopidogrel 900-mg LD. Patients with non-ST elevation ACS, treated with aspirin and a clopidogrel 900-mg LD, were randomised within 24 hours post-LD to receive a prasugrel 10-mg or clopidogrel 150-mg MD. After 14 days of the initial MD, subjects switched to the alternative treatment for 14 days. The primary endpoint compared maximum platelet aggregation (MPA, 20 microM adenosine diphosphate [ADP]) between prasugrel and clopidogrel MDs for both periods. Responder analyses between treatments were performed using several platelet-function methods. Of 56 randomised subjects, 37 underwent PCI. MPA was 26.2% for prasugrel 10 mg and 39.1% for clopidogrel 150 mg (p<0.001). The prasugrel MD regimen reduced MPA from the post-900-mg LD level (41.2% to 29.1%, p=0.003). Poor response ranged from 0% to 6% for prasugrel 10 mg and 4% to 34% for clopidogrel 150 mg. Thus, in ACS patients a prasugrel 10-mg MD regimen resulted in significantly greater platelet inhibition than clopidogrel at twice its approved MD or a 900-mg LD.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2981075','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2981075"><span id="translatedtitle">Image quality and attenuation values of multi detector CT <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography using <span class="hlt">high</span> iodine-concentration contrast material: A comparison of the use of iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Eun Young; Yeh, Dae Wook; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo Keun</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background: Effects of <span class="hlt">high</span> iodine-concentration contrast material on the image quality of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography (CCTA) have not been well evaluated. Purpose: To compare the image quality and attenuation values of CCTA between patients administered iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400 with the use of 64-slice multidetector CT. Material and Methods: Patients were prospectively enrolled and were randomized into two groups (group A, 151 patients received iopromide 370, iodine flux = 1.48 g I/s; group B, 146 patients received iomeprol 400, iodine flux = 1.60 g I/s). CT attenuation was measured in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries and great arteries and measurements were standardized based on an iodine flux of 1.5 0 g I/s. The image quality of 15 <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery segments was graded by two radiologists in consensus with the use of a four-point scale (1 = excellent to 4 = poor enhancement). Non-parametric statistical approaches were used to compare the two groups. Results: The median attenuation values in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries were 454 HU and 464 HU for iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400, respectively, and they did not differ (P = 0.26). When standardizing for an iodine flux, significantly higher attenuation values were found for iopromide 370 (median = 460 HU, range = 216-791 HU) compared with iomeprol 400 (median = 435 HU, range = 195—758 HU) (P = 0.006). The median image quality score of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial segments was 1 (range 1—2) for both groups (P = 0.84). Conclusion: The attenuation values in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries after injection of the same amount of two <span class="hlt">high</span> iodine-concentration contrast materials at the same flow rate with different iodine fluxes are similar with no difference in image quality. With standardization for an iodine flux, the attenuation is significantly higher when using iopromide 370. PMID:20849317</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Absolutism&pg=3&id=EJ265369','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Absolutism&pg=3&id=EJ265369"><span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic <span class="hlt">Absolutism</span> in Moral Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Vogt, W. Paul</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess <span class="hlt">absolute</span> rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720027445&hterms=Phosphorus&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DPhosphorus','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720027445&hterms=Phosphorus&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DPhosphorus"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> transition probabilities of phosphorus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24079365','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24079365"><span id="translatedtitle">Statins and percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention: a complementary synergy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Echeverri, Darío; Cabrales, Jaime</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The inclusion of statins and stents in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease management during the 1980s has marked a dramatic change in the natural history of the disease. Separately, each of these therapies have progressed rapidly and have achieved a prime position in the current armamentarium. The simultaneous use of statins in patients undergoing percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> revascularization procedures with stent implantation has shown a significant beneficial synergistic effect by reducing ischemia and necrosis, and improving <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow in patients with stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease, as well as in acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes. The use of <span class="hlt">high</span> dose statins in conjunction with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty with stent implantation has shown great efficacy and safety in patients with severe <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease. PMID:24079365</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7854154','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7854154"><span id="translatedtitle">The associations of <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein subclasses with insulin and glucose levels, physical activity, resting heart rate, and regional adiposity in men with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease: the Stanford <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Risk Intervention Project baseline survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Williams, P T; Haskell, W L; Vranizan, K M; Krauss, R M</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>We used nondenaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis to examine the associations of <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses with adiposity, physical activity, resting heart rate (an indicator of sympathetic drive), and plasma insulin and glucose levels in 97 men with angiographically documented <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. These men neither smoked nor used medications known to affect lipoproteins. The absorbency of protein stain was used as an index of mass concentrations at intervals of 0.01 nm within five HDL subclasses: HDL3c (7.2 to 7.8 nm), HDL3b (7.8 to 8.2 nm), HDL3a (8.2 to 8.8 nm), HDL2a (8.8 to 9.7 nm), and HDL2b (9.7 to 12 nm). HDL peak diameter was determined from the predominant peak of the HDL particle distribution when plotted against particle diameter. Four men who were non-insulin-dependent diabetics as defined by a fasting glucose exceeding 140 mg/dL had significantly higher plasma HDL3b levels and significantly smaller HDL peak diameters than nondiabetic men, and were therefore excluded from further analyses. In the remaining 93 nondiabetic men, plasma HDL3b levels correlated positively with indices of truncal obesity (waist to hip ratio and subscapular skinfold), whereas plasma HDL2b levels correlated negatively with indices of total adiposity (body mass index [BMI]) and truncal obesity (subscapular and abdominal skinfold). Fasting plasma insulin levels correlated negatively with HDL3a, HDL2a, and HDL2b. Obesity significantly affected the relationships of resting heart rate with insulin and HDL subclasses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920003670','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920003670"><span id="translatedtitle">Asteroid <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes and slope parameters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tedesco, Edward F.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A new listing of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently <span class="hlt">high</span> quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830020273','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830020273"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Slater, P. N.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The distinction between the uses of relative and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration are described, and the categories of relative and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, <span class="hlt">high</span>-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997A%26A...319..881G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997A%26A...319..881G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> magnitudes and kinematics of barium stars.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gomez, A. E.; Luri, X.; Grenier, S.; Prevot, L.; Mennessier, M. O.; Figueras, F.; Torra, J.</p> <p>1997-03-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitude of barium stars has been obtained from kinematical data using a new algorithm based on the maximum-likelihood principle. The method allows to separate a sample into groups characterized by different mean <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes, kinematics and z-scale heights. It also takes into account, simultaneously, the censorship in the sample and the errors on the observables. The method has been applied to a sample of 318 barium stars. Four groups have been detected. Three of them show a kinematical behaviour corresponding to disk population stars. The fourth group contains stars with halo kinematics. The luminosities of the disk population groups spread a large range. The intrinsically brightest one (M_v_=-1.5mag, σ_M_=0.5mag) seems to be an inhomogeneous group containing barium binaries as well as AGB single stars. The most numerous group (about 150 stars) has a mean <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitude corresponding to stars in the red giant branch (M_v_=0.9mag, σ_M_=0.8mag). The third group contains barium dwarfs, the obtained mean <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitude is characteristic of stars on the main sequence or on the subgiant branch (M_v_=3.3mag, σ_M_=0.5mag). The obtained mean luminosities as well as the kinematical results are compatible with an evolutionary link between barium dwarfs and classical barium giants. The <span class="hlt">highly</span> luminous group is not linked with these last two groups. More <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution spectroscopic data will be necessary in order to better discriminate between barium and non-barium stars.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24737995','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24737995"><span id="translatedtitle">Chronic kidney disease stage is a modulator on the association between <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasospastic angina.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hsu, Heng-Jung; Yen, Chiung-Hui; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Wu, I-Wen; Lee, Chin-Chan; Sun, Chiao-Yin; Chou, Chia-Chi; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yang, Shih-Ying; Tsai, Chi-Jen; Wu, Mai-Szu; Hung, Ming-Jui</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The prevalence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasospasm and also the factors associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasospasm in CKD is still unclear. In this cross-sectional study of 859 consecutive CKD patients with angina pectoris received <span class="hlt">coronary</span> catheterization, we evaluated the factors associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasospasm. Patients with vasospasm were older and had higher peripheral blood white cell counts, higher peripheral blood monocyte cell counts, higher haemoglobin levels, higher hs-CRP levels, and lower levels of serum creatinine than patients without vasospasm. The results of multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that peripheral blood monocyte count and hs-CRP level were independently associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasospasm in patients with stage 1 CKD. Only peripheral blood monocyte count but not hs-CRP was independently associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasospasm in patients with stages 2 and 3 of CKD. In conclusion, peripheral blood monocyte count is independently associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasospasm in patients with stage 1-3 CKD, whereas hs-CRP is only independently associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasospasm in patients with stage 1 CKD.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3987397','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3987397"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Obstruction Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ribeiro, Henrique Barbosa; Sarmento-Leite, Rogério; Siqueira, Dimytri A. A.; Carvalho, Luiz Antônio; Mangione, José Armando; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Perin, Marco A.; de Brito, Fábio Sandoli</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was established as an important alternative for <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, there are few data in the literature regarding <span class="hlt">coronary</span> obstruction, that although rare, is a potentially fatal complication. Objective Evaluate this complication in Brazil. Methods We evaluated all patients presenting <span class="hlt">coronary</span> obstruction from the Brazilian Registry of TAVI. Main baseline and procedural characteristics, management of the complication, and clinical outcomes were collected from all patients. Results From 418 consecutive TAVI procedures, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> obstruction occurred in 3 cases (incidence of 0.72%). All patients were women, without prior <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting (CABG), and with mean age of 85 ± 3 years, logistic EuroSCORE of 15 ± 6% and STS-PROM score of 9 ± 4%. All of the cases were performed with balloon-expandable Sapien XT prosthesis. In one patient, with pre-procedural computed tomography data, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries presented a low height and a narrow sinus of Valsalva. All patients presented with clinically significant severe maintained hypotension, immediately after valve implantation, and even though <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty with stent implantation was successfully performed in all cases, patients died during hospitalization, being two periprocedurally. Conclusion <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> obstruction following TAVI is a rare but potentially fatal complication, being more frequent in women and with the balloon-expandable prosthesis. Anatomical factors might be related with its increased occurrence, highlighting the importance of a good pre-procedural evaluation of the patients in order to avoid this severe complication. PMID:24652089</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cmd/causes','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cmd/causes"><span id="translatedtitle">What Causes <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Microvascular Disease?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease Risk Factors ... Microvascular Disease? The same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis may cause <span class="hlt">coronary</span> microvascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/angioplasty/howdone','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/angioplasty/howdone"><span id="translatedtitle">How Is <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Angioplasty Done?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention Done? Before you have percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI), ... wall, relieving the blockage and improving blood flow. Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention Figure A shows the location of the heart ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cabg/whoneeds','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cabg/whoneeds"><span id="translatedtitle">Who Needs <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Bypass Grafting?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Rehabilitation <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Surgery Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries that can't be treated with percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI), also known as <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty. Your doctor ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17709086','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17709086"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery anomalies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Earls, James P</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery anomalies are uncommon findings but can be of significant clinical importance in a small number of individuals. Clinical presentation depends on the specific anomaly. Most <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery anomalies are benign and clinically insignificant, however, some anomalies are potentially significant and can lead to heart failure and even death. Noninvasive imaging has emerged as the preferred way to image <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anomalies. Both electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) are useful for the diagnosis of anomalous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. Recently, MDCT has also proven to be very useful in the detection and characterization of anomalous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. This chapter will review the appearance of the most commonly encountered <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anomalies on MDCT. PMID:17709086</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25056722','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25056722"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-density lipoprotein from patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease loses anti-thrombotic effects on endothelial cells: impact on arterial thrombus formation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Holy, Erik W; Besler, Christian; Reiner, Martin F; Camici, Giovanni G; Manz, Jasmin; Beer, Jürg H; Lüscher, Thomas F; Landmesser, Ulf; Tanner, Felix C</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Thrombus formation is determined by the balance between pro- thrombotic mediators and anti-thrombotic factors.<span class="hlt">High</span>-density lipoprotein (HDL) from healthy subjects exerts anti-thrombotic properties. Whether this is also the case for HDL from patients with stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) or acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) is unknown.In human aortic endothelial cells in culture,HDL (50 µg/ml) from healthy subjects (HS) inhibited thrombin-induced tissue factor (TF) expression and activity, while HDL (50 µg/ml) from CHD and ACS patients did not. Similarly, only healthy HDL increased endothelial tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) expression and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) release, while HDL from CHD and ACS patients had no effect. Healthy HDL inhibited thrombin-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) expression, while HDL from ACS patients enhanced endothelial PAI-1 expression. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) formation with L-NAME (100 µmol/l) abolished the anti-thrombotic effects of healthy HDL on TF, TFPI, and tPA expression. The exogenous nitric oxide donor, DETANO, mimicked the effects of healthy HDL and counterbalanced the loss of anti-thrombotic effects of HDL from CHD and ACS patients in endothelial cells. In line with this observation, healthy HDL, in contrast to HDL from CHD and ACS patients, increased endothelial NO production. In the laser-injured carotid artery of the mouse, thrombus formation was delayed in animals treated with healthy HDL compared with mice treated with vehicle or HDL from patients with CHD or ACS. In conclusion, HDL from CHD and ACS patients loses the ability of healthy HDL to suppress TF and to increase TFPI and t-PA and instead enhances PAI-1 and arterial thrombus formation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24689061','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24689061"><span id="translatedtitle">The 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism is related with <span class="hlt">high</span> blood pressure in acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>García-González, Ilian Janet; Valle, Yeminia; Rivas, Fernando; Figuera-Villanueva, Luis Eduardo; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Flores-Salinas, Hector Enrique; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory Omayra; Padilla-Gutiérrez, Jorge Ramón</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Immunologic and inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a negative regulator of the immune response. This study evaluates the 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism in ACS and DM2. Three hundred and seventy individuals from Western Mexico were recruited and categorized into three groups: ACS (86), DM2 without <span class="hlt">coronary</span> complications (70), and healthy subjects (214). Genotyping of the 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism was performed by PCR and Native-PAGE. The most common risk factors were hypertension and overweight in ACS and DM2, respectively. The genetic distribution of the 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism showed no significant differences between groups (P ≥ 0.23). Nonetheless, the Ins/Ins genotype was associated with <span class="hlt">high</span> blood pressure (HBP) in the DM2 group (OR(c) = 1.65, P = 0.02). The genetic recessive model showed similar findings (OR(c) = 3.03, P = 0.04). No association was found in ACS, with a P of 0.05; nevertheless, the prevalence of Ins/Ins carriers was quite similar to that found in the DM2-HBP group. The 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism was not a susceptibility factor for ACS or DM2; however, the Ins/Ins genotype might have contributed to the development of HBP in the studied groups.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3933038','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3933038"><span id="translatedtitle">The 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G Polymorphism Is Related with <span class="hlt">High</span> Blood Pressure in Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>García-González, Ilian Janet; Valle, Yeminia; Rivas, Fernando; Figuera-Villanueva, Luis Eduardo; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Flores-Salinas, Hector Enrique; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory Omayra; Padilla-Gutiérrez, Jorge Ramón</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Immunologic and inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a negative regulator of the immune response. This study evaluates the 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism in ACS and DM2. Three hundred and seventy individuals from Western Mexico were recruited and categorized into three groups: ACS (86), DM2 without <span class="hlt">coronary</span> complications (70), and healthy subjects (214). Genotyping of the 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism was performed by PCR and Native-PAGE. The most common risk factors were hypertension and overweight in ACS and DM2, respectively. The genetic distribution of the 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism showed no significant differences between groups (P ≥ 0.23). Nonetheless, the Ins/Ins genotype was associated with <span class="hlt">high</span> blood pressure (HBP) in the DM2 group (ORc = 1.65, P = 0.02). The genetic recessive model showed similar findings (ORc = 3.03, P = 0.04). No association was found in ACS, with a P of 0.05; nevertheless, the prevalence of Ins/Ins carriers was quite similar to that found in the DM2-HBP group. The 14 bp Del/Ins HLA-G polymorphism was not a susceptibility factor for ACS or DM2; however, the Ins/Ins genotype might have contributed to the development of HBP in the studied groups. PMID:24689061</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3487336','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3487336"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span> On-Aspirin Platelet Reactivity and Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease: Results From ASCET (Aspirin Nonresponsiveness and Clopidogrel Endpoint Trial)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pettersen, Alf-Åge R.; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Abdelnoor, Michael; Arnesen, Harald</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Patients with stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease on single-antiplatelet therapy with aspirin are still at risk for atherothrombotic events, and <span class="hlt">high</span> on-aspirin residual platelet reactivity (RPR) has been suggested as a risk factor. Methods and Results In this randomized trial, the association between platelet function determined by the PFA100 platelet function analyzer system (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Germany) and clinical outcome in 1001 patients, all on single-antiplatelet therapy with aspirin (160 mg/d) was studied. Patients were randomized to continue with aspirin 160 mg/d or change to clopidogrel 75 mg/d. A composite end point of death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and unstable angina was used. At 2-year follow-up, 106 primary end points were registered. The prevalence of <span class="hlt">high</span> RPR was 25.9%. <span class="hlt">High</span> on-aspirin RPR did not significantly influence the primary end point in the aspirin group (13.3% versus 9.9%, P=0.31). However, in post hoc analysis, patients with von Willebrand factor levels or platelet count below median values and <span class="hlt">high</span> on-aspirin RPR had a statistically significant higher end point rate than that of patients with low RPR (20% versus 7.5%, P=0.014, and 18.2% versus 10.8%, P=0.039, respectively). The composite end point rate in patients with <span class="hlt">high</span> on-aspirin RPR treated with clopidogrel was not different from that of patients treated with aspirin (7.6% versus 13.3%, P=0.16). Conclusions In stable, aspirin-treated patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease, <span class="hlt">high</span> on-aspirin RPR did not relate to clinical outcome and did not identify a group responsive to clopidogrel. Post hoc subgroup analysis raised the possibility that <span class="hlt">high</span> on-aspirin RPR might be predictive in patients with low von Willebrand factor or platelet count, but these findings will require confirmation in future studies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT00222261. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e000703 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016PhRvA..94a3808D&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016PhRvA..94a3808D&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Optomechanics for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> rotation detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davuluri, Sankar</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11262641','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11262641"><span id="translatedtitle">Moral <span class="hlt">absolutism</span> and ectopic pregnancy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaczor, C</p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>If one accepts a version of <span class="hlt">absolutism</span> that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the <span class="hlt">absolutism</span> mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11262641','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11262641"><span id="translatedtitle">Moral <span class="hlt">absolutism</span> and ectopic pregnancy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaczor, C</p> <p>2001-02-01</p> <p>If one accepts a version of <span class="hlt">absolutism</span> that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the <span class="hlt">absolutism</span> mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate. PMID:11262641</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100014902&hterms=asp&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dasp','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100014902&hterms=asp&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dasp"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kogut, A. J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15831074','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15831074"><span id="translatedtitle">Classification images predict <span class="hlt">absolute</span> efficiency.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Murray, Richard F; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B</p> <p>2005-02-24</p> <p>How well do classification images characterize human observers' strategies in perceptual tasks? We show mathematically that from the classification image of a noisy linear observer, it is possible to recover the observer's <span class="hlt">absolute</span> efficiency. If we could similarly predict human observers' performance from their classification images, this would suggest that the linear model that underlies use of the classification image method is adequate over the small range of stimuli typically encountered in a classification image experiment, and that a classification image captures most important aspects of human observers' performance over this range. In a contrast discrimination task and in a shape discrimination task, we found that observers' <span class="hlt">absolute</span> efficiencies were generally well predicted by their classification images, although consistently slightly (approximately 13%) higher than predicted. We consider whether a number of plausible nonlinearities can account for the slight under prediction, and of these we find that only a form of phase uncertainty can account for the discrepancy.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1175308','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1175308"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> calibration of optical flats</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Sommargren, Gary E.</p> <p>2005-04-05</p> <p>The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> phase error of the optical flat is obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16060542','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16060542"><span id="translatedtitle">Update on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium imaging.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hergott, Lawrence J</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This update of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium imaging discusses methods of detecting and measuring <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium and their correlation to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease risk. The value of EBCT to traditional non-invasive cardiovascular tests is compared. A negative EBCT test makes the presence of atherosclerotic plaque, including unstable plaque, very unlikely. Negative EBCT may be consistent with low risk of a cardiovascular event over the next 2-5 years. Conversely, positive EBCT confirms the presence of a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque. The greater the amount of calcium, the greater the likelihood of occlusive disease, but there is a not a 1:1 relationship and findings may not be site specific. A <span class="hlt">high</span> calcium score may be consistent with moderate to <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of cardiovascular event within the next 2-5 years. Limitations and cautions concerning the general use of EBCT for screening are discussed. PMID:16060542</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6524524','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6524524"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> thrombolysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Geltman, E.M.; Abendschein, D.R.; Devries, S.R.</p> <p>1987-02-01</p> <p>The efficacy of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> thrombolysis may be assessed by several invasive and noninvasive means, including <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, contrast and radionuclide angiography, thallium 201 or /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, positron emission tomography, cardiac ultrasonography, electrocardiography, and analysis of plasma creatine kinase activity. Each technique has its own strengths and limitations, but when used in concert these methods may provide insight into the physiology of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> reperfusion and the efficacy of reperfusion in individual patients and populations. 104 references.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140007386','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140007386"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span> Precision, <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Total Column Ozone Measurements from the Pandora Spectrometer System: Comparisons with Data from a Brewer Double Monochromator and Aura OMI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tzortziou, Maria A.; Herman, Jay R.; Cede, Alexander; Abuhassan, Nader</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We present new, <span class="hlt">high</span> precision, <span class="hlt">high</span> temporal resolution measurements of total column ozone (TCO) amounts derived from ground-based direct-sun irradiance measurements using our recently deployed Pandora single-grating spectrometers. Pandora's small size and portability allow deployment at multiple sites within an urban air-shed and development of a ground-based monitoring network for studying small-scale atmospheric dynamics, spatial heterogeneities in trace gas distribution, local pollution conditions, photochemical processes and interdependencies of ozone and its major precursors. Results are shown for four mid- to <span class="hlt">high</span>-latitude sites where different Pandora instruments were used. Comparisons with a well calibrated double-grating Brewer spectrometer over a period of more than a year in Greenbelt MD showed excellent agreement and a small bias of approximately 2 DU (or, 0.6%). This was constant with slant column ozone amount over the full range of observed solar zenith angles (15-80), indicating adequate Pandora stray light correction. A small (1-2%) seasonal difference was found, consistent with sensitivity studies showing that the Pandora spectral fitting TCO retrieval has a temperature dependence of 1% per 3K, with an underestimation in temperature (e.g., during summer) resulting in an underestimation of TCO. Pandora agreed well with Aura-OMI (Ozone Measuring Instrument) satellite data, with average residuals of <1% at the different sites when the OMI view was within 50 km from the Pandora location and OMI-measured cloud fraction was <0.2. The frequent and continuous measurements by Pandora revealed significant short-term (hourly) temporal changes in TCO, not possible to capture by sun-synchronous satellites, such as OMI, alone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11716303T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11716303T"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span> precision, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> total column ozone measurements from the Pandora spectrometer system: Comparisons with data from a Brewer double monochromator and Aura OMI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tzortziou, Maria; Herman, Jay R.; Cede, Alexander; Abuhassan, Nader</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>We present new, <span class="hlt">high</span> precision, <span class="hlt">high</span> temporal resolution measurements of total column ozone (TCO) amounts derived from ground-based direct-sun irradiance measurements using our recently deployed Pandora single-grating spectrometers. Pandora's small size and portability allow deployment at multiple sites within an urban air-shed and development of a ground-based monitoring network for studying small-scale atmospheric dynamics, spatial heterogeneities in trace gas distribution, local pollution conditions, photochemical processes and interdependencies of ozone and its major precursors. Results are shown for four mid- to <span class="hlt">high</span>-latitude sites where different Pandora instruments were used. Comparisons with a well calibrated double-grating Brewer spectrometer over a period of more than a year in Greenbelt MD showed excellent agreement and a small bias of approximately 2 DU (or, 0.6%). This was constant with slant column ozone amount over the full range of observed solar zenith angles (15-80°), indicating adequate Pandora stray light correction. A small (1-2%) seasonal difference was found, consistent with sensitivity studies showing that the Pandora spectral fitting TCO retrieval has a temperature dependence of 1% per 3°K, with an underestimation in temperature (e.g., during summer) resulting in an underestimation of TCO. Pandora agreed well with Aura-OMI (Ozone Measuring Instrument) satellite data, with average residuals of <1% at the different sites when the OMI view was within 50 km from the Pandora location and OMI-measured cloud fraction was <0.2. The frequent and continuous measurements by Pandora revealed significant short-term (hourly) temporal changes in TCO, not possible to capture by sun-synchronous satellites, such as OMI, alone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27448943','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27448943"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Fractional Flow Reserve (≤0.90 vs >0.90) on Long-Term Outcome (>10 Years) in Patients With Nonsignificant <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Arterial Narrowings.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Badoz, Marc; Chatot, Marion; Hechema, Rémy; Chopard, Romain; Meneveau, Nicolas; Schiele, François</p> <p>2016-08-15</p> <p>We assessed the long-term (>10 years) clinical course of patients with documented <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesions deemed nonsignificant according to fractional flow reserve (FFR) assessment and investigated whether the initial FFR value impacted on prognosis. From January 2000 to October 2003, all patients submitted to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography with FFR measurement were included in a single-center, prospective registry. Patients with an FFR value >0.80 were treated medically without revascularization. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (death, acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS), or <span class="hlt">coronary</span> revascularization) were compared according to initial FFR value (<span class="hlt">absolute</span> value and by category, ≤0.90 vs >0.90). Analyses were performed using a multivariable Cox model and propensity score matching. Among 257 patients (332 lesions) treated medically initially, 131 (51%, 143 lesions) had FFR ≤0.90 and 126 (49%, 189 lesions) >0.90. During follow-up (median duration, 11.6 years), 82 (31.9%) had a MACE, 38 (14.8%) died, 17 (6.6%) had ACS, 93 (36.2%) had repeat <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, and 27 (10.5%) had revascularization. There was no clinical, biologic or angiographic difference between patients with initial FFR value ≤0.90 versus >0.90. Adjusted Cox model showed no difference in relative risk of MACE, death, ACS, or revascularization. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angiographies were numerically more frequent in patients with FFR ≤0.90, versus FFR >0.90. These findings were confirmed by propensity score-matched comparison. In patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> narrowings left unrevascularized based on FFR, an FFR value between 0.80 and 0.90 has no impact on long-term outcome compared with those with FFR >0.90. In conclusion, patients with <span class="hlt">high</span> FFR values should not be considered as having a lower risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> event. PMID:27448943</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21328584','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21328584"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-precision <span class="hlt">absolute</span> (true) density measurements on hygroscopic powders by gas pycnometry: application to determining effects of formulation and process on free volume of lyophilized products.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kikuchi, Takayuki; Wang, Bingquan Stuart; Pikal, Michael J</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>As density (free volume) of the amorphous solids should be related to mobility and stability, an attempt was made to develop a simple, sensitive, and reproducible method to evaluate free volume via <span class="hlt">high</span>-precision gas pycnometry density measurements, and to apply this methodology to study the variation of free volume with formulation and thermal history (i.e., annealing). Annealed samples were prepared either by heating the product after freeze drying (postannealing) or drying at higher temperature in secondary drying than normal (in-process annealing). Density was measured using a gas pycnometer. We find that the key to <span class="hlt">high</span>-precision density measurements is isolation of the instrument from atmospheric moisture; accordingly, all operations were carried out in a dry box. With suitable care, densities of amorphous freeze-dried products can be measured with a precision of better than 0.5% in a series of independent but nominally identical samples. Density decreased with increasing molecular weight of dextran, but density of proteins was independent of molecular weight. Small but significant increases in density upon annealing were observed for several formulations. Thus, we conclude that accurate density measurements may be made by carefully controlling residual moisture. Density may be a useful parameter to predict long-term stability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17399809','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17399809"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angiography in Lebanon: Use and overuse.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sibai, Abla-Mehio; Tohme, Rania A; Saade, Georges A</p> <p>2008-04-25</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angiography remains the gold standard for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease diagnosis. In Lebanon, the density of cardiac catheterization centers is almost three times that of France (9.32 vs. 2.92 per 1,000,000 individuals) and recently collated national data indicate notably a <span class="hlt">high</span> utilization rate of 53 per 10,000 individuals, placing Lebanon third after the United States and Germany. PMID:17399809</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4804925','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4804925"><span id="translatedtitle">The Effect of <span class="hlt">High</span> Dose Cilostazol and Rosuvastatin on Periprocedural Myocardial Injury in Patients with Elective Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>H., Ari; N., Emlek; S., Ari; S., Coşar; K., Doğanay; C., Aydin; E., Tenekecioğlu; A., Tütüncü; O.C., Yontar; M., Gürdoğan; T., Bozat; M., Melek</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background The aim of our study was to assess the effect of pretreatment with cilostazol and rosuvastatin combination before elective percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI) on peri-procedural myocardial injury (PPMIJ). Methods We randomly assigned 172 patients with stable angina pectoris scheduled for elective PCI to pre- treatment with Cilostazol 200mg and Rosuvastatin 40 mg (group 1), or to pretreatment with Rosuvastatin 40 mg group (group 2). The primary end-point was the occurrence of PPMIJ defined as any cardiac troponin I (Tn I) level elevated above the upper normal limit (UNL). The occurrence of peri-procedural myocardial infarction (PPMIN) was defined as a post-procedural increase in cTnI level ≥ 5 times above the UNL. Results There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between group 1 (n = 86) and group 2 (n = 86). The rate of PPMIJ (21% vs. 24%, p = 0.58) and PPMIN (2.3% vs. 7%, p = 0.27) were similar between the two study groups. Subgroup analysis performed on those patients without statin therapy before PCI (53 patients in group 1 and 50 patients in group 2) showed that the incidence of PPMIJ was significantly lower in the group 1 patients without chronic statin treatment [17% (9/53) versus 34% (17/50); p = 0.04], but the rate of PPMIN was similar between the two groups for those patients without chronic statin treatment [1.9% (1/53) versus 10% (5/50); p = 0.07]. Conclusions We found that adjunct cilostazol and rosuvastatin pre-treatment did not significantly reduce PPMIJ after elective PCI in patients with stable angina pectoris. However, adjunct cilostazol pre-treatment could reduce PPMIJ in patients without chronic statin therapy before elective PCI. PMID:27122885</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JQSRT.151..287V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JQSRT.151..287V"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span> resolution spectroscopy of silane with an external-cavity quantum cascade laser: <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> line strengths of the ν3 fundamental band at 4.6 μm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Helden, J. H.; Lopatik, D.; Nave, A.; Lang, N.; Davies, P. B.; Röpcke, J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The introduction of room temperature continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) with narrow linewidths has greatly facilitated <span class="hlt">high</span> resolution spectroscopy over wide spectral ranges in the mid-infrared (MIR) region. Using the wide tuning range of an EC-QCL we have measured the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> line strengths of many P-branch transitions of the stretching dyad of the ν3 fundamental band of 28SiH4 between 2096 and 2178 cm-1. Furthermore, the <span class="hlt">high</span> spectral resolution available has enabled us to resolve and measure representative examples of the tetrahedral splittings associated with each component of the P-branch. The positions of these components are in excellent agreement with spherical top data system (STDS) predictions and theoretical transitions from the TDS spectroscopic database for spherical top molecules. These are the first measurements of these line strengths of 28SiH4 and are an example of the applicability of <span class="hlt">high</span>-powered, widely tunable EC-QCLs to <span class="hlt">high</span> resolution spectroscopy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140005478&hterms=fingerprint&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dfingerprint','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140005478&hterms=fingerprint&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dfingerprint"><span id="translatedtitle">Achieving Climate Change <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Accuracy in Orbit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The Climate <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with <span class="hlt">high</span> <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometric accuracy and <span class="hlt">high</span> statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently <span class="hlt">high</span> <span class="hlt">absolute</span> accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790013324','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790013324"><span id="translatedtitle">The AFGL <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravity program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1287535','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1287535"><span id="translatedtitle">Familial Aggregation of <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Pitch</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Baharloo, Siamak; Service, Susan K.; Risch, Neil; Gitschier, Jane; Freimer, Nelson B.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> pitch (AP) is a behavioral trait that is defined as the ability to identify the pitch of tones in the absence of a reference pitch. AP is an ideal phenotype for investigation of gene and environment interactions in the development of complex human behaviors. Individuals who score exceptionally well on formalized auditory tests of pitch perception are designated as “AP-1.” As described in this report, auditory testing of siblings of AP-1 probands and of a control sample indicates that AP-1 aggregates in families. The implications of this finding for the mapping of loci for AP-1 predisposition are discussed. PMID:10924408</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cmd','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cmd"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Microvascular Disease (MVD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... narrows the heart's large arteries and reduces the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your heart muscle. The buildup of plaque also makes it more likely that blood clots will form in your arteries. Blood clots can mostly or completely block blood flow through a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. In <span class="hlt">coronary</span> MVD, however, ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=325287','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=325287"><span id="translatedtitle">Ancrod for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pothoulakis, A J; Neerukonda, S K; Ansel, G; Jantz, R D</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Anticoagulation in the form of intravenous heparin is used after <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty to prevent thrombosis. Ancrod, a rapid-acting defibrinogenating agent, has been used in various clinical settings that require anticoagulation. We present the use of ancrod after percutaneous transluminal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty in a patients with heparin-induced thrombopathia. PMID:8605439</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3968593','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3968593"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathophysiology of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Collaterals#</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stoller, Michael; Seiler, Christian</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>While the existence of structural adaptation of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anastomoses is undisputed, the potential of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> collaterals to be capable of functional adaptation has been questioned. For many years, collateral vessels were thought to be rigid tubes allowing only limited blood flow governed by the pressure gradient across them. This concept was consistent with the notion that although collaterals could provide adequate blood flow to maintain resting levels, they would be unable to increase blood flow sufficiently in situations of increased myocardial oxygen demand. However, more recent studies have demonstrated the capability of the collateral circulation to deliver sufficient blood flow even during exertion or pharmacologic stress. Moreover, it has been shown that increases in collateral flow could be attributed directly to collateral vasomotion. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> collateral circulation, ie the functional adapation of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> collaterals to acute alterations in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> circulation. PMID:23701025</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012RScI...83jD519K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012RScI...83jD519K"><span id="translatedtitle">Method to obtain <span class="hlt">absolute</span> impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without <span class="hlt">absolute</span> intensity calibrationa)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with <span class="hlt">absolute</span> impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a <span class="hlt">high</span> efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with <span class="hlt">high</span> etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> impurity densities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9206E..0ER','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9206E..0ER"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental results for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> cylindrical wavefront testing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of <span class="hlt">high</span> quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean <span class="hlt">high</span> quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with <span class="hlt">high</span> accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27196956','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27196956"><span id="translatedtitle">Off-Pump <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Bypass Grafting and Transaortic Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dellis, Sophia L; Akujuo, Adanna C; Bennett, Edward V; Britton, Lewis W</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We sought to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-pump <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting and transcatheter aortic valve replacement in two patients with porcelain aortas and lesions that could not be optimally treated with percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention. Patients with aortic stenosis and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease who are too <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting due to comorbidities and porcelain aorta, and who do not have the appropriate anatomy for percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention should be considered for concomitant transcatheter aortic valve replacement and off-pump <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12762 (J Card Surg 2016;31:435-438). PMID:27196956</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26330339','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26330339"><span id="translatedtitle">Complete rupture of the anterolateral papillary muscle caused by <span class="hlt">coronary</span> spasm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yamazaki, Masataka; Fukui, Toshihiro; Mahara, Keitaro; Takanashi, Shuichiro</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Papillary muscle rupture usually occurs as a catastrophic complication of acute myocardial infarction in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery stenosis; it is therefore less common in patients without <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery stenosis. We report the case of a 67-year old woman without <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery stenosis who suffered an acute anterolateral papillary muscle rupture and was successfully treated with mitral valve replacement. Evidence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> spasm was found on a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasomotion test, suggesting that a <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitivity to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> spasm may explain a mechanism of isolated papillary muscle infarction.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1731459','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1731459"><span id="translatedtitle">Postangioplasty restenosis rate between segments of the major <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hermans, W R; Rensing, B J; Kelder, J C; de Feyter, P J; Serruys, P W</p> <p>1992-01-15</p> <p>Conflicting data have been published regarding the rate of postangioplasty restenosis observed in diverse segments of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> tree. However, these studies may be criticized for their biased selection of patients, methods of analysis, and definitions of restenosis. In the present study, 1,353 patients underwent a successful <span class="hlt">coronary</span> dilatation of greater than or equal to 1 site. In all, 1,234 patients (91%) had a follow-up angiogram after 6 months, or earlier when indicated by symptoms. All films were processed and analyzed at the thoraxcenter core laboratory with the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography analysis system (automated contour detection). Restenosis was considered present if the diameter stenosis at follow-up was greater than 50%. No differences in restenosis rates were observed between <span class="hlt">coronary</span> segments using this categorical definition. A continuous approach was also used; <span class="hlt">absolute</span> changes in minimal luminal diameter adjusted for vessel size were used in order to allow comparison between vessels of different sizes (relative loss). No significant differences were observed between the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> segments with this continuous approach. These results suggest that restenosis is a ubiquitous phenomenon without any predilection for a particular site in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> tree. PMID:1731459</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4949024','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4949024"><span id="translatedtitle">Ectopic Origin of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Arteries Diagnozed by <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Angiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Gorani, Daut; Sejdiu, Basri; Citaku, Hajdin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: Anomalous origin of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries from opposite sinus of Valsalva is rare finding. The incidence of anomalous origination of the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery from right sinus is 0.15% and the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery from the left sinus is 0.92%. The ectopic origin of left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery or right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery from opposite sinus depending on pathways and considering atherosclerotic changes are manifested with different clinical significance. Case report: We report two cases, the first case the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography showed the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery arising from the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus, presenting with proximally and distally stenosed left anterior descending artery (LAD), associated with medial and distal stenosed right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery (RCA). The second case the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography revealed the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery arising from the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus, associated with tortuous medial and distal segments of left anterior descending artery (LAD), without atherosclerotic changes. The first case successfully underwent treatment procedures based on guidelines for revascularization. Conclusion: The <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography of patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> ischemia determines atherosclerotic disease with possibility of the presence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery anomalies that in cases with ectopic origin from opposite sinus continues to exist as a challenge during treatment in interventional cardiology. PMID:27482140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.G11B0924M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.G11B0924M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely <span class="hlt">high</span> levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibrations - the IGS adopted <span class="hlt">absolute</span> antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using <span class="hlt">absolute</span> antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to <span class="hlt">absolute</span>, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration system. These <span class="hlt">absolute</span> antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1545069','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1545069"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of acetylcholine on the <span class="hlt">highly</span> stenotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery: difference between the constrictor response of the infarct-related <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery and that of the noninfarct-related artery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Okumura, K; Yasue, H; Matsuyama, K; Ogawa, H; Morikami, Y; Obata, K; Sakaino, N</p> <p>1992-03-15</p> <p>To examine the constrictor response of the infarct-related stenotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery in comparison with that of noninfarct-related stenotic arteries, acetylcholine in maximal doses of 100 micrograms for the left and 50 micrograms for the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery was injected into the 16 infarct-related <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries of 16 patients with previous myocardial infarction (group 1) and into 19 stenotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries of 16 patients with stable angina without myocardial infarction (group 2). Acetylcholine's effects on lumen diameter and area were quantitatively analyzed at the stenotic segment and its proximal segment without significant stenosis. Acetylcholine decreased lumen diameter and area at the stenotic segments from 0.72 +/- 0.18 to 0.18 +/- 0.33 mm and from 0.45 +/- 0.22 to 0.10 +/- 0.22 mm2, respectively, in group 1 (both p less than 0.01) and from 0.75 +/- 0.22 to 0.49 +/- 0.30 mm and 0.48 +/- 0.29 to 0.26 +/- 0.23 mm2, respectively, in group 2 (both p less than 0.01). Acetylcholine decreased the diameter and area at the proximal segment from 2.71 +/- 0.75 to 2.38 +/- 0.6 mm and from 6.18 +/- 3.4 to 4.71 +/- 2.23 mm2, respectively, in group 1 (both p less than 0.01) and from 2.31 +/- 0.67 to 1.95 +/- 0.59 mm and from 4.5 +/- 2.97 to 3.22 +/- 1.96 mm2, respectively, in group 2 (both p less than 0.01). The changes in diameter and area at the stenotic segment in group 1 were significantly greater than those in group 2 (both p less than 0.01); there were no significant differences between groups in the changes at the proximal segment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4773142','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4773142"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span> Spinal Anesthesia Enhances Anti-Inflammatory Responses in Patients Undergoing <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Bypass Graft Surgery and Aortic Valve Replacement: Randomized Pilot Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lee, Trevor W. R.; Kowalski, Stephen; Falk, Kelsey; Maguire, Doug; Freed, Darren H.; HayGlass, Kent T.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Cardiac surgery induces many physiologic changes including major inflammatory and sympathetic nervous system responses. Here, we conducted a single-centre pilot study to generate hypotheses on the potential immune impact of adding <span class="hlt">high</span> spinal anaesthesia to general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery in adults. We hypothesized that this strategy, previously shown to blunt the sympathetic response and improve pain management, could reduce the undesirable systemic inflammatory responses caused by cardiac surgery. Methods This prospective randomized unblinded pilot study was conducted on 14 patients undergoing cardiac surgery for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement secondary to severe aortic stenosis. The primary outcome measures examined longitudinally were serum pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-1b, CCL2), anti-inflammatory (IL-10, TNF-RII, IL-1Ra), acute phase protein (CRP, PTX3) and cardiovascular risk (sST2) biomarkers. Results The kinetics of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarker was determined following surgery. All pro-inflammatory and acute phase reactant biomarker responses induced by surgical stress were indistinguishable in intensity and duration between control groups and those who also received <span class="hlt">high</span> spinal anaesthesia. Conversely, IL-10 levels were markedly elevated in both intensity and duration in the group receiving <span class="hlt">high</span> spinal anesthesia (p = 0.005). Conclusions This hypothesis generating pilot study suggests that <span class="hlt">high</span> spinal anesthesia can alter the net inflammatory response that results from cardiac surgery. In appropriately selected populations, this may add incremental benefit by dampening the net systemic inflammatory response during the week following surgery. Larger population studies, powered to assess immune, physiologic and clinical outcomes in both acute and longer term settings, will be required to better assess potential benefits of incorporating <span class="hlt">high</span> spinal anesthesia. Trial Registration Clinical</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9639E..06L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9639E..06L"><span id="translatedtitle">Sentinel-2/MSI <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration: first results</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lonjou, V.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Tremas, T.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Sentinel-2 is an optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. It is developed in partnership between the European Commission and the European Space Agency. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. It will offer a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a <span class="hlt">high</span> revisit (5 days with two satellites), a <span class="hlt">high</span> resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). CNES is involved in the instrument commissioning in collaboration with ESA. This paper reviews all the techniques that will be used to insure an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration of the 13 spectral bands better than 5% (target 3%), and will present the first results if available. First, the nominal calibration technique, based on an on-board sun diffuser, is detailed. Then, we show how vicarious calibration methods based on acquisitions over natural targets (oceans, deserts, and Antarctica during winter) will be used to check and improve the accuracy of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration coefficients. Finally, the verification scheme, exploiting photometer in-situ measurements over Lacrau plain, is described. A synthesis, including spectral coherence, inter-methods agreement and temporal evolution, will conclude the paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27465517','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27465517"><span id="translatedtitle">Distal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> perforation in patients with prior <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass graft surgery: The importance of early treatment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Karatasakis, Aris; Akhtar, Yasir N; Brilakis, Emmanouil S</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>In patients with prior <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, distal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> perforations are commonly considered to be at low risk for causing cardiac tamponade due to a potential protective role of pericardial adhesions, which obliterate the pericardial space. Loculated effusions can however form in such patients, compressing various cardiac structures and causing hemodynamic compromise. We present two cases of distal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> perforation in prior CABG patients undergoing chronic total occlusion percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention. In the first case a distal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> perforation was initially observed, resulting in a loculated pericardial effusion that caused ST-segment elevation and death, despite successful sealing of the perforation. In the second case a similar perforation was immediately sealed with a covered stent, followed by uneventful patient recovery. A literature review of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> perforation leading to hemodynamic compromise in patients with prior CABG surgery revealed <span class="hlt">high</span> mortality (22%), suggesting that prompt sealing of the perforation is critical in these patients. PMID:27465517</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070032798&hterms=radiometric+calibration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dradiometric%2Bcalibration','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070032798&hterms=radiometric+calibration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dradiometric%2Bcalibration"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's <span class="hlt">absolute</span> spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016JCAP...08..060V&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016JCAP...08..060V&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology with negative <span class="hlt">absolute</span> temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Negative <span class="hlt">absolute</span> temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730021662','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730021662"><span id="translatedtitle">Apparatus for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> pressure measurement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hecht, R. (Inventor)</p> <p>1969-01-01</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">absolute</span> pressure sensor (e.g., the diaphragm of a capacitance manometer) was subjected to a superimposed potential to effectively reduce the mechanical stiffness of the sensor. This substantially increases the sensitivity of the sensor and is particularly useful in vacuum gauges. An oscillating component of the superimposed potential induced vibrations of the sensor. The phase of these vibrations with respect to that of the oscillating component was monitored, and served to initiate an automatic adjustment of the static component of the superimposed potential, so as to bring the sensor into resonance at the frequency of the oscillating component. This establishes a selected sensitivity for the sensor, since a definite relationship exists between resonant frequency and sensitivity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JCAP...08..060V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JCAP...08..060V"><span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology with negative <span class="hlt">absolute</span> temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Negative <span class="hlt">absolute</span> temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12017193','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12017193"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span> density- and beta-lipoprotein screening for risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease in the context of new findings on reverse cholesterol transport.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Levinson, Stanley S</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>This article considers how <span class="hlt">high</span> density lipoproteins (HDL) act as anti-arteriosclerotic agents, examines the usefulness of HDL indexes alone and in conjunction with other markers of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD), and discusses how HDL markers compare with what one might expect from known metabolic mechanisms. This is accomplished by: (i) an overview of mechanisms associated with CAD, especially new findings regarding reverse cholesterol transport; (ii) a brief review of the clinical literature on biochemical markers for automated use; and (iii) analysis of data for persons with or without angiographically documented CAD. Based on these considerations, the ratio of optimized apo A-I/apo B appears superior to lipoprotein lipid markers for predicting the risk of CAD. Yet the ratio shows poor diagnostic accuracy by itself; it yields poorer diagnostic accuracy than would be expected from assessing the metabolic pathways. Discrimination is improved by using the ratio in conjunction with risk factors defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Based on receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve data, this approach increases the accuracy by 13-14% above that obtained with current lipid markers; it improves discrimination more than the use of inflammatory markers. Apolipoprotein testing is better related to the mechanisms of cholesterol transport, is widely available, and requires only two tests, compared to three, to improve discrimination. However, inclusion of inflammatory markers may need to be considered in the future, when more information is available about their functions and clinical value. PMID:12017193</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4677868','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4677868"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shrestha, Sanjay; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>After undergoing elective percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of <span class="hlt">high</span>-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot. PMID:26722183</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4337271','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4337271"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">High</span> Intensity Interval versus Moderate Continuous Training on Markers of Ventilatory and Cardiac Efficiency in <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease Patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cardozo, Gustavo G.; Oliveira, Ricardo B.; Farinatti, Paulo T. V.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background. We tested the hypothesis that <span class="hlt">high</span> intensity interval training (HIIT) would be more effective than moderate intensity continuous training (MIT) to improve newly emerged markers of cardiorespiratory fitness in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) patients, as the relationship between ventilation and carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2 slope), oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES), and oxygen pulse (O2P). Methods. Seventy-one patients with optimized treatment were randomly assigned into HIIT (n = 23, age = 56 ± 12 years), MIT (n = 24, age = 62 ± 12 years), or nonexercise control group (CG) (n = 24, age = 64 ± 12 years). MIT performed 30 min of continuous aerobic exercise at 70–75% of maximal heart rate (HRmax), and HIIT performed 30 min sessions split in 2 min alternate bouts at 60%/90% HRmax (3 times/week for 16 weeks). Results. No differences among groups (before versus after) were found for VE/VCO2 slope or OUES (P > 0.05). After training the O2P slope increased in HIIT (22%, P < 0.05) but not in MIT (2%, P > 0.05), while decreased in CG (−20%, P < 0.05) becoming lower versus HIIT (P = 0.03). Conclusion. HIIT was more effective than MIT for improving O2P slope in CHD patients, while VE/VCO2 slope and OUES were similarly improved by aerobic training regimens versus controls. PMID:25741531</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26722183','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26722183"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shrestha, Sanjay; Adams, Jenny; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>After undergoing elective percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of <span class="hlt">high</span>-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4980920','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4980920"><span id="translatedtitle">Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio but not neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio predicts <span class="hlt">high</span> on-treatment platelet reactivity in clopidogrel-treated patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Efe, Edem; Kocayiğit, Ibrahim; Türker, Pabuccu Mustafa; Murat, Küçükukur; Erkan, Alpaslan; Sedat, Taş; Alper, Çil; Necati, Aksoy Murat; Gökhan, Vural Mustafa; Bahri, Akdeniz</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), consisting of clopidogrel and aspirin, is the main-stay treatment of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes (ACS). However, major adverse cardiovascular events may occur even in patients undergoing DAPT, and this has been related to the variable pharmacodynamic efficacy of these drugs, especially clopidogrel. Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) are novel inflammatory markers for cardiovascular risk stratification, which may reflect an inflammatory state and thus <span class="hlt">high</span> on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR). Methods: We investigated the usefulness of PLR and NLR in predicting HPR in clopidogrel-treated patients with ACS. A total of 244 patients were enrolled in this study, and 43 of them were nonresponsive to clopidogrel. Results: Logistic regression analysis indicated that PLR was significantly associated with HPR (P < 0.001). Using a cutoff level of 331, PLR predicted HPR with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 69% (odds ratio: 376.15, 95% confidence interval = 37.813–3741.728 P < 0.001, receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.885). Conclusions: We suggest that more attention should be paid to the PLR values of these patients on admission to identify individuals who may not benefit from clopidogrel during the course of ACS. PMID:27756943</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15895406','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15895406"><span id="translatedtitle">Left ventricular unloading and concomitant total cardiac output increase by the use of percutaneous Impella Recover LP 2.5 assist device during <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Valgimigli, Marco; Steendijk, Paul; Sianos, George; Onderwater, Emile; Serruys, Patrick W</p> <p>2005-06-01</p> <p>A number of techniques have been proposed for circulatory support during <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> interventions (PCI), but no single approach has achieved wide acceptance so far. We report on a patient with severe left ventricular (LV) impairment who underwent a PCI with the use of a new left ventricular assist device, the Impella Recover LP 2.5 system. The effects on global cardiac output were determined by thermodilution (TD) and LV pressure-volume loops obtained by conductance catheter. The activation of the pump resulted in a rapid and sustained unloading effect of the LV. At the same time, the continuous expulsion of blood into ascending aorta throughout the cardiac cycle produced by the pump resulted in an increase of systemic overall CO, measured by the TD technique, of 1.43 L/min. The procedure was uncomplicated and the patient remained uneventful at follow-up. Our single experience gives new input for future trials to assess the effect of the Impella Recover LP 2.5 assist device on outcome in this subset of patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001SPIE.4241..324D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001SPIE.4241..324D"><span id="translatedtitle">Physical and mathematical aspects of blood-glucose- and insulin-level kinetics in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease and <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of its development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Denisova, Tatyana P.; Malinova, Lidia I.; Malinov, Igor A.</p> <p>2001-05-01</p> <p>The intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed to estimate the kinetics of blood glucose and insulin levels. Glucose was injected in individual standardized dose (0.5 g. per 1 kg of body weight). Three groups of patients were checked up: 1) patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease verified by cicatricial alterations in myocardium found by electrocardiographic and echocardiographic methods; 2) children of patients with transmural myocardial infarction practically healthy at the moment of study; 3) persons practically healthy at the moment of study without any indications on cardiovascular diseases and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus among all ancestors and relatives who frequently were long-livers. Last groups didn't differ by age and sex. Peripheral blood glucose level, immunoreactive and free insulin (tested by muscular tissue) were studied just before glucose injection (on an empty stomach) and 4 times after it. The received discrete data were approximated by <span class="hlt">high</span> degree polynomials, the estimation of blood glucose and insulin time functions symmetric was performed. The deceleration of degradation of insulin circulating in peripheral blood and the time decrease of second phase of insulin secretion were analytically established. This fact proves the complicated mechanism of insulin alterations in atherosclerosis, consisting not only of insulin resistance of peripheral tissues but of decrease of plastic processes in insulin- generating cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26742468','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26742468"><span id="translatedtitle">A US Claims-Based Analysis of Real-World Lipid-Lowering Treatment Patterns in Patients With <span class="hlt">High</span> Cardiovascular Disease Risk or a Previous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Event.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Quek, Ruben G W; Fox, Kathleen M; Wang, Li; Li, Lu; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Wong, Nathan D</p> <p>2016-02-15</p> <p>The objective was to examine real-world treatment patterns of lipid-lowering therapies and their possible associated intolerance and/or ineffectiveness in patients with <span class="hlt">high</span> cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk initiating statins and/or ezetimibe. Patients aged ≥18 years who initiated statins and/or ezetimibe from January 01, 2007, to June 30, 2011, were retrospectively identified from the IMS LifeLink PharMetrics Plus commercial claims database. Patients were further classified into 2 cohorts: (1) history of cardiovascular event (CVE) and (2) history of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease risk equivalent (CHD RE). Patients had continuous health plan enrollment ≥1 year pre- and post-index date (statin and/or ezetimibe initiation date). Primary outcomes were index statin intensity, treatment modifications, possible associated statin/nonstatin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness issues (based on treatment modification), and time-to-treatment modifications. Analyses for each cohort were stratified by age group (<65 and ≥65 years). A total of 41,934 (history of CVE) and 170,344 patients (history of CHD RE) were included. On the index date, 8.8% to 25.1% of patients were initiated on <span class="hlt">high</span>-intensity statin. Among patients aged <65, 79.2% and 48.8% of those with history of CVE and 78.6% and 47.3% of those with a history of CHD RE had ≥1 and 2 treatment modifications, respectively. Among all patients, 24.6% to 25.6% had possible statin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness issues after accounting for second treatment modification (if any). In conclusion, in patients with <span class="hlt">high</span> CVD risk, index statin treatment modifications that imply possible statin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness were frequent; low use of <span class="hlt">high</span>-intensity statins indicates unmet need in the management of hyperlipidemia and possible remaining unaccounted CVD residual risk. PMID:26742468</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5035795','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5035795"><span id="translatedtitle">Diagnostic Accuracy of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Calcium Score Less than 100 in Excluding <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hanifehpour, Reza; Motevalli, Marzieh; Ghanaati, Hossein; Shahriari, Mona; Aliyari Ghasabeh, Mounes</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery calcium score (CACS) is a quantitative assessment of calcifications and an established predictor of cardiovascular events. Objectives In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV), specificity and sensitivity of CACS less than 100 in predicting significant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery stenosis in patients with risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) in a vessel-based analysis. Patients and Methods A cross sectional study was carried out on a study population of 2527 consecutive stable patients with symptoms suggestive of CAD who were referred for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). We performed 1343 studies with 256 slice machine in Shahid Rajaee hospital and the other studies were carried out with 64 slice machine in Imam Khomeini hospital and the calcium score was quantified according to the Agatston method. Results At the cutoff point of 100 for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium scoring, there was <span class="hlt">high</span> specificity (87%), <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitivity (79%), <span class="hlt">high</span> efficiency (84%), <span class="hlt">high</span> PPV (79%), and <span class="hlt">high</span> NPV (87%) in the diagnosis of significant stenosis in the whole heart. The frequency of zero calcium scoring was 59% in normal or nonsignificant stenosis and 7.6% in significant stenosis in the whole heart. Calcium scoring increased with greater severity of the arterial stenosis (P values < 0.001). Conclusion We conclude that <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium scoring provided useful information in the management of patients. In CACS less than 100, it has a NPV of 87% in excluding significant stenosis in patients with the risk of CAD but it does not have enough diagnostic accuracy for surely excluding <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenosis, so we should perform a combination of CACS and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography for patients.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3494749','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3494749"><span id="translatedtitle">Relation between geometric dimensions of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery stenoses and myocardial perfusion reserve in man.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Goldstein, R A; Kirkeeide, R L; Demer, L L; Merhige, M; Nishikawa, A; Smalling, R W; Mullani, N A; Gould, K L</p> <p>1987-05-01</p> <p>To determine the relation between stenosis anatomy and perfusion in man, 31 patients had quantitative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteriography and positron imaging (PET) with Rb-82 or N-13 ammonia at rest and after dipyridamole-handgrip stress. 10 patients were also studied after angioplasty (total stenoses = 41). Percent narrowing and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> cross-sectional luminal area were related through a quadratic function to myocardial perfusion reserve determined with PET. Arteriographically determined <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve was linearly related to relative myocardial perfusion reserve as expected, based on the derivation of equations for stenosis flow reserve. All of the correlations had considerable scatter, indicating that no single measurement derived by <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteriography was a good indicator of perfusion reserve by PET in individual patients. This study provides the relation between all anatomic dimensions of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery stenoses and myocardial perfusion reserve in man, and suggests that PET indicates the functional significance of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery stenoses for clinical purposes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4709668','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4709668"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of the New Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Benzofuroxane Derivative BF-5m on <span class="hlt">High</span> Glucose Induced Prolongation of Cardiac QT Interval and Increase of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Perfusion Pressure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Di Filippo, C.; Ferraro, B.; Maisto, R.; Trotta, M. C.; Di Carluccio, N.; Sartini, S.; La Motta, C.; Ferraraccio, F.; Rossi, F.; D'Amico, M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated the effects of the new aldose reductase inhibitor benzofuroxane derivative 5(6)-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylmethoxy)benzofuroxane (BF-5m) on the prolongation of cardiac QT interval and increase of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> perfusion pressure (CPP) in isolated, <span class="hlt">high</span> glucose (33.3 mM D-glucose) perfused rat hearts. BF-5m was dissolved in the Krebs solution at a final concentration of 0.01 μM, 0.05 μM, and 0.1 μM. 33.3 mM D-glucose caused a prolongation of the QT interval and increase of CPP up to values of 190 ± 12 ms and 110 ± 8 mmHg with respect to the values of hearts perfused with standard Krebs solution (11.1 mM D-glucose). The QT prolongation was reduced by 10%, 32%, and 41%, respectively, for the concentration of BF-5m 0.01 μM, 0.05 μM, and 0.1 μM. Similarly, the CPP was reduced by 20% for BF-5m 0.05 μM and by 32% for BF-5m 0.1 μM. BF-5m also increased the expression levels of sirtuin 1, MnSOD, eNOS, and FOXO-1, into the heart. The beneficial actions of BF-5m were partly abolished by the pretreatment of the rats with the inhibitor of the sirtuin 1 activity EX527 (10 mg/kg/day/7 days i.p.) prior to perfusion of the hearts with <span class="hlt">high</span> glucose + BF-5m (0.1 μM). Therefore, BF-5m supplies cardioprotection from the <span class="hlt">high</span> glucose induced QT prolongation and increase of CPP. PMID:26839893</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26161234','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26161234"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">High</span>-Dose Polymerized Hemoglobin Fails to Alleviate Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury due to Induction of Oxidative Damage in <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yang, Qian; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Chan; Zhou, Ronghua; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Shen; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Wentao; Liu, Jiaxin; Yang, Chengmin; Liu, Jin; Li, Tao</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable event for patients in cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study was designed to investigate whether glutaraldehyde-polymerized human placenta hemoglobin (PolyPHb), a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC), can protect heart against CPB-induced I/R injury or not and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Methods and Results. A standard dog CPB model with 2-hour cardiac arrest and 2-hour reperfusion was established. The results demonstrated that a low-dose PolyPHb (0.1%, w/v) provided a significant protection on the I/R heart, whereas the <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose PolyPHb (3%, w/v) did not exhibit cardioprotective effect, as evidenced by the impaired cardiac function, decreased myocardial oxygen utilization, and elevated enzymes release and pathological changes. Further study indicated that exposure of isolated <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to a <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose PolyPHb caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was companied with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and elevated malonaldehyde (MDA) formation. Consistent with the increased oxidative stress, the NAD(P)H oxidase activity and subunits expression, including gp91(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), and Nox1, were greatly upregulated. Conclusion. The <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose PolyPHb fails to protect heart from CPB-induced I/R injury, which was due to overproduction of NAD(P)H oxidase-induced ROS and resultant endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26161234</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=481472','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=481472"><span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of angiographic and surgical findings in distal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> branches.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pidgeon, J; Treasure, T; Brooks, N; Cattell, M; Balcon, R</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>In 60 consecutive patients undergoing vein graft surgery the angiographic appearances of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vessels were compared with those of the vessels at operation. On the basis of lumen diameter at the potential sites for grafting it was possible to predict with reasonable accuracy from examination of the angiogram which vessels were large enough to be grafted. Angiographic predictive accuracy was 82% and was similar both for vessels which filled normally and for those which filled by collaterals. The predictive value of the angiographic assessment was similar for branches thought to be too small (predictive value 74%) and for those considered sufficiently large (predictive value 85%) to receive a vein graft. Disease of the vessel walls was found at surgery (66% of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> branches examined) more frequently than was predicted from the angiographic appearances (33%). Previous necropsy studies have found a <span class="hlt">high</span> prevalence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atheroma in the population, yet normal angiographic appearances in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries are not uncommon in patients undergoing investigation for suspected <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease. The present study showed that atheroma may be present in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vessels without encroaching into the vessel lumen, so that it is not evident on the angiogram. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> atheroma is thus present more often and is more widely distributed in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> tree than is indicated by <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography. PMID:6607059</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9307486','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9307486"><span id="translatedtitle">Unusual right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery anomaly with major implication during cardiac operations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gaudino, M; Glieca, F; Bruno, P; Piancone, F L; Alessandrini, F; Possati, G</p> <p>1997-09-01</p> <p>We report a case in which an unrevealed <span class="hlt">high</span> origin of the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery (almost 4 cm above the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus) led to major complications during a routine atrial septal defect closure. We stress that, in absence of preoperative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery anomalies should always be considered and minimal ascending aorta manipulation and antegrade/ retrograde myocardial protection should be recommended. PMID:9307486</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/coronaryarterydisease.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/coronaryarterydisease.html"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2499687','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2499687"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery fistulas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Said, S.A.M.; Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Fieren, M.J.C.H.; Meijboom, E.J.; van der Werf, T.; Bennink, G.B.W.E.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The aetiology of congenital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistulas remains a challenging issue. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> arteries with an anatomically normal origin may, for obscure reasons, terminate abnormally and communicate with different single or multiple cardiac chambers or great vessels. When this occurs, the angiographic morphological appearance may vary greatly from discrete channels to plexiform network of vessels. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> arteriovenous fistulas (CAVFs) have neither specific signs nor pathognomonic symptoms; the spectrum of clinical features varies considerably. The clinical presentation of symptomatic cases can include angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, fatigue, dyspnoea, CHF, SBE, ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias or even sudden cardiac death. CAVFs may, however, be a coincidental finding during diagnostic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (CAG). CAG is considered the gold standard for diagnosing and delineating the morphological anatomy and pathway of CAVFs. There are various tailored therapeutic modalities for the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CAVFs, including conservative pharmacological strategy, percutaneous transluminal embolisation and surgical ligation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696067</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/coronaryarterybypasssurgery.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/coronaryarterybypasssurgery.html"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Bypass Surgery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... t help, you may need <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/coronary-artery-disease.printerview.all.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/coronary-artery-disease.printerview.all.html"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... ve started to help the medicine work. Other Organizations American Heart Association Questions to Ask Your Doctor Am I at risk for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD)? What lifestyle changes should I make to decrease my risk of ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos/000042.htm','SCIGOVIMAGE-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos/000042.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Directional <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherectomy (DCA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... with rotation of the catheter, the balloon can be deflated and re-inflated to cut the blockage ... uniform debulking. A device called a stent may be placed within the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery to keep the ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24501660','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24501660"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> fistulas: a case series.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nada, Fennich; Fedoua, Elouali; Ghita, Saghi; Nadia, Bouzammour; Leila, Haddour; Jamila, Zarzur; Mohamed, Cherti</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery fistula is an uncommon finding during angiographic exams. We report a case series of five patients with congenital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> fistulas. The first patient was 56 years old and had a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> fistula associated with a partial atrio ventricular defect, the second patient was 54 years old and had two fistulas originating from the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery with a severe atherosclerotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease, the third patient was 57 years old with a fistula originating from the circumflex artery associated with a rheumatic mitral stenosis, the fourth patient was 50 years old and had a fistulous communication between the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery and the right bronchial artery, and the last patient was 12 years old who had bilateral <span class="hlt">coronary</span> fistulas draining into the right ventricle with an aneurismal dilatation of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. Angiographic aspects of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> fistulas are various; management is controversial and depends on the presence of symptoms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23516028','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23516028"><span id="translatedtitle">Low <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol is a residual risk factor associated with long-term clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with stable <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease who achieve optimal control of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Yokoyama, Takayuki; Okazaki, Shinya; Kurata, Takeshi; Daida, Hiroyuki</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Diabetes mellitus is recognized an independent risk factor for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) and mortality. Clinical trials have shown that statins significantly reduce cardiovascular events in diabetic patients. However, residual cardiovascular risk persists despite the achievement of target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels with statin. <span class="hlt">High</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factor that is independent of LDL-C levels. We evaluated the impact of HDL-C on long-term mortality in diabetic patients with stable CAD who achieved optimal LDL-C. We enrolled 438 consecutive diabetic patients who were scheduled for percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention between 2004 and 2007 at our institution. We identified 165 patients who achieved target LDL-C <100 mg/dl. Patients were stratified into two groups according to HDL-C levels (low HDL-C group, baseline HDL-C <40 mg/dl; <span class="hlt">high</span> HDL-C group, ≥40 mg/dl). Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) that included all-cause death, acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome, and target lesion revascularization were evaluated between the two groups. The median follow-up period was 946 days. The rate of MACE was significantly higher in diabetic patients with low-HDL-C who achieved optimal LDL-C (6.9 vs 17.9 %, log-rank P = 0.030). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that HDL-C is significantly associated with clinical outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio for MACE 1.33, 95 % confidence interval 1.01-1.75, P = 0.042). Low HDL-C is a residual risk factor that is significantly associated with long-term clinical outcomes among diabetic patients with stable CAD who achieve optimal LDL-C levels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23964121','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23964121"><span id="translatedtitle">Association between cholesterol synthesis/absorption markers and effects of cholesterol lowering by atorvastatin among patients with <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qi, Yue; Liu, Jing; Ma, Changsheng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Miao; Lv, Qiang; Sun, Jiayi; Liu, Jun; Li, Yan; Zhao, Dong</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>No indices are currently available to facilitate clinicians to identify patients who need either statin monotherapy or statin-ezetimibe combined treatment. We aimed to investigate whether cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers can predict the cholesterol-lowering response to statin. Total 306 statin-naïve patients with <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) were treated with atorvastatin 20 mg/day for 1 month. Cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were measured before and after treatment. Atorvastatin decreased LDL-C by 36.8% (range: decrease of 74.5% to increase of 31.9%). Baseline cholesterol synthesis marker lathosterol and cholesterol absorption marker campesterol codetermined the effect of atorvastatin treatment. The effect of cholesterol lowering by atorvastatin was significantly associated with baseline lathosterol levels but modified bidirectionally by baseline campesterol levels. In patients with the highest baseline campesterol levels, atorvastatin treatment decreased cholesterol absorption by 46.1%, which enhanced the effect of LDL-C lowering. Atorvastatin treatment increased cholesterol absorption by 52.3% in those with the lowest baseline campesterol levels, which attenuated the effect of LDL-C reduction. Especially those with the highest lathosterol but the lowest campesterol levels at baseline had significantly less LDL-C reduction than those with the same baseline lathosterol levels but the highest campesterol levels (27.3% versus 42.4%, P = 0.002). These results suggest that combined patterns of cholesterol synthesis/absorption markers, rather than each single marker, are potential predictors of the LDL-C-lowering effects of atorvastatin in <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk CHD patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3007289','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3007289"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> configuration of isovouacapenol C</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fun, Hoong-Kun; Yodsaoue, Orapun; Karalai, Chatchanok; Chantrapromma, Suchada</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The title compound, C27H34O5 {systematic name: (4aR,5R,6R,6aS,7R,11aS,11bR)-4a,6-dihy­droxy-4,4,7,11b-tetra­methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,6a,7,11,11a,11b-dodeca­hydro­phenanthro[3,2-b]furan-5-yl benzoate}, is a cassane furan­oditerpene, which was isolated from the roots of Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The three cyclo­hexane rings are trans fused: two of these are in chair conformations with the third in a twisted half-chair conformation, whereas the furan ring is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.003 Å). An intra­molecular C—H⋯O inter­action generates an S(6) ring. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> configurations of the stereogenic centres at positions 4a, 5, 6, 6a, 7, 11a and 11b are R, R, R, S, R, S and R, respectively. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into infinite chains along [010] by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. C⋯O [3.306 (2)–3.347 (2) Å] short contacts and C—H⋯π inter­actions also occur. PMID:21588364</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Metro..49..706S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Metro..49..706S"><span id="translatedtitle">Frequency-domain analysis of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Svitlov, S.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeter is analysed as a linear time-invariant system in the frequency domain. Frequency responses of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeters are derived analytically based on the propagation of the complex exponential signal through their linear measurement functions. Depending on the model of motion and the number of time-distance coordinates, an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeter is considered as a second-order (three-level scheme) or third-order (multiple-level scheme) low-pass filter. It is shown that the behaviour of an atom <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeter in the frequency domain corresponds to that of the three-level corner-cube <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeter. Theoretical results are applied for evaluation of random and systematic measurement errors and optimization of an experiment. The developed theory agrees with known results of an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeter analysis in the time and frequency domains and can be used for measurement uncertainty analyses, building of vibration-isolation systems and synthesis of digital filtering algorithms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22055716','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22055716"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Roshan, M. V.; Springham, S. V.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.; Krishnan, M.</p> <p>2010-08-15</p> <p>Yttrium is presented as an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f{sub n}{approx}4.1x10{sup -4} with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10{sup 8} neutrons per discharge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/910204','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/910204"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Measurement of Electron Cloud Density</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L</p> <p>2007-06-21</p> <p>Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the <span class="hlt">High</span>-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGP51B..07L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGP51B..07L"><span id="translatedtitle">Swarm's <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver <span class="hlt">high</span> resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2716238','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2716238"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of serum neopterin, <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in Egyptian patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ragab, M; Hassan, H; Zaytoun, T; Refai, W; Rocks, B; Elsammak, M</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The present study evaluated serum neopterin, <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in Egyptian patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. Thirty-six patients with unstable angina aged (mean ± SD) 61.3±9.4 years, 29 patients with myocardial infarction aged 58.2±8.7 years and 24 sex- and age-matched control subjects were included in the study. Neopterin levels were significantly higher in patients with myocardial infarction and those with unstable angina than in the healthy control group (P<0.001). The serum level of neopterin in the control group (median [range]) was 3.25 nmol/L (1.25 nmol/L to 5.4 nmol/L), whereas in patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction, neopterin levels were 10.4 nmol/L (3.5 nmol/L to 15.2 nmol/L) and 12.6 nmol/L (3.25 nmol/L to 17.8 nmol/L), respectively. Levels of hs-CRP and TBARS were also significantly higher in patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction than in the healthy control group (P<0.01). The medians (ranges) of hs-CRP were 4.8 mg/L (2.5 mg/L to 9.9 mg/L), 12.0 mg/L (4.6 mg/L to 31.0 mg/L) and 12.3 mg/L (7.5 mg/L to 32.1 mg/L) in the control group, patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction, respectively. The means ± SD of TBARS in the control group, patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction were 0.64±0.17 μmol/L, 1.17±0.31 μmol/L and 1.17±0.49 μmol/L, respectively. TBARS positively correlated with hs-CRP and neopterin levels. Furthermore, when both patients and controls were classified according to their smoking status, significantly higher levels of neopterin and TBARS were found in the smokers of each subgroup than in the nonsmokers. In conclusion, the present study found a higher level of neopterin, hs-CRP and TBARS in patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. Serum neopterin and hs-CRP positively correlated with the level of TBARS. The authors suggest that</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5006637','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5006637"><span id="translatedtitle">Prasugrel Results in Higher Decrease in <span class="hlt">High</span>-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention Comparing to Clopidogrel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Chitsazan, Mandana; Chitsazan, Mitra; Salehi, Negar; Amin, Ahmad; Bidokhti, Arash Amin; Babaali, Nima; Bordbar, Armin; Hejrati, Maral; Moghadami, Samar</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVES A growing body of clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we compared the effects of clopidogrel and prasugrel on <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients undergoing percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI). METHODS The present randomized, double-blind clinical trial included 120 patients who underwent PCI. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to one of the two groups: 80 patients in the first group received clopidogrel (Plavix®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 300 and 75 mg daily, respectively) and 40 patients in the second group received prasugrel (Effient®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 60 and 10 mg, respectively) for 12 weeks. The hs-CRP levels between baseline and 12th week were compared. RESULTS Of the 120 patients, 69 patients (57.5%) were male. Pretreatment hs-CRP level was statistically comparable in clopidogrel (median, 15.10 mg/dL; interquartile range [IQR], 9.62–23.75 mg/dL) and prasugrel groups (median, 18 mg/dL; IQR, 14.25–22 mg/dL; P = 0.06). Patients taking clopidogrel showed a significant reduction in hs-CRP level compared with the baseline values (P < 0.001). Prasugrel administration also resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP level (P < 0.001). A significant 73% overall reduction in the hs-CRP level was seen with prasugrel compared with 39% overall reduction in hs-CRP level with clopidogrel (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Prasugrel seems to be superior to clopidogrel in the reduction of hs-CRP in patients undergoing PCI.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4668337','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4668337"><span id="translatedtitle">Interval training based on ventilatory anaerobic threshold increases cardiac vagal modulation and decreases <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity c-reative protein: randomized clinical trial in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tamburus, Nayara Y.; Paula, Roberta F. L.; Kunz, Vandeni C.; César, Marcelo C.; Moreno, Marlene A.; da Silva, Ester</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: Autonomic dysfunction and inflammatory activity are involved in the development and progression of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD), and exercise training has been shown to confer a cardiovascular benefit. Objective: To evaluate the effects that interval training (IT) based on ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) has on heart rate variability (HRV) and <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels, as well as the relationship between both levels, in patients with CAD and/or cardiovascular risk factors (RF). Method: Forty-two men (aged 57.88±6.20 years) were divided into two training groups, CAD-T (n= 12) and RF-T (n= 10), and two control groups, CAD-C (n= 10) and RF-C (n=10). Heart rate and RR intervals in the supine position, cardiopulmonary exercise tests, and hs-CRP levels were measured before and after IT. HRV was analyzed by spectral and symbolic analysis. The CAD-T and RF-T underwent a 16-week IT program of three weekly sessions at training intensities based on the VAT. Results: In the RF-T, cardiac sympathetic modulation index and hs-CRP decreased (p<0.02), while cardiac parasympathetic modulation index increased (p<0.02). In the CAD-T, cardiac parasympathetic modulation index increased, while hs-CRP, systolic, and diastolic blood pressures decreased (p<0.02). Both control groups showed increase in hs-CRP parameters (p<0.02). There was a strong and significant association between parasympathetic and sympathetic modulations with hs-CRP. Conclusion: The IT program based on the VAT promoted a decrease in hs-CRP associated with improvement in cardiac autonomic modulation. PMID:26647745</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5006637','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5006637"><span id="translatedtitle">Prasugrel Results in Higher Decrease in <span class="hlt">High</span>-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention Comparing to Clopidogrel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Chitsazan, Mandana; Chitsazan, Mitra; Salehi, Negar; Amin, Ahmad; Bidokhti, Arash Amin; Babaali, Nima; Bordbar, Armin; Hejrati, Maral; Moghadami, Samar</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVES A growing body of clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we compared the effects of clopidogrel and prasugrel on <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients undergoing percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI). METHODS The present randomized, double-blind clinical trial included 120 patients who underwent PCI. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to one of the two groups: 80 patients in the first group received clopidogrel (Plavix®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 300 and 75 mg daily, respectively) and 40 patients in the second group received prasugrel (Effient®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 60 and 10 mg, respectively) for 12 weeks. The hs-CRP levels between baseline and 12th week were compared. RESULTS Of the 120 patients, 69 patients (57.5%) were male. Pretreatment hs-CRP level was statistically comparable in clopidogrel (median, 15.10 mg/dL; interquartile range [IQR], 9.62–23.75 mg/dL) and prasugrel groups (median, 18 mg/dL; IQR, 14.25–22 mg/dL; P = 0.06). Patients taking clopidogrel showed a significant reduction in hs-CRP level compared with the baseline values (P < 0.001). Prasugrel administration also resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP level (P < 0.001). A significant 73% overall reduction in the hs-CRP level was seen with prasugrel compared with 39% overall reduction in hs-CRP level with clopidogrel (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Prasugrel seems to be superior to clopidogrel in the reduction of hs-CRP in patients undergoing PCI. PMID:27597810</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8909379','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8909379"><span id="translatedtitle">Fetal growth and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease in south India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stein, C E; Fall, C H; Kumaran, K; Osmond, C; Cox, V; Barker, D J</p> <p>1996-11-01</p> <p>People from India living overseas have <span class="hlt">high</span> rates of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease which are not explained by known <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factors. In India, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease is predicted to become the most common cause of death within 15 years. Small size at birth is a newly described risk factor for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease. The authors studied 517 men and women born between 1934 and 1954 in a mission hospital in Mysore, South India, and who still lived near the hospital. Researchers related the prevalence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease, defined by standard criteria, to individual birth size. 25 men and 27 women had <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease. Low birth weight, short birth length, and small head circumference were associated with a raised prevalence of the disease. The associations were stronger and statistically significant among people aged 45 years and over. <span class="hlt">High</span> rates of disease were also found in those whose mothers had a low body weight during pregnancy. The highest prevalence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease was in people who weighed 2.5 kg or less at birth and whose mothers weighed less than 45 kg during pregnancy. These associations were largely independent of known <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5010093','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5010093"><span id="translatedtitle">Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated with Severity of Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndrome in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and <span class="hlt">High</span> Rates of Sun Exposure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gondim, Fernando; Caribé, Ana; Vasconcelos, Karine Ferreira; Segundo, Alexandre Dantas; Bandeira, Francisco</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Evidence shows that patients with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations have a higher risk of developing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to assess vitamin D as a predictor of the severity in diabetics with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS). METHODS A total of 166 patients were diagnosed with ACS. Serum 25OHD concentrations were analyzed, and risk factors for ACS were evaluated. RESULTS Patients diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction with elevation of the ST segment had a higher rate of 25OHD, <20 ng/mL compared to ≥30 ng/mL (47.8% × 13.4%, P = 0.03). Diabetics with vitamin D deficiency had more multivessel lesions in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography than non-diabetics (69% × 31.8%, P = 0.007). After adjustments for confounders, serum 25OHD remained associated with more severe disease. CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency is associated with more severe ACS and is a predictor of more extensive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesions in patients with T2DM.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5010093','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5010093"><span id="translatedtitle">Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated with Severity of Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndrome in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and <span class="hlt">High</span> Rates of Sun Exposure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gondim, Fernando; Caribé, Ana; Vasconcelos, Karine Ferreira; Segundo, Alexandre Dantas; Bandeira, Francisco</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Evidence shows that patients with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations have a higher risk of developing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to assess vitamin D as a predictor of the severity in diabetics with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS). METHODS A total of 166 patients were diagnosed with ACS. Serum 25OHD concentrations were analyzed, and risk factors for ACS were evaluated. RESULTS Patients diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction with elevation of the ST segment had a higher rate of 25OHD, <20 ng/mL compared to ≥30 ng/mL (47.8% × 13.4%, P = 0.03). Diabetics with vitamin D deficiency had more multivessel lesions in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography than non-diabetics (69% × 31.8%, P = 0.007). After adjustments for confounders, serum 25OHD remained associated with more severe disease. CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency is associated with more severe ACS and is a predictor of more extensive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesions in patients with T2DM. PMID:27625577</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8519704','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8519704"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Coronary</span> veins and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus tributary veins in Africans].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yangni-Angate, H; Kokoua, A; Kouassi, R; Kassanyou, S; Gnagne, Y; Guessan, G N; Cowppli-Bony, P; Memel, J B</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>This anatomical study carried out on 40 African adults hearts studied branches of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus. By using of injection of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries and corrosion of the myocardium, the study identified certain peculiarities of the small <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vein and the posterior descending interventricular vein in Africans. PMID:8519704</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3931942','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3931942"><span id="translatedtitle">Lateral rectus palsy following <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography and percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nicholson, Luke; Jones, Ruth; Hughes, David S</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present a rare case of unilateral lateral rectus palsy following an elective <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography and percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention in a 78-year-oldwoman. Ophthalmoplegia following <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography is extremely rare and this is the first case of a unilateral lateral rectus palsy following the procedure. PMID:24536054</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987PhDT........96H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987PhDT........96H"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Radiometric Calibration of Space - Sensors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Holm, Ronald Gene</p> <p>1987-09-01</p> <p>The need for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometric calibration of space-based sensors will continue to increase as new generations of space sensors are developed. A reflectance -based in-flight calibration procedure is used to determine the radiance reaching the entrance pupil of the sensor. This procedure uses ground-based measurements coupled with a radiative transfer code to characterize the effects the atmosphere has on the signal reaching the sensor. The computed radiance is compared to the digital count output of the sensor associated with the image of a test site. This provides an update to the preflight calibration of the system and a check on the on-board internal calibrator. This calibration procedure was used to perform a series of five calibrations of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM). For the 12 measurements made in TM bands 1-3, the RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean is (+OR-) 1.9%, and for measurements in the IR, TM bands 4,5, and 7, the value is (+OR-) 3.4%. The RMS variation for all 23 measurements is (+OR-) 2.8%. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration techniques were put to another test with a series of three calibration of the SPOT-1 <span class="hlt">High</span> Resolution Visible, (HRV), sensors. The ratio, HRV-2/HRV-1, of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration coefficients compared very well with ratios of histogrammed data obtained when the cameras simultaneously imaged the same ground site. Bands PA, B1 and B3 agreed to within 3%, while band B2 showed a 7% difference. The procedure for performing a satellite calibration was then used to demonstrate how a calibrated satellite sensor can be used to quantitatively evaluate surface reflectance over a wide range of surface features. Predicted reflectance factors were compared to values obtained from aircraft -based radiometer data. This procedure was applied on four dates with two different surface conditions per date. A strong correlation, R('2) = .996, was shown between reflectance values determined from satellite imagery and low-flying aircraft</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01881555','CLINICALTRIALS'); return false;" href="https://ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01881555"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional Testing Underlying <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Revascularisation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/screen/SimpleSearch">ClinicalTrials.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-10-04</p> <p>Multivessel <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease; Vessel Disease; Stable Angina; Unstable Angina or Stabilized Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction; Patients With ST-elevated Myocardial Infarction; Revascularization of Culprit <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8610603','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8610603"><span id="translatedtitle">Angiographic and procedural outcome after <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty in <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk subsets using a decremental diameter (tapered) balloon catheter. Tapered Balloon Registry Investigators.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laird, J R; Popma, J J; Knopf, W D; Yakubov, S; Satler, L; White, H; Bergelson, B; Hennecken, J; Lewis, S; Parks, J M; Holmes, D R</p> <p>1996-03-15</p> <p>The angiographic and clinical outcomes of 115 patients (129 lesions) treated at 11 clinical centers using a decremental diameter (tapered) balloon catheter were evaluated. The presence of marked tapering of the reference vessel, lesion location involving a bifurcation or anastomosis of a saphenous vein graft, or total <span class="hlt">coronary</span> occlusion where estimation of the distal vessel size was difficult were indications for this device. The tapered balloon was used as the initial dilatation device in 62 patients (73 narrowings), and as a secondary device in 53 patients (56 narrowings). Lesions selected for tapered balloon angioplasty were generally complex (95% had > or = 1 and 60% had > or = 2 adverse morphologic features). Vessel diameters were larger in the proximal reference segments (3.07 +/- 0.52 mm) than in distal ones (2.48 +/- 0.45 mm) (p<0.001). After tapered balloon angioplasty, the minimal lumen diameter increased from 0.85 +/- 0.34 mm to 2.13 +/- 0.50 mm (p<0.001), and the percent diameter stenosis decreased from 69 +/- 12% to 24 +/- 12% (p<0.001). <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> dissections occurred in 20% of lesions; they were severe in 4% (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute grade C to F). Abrupt closure occurred in 4.3% of patients (2.6% immediate; 1.7% delayed). Procedural success was obtained in 110 patients (96%); major complications (in-hospital death, myocardial infarction, or emergency <span class="hlt">coronary</span> bypass surgery) occurred in 3 patients (2.7%). <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angioplasty using the tapered balloon catheter appears to be a safe and effective technique for the treatment of complex lesion subsets, particularly those involving <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries with marked segmental tapering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4580697','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4580697"><span id="translatedtitle">Apelin Levels In Isolated <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Ectasia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kaplan, İbrahim; Yıldız, Abdulkadir; Akıl, Mehmet Ata; Acet, Halit; Yüksel, Murat; Polat, Nihat; Aydın, Mesut; Oylumlu, Mustafa; Ertaș, Faruk; Kaya, Hasan; Alan, Sait</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background and Objectives The etiopathogenesis of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery ectasia (CAE) is not known completely. In most of the cases, CAE is associated with atherosclerosis; however, isolated CAE has a nonatherosclerotic mechanism. The association between atherosclerotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease and apelin has been examined in previous studies. However, the role of plasma apelin in isolated <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery ectasia has not been studied. In this study, we investigated the relationship between plasma apelin levels and isolated <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery ectasia. Subjects and Methods The study population included a total of 54 patients. Twenty-six patients had isolated CAE (53.6±8.1 years); 28 patients with normal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries (51.6±8.8 years) and with similar risk factors and demographic characteristics served as the control group. Apelin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunoassay kit. Results Apelin level in the CAE group was significantly lower (apelin=0.181±0.159 ng/mL) than that in the control group (apelin=0.646±0.578 ng/mL) (p=0.033). Glucose, creatinine, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and <span class="hlt">high</span> density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion In this study, we showed that patients with isolated CAE have decreased plasma apelin levels compared with the control group. Based on the data, a relationship between plasma apelin and isolated CAE was determined. PMID:26413106</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4496O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4496O"><span id="translatedtitle">Possibilities of modelling of local and global hydrological changes from <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution Global Hydrological Model in the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravity observations - the case of Józefosław Observatory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Olszak, Tomasz; Barlik, Marcin; Pachuta, Andrzej; Próchniewicz, Dominik</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Geodynamical use of epoch gravimetric relative and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> observations requires the elimination of one from the most significant effect related to local and global changes of hydrological conditions. It is understood that hydrological effect is associated with changes in groundwater levels and soil moisture around the gravimetric station. In Poland, the quasi - permanent observations of gravity changes by <span class="hlt">absolute</span> method carried out since 2005 on gravity station located in the Astronomical - Geodetic Observatory in Józefosław. In the poster will be shortly described measurement strategy of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> observations and different approaches to the elimination of the local and global effects associated with changes in hydrology. This paper will discuss the results of the analysis of tidal observations relevant to the development of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> observations - seasonal changes in barometric correction factor and differences in the locally designated tidal corrections model. Analysis of the possibility of elimination the impact of global hydrological influence is based on the model GLDAS a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree independently on a local scale and global. Józefosław Observatory is equipped with additional sensors linked to the monitoring of local hydrological conditions. It gives a possibility to verify the quality of modeling of hydrological changes using global models in local and global scale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Happiness&pg=7&id=EJ804151','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Happiness&pg=7&id=EJ804151"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Income, Relative Income, and Happiness</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in <span class="hlt">absolute</span> terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and relative income are positively and significantly…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ853800.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ853800.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Value: A Real World Application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value simply…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=RHS+AND+15&pg=4&id=EJ249107','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=RHS+AND+15&pg=4&id=EJ249107"><span id="translatedtitle">Preschoolers' Success at Coding <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Size Values.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Russell, James</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Forty-five 2-year-old and forty-five 3-year-old children coded relative and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> sizes using 1.5-inch, 6-inch, and 18-inch cardboard squares. Results indicate that <span class="hlt">absolute</span> coding is possible for children of this age. (Author/RH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=standard+AND+deviation&pg=2&id=EJ1050985','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=standard+AND+deviation&pg=2&id=EJ1050985"><span id="translatedtitle">Introducing the Mean <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Deviation "Effect" Size</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gorard, Stephen</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean <span class="hlt">absolute</span> deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean <span class="hlt">absolute</span> deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4490812','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4490812"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> wealth of households</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gerkey, Drew; Hadley, Craig</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Objective To estimate the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> wealth of households using data from demographic and health surveys. Methods We developed a new metric, the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> wealth estimate, based on the rank of each surveyed household according to its material assets and the assumed shape of the distribution of wealth among surveyed households. Using data from 156 demographic and health surveys in 66 countries, we calculated <span class="hlt">absolute</span> wealth estimates for households. We validated the method by comparing the proportion of households defined as poor using our estimates with published World Bank poverty headcounts. We also compared the accuracy of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> versus relative wealth estimates for the prediction of anthropometric measures. Findings The median <span class="hlt">absolute</span> wealth estimates of 1 403 186 households were 2056 international dollars per capita (interquartile range: 723–6103). The proportion of poor households based on <span class="hlt">absolute</span> wealth estimates were strongly correlated with World Bank estimates of populations living on less than 2.00 United States dollars per capita per day (R2 = 0.84). <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> wealth estimates were better predictors of anthropometric measures than relative wealth indexes. Conclusion <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> wealth estimates provide new opportunities for comparative research to assess the effects of economic resources on health and human capital, as well as the long-term health consequences of economic change and inequality. PMID:26170506</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4916589','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4916589"><span id="translatedtitle">Reducing time to angiography and hospital stay for patients with <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk non-ST-elevation acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome: retrospective analysis of a paramedic-activated direct access pathway</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Koganti, S; Patel, N; Seraphim, A; Kotecha, T; Whitbread, M; Rakhit, R D</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective To assess whether a novel ‘direct access pathway’ (DAP) for the management of <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk non-ST-elevation acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes (NSTEACS) is safe, results in ‘shorter time to intervention and shorter admission times’. This pathway was developed locally to enable London Ambulance Service to rapidly transfer suspected <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk NSTEACS from the community to our regional heart attack centre for consideration of early angiography. Methods This is a retrospective case–control analysis of 289 patients comparing patients with <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk NSTEACS admitted via DAP with age-matched controls from the standard pan-London <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk ACS pathway (PLP) and the conventional pathway (CP). The primary end point of the study was time from admission to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography/intervention. Secondary end point was total length of hospital stay. Results Over a period of 43 months, 101 patients were admitted by DAP, 109 matched patients by PLP and 79 matched patients through CP. Median times from admission to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography for DAP, PLP and CP were 2.8 (1.5–9), 16.6 (6–50) and 60 (33–116) hours, respectively (p<0.001). Median length of hospital stay for DAP and PLP was similar at 3.0 (2.0–5.0) days in comparison to 5 (3–7) days for CP (p<0.001). Conclusions DAP resulted in a significant reduction in time to angiography for patients with <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk NSTEACS when compared to existing pathways. PMID:27324709</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880033615&hterms=VALUE+ABSOLUTE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DVALUE%2BABSOLUTE','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880033615&hterms=VALUE+ABSOLUTE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DVALUE%2BABSOLUTE"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> instability of the Gaussian wake profile</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local <span class="hlt">absolute</span> instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or <span class="hlt">absolute</span>, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27477409','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27477409"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intramural Hematoma Presenting as Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shimada, Takenobu; Kadota, Kazushige; Kubo, Shunsuke; Habara, Seiji; Mitsudo, Kazuaki</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We herein report a case of intramural hematoma without ongoing myocardial ischemia that healed spontaneously with conservative treatment. A 37-year-old woman was admitted due to chest pain. Acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome was diagnosed by electrocardiography and echocardiography. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angiography showed 90% stenosis in the distal portion of the left anterior descending <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery, where intravascular ultrasound showed a hematoma, but optical coherence tomography could not detect the entry point. Therefore, we identified the intramural hematoma as the etiology. Because the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow was maintained and chest pain disappeared, we chose conservative treatment. Fifteen days after admission, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomography showed an improvement in the intramural hematoma. PMID:27477409</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860059673&hterms=ram&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dram','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860059673&hterms=ram&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dram"><span id="translatedtitle">STS-9 Shuttle grow - Ram angle effect and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> intensities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, K. S.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Visible imagery from Space Shuttle mission STS-9 (Spacelab 1) has been analyzed for the ram angle effect and the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> intensity of glow. The data are compared with earlier measurements and the anomalous <span class="hlt">high</span> intensities at large ram angles are confirmed. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> intensities of the ram glow on the shuttle tile, at 6563 A, are observed to be about 20 times more intense than those measured on the AE-E spacecraft. Implications of these observations for an existing theory of glow involving NO2 are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1604034','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1604034"><span id="translatedtitle">[Transluminal percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty of the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Alfonso, F; Macaya, C; Iñíguez, A; Goicolea, J; Hernández, R A; Fernández-Ortiz, A; Zamorano, J; Casado, J; Zarco, P</p> <p>1992-05-01</p> <p>This paper describes our preliminary experience with left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty in 8 patients (9 procedures). In 6 patients the left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery was "protected" either by previous by-pass surgery (4 patients) or by collateral vessels from the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery (2 patients). Three patients had a total occlusion of the left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery and 2 of them had a recent or acute myocardial infarction and the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiogram suggested a thrombotic occlusion of the infarct-related artery. Three patients were not considered surgical candidates and an additional patient, who was in cardiogenic shock, required an emergency <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty as "rescue" procedure. A successful dilatation was achieved in 6 patients (including a patient with successful deployment of a Palmaz-Schatz stent) but, unfortunately, one them eventually died 7 days later from a femoral sepsis related to the procedure. However in the 2 remaining patients--with a total occlusion of the left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery in relation with a myocardial infarction--the dilatation procedures were unsuccessful. One patient underwent a successful repeat <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty for restenosis of left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. Our preliminary experience confirms previous reports suggesting the value of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty in patients with left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease providing a careful selection of possible candidates is performed prior to the procedure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23294588','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23294588"><span id="translatedtitle">Intravenous Contrast Material Administration at <span class="hlt">High</span>-pitch Dual-source CT <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Angiography: Bolus-tracking Technique with Shortened Time of Respiratory Instruction Versus Test Bolus Technique.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sun, Kai; Liu, Guo-Rong; Li, Yue-Chun; Han, Rui-Juan; Cui, Li-Fang; Ma, Li-Jun; Li, Li-Gang; Li, Chang-Yong</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objective To investigate the feasibility of acquiring the similar homogeneous enhancement using bolus-tracking techniques with shortened respiratory time in prospectively electrocardiogram-gated <span class="hlt">high</span>-pitch spiral acquisition mode (Flash mode) <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomography angiography (CCTA) compared with test bolus technique. Methods One hundred and eighty-four consecutive patients with mean heart rate ≤65 beats per minute undergoing CCTA were prospectively included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in the group A (n=92) instructed to shorten respiratory time received CCTA using bolus-tracking technique with <span class="hlt">high</span>-pitch spiral acquisition mode (Flash mode), while those in the group B (n=92) underwent CCTA with test bolus technique. The attenuation in the ascending aorta, image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and radiation doses of the two groups were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in the mean attenuation values in the ascending aorta (483.18±59.07 HU vs. 498.7±83.51 HU, P=0.183), image noise (21.4±4.5 HU vs. 20.9±4.3 HU, P=0.414), contrast-to-noise ratio (12.1±4.2 vs. 13.8±5.1, P=0.31) between the groups A and B. There were no significant differences in the radiation dose of dynamic monitoring scans (0.056±0.026 mSv vs. 0.062±0.018 mSv, P=0.068) and radiation dose of angiography (0.94±0.07 mSv vs. 0.96±0.15 mSv, P=0.926) between the two groups, while 15 mL less contrast material volume was administered in the group A than the group B. Conclusion Bolus-tracking technique with shortened time of respiratory in Flash mode of dual-source CT yields the similar homogeneous enhancement with less contrast material in comparison to the test bolus technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23384447','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23384447"><span id="translatedtitle">Northern contaminant mixtures induced morphological and functional changes in human <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery endothelial cells under culture conditions typifying <span class="hlt">high</span> fat/sugar diet and ethanol exposure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Florian, Maria; Yan, Jin; Ulhaq, Saad; Coughlan, Melanie; Laziyan, Mahemuti; Willmore, William; Jin, Xiaolei</p> <p>2013-11-16</p> <p>It has been reported that Northern populations are exposed to mixtures of various environmental contaminants unique to the Arctic (Northern contaminant mixtures - NCM) at a large range of concentrations, depending on their geological location, age, lifestyle and dietary habits. To determine if these contaminants may contribute to a cardiovascular health risk, especially when combined with a <span class="hlt">high</span> fat and sugar diet and ethanol exposure, we treated human <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) with two mixtures of 4 organic (NCM1) or 22 organic and inorganic (NCM2) chemicals detected in Northerners' blood during 2004-2005 in the presence or absence of low-density lipoprotein (1.5mg/ml), very-low-density lipoprotein (1.0mg/ml) and glucose (10mmol/L) (LVG), and in the absence or presence of 0.1% ethanol. After 24h of exposure, cell morphology and markers of cytotoxicity and endothelial function were examined. NCM1 treatment did not affect cell viability, but increased cell size, disrupted cell membrane integrity, and decreased cell density, uptake of small peptides, release of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), while causing no changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression and nitric oxide (NO) release. In contrast, NCM2 decreased cell viability, total protein yield, uptake of small peptides, eNOS protein expression, and NO release and caused membrane damage, but caused no changes in the secretion of ET-1, prostacyclin and PAI. The presence of LVG and/or alcohol did or did not influence the effects of NCM1 or NCM2 depending on the endpoint and the mixture examined. These results suggested that the effects of one or one group of contaminants may be altered by the presence of other contaminants, and that with or without the interaction of <span class="hlt">high</span> fat and sugar diet and/or ethanol exposure, NCMs at the concentrations used caused endothelial dysfunction in vitro. It remains to be investigated if these effects of NCMs also</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27462490','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27462490"><span id="translatedtitle">An improved generalized Newton method for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value equations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Feng, Jingmei; Liu, Sanyang</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, we suggest and analyze an improved generalized Newton method for solving the NP-hard <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value equations [Formula: see text] when the singular values of A exceed 1. We show that the global and local quadratic convergence of the proposed method. Numerical experiments show the efficiency of the method and the <span class="hlt">high</span> accuracy of calculation. PMID:27462490</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21347391','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21347391"><span id="translatedtitle">Multifrequency continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thickness determination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Scheller, Maik; Baaske, Kai; Koch, Martin</p> <p>2010-04-12</p> <p>We present a tunable multifrequency continuous wave terahertz spectrometer based on two laser diodes, photoconductive antennas, and a coherent detection scheme. The system is employed to determine the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> thickness of samples utilizing a proposed synthetic difference frequency method to circumvent the 2pi uncertainty known from conventional photomixing systems while preserving a <span class="hlt">high</span> spatial resolution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19026302','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19026302"><span id="translatedtitle">Efficacy and safety of ezetimibe added on to atorvastatin (20 mg) versus uptitration of atorvastatin (to 40 mg) in hypercholesterolemic patients at moderately <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Conard, Scott E; Bays, Harold E; Leiter, Lawrence A; Bird, Steven R; Rubino, Joseph; Lowe, Robert S; Tomassini, Joanne E; Tershakovec, Andrew M</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ezetimibe 10 mg added to atorvastatin 20 mg compared with doubling atorvastatin to 40 mg in patients with hypercholesterolemia at moderately <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease who did not reach low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels <100 mg/dl with atorvastatin 20 mg. In this 6-week, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study, 196 patients treated with atorvastatin 20 mg received atorvastatin 20 mg plus ezetimibe 10 mg or atorvastatin 40 mg for 6 weeks. Adding ezetimibe 10 mg to atorvastatin 20 mg produced significantly greater reductions in LDL cholesterol than increasing atorvastatin to 40 mg (-31% vs -11%, p <0.001). Significantly greater reductions were also seen in non-<span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B (p <0.001). Significantly more patients reached LDL cholesterol levels <100 mg/dl with atorvastatin 20 mg plus ezetimibe compared with atorvastatin 40 mg (84% vs 49%, p <0.001). The 2 treatment groups had comparable results for <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein A-I, and <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein. The incidences of clinical and laboratory adverse experiences were generally similar between groups. In conclusion, the addition of ezetimibe 10 mg to atorvastatin 20 mg was generally well tolerated and resulted in significantly greater lipid-lowering efficacy compared with doubling atorvastatin to 40 mg in patients with hypercholesterolemia at moderately <span class="hlt">high</span> risk for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3042203','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3042203"><span id="translatedtitle">Lipoprotein subspecies and risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Musliner, T A; Krauss, R M</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>This review summarizes physical and chemical properties of major subspecies of very-low-, low-, intermediate, and <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoproteins. Hypotheses regarding the metabolic origins of these subspecies and evidence for their associations with risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2810435','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2810435"><span id="translatedtitle">Socioeconomic inequalities in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease risk in older age: contribution of established and novel <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>RAMSAY, S E; MORRIS, R W; WHINCUP, P H; PAPACOSTA, O; RUMLEY, A; LENNON, L; LOWE, G; WANNAMETHEE, S G</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background:Evidence on socioeconomic inequalities in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) and their pathways in the elderly is limited. Little is also known about the contributions that novel <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factors (particularly inflammatory/hemostatic markers) make to socioeconomic inequalities in CHD. Objectives:To examine the extent of socioeconomic inequalities in CHD in older age, and the contributions (relative and <span class="hlt">absolute</span>) of established and novel <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factors. Methods:A population-based cohort of 3761 British men aged 60–79 years was followed up for 6.5 years for CHD mortality and incidence (fatal and non-fatal). Social class was based on longest-held occupation recorded at 40–59 years. Results:There was a graded relationship between social class and CHD incidence. The hazard ratio for CHD incidence comparing social class V (unskilled workers) with social class I (professionals) was 2.70 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37–5.35; P-value for trend = 0.008]. This was reduced to 2.14 (95% CI 1.06–4.33; P-value for trend = 0.11) after adjustment for behavioral factors (cigarette smoking, physical activity, body mass index, and alcohol consumption), which explained 38% of the relative risk gradient (41% of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> risk). Additional adjustment for inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and von Willebrand factor) explained 55% of the relative risk gradient (59% of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> risk). Blood pressure and lipids made little difference to these estimates; results were similar for CHD mortality. Conclusions:Socioeconomic inequalities in CHD persist in the elderly and are at least partly explained by behavioral risk factors; novel (inflammatory) <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk markers made some further contribution. Reducing inequalities in behavioral factors (especially cigarette smoking) could reduce these social inequalities by at least one-third. PMID:20015318</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27392507','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27392507"><span id="translatedtitle">Implications of Total to <span class="hlt">High</span>-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Discordance With Alternative Lipid Parameters for <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Atheroma Progression and Cardiovascular Events.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Elshazly, Mohamed B; Nicholls, Stephen J; Nissen, Steven E; St John, Julie; Martin, Seth S; Jones, Steven R; Quispe, Renato; Stegman, Brian; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Puri, Rishi</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>The total cholesterol to <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio may quantify atherogenic lipoproteins beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-HDL-C and apolipoprotein B (apoB). We analyzed pooled data from 9 trials involving 4,957 patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease undergoing serial intravascular ultrasonography to assess changes in percent atheroma volume (ΔPAV) and 2-year major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) rates when TC/HDL-C levels were discordant with LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and apoB. Discordance was investigated when lipid levels were stratified by </≥median levels (TC/HDL-C 3.3 vs LDL-C 80, non-HDL-C 107, and apoB 76 mg/dl) or </≥very low percentile equivalent cutoffs (TC/HDL-C 2.5 vs LDL-C 70, non-HDL-C 89, and apoB 59 mg/dl). When stratified by median levels, TC/HDL-C was commonly observed to be discordant with LDL-C (26%), non-HDL-C (20%), and apoB (27%). In patients with LDL-C, non-HDL-C, or apoB <median, those with a discordant TC/HDL-C ≥median demonstrated less PAV regression and greater MACE (18.9%, 17.7%, 19.8%, respectively) compared with TC/HDL-C <median (14.4%, 14.0%, 12.8%; p = 0.02, 0.14, 0.003, respectively). In patients with LDL-C, non-HDL-C, or apoB ≥median, those with a discordant TC/HDL-C <median demonstrated less PAV progression and lower MACE (15.0%, 17.3%, 19.9%, respectively) compared with TC/HDL-C ≥median (24.7%, 24.2%, 26.4%; p <0.001, 0.003, 0.03, respectively). In conclusion, the TC/HDL-C ratio reclassifies atheroma progression and MACE rates when discordant with LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and apoB within subjects. Thus, using the ratio, in addition to individual lipid parameters, may identify patients who may benefit from more intensive lipid modification. PMID:27392507</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3611842','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3611842"><span id="translatedtitle">(1) <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Events Caused by Myocardial Bridge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yoko, Kawawa; Ehiichi, Kohda; Toshiharu, Ishii</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Myocardial bridge (MB), which covers a part of the left anterior descending <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery (LAD), is a normal anatomical variant structure (45% in frequency by autopsy) in LAD. MB contraction plays the role of a “double-edged sword” on the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> events, suppressing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis under the MB, yet generating abnormal blood flow associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart diseases (CHDs). <span class="hlt">High</span> shear stress driven by MB compression causes the suppression of vascular permeability and vasoactive protein expression such as e-NOS and endothelin-1, which leads to the suppression of atherosclerosis in the LAD segment under the MB. However, despite the prevalent view of MB as benignancy by conventional <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (5-6% in frequency), with advance of imaging technique such as multislice spiral computed tomography [(MSCT); 16% in frequency], cardiologists are now frequently aware of symptomatic MB occurring not only in hospitalized patients, but also in young athletes free from atherosclerosis. Moreover, the large mass volume of MB muscle induces atherosclerosis evolution at the settled site in LAD proximal to MB and contributes to the occurrence of myocardial infarction. These events upon the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> events result from the different pathophysiological mechanisms induced by contractile force of MB, which is solely determined just by the integration of anatomical properties of MB, such as the location, length and thickness of MB in an individual LAD. A recent MSCT provides the objective quantification of the anatomical variables that correlate with the histopathological results in relation to the occurrence of CHD. In this review, we therefore discuss the necessity to explore MB as a inherent chance anatomical risk factor for CHD. PMID:23555365</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4209719','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4209719"><span id="translatedtitle">The relationship between ischemia-induced left ventricular dysfunction, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve, and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> steal on regadenoson stress-gated 82Rb PET myocardial perfusion imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Van Tosh, Andrew; Votaw, John R.; Reichek, Nathaniel; Palestro, Christopher J.; Nichols, Kenneth J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Gated rubidium-82 (82Rb) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies are acquired both at rest and during pharmacologic stress. Stress-induced ischemic left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) can produce a significant decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from rest to stress. We determined the prevalence on PET of stress LVD with reduced ejection fraction (EF) and its association with <span class="hlt">absolute</span> global and regional <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve (CFR), and with relative perfusion defect summed difference score (SDS). Methods and Results We studied 205 patients with known or suspected <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease (120 M, 75 F, age 69 ± 13 years) who had clinically indicated rest/regadenoson stress 82Rb PET/CT studies. Data were acquired in dynamic gated list mode. Global and 17-segment regional CFR values were computed from first-pass flow data using a 2-compartment model and factor analysis applied to auto-generated time-activity curves. Rest and stress LVEF and SDS were quantified from gated equilibrium myocardial perfusion tomograms using Emory Cardiac Toolbox software. LVD was defined as a change in LVEF of ≤−5% from rest to stress. A subgroup of 109 patients also had <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography. Stress LVD developed in 32 patients (16%), with mean EF change of −10 ± 5%, vs +6 ± 7% for patients without LVD (P < .0001). EF was similar at rest in patients with and without stress LVD (57 ± 18% vs 56 ± 16%, P = .63), but lower during stress for patients with LVD (47 ± 20% vs 61 ± 16%, P = .0001). CFR was significantly lower in patients with LVD (1.61 ± 0.67 vs 2.21 ± 1.03, Wilcoxon P = .002), and correlated significantly with change in EF (r = 0.35, P < .0001), but not with SDS (r = −0.13, P = .07). The single variable most strongly associated with <span class="hlt">high</span> risk of CAD (i.e., left main stenosis ≥50%, LAD % stenosis ≥70%, and/or 3-vessel disease) was stress EF (χ2 = 17.3, P < .0001). There was a higher prevalence of patients with territorial CFR</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8481039','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8481039"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> risk factors in schoolchildren.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boreham, C; Savage, J M; Primrose, D; Cran, G; Strain, J</p> <p>1993-02-01</p> <p>Death rates from <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) in Northern Ireland are among the highest in the world. However, no data have been available to test the hypothesis that the <span class="hlt">high</span> prevalence of CHD is reflected by the risk status of the childhood population. A randomly selected 2% population sample of 1015 children aged 12 and 15 years was studied to obtain baseline information on blood pressure, lipid profile, cigarette smoking, family history, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and dietary fat intake. Using available criteria thresholds, 15-23% displayed increased blood pressure, 12-25% had unfavourable lipid profiles, and 18-34% were overfat. In 15 year old children, 16-21% admitted being regular smokers, 26-34% displayed poor cardiorespiratory fitness, and 24-29% reported little physical activity in the previous week. Dietary analysis revealed relatively low polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratios and <span class="hlt">high</span> mean fat intakes, accounting for approximately 40% total daily energy. Despite the exclusion of family history from the analysis, 16% of the older children exhibited three or more risk factors. These results justify major concern about the level of potential <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk in Northern Ireland schoolchildren. Broadly based primary prevention strategies aimed at children are essential if future adult CHD mortality is to be reduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/8755.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/8755.htm"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery disease (image)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... through these arteries is critical for the heart. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the ... blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPSC...10..717D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPSC...10..717D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 <span class="hlt">absolute</span> magnitudes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=organic+AND+carbon&pg=5&id=EJ288694','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=organic+AND+carbon&pg=5&id=EJ288694"><span id="translatedtitle">A New Gimmick for Assigning <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Configuration.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ayorinde, F. O.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment <span class="hlt">absolute</span> configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=husserl&pg=3&id=EJ118696','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=husserl&pg=3&id=EJ118696"><span id="translatedtitle">The Simplicity Argument and <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Morality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mijuskovic, Ben</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> system of morality. (Author/RK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989Metro..26...81S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989Metro..26...81S"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Radiometer for Reproducing the Solar Irradiance Unit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sapritskii, V. I.; Pavlovich, M. N.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">high</span>-precision <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometer with a thermally stabilized cavity as receiving element has been designed for use in solar irradiance measurements. The State Special Standard of the Solar Irradiance Unit has been built on the basis of the developed <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometer. The Standard also includes the sun tracking system and the system for automatic thermal stabilization and information processing, comprising a built-in microcalculator which calculates the irradiance according to the input program. During metrological certification of the Standard, main error sources have been analysed and the non-excluded systematic and accidental errors of the irradiance-unit realization have been determined. The total error of the Standard does not exceed 0.3%. Beginning in 1984 the Standard has been taking part in a comparison with the Å 212 pyrheliometer and other Soviet and foreign standards. In 1986 it took part in the international comparison of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometers and standard pyrheliometers of socialist countries. The results of the comparisons proved the <span class="hlt">high</span> metrological quality of this Standard based on an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22402193','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22402193"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Coronary</span> revascularization during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The bridge code].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Serrano Moraza, A; Del Nogal Sáez, F; Alfonso Manterola, F</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Cardiac arrest is one of the major current challenges, due to both its <span class="hlt">high</span> incidence and mortality and the fact that it leads to severe brain dysfunction in over half of the survivors. The so-called <span class="hlt">coronary</span> origin Bridge Code is presented, based on the international resuscitation recommendations (2005, 2010). In accordance with a series of strict predictive criteria, this code makes it possible to: (1) select refractory CPR patients with a <span class="hlt">high</span> or very <span class="hlt">high</span> presumption of underlying <span class="hlt">coronary</span> cause; (2) evacuate the patient using mechanical chest compressors [LucasTM, Autopulse®], maintaining <span class="hlt">coronary</span> and brain perfusion pressures; (3) allow <span class="hlt">coronary</span> revascularization access during resuscitation maneuvering (PTCA during ongoing CPR); (4) induce early hypothermia; and (5) facilitate post-cardiac arrest intensive care. In the case of treatment failure, the quality of hemodynamic support makes it possible to establish a second bridge to non-heart beating organ donation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001ESASP.464..355T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001ESASP.464..355T"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> alignment of GONG images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Toner, C. G.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>In order to combine data from the six instruments in the GONG network the alignment of all of the images must be known to a fairly <span class="hlt">high</span> precision (~0°.1 for GONG Classic and ~0°.01 for GONG+). The relative orientation is obtained using the angular cross-correlation method described by (Toner & Harvey, 1998). To obtain the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> orientation the Project periodically records a day of drift scans, where the image of the Sun is allowed to drift across the CCD repeatedly throughout the day. These data are then analyzed to deduce the direction of Terrestrial East-West as a function of hour angle (i.e., time) for that instrument. The transit of Mercury on Nov. 15, 1999, which was recorded by three of the GONG instruments, provided an independent check on the current alignment procedures. Here we present a comparison of the alignment of GONG images as deduced from both drift scans and the Mercury transit for two GONG sites: Tucson (GONG+ camera) and Mauna Loa (GONG Classic camera). The agreement is within ~0°.01 for both cameras, however, the scatter is substantially larger for GONG Classic: ~0°.03 compared to ~0°.01 for GONG+.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4031707','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4031707"><span id="translatedtitle">A Value-Based Analysis of Hemodynamic Support Strategies for <span class="hlt">High</span>-Risk Heart Failure Patients Undergoing a Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gregory, David; Scotti, Dennis J.; de Lissovoy, Gregory; Palacios, Igor; Dixon, Simon; Maini, Brijeshwar; O'Neill, William</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background The economic burden of heart disease is heavy and growing. As advanced technologies for treating heart disease become available, decision makers need to be able to assess the relative value of such options against existing standards of care. Objectives To compare the clinical and economic benefits of a percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD) versus an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) observed during the 90-day duration of the PROTECT II clinical trial, and to supplement these findings with a simulation of the longer-term value of this technology through the use of a Markov model to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of a pVAD relative to an IABP, in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Methods Hospital bills were collected for patients enrolled in the PROTECT II trial who received hemodynamic support for <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI) provided by a pVAD (Impella 2.5) versus a conventional IABP during a 90-day episode of care (EOC). Length of stay, charges, and costs were analyzed for the index admissions, intensive care unit confinements, readmissions, and overall EOC. In addition, a probabilistic Markov model was used to project these parameters and their impact on a patient's quality of life for up to 10 years in relation to a pVAD versus an IABP. Results Hospital costs for the index admission were lower for the IABP compared with the pVAD ($33,684 vs $47,667; P <.001), whereas readmission length of stay and costs were lower for the pVAD versus the IABP (5 days vs 7 days; and $11,007 vs $21,834, respectively; P <.001). The total 90-day hospital charges were similar for the pVAD and the IABP ($172,564 vs $172,758, respectively; P = .785); however, the total 90-day EOC cost was lower for the IABP than for the pVAD ($44,032 vs $53,171, respectively; P <.001). The median hospital days for the entire EOC were 7 days for the pVAD versus 9 days for the IABP (P = .008). Critical care stays were considerably shorter</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5070323','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5070323"><span id="translatedtitle">Perioperative utility of goal-directed therapy in <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk cardiac patients undergoing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting: “A clinical outcome and biomarker-based study”</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Magoon, Rohan; Rawat, Rajinder; Mehta, Yatin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Goal-directed therapy (GDT) encompasses guidance of intravenous (IV) fluid and vasopressor/inotropic therapy by cardiac output or similar parameters to help in early recognition and management of <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk cardiac surgical patients. With the aim of establishing the utility of perioperative GDT using robust clinical and biochemical outcomes, we conducted the present study. This multicenter randomized controlled study included 130 patients of either sex, with European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation ≥3 undergoing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting on cardiopulmonary bypass. The patients were randomly divided into the control and GDT group. All the participants received standardized care; arterial pressure monitored through radial artery, central venous pressure (CVP) through a triple lumen in the right internal jugular vein, electrocardiogram, oxygen saturation, temperature, urine output per hour, and frequent arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis. In addition, cardiac index (CI) monitoring using FloTrac™ and continuous central venous oxygen saturation (ScVO2) using PreSep™ were used in patients in the GDT group. Our aim was to maintain the CI at 2.5–4.2 L/min/m2, stroke volume index 30–65 ml/beat/m2, systemic vascular resistance index 1500–2500 dynes/s/cm5/m2, oxygen delivery index 450–600 ml/min/m2, continuous ScVO2 >70%, and stroke volume variation <10%; in addition to the control group parameters such as CVP 6–8 mmHg, mean arterial pressure 90–105 mmHg, normal ABG values, oxygen saturation, hematocrit value >30%, and urine output >1 ml/kg/h. The aims were achieved by altering the administration of IV fluids and doses of inotropes or vasodilators. The data of sixty patients in each group were analyzed in view of ten exclusions. The average duration of ventilation (19.89 ± 3.96 vs. 18.05 ± 4.53 h, P = 0.025), hospital stay (7.94 ± 1.64 vs. 7.17 ± 1.93 days, P = 0.025), and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay (3.74 ± 0.59 vs. 3.41 ± 0</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7589015','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7589015"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevation of D-glucose impairs <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery autoregulation after slight reduction of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wascher, T C; Bachernegg, M; Kickenweiz, E; Stark, G; Stark, U; Toplak, H; Graier, W F; Krejs, G J</p> <p>1995-08-01</p> <p>Diabetes mellitus is thought to increase the susceptibility of tissue to hypoxic injury through D-glucose-induced alterations of intracellular metabolism. Therefore the effects of hyperglycaemia on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery autoregulation under slight reduction of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow were investigated in isolated perfused guinea-pig hearts. Under normal (10 mM) D-glucose concentrations <span class="hlt">coronary</span> autoregulation was intact in response to a slight reduction of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow (from 6 to 4.5 mL min-1) when L-arginine as a precursor of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF/NO) was available and formation of prostaglandines was intact. Under <span class="hlt">high</span> (44 mM) D-glucose concentrations on the other hand, a sustained vasodilatation dependent on the availability of L-arginine was observed, when formation of prostaglandins was blocked. This effect was partially reduced in the presence of prostaglandin synthesis. Furthermore, the effect of L-arginine under both conditions could be antagonized by the L-arginine-analogue NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (100 microM). Our results suggest that hyperglycaemia impairs <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery autoregulation by reducing the threshold for hypoxic vasodilatation in an EDRF/NO-dependent manner. Concomitantly a shift from the formation of vasodilatatory to vasoconstrictive prostaglandines was observed. These results might be of particular interest in patients with diabetes mellitus and ischaemic heart disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20197583','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20197583"><span id="translatedtitle">Transcatheter coil embolization of multiple bilateral congenital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistulae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Iglesias, Juan F; Thai, Hoa Tran; Kabir, Tito; Roguelov, Christan; Eeckhout, Eric</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery fistulae represent the most frequent congenital anomalies of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries, but remain a relatively uncommon clinical problem. Moreover, multiple fistulae originating from both the left and the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries and draining into the left ventricular chamber are a rare condition. Due to the low prevalence of these anomalies, the appropriate management of patients with symptomatic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistulae is controversial. Transcatheter closure approaches have emerged as a less invasive strategy and are nowadays considered a valuable alternative to surgical correction with similar effectiveness, morbidity and mortality. The percutaneous management, however, is mainly limited by the individual anatomic features of the fistula and an appropriate patient's selection is considered as a key determining factor to achieve complete occlusion. Thus, success rates of transcatheter closure techniques reported in the literature are extremely variable and <span class="hlt">highly</span> dependent upon the nature of the follow up, which, at present, is not standardized. The optimal management of symptomatic patients with multiple <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistulae still remains a challenging problem and has been traditionally considered as an indication for cardiac surgery. We report here the case of a patient with double bilateral congenital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistulae arising from both the left and right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries and draining individually into the left ventricular chamber. This patient underwent successful transcatheter anterograde closure of both fistulae using a microcoil embolization technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011AGUFM.G31A0939M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011AGUFM.G31A0939M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">GNSS <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Antenna Calibration at the National Geodetic Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.; Geoghegan, C.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely <span class="hlt">high</span> levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. To help meet the needs of the <span class="hlt">high</span>-precision GNSS community, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) now operates an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> antenna calibration facility. Located in Corbin, Virginia, this facility uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to quantitatively determine the carrier phase advance/delay introduced by the antenna element. The NGS facility was built to serve traditional NGS constituents such as the surveying and geodesy communities, however calibration services are open and available to all GNSS users as the calibration schedule permits. All phase center patterns computed by this facility will be publicly available and disseminated in both the ANTEX and NGS formats. We describe the NGS calibration facility, and discuss the observation models and strategy currently used to generate NGS <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibrations. We demonstrate that NGS <span class="hlt">absolute</span> phase center variation (PCV) patterns are consistent with published values determined by other <span class="hlt">absolute</span> antenna calibration facilities, and compare <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibrations to the traditional NGS relative calibrations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23237486','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23237486"><span id="translatedtitle">Left-sided <span class="hlt">high</span>-flow arteriovenous hemodialysis fistula combined with a persistent left superior vena cava causing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus dilatation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wolf, Michael; Scott, Benjamin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We present an interesting case illustrating the possible hemodynamic consequences when a left-sided arteriovenous hemodialysis fistula is combined with the congenital anomaly of a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC). Our case illustrates the importance of an echocardiographic examination with attention to the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus (CS) caliber-raising suspicion of a PLSVC-in the assessment for the hemodialysis access in end-stage renal disease patients. The causes and symptoms of CS dilatation, as well as the literature on PLSVC, are also discussed in detail.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2735894','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2735894"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> computed tomographic angiography: current role in the diagnosis and management of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bowman, Andrew W.; Kantor, Birgit; Gerber, Thomas C.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Advances in computed tomography (CT) technology allow images to be obtained with <span class="hlt">high</span> spatial and temporal resolution. These features now permit noninvasive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography (CCTA). Many studies addressing proof of concept, feasibility, and clinical robustness have been published since CCTA was first described. More recently, the scientific evaluation of CCTA has rightly focused less on technical aspects and more on multicenter trials of the diagnostic value of CCTA and on head-to-head comparisons with other noninvasive modalities for the detection of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD), such as stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with radionuclides. Recent peer-reviewed publications that compare CCTA to invasive, selective <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (SCA) or MPI, or that address radiation protection issues related to CCTA, were reviewed and summarized. Overall, there is <span class="hlt">high</span> agreement between CCTA and both SCA and MPI for the presence of CAD. However, CCTA can over- or underestimate the severity of CAD compared to SCA as a reference standard. Initial studies that compared CCTA to MPI found their accuracies for determining the presence of <span class="hlt">high</span>-grade luminal obstructions comparable. Limitations of CCTA include inability to reliably assess the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery lumen dimensions in patients with large amounts of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium, artifacts caused by <span class="hlt">coronary</span> and respiratory motion, and the need for ionizing radiation and intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. Various dose reduction methods for CCTA now exist that may substantially lower patient dose to levels less than those of SCA or MPI. Although current expert consensus does not call for CCTA to be a first-line test for CAD, particularly for screening in asymptomatic individuals, current data suggest a promising role in the evaluation of symptomatic patients for possible CAD. PMID:19694220</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19831037','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19831037"><span id="translatedtitle">Jasminum flexile flower <span class="hlt">absolute</span> from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine <span class="hlt">absolutes</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Jasminum flexile flower <span class="hlt">absolute</span> from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine <span class="hlt">absolutes</span> from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower <span class="hlt">absolute</span>, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26702692','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26702692"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dendramis, Gregory; Paleologo, Claudia; Piraino, Davide; Arrotti, Salvatore; Assennato, Pasquale</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Systemic autoimmune diseases are themselves a relevant and independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> ectasia. We describe a case of a 58-year-old Caucasian man who was admitted to our department for unstable angina. History of asthma, paranasal sinus abnormality, and peripheral eosinophilia given a <span class="hlt">high</span> suspicion of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS). Diagnosis was performed with 5 of the 6 American College of Rheumatology criteria. The knowledge that CSS is often associated with significant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery involvement and the persistence of chest pain led us to performing immediately a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angiography showed diffuse ectasic lesions, chronic occlusion of left anterior descending artery with homocoronary collateral circulation from left circumflex artery and subocclusive stenosis in the proximal tract of posterior descending artery. The early recognition of CSS, an aggressive invasive diagnostic approach, and an early appropriate therapy are important to prevent the progressive and permanent cardiac damage in these patients. In the setting of a multidisciplinary approach, careful cardiac assessment is an essential step in CSS, even in mildly symptomatic patients. PMID:26702692</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25921917','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25921917"><span id="translatedtitle">A relative difference in systolic blood pressure between arms by synchronal measurement and conventional cardiovascular risk factors are associated with the severity of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Suematsu, Yasunori; Kuwano, Takashi; Sugihara, Makoto; Ike, Amane; Iwata, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Saku, Keijiro</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>It is not known the relationships between a difference in systolic blood pressure (SBP) or diastolic BP (DBP) between arms by synchronal measurement and the presence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD), and between a difference in BP between arms and the severity of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis. We enrolled 425 consecutive patients (M/F = 286/139, 67 ± 13 year) who were admitted to our University Hospital and in whom we could measure the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> (|rt. BP - lt. BP|) and relative (rt. BP - lt. BP) differences in SBP and DBP using a nico PS-501(®) (Parama-Tech). We divided all patients into those who did and did not have CAD. The relative differences in SBP between arms in patients with CAD were significantly lower than those in patients without CAD. However, the relative difference in SBP between arms was not a predictor of the presence of CAD. We also divided 267 patients who underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography into tertiles according to the Gensini score (low, middle, and <span class="hlt">high</span> score groups). Interestingly, the middle + <span class="hlt">high</span> score groups showed significantly lower relative differences in SBP between arms than the low score group. The mean Korotkoff sound graph in the middle + <span class="hlt">high</span> Gensini score group was significantly higher than that in the low Gensini score group. Among conventional cardiovascular risk factors and nico parameters, the relative difference in SBP between arms in addition to the risk factors (age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus) was associated with the score by a logistic regression analysis. In conclusion, the relative difference in SBP between arms as well as conventional risk factors may be associated with the severity of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteriosclerosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20578102','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20578102"><span id="translatedtitle">Atrial myxomas and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rafiq, Isma; Parthasarthy, H; Clark, C Grahame</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angiography is not an only important component of preoperative evaluation of the patient with underlying <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease but also diagnostic tool for delineating cardiac myxomas. This also serve as an important surgical anatomical marker. We present two cases which presented with repeated episode of chest pain, were found to have atrial blushing on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography subsequent confirmation of diagnosis of atrial myxoma on echocardiography. PMID:20578102</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27216840','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27216840"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Dissection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27216840','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27216840"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Dissection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge. PMID:27216840</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5558468','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5558468"><span id="translatedtitle">Balloon catheter <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Angelini, P.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as <span class="hlt">coronary</span> spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24770610','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24770610"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of new risk score for pre-test probability of obstructive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease based on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Kondo, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hideya; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Tarutani, Yasuhiro; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Urabe, Yoji; Konno, Kumiko; Nishizaki, Yuji; Shinozaki, Tomohiro; Kihara, Yasuki; Daida, Hiroyuki; Isshiki, Takaaki; Takase, Shinichi</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Existing methods to calculate pre-test probability of obstructive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) have been established using selected <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients who were referred to conventional <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate our new method for pre-test probability of obstructive CAD using patients who underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography (CTA), which could be applicable to a wider range of patient population. Using consecutive 4137 patients with suspected CAD who underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CTA at our institution, a multivariate logistic regression model including clinical factors as covariates calculated the pre-test probability (K-score) of obstructive CAD determined by <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CTA. The K-score was compared with the Duke clinical score using the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver-operating characteristic curve. External validation was performed by an independent sample of 319 patients. The final model included eight significant predictors: age, gender, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factor (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, smoking), history of cerebral infarction, and chest symptom. The AUC of the K-score was significantly greater than that of the Duke clinical score for both derivation (0.736 vs. 0.699) and validation (0.714 vs. 0.688) data sets. Among patients who underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CTA, newly developed K-score had better pre-test prediction ability of obstructive CAD compared to Duke clinical score in Japanese population.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26408105','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26408105"><span id="translatedtitle">The challenge of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) scans: effect on interpretation and possible solutions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Andrew, Makmur; John, Hoe</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> calcium seen on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) scans is a common diagnostic challenge which can make interpretation difficult. It is the most common cause of false positive (FP) results from CCTA compared with invasive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (ICA), and affects the positive predictive results. At the same time, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium can result in false negative (FN) results, and this again can affect the reported diagnostic accuracy of CCTA, as the <span class="hlt">high</span> negative predictive value of CCTA compared to ICA is one of its strengths. This paper reviews the reasons that <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium can cause FP and FN results, and the effects of the morphologies and sizes of the calcified plaques, with particular regard to their relationship with the visualization of the contrast-filled lumen of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. Some possible solutions to overcome the limitations of reading CCTA scans with calcified plaques also are discussed, with a view to improving the accuracy of interpreting and reporting CCTA scans; these solutions include using the degree of residual visible contrast-filled lumen to help assess the likelihood of significant associated <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenosis, and applying newer technical developments such as dual-energy imaging and volume calcium subtraction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ufm..conf..509K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ufm..conf..509K"><span id="translatedtitle">Universal Cosmic <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> and Modern Science</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kostro, Ludwik</p> <p></p> <p>The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal <span class="hlt">Absolute</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940024091&hterms=beers+law&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dbeers%2Blaw','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940024091&hterms=beers+law&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dbeers%2Blaw"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine <span class="hlt">absolute</span> concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This <span class="hlt">high</span> scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4939256','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4939256"><span id="translatedtitle">Left Main <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Aneurysm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Aneurysms of the left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenosis, patients with left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. The patient immediately underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2425184','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2425184"><span id="translatedtitle">Perspectives in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> prevention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Turner, R. W.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>The seeds of premature <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease are often sown in childhood and it is the developing arteries of children which are the most susceptible. Paediatricians and all who work with them have the earliest and most promising opportunities for prevention. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> protection can be added to the potential advantages of breast feeding and to ensure appropriate fatty acid balance throughout weaning. It is reasonable to accept the strong consensus of opinion on diet reflected in the reports of the eighteen national committees. They are: to reduce total fat intake to 30-35% of the energy, to restrict consumption of saturated fat, cholesterol, sugar, and salt, to increase unrefined carbohydrate and polyunsaturated fat, and to maintain a P/S balance of 1.0-1.5:1. Food is the fundamental <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factor, but others may add insult to injury. Smoking, hypertension, obesity, lack of exercise, and stress, each of which is related to behaviour, may start in childhood. Smoking doubles the overall risk CHD and increases it ten times in males under 45 years old. Good habits, including food preferences and eating patterns learned early, are those most likely to be continued. School meals require and should match revised nutritional education. The co-operation of the food industry is essential and can be anticipated, but it requires a clear lead by paediatricians. The nutritional advice should come from the medical profession. Every contact with children and their parents provides an opportunity for enquiry and giving advice. PMID:349532</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19238505','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19238505"><span id="translatedtitle">Excimer laser debulking for percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention in left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Topaz, On; Polkampally, Pritam R; Mohanty, Pramod K; Rizk, Maged; Bangs, Julie; Bernardo, Nelson L</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>Excimer laser has been successfully applied to complex atherosclerotic plaques in acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes; however, its role in debulking in left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease has not been fully explored. Details of a series of 20 patients who underwent excimer laser revascularization of a spectrum of left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery lesions are presented. Twenty symptomatic patients who received excimer laser debulking were examined for procedural outcome and follow up results. The left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery was characterized as protected, semi-protected, poorly protected, or unprotected, depending on the presence or absence of patent bypass grafts to the left anterior descending (LAD) and circumflex (CX) arteries. A fully protected left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery (LMCA) was present in only 20% of the patients. The target lesions included 11(55%) distal LMCA stenoses, six (30%) ostial stenoses, and one (5%) mid-portion lesions. Two (10%) patients had in-stent re-stenosis of the entire length of the LMCA. Small (0.7 mm-1.4 mm) excimer laser catheters were mostly used. A relatively <span class="hlt">high</span> number of laser energy pulses (1,334 +/- 643) were required to achieve adequate debulking. Successful LMCA intervention was performed in 19 (95%) patients, while in-hospital complications occurred in only one (5%) patient. Subacute/late stent thrombosis developed 3 months after the procedure in one patient, and two patients died from non-cardiac causes during follow-up. Lesions in LMCAs can be revascularized in selected patients by laser debulking and adjunct stenting. Inadequate protection by bypass grafts and decreased left ventricular function do not contradict utilization of excimer laser. Small laser catheters and <span class="hlt">high</span> energy levels are required during laser debulking of stenoses of left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25117643','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25117643"><span id="translatedtitle">Computer-aided CT <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery stenosis detection: comparison with human reading and quantitative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rief, Matthias; Kranz, Anisha; Hartmann, Lisa; Roehle, Robert; Laule, Michael; Dewey, Marc</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>To evaluate computer-aided stenosis detection for computed tomography <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (CTA) in comparison with human reading and conventional <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (CCA) as the reference standard. 50 patients underwent CTA and CCA and out of these 44 were evaluable for computer-aided stenosis detection. The diagnostic performance of the software and of human reading were compared and quantitative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (QCA) served as the reference standard for the detection of significant stenosis (>50 %). Overall, three readers with <span class="hlt">high</span> (reader 1), intermediate (reader 2) and low (reader 3) experience in cardiac CT imaging performed the manual CTA evaluation on a commercially available workstation, whereas the automated software processed the datasets without any human interaction. The prevalence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease was 41 % (18/44) and QCA indicated significant stenosis (>50 %) in 33 <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vessels. The automated software accurately diagnosed 18 individuals with significant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD), and correctly ruled out CAD in 10 patients. In summary the sensitivity of computer-aided detection was 100 %/94 % (per-patient/per-vessel) and the specificity was 38 %/70 %, the positive predictive value (PPV) was 53 %/42 % and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 100 %/98 %. In comparison, reader 1-3 showed per-patient sensitivities of 100/94/89 %, specificities of 73/69/50 %, PPVs of 72/68/55 % and NPVs of 100/95/87 %. Computer-aided detection yields a <span class="hlt">high</span> NPV that is comparable to more experienced human readers. However, PPV is rather low and in the range of an unexperienced reader.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.G51B0368C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.G51B0368C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic <span class="hlt">absolute</span> meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain <span class="hlt">high</span> order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvA..92f2125A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvA..92f2125A"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantum theory allows for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> maximal contextuality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Amaral, Barbara; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Cabello, Adán</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory and a necessary resource for quantum computation and communication. It is therefore important to investigate how large contextuality can be in quantum theory. Linear contextuality witnesses can be expressed as a sum S of n probabilities, and the independence number α and the Tsirelson-like number ϑ of the corresponding exclusivity graph are, respectively, the maximum of S for noncontextual theories and for the theory under consideration. A theory allows for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> maximal contextuality if it has scenarios in which ϑ /α approaches n . Here we show that quantum theory allows for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> maximal contextuality despite what is suggested by the examination of the quantum violations of Bell and noncontextuality inequalities considered in the past. Our proof is not constructive and does not single out explicit scenarios. Nevertheless, we identify scenarios in which quantum theory allows for almost-<span class="hlt">absolute</span>-maximal contextuality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6063303','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6063303"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> calibration in vivo measurement systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.</p> <p>1991-02-01</p> <p>Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24117660','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24117660"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantitative standards for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> linguistic universals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify <span class="hlt">absolute</span>, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish <span class="hlt">absolute</span> properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24322224','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24322224"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> photoacoustic thermometry in deep tissue.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yao, Junjie; Ke, Haixin; Tai, Stephen; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V</p> <p>2013-12-15</p> <p>Photoacoustic thermography is a promising tool for temperature measurement in deep tissue. Here we propose an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> temperature measurement method based on the dual temperature dependences of the Grüneisen parameter and the speed of sound in tissue. By taking ratiometric measurements at two adjacent temperatures, we can eliminate the factors that are temperature irrelevant but difficult to correct for in deep tissue. To validate our method, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> temperatures of blood-filled tubes embedded ~9 mm deep in chicken tissue were measured in a biologically relevant range from 28°C to 46°C. The temperature measurement accuracy was ~0.6°C. The results suggest that our method can be potentially used for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> temperature monitoring in deep tissue during thermotherapy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890000284&hterms=Hilbert&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DHilbert','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890000284&hterms=Hilbert&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DHilbert"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Stability And Hyperstability In Hilbert Space</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wen, John Ting-Yung</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Theorems on stabilities of feedback control systems proved. Paper presents recent developments regarding theorems of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> stability and hyperstability of feedforward-and-feedback control system. Theorems applied in analysis of nonlinear, adaptive, and robust control. Extended to provide sufficient conditions for stability in system including nonlinear feedback subsystem and linear time-invariant (LTI) feedforward subsystem, state space of which is Hilbert space, and input and output spaces having finite numbers of dimensions. (In case of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> stability, feedback subsystem memoryless and possibly time varying. For hyperstability, feedback system dynamical system.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120012063','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120012063"><span id="translatedtitle">Orion <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Navigation System Progress and Challenge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and <span class="hlt">high</span>-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3161319','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3161319"><span id="translatedtitle">Digital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> roadmapping as an aid for performing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tobis, J; Johnston, W D; Montelli, S; Henderson, E; Roeck, W; Bauer, B; Nalcioglu, O; Henry, W</p> <p>1985-08-01</p> <p>In an attempt to improve visualization of the position of the guidewire and dilatation balloon during <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty, a method was developed called digital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> roadmapping. With this method a digitally acquired <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiogram is interlaced with the live fluoroscopic image of the guidewire and balloon catheter. The digital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiogram is superimposed at the same magnification and radiologic projection as the live fluoroscopic image onto the video monitor above the catheterization table. The digital roadmap image thus provides immediate feedback to the angiographer to assist in directing the guidewire into the appropriate <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery branch and to help in placement of the balloon so that it straddles the site of stenosis. PMID:3161319</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2181499','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2181499"><span id="translatedtitle">Pressure-flow relations in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> circulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoffman, J I; Spaan, J A</p> <p>1990-04-01</p> <p>The blood vessels that run on the surface of the heart and through its muscle are compliant tubes that can be affected by the pressures external to them in at least two ways. If the pressure outside these vessels is higher than the pressure at their downstream ends, the vessels may collapse and become Starling resistors or vascular waterfalls. If this happens, the flow through these vessels depends on their resistance and the pressure drop from their inflow to the pressure around them and is independent of the actual downstream pressure. In the first part of this review, the physics of collapsible tubes is described, and the possible occurrences of vascular waterfalls in the body is evaluated. There is good evidence that waterfall behavior is seen in collateral <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries and in extramural <span class="hlt">coronary</span> veins, but the evidence that intramural <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vessels act like vascular waterfalls is inconclusive. There is no doubt that in systole there are <span class="hlt">high</span> tissue pressures around the intramyocardial vessels, particularly in the subendocardial muscle of the left ventricle. The exact nature and values of the forces that act at the surface of the small intramural vessels, however, are still not known. We are not certain whether radial (compressive) or circumferential and longitudinal (tensile) stresses are the major causes of vascular compression; the role of collagen struts in modifying the reaction of vessel walls to external pressures is unknown but possibly important; direct examination of small subepicardial vessels has failed to show vascular collapse. One of the arguments in favor of intramyocardial vascular waterfalls has been that during a long diastole the flow in the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery decreases and reaches zero when <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial pressure is still <span class="hlt">high</span>: it can be as much as 50 mmHg in the autoregulating left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial bed and approximately 15-20 mmHg even when the vessels have been maximally dilated. These <span class="hlt">high</span> zero flow pressures, especially</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2181499','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2181499"><span id="translatedtitle">Pressure-flow relations in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> circulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoffman, J I; Spaan, J A</p> <p>1990-04-01</p> <p>The blood vessels that run on the surface of the heart and through its muscle are compliant tubes that can be affected by the pressures external to them in at least two ways. If the pressure outside these vessels is higher than the pressure at their downstream ends, the vessels may collapse and become Starling resistors or vascular waterfalls. If this happens, the flow through these vessels depends on their resistance and the pressure drop from their inflow to the pressure around them and is independent of the actual downstream pressure. In the first part of this review, the physics of collapsible tubes is described, and the possible occurrences of vascular waterfalls in the body is evaluated. There is good evidence that waterfall behavior is seen in collateral <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries and in extramural <span class="hlt">coronary</span> veins, but the evidence that intramural <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vessels act like vascular waterfalls is inconclusive. There is no doubt that in systole there are <span class="hlt">high</span> tissue pressures around the intramyocardial vessels, particularly in the subendocardial muscle of the left ventricle. The exact nature and values of the forces that act at the surface of the small intramural vessels, however, are still not known. We are not certain whether radial (compressive) or circumferential and longitudinal (tensile) stresses are the major causes of vascular compression; the role of collagen struts in modifying the reaction of vessel walls to external pressures is unknown but possibly important; direct examination of small subepicardial vessels has failed to show vascular collapse. One of the arguments in favor of intramyocardial vascular waterfalls has been that during a long diastole the flow in the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery decreases and reaches zero when <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial pressure is still <span class="hlt">high</span>: it can be as much as 50 mmHg in the autoregulating left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial bed and approximately 15-20 mmHg even when the vessels have been maximally dilated. These <span class="hlt">high</span> zero flow pressures, especially</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24894361','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24894361"><span id="translatedtitle">A novel method for non-invasive plaque morphology analysis by <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomography angiography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Kondo, Takeshi; Kodama, Takahide; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Groarke, John; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Matsunaga, Eriko; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Rybicki, Frank J</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> computed tomography angiography (CCTA) plaque morphology based on conventional Hounsfield units relies on <span class="hlt">absolute</span> CT numbers is influenced by imaging and anatomical variables. The project describes and tests a novel alternative method, termed the "labeling method", which uses relative CT numbers and 3-dimensional plaque structure. Using virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) as the reference standard, this study compares the labeling method to a conventional CT-number based method to determine <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque morphology. Thirty-seven <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk, non-calcified atherosclerotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesions were prospectively evaluated in 33 consecutive patients who underwent CCTA followed by VH-IVUS (mean interval 8.6 ± 13.3 days). CCTA-derived vessel and minimum lumen areas were compared to VH-IVUS measures. Fibrotic and necrotic core areas were calculated by both the labeling method to the CT-number based method; both were tested for agreement with reference standard VH-IVUS. Inter- and intra-observer correlations were assessed. CCTA significantly underestimated minimum lumen area when compared to VH-IVUS (mean difference -1.4 ± 0.9 mm(2), p < 0.0001). Necrotic core and fibrous areas quantified using the labeling method demonstrated superior correlation with VH-IVUS compared to those quantified using the CT-number based method, Pearson's r = 0.75 versus 0.42 and r = 0.80 and 0.59, respectively. Compared to VH-IVUS, limits of agreement for the labeling method-derived necrotic core (-2.0 to 2.5 mm(2)) and fibrous areas (0.6-8.0 mm(2)) were more narrow than those determined using the CT-number based method (-3.7 to 7.3 and -4.0 to 8.9 mm(2), respectively). Inter- and intraobserver correlations were excellent for all CCTA derived measures (r = 0.85-0.98). A novel CCTA-based labeling method offers an alternative to conventional CT-number based analyses for plaque morphology. The labeling method demonstrates superior correlation to VH-IVUS for measures of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4699946','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4699946"><span id="translatedtitle">Diagnosis of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> microvascular dysfunction – Present status</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mittal, S.R.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Definite clinical diagnosis of microvascular angina is not possible with the existing knowledge. Resting electrocardiogram may be normal, and exercise electrocardiogram may be unremarkable. Echocardiography usually does not show regional wall motion abnormalities. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography can satisfactorily evaluate only left anterior descending <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery and that too in some patients. Radio-isotope imaging can detect only severe localized disease. Noninvasive diagnosis needs <span class="hlt">high</span> index of suspicion. At present, definite diagnosis is based on documentation of normal epicardial <span class="hlt">coronaries</span>, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve less than 2.5 on adenosine induced hyperemia, and absence of spasm of epicardial <span class="hlt">coronaries</span> on acetylcholine provocation. Invasive evaluation is costly, needs sophisticated equipments and expertise. Therapeutic and prognostic implications of various parameters remains to be evaluated. At present invasive evaluation is recommended only for patients with intractable symptoms with unconfirmed diagnosis, requiring repeated hospitalization and evaluation with failure of empirical therapy. PMID:26702685</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20951162','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20951162"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcifications from computed tomography scans for automated risk assessment of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Isgum, Ivana; Rutten, Annemarieke; Prokop, Mathias; Ginneken, Bram van</p> <p>2007-04-15</p> <p>A fully automated method for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcification detection from non-contrast-enhanced, ECG-gated multi-slice computed tomography (CT) data is presented. Candidates for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcifications are extracted by thresholding and component labeling. These candidates include <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcifications, calcifications in the aorta and in the heart, and other <span class="hlt">high</span>-density structures such as noise and bone. A dedicated set of 64 features is calculated for each candidate object. They characterize the object's spatial position relative to the heart and the aorta, for which an automatic segmentation scheme was developed, its size and shape, and its appearance, which is described by a set of approximated Gaussian derivatives for which an efficient computational scheme is presented. Three classification strategies were designed. The first one tested direct classification without feature selection. The second approach also utilized direct classification, but with feature selection. Finally, the third scheme employed two-stage classification. In a computationally inexpensive first stage, the most easily recognizable false positives were discarded. The second stage discriminated between more difficult to separate <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcium and other candidates. Performance of linear, quadratic, nearest neighbor, and support vector machine classifiers was compared. The method was tested on 76 scans containing 275 calcifications in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries and 335 calcifications in the heart and aorta. The best performance was obtained employing a two-stage classification system with a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifier and a feature selection scheme. The method detected 73.8% of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcifications at the expense of on average 0.1 false positives per scan. A calcium score was computed for each scan and subjects were assigned one of four risk categories based on this score. The method assigned the correct risk category to 93.4% of all scans.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26504436','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26504436"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Interventions before Liver Transplantation Might Not Avert Postoperative Cardiovascular Events.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Snipelisky, David F; McRee, Chad; Seeger, Kristina; Levy, Michael; Shapiro, Brian P</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting may be performed before orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) to try to improve the condition of patients who have severe ischemic heart disease. However, data supporting improved outcomes are lacking. We reviewed the medical records of 2,010 patients who underwent OLT at our hospital from 2000 through 2010. The 51 patients who underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery angiography within 6 months of transplantation were included in this study: 28 had mild <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease, 10 had moderate disease, and 13 had severe disease. We compared all-cause and cardiac-cause mortality rates. We found a significant difference in cardiac deaths between the groups (P <0.001), but none in all-cause death (P=0.624). Of the 10 patients who had moderate <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease, one underwent pre-transplant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting. Of 13 patients with severe disease, 3 underwent percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention, and 6 underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting. Overall, 50% of patients who underwent either intervention died of cardiac-related causes, whereas no patient died of a cardiac-related cause after undergoing neither intervention (P <0.0001). We conclude that, despite <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention, mortality rates remain <span class="hlt">high</span> in OLT patients who have severe <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. PMID:26504436</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5809891','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5809891"><span id="translatedtitle">Noninvasive assessment of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenoses by myocardial perfusion imaging during pharmacologic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasodilation. VIII. Clinical feasibility of positron cardiac imaging without a cyclotron using generator-produced rubidium-82</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gould, K.L.; Goldstein, R.A.; Mullani, N.A.; Kirkeeide, R.L.; Wong, W.H.; Tewson, T.J.; Berridge, M.S.; Bolomey, L.A.; Hartz, R.K.; Smalling, R.W.</p> <p>1986-04-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical feasibility of diagnosing significant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease by positron imaging of myocardial perfusion without a cyclotron, using generator-produced rubidium-82 (/sup 82/Rb). Fifty patients underwent positron emission tomography of the entire heart using a multislice positron camera and intravenous /sup 82/Rb or nitrogen-13 ammonia (/sup 13/NH/sub 3/) before and after intravenous dipyridamole combined with handgrip stress. Images were read by two observers blinded as to clinical or arteriographic data. Automated quantitative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteriography was obtained for the arteriographic determination of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve, previously demonstrated to be a single integrated measure of stenosis severity accounting for all its geometric dimensions of length, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> diameter, percent narrowing and asymmetry by quantitative analysis of cine films. Significant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease was defined as an arteriographically determined <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve of less than 3.0 based on all stenosis dimensions. Any single geometric measure of stenosis severity alone was an inadequate reference standard for comparison with perfusion images. Sensitivity of identifying patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease having an arteriographically determined <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve of less than 3.0 was 95% by positron imaging with a specificity of 100%. The single case that was missed, studied with /sup 13/NH/sub 3/, had a 43% diameter narrowing of a small ramus intermedius off the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery with no significant narrowing of the major <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. Positron emission tomography of myocardial perfusion before and after intravenous dipyridamole combined with handgrip stress utilizing generator-produced /sup 82/Rb provides sensitive and specific diagnosis of reduced <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve due to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease in humans.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6973845','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6973845"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of isolated proximal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenotic lesions on distal myocardial perfusion during exercise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nichols, A.B.; Buczek, J.A.; Schwann, T.A.; Esser, P.D.; Blood, D.K.</p> <p>1988-07-01</p> <p>This study tested the hypothesis that the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> dimension of a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenotic lesion is a more important determinant of its hemodynamic effect on regional myocardial perfusion during exercise than is relative percent stenosis. In 31 patients with an isolated lesion of the left anterior descending <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery, regional myocardial perfusion was determined from thallium-201 scans recorded in the left anterior oblique projection after symptom-limited treadmill exercise. Thallium-201 uptake in the distribution of the left anterior descending <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery was expressed as a ratio of thallium-201 uptake in the left circumflex artery distribution. Percent area stenosis, minimal cross-sectional area and mean diameter of each stenotic lesion were measured by computer-assisted cinevideodensitometric analysis of projected <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteriograms digitized in a 512 X 512 pixel matrix with 256 gray levels. Thallium-201 uptake in the left anterior descending <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery distribution, expressed as a ratio, correlated poorly (r = 0.65) with relative percent stenosis, but correlated significantly (r = 0.83; p less than 0.05) with <span class="hlt">absolute</span> lesion area. For all 16 patients with reduced regional perfusion in the left anterior descending <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery distribution during exercise, lesion cross-sectional area was less than 1.8 mm2 (mean 0.9 +/- 0.6); for 13 of the 15 patients with normal distal perfusion, the area of the stenotic lesion was greater than 1.8 mm2 (mean 2.7 +/- 0.7; p less than 0.001). Percent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenosis failed to predict flow-limiting lesions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730008357&hterms=heart+attack&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dheart%2Battack','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730008357&hterms=heart+attack&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dheart%2Battack"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Patient in Industry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schuster, B.</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">coronary</span> patient, as he pertains to industry particularly NASA, is discussed. Concepts of precoronary care, acute attacks which may develop while on the job, and the return of the cardiac patient to work are covered. Major emphasis was on the prevention of sudden death due to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19359764','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19359764"><span id="translatedtitle">Recent trends in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease epidemiology in India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gupta, Rajeev</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) is epidemic in India and one of the major causes of disease-burden and deaths. Mortality data from the Registrar General of India shows that cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of death in India now. Studies to determine the precise causes of death in urban Chennai and rural areas of Andhra Pradesh have revealed that cardiovascular diseases cause about 40% of the deaths in urban areas and 30% in rural areas. Analysis of cross-sectional CHD epidemiological studies performed over the past 50 years reveals that this condition is increasing in both urban and rural areas. The adult prevalence has increased in urban areas from about 2% in 1960 to 6.5% in 1970, 7.0% in 1980, 9.7% in 1990 and 10.5% in 2000; while in rural areas, it increased from 2% in 1970, to 2.5% in 1980, 4% in 1990, and 4.5% in 2000. In terms of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> numbers this translates into 30 million CHD patients in the country. The disease occurs at a much younger age in Indians as compared to those in North America and Western Europe. Rural-urban differences reveal that risk factors like obesity, truncal obesity, hypertension, <span class="hlt">high</span> cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol and diabetes are more in urban areas. Case-control studies also confirm the importance of these risk factors. The INTERHEART-South Asia study identified that eight established <span class="hlt">coronary</span> risk factors--abnormal lipids, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, abdominal obesity, psychosocial factors, low fruit and vegetable consumption, and lack of physical activity--accounted for 89% of the cases of acute myocardial infarction in Indians. There is epidemiological evidence that all these risk factors are increasing. Over the past fifty years prevalence of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes have increased significantly in urban (R2 0.45-0.74) and slowly in rural areas (R2 0.19-0.29). There is an urgent need for development and implementation of suitable primordial, primary, and secondary prevention</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cell+AND+size&pg=4&id=EJ753903','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cell+AND+size&pg=4&id=EJ753903"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Points for Multiple Assignment Problems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group <span class="hlt">absolute</span> points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/927741','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/927741"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>Despite the current concerns about ozone, <span class="hlt">absolute</span> partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=effect&pg=3&id=EJ1099263','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=effect&pg=3&id=EJ1099263"><span id="translatedtitle">Stimulus Probability Effects in <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Identification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mathematics+AND+inequalities&pg=5&id=EJ945042','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mathematics+AND+inequalities&pg=5&id=EJ945042"><span id="translatedtitle">Teaching <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Value Inequalities to Mature Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sierpinska, Anna; Bobos, Georgeana; Pruncut, Andreea</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper gives an account of a teaching experiment on <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value inequalities, whose aim was to identify characteristics of an approach that would realize the potential of the topic to develop theoretical thinking in students enrolled in prerequisite mathematics courses at a large, urban North American university. The potential is…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=VALUE+AND+ABSOLUTE&pg=2&id=EJ726176','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=VALUE+AND+ABSOLUTE&pg=2&id=EJ726176"><span id="translatedtitle">Solving <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shiyuan, Wei</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=limit+AND+articles&pg=2&id=EJ933808','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=limit+AND+articles&pg=2&id=EJ933808"><span id="translatedtitle">Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Identification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In most of the long history of the study of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986SPIE..660....2S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986SPIE..660....2S"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Radiometric Calibration Of The Thematic Mapper</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Slater, P. N.; Biggar, S. F.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. D.; Mao, Y.; Moran, M. S.; Palmer, J. M.; Yuan, B.</p> <p>1986-11-01</p> <p>The results are presented of five in-flight <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometric calibrations, made in the period July 1984 to November 1985, at White Sands, New Mexico, of the solar reflective bands of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) . The 23 bandcalibrations made on the five dates show a ± 2.8% RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mathematics+AND+education&pg=5&id=EJ1070973','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mathematics+AND+education&pg=5&id=EJ1070973"><span id="translatedtitle">On Relative and <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Conviction in Mathematics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between <span class="hlt">absolute</span> conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26879079','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26879079"><span id="translatedtitle">An Update on the Utility of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Calcium Scoring for <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Prediction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kianoush, Sina; Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Umapathi, Priya; Graham, Garth; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael J</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Estimating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is necessary for determining the potential net benefit of primary prevention pharmacotherapy. Risk estimation relying exclusively on traditional CVD risk factors may misclassify risk, resulting in both undertreatment and overtreatment. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery calcium (CAC) scoring personalizes risk prediction through direct visualization of calcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerotic plaques and provides improved accuracy for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) or CVD risk estimation. In this review, we discuss the most recent studies on CAC, which unlike historical studies, focus sharply on clinical application. We describe the MESA CHD risk calculator, a recently developed CAC-based 10-year CHD risk estimator, which can help guide preventive therapy allocation by better identifying both <span class="hlt">high</span>- and low-risk individuals. In closing, we discuss calcium density, regional distribution of CAC, and extra-<span class="hlt">coronary</span> calcification, which represent the future of CAC and CVD risk assessment research and may lead to further improvements in risk prediction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21474897','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21474897"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> revascularization: 2011.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Butman, Samuel M</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> revascularization is a proven method to alleviate the symptoms of ischemic heart disease and improve survival. There have been many improvements in surgical revascularization since its advent > 40 years ago and in balloon angioplasty since its first usage > 30 years ago. Patients will continue to benefit as these surgical techniques continue to undergo further improvements. This article is a testament to the many physicians, surgeons, scientists, industry leaders, and insurers who continue to reinvent how we provide cutting-edge procedures in the most cost-effective manner for our patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27289296','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27289296"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Frequency of Adverse Events in Patients With Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndromes Undergoing Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Piccolo, Raffaele; Franzone, Anna; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Räber, Lorenz; Pilgrim, Thomas; Valgimigli, Marco; Stortecky, Stefan; Rat-Wirtzler, Julie; Silber, Sigmund; Serruys, Patrick W; Jüni, Peter; Heg, Dik; Windecker, Stephan</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Few data are available on the timing of adverse events in relation to the status of diabetes mellitus and the type of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS). We investigated this issue in diabetic and nondiabetic patients admitted with a diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS) or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention. Patient-level data from 6 studies (n = 16,601) were pooled and only patients with ACS are included (n = 9,492). Early (0 to 30 days), late (31 to 365 days), and overall (0 to 365 days) events were analyzed. Diabetes mellitus was present in 1,927 patients (20.3%). At 1 year, all-cause mortality was highest for diabetic patients with STEMI (13.4%), followed by diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS (10.3%), nondiabetic patients with STEMI (6.4%) and nondiabetic patients with NSTE-ACS (4.4%; p <0.001). Among patients with diabetes, there was a significant interaction (p <0.001) for STEMI versus NSTE-ACS in early compared with late mortality, due to an excess of early mortality associated with STEMI (9.3% vs 3.7%; hazard ratio 2.31, 95% CI 1.52 to 3.54, p <0.001). Compared with diabetic NSTE-ACS patients, diabetic patients with STEMI had an increased risk of early stent thrombosis (hazard ratio 2.26, 95% CI 1.48 to 3.44, p <0.001), as well as a significant interaction (p = 0.009) in the risk of target lesion revascularization between the early and late follow-up. The distribution of fatal and nonfatal events according to the type of ACS was not influenced by diabetic status. In conclusion, diabetes in ACS setting confers a worse prognosis with 1-year mortality >10% in both STEMI and NSTE-ACS. Notwithstanding the <span class="hlt">high</span> <span class="hlt">absolute</span> rates, the temporal distribution of adverse events related to the type of ACS is similar between diabetic and nondiabetic patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27289296','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27289296"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Frequency of Adverse Events in Patients With Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndromes Undergoing Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Piccolo, Raffaele; Franzone, Anna; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Räber, Lorenz; Pilgrim, Thomas; Valgimigli, Marco; Stortecky, Stefan; Rat-Wirtzler, Julie; Silber, Sigmund; Serruys, Patrick W; Jüni, Peter; Heg, Dik; Windecker, Stephan</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Few data are available on the timing of adverse events in relation to the status of diabetes mellitus and the type of acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS). We investigated this issue in diabetic and nondiabetic patients admitted with a diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS) or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention. Patient-level data from 6 studies (n = 16,601) were pooled and only patients with ACS are included (n = 9,492). Early (0 to 30 days), late (31 to 365 days), and overall (0 to 365 days) events were analyzed. Diabetes mellitus was present in 1,927 patients (20.3%). At 1 year, all-cause mortality was highest for diabetic patients with STEMI (13.4%), followed by diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS (10.3%), nondiabetic patients with STEMI (6.4%) and nondiabetic patients with NSTE-ACS (4.4%; p <0.001). Among patients with diabetes, there was a significant interaction (p <0.001) for STEMI versus NSTE-ACS in early compared with late mortality, due to an excess of early mortality associated with STEMI (9.3% vs 3.7%; hazard ratio 2.31, 95% CI 1.52 to 3.54, p <0.001). Compared with diabetic NSTE-ACS patients, diabetic patients with STEMI had an increased risk of early stent thrombosis (hazard ratio 2.26, 95% CI 1.48 to 3.44, p <0.001), as well as a significant interaction (p = 0.009) in the risk of target lesion revascularization between the early and late follow-up. The distribution of fatal and nonfatal events according to the type of ACS was not influenced by diabetic status. In conclusion, diabetes in ACS setting confers a worse prognosis with 1-year mortality >10% in both STEMI and NSTE-ACS. Notwithstanding the <span class="hlt">high</span> <span class="hlt">absolute</span> rates, the temporal distribution of adverse events related to the type of ACS is similar between diabetic and nondiabetic patients. PMID:27289296</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4599477','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4599477"><span id="translatedtitle">Prognostic Value of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Computed Tomography (CT) Angiography and <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Calcium Score Performed Before Revascularization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Kondo, Takeshi; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Shinozaki, Tomohiro; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Matsumori, Rie; Hiki, Makoto; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Rybicki, Frank J</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Cardiac events after revascularization are equally attributable to recurrence at site of culprit lesions and development of nonculprit lesions. We evaluated the hypothesis that <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomography (CT) angiography and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium score (CACS) performed before revascularization predicts cardiac events after treatment. Methods and Results Among 2238 consecutive patients without known <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease who underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> CT angiography and CACS, 359 patients underwent revascularization within 30 days after CT; in 337 of 359 (93.9%) follow-up clinical information was available. In addition to known cardiac risk factors, CT findings were evaluated as predictors of cardiac events after revascularization: CACS and the presence of CT-verified <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk plaque (CT-HRP). Improvement of predictive accuracy by including CT findings was evaluated from a discrimination (Harrell’s C-statistics) standpoint. During the follow-up period (median: 673, interquartile range: 47 to 1529 days), a total of 98 cardiac events occurred. Cox proportional hazard model revealed that age, diabetes, triglyceride, CACS, and nonculprit CT-HRP were significant predictors of overall cardiac events. Although not statistically significant, discriminatory power was greater for the model with CACS (C-stat: 63.2%) and the model with both CACS and CT-HRP (65.8%) compared to the model including neither CACS nor CT-HRP (60.7%). Conclusions <span class="hlt">High</span> CACS and the presence of nonculprit CT-HRP performed before revascularization are significant predictors of cardiac events after revascularization. PMID:26296858</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4799828','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4799828"><span id="translatedtitle">TBS Predict <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Calcification in Adults</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chuang, Tzyy-Ling; Hsiao, Fu-Tsung; Li, Yi-Da</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose. This study analyzes the association between the bony microarchitecture score (trabecular bone score, TBS) and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcification (CAC) in adults undergoing health exams. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively collected subjects (N = 81) who underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomography and bone mineral density studies simultaneously. CAC was categorized to three levels (Group 0, G0, no CAC, score = 0, N = 45; Group 1, G1, moderate CAC, score = 1–100, N = 17; Group 2, G2, <span class="hlt">high</span> CAC, score ≧ 101, N = 19). Multinomial logistic regression was used to study the association between TBS and CAC levels. Results. CAC is present in 44.4% of the population. Mean TBS ± SD was 1.399 ± 0.090. Per 1 SD increase in TBS, the unadjusted odds ratio (2.393) of moderate CAC compared with no CAC was significantly increased (95% CI, 1.219–4.696, p = 0.011). However, there has been no association of TBS with <span class="hlt">high</span> CAC (OR: 1.026, 95% CI: 0.586–1.797, p = 0.928). These relationships also existed when individually adjusted for age, sex, and multiple other covariates. Conclusions. Higher TBS was related to moderate CAC, but not <span class="hlt">high</span> CAC; a possible explanation may be that bone microarchitecture remodeling becomes more active when early <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcification occurs. However, further researches are needed to clarify this pathophysiology. PMID:27042671</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012EGUGA..14.3080M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012EGUGA..14.3080M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> GNSS Antenna Calibration at the National Geodetic Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mader, G.; Bilich, A.; Geoghegan, C.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely <span class="hlt">high</span> levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. To help meet the needs of the <span class="hlt">high</span>-precision GNSS community, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) now operates an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> antenna calibration facility. Located in Corbin, Virginia, this facility uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to quantitatively determine the carrier phase advance/delay introduced by the antenna element. The NGS facility was built to serve traditional NGS constituents such as the surveying and geodesy communities, however calibration services are open and available to all GNSS users as the calibration schedule permits. All phase center patterns computed by this facility will be publicly available and disseminated in both the ANTEX and NGS formats. We describe the NGS calibration facility, and discuss the observation models and strategy currently used to generate NGS <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibrations. We demonstrate that NGS <span class="hlt">absolute</span> phase center variation (PCV) patterns are consistent with published values determined by other <span class="hlt">absolute</span> antenna calibration facilities, and outline future planned refinements to the system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19681465','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19681465"><span id="translatedtitle">[Elective percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention after acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sebetić, Drazen; Raguz, Miroslav; Sakić, Ivana; Lazić, Jelenko; Puksić, Silva; Bergovec, Mijo</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>Elective percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI) after acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS), according to guidelines issued by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC), is a therapeutic method that is indicated in patients with ACS with ST segment elevation in case of persistent signs of myocardial ischemia and with significant stenosis of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery verified by <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, suitable for PCI according to the guidelines. It is also indicated for non-culprit significant stenosis of other <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries which have been seen during primary PCI for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). After non ST segment myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or after non-ST elevation ACS, elective <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery angiography is indicated in low risk patients if they have positive signs of ischemia on noninvasive tests. Depending on the results of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, elective PCI is indicated according to ESC or AHA/ACC guidelines. The method success is assessed at three levels, i.e. by angiography, clinically and periprocedurally. PCI enables earlier and more efficient resolution of symptoms, better effort tolerance and lower rate of residual ischemia on noninvasive tests. PMID:19681465</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26112200','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26112200"><span id="translatedtitle">Finding the Gatekeeper to the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory: <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> CT Angiography or Stress Testing?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marwick, Thomas H; Cho, Iksung; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Min, James K</p> <p>2015-06-30</p> <p>Functional capacity is a robust predictor of clinical outcomes, and stress testing is used in current practice paradigms to guide referral to invasive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography. However, invasive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography is driven by ongoing symptoms, as well as risk of adverse outcomes. The limitations of current functional testing-based paradigms might be avoided by using <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) for exclusion of obstructive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. The growth of CCTA has been supported by comparative prognostic evidence with CCTA and functional testing, as well as radiation dose reduction. Use of CCTA for physiological evaluation of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesion-specific ischemia may facilitate evaluation of moderate stenoses, designation of the culprit lesion, and prediction of benefit from revascularization. The potential of CCTA to serve as an effective gatekeeper to invasive <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography will depend, in part, on the adoption of these new developments, as well as definition of the benefit of detecting <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk plaque for guiding the management of selected patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S42C..05M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S42C..05M"><span id="translatedtitle">Combined Use of <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> and Differential Seismic Arrival Time Data to Improve <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Event Location</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Myers, S.; Johannesson, G.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Arrival time measurements based on waveform cross correlation are becoming more common as advanced signal processing methods are applied to seismic data archives and real-time data streams. Waveform correlation can precisely measure the time difference between the arrival of two phases, and differential time data can be used to constrain relative location of events. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> locations are needed for many applications, which generally requires the use of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> time data. Current methods for measuring <span class="hlt">absolute</span> time data are approximately two orders of magnitude less precise than differential time measurements. To exploit the strengths of both <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and differential time data, we extend our multiple-event location method Bayesloc, which previously used <span class="hlt">absolute</span> time data only, to include the use of differential time measurements that are based on waveform cross correlation. Fundamentally, Bayesloc is a formulation of the joint probability over all parameters comprising the multiple event location system. The Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method is used to sample from the joint probability distribution given arrival data sets. The differential time component of Bayesloc includes scaling a stochastic estimate of differential time measurement precision based the waveform correlation coefficient for each datum. For a regional-distance synthetic data set with <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and differential time measurement error of 0.25 seconds and 0.01 second, respectively, epicenter location accuracy is improved from and average of 1.05 km when solely <span class="hlt">absolute</span> time data are used to 0.28 km when <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and differential time data are used jointly (73% improvement). The improvement in <span class="hlt">absolute</span> location accuracy is the result of conditionally limiting <span class="hlt">absolute</span> location probability regions based on the precise relative position with respect to neighboring events. Bayesloc estimates of data precision are found to be accurate for the synthetic test, with <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and differential time measurement</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21029821','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21029821"><span id="translatedtitle">Safety and efficacy of ezetimibe/simvastatin combination versus atorvastatin alone in adults ≥65 years of age with hypercholesterolemia and with or at moderately <span class="hlt">high/high</span> risk for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (the VYTELD study).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Foody, JoAnne M; Brown, W Virgil; Zieve, Franklin; Adewale, Adeniyi J; Flaim, Doreen; Lowe, Robert S; Jones-Burton, Charlotte; Tershakovec, Andrew M</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>Higher than 80% of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease-related mortality occurs in patients ≥65 years of age. Guidelines recommend low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol targets for these at-risk patients; however, few clinical studies have evaluated lipid-lowering strategies specifically in older adults. This multicenter, 12-week, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of the usual starting dose of ezetimibe/simvastatin (10/20 mg) versus atorvastatin 10 or 20 mg and the next higher dose of ezetimibe/simvastatin (10/40 mg) versus atorvastatin 40 mg in 1,289 hypercholesterolemic patients ≥65 years of age with or without cardiovascular disease. Patients randomized to ezetimibe/simvastatin had greater percent decreases in LDL cholesterol (-54.2% for 10/20 mg vs -39.5% and -46.6% for atorvastatin 10 and 20 mg, respectively; -59.1% for 10/40 mg vs -50.8% for atorvastatin 40 mg; p <0.001 for all comparisons) and the number attaining LDL cholesterol <70 mg/dl (51.3% for 10/20 mg, 68.2% for 10/40 mg) and <100 mg/dl (83.6% for 10/20 mg; 90.3% for 10/40 mg) was significantly larger compared to those receiving atorvastatin for all prespecified dose comparisons (p <0.05 to <0.001). A significantly larger percentage of <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk patients achieved LDL cholesterol <70 mg/dl on ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/20 mg (54.3%) versus atorvastatin 10 mg (10.9%, p <0.001) or 20 mg (28.9%, p <0.001) and ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/40 mg (69.2%) versus atorvastatin 40 mg (38.2%, p <0.001), and a significantly larger percentage of intermediate-risk patients achieved LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl on ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/20 mg (82.1%) versus atorvastatin 10 mg (59.3%, p <0.05). Improvements in non-<span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein ratios were significantly greater with ezetimibe/simvastatin than atorvastatin for all comparisons (p <0.01 to <0.001). <span class="hlt">High</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride results</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001NIMPA.467.1533Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001NIMPA.467.1533Y"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> calibration of space-resolving soft X-ray spectrograph for plasma diagnostics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yoshikawa, M.; Okamoto, Y.; Kawamori, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Watabe, C.; Yamaguchi, N.; Tamano, T.</p> <p>2001-07-01</p> <p>A grazing incidence flat-field soft X-ray (20-350 Å) spectrograph was constructed and applied for impurity diagnostics in the GAMMA 10 fusion plasma. The spectrograph consisted of a limited height entrance slit, an aberration-corrected concave grating, a microchannel-plate intensified detector and an instant camera/a <span class="hlt">high</span> speed solid state camera. An <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration experiment for the SX spectrograph was performed at the Photon Factory in the <span class="hlt">High</span> Energy Accelerator Research Organization with monitoring the incident synchrotron beam intensity by using an <span class="hlt">absolutely</span> calibrated XUV silicon photodiode. From the results of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration of the spectrograph, the radiation loss from the plasma was obtained.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25567747','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25567747"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis in an Asian population: findings from <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomographic angiography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Gyung-Min; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Cho, Young-Rak; Gil, Eun Ha; Her, Sung Ho; Kim, Seon Ha; Jo, Min-Woo; Lee, Moo Song; Lee, Seung-Whan; Kim, Young-Hak; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Beom-Jun; Koh, Jung-Min; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Choe, Jaewon; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Seung-Jung</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We sought to estimate the prevalence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis by <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) and to identify risk factors attributable to the development of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis in an asymptomatic Asian population. We analyzed 6,311 consecutive asymptomatic individuals aged 40 and older with no prior history of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) who voluntarily underwent CCTA evaluation as part of a general health examination. The mean age of study participants was 54.7 ± 7.4 years, and 4,594 (72.8%) were male. After age and gender adjustment using the population census of the National Statistical Office, the prevalence of plaque was 40.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 38.1-42.9], and significant CAD (diameter stenosis ≥50%) was observed in 9.0% (95% CI 7.7-10.2). Individuals with significant CAD were significantly older than those without (59.2 ± 8.8 vs. 54.0 ± 7.1 years, p < 0.001). Compared with individuals with no cardiovascular risk factors, there was a higher prevalence of significant CAD in individuals with diabetes mellitus [standardized rate ratio (SRR) 2.66; 95% CI 1.93-3.68; p < 0.001], hypertension (SRR 2.24; 95% CI 1.69-2.97; p < 0.001), or hyperlipidemia (SRR 1.65; 95% CI 1.25-2.17; p < 0.001). There was also a greater prevalence of significant CAD in individuals with an intermediate or <span class="hlt">high</span> Framingham risk score (SRR 5.91; 95% CI 2.34-14.95; p < 0.001) or a <span class="hlt">high</span> atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk score (SRR 8.04; 95% CI 3.04-21.23; p < 0.001). The prevalence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis in this Asian population was not negligible and was associated with known cardiovascular risk factors and <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk individuals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5059126','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5059126"><span id="translatedtitle">Anomalous Origin of the Left <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery from the Pulmonary Artery in Adulthood: Challenges and Outcomes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kothari, Jignesh; Lakhia, Ketav; Solanki, Parth; Parmar, Divyakant; Boraniya, Hiren; Patel, Sanjay</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Anomalous origin of the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is an extremely rare, potentially fatal, congenital anomaly with a <span class="hlt">high</span> mortality rate in the first year of life. It occurs rarely in adulthood and may appear with malignant ventricular a rrhythmia or sudden death. We report a case of a 49-year-old woman with ALCAPA who presented with dyspnea on exertion. Management was <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting to the left anterior descending artery and obtuse marginal arteries, closure of the left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery ostium, and reestablishment of the dual <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery system. PMID:27734000</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4976180','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4976180"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiple Small <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Fistulas Emptying into the Left Ventricle: A Rare but Challenging Problem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kahaly, Omar</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula (CAF) is an abnormal communication between a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery and a cardiac chamber or a great vessel. CAFs are rare based on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteriography and when found they most often empty into the right ventricle and atrium and less often into the <span class="hlt">high</span> pressure, low compliance left ventricle (LV). A patient who presented with atypical chest pain and was found to have multiple small CAFs originating from the ramus intermedius <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery and emptying into the LV is presented. This case highlights the challenges in providing an appropriate therapy for multiple small CAFs emptying into the LV. PMID:27525009</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21627612','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21627612"><span id="translatedtitle">[Key laboratory diagnostic biomarkers of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ragino, Iu I; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Eremenko, N V; Shakhtshneĭder, E V; Polonskaia, Ia V; Tsymbal, S Iu; Ivanova, M V; Voevoda, M I</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Laboratory lipid and lipoprotein biomarkers (total cholesterol - CH, triglycerides - TG, low-density and <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol- LDL-CH, HDL-CH, apolipoproteins B and A1 - apoB, apoA1), carbohydrate biomarkers (plasma glucose, basal insulin), <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidative biomarkers (basal level of lipid peroxidation [LPO] products in LDL, LDL resistance to oxidation in vitro, oxidative modification of apoLDL and level of LDL lipophilic antioxidants) were studied in 388 men aged 42-70 years: 96 citizens of Western Siberia with angiographically documented <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD); 292 men of population sample of citizens of Novosibirsk, including 44 men with CHD confirmed by standardized criteria and methods. Significant associations were found of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis and CHD with laboratory diagnostic biomarkers like blood levels of HDL-CH, TG, apoB, apoA1, basal insulin, hsCRP and basal level of LPO products in LDL and LDL resistance to oxidation. PMID:21627612</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27586139','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27586139"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetics and Genomics of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pjanic, Milos; Miller, Clint L; Wirka, Robert; Kim, Juyong B; DiRenzo, Daniel M; Quertermous, Thomas</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery disease (or <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease), is the leading cause of mortality in many of the developing as well as the developed countries of the world. Cholesterol-enriched plaques in the heart's blood vessels combined with inflammation lead to the lesion expansion, narrowing of blood vessels, reduced blood flow, and may subsequently cause lesion rupture and a heart attack. Even though several environmental risk factors have been established, such as <span class="hlt">high</span> LDL-cholesterol, diabetes, and <span class="hlt">high</span> blood pressure, the underlying genetic composition may substantially modify the disease risk; hence, genome composition and gene-environment interactions may be critical for disease progression. Ongoing scientific efforts have seen substantial advancements related to the fields of genetics and genomics, with the major breakthroughs yet to come. As genomics is the most rapidly advancing field in the life sciences, it is important to present a comprehensive overview of current efforts. Here, we present a summary of various genetic and genomics assays and approaches applied to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease research. PMID:27586139</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989SPIE.1067..158S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989SPIE.1067..158S"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical Problems In <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Angioscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sherman, C. Todd</p> <p>1989-06-01</p> <p>I have been asked to talk about the clinical problems encountered when performing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioscopy. By definition, this discussion will reflect negatively on the procedure. Nevertheless, after presenting some of the data, I hope you will leave thinking optimistically about the future of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioscopy. The first topic that I would like to address, as shown in Figure 1, concerns the goals for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioscopy. What great discoveries might we ekpect from this tool? Is the potential benefit worthy of a large research and development investment? Then, assuming these goals are meritorious, I will compare the difficulties of percutaneous angioscopy with that of a more fully explored technique- intraoperative angioscopy. I will next describe the differences between percutaneous angioscopy of peripheral vasculature, a procedure enjoying more widespread use, and percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioscopy (a technique less often utilized). I will then outline the basic requirements for any percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioscopy system whose attributes can resolve some of the inherent challenges of the technique. Even if this hypothetical instrument were developed and proved to be safe and functional, angioscopy will always have intrinsic limitations. I will next outline these shortcomings. This will be followed by a more optimistic topic- a review of the published studies that have utilized percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioscopy. Finally, I will speculate on developments in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioscopy for the near future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26729134','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26729134"><span id="translatedtitle">Bio-Inspired Stretchable <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Pressure Sensor Network.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guo, Yue; Li, Yu-Hung; Guo, Zhiqiang; Kim, Kyunglok; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Wang, Shan X</p> <p>2016-01-02</p> <p>A bio-inspired <span class="hlt">absolute</span> pressure sensor network has been developed. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> pressure sensors, distributed on multiple silicon islands, are connected as a network by stretchable polyimide wires. This sensor network, made on a 4'' wafer, has 77 nodes and can be mounted on various curved surfaces to cover an area up to 0.64 m × 0.64 m, which is 100 times larger than its original size. Due to Micro Electro-Mechanical system (MEMS) surface micromachining technology, ultrathin sensing nodes can be realized with thicknesses of less than 100 µm. Additionally, good linearity and <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitivity (~14 mV/V/bar) have been achieved. Since the MEMS sensor process has also been well integrated with a flexible polymer substrate process, the entire sensor network can be fabricated in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. Moreover, an accurate pressure contour can be obtained from the sensor network. Therefore, this <span class="hlt">absolute</span> pressure sensor network holds significant promise for smart vehicle applications, especially for unmanned aerial vehicles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4732088','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4732088"><span id="translatedtitle">Bio-Inspired Stretchable <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Pressure Sensor Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Guo, Yue; Li, Yu-Hung; Guo, Zhiqiang; Kim, Kyunglok; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Wang, Shan X.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A bio-inspired <span class="hlt">absolute</span> pressure sensor network has been developed. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> pressure sensors, distributed on multiple silicon islands, are connected as a network by stretchable polyimide wires. This sensor network, made on a 4’’ wafer, has 77 nodes and can be mounted on various curved surfaces to cover an area up to 0.64 m × 0.64 m, which is 100 times larger than its original size. Due to Micro Electro-Mechanical system (MEMS) surface micromachining technology, ultrathin sensing nodes can be realized with thicknesses of less than 100 µm. Additionally, good linearity and <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitivity (~14 mV/V/bar) have been achieved. Since the MEMS sensor process has also been well integrated with a flexible polymer substrate process, the entire sensor network can be fabricated in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. Moreover, an accurate pressure contour can be obtained from the sensor network. Therefore, this <span class="hlt">absolute</span> pressure sensor network holds significant promise for smart vehicle applications, especially for unmanned aerial vehicles. PMID:26729134</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26729134','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26729134"><span id="translatedtitle">Bio-Inspired Stretchable <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Pressure Sensor Network.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guo, Yue; Li, Yu-Hung; Guo, Zhiqiang; Kim, Kyunglok; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Wang, Shan X</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A bio-inspired <span class="hlt">absolute</span> pressure sensor network has been developed. <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> pressure sensors, distributed on multiple silicon islands, are connected as a network by stretchable polyimide wires. This sensor network, made on a 4'' wafer, has 77 nodes and can be mounted on various curved surfaces to cover an area up to 0.64 m × 0.64 m, which is 100 times larger than its original size. Due to Micro Electro-Mechanical system (MEMS) surface micromachining technology, ultrathin sensing nodes can be realized with thicknesses of less than 100 µm. Additionally, good linearity and <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitivity (~14 mV/V/bar) have been achieved. Since the MEMS sensor process has also been well integrated with a flexible polymer substrate process, the entire sensor network can be fabricated in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. Moreover, an accurate pressure contour can be obtained from the sensor network. Therefore, this <span class="hlt">absolute</span> pressure sensor network holds significant promise for smart vehicle applications, especially for unmanned aerial vehicles. PMID:26729134</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..407...15O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..407...15O"><span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">absolute</span> measure for a key currency</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito</p> <p></p> <p>It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no <span class="hlt">absolute</span> general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25423049','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25423049"><span id="translatedtitle">Probing <span class="hlt">absolute</span> spin polarization at the nanoscale.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus</p> <p>2014-12-10</p> <p>Probing <span class="hlt">absolute</span> values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750063653&hterms=VALUE+ABSOLUTE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DVALUE%2BABSOLUTE','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750063653&hterms=VALUE+ABSOLUTE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DVALUE%2BABSOLUTE"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> radiometry and the solar constant</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Willson, R. C.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in <span class="hlt">absolute</span> units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small <span class="hlt">absolute</span> uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120011123','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120011123"><span id="translatedtitle">From Hubble's NGSL to <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Fluxes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as <span class="hlt">absolute</span> flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15281420','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15281420"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of Winko on <span class="hlt">absolute</span> discharges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Balachandra, Krishna; Swaminath, Sam; Litman, Larry C</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>In Canada, case laws have had a significant impact on the way mentally ill offenders are managed, both in the criminal justice system and in the forensic mental health system. The Supreme Court of Canada's decision with respect to Winko has set a major precedent in the application of the test of significant risk to the safety of the public in making dispositions by the Ontario Review Board and granting <span class="hlt">absolute</span> discharges to the mentally ill offenders in the forensic health system. Our study examines the impact of the Supreme Court of Canada's decision before and after Winko. The results show that the numbers of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> discharges have increased post-Winko, which was statistically significant, but there could be other factors influencing this increase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22340250','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22340250"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span>-magnitude distributions of supernovae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">absolute</span>-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean <span class="hlt">absolute</span> blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22218280','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22218280"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> and relative dosimetry for ELIMED</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Presti, D. Lo; Raffaele, L.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V.; Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S.</p> <p>2013-07-26</p> <p>The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23807613','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23807613"><span id="translatedtitle">Long-term incidence and prognostic factors of the progression of new <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesions in Japanese <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease patients after percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaneko, Hidehiro; Yajima, Junji; Oikawa, Yuji; Tanaka, Shingo; Fukamachi, Daisuke; Suzuki, Shinya; Sagara, Koichi; Otsuka, Takayuki; Matsuno, Shunsuke; Kano, Hiroto; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Koike, Akira; Nagashima, Kazuyuki; Kirigaya, Hajime; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Yamashita, Takeshi</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Revascularization of an initially non-target site due to its progression as a new culprit lesion has emerged as a new therapeutic target of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) in the era of drug-eluting stents. Using the Shinken database, a single-hospital-based cohort, we aimed to clarify the incidence and prognostic factors for progression of previously non-significant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> portions after prior percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI) in Japanese CAD patients. We selected from the Shinken database a single-hospital-based cohort of Japanese patients (n = 15227) who visited the Cardiovascular Institute between 2004 and 2010 to undergo PCI. This study included 1,214 patients (median follow-up period, 1,032 ± 704 days). Additional clinically driven PCI to treat previously non-significant lesions was performed in 152 patients. The cumulative rate of new-lesion PCI was 9.5 % at 1 year, 14.4 % at 3 years, and 17.6 % at 5 years. There was no difference in background clinical characteristics between patients with and without additional PCI. Prevalence of multi-vessel disease (MVD) (82 vs. 57 %, p < 0.001) and obesity (47 vs. 38 %, p = 0.028) were significantly higher and <span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) level (51 ± 15 vs. 47 ± 12 mg/dl, p < 0.001) was significantly lower in patients with additional PCI than those without. Patients using insulin (6 vs. 3 %, p = 0.035) were more common in patients with additional PCI. Multivariate analysis showed that MVD, lower HDL, and insulin use were independent determinants of progression of new culprit <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesions. In conclusion, progression of new <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesions was common and new-lesion PCI continued to occur beyond 1 year after PCI without attenuation of their annual incidences up to 5 years. Greater <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease burden, low HDL, and insulin-dependent DM were independent predictors of progression of new culprit <span class="hlt">coronary</span> lesions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26654676','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26654676"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional and anatomical measures for outflow boundary conditions in atherosclerotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> bifurcations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schrauwen, Jelle T C; Coenen, Adriaan; Kurata, Akira; Wentzel, Jolanda J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Nieman, Koen; Gijsen, Frank J H</p> <p>2016-07-26</p> <p>The aim of this research was finding the influence of anatomy-based and functional-based outflow boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on fractional flow reserve (FFR) and wall shear stress (WSS) in mildly diseased <span class="hlt">coronary</span> bifurcations. For 10 patient-specific bifurcations three simulations were set up with different outflow conditions, while the inflow was kept constant. First, the outflow conditions were based on the diameter of the outlets. Second, they were based on the volume estimates of the myocardium that depended on the outlets. Third, they were based on a myocardial flow measure derived from computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTP). The difference in outflow ratio between the perfusion-based and the diameter-based approach was -7 p.p. [-14 p.p.:7 p.p.] (median percentage point and interquartiles), and between the perfusion-based and volume-based this was -2 p.p. [-2 p.p.:1 p.p.]. Despite of these differences the computed FFRs matched very well. A quantitative analysis of the WSS results showed very <span class="hlt">high</span> correlations between the methods with an r(2) ranging from 0.90 to 1.00. But despite the <span class="hlt">high</span> correlations the diameter-based and volume-based approach generally underestimated the WSS compared to the perfusion-based approach. These differences disappeared after normalization. We demonstrated the potential of CTP for setting patient-specific boundary conditions for atherosclerotic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> bifurcations. FFR and normalized WSS were unaffected by the variations in outflow ratios. In order to compute <span class="hlt">absolute</span> WSS a functional measure to set the outflow ratio might be of added value in this type of vessels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22409579','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22409579"><span id="translatedtitle">Computerized analysis of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease: Performance evaluation of segmentation and tracking of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries in CT angiograms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhou, Chuan Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Kuriakose, Jean; Agarwal, Prachi; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Patel, Smita; Wei, Jun</p> <p>2014-08-15</p> <p>.2% and 53.4%, respectively. For the 62 test cases, a total of 55 FPs were identified by radiologist in 23 of the cases. Conclusions: The authors’ MSCAR-RBG method achieved <span class="hlt">high</span> sensitivity for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery segmentation and tracking. Studies are underway to further improve the accuracy for the arterial segments affected by motion artifacts, severe calcified and noncalcified soft plaques, and to reduce the false tracking of the veins and other noisy structures. Methods are also being developed to detect <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease along the tracked vessels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850050574&hterms=VALUE+ABSOLUTE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DVALUE%2BABSOLUTE','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850050574&hterms=VALUE+ABSOLUTE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DVALUE%2BABSOLUTE"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840024060','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840024060"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26280315','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26280315"><span id="translatedtitle">Relative errors can cue <span class="hlt">absolute</span> visuomotor mappings.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van Dam, Loes C J; Ernst, Marc O</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>When repeatedly switching between two visuomotor mappings, e.g. in a reaching or pointing task, adaptation tends to speed up over time. That is, when the error in the feedback corresponds to a mapping switch, fast adaptation occurs. Yet, what is learned, the relative error or the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> mappings? When switching between mappings, errors with a size corresponding to the relative difference between the mappings will occur more often than other large errors. Thus, we could learn to correct more for errors with this familiar size (Error Learning). On the other hand, it has been shown that the human visuomotor system can store several <span class="hlt">absolute</span> visuomotor mappings (Mapping Learning) and can use associated contextual cues to retrieve them. Thus, when contextual information is present, no error feedback is needed to switch between mappings. Using a rapid pointing task, we investigated how these two types of learning may each contribute when repeatedly switching between mappings in the absence of task-irrelevant contextual cues. After training, we examined how participants changed their behaviour when a single error probe indicated either the often-experienced error (Error Learning) or one of the previously experienced <span class="hlt">absolute</span> mappings (Mapping Learning). Results were consistent with Mapping Learning despite the relative nature of the error information in the feedback. This shows that errors in the feedback can have a double role in visuomotor behaviour: they drive the general adaptation process by making corrections possible on subsequent movements, as well as serve as contextual cues that can signal a learned <span class="hlt">absolute</span> mapping. PMID:26280315</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BCrAO.110...76B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BCrAO.110...76B"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Burnashev, V. I.; Burnasheva, B. A.; Ruban, E. V.; Hagen-Torn, E. I.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran is presented in a machine-readable form. The catalog systematizes observations acquired at the McDonald Observatory in 1977-1978. The data are compared with other sources, in particular, the calculated broadband stellar magnitudes are compared with photometric observations by other authors, to show that the observational data given in the catalog are reliable and suitable for a variety of applications. Observations of variable stars of different types make Cochran's catalog especially valuable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3331658','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3331658"><span id="translatedtitle">Nitric Oxide-Mediated <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Flow Regulation in Patients with <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease: Recent Advances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Toda, Noboru; Tanabe, Shinichi; Nakanishi, Sadanobu</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Nitric oxide (NO) formed via endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays crucial roles in the regulation of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow through vasodilatation and decreased vascular resistance, and in inhibition of platelet aggregation and adhesion, leading to the prevention of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> circulatory failure, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. Endothelial function is impaired by several pathogenic factors including smoking, chronic alcohol intake, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. The mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction include reduced NO synthase (NOS) expression and activity, decreased NO bioavailability, and increased production of oxygen radicals and endogenous NOS inhibitors. Atrial fibrillation appears to be a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is an important predictor of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) in humans. Penile erectile dysfunction, associated with impaired bioavailability of NO produced by eNOS and neuronal NOS, is also considered to be <span class="hlt">highly</span> predictive of ischemic heart disease. There is evidence suggesting an important role of nitrergic innervation in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow regulation. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures to eliminate pathogenic factors inducing endothelial and nitrergic nerve dysfunction would be quite important in preventing the genesis and development of CAD. PMID:22942627</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20070087','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20070087"><span id="translatedtitle">Chemical composition of French mimosa <span class="hlt">absolute</span> oil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas</p> <p>2010-02-10</p> <p>Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) <span class="hlt">absolute</span> oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa <span class="hlt">absolute</span> oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound. PMID:20070087</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SolED...3...43D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SolED...3...43D"><span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravity acceleration in Firenze</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 <span class="hlt">absolute</span> gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.V41E..01S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.V41E..01S"><span id="translatedtitle">A Methodology for <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Isotope Composition Measurement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shen, J. J.; Lee, D.; Liang, W.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Double spike technique was a well defined method for isotope composition measurement by TIMS of samples which have natural mass fractionation effect, but it is still a problem to define the isotope composition for double spike itself. In this study, we modified the old double spike technique and found that we could use the modified technique to solve the ¡§true¡¨ isotope composition of double spike itself. According the true isotope composition of double spike, we can measure the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> isotope composition if the sample has natural fractionation effect. A new vector analytical method has been developed in order to obtain the true isotopic composition of a 42Ca-48Ca double spike, and this is achieved by using two different sample-spike mixtures combined with the double spike and the natural Ca data. Because the natural sample, the two mixtures, and the spike should all lie on a single mixing line, we are able to constrain the true isotopic composition of our double spike using this new approach. This method not only can be used in Ca system but also in Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Mo, Ba and Pb systems. The <span class="hlt">absolute</span> double spike isotopic ratio is important, which can save a lot of time to check different reference standards. Especially for Pb, radiogenic isotope system, the decay systems embodied in three of four naturally occurring isotopes induce difficult to obtain true isotopic ratios for <span class="hlt">absolute</span> dating.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20070087','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20070087"><span id="translatedtitle">Chemical composition of French mimosa <span class="hlt">absolute</span> oil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas</p> <p>2010-02-10</p> <p>Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) <span class="hlt">absolute</span> oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa <span class="hlt">absolute</span> oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003MmSAI..74..884C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003MmSAI..74..884C"><span id="translatedtitle">The Carina Project: <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> and Relative Calibrations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Corsi, C. E.; Bono, G.; Walker, A. R.; Brocato, E.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Castellani, M.; Castellani, V.; Dall'Ora, M.; Marconi, M.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.; Pulone, L.; Ripepi, V.; Smith, H. A.</p> <p></p> <p>We discuss the reduction strategy adopted to perform the relative and the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration of the Wide Field Imager (WFI) available at the 2.2m ESO/MPI telescope and of the Mosaic Camera (MC) available at the 4m CTIO Blanco telescope. To properly constrain the occurrence of deceptive systematic errors in the relative calibration we observed with each chip the same set of stars. Current photometry seems to suggest that the WFI shows a positional effect when moving from the top to the bottom of individual chips. Preliminary results based on an independent data set collected with the MC suggest that this camera is only marginally affected by the same problem. To perform the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibration we observed with each chip the same set of standard stars. The sample covers a wide color range and the accuracy both in the B and in the V-band appears to be of the order of a few hundredths of magnitude. Finally, we briefly outline the observing strategy to improve both relative and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> calibrations of mosaic CCD cameras.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26819234','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26819234"><span id="translatedtitle">Almanac 2015: <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shavelle, David M</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Recent years have seen major advances in the evaluation and treatment of patients with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. These include assessment of novel biomarkers and imaging methods for patients at risk for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease, care of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, a novel device to treat medical refractory angina, use of non-statin lipid-lowering agents, a better understanding of the risks and benefits of long-term dual antiplatelet therapy and the use of the newer antiplatelet agents. This article summarises research related to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease published in Heart in 2014 and 2015, within the context of other major cardiovascular journals. PMID:26819234</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26597828','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26597828"><span id="translatedtitle">Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentrations and Association of <span class="hlt">High</span>-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Concentrations With Incident <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lin, Gen-Min; Liu, Kiang; Colangelo, Laura A; Lakoski, Susan G; Tracy, Russell P; Greenland, Philip</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">High</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has been associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease (CHD) in numerous but not all observational studies, and whether low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) alter this association is unknown. In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000-2012), we prospectively assessed the association of hs-CRP concentrations with incident CHD in participants who did not receive lipid-lowering therapy, as well as in those with LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL (n = 3,106) and those with LDL-C concentrations of 130 mg/dL or greater (n = 1,716) at baseline (2000-2002). Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to assess the associations after adjustment for socioeconomic status, traditional risk factors, body mass index, diabetes, aspirin use, kidney function, and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery calcium score. Loge hs-CRP was associated with incident CHD in participants with LDL-C concentrations of 130 mg/dL or higher (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.60) but not in those with LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL (HR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.74, 1.05; P for interaction = 0.003). As a whole, loge hs-CRP was not associated with incident CHD in participants who had not received lipid-lowering therapy at baseline (HR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.20) and who had mean LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL. These findings suggest that LDL-C concentrations might be a moderator of the contribution of hs-CRP to CHD.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4676634','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4676634"><span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention Enhances Accelerative Wave Intensity in <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Arteries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Narayan, Om; Leung, Michael C. H.; Wong, Dennis T. L.; Meredith, Ian T.; Cameron, James D.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background The systolic forward travelling compression wave (sFCW) and diastolic backward travelling decompression waves (dBEW) predominantly accelerate <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow. The effect of a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stenosis on the intensity of these waves in the distal vessel is unknown. We investigated the relationship between established physiological indices of hyperemic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow and the intensity of the two major accelerative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> waves identified by <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Wave Intensity analysis (CWIA). Methodology / Principal Findings Simultaneous intracoronary pressure and velocity measurement was performed during adenosine induced hyperemia in 17 patients with pressure / Doppler flow wires positioned distal to the target lesion. CWI profiles were generated from this data. Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) and <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Flow Velocity Reserve (CFVR) were calculated concurrently. The intensity of the dBEW was significantly correlated with FFR (R = -0.70, P = 0.003) and CFVR (R = -0.73, P = 0.001). The intensity of the sFCW was also significantly correlated with baseline FFR (R = 0.71, p = 0.002) and CFVR (R = 0.59, P = 0.01). Stenting of the target lesion resulted in a median 178% (interquartile range 55–280%) (P<0.0001) increase in sFCW intensity and a median 117% (interquartile range 27–509%) (P = 0.001) increase in dBEW intensity. The increase in accelerative wave intensity following PCI was proportionate to the baseline FFR and CFVR, such that stenting of lesions associated with the greatest flow limitation (lowest FFR and CFVR) resulted in the largest increases in wave intensity. Conclusions Increasing ischemia severity is associated with proportionate reductions in cumulative intensity of both major accelerative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> waves. Impaired diastolic microvascular decompression may represent a novel, important pathophysiologic mechanism driving the reduction in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> blood flow in the setting of an epicardial stenosis. PMID:26658896</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27530333','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27530333"><span id="translatedtitle">Relation of Plasma Lipoprotein(a) to Subclinical <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Plaque Volumes, Three-Vessel and Left Main <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Disease, and Severe <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Stenoses in Apparently Healthy African-Americans With a Family History of Early-Onset <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kral, Brian G; Kalyani, Rita R; Yanek, Lisa R; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Fishman, Elliot K; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) risk factor in persons of European ancestry. Levels are twofold to threefold higher in African-Americans (AAs), but reported associations with CAD have been inconsistent. The relation of Lp(a) with the extent and severity of subclinical <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque has not been described in AAs. We screened 269 apparently healthy AAs for risk factors and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque using advanced <span class="hlt">coronary</span> computed tomographic angiography. Total <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque (TCP), noncalcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque, and calcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque volumes (mm(3)) were quantified using a validated automated method. Lp(a) was measured by ELISA. Multivariable modeling was performed with adjustment for traditional CAD risk factors and intrafamilial correlations. Mean age was 51 ± 11 years and 64% were female. Plaque was present in 41%. Lp(a) was independently associated with TCP volume [log(TCP + 1)] (p = 0.04), 3-vessel and/or left main involvement (p = 0.04), and at least 1 stenosis >50% (p = 0.006). Best-fit regression analyses showed that subjects with Lp(a) >40 mg/dl were threefold more likely to have 3-vessel and/or left main disease (95% confidence interval 1.4 to 6.8, p = 0.005) and fourfold more likely to have stenosis >50% (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 15.0, p = 0.02). In subjects with plaque (n = 110), multivariable models showed the Lp(a) level was significantly and independently associated with TCP (p = 0.009), noncalcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque (p = 0.01), and calcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque (p = 0.003) and affected vessel length (p = 0.01). In conclusion, <span class="hlt">high</span> Lp(a) is strongly associated with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaque volumes, extent, and severity in apparently healthy AAs. <span class="hlt">High</span> levels of Lp(a) may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of CAD in AAs. PMID:27530333</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1468358','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1468358"><span id="translatedtitle">Origin and course of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries in normal mice and in iv/iv mice</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>ICARDO, JOSÉ M.; COLVEE, ELVIRA</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>This paper reports on the origin and distribution of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries in normal mice and in mice of the iv/iv strain, which show situs inversus and heterotaxia. The <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries were studied by direct observation of the aortic sinuses with the scanning electron microscope, and by examination of vascular corrosion casts. In the normal mouse, the left and right <span class="hlt">coronaries</span> (LC, RC) arise from the respective Valsalva sinus and course along the ventricular borders to reach the heart apex. Along this course the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries give off small branches at perpendicular or acute angles to supply the ventricles. The ventricular septum is supplied by the septal artery, which arises as a main branch from the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span>. Conus arteries arise from the main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> trunks, from the septal artery and/or directly from the Valsalva sinus. The vascular casts demonstrate the presence of intercoronary anastomoses. The origin of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries was found to be abnormal in 84% of the iv/iv mice. These anomalies included double origin, <span class="hlt">high</span> take-off, slit-like openings and the presence of a single <span class="hlt">coronary</span> orifice. These anomalies occurred singly or in any combination, and were independent of heart situs. The septal artery originated from RC in most cases of situs solitus but originated predominantly from LC in situs inversus hearts. Except for this anomalous origin no statistical correlation was found between the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anomalies and heart situs or a particular mode of heterotaxia. The <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anomalies observed in the iv/iv mice are similar to those found in human hearts. Most <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anomalies appear to be due to defective connections between the aortic root and the developing <span class="hlt">coronaries</span>. iv/iv mice may therefore constitute a good model to study the development of similar anomalies in the human heart. PMID:11693308</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4484099','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4484099"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease Risk Factors, <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Calcification and <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Bypass Surgery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ulusoy, Fatih Rifat; Ipek, Emrah; Korkmaz, Ali Fuat; Gurler, Mehmet Yavuz; Gulbaran, Murat</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Atherosclerosis is an intimal disease which affects large and medium size arteries including aorta and carotid, <span class="hlt">coronary</span>, cerebral and radial arteries. Calcium accumulated in the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial plaques have substantial contribution to the plaque volume. The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD) risk factors and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial calcification, and to delineate the importance of CACS in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass surgery. Materials and Methods The current study is retrospective and 410 patients admitted to our clinic with atypical chest pain and without known CAD were included. These individuals were evaluated by 16 slice electron beam computed tomography with suspicion of CAD and their calcium scores were calculated. Detailed demographic and medical history were obtained from all of the patients. Results In our study, we employed five different analyses using different <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial calcification score (CACS) thresold levels reported in previous studies. All of the analyses, performed according to the previously defined thresold levels, showed that risk factors had strong positive relationship with CACS as mentioned in previous studies. Conclusion <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> arterial calcification is part of the athero-sclerotic process and although it can be detected in atherosclerotic vessel, it is absent in a normal vessel. It can be concluded that the clinical scores, even they are helpful, have some limitations in a significant part of the population for cardiovascular risk determination. It is important for an anastomosis region to be noncalcified in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> bypass surgery. In a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery, it will be helpness for showing of calcific field and anostomosis spot. PMID:26155507</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=482459','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=482459"><span id="translatedtitle">Incidence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Morrison, G W; Thomas, R D; Grimmer, S F; Silverton, P N; Smith, D R</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The case notes, cardiac catheterisation data, and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteriograms of 239 patients investigated for valvular heart disease during a five year period were reviewed. Angina present in 13 of 95 patients with isolated mitral valve disease, 43 of 90 patients with isolated aortic valve disease, and 18 of 54 patients with combined mitral and aortic valve disease. Significant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease was present in 85 per cent of patients with mitral valve disease and angina, but in only 33 per cent of patients with aortic valve disease and angina. Patients with no chest pain still had a <span class="hlt">high</span> incidence of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease, significant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> obstruction being present in 22 per cent with mitral valve disease, 22 per cent with aortic valve disease, and 11 per cent with combine mitral and aortic valve disease. Several possible clinical markers of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease were examined but none was found to be of practical help. There was, however, a significant inverse relation between severity of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease and severity of valve disease in patients with aortic valve disease. Asymptomatic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease is not uncommon in patients with valvular heart disease and if it is policy to perform <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting in such patients, routine <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteriography must be part of the preoperative investigation. PMID:7459146</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25048808','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25048808"><span id="translatedtitle">Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus: anatomic variants and congenital anomalies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Yingming Amy; Nguyen, Elsie T; Dennie, Carole; Wald, Rachel M; Crean, Andrew M; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Jimenez-Juan, Laura</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus (CS) is an important vascular structure that allows for access into the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> veins in multiple interventional cardiology procedures, including catheter ablation of arrhythmias, pacemaker implantation and retrograde cardioplegia. The success of these procedures is facilitated by the knowledge of the CS anatomy, in particular the recognition of its variants and anomalies. This pictorial essay reviews the spectrum of CS anomalies, with particular attention to the distinction between clinically benign variants and life-threatening defects. Emphasis will be placed on the important role of cardiac CT and cardiovascular magnetic resonance in providing detailed anatomic and functional information of the CS and its relationship to surrounding cardiac structures. Teaching Points • Cardiac CT and cardiovascular magnetic resonance offer 3D <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution mapping of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus in pre-surgical planning.• Congenital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus enlargement occurs in the presence or absence of a left-to-right shunt.• Lack of recognition of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus anomalies can lead to adverse outcomes in cardiac procedures.• In <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus ostial atresia, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> venous drainage to the atria occurs via Thebesian or septal veins.• <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> sinus diverticulum is a congenital outpouching of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> sinus and may predispose to cardiac arrhythmias.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=1993SPIE.1878...94D&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=1993SPIE.1878...94D&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasomotion by intracoronary ultrasound</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dupouy, Patrick J.; Dubois-Rande, Jean Luc; Pelle, Gabriel; Gallot, Dominique; Geschwind, Herbert J.</p> <p>1993-06-01</p> <p>Recently, new intravascular ultrasound devices for intracoronary use became available. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound for the assessment of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery vasomotion and endothelial function in patients with atherosclerosis. Twenty patients with luminal irregularities on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiogram and a <span class="hlt">high</span> cholesterol level (287 +/- 19 mg/dl) (group 1) and 6 patients with angiographically smooth arteries and a minimally elevated cholesterol level (197 +/- 12 mg/dl) (group 2) were studied. A mechanical intravascular ultrasound probe (4.3 French, 30 MHz, Cardiovascular Imaging Systems) was placed into the proximal segment of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. Off-line measurements of the lumen area and calculation of mean intimal thickness indice was performed using digitized ultrasound images. Endothelial function was studied during a sympathetic stimulation by a cold pressor test and after intracoronary administration of papaverine and linsidomine. Mean intimal thickness was higher in group 1 than in group 2 (1.52 +/- 0.64 mm vs. 0.18 +/- 0.08 mm, p < 0.001). Linsidomine infusion induced a significant vasodilating effect in both groups (p < 0.001).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22382138','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22382138"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Coronary</span> intervention. 2012 update].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rittger, H; Arnold, M; Schmid, M; Zimmermann, S; Daniel, W G</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>In-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis are still the main topics of any update on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention. One of the challenging issues in the past year lay in answering the question of whether the data on first-generation drug-eluting stents are still relevant in the light of newer stent designs and drugs. Other issues include new strategies in antiplatelet therapy, treatment of in-stent restenosis, particularly drug-eluting stent restenosis, treatment of multivessel and left-main disease, as well as the latest developments in bioresorbable polymers and "scaffolds". In the light of demographic changes, the main challenge for the interventional community is to build an evidence base for the adequate treatment of elderly patients in order to resolve uncertainties in the treatment of this challenging patient group. PMID:22382138</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos/000096.htm','SCIGOVIMAGE-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos/000096.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous transluminal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty (PTCA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html">MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... minimally invasive procedure to open up blocked <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries, allowing blood to circulate unobstructed to the heart ... area and putting a needle into the femoral artery, the blood vessel that runs down the leg. ...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Arteries&pg=2&id=EJ963016','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Arteries&pg=2&id=EJ963016"><span id="translatedtitle">Marital Discord and <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease: A Comparison of Behaviorally Defined Discrete Groups</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Smith, Timothy W.; Uchino, Bert N.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Florsheim, Paul</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Objective: Marital difficulties can confer risk of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> heart disease, as in a study of outwardly healthy couples (T. W. Smith et al., 2011) where behavioral ratings of low affiliation and <span class="hlt">high</span> control during marital disagreements were associated with asymptomatic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease (CAD). However, taxometric studies suggest that marital…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5042246','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5042246"><span id="translatedtitle">Acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome in Behcet’s disease caused by a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysm and thrombosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tekin, Bahar; Özen, Gülsen; Tekayev, Nazar; Gerçek, Şeyma; Direskeneli, Haner</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Behcet’s disease (BD) is a multisystemic vasculitis that can involve vessels of all sizes and is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers with variable manifestations affecting the skin, eyes, and central nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Vascular involvement in BD is reported to be up to 40% in different series. The abdominal and thoracic aorta and pulmonary and femoral arteries are the most commonly involved arteries. However <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries are rarely affected. Herein, we present a 29-year-old man who was consulted with progressive severe chest pain of 3 days in duration to our clinic. The patient was diagnosed with BD with mucocutaneous symptoms and a positive pathergy test 1 year ago and was in clinical remission for the last 6 months. At the first evaluation in the emergency department, the patient’s vital signs were stable, whereas he had elevated troponin T levels with a normal electrocardiogram and hypokinetic areas in the apex of the heart in the echocardiography. Conventional and computed tomography <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography revealed aneurysms and intramural thrombosis in the left anterior descending and right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. Although ischemic symptoms and signs improved with anticoagulant and antiaggregant therapies, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysms were observed to increase in size. Immunosuppressive (IS) treatment was started with pulse intravenous corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Because of the <span class="hlt">high</span> re-stenosis risk, stents were not applied to the affected vessels during the acute thrombosis period. During routine investigations, an in situ pulmonary thrombosis was also detected bilaterally in the peripheral pulmonary arteries. In conclusion, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysm is a rare and poor prognostic manifestation of BD. The treatment protocol for these aneurysms is not well clarified. IS therapies are definitely indicated, but the role of anticoagulants and invasive vascular interventions is controversial.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5960399','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5960399"><span id="translatedtitle">Physiologic assessment of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gupta, N.C.; Beauvais, J. )</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery fistula is an uncommon clinical entity. The most common <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula is from the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery to the right side of the heart, and it is less frequent to the pulmonary artery. The effect of a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula may be physiologically significant because of the steal phenomenon resulting in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> ischemia. Based on published reports, it is recommended that patients with congenital <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistulas be considered candidates for elective surgical correction to prevent complications including development of congestive heart failure, angina, subacute bacterial endocarditis, myocardial infarction, and <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysm formation with rupture or embolization. A patient is presented in whom treadmill-exercise thallium imaging was effective in determining the degree of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> steal from a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery fistula, leading to successful corrective surgery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1767107','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1767107"><span id="translatedtitle">[Guided <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherectomy: preliminary results].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Iñíguez Romo, A; Macaya Miquel, C; Casado Larre, J; Hernández Antolín, R A; Alfonso Manterola, F; Goikolea Ruigómez, J; Arangoncillo, P; Zarco Gutiérrez, P</p> <p>1991-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> atherectomy implies removing atheromatous material from the diseased <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arterial wall. This technique has emerged as an attractive alternative to conventional percutaneous transluminal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioplasty procedures, in an attempt to diminish both initial procedural failure and restenosis rate. Among different technologies, the Simpson's atherotome provides a means of performing directional (i.e. selective) <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherectomy (DCA). This device implements a coaxial catheter which is advanced into the lesion over a steerable guidewire. Its distal tip includes a hollow metallic cylinder with a lateral window. Removal of the material is accomplished by a rotating cutter which can be moved distally, once the device's window has been orientated facing the lesion. We have performed 14 DCA in 14 patients. Mean age was 58 years and 12 patients were male. The technique was indicated for unstable angina (7 patients), stable angina (4 patients) and silent myocardial ischemia (3 patients). Fifteen lesions were attempted (13 original and two with restenosis), located as follows: nine in the left anterior descending <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery, three in the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery and three in the left circumflex artery. Eleven lesions were proximal and four were located in mid <span class="hlt">coronary</span> segments. Twelve lesions (80%) were eccentric, and five (33%) were irregular. Initial angiographic success (residual stenosis less than 50%) was obtained in all 15 lesions (100%). Pre-DCA stenosis was 84 +/- 5% and post-DCA stenosis was 16 +/- 6%. There was no need for urgent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery by-pass surgery and no patient developed an acute myocardial infarction in relation to the procedure. A 82-year-old woman died after the procedure in cardiogenic shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3293218','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3293218"><span id="translatedtitle">Appropriateness of Percutaneous <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Intervention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chan, Paul S.; Patel, Manesh R.; Klein, Lloyd W.; Krone, Ronald J.; Dehmer, Gregory J.; Kennedy, Kevin; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Douglas Weaver, W.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Rumsfeld, John S.; Brindis, Ralph G.; Spertus, John A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Context Despite the widespread use of percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI), the appropriateness of these procedures in contemporary practice is unknown. Objective To assess the appropriateness of PCI in the United States. Design, Setting, and Patients Multicenter, prospective study of patients within the National Cardiovascular Data Registry undergoing PCI between July 1, 2009, and September 30, 2010, at 1091 US hospitals. The appropriateness of PCI was adjudicated using the appropriate use criteria for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> revascularization. Results were stratified by whether the procedure was performed for an acute (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, or unstable angina with <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk features) or nonacute indication. Main Outcome Measures Proportion of acute and nonacute PCIs classified as appropriate, uncertain, or inappropriate; extent of hospital-level variation in inappropriate procedures. Results Of 500 154 PCIs, 355 417 (71.1%) were for acute indications (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 103 245 [20.6%]; non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 105 708 [21.1%]; <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk unstable angina, 146 464 [29.3%]), and 144 737 (28.9%) for nonacute indications. For acute indications, 350 469 PCIs (98.6%) were classified as appropriate, 1055 (0.3%) as uncertain, and 3893 (1.1%) as inappropriate. For nonacute indications, 72 911 PCIs (50.4%) were classified as appropriate, 54 988 (38.0%) as uncertain, and 16 838 (11.6%) as inappropriate. The majority of inappropriate PCIs for nonacute indications were performed in patients with no angina (53.8%), low-risk ischemia on noninvasive stress testing (71.6%), or suboptimal (≤1 medication) antianginal therapy (95.8%). Furthermore, although variation in the proportion of inappropriate PCI across hospitals was minimal for acute procedures, there was substantial hospital variation for nonacute procedures (median hospital rate for inappropriate PCI, 10</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..DFD.A7005P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..DFD.A7005P"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of incomplete stent apposition on the changes in hemodynamics inside a curved and calcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Poon, Eric; Ooi, Andrew; Barlis, Peter; Hayat, Umair; Moore, Stephen</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention (PCI) is the modern gold standard for treatment of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease. Stenting (a common PCI procedure) of simple lesion inside a relatively straight segment of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery has proven to be <span class="hlt">highly</span> successful. However, incomplete stent apposition (ISA) where there is a lack of contact between the stent struts and lumen wall is not uncommon in curved and calcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are carried out to study the changes in hemodynamics as a result of ISA inside a curved and calcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. For a 3 mm <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery, we simulate a resting condition at 80 mL/min and a range of hyperemic conditions with <span class="hlt">coronary</span> flow reserve in between 1 and 2. The heartbeat is fixed at 75 BPM. Five different curvatures of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery are considered. Negative effects on hemodynamic variables, such as low wall shear stress (<0.5 Pa); <span class="hlt">high</span> wall shear stress gradient (>5,000 Pa/m) and oscillation shear index (0 <= OSI <= 0.5), are employed to identify locations with <span class="hlt">high</span> possibilities of adverse clinical events. This study will lead to better understandings of ISA in curved and calcified <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries and help improve future <span class="hlt">coronary</span> stent deployment. Supported by the Australian Research Council (LP120100233) and Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VR0210).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9570E..1DS','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9570E..1DS"><span id="translatedtitle">Clock time is <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and universal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shen, Xinhang</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is <span class="hlt">absolute</span>, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/913245','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/913245"><span id="translatedtitle">Method of differential-phase/<span class="hlt">absolute</span>-amplitude QAM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Dimsdle, Jeffrey William</p> <p>2007-07-03</p> <p>A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude <span class="hlt">absolutely</span>, allowing for a <span class="hlt">high</span> data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/985179','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/985179"><span id="translatedtitle">Method of differential-phase/<span class="hlt">absolute</span>-amplitude QAM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Dimsdle, Jeffrey William</p> <p>2008-10-21</p> <p>A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude <span class="hlt">absolutely</span>, allowing for a <span class="hlt">high</span> data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/913114','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/913114"><span id="translatedtitle">Method of differential-phase/<span class="hlt">absolute</span>-amplitude QAM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Dimsdle, Jeffrey William</p> <p>2007-07-17</p> <p>A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude <span class="hlt">absolutely</span>, allowing for a <span class="hlt">high</span> data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/917192','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/917192"><span id="translatedtitle">Method of differential-phase/<span class="hlt">absolute</span>-amplitude QAM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Dimsdle, Jeffrey William</p> <p>2007-10-02</p> <p>A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude <span class="hlt">absolutely</span>, allowing for a <span class="hlt">high</span> data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/988841','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/988841"><span id="translatedtitle">Method of differential-phase/<span class="hlt">absolute</span>-amplitude QAM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Dimsdle, Jeffrey William</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude <span class="hlt">absolutely</span>, allowing for a <span class="hlt">high</span> data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985Geo....13..558E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985Geo....13..558E"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> dating of dedolomitization by means of paleomagnetic techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Elmore, R. Douglas; Dunn, William; Peck, Craig</p> <p>1985-08-01</p> <p>Paleomagnetic analysis, in conjunction with petrographic studies, is an approach whereby <span class="hlt">absolute</span> dates can be placed on diagenetic events. Hematite is associated with dedolomite in the Lower Ordovician Kindblade Formation in south-central Oklahoma and is interpreted as a by-product of the dedolomitization of ferroan dolomite. Paleomagnetic results date the time of dedolomitization as Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian. Dedolomitization was probably caused by oxidizing fluids with <span class="hlt">high</span> calcium contents that migrated through the Kindblade Formation following uplift of the Arbuckle Mountains.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15020268','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15020268"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.</p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2005PNAS..10218926W&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2005PNAS..10218926W&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> rate theories of epigenetic stability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGC21C..07F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGC21C..07F"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the DARA solar <span class="hlt">absolute</span> radiometer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>The Davos <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009acse.book..955S&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009acse.book..955S&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Priority for a Vehicle in VANET</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad</p> <p></p> <p>In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide <span class="hlt">absolute</span> priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70010730','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70010730"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> method of measuring magnetic susceptibility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.</p> <p>1959-01-01</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">absolute</span> method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25896129','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25896129"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on non-culprit mild <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaques in the culprit <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery of patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kurose, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Junji; Tsutsumi, Hiromi; Yamanaka, Yutaka; Shinno, Hiromi; Fukushima, Yaeko; Higurashi, Kyoko; Imai, Masaru; Masuda, Izuru; Takeda, Shinichi; Kawai, Chuichi; Kimura, Yutaka</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Approximately, 70 % of acute myocardial infarctions are known to develop from mild atherosclerotic lesions. Therefore, it is important to evaluate mild <span class="hlt">coronary</span> plaques to prevent acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on mild <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis in non-culprit lesions in patients with ACS. Forty-one men with ACS who underwent emergency percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> interventions and completed a 6-month follow-up were divided into CR and non-CR groups. Quantitative <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (QCA) was performed using the automatic edge detection program. The target lesion was a mild stenotic segment (10-50 % stenosis) at the distal site of the culprit lesion, and the segment to be analyzed was determined at a segment length ranging from 10 to 15 mm. The plaque area was significantly decreased in the CR group after 6 months, but was significantly increased in the non-CR group (P < 0.05). The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, LDL/<span class="hlt">high</span>-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio and <span class="hlt">high</span>-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) levels were significantly reduced in both groups (P < 0.01). Peak VO2 in the CR group was significantly increased (P < 0.01). Changes in the plaque area correlated with those in Hs-CRP in both groups, while that association with those in HDL-C was observed in only CR group. Stepwise regression analysis revealed the decrease in Hs-CRP as an independent predictor of plaque area regression in the CR group. CR prevented the progression of mild <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis in patients with ACS. PMID:25896129</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5013459','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5013459"><span id="translatedtitle">Outcomes of patients with spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>McGrath-Cadell, Lucy; McKenzie, Pamela; Emmanuel, Sam; Muller, David W M; Graham, Robert M; Holloway, Cameron J</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon but serious condition presenting as an acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) or cardiac arrest. The pathophysiology and outcomes are poorly understood. We investigated the characteristics and outcomes of patients presenting with SCAD. Methods In a retrospective study of a large cohort of patients with SCAD, data were collected regarding clinical presentation, patient characteristics, vascular screening, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery involvement and clinical outcomes. Results 40 patients with SCAD (95% women, mean age 45±10 years) were included. At least 1 traditional cardiovascular risk factor was present in 40% of patients. Migraine was reported in 43% of patients. Events preceding SCAD included parturition (8%), physical stress (13%), emotional stress (10%) and vasoconstrictor substance-use (8%). 65% of patients had a non-ST elevation ACS (NSTEACS) at presentation, 30% had an ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 13% had a cardiac arrest. The left anterior descending artery was most frequently involved (68% of patients), and 13% had involvement of multiple <span class="hlt">coronary</span> territories. Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was identified in 7 (37%) of 19 patients screened. 68% of patients were managed medically, 30% had percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention and 5% had <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting. Over a median 16-month follow-up period, 8% of patients had at least 1 recurrent SCAD event. There were no deaths. Conclusions Patients with SCAD in this study often had multiple <span class="hlt">coronary</span> territories involved (13%) and extracardiac vascular abnormalities, suggesting a systemic vascular process, which may explain the <span class="hlt">high</span> incidence of migraine. All patients with SCAD should be screened for FMD and followed closely due to the possibility of recurrence.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5013459','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5013459"><span id="translatedtitle">Outcomes of patients with spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>McGrath-Cadell, Lucy; McKenzie, Pamela; Emmanuel, Sam; Muller, David W M; Graham, Robert M; Holloway, Cameron J</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Spontaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon but serious condition presenting as an acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome (ACS) or cardiac arrest. The pathophysiology and outcomes are poorly understood. We investigated the characteristics and outcomes of patients presenting with SCAD. Methods In a retrospective study of a large cohort of patients with SCAD, data were collected regarding clinical presentation, patient characteristics, vascular screening, <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery involvement and clinical outcomes. Results 40 patients with SCAD (95% women, mean age 45±10 years) were included. At least 1 traditional cardiovascular risk factor was present in 40% of patients. Migraine was reported in 43% of patients. Events preceding SCAD included parturition (8%), physical stress (13%), emotional stress (10%) and vasoconstrictor substance-use (8%). 65% of patients had a non-ST elevation ACS (NSTEACS) at presentation, 30% had an ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 13% had a cardiac arrest. The left anterior descending artery was most frequently involved (68% of patients), and 13% had involvement of multiple <span class="hlt">coronary</span> territories. Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was identified in 7 (37%) of 19 patients screened. 68% of patients were managed medically, 30% had percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention and 5% had <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting. Over a median 16-month follow-up period, 8% of patients had at least 1 recurrent SCAD event. There were no deaths. Conclusions Patients with SCAD in this study often had multiple <span class="hlt">coronary</span> territories involved (13%) and extracardiac vascular abnormalities, suggesting a systemic vascular process, which may explain the <span class="hlt">high</span> incidence of migraine. All patients with SCAD should be screened for FMD and followed closely due to the possibility of recurrence. PMID:27621835</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27229898','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27229898"><span id="translatedtitle">Association Between <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Neutrophil Count and Variation at TCIRG1: The NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Makaryan, Vahagn; Burt, Amber A; Crosslin, David R; Kim, Daniel Seung; Smith, Joshua D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Reiner, Alex P; Rich, Stephen S; Jackson, Rebecca D; Ganesh, Santhi K; Polfus, Linda M; Qi, Lihong; Dale, David C; Jarvik, Gail P</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Neutrophils are a key component of innate immunity. Individuals with low neutrophil count are susceptible to frequent infections. Linkage and association between congenital neutropenia and a single rare missense variant in TCIRG1 have been reported in a single family. Here, we report on nine rare missense variants at evolutionarily conserved sites in TCIRG1 that are associated with lower <span class="hlt">absolute</span> neutrophil count (ANC; p = 0.005) in 1,058 participants from three cohorts: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC), <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA), and Jackson Heart Study (JHS) of the NHLBI Grand Opportunity Exome Sequencing Project (GO ESP). These results validate the effects of TCIRG1 coding variation on ANC and suggest that this gene may be associated with a spectrum of mild to severe effects on ANC. PMID:27229898</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4681824','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4681824"><span id="translatedtitle">Thyroid Function, Prevalent <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease, and Severity of <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Atherosclerosis in Patients Undergoing <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Angiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ling, Yan; Jiang, Jingjing; Gui, Minghui; Liu, Lin; Aleteng, Qiqige; Wu, Bingjie; Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaojing; Gao, Xin</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated if free T4 and TSH concentrations or thyroid function categories were associated with prevalent CHD and the severity of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis in a population undergoing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography. This was a cross-sectional study including 1799 patients who were consecutively admitted and underwent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography. We evaluated the severity of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis using Gensini score. In the entire study population, free T4 level was inversely associated with prevalent CHD (OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.91–0.99, P = 0.01) and the natural log-transformed Gensini score (ln(Gensini score)) (β = −0.03, 95% CI −0.05–−0.01, P = 0.005). The odds of CHD increased gradually across hyperthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, and overt hypothyroidism groups using the euthyroid group as the reference, and the trend is borderline significant (P for trend = 0.051). When comparing to the euthyroid group, ln(Gensini score) of the overt hypothyroidism group was significantly higher (P = 0.009), but the trend was not significant (P for trend = 0.08). A significant association of thyroid function with CHD or ln(Gensini score) in euthyroid patients was not observed. The present study demonstrated an association of thyroid function with prevalent CHD and the severity of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> atherosclerosis in a population undergoing <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography. However, this association was not observed in euthyroid individuals. PMID:26770196</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016APS..APRB16007K&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016APS..APRB16007K&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not <span class="hlt">absolute</span>, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an <span class="hlt">absolute</span> EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24969531','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24969531"><span id="translatedtitle">Why to compare <span class="hlt">absolute</span> numbers of mitochondria.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to <span class="hlt">absolute</span> mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996AAS...188.0803D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996AAS...188.0803D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Proper Motions of Southern Globular Clusters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dinescu, D. I.; Girard, T. M.; van Altena, W. F.</p> <p>1996-05-01</p> <p>Our program involves the determination of <span class="hlt">absolute</span> proper motions with respect to galaxies for a sample of globular clusters situated in the southern sky. The plates cover a 6(deg) x 6(deg) area and are taken with the 51-cm double astrograph at Cesco Observatory in El Leoncito, Argentina. We have developed special methods to deal with the modelling error of the plate transformation and we correct for magnitude equation using the cluster stars. This careful astrometric treatment leads to accuracies of from 0.5 to 1.0 mas/yr for the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> proper motion of each cluster, depending primarily on the number of measurable cluster stars which in turn is related to the cluster's distance. Space velocities are then derived which, in association with metallicities, provide key information for the formation scenario of the Galaxy, i.e. accretion and/or dissipational collapse. Here we present results for NGC 1851, NGC 6752, NGC 6584, NGC 6362 and NGC 288.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23350305','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23350305"><span id="translatedtitle">Relational versus <span class="hlt">absolute</span> representation in categorization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Edwards, Darren J; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Perlman, Amotz</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This study explores relational-like and <span class="hlt">absolute</span>-like representations in categorization. Although there is much evidence that categorization processes can involve information about both the particular physical properties of studied instances and abstract (relational) properties, there has been little work on the factors that lead to one kind of representation as opposed to the other. We tested 370 participants in 6 experiments, in which participants had to classify new items into predefined artificial categories. In 4 experiments, we observed a predominantly relational-like mode of classification, and in 2 experiments we observed a shift toward an <span class="hlt">absolute</span>-like mode of classification. These results suggest 3 factors that promote a relational-like mode of classification: fewer items per group, more training groups, and the presence of a time delay. Overall, we propose that less information about the distributional properties of a category or weaker memory traces for the category exemplars (induced, e.g., by having smaller categories or a time delay) can encourage relational-like categorization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27581485','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27581485"><span id="translatedtitle">Transient <span class="hlt">absolute</span> robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Enciso, German A</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, <span class="hlt">absolutely</span> robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4763810','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4763810"><span id="translatedtitle">Absent Left Main <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery and Separate Ostia of Left <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> System in a Patient with Holt-Oram Syndrome and Sinus Node Dysfunction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Aung, Thein Tun; Roberto, Edward Samuel; Wase, Abdul</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Patient: Male, 41 Final Diagnosis: Sick Sinus Syndrome and absent left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery • separate ostia of left anterior descending and circumflex arteries in Holt-Oram Syndrome Symptoms: Conduction disturbance • seizure-like activity • upper extremity malformations Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Electro physiology study • <span class="hlt">coronary</span> catheterization • pacemaker Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Congenital defects/diseases Background: Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is a rare but significant syndrome consisting of structural heart defects, conduction abnormalities, and upper extremity anomalies. It was first described in the British Heart Journal in 1960 by Mary Holt and Samuel Oram as a report of atrial septal defect, conduction disturbances, and hand malformations occurring in family members. Patients can present with heart blocks or symptoms of underlying congenital heart defects. Case Report: A 41-year-old man with Holt-Oram syndrome presented with seizure-like activity and was found to have an underlying conduction disturbance. Physical exam showed bilateral atrophic upper extremities with anatomic disfiguration, and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles. Cardiovascular exam revealed a slow heart rate with irregular rhythm. EKG showed sinus arrest with junctional escape rhythm. Cardiac catheterization revealed <span class="hlt">coronary</span> anomalies, including absent left main <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery and separate ostia of the left anterior ascending and left circumflex <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> arteries were patent. Following electrophysiology study, sick sinus syndrome and AV block were diagnosed, and the patient received implantation of a permanent pacemaker. Conclusions: This patient presented with a seizure-like episode attributed to hypoxia during asystole from an underlying cardiac conduction defect associated with Holt-Oram syndrome. Arrhythmias and heart blocks are seen in these patients, and conduction defects are <span class="hlt">highly</span> associated with congenital heart defects. Holt</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=VALUE+AND+ABSOLUTE&id=EJ819063','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=VALUE+AND+ABSOLUTE&id=EJ819063"><span id="translatedtitle">Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing <span class="hlt">Absolute</span> Value for Deeper Understanding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ponce, Gregorio A.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value. They should also be able to solve <span class="hlt">absolute</span> value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994SPIE.2132..150H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994SPIE.2132..150H"><span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angioscopy and stents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Heuser, Richard R.</p> <p>1994-05-01</p> <p>With the expanding array of therapies available for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> intervention, the invasive cardiologist has many choices for treating a specific lesion in an individual patient. Certain types of lesions might respond more effectively with stents, particularly the rigid Palmax- Schatz device. Thrombus and dissection immediately following stent placement are associated with early occlusion, and the interventionist must be able to assess their presence pre- and post-stenting. Angiography is deficient in quantifying minimal disease and in defining lesion architecture and composition, as well as the plaque rupture and thrombosis associated with unstable angina. It is also imprecise in detecting dissection and thrombus. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides <span class="hlt">high</span>-resolution images that delineate irregularities and other structures inside the lumen and within the vessel wall and surrounding tissues. Like angiography, IVUS has limited specificity for thrombus differentiation. Angioscopy is superior to angiography and IVUS in detecting thrombus and dissection. Angioscopy allows the clinician to assess the appearance of stent struts after deployment and at follow-up. This may aid in reducing acute complications as well as restenosis. Follow-up angioscopy of stents to detect thrombus or exposed struts may guide therapy in a patient who has clinical symptoms of restenosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3857235','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3857235"><span id="translatedtitle">Positive influence of aspirin on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> endothelial function: Importance of the dose</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Teragawa, Hiroki; Mitsuba, Naoya; Ishibashi, Ken; Kurisu, Satoshi; Kihara, Yasuki</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>AIM: To investigate the effects of different doses of aspirin on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> endothelial function. METHODS: The study included 139 Japanese subjects (mean age, 60 years; 53 women) with angiographically normal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries. Patients were distributed into Group I (n = 63), who was administered aspirin and Group II (n = 76), the control, who were not administered aspirin. Group I was further divided into Group Ia (n = 50, low-dose aspirin, 100 mg) and Group Ib (n = 13, <span class="hlt">high</span>-dose aspirin, 500 mg). After a routine <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography, acetylcholine (ACh; 3 and 30 μg/min successively) and nitroglycerin (NTG) were infused into the left <span class="hlt">coronary</span> ostium over 2 min. The change in the diameter of the <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery in response to each drug was expressed as the percentage change from baseline values. RESULTS: The patient characteristics did not differ between the two groups. The change in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> diameter in response to ACh was greater in Group I than in Group II (P = 0.0043), although the NTG-induced <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vasodilation was similar between groups. ACh-induced dilation was greater in Group Ia than in Group Ib (P = 0.0231). Multivariate regression analysis showed that a low-dose of aspirin (P = 0.0004) was one of the factors associated with ACh-induced dilation at 30 μg/min. CONCLUSION: In subjects with angiographically normal <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries, aspirin only had a positive influence on <span class="hlt">coronary</span> endothelial function at the low dose of 100 mg. This improvement of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> endothelial function may be involved in the preventive effect of aspirin against future <span class="hlt">coronary</span> events. PMID:24340141</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhFl...21j4102M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhFl...21j4102M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absolute</span> and convective instability of cylindrical Couette flow with axial and radial flows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Martinand, Denis; Serre, Eric; Lueptow, Richard M.</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>Imposing axial flow in the annulus and/or radial flow through the cylindrical walls in a Taylor-Couette system alters the stability of the flow. Theoretical methods and numerical simulations were used to determine the impact of imposed axial and radial flows, homogeneous in the axial direction, on the first transition of Taylor-Couette flow in the framework of convective and <span class="hlt">absolute</span> instabilities. At low axial Reynolds numbers the convective instability is axisymmetric, but convective helical modes with an increasing number of helices having a helicity opposite that of the base flow dominate as the axial flow increases. The number of helices and the critical Taylor number are affected only slightly by the radial flow. The flow becomes <span class="hlt">absolutely</span> unstable at higher Taylor numbers. <span class="hlt">Absolutely</span> unstable axisymmetric modes occur for inward radial flows, while helical <span class="hlt">absolute</span> instability modes having a helicity identical to that of the base flow occur at <span class="hlt">high</span> enough axial Reynolds numbers for outward radial flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Home/GetFileByID/884','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Home/GetFileByID/884"><span id="translatedtitle">Screening for <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease with Electrocardiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Force Recommendations Screening for <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27000621','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27000621"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral Giant <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Aneurysms Complicated by Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndrome and Cardiogenic Shock.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chiu, Peter; Lynch, Donald; Jahanayar, Jama; Rogers, Ian S; Tremmel, Jennifer; Boyd, Jack</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Giant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysms are rare. We present a 25-year-old woman with a known history of non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic bilateral <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysms. She was transferred to our facility with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndrome complicated by cardiogenic shock. Angiography demonstrated giant bilateral <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysms and complete occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Emergent <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery bypass grafting was performed. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery bypass grafting is the preferred approach for addressing giant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> aneurysms. Intervention on the aneurysm varies in the literature. Aggressive revascularization is recommended in the non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic aneurysm patient, and ligation should be performed in patients with thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:27000621</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3595774','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3595774"><span id="translatedtitle">Histopathologic Characteristics of a <span class="hlt">Coronary</span>-pulmonary Artery Fistula with a <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Aneurysm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sakata, Noriyuki; Minematsu, Noritoshi; Morishige, Noritsugu; Tashiro, Tadashi; Imanaga, Yoshinobu</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Here, we report a case of a 59-year-old woman with a <span class="hlt">coronary</span>-pulmonary artery fistula with a concomitant <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysm, which comprised an anomalous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery originating at the right <span class="hlt">coronary</span> cusp, an aberrant branch of the left anterior descending artery, and a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery aneurysm draining into the main pulmonary artery. Histopathologically, non-dilated anomalous <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery showed the preservation of internal elastic lamina and medial smooth muscle cell phenotype which lacked in the aneurysmal wall. Thus, the disrupted internal elastic lamina and phenotypic change of medial smooth muscle cells might contribute to aneurysm formation in a <span class="hlt">coronary</span>-pulmonary arterial fistula. PMID:23555427</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3282292','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3282292"><span id="translatedtitle">The impact of increased age on outcome from a strategy of early invasive management and revascularisation in patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes: retrospective analysis study from the ACACIA registry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Prakash, Roshan; Chew, Derek P</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Objective To evaluate the impact of increased age on outcome from a strategy of early invasive management and revascularisation in patients with acute <span class="hlt">coronary</span> syndromes (ACS). Design Retrospective analysis of a national Acute <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Syndrome registry (ACACIA). Setting Multiple Australian (n=39) centres; 25% rural, 52% with onsite cardiac surgery. Patients Unselected consecutive patients admitted with confirmed ACS, total n=2559, median 99 per centre. Interventions Management was at the discretion of the treating physician. Analysis of outcome based on age >75 years was compared using Cox proportional hazard with a propensity model to adjust for baseline covariates. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were bleeding and a composite of any vascular event or unplanned readmission. Results Elderly patients were more likely to present with <span class="hlt">high</span>-risk features yet were less likely to receive evidence-based medical therapies or receive diagnostic <span class="hlt">coronary</span> angiography (75% vs 49%, p<0.0001) and early revascularisation (50% vs 30%, p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis found early revascularisation in the elderly cohort to be associated with lower 12-month mortality hazard (0.4 (0.2–0.7)) and composite outcome (0.6 (0.5–0.8)). Propensity model suggested a greater <span class="hlt">absolute</span> benefit in elderly patients compared to others. Conclusions Following presentation with ACS, elderly patients are less likely to receive evidence-based medical therapies, to be considered for an early invasive strategy and be revascularised. Increasing age is a significant barrier to physicians when considering early revascularisation. An early invasive strategy with revascularisation when performed was associated with substantial benefit and the <span class="hlt">absolute</span> accrued benefit appears to be higher in elderly patients. PMID:22344538</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/MyHeartandStrokeNews/Coronary-Artery-Disease---Coronary-Heart-Disease_UCM_436416_Article.jsp','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/MyHeartandStrokeNews/Coronary-Artery-Disease---Coronary-Heart-Disease_UCM_436416_Article.jsp"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Artery Disease - <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Heart Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... LDL + 20 percent of your triglyceride level. Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol = "bad" cholesterol A low LDL ... and trans fats can raise LDL cholesterol. <span class="hlt">High</span>-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol = "good" cholesterol With HDL (good) ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27372847','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27372847"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydroxychloroquine, a promising choice for <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sun, Lizhe; Liu, Mengping; Li, Ruifeng; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Junhui; Yang, Yanjie; Zhang, Lisha; Bai, Xiaofang; Wei, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiangqiang; Zhou, Juan; Yuan, Zuyi; Wu, Yue</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Coronary</span> artery disease is a common disease that seriously threaten the health of more than 150 million people per year. Atherosclerosis is considered to be the main cause of <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease which begins with damage or injury to the inner layer of a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery, sometimes as early as childhood. The damage may be caused by various factors, including: smoking, <span class="hlt">high</span> blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes and insulin resistance. Once a <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease has developed, all patients need to be treated with long term standard treatment, including heart-healthy lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical procedures or surgery. Hydroxychloroquine, an original antimalarial drug, prevents inflammation caused by lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. It is relatively safe and well-tolerated during the treatment. Since atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis have resemble mechanism and increasing clinical researches confirm that hydroxychloroquine has an important role in both anti-rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular protection (such as anti-platelet, anti-thrombotic, lipid-regulating, anti-hypertension, hypoglycemia, and so on), we hypothesize that hydroxychloroquine might be a promising choice to <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease patients for its multiple benefits. PMID:27372847</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26381906','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26381906"><span id="translatedtitle">Oxidative Stress-Dependent <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Mice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gamez-Mendez, Ana María; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Obesity is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including <span class="hlt">coronary</span> artery disease and endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial Endothelium vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agonists play a key role in regulation of vascular tone. In this study, we evaluated <span class="hlt">coronary</span> vascular response in an 8 weeks diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice model. <span class="hlt">Coronary</span> perfusion pressure in response to acetylcholine in isolated hearts from obese mice showed increased vasoconstriction and reduced vasodilation responses compared with control mice. Vascular nitric oxide assessed in situ with DAF-2 DA showed diminished levels in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries from obese mice in both basal and acetylcholine-stimulated conditions. Also, released prostacyclin was decreased in heart perfusates from obese mice, along with plasma tetrahydrobiopterin level and endothelium nitric oxide synthase dimer/monomer ratio. Obesity increased thromboxane A2 synthesis and oxidative stress evaluated by superoxide and peroxynitrite levels, compared with control mice. Obese mice treated with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reversed all parameters to normal levels. These results suggest that after 8 weeks on a <span class="hlt">high</span>-fat diet, the increase in oxidative stress lead to imbalance in vasoactive substances and consequently to endothelial dysfunction in <span class="hlt">coronary</span> arteries.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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