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Sample records for high affinity ligands

  1. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  2. High affinity ligands from in vitro selection: Complex targets

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin N.; Jensen, Kirk B.; Julin, Carol M.; Weil, Michael; Gold, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Human red blood cell membranes were used as a model system to determine if the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) methodology, an in vitro protocol for isolating high-affinity oligonucleotides that bind specifically to virtually any single protein, could be used with a complex mixture of potential targets. Ligands to multiple targets were generated simultaneously during the selection process, and the binding affinities of these ligands for their targets are comparable to those found in similar experiments against pure targets. A secondary selection scheme, deconvolution-SELEX, facilitates rapid isolation of the ligands to targets of special interest within the mixture. SELEX provides high-affinity compounds for multiple targets in a mixture and might allow a means for dissecting complex biological systems. PMID:9501188

  3. Chlorophenylpiperazine analogues as high affinity dopamine transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Motel, William C; Healy, Jason R; Viard, Eddy; Pouw, Buddy; Martin, Kelly E; Matsumoto, Rae R; Coop, Andrew

    2013-12-15

    Selective σ2 ligands continue to be an active target for medications to attenuate the effects of psychostimulants. In the course of our studies to determine the optimal substituents in the σ2-selective phenyl piperazines analogues with reduced activity at other neurotransmitter systems, we discovered that 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4-phenethylpiperazine actually had preferentially increased affinity for dopamine transporters (DAT), yielding a highly selective DAT ligand. PMID:24211020

  4. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  5. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  6. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  7. Selective high-affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2013-09-17

    This invention provides polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each binds different regions on the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  8. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  9. "DAKLI": a multipurpose ligand with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (kappa opioid) binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A; Nestor, J J; Naidu, A; Newman, S R

    1988-01-01

    We describe a synthetic ligand, "DAKLI" (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin (kappa opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites. PMID:2902630

  10. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  11. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  12. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  13. A 45-amino acid scaffold mined from the Protein Data Bank for high affinity ligand engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kruziki, Max A.; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Woldring, Daniel R.; Duong, Vandon T.; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Small protein ligands can provide superior physiological distribution versus antibodies and improved stability, production, and specific conjugation. Systematic evaluation of the Protein Data Bank identified a scaffold to push the limits of small size and robust evolution of stable, high-affinity ligands: 45-residue T7 phage gene 2 protein (Gp2) contains an α-helix opposite a β-sheet with two adjacent loops amenable to mutation. De novo ligand discovery from 108 mutants and directed evolution towards four targets yielded target-specific binders with affinities as strong as 200 ±100 pM, Tm’s from 65 ±3 °C to 80 ±1 °C, and retained activity after thermal denaturation. For cancer targeting, a Gp2 domain for epidermal growth factor receptor was evolved with 18 ±8 nM affinity, receptor-specific binding, and high thermal stability with refolding. The efficiency of evolving new binding function and the size, affinity, specificity, and stability of evolved domains render Gp2 a uniquely effective ligand scaffold. PMID:26165154

  14. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay

    PubMed Central

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this aim, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to a thousand domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. Extracts of overexpressed domains are incubated with peptide-coated resins and subjected to filtration. Binding affinities are deduced from microfluidic capillary electrophoresis of flow-throughs. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from Human Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human PDZome. We obtained exquisite sequence-dependent binding profiles, describing quantitatively the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has a wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes. PMID:26053890

  15. Identifying high-affinity aptamer ligands with defined cross-reactivity using high-throughput guided systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Levay, Agata; Brenneman, Randall; Hoinka, Jan; Sant, David; Cardone, Marco; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Berezhnoy, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide aptamers represent a novel platform for creating ligands with desired specificity, and they offer many potentially significant advantages over monoclonal antibodies in terms of feasibility, cost, and clinical applicability. However, the isolation of high-affinity aptamer ligands from random oligonucleotide pools has been challenging. Although high-throughput sequencing (HTS) promises to significantly facilitate systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) analysis, the enormous datasets generated in the process pose new challenges for identifying those rare, high-affinity aptamers present in a given pool. We show that emulsion PCR preserves library diversity, preventing the loss of rare high-affinity aptamers that are difficult to amplify. We also demonstrate the importance of using reference targets to eliminate binding candidates with reduced specificity. Using a combination of bioinformatics and functional analyses, we show that the rate of amplification is more predictive than prevalence with respect to binding affinity and that the mutational landscape within a cluster of related aptamers can guide the identification of high-affinity aptamer ligands. Finally, we demonstrate the power of this selection process for identifying cross-species aptamers that can bind human receptors and cross-react with their murine orthologs. PMID:26007661

  16. Identifying high-affinity aptamer ligands with defined cross-reactivity using high-throughput guided systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment.

    PubMed

    Levay, Agata; Brenneman, Randall; Hoinka, Jan; Sant, David; Cardone, Marco; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Przytycka, Teresa M; Berezhnoy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Oligonucleotide aptamers represent a novel platform for creating ligands with desired specificity, and they offer many potentially significant advantages over monoclonal antibodies in terms of feasibility, cost, and clinical applicability. However, the isolation of high-affinity aptamer ligands from random oligonucleotide pools has been challenging. Although high-throughput sequencing (HTS) promises to significantly facilitate systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) analysis, the enormous datasets generated in the process pose new challenges for identifying those rare, high-affinity aptamers present in a given pool. We show that emulsion PCR preserves library diversity, preventing the loss of rare high-affinity aptamers that are difficult to amplify. We also demonstrate the importance of using reference targets to eliminate binding candidates with reduced specificity. Using a combination of bioinformatics and functional analyses, we show that the rate of amplification is more predictive than prevalence with respect to binding affinity and that the mutational landscape within a cluster of related aptamers can guide the identification of high-affinity aptamer ligands. Finally, we demonstrate the power of this selection process for identifying cross-species aptamers that can bind human receptors and cross-react with their murine orthologs.

  17. Bodilisant—A Novel Fluorescent, Highly Affine Histamine H3 Receptor Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A piperidine-based lead structure for the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) was coupled with the BODIPY fluorophore and resulted in a strong green fluorescent (quantum yield, 0.92) hH3R ligand with affinity in the nanomolar concentration range (Ki hH3R = 6.51 ± 3.31 nM), named Bodilisant. Screening for affinities at histamine and dopamine receptor subtypes showed high hH3R preference. Bodilisant was used for visualization of hH3R in hH3R overexpressing HEK-293 cells with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, in native human brain tissues, Bodilisant showed clear and displaceable images of labeled hH3R. PMID:24900647

  18. Combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and time-resolved luminescence for high affinity antibody-ligand interaction thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Meares, Claude F

    2012-02-01

    For experiments using synthetic ligands as probes for biological experiments, it is useful to determine the specificity and affinity of the ligands for their receptors. As ligands with higher affinities are developed (K(A)>10(8)M(-1); K(D)<10(-8)M), a new challenge arises: to measure these values accurately. Isothermal titration calorimetry measures heat produced or consumed during ligand binding, and also provides the equilibrium binding constant. However, as normally practiced, its range is limited. Displacement titration, where a competing weaker ligand is used to lower the apparent affinity of the stronger ligand, can be used to determine the binding affinity as well as the complete thermodynamic data for ligand-antibody complexes with very high affinity. These equilibrium data have been combined with kinetic measurements to yield the rate constants as well. We describe this methodology, using as an example antibody 2D12.5, which captures yttrium S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetate.

  19. LNP 906, the first high-affinity photoaffinity ligand selective for I1 imidazoline receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dragan, Urosevic; Stephan, Schann; Jean-Daniel, Ehrhardt; Pascal, Bousquet; Hugues, Greney

    2004-01-01

    The hypotensive effect of imidazoline-like drugs, such as clonidine, was attributed both to α2-adrenergic receptors and nonadrenergic imidazoline receptors, which are divided into I1, I2 and I3 subtypes. We have recently synthesized a derivative of (2-(2-chloro-4-iodo-phenylamino)-5-methyl-pyrroline (LNP 911), the first high-affinity and selective ligand for I1 receptors (I1R), with a photoactivable function (LNP 906). This work aims to test whether this derivative retained the binding properties of LNP 911 and bound irreversibly to I1R. Binding studies showed that LNP 906 exhibited nanomolar affinity for I1R and was selective for I1R over I2 receptors and α2-adrenergic receptors (α2Ars). Upon exposure to u.v. light, LNP 906 irreversibly blocked the binding of [125I]-paraiodoclonidine (PIC) to I1R, time- and dose-dependently, on PC12 cell membranes and interacted with I1R in a reversible and competitive manner in the absence of light. Pharmacological studies showed that this blockade was prevented by the concomitant presence of rilmenidine (a well-known I1 agonist), but not by rauwolscine (an α2 antagonist). Finally, LNP 906 clearly antagonized the decrease in forskolin-stimulated cAMP level induced by rilmenidine, but not by melatonin. These results indicate that LNP 906 is the first high-affinity and selective photoaffinity ligand for I1R and that it behaves as an I1R antagonist. PMID:15178642

  20. Cyclic peptide ligand with high binding capacity for affinity purification of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Choe, Weonu; Min, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, B Moon; Chung, Sang J

    2016-09-30

    The rapidly increasing implementation of antibodies in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has necessitated the development of antibody production and purification technologies for both academic and industrial usage. Bacterial Protein A and Protein G are known to bind antibodies with high affinity and have facilitated the isolation and purification thereof. Recently, small peptide ligands (i.e. IgG Fc domain-binding peptides, FcBP) that specifically bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies were reported. In the present study we describe the development of a reusable high affinity column for antibody purification utilizing immobilized FcBP, comprising 13 amino acids residues, on a sepharose resin. In addition to FcBP, Cys to Ser substituted FcBP (FcBP-Ser), reduced FcBP (FcBP-Red), commercial Protein A and Protein G resins, packed into columns, were evaluated for antibody purification. All these columns except the FcBP-Ser one showed good binding capacity for a humanized IgG (trastuzumab) and a chimeric IgG (cetuximab). The column packed with FcBP-Red allowed antibody purification at a less acidic pH (pH 4.8) than was required for the other ligand affinity columns used in our experiments (i.e., pH 3.2 for Protein G and FcBP columns, and pH 3.5 for Protein A column, respectively). Utilizing the FcBP column, antibodies from swine human sera were isolated with a purity of 95%. Interestingly, the FcBP column could be easily regenerated and operated without loss of efficiency for up to 60 runs, the maximum number of runs performed in the present study.

  1. In silico design of high-affinity ligands for the immobilization of inulinase.

    PubMed

    Holyavka, M G; Kondratyev, M S; Samchenko, A A; Kabanov, A V; Komarov, V M; Artyukhov, V G

    2016-04-01

    Using computer modeling, virtual screening of high-affinity ligands for immobilization of inulinase - an enzyme that cleaves inulin and fructose-containing polymers to fructose - has been performed. The inulinase molecule from Aspergillus ficuum (pdb: 3SC7) taken from the database of protein structures was used as a protein model and the target for flexible docking. The set of ligands studied included simple sugars (activators, inhibitors, products of enzymatic catalysis), as well as high-molecular weight compounds (polycation and polyanion exchange resins, glycoproteins, phenylalanine-proline peptide, polylactate, and caffeine). Based on the comparative analysis of the values of the total energy and the localization of ligand binding sites, we made several assumptions concerning the mechanisms of interaction of the suggested matrices for the immobilization of enzyme molecules and the structural features of such complexes. It was also assumed that the candidates for immobilization agents meeting the industrial requirements may be glycoproteins, for which we propose an additional incorporation of cysteine residues into their structure, aimed to create disulfide «anchors» to the surface. PMID:26945599

  2. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons. PMID:25135936

  3. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy-based high-throughput screening of ligands for use in affinity and displacement chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vutukuru, Srinavya; Kane, Ravi S

    2008-10-21

    We describe an approach that uses surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for the high-throughput screening of ligands for use in displacement and affinity chromatographic processes. We identified a set of commercially available organic amines and allowed them to react with SAMs presenting interchain carboxylic anhydride groups; the resulting surfaces presented ligands of interest in a background of carboxylic acid groups. We used SPR spectroscopy to determine the extent of adsorption of two model proteinslysozyme and cytochrome conto these "multimodal" surfaces and to select promising "affinity" ligands for further characterization. The attachment of selected ligands to UltraLink Biosupport resulted in beads with a significantly greater affinity for lysozyme than for cytochrome c that would be suitable for use in affinity chromatographic processes. Furthermore, we also used the screens to design "affinity displacers"small molecules that selectively retain lysozyme on chromatographic resins, while displacing cytochrome c. The combination of SPR spectroscopy and SAMs represents a powerful technique for identifying novel ligands that enable the purification of complex protein mixtures.

  5. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  6. Structure-Affinity Properties of a High-Affinity Ligand of FKBP12 Studied by Molecular Simulations of a Binding Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Lilian; Gardebien, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    With a view to explaining the structure-affinity properties of the ligands of the protein FKBP12, we characterized a binding intermediate state between this protein and a high-affinity ligand. Indeed, the nature and extent of the intermolecular contacts developed in such a species may play a role on its stability and, hence, on the overall association rate. To find the binding intermediate, a molecular simulation protocol was used to unbind the ligand by gradually decreasing the biasing forces introduced. The intermediate was subsequently refined with 17 independent stochastic boundary molecular dynamics simulations that provide a consistent picture of the intermediate state. In this state, the core region of the ligand remains stable, notably because of the two anchoring oxygen atoms that correspond to recurrent motifs found in all FKBP12 ligand core structures. Besides, the non-core regions participate in numerous transient intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The dynamic aspect of most of the contacts seems important both for the ligand to retain at least a part of its configurational entropy and for avoiding a trapped state along the binding pathway. Since the transient and anchoring contacts contribute to increasing the stability of the intermediate, as a corollary, the dissociation rate constant of this intermediate should be decreased, resulting in an increase of the affinity constant . The present results support our previous conclusions and provide a coherent rationale for explaining the prevalence in high-affinity ligands of (i) the two oxygen atoms found in carbonyl or sulfonyl groups of dissimilar core structures and of (ii) symmetric or pseudo-symmetric mobile groups of atoms found as non-core moieties. Another interesting aspect of the intermediate is the distortion of the flexible 80 s loop of the protein, mainly in its tip region, that promotes the accessibility to the bound state. PMID:25502559

  7. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Aleš; Bay, Tina; Wellendorph, Petrine; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Frølund, Bente; Pedersen, Martin H.F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affinity GHB binding sites. PMID:24053696

  8. The Structure of a High-Affinity Kainate Receptor: GluK4 Ligand-Binding Domain Crystallized with Kainate.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Ole; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play a key role in fast neurotransmission in the CNS and have been linked to several neurological diseases and disorders. One subfamily is the kainate receptors, which are grouped into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptors based on their affinity for kainate. Although structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of all low-affinity kainate receptors have been reported, no structures of the high-affinity receptor subunits are available. Here, we present the X-ray structure of GluK4-LBD with kainate at 2.05 Å resolution, together with thermofluor and radiolabel binding affinity data. Whereas binding-site residues in GluK4 are most similar to the AMPA receptor subfamily, the domain closure and D1-D2 interlobe contacts induced by kainate are similar to the low-affinity kainate receptor GluK1. These observations provide a likely explanation for the high binding affinity of kainate at GluK4-LBD.

  9. Synthesis, Structure-affinity Relationships and Radiolabeling of Selective High-affinity 5-HT4 Receptor Ligands as Prospective Imaging Probes for PET

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.

    2010-01-01

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT4 receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT4 antagonist, (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron-emitter, either carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.7 min), and included, i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl or fluoro, ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT4 receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron-emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-11C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [11C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT4 receptors. PMID:20812727

  10. Synthesis, structure-affinity relationships, and radiolabeling of selective high-affinity 5-HT4 receptor ligands as prospective imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L; Pike, Victor W

    2010-10-14

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT(4) receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT(4) antagonist (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron emitter, either carbon-11 (t(1/2) = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t(1/2) = 109.7 min), and included (i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl, or fluoro, (ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, (iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and (iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT(4) receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-(11)C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [(11)C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT(4) receptors. PMID:20812727

  11. Bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium): a chiral scaffold for developing high-affinity ligands for SK channels.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Jean-François; Wouters, Johan; Seutin, Vincent; Dilly, Sébastien

    2014-04-01

    N-Methyl-bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium) analogues derived from AG525 (1,1'-(propane-1,3-diyl)-bis-(6,7-dimethoxy-2- methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline)) stereoisomers and tetrandrine, a rigid bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline) analogue with an S,S configuration, were synthesized and tested for their affinity for small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SK/KCa2) subtypes using radioligand binding assays. A significant increase in affinity was observed for the quaternized analogues over the parent 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline compounds. Interestingly, the impact of stereochemistry was not the same in the two groups of compounds. For quaternized analogues, affinities of S,S and R,R isomers for SK2 and SK3 channels were similar and in both cases higher than that of the meso derivative. Among the bis-tetrahydroisoquinoline compounds, the S,S isomers exhibited high affinity, while the R,R and meso isomers had similarly lower affinities. Furthermore, the SK2/SK3 selectivity ratio was slightly increased for quaternized analogues. Bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium) represents a new scaffold for the development of high-affinity ligands for SK channel subtypes. PMID:24829978

  12. Transmembrane-truncated alphavbeta3 integrin retains high affinity for ligand binding: evidence for an 'inside-out' suppressor?

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, R J; Diefenbach, B; Brown, A; Cullen, E; Jonczyk, A; Güssow, D; Luckenbach, G A; Goodman, S L

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of alphavbeta3 integrin affinity regulation have important biological implications in tumour development, wound repair and angiogenesis. We expressed, purified and characterized recombinant forms of human alphavbeta3 (r-alphavbeta3) and compared the activation state of these with alphavbeta3 in its cellular environment. The ligand specificity and selectivity of recombinant full-length and double transmembrane truncations of r-alphavbeta3 cloned in BacPAK6 vectors and expressed in Sf9 and High Five insect cells were compared with those of native placental alphavbeta3 and the receptor in situ on the cell surface. r-alphavbeta3 integrins were purified by affinity chromatography from detergent extracts of cells (full-length), and from the culture medium of cells expressing double-truncated r-alphavbeta3. r-alphavbeta3 had the same epitopes, ligand-binding specificities, bivalent cation requirements and susceptibility to RGD-containing peptides as native alphavbeta3. On M21-L4 melanoma cells, alphavbeta3 mediated binding to vitronectin, but not to fibrinogen unless activated with Mn2+. Non-activated alphaIIbbeta3 integrin as control in M21-L-IIb cells had the opposite profile, mediating binding to fibrinogen, but not to vitronectin unless activated with Mn2+. Thus these receptors had moderate to low ligand affinity. In marked contrast, purified alphavbeta3 receptors, with or without transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, were constitutively of high affinity and able to bind strongly to vitronectin, fibronectin and fibrinogen under physiological conditions. Our data suggest that, in contrast with the positive regulation of alphaIIbbeta3 in situ, intracellular controls lower the affinity of alphavbeta3, and the cytoplasmic domains may act as a target for negative regulators of alphavbeta3 activity. PMID:9480902

  13. Sulfated Metabolites of Polychlorinated Biphenyls Are High-Affinity Ligands for the Thyroid Hormone Transport Protein Transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian A.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; He, Xianran; Robertson, Larry W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The displacement of l-thyroxine (T4) from binding sites on transthyretin (TTR) is considered a significant contributing mechanism in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced thyroid disruption. Previous research has discovered hydroxylated PCB metabolites (OH-PCBs) as high-affinity ligands for TTR, but the binding potential of conjugated PCB metabolites such as PCB sulfates has not been explored. Objectives: We evaluated the binding of five lower-chlorinated PCB sulfates to human TTR and compared their binding characteristics to those determined for their OH-PCB precursors and for T4. Methods: We used fluorescence probe displacement studies and molecular docking simulations to characterize the binding of PCB sulfates to TTR. The stability of PCB sulfates and the reversibility of these interactions were characterized by HPLC analysis of PCB sulfates after their binding to TTR. The ability of OH-PCBs to serve as substrates for human cytosolic sulfotransferase 1A1 (hSULT1A1) was assessed by OH-PCB–dependent formation of adenosine-3´,5´-diphosphate, an end product of the sulfation reaction. Results: All five PCB sulfates were able to bind to the high-affinity binding site of TTR with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd values) in the low nanomolar range (4.8–16.8 nM), similar to that observed for T4 (4.7 nM). Docking simulations provided corroborating evidence for these binding interactions and indicated multiple high-affinity modes of binding. All OH-PCB precursors for these sulfates were found to be substrates for hSULT1A1. Conclusions: Our findings show that PCB sulfates are high-affinity ligands for human TTR and therefore indicate, for the first time, a potential relevance for these metabolites in PCB-induced thyroid disruption. PMID:23584369

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of [76Br]-Labeled High Affinity A3 Adenosine Receptor Ligands for Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Melman, Artem; de Castro, Sonia; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Bromine-76 radiolabeled analogues of previously reported high affinity A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) nucleoside ligands have been prepared as potential radiotracers for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Methods The radiosyntheses were accomplished by oxidative radiobromination on the N6-benzyl moiety of trimethyltin precursors. Biodistribution studies of the kinetics of uptake were conducted in awake rats. Results We prepared an agonist ligand {[76Br](1′R,2′R,3′S,4′R,5′S)-4-{2-chloro-6-[(3-bromophenylmethyl)amino]purin-9-yl}-1-(methylaminocarbonyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol (MRS3581)} in 59% radiochemical yield (RCY) with a specific activity of 19.5 GBq/μmol and an antagonist ligand {[76Br](1R,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(6-(3-bromobenzylamino)-2-chloro-9H-purin-9-yl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol. (MRS5147)} in 65% RCY with a specific activity of 22 GBq/μmol). The resultant products exhibited the expected high affinity (Ki ~ 0.6 nM) and specific binding at the human A3AR in vitro. Biodistribution studies in the rat showed uptake in the organs of excretion and metabolism. The antagonist MRS5147 exhibited increasing uptake in testes, an organ that contains significant quantities of A3AR, over a 2 h time course, which suggests the presence of a specific A3AR retention mechanism. Conclusion We were able to compare uptake of the [76Br]labeled antagonist MRS5147 to [76Br]agonist MRS3581. The antagonist MRS5147 shows increasing uptake in the testes, an A3AR rich tissue, suggesting that this ligand may have promise as a molecular imaging agent. PMID:19181263

  15. Neutrophil recruitment limited by high-affinity bent β2 integrin binding ligand in cis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; McArdle, Sara; Marki, Alex; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Gutierrez, Edgar; Engelhardt, Britta; Deutsch, Urban; Ginsberg, Mark; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for innate immunity and inflammation and many neutrophil functions are β2 integrin-dependent. Integrins can extend (E+) and acquire a high-affinity conformation with an ‘open' headpiece (H+). The canonical switchblade model of integrin activation proposes that the E+ conformation precedes H+, and the two are believed to be structurally linked. Here we show, using high-resolution quantitative dynamic footprinting (qDF) microscopy combined with a homogenous conformation-reporter binding assay in a microfluidic device, that a substantial fraction of β2 integrins on human neutrophils acquire an unexpected E−H+ conformation. E−H+ β2 integrins bind intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) in cis, which inhibits leukocyte adhesion in vitro and in vivo. This endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanism inhibits neutrophil aggregation, accumulation and inflammation. PMID:27578049

  16. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  17. Characterization of SynCAM surface trafficking using a SynCAM derived ligand with high homophilic binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Breillat, Christelle; Thoumine, Olivier; Choquet, Daniel . E-mail: Daniel.Choquet@pcs.u-bordeaux2.fr

    2007-08-03

    In order to better probe SynCAM function in neurons, we produced a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of SynCAM1 and the constant fragment of human IgG (SynCAM-Fc). Whether in soluble form or immobilized on latex microspheres, the chimera bound specifically to the surface of hippocampal neurons and recruited endogenous SynCAM molecules. SynCAM-Fc was also used in combination with Quantum Dots to follow the mobility of transfected SynCAM receptors at the neuronal surface. Both immobile and highly mobile SynCAM were found. Thus, SynCAM-Fc behaves as a high affinity ligand that can be used to study the function of SynCAM at the neuronal membrane.

  18. Selection of high affinity peptide ligands for detection of circulating antibodies in neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    da Silva Ribeiro, Vanessa; Manhani, Marianna Nascimento; Cardoso, Rone; Vieira, Carlos Ueira; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2010-04-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC), caused by Taenia solium, is the most common infection caused by helminthes of the human central nervous system. In this study, a random peptide phage display library was used to isolate peptide ligands as potential markers for neurocysticercosis diagnosis, because occurrence of cross-reactions with other helminthes species in the current used markers. We selected different peptides using IgG purified from pooled sera of neurocysticercosis patients. To investigate the diagnostic potential of recombinant peptides, we have tested different panels of serum samples by Phage-ELISA, and 10 phage clones strongly bound to the anti-T. solium IgGs in NC sera, with an accuracy range from 84.2% to 95%. The phage clones, NC(4)1 and NC(2)8, presented the highest sensitivity and specificity (100%), respectively, and most important, some phage clones did not react with patients' sera from Echinococcus granulosus infected patients. The validation with a competitive ELISA assay demonstrated that the selected phages could mimic T. solium epitopes and bind specifically to the pool of NC sera. Finally, the two recombinant antigens may become potential biomarkers for serodiagnosis of NC, and the Phage-ELISA demonstrated to be a very good assay, being reproducible, simple, fast, and low-cost due to its production through Escherichia coli culture, allowing a high throughput screening of NC.

  19. Multifunctional and High Affinity Polymer Ligand that Provides Bio-Orthogonal Coating of Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wentao; Kapur, Anshika; Ji, Xin; Zeng, Birong; Mishra, Dinesh; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2016-09-21

    We detail the design of hydrophilic metal-coordinating ligands and their use for the effective coating of luminescent quantum dots (QDs). The ligand design exploits the specific, reagent-free nucleophilic addition reaction of amine-modified molecules toward maleic anhydride to introduce several lipoic acid metal anchors, hydrophilic zwitterion moieties, and specific reactive groups along a poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PIMA) chain. Tunable reactive groups tested in this study include azide, biotin, carboxyl, and amine. Cap exchange with these multilipoic acid ligands via a photochemical ligation strategy yields homogeneous QD dispersions that are colloidally stable over several biologically relevant conditions and for extended periods of time. The zwitterionic coating yields compact nanoparticle size and imparts nonsticky surface properties onto the QDs, preventing protein absorption. The introduction of a controllable number of reactive groups allows conjugation of the QDs to biomolecules via bio-orthogonal coupling chemistries including (1) attachment of the neurotransmitter dopamine to QDs via amine-isothiocyanate reaction to produce a platform capable of probing interactions with cysteine in proteins, based on charge transfer interactions; (2) self-assembly of biotinylated QDs with streptavidin-dye; and (3) ligation of azide-functionalized QDs to cyclooctyne-modified transferrin via copper-free click chemistry, used for intracellular delivery. This ligand design strategy can be used to prepare an array of metal-coordinating ligands adapted for coating other inorganic nanoparticles, including magnetic and plasmonic nanomaterials. PMID:27482756

  20. Affinity chromatographic purification of tetrodotoxin by use of tetrodotoxin-binding high molecular weight substances in the body fluid of shore crab (Hemigrapsus sanguineus) as ligands.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, K; Yamaguchi, S; Shimakura, K; Nagashima, Y; Yamamori, K; Matsui, T

    1993-12-01

    A purification method for tetrodotoxin (TTX), based on affinity chromatography using the TTX-binding high mol. wt substances in the body fluid of shore crab (Hemigrapsus sanguineus) as ligands, was developed. This method was particularly useful for analysis of TTX in biological samples with low concentrations of TTX. The affinity gel prepared was highly specific for TTX, having no ability to bind 4-epi-TTX and anhydro-TTX as well as saxitoxin.

  1. The high affinity ligand binding conformation of the nuclear 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor is functionally linked to the transactivation domain 2 (AF-2).

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, S; Kahlen, J P; Carlberg, C

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear receptor for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD), VDR, is a transcription factor that mediates all genomic actions of the hormone. The activation of VDR by ligand induces a conformational change within its ligand binding domain (LBD). Due to the lack of a crystal structure analysis, biochemical methods have to be applied in order to investigate the details of this receptor-ligand interaction. The limited protease digestion assay can be used as a tool for the determination of a functional dissociation constant (K(df)) of VDR with any potential ligand. This method provided with the natural hormone VD two protease-resistant fragments of the VDR LBD and with the 20-epi conformation of VD, known as MC1288, even an additional fragment of intermediate size. These fragments were interpreted as different receptor conformations and their decreasing size was found to be associated with decreasing ligand binding affinity. A critical amino acid for VDR's high ligand binding conformation has been identified by C-terminal receptor truncations and point mutations as phenylalanine 422. This amino acid appears to directly contact the ligand and belongs to the ligand-inducible activation function-2 (AF-2) domain. Moreover, functional assays supported the observation that high affinity ligand binding is directly linked to transactivation function. PMID:8948643

  2. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship for High Affinity 5-HT1A Receptor Ligands Based on Norm Indexes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingzhu; Cui, Xue; Li, Lei; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Ying; Xia, Shuqian; Ma, Peisheng

    2015-12-24

    Arylpiperazine derivatives are promising 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor ligands which can inhibit serotonin reuptake effectively. In this work, some norm index descriptors were proposed and further utilized to develop a model for predicting 5-HT1A receptor affinity (pKi) of 88 arylpiperazine derivatives. Results showed that this new model could provide satisfactory predictions with the square of the correction coefficient (R(2)) of 0.8891 and the squared correlation coefficient of cross-validation (Q(2)) of 0.8082, respectively. In addition, the applicability domain of this model was validated by using the leverage approach and results which suggested potential large scale for further utilization of this model. The results of statistical values and validation tests demonstrated that our proposed norm index based model could be successfully applied for predicting the affinity 5-HT1A receptor ligands of arylpiperazine derivatives.

  3. The high affinity melationin binding site probed with conformationally restricted ligand--I. Pharmacophore and minireceptor models.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J M; Copinga, S; Gruppen, G; Molinari, E J; Dubocovich, M L; Grol, C J

    1996-08-01

    The affinities of enantiomers of conformationally restricted melatonin analogues for the ML-1 and ML-2 putative melatonin receptor subtypes are reported. Most ligands exhibited reversed stereoselectivity when competing with 125I 2-iodomelatonin binding to chicken retinal (ML-1) and hamster brain (ML-2) membranes, further supporting the biochemical and pharmacological differences reported for these two sites. Based on the data for the ML-1 site and thorough conformational analyses of several ligands, two pharmacophore models were derived using the program APOLLO. The pharmacophoric elements included were putative receptor points from the amide NH, the amide CO, and the methoxy-O, together with the normal through the phenyl ring. The large drop in ML-1 affinity observed for 4-methoxy-2-acetamido-indan (6a) could not be explained from either of these models. Minireceptors were subsequently built around the two pharmacophores using Yak. Analysis of the resulting ligand-minireceptor interactions offered an explanation for the low affinity of 6a and allowed one of the pharmacophore models to be selected for use in future drug design. PMID:8879554

  4. Excited protein states of human tear lipocalin for low- and high-affinity ligand binding revealed by functional AB loop motion.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2010-06-01

    Human tear lipocalin (TL), a prominent member of lipocalin family, exhibits functional and structural promiscuity. The plasticity of loop regions modulates entry to the ligand pocket at the "open" end of the eight-stranded beta-barrel. Site-directed multi-distance measurements using fluorescence resonance energy transfer between functional loops register two excited protein states for low- and high-affinity ligand binding. At low pH, the longest loop AB adopts the conformation of the low-affinity excited protein state that matches the crystal structure of holo-TL at pH 8. A "crankshaft" like movement is detected for the loop AB in a low pH transition. At pH 7.3 the holo-protein assumes a high-affinity excited protein state, in which the loop AB is more compact (RMS=3.1A). In the apo-holo transition, the reporter Trp 28 moves about 4.5A that reflects a decrease in distance between Glu27 and Lys108. This interaction fixes the loop AB conformation for the high-affinity mode. No such movement is detected at low pH, where Glu27 is protonated. Data strongly indicate that the protonation state of Glu27 modulates the conformation of the loop AB for high- and low-affinity binding. PMID:20439130

  5. Syntheses of 2-amino and 2-halothiazole derivatives as high-affinity metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 ligands and potential radioligands for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T; Pike, Victor W

    2011-02-10

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu(5) ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu(5) ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed subnanomolar mGlu(5) affinity. 10b also displayed >10000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [(18)F]fluoride ion (t(1/2) = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu(5) with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu(5) and may also serve as a lead to a potential (123)I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu(5) with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  6. Syntheses of 2-Amino and 2-Halothiazole Derivatives as High-Affinity Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Ligands and Potential Radioligands for In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T.; Pike, Victor W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu5 ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu5 ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed sub-nanomolar mGlu5 affinity. 10b also displayed >10,000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [18F]fluoride ion (t1/2 = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu5 with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu5 and may also serve as a lead to a potential 123I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu5 with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  7. High throughput screening of high-affinity ligands for proteins with anion-binding sites using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  8. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  9. Regions outside of conserved PxxPxR motifs drive the high affinity interaction of GRB2 with SH3 domain ligands.

    PubMed

    Bartelt, Rebekah R; Light, Jonathan; Vacaflores, Aldo; Butcher, Alayna; Pandian, Madhana; Nash, Piers; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-10-01

    SH3 domains are evolutionarily conserved protein interaction domains that control nearly all cellular processes in eukaryotes. The current model is that most SH3 domains bind discreet PxxPxR motifs with weak affinity and relatively low selectivity. However, the interactions of full-length SH3 domain-containing proteins with ligands are highly specific and have much stronger affinity. This suggests that regions outside of PxxPxR motifs drive these interactions. In this study, we observed that PxxPxR motifs were required for the binding of the adaptor protein GRB2 to short peptides from its ligand SOS1. Surprisingly, PxxPxR motifs from the proline rich region of SOS1 or CBL were neither necessary nor sufficient for the in vitro or in vivo interaction with full-length GRB2. Together, our findings show that regions outside of the consensus PxxPxR sites drive the high affinity association of GRB2 with SH3 domain ligands, suggesting that the binding mechanism for this and other SH3 domain interactions may be more complex than originally thought.

  10. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-02-10

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 /sup 0/C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17..beta..-(/sup 3/H)estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins.

  11. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  12. Investigations on the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid motif. 6. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of 7-substituted quinolone-3-carboxamide derivatives as high affinity ligands for cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Serena; De Rosa, Maria; Ligresti, Alessia; Mugnaini, Claudia; Brizzi, Antonella; Caradonna, Nicola P; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Bolognini, Daniele; Pertwee, Roger G; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Corelli, Federico

    2012-12-01

    Within our studies on structure-activity relationships of 4-quinolone-3-carboxamides as cannabinoid ligands, a new series of compounds characterized by a fluoro or phenylthio group at 7-position and different substituents at N1 and carboxamide nitrogen were synthesized and evaluated for their binding ability to cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) receptors. Most of the compounds showed affinity for one or both cannabinoid receptors at nanomolar concentration, with K(i)(CB1) and K(i)(CB2) values ranging from 2.45 to >10,000 nM and from 0.09 to 957 nM, respectively. The N-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)amide derivatives 27 and 40 displayed relatively low affinity, but high selectivity towards the CB1 receptor. Compounds 4 and 40, a CB2 and a CB1 ligand, respectively, behaved as partial agonists in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay. They showed very low permeability through (MDCK-MDR1) cells and might, therefore, represent possible lead structures for further optimization in the search for cannabinoid ligands unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:23085772

  13. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands: design, synthesis, and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte; Frydenvang, Karla; Dahl, Ivar F; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Brehm, Lotte; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2008-12-25

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites in brain, of which the latter have not been linked unequivocally to function, but are speculated to be GHB receptors. In this study, a series of biaromatic 4-substituted GHB analogues, including 4'-phenethylphenyl, 4'-styrylphenyl, and 4'-benzyloxyphenyl GHB analogues, were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in a [3H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid ([3H]NCS-382) binding assay and in GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor binding assays. The compounds were selective for the high-affinity GHB binding sites and several displayed Ki values below 100 nM. The affinity of the 4-[4'-(2-iodobenzyloxy)phenyl] GHB analogue 17b was shown to reside predominantly with the R-enantiomer (Ki = 22 nM), which has higher affinity than previously reported GHB ligands.

  14. Biomagnetic separation of Salmonella Typhimurium with high affine and specific ligand peptides isolated by phage display technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steingroewer, Juliane; Bley, Thomas; Bergemann, Christian; Boschke, Elke

    2007-04-01

    Analyses of food-borne pathogens are of great importance in order to minimize the health risk for customers. Thus, very sensitive and rapid detection methods are required. Current conventional culture techniques are very time consuming. Modern immunoassays and biochemical analysis also require pre-enrichment steps resulting in a turnaround time of at least 24 h. Biomagnetic separation (BMS) is a promising more rapid method. In this study we describe the isolation of high affine and specific peptides from a phage-peptide library, which combined with BMS allows the detection of Salmonella spp. with a similar sensitivity as that of immunomagnetic separation using antibodies.

  15. Development of indazolylpyrimidine derivatives as high-affine EphB4 receptor ligands and potential PET radiotracers.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Kristin; Wiemer, Jens; Caballero, Julio; Köckerling, Martin; Steinbach, Jörg; Pietzsch, Jens; Mamat, Constantin

    2015-09-01

    Due to their essential role in the pathogenesis of cancer, members of the Eph (erythropoietin-producing hepatoma cell line-A2) receptor tyrosine kinase family represent promising candidates for molecular imaging. Thus, the development and preparation of novel radiotracers for the noninvasive imaging of the EphB4 receptor via positron emission tomography (PET) is described. First in silico investigations with the indazolylpyrimidine lead compound which is known to be highly affine to EphB4 were executed to identify favorable labeling positions for an introduction of fluorine-18 to retain the affinity. Based on this, reference compounds as well as precursors were developed and labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18, respectively. For this purpose, a protecting group strategy essentially had to be generated to prevent unwanted methylation and to enable the introduction of fluorine-18. Further, a convenient radiolabeling strategy using [(11)C]methyl iodide was established which afforded the isotopically labeled radiotracer in 30-35% RCY (d.c.) which is identical with the original inhibitor molecule. A spiro ammonium precursor was prepared for radiolabeling with fluorine-18. Unfortunately, the labeling did not lead to the desired (18)F-radiotracer under the chosen conditions. PMID:26189032

  16. Synthesis and receptor binding of N-substituted tropane derivatives. High-affinity ligands for the cocaine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.A.; Saha, J.K.; Madras, B.K.; Neumeyer, J.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a series of N-substituted 3-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane derivatives is reported. The compounds displayed binding characteristics that paralleled those of cocaine, and several had substantially higher affinity at cocaine recognition sites. Conjugate addition of 4-fluorophenyl magnesium bromide to anhydroecgonine methyl ester gave 2 beta-(carbomethoxy)-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (4a, designated CFT, also known as WIN 35,428) after flash chromatography. N demethylation of 4a was effected by Zn/HOAc reduction of the corresponding 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate to give 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)nortropane (5), which was alkylated with allyl bromide to afford the N-allyl analogue, 6. The N-propyl analogue, 7, was prepared by catalytic reduction (Pd/C) of 6. The most potent analogue, 4a, was tritiated at a specific activity of 81.3 Ci/mmol. ({sup 3}H)4a bound rapidly and reversibly to caudate putamen membranes; the two-component binding curve typical of cocaine analogues was observed. Equilibrium was achieved within 2 h and was stable for at least 4 h. High- and low-affinity Kd values observed for ({sup 3}H)4a (4.7 and 60 nM, respectively) were more than 4 times lower than those for ({sup 3}H)cocaine, and the density of binding sites (Bmax = 50 pmol/g, high, and 290 pmol/g, low) for the two drugs were comparable. Nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)4a was 5-10% of total binding.

  17. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  18. Piperazine imidazo[1,5-a]quinoxaline ureas as high-affinity GABAA ligands of dual functionality.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, E J; Stelzer, L S; TenBrink, R E; Belonga, K L; Carter, D B; Im, H K; Im, W B; Sethy, V H; Tang, A H; VonVoigtlander, P F; Petke, J D; Zhong, W Z; Mickelson, J W

    1999-04-01

    A series of imidazo[1,5-a]quinoxaline piperazine ureas appended with a tert-butyl ester side chain at the 3-position was developed. Analogues within this series have high affinity for the gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA)/benzodiazepine receptor complex with efficacies ranging from inverse agonists to full agonists. Many analogues were found to be partial agonists as indicated by [35S]TBPS and Cl- current ratios. Uniquely, a number of these analogues were found to have a bell-shaped dose-response profile in the alpha1 beta2 gamma2 subtype as determined by whole cell patch-clamp technique, where in vitro efficacy was found to decrease with increasing drug concentration. Many of the compounds from this series were effective in antagonizing metrazole-induced seizures, consistent with anticonvulsant and possibly anxiolytic activity. Additionally, several analogues were also effective in lowering cGMP levels (to control values) after applied stress, also consistent with anxiolytic-like properties. The most effective compounds in these screens were also active in animal models of anxiety such as the Vogel and Geller assays. The use of the piperazine substituent allowed for excellent drug levels and a long duration of action in the central nervous system for many of the quinoxalines, as determined by ex vivo assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis of several compounds indicated excellent oral bioavailability and a reasonable half-life in rats. From this series emerged two partial agonists (55, 91) which had good activity in anxiolytic models, acceptable pharmacokinetics, and minimal benzodiazepine-type side effects.

  19. Synthesis and in vitro autoradiographic evaluation of a novel high-affinity radioiodinated ligand for imaging brain cannabinoid subtype-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Sean R; Varnäs, Katarina; Jia, Zhisheng; Gulyás, Balázs; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer

    2009-11-01

    There is strong interest to study the involvement of brain cannabinoid subtype-1 (CB1) receptors in neuropsychiatric disorders with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and a suitable radioligand. Here we report the synthesis of a novel high-affinity radioiodinated CB1 receptor ligand ([125I]8, [125I]1-(2-iodophenyl)-4-cyano-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylate, [125I]SD7015). By autoradiography in vitro, [125I]8 showed selective binding to CB1 receptors on human brain postmortem cryosections and now merits labeling with iodine-123 for further evaluation as a SPECT radioligand in non-human primate. PMID:19767206

  20. Exploration of dimensions of estrogen potency: parsing ligand binding and coactivator binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Carlson, Kathryn E; Gunther, Jillian R; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2011-04-15

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  1. Design and Synthesis of High Affinity Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax N-Myristoyltransferases Directed by Ligand Efficiency Dependent Lipophilicity (LELP)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT) is an essential eukaryotic enzyme and an attractive drug target in parasitic infections such as malaria. We have previously reported that 2-(3-(piperidin-4-yloxy)benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)-5-((1,3,5-trimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (34c) is a high affinity inhibitor of both Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax NMT and displays activity in vivo against a rodent malaria model. Here we describe the discovery of 34c through optimization of a previously described series. Development, guided by targeting a ligand efficiency dependent lipophilicity (LELP) score of less than 10, yielded a 100-fold increase in enzyme affinity and a 100-fold drop in lipophilicity with the addition of only two heavy atoms. 34c was found to be equipotent on chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant cell lines and on both blood and liver stage forms of the parasite. These data further validate NMT as an exciting drug target in malaria and support 34c as an attractive tool for further optimization. PMID:24641010

  2. Autoradiographic Evaluation of [(18)F]FECUMI-101, a High Affinity 5-HT1AR Ligand in Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J S Dileep; Underwood, Mark D; Simpson, Norman R; Kassir, Suham A; Prabhakaran, Jaya; Majo, Vattoly J; Bakalian, Mihran J; Parsey, Ramin V; Mann, J John; Arango, Victoria

    2016-05-12

    [(18)F]FECUMI-101 ([(18)F]1) is a 5HT1AR ligand demonstrating specific binding in brain regions corresponding to the distribution of 5-HT1AR in baboons. However, we detected moderate uptake of [(18)F]1 in baboon thalamus, a brain region lacking 5-HT1AR. We sought to investigate the relative binding of [(18)F]1 to 5-HT1AR, α1R, and 5-HT7R in vitro. Using autoradiography in human brain sections, specific binding of [(18)F]1 to 5-HT1AR was confirmed. However, [(18)F]1 also showed 26% binding to α1R in PFC. The hippocampal formation exhibited 51% and 92% binding of [(18)F]1 to α1R and 5-HT1AR, respectively. Thalamus and cerebellum showed very little binding. There is no measurable specific binding of [(18)F]1 to 5-HT7R and no effect of temperature on [(18)F]1 specific binding to 5-HT1AR or α1R. These results indicate that, while [(18)F]FECUMI-101 is not a completely selective 5-HT1AR ligand for receptor quantification, it may be useful for occupancy measurements of drugs acting at 5-HT1AR in vivo. PMID:27190597

  3. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  4. Affinity screening using competitive binding with fluorine-19 hyperpolarized ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-04-13

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (K(D)) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand for the binding pocket of interest is known.

  5. Artificial Affinity Proteins as Ligands of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mouratou, Barbara; Béhar, Ghislaine; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural proteins are known to have affinity and specificity for immunoglobulins. Some of them are widely used as reagents for detection or capture applications, such as Protein G and Protein A. However, these natural proteins have a defined spectrum of recognition that may not fit specific needs. With the development of combinatorial protein engineering and selection techniques, it has become possible to design artificial affinity proteins with the desired properties. These proteins, termed alternative scaffold proteins, are most often chosen for their stability, ease of engineering and cost-efficient recombinant production in bacteria. In this review, we focus on alternative scaffold proteins for which immunoglobulin binders have been identified and characterized. PMID:25647098

  6. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies of novel 2-diarylethyl substituted (2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl)glycines as high-affinity group II metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ulrik S; Bleisch, Thomas J; Kingston, Anne E; Wright, Rebecca A; Johnson, Bryan G; Schoepp, Darryle D; Ornstein, Paul L

    2003-01-17

    The major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, (S)-glutamic acid , activates both ionotropic and metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptors. Its importance in connection to neurological and psychiatric disorders has directed great attention to the development of compounds that modulate the effects of this endogenous ligand. Whereas L-carboxycyclopropylglycine (L-CCG-1) is a potent agonist at, primarily, group II metabotropic glutamate receptors, alkylation of at the alpha-carbon notoriously result in group II mGluR antagonists, of which the most potent compound described so far, LY341495, displays IC(50) values of 23 and 10 nM at the group II receptor subtypes mGlu2 and mGlu3, respectively. In this study we synthesized a series of structural analogues of in which the xanthyl moiety is replaced by two substituted-phenyl groups. The pharmacological characterization shows that these novel compounds have very high affinity for group II mGluRs when tested as their racemates. The most potent analogues demonstrate K(i) values in the range of 5-12 nM, being thus comparable to LY341495. PMID:12470714

  7. Computational protocol for predicting the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun; Jayaram, B

    2007-06-01

    Zinc is one of the most important metal ions found in proteins performing specific functions associated with life processes. Coordination geometry of the zinc ion in the active site of the metalloprotein-ligand complexes poses a challenge in determining ligand binding affinities accurately in structure-based drug design. We report here an all atom force field based computational protocol for estimating rapidly the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes, considering electrostatics, van der Waals, hydrophobicity, and loss in conformational entropy of protein side chains upon ligand binding along with a nonbonded approach to model the interactions of the zinc ion with all the other atoms of the complex. We examined the sensitivity of the binding affinity predictions to the choice of Lennard-Jones parameters, partial atomic charges, and dielectric treatments adopted for system preparation and scoring. The highest correlation obtained was R2 = 0.77 (r = 0.88) for the predicted binding affinity against the experiment on a heterogenous dataset of 90 zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes consisting of five unique protein targets. Model validation and parameter analysis studies underscore the robustness and predictive ability of the scoring function. The high correlation obtained suggests the potential applicability of the methodology in designing novel ligands for zinc-metalloproteins. The scoring function has been web enabled for free access at www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/drugdesign/bapplz.jsp as BAPPL-Z server (Binding Affinity Prediction of Protein-Ligand complexes containing Zinc metal ions).

  8. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  9. Labeling by ( sup 3 H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.B.; Reid, A.; Mahboubi, A.; Kim, C.H.; De Costa, B.R.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. )

    1991-02-01

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand ({sup 3}H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (({sup 3}H)DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. (Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)). Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that ({sup 3}H)DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels.

  10. Tuned-Affinity Bivalent Ligands for the Characterization of Opioid Receptor Heteromers.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jessica H; Long, Darcie H; England, Pamela M; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    Opioid receptors, including the mu and delta opioid receptors (MOR and DOR) are important targets for the treatment of pain. Although there is mounting evidence that these receptors form heteromers, the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer remains unresolved. We have designed and synthesized bivalent ligands as tools to elucidate the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer. Our ligands (L2 and L4) are comprised of a compound with low affinity at the DOR tethered to a compound with high affinity at the MOR, with the goal of producing ligands with "tuned affinity" at MOR/DOR heteromers compared to DOR homomers. Here we show that both L2 and L4 demonstrate enhanced affinity at MOR/DOR heteromers compared to DOR homomers, thereby providing unique pharmacological tools to dissect the role of the MOR/DOR heteromer in pain.

  11. Determination of a highly selective mixed-affinity sigma receptor ligand, in rat plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and its application to a pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Jamalapuram, Seshulatha; Vuppala, Pradeep K.; Mesangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Avery, Bonnie A.

    2014-01-01

    A selective, rapid and sensitive ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) method was developed and validated to quantitate a highly selective mixed-affinity sigma receptor ligand, CM156 (3-(4-(4-cyclohexylpiperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d] thiazole-2(3H)-thione), in rat plasma. CM156 and the internal standard (aripiprazole) were extracted from plasma samples by a single step liquid–liquid extraction using chloroform. The analysis was carried out on an ACQUITY UPLCTM BEH HILIC column (1.7 µm, 2.1 mm × 50 mm) with isocratic elution at flow rate of 0.2 mL/min using 10 mM ammonium formate in 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile (10:90) as the mobile phase. The detection of the analyte was performed on a mass spectrometer operated in selected ion recording (SIR) mode with positive electrospray ionization (ESI). The validated analytical method resulted in a run time of 4 min and the retention times observed were 2.6 ± 0.1 and 2.1 ± 0.1 min for CM156 and the IS, respectively. The calibration curve exhibited excellent linearity over a concentration range of 5–4000 ng/mL with the lower limit of quantification of 5 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision values were below 15% and accuracy ranged from −6.5% to 5.0%. The mean recovery of CM156 from plasma was 96.8%. The validated method was applied to a pilot intravenous pharmacokinetic study in rats. PMID:22406103

  12. AM2389, a high-affinity, in vivo potent CB1-receptor-selective cannabinergic ligand as evidenced by drug discrimination in rats and hypothermia testing in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Sherrica; LeMay, Brian J.; Nikas, Spyros P.; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    Rationale The endocannabinoid signaling system (ECS) has been targeted for developing novel therapeutics since ECS dysfunction has been implicated in various pathologies. Current focus is on chemical modifications of the hexahydrocannabinol (HHC) nabilone (Cesamet®). Objective To characterize the novel, high-affinity cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) HHC-ligand AM2389 [9β-hydroxy-3-(1-hexyl-cyclobut-1-yl)-hexahydrocannabinol in two rodent pre-clinical assays. Materials and methods CB1R mediation of AM2389-induced hypothermia in mice was evaluated with AM251, a CB1R-selective antagonist/inverse agonist. Additionally, two groups of rats discriminated the full cannabinergic aminoalkylindole AM5983 (0.18 and 0.56 mg/kg) from vehicle 20 min post-injection in a two-choice operant conditioning task motivated by 0.1% saccharin/water. Generalization/substitution tests were conducted with AM2389, AM5983, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). Results Δ9-THC (30 mg/kg)-induced hypothermia exhibited a faster onset and shorter duration of action compared with AM2389 (0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg). AM251 (3 and 10 mg/kg) attenuated/blocked hypothermia induced by 0.3 mg/kg AM2389. In drug discrimination, the order of potency was AM2389>AM5983>Δ9-THC with ED50 values of 0.0025, 0.0571, and 0.2635 mg/kg, respectively, in the low-dose condition. The corresponding ED50 values in the high-dose condition were 0.0069, 0.1246, and 0.8438 mg/kg, respectively. Onset of the effects of AM2389 was slow with a protracted time-course; the functional, perceptual in vivo half-life was approximately 17 h. Conclusions This potent cannabinergic HHC exhibited a slow onset of action with a protracted time-course. The AM2389 chemotype appears well suited for further drug development, and AM2389 currently is used to probe behavioral consequences of sustained ECS activation. PMID:21989802

  13. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  14. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  15. The quest for affinity chromatography ligands: are the molecular libraries the right source?

    PubMed

    Perret, Gérald; Santambien, Patrick; Boschetti, Egisto

    2015-08-01

    Affinity chromatography separations of proteins call for highly specific ligands. Antibodies are the most obvious approach; however, except for specific situations, technical and economic reasons are arguments against this choice especially for preparative purposes. With this in mind, the rationale is to select the most appropriate ligands from collections of pre-established molecules. To reach the objective of having a large structural coverage, combinatorial libraries have been proposed. These are classified according to their nature and origin. This review presents and discusses the most common affinity ligand libraries along with the most appropriate screening methods for the identification of the right affinity chromatography selective structure according to the type of library; a side-by-side comparison is also presented. PMID:26033846

  16. Interpolation method for accurate affinity ranking of arrayed ligand-analyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Schasfoort, Richard B M; Andree, Kiki C; van der Velde, Niels; van der Kooi, Alex; Stojanović, Ivan; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-05-01

    The values of the affinity constants (kd, ka, and KD) that are determined by label-free interaction analysis methods are affected by the ligand density. This article outlines a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging method that yields high-throughput globally fitted affinity ranking values using a 96-plex array. A kinetic titration experiment without a regeneration step has been applied for various coupled antibodies binding to a single antigen. Globally fitted rate (kd and ka) and dissociation equilibrium (KD) constants for various ligand densities and analyte concentrations are exponentially interpolated to the KD at Rmax = 100 RU response level (KD(R100)).

  17. Characterization of opiate receptor heterogeneity using affinity ligands and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Reichman, M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary aim of the dissertation was to study the heterogeneity of opiate receptors by utilizing affinity ligands, and by modification of the receptor lipid-microenvironment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/). The affinity ligands, 14-bromacetamidomorphine (BAM) and 14-chloroacetylnaltrexone (CAN), selectively inactivated high affinity dihydromorphine binding sites in an apparently irreversible manner (the inhibition was resistant to extensive washes of treated neural membrane homogenates). The inhibitory effect of PLA/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) on opiate receptor subtypes was determined using (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine (..mu..-type agonist), (/sup 3/H)-enkephalin (delta agonist) and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone (..mu.. antagonist). PLA/sub 2/ abolished the high affinity antagonist binding site, whereas it inhibited high and low affinity agonist binding sites similarly. The results suggest that high affinity antagonist binding sites are different from high affinity agonist binding sites. Indirect binding assays demonstrated that the selectivities of ..mu..- and delta receptors are not affected significantly by PLA/sub 2/ treatment.

  18. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%. PMID:26856529

  19. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  20. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  1. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.

  2. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  3. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future. PMID:26032605

  4. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  5. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection. PMID:25271333

  6. Specific recognition of supercoiled plasmid DNA by affinity chromatography using a synthetic aromatic ligand.

    PubMed

    Caramelo-Nunes, Catarina; Tomaz, Cândida T

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography is the method of choice for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA), since it is simple, robust, versatile, and highly reproducible. The most important features of a chromatographic procedure are the use of suitable stationary phases and ligands. As conventional purification protocols are being replaced by more sophisticated and selective procedures, the focus changes toward designing and selecting ligands of high affinity and specificity. In fact, the chemical composition of the chromatographic supports determines the interactions established with the target molecules, allowing their preferential retention over the undesirable ones. Here it is described the selective recognition and purification of supercoiled pDNA by affinity chromatography, using an intercalative molecule (3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridine) as ligand. PMID:25749945

  7. Estimation of Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinity from Fluctuation of Their Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohta, Masami; Misu, Takashi; Hata, Masayuki; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2005-10-01

    It is necessary for the understanding of protein interactions or in silico drug designs to accurately estimate ligand-receptor affinity. The energy calculation based on the electrostatic force, van der Waals force, and solvation effect is a direct method of computing the magnitude of the interaction between ligand and receptor. By this conventional method, however, it is difficult to estimate a slight difference in binding affinity with sufficient accuracy. We propose a novel concept for the evaluation of binding affinity between a ligand and its receptor by functionalizing the fluctuation at the ligand-receptor interface. This method enables an adequate estimation with a high accuracy compared with the conventional energetic approach. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor are used to explain how binding affinity is extracted from the fluctuation in interfacial energy, and a combination of an antigen and its antibody is examined to demonstrate the compatibility between the estimation from the interfacial fluctuation and the experimentally measured binding energy.

  8. Octapeptide-based affinity chromatography of human immunoglobulin G: comparisons of three different ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Liu, Fu-Feng; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-09-12

    In an earlier work, we have developed a biomimetic design strategy based on the human IgG (hIgG)-Protein A interactions and identified an affinity ligand for hIgG, FYWHCLDE, which ranked top one in a pool of 14 potential candidates. Herein, two more octapeptides, FYCHWALE and FYCHTIDE, were identified, and the binding and purification of hIgG on the affinity columns packed with the three octapeptide-modified Sepharose gels were extensively studied and compared to find more effective octapeptide-based affinity ligands. It was found that all the three ligands bound hIgG and Fc fragment but barely bound Fab fragment, and the binding to hIgG and Fc was mainly by electrostatic interactions. The optimum binding pH values for the three ligands were different from each other, but kept in the range of 5.0-6.0. Ligand binding competition revealed that the binding sites on hIgG for the three octapeptides were similar to those for Protein A. Adsorption isotherms revealed that hIgG binding capacity was in the range of 64-104mg/mL drained gel in the order of FYWHCLDE>FYCHWALE>FYCHTIDE. Then, purifications of hIgG and human monoclonal antibody from human serum and cell culture supernatant, respectively, were achieved with the three affinity columns at high purities and recovery yields. Finally, the molecular basis for the binding affinity of the peptides for the Fc fragment of hIgG was elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25064536

  9. A liposomal drug platform overrides peptide ligand targeting to a cancer biomarker, irrespective of ligand affinity or density.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bethany Powell; McGuire, Michael J; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2013-01-01

    One method for improving cancer treatment is the use of nanoparticle drugs functionalized with targeting ligands that recognize receptors expressed selectively by tumor cells. In theory such targeting ligands should specifically deliver the nanoparticle drug to the tumor, increasing drug concentration in the tumor and delivering the drug to its site of action within the tumor tissue. However, the leaky vasculature of tumors combined with a poor lymphatic system allows the passive accumulation, and subsequent retention, of nanosized materials in tumors. Furthermore, a large nanoparticle size may impede tumor penetration. As such, the role of active targeting in nanoparticle delivery is controversial, and it is difficult to predict how a targeted nanoparticle drug will behave in vivo. Here we report in vivo studies for αvβ6-specific H2009.1 peptide targeted liposomal doxorubicin, which increased liposomal delivery and toxicity to lung cancer cells in vitro. We systematically varied ligand affinity, ligand density, ligand stability, liposome dosage, and tumor models to assess the role of active targeting of liposomes to αvβ6. In direct contrast to the in vitro results, we demonstrate no difference in in vivo targeting or efficacy for H2009.1 tetrameric peptide liposomal doxorubicin, compared to control peptide and no peptide liposomes. Examining liposome accumulation and distribution within the tumor demonstrates that the liposome, and not the H2009.1 peptide, drives tumor accumulation, and that both targeted H2009.1 and untargeted liposomes remain in perivascular regions, with little tumor penetration. Thus H2009.1 targeted liposomes fail to improve drug efficacy because the liposome drug platform prevents the H2009.1 peptide from both actively targeting the tumor and binding to tumor cells throughout the tumor tissue. Therefore, using a high affinity and high specificity ligand targeting an over-expressed tumor biomarker does not guarantee enhanced efficacy of a

  10. Selection is more intelligent than design: improving the affinity of a bivalent ligand through directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Kareem M; Xiao, Yi; Soh, H Tom

    2012-12-01

    Multivalent molecular interactions can be exploited to dramatically enhance the performance of an affinity reagent. The enhancement in affinity and specificity achieved with a multivalent construct depends critically on the effectiveness of the scaffold that joins the ligands, as this determines their positions and orientations with respect to the target molecule. Currently, no generalizable design rules exist for construction of an optimal multivalent ligand for targets with known structures, and the design challenge remains an insurmountable obstacle for the large number of proteins whose structures are not known. As an alternative to such design-based strategies, we report here a directed evolution-based method for generating optimal bivalent aptamers. To demonstrate this approach, we fused two thrombin aptamers with a randomized DNA sequence and used a microfluidic in vitro selection strategy to isolate scaffolds with exceptionally high affinities. Within five rounds of selection, we generated a bivalent aptamer that binds thrombin with an apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) <10 pM, representing a ∼200-fold improvement in binding affinity over the monomeric aptamers and a ∼15-fold improvement over the best designed bivalent construct. The process described here can be used to produce high-affinity multivalent aptamers and could potentially be adapted to other classes of biomolecules.

  11. Quantification of the Effects of Ionic Strength, Viscosity, and Hydrophobicity on Protein–Ligand Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In order to quantify the interactions between molecules of biological interest, the determination of the dissociation constant (Kd) is essential. Estimation of the binding affinity in this way is routinely performed in “favorable” conditions for macromolecules. Crucial data for ligand–protein binding elucidation is mainly derived from techniques (e.g., macromolecular crystallography) that require the addition of high concentration of salts and/or other additives. In this study we have evaluated the effect of temperature, ionic strength, viscosity, and hydrophobicity on the Kd of three previously characterized protein–ligand systems, based on variation in their binding sites, in order to provide insight into how these often overlooked unconventional circumstances impact binding affinity. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) increasing solvent viscosity in general is detrimental to ligand binding, (2) moderate increases in temperature have marginal effects on the dissociation constant, and (3) the degree of hydrophobicity of the ligand and the binding site determines the extent of the influence of cosolvents and salt concentration on ligand binding affinity. PMID:25147617

  12. Affinity Enhancement by Ligand Clustering Effect Inspired by Peptide Dendrimers−Shank PDZ Proteins Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Liu, Miao; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity binders are desirable tools to probe the function that specific protein−protein interactions play in cell. In the process of seeking a general strategy to design high-affinity binders, we found a clue from the βPIX (p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor)−Shank PDZ interaction in synaptic assembly: three PDZ-binding sites are clustered by a parallel coiled-coil trimer but bind to Shank PDZ protein with 1:1 stoichiometry (1 trimer/1 PDZ). Inspired by this architecture, we proposed that peptide dendrimer, mimicking the ligand clustering in βPIX, will also show enhanced binding affinity, yet with 1:1 stoichiometry. This postulation has been proven here, as we synthesized a set of monomeric, dimeric and trimeric peptides and measured their binding affinity and stoichiometry with Shank PDZ domains by isothermal titration calorimetry, native mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance. This affinity enhancement, best explained by proximity effect, will be useful to guide the design of high-affinity blockers for protein−protein interactions. PMID:26918521

  13. Trematode hemoglobins show exceptionally high oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Kiger, L; Rashid, A K; Griffon, N; Haque, M; Moens, L; Gibson, Q H; Poyart, C; Marden, M C

    1998-08-01

    Ligand binding studies were made with hemoglobin (Hb) isolated from trematode species Gastrothylax crumenifer (Gc), Paramphistomum epiclitum (Pe), Explanatum explanatum (Ee), parasitic worms of water buffalo Bubalus bubalis, and Isoparorchis hypselobagri (Ih) parasitic in the catfish Wallago attu. The kinetics of oxygen and carbon monoxide binding show very fast association rates. Whereas oxygen can be displaced on a millisecond time scale from human Hb at 25 degrees C, the dissociation of oxygen from trematode Hb may require a few seconds to over 20 s (for Hb Pe). Carbon monoxide dissociation is faster, however, than for other monomeric hemoglobins or myoglobins. Trematode hemoglobins also show a reduced rate of autoxidation; the oxy form is not readily oxidized by potassium ferricyanide, indicating that only the deoxy form reacts rapidly with this oxidizing agent. Unlike most vertebrate Hbs, the trematodes have a tyrosine residue at position E7 instead of the usual distal histidine. As for Hb Ascaris, which also displays a high oxygen affinity, the trematodes have a tyrosine in position B10; two H-bonds to the oxygen molecule are thought to be responsible for the very high oxygen affinity. The trematode hemoglobins display a combination of high association rates and very low dissociation rates, resulting in some of the highest oxygen affinities ever observed.

  14. Beyond helper phage: Using "helper cells" to select peptide affinity ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Phipps, Mary Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M.; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie A.; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; et al

    2016-09-14

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report onmore » the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Here, based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.« less

  15. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M; Savidge, Tor C

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  16. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  17. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM) to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM) to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after adding a large concentration of

  18. Petasis-Ugi ligands: New affinity tools for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Íris L; Roque, Ana C A

    2016-09-15

    Affinity chromatography is a widespread technique for the enrichment and isolation of biologics, which relies on the selective and reversible interaction between affinity ligands and target molecules. Small synthetic affinity ligands are valuable alternatives due to their robustness, low cost and fast ligand development. This work reports, for the first time, the use of a sequential Petasis-Ugi multicomponent reaction to generate rationally designed solid-phase combinatorial libraries of small synthetic ligands, which can be screened for the selection of new affinity adsorbents towards biological targets. As a proof of concept, the Petasis-Ugi reaction was here employed in the discovery of affinity ligands suitable for phosphopeptide enrichment. A combinatorial library of 84 ligands was designed, synthesized on a chromatographic solid support and screened in situ for the specific binding of phosphopeptides binding human BRCA1C-terminal domains. The success of the reaction on the chromatographic matrix was confirmed by both inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Three lead ligands were identified due to their superior performance in terms of binding capacity and selectivity towards the phosphorylated moiety on peptides, which showed the feasibility of the Petasis-Ugi reaction for affinity ligand development. PMID:27469904

  19. Unsaturated fatty acids as high-affinity ligands of the C-terminal Per-ARNT-Sim domain from the Hypoxia-inducible factor 3α

    PubMed Central

    Fala, Angela M.; Oliveira, Juliana F.; Adamoski, Douglas; Aricetti, Juliana A.; Dias, Marilia M.; Dias, Marcio V. B.; Sforça, Maurício L.; Lopes-de-Oliveira, Paulo S.; Rocco, Silvana A.; Caldana, Camila; Dias, Sandra M. G.; Ambrosio, Andre L. B.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF) form heterodimeric complexes that mediate cell responses to hypoxia. The oxygen-dependent stability and activity of the HIF-α subunits is traditionally associated to post-translational modifications such as hydroxylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. Here we report novel evidence showing that unsaturated fatty acids are naturally occurring, non-covalent structural ligands of HIF-3α, thus providing the initial framework for exploring its exceptional role as a lipid sensor under hypoxia. PMID:26237540

  20. Cadherin-dependent mechanotransduction depends on ligand identity but not affinity

    PubMed Central

    Tabdili, Hamid; Langer, Matthew; Shi, Quanming; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Wang, Ning; Leckband, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Summary This study investigates the relationship between classical cadherin binding affinities and mechanotransduction through cadherin-mediated adhesions. The mechanical properties of cadherin-dependent intercellular junctions are generally attributed to differences in the binding affinities of classical cadherin subtypes that contribute to cohesive energies between cells. However, cell mechanics and mechanotransduction may also regulate intercellular contacts. We used micropipette measurements to quantify the two-dimensional affinities of cadherins at the cell surface, and two complementary mechanical measurements to assess ligand-dependent mechanotransduction through cadherin adhesions. At the cell surface, the classical cadherins investigated in this study form both homophilic and heterophilic bonds with two-dimensional affinities that differ by less than threefold. In contrast, mechanotransduction through cadherin adhesions is strongly ligand dependent such that homophilic, but not heterophilic ligation mediates mechanotransduction, independent of the cadherin binding affinity. These findings suggest that ligand-selective mechanotransduction may supersede differences in cadherin binding affinities in regulating intercellular contacts. PMID:22718345

  1. Protein-ligand binding affinity by nonequilibrium free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Cossins, Benjamin P; Foucher, Sebastien; Edge, Colin M; Essex, Jonathan W

    2008-11-27

    Nonequilibrium (NE) free energy methods are embarrassingly parallel and may be very conveniently run on desktop computers using distributed computing software. In recent years there has been a proliferation of NE methods, but these approaches have barely, if at all, been used in the context of calculating protein-ligand binding free energies. In a recent study by these authors, different combinations of NE methods with various test systems were compared and protocols identified which yielded results as accurate as replica exchange thermodynamic integration (RETI). The NE approaches, however, lend themselves to extensive parallelization through the use of distributed computing. Here the best performing of those NE protocols, a replica exchange method using Bennett's acceptance ratio as the free energy estimator (RENE), is applied to two sets of congeneric inhibitors bound to neuraminidase and cyclooxygenase-2. These protein-ligand systems were originally studied with RETI, giving results to which NE and RENE simulations are compared. These NE calculations were carried out on a large, highly distributed group of low-performance desktop computers which are part of a Condor pool. RENE was found to produce results of a predictive quality at least as good as RETI in less than half the wall clock time. However, non-RE NE results were found to be far less predictive. In addition, the RENE method successfully identified a localized region of rapidly changing free energy gradients without the need for prior investigation. These results suggest that the RENE protocol is appropriate for use in the context of predicting protein-ligand binding free energies and that it can offer advantages over conventional, equilibrium approaches. PMID:18973369

  2. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    PubMed Central

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the environmental effect of the atom under consideration. We have developed a novel knowledge-based statistical energy function for protein-ligand complexes which takes atomic environment in to account hence functional group as a singular entity. The proposed knowledge based scoring function is fast, simple to construct, easy to use and moreover it tackle the existing problem of handling molecular orientation in active site pocket. We have designed and used Functional group based Ligand retrieval (FBLR) system which can identify and detect the orientation of functional groups in ligand. This decoy searching was used to build the above KBSF to quantify the activity and affinity of high resolution protein-ligand complexes. We have proposed the probable use of these decoys in molecular build-up as a de-novo drug designing approach. We have also discussed the possible use of the said KSBF in pharmacophore fragment detection and pseudo center based fragment alignment procedure. PMID:19255647

  3. Open conformers of HLA-F are high-affinity ligands of the activating NK-cell receptor KIR3DS1.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Hölzemer, Angelique; Martrus, Gloria; Chung, Amy W; Pacheco, Yovana; Simoneau, Camille R; Rucevic, Marijana; Lamothe-Molina, Pedro A; Pertel, Thomas; Kim, Tae-Eun; Dugan, Haley; Alter, Galit; Dechanet-Merville, Julie; Jost, Stephanie; Carrington, Mary; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The activating natural killer (NK)-cell receptor KIR3DS1 has been linked to the outcome of various human diseases, including delayed progression of disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet a ligand that would account for its biological effects has remained unknown. We screened 100 HLA class I proteins and found that KIR3DS1 bound to HLA-F, a result we confirmed biochemically and functionally. Primary human KIR3DS1(+) NK cells degranulated and produced antiviral cytokines after encountering HLA-F and inhibited HIV-1 replication in vitro. Activation of CD4(+) T cells triggered the transcription and surface expression of HLA-F mRNA and HLA-F protein, respectively, and induced binding of KIR3DS1. HIV-1 infection further increased the transcription of HLA-F mRNA but decreased the binding of KIR3DS1, indicative of a mechanism for evading recognition by KIR3DS1(+) NK cells. Thus, we have established HLA-F as a ligand of KIR3DS1 and have demonstrated cell-context-dependent expression of HLA-F that might explain the widespread influence of KIR3DS1 in human disease.

  4. Open conformers of HLA-F are high-affinity ligands of the activating NK-cell receptor KIR3DS1.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Hölzemer, Angelique; Martrus, Gloria; Chung, Amy W; Pacheco, Yovana; Simoneau, Camille R; Rucevic, Marijana; Lamothe-Molina, Pedro A; Pertel, Thomas; Kim, Tae-Eun; Dugan, Haley; Alter, Galit; Dechanet-Merville, Julie; Jost, Stephanie; Carrington, Mary; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The activating natural killer (NK)-cell receptor KIR3DS1 has been linked to the outcome of various human diseases, including delayed progression of disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet a ligand that would account for its biological effects has remained unknown. We screened 100 HLA class I proteins and found that KIR3DS1 bound to HLA-F, a result we confirmed biochemically and functionally. Primary human KIR3DS1(+) NK cells degranulated and produced antiviral cytokines after encountering HLA-F and inhibited HIV-1 replication in vitro. Activation of CD4(+) T cells triggered the transcription and surface expression of HLA-F mRNA and HLA-F protein, respectively, and induced binding of KIR3DS1. HIV-1 infection further increased the transcription of HLA-F mRNA but decreased the binding of KIR3DS1, indicative of a mechanism for evading recognition by KIR3DS1(+) NK cells. Thus, we have established HLA-F as a ligand of KIR3DS1 and have demonstrated cell-context-dependent expression of HLA-F that might explain the widespread influence of KIR3DS1 in human disease. PMID:27455421

  5. Mimicking nature: Phosphopeptide enrichment using combinatorial libraries of affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Iris L; Zhou, Houjiang; Lilley, Kathryn; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, Ana C A

    2016-07-29

    Phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification of proteins that controls a plethora of cellular processes and triggers specific physiological responses, for which there is a need to develop tools to characterize phosphorylated targets efficiently. Here, a combinatorial library of triazine-based synthetic ligands comprising 64 small molecules has been rationally designed, synthesized and screened for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides. The lead candidate (coined A8A3), composed of histidine and phenylalanine mimetic components, showed high binding capacity and selectivity for binding mono- and multi-phosphorylated peptides at pH 3. Ligand A8A3 was coupled onto both cross-linked agarose and magnetic nanoparticles, presenting higher binding capacities (100-fold higher) when immobilized on the magnetic support. The magnetic adsorbent was further screened against a tryptic digest of two phosphorylated proteins (α- and β-caseins) and one non-phosphorylated protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). The MALDI-TOF mass spectra of the eluted peptides allowed the identification of nine phosphopeptides, comprising both mono- and multi-phosphorylated peptides. PMID:27345211

  6. Monolayers assembled from a glycolipid biosurfactant from Pseudozyma (Candida) antarctica serve as a high-affinity ligand system for immunoglobulin G and M.

    PubMed

    Imura, Tomohiro; Ito, Seya; Azumi, Reiko; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-06-01

    A carbohydrate ligand system has been developed which is composed of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) from Pseudozyma antarctica, serving for human immunoglobulin G and M (HIgG and HIgM). The estimated binding constants from surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurement were Ka = 9.4 x 10(6) M(-1) for HIgG and 5.4 x 10(6) M(-1) for HIgM, respectively. The binding site was not in the Fc region of immunoglobulin but in the Fab region. Large amounts of HIgG and HIgM bound to MEL-A SAMs were directly observed by atomic force microscopy. PMID:17342348

  7. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein–ligand binding affinities and structures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D.; Clark, Jordan J.; Dunbar, James B.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein–ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23 269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  8. Effects of midgut-protein-preparative and ligand binding procedures on the toxin binding characteristics of BT-R1, a common high-affinity receptor in Manduca sexta for Cry1A Bacillus thuringiensis toxins.

    PubMed

    Keeton, T P; Francis, B R; Maaty, W S; Bulla, L A

    1998-06-01

    The identity of the physiologically important Cry1A receptor protein(s) in the lepidopteran Manduca sexta has been a matter of dispute due to the multiple proteins which bind the Cry1Ac toxin. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac exhibit essentially identical toxicities toward M. sexta larvae and show a high degree of sequence and presumed structural identities. These similarities make it likely that there is a common mechanism of toxicity in these lepidopteran-specific toxins in terms of both mode of action and the receptor proteins through which these toxins exert their lepidopteran-specific toxicity. Investigators in our laboratory previously demonstrated that the cloned 210-kDa glycoprotein BT-R1 binds all three Cry1A toxins (T. P. Keeton and L. A. Bulla, Jr., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:3419-3425, 1997). This protein remains a common binding protein even after being subjected to various midgut membrane preparation and processing protocols. The method used to isolate proteins from the M. sexta larval midgut in no significant way affects the results of ligand binding and vacuum blotting experiments, and we have been unable to detect specific, high-affinity binding of any Cry1A toxin to Cry1Ac binding proteins other than BT-R1. Alterations in blot substrate and blocking, hybridization, and washing buffers support these conclusions. Collectively, these results indicate that in M. sexta the cadherin-like BT-R1 protein is a common high-affinity receptor protein for the Cry1A family of toxins.

  9. Evaluation of ligand-binding affinity using polynomial empirical scoring functions.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira; Dias, Raquel

    2008-10-15

    Assessing protein-ligand interaction is of great importance for virtual screening initiatives in order to discover new drugs. The present work describes a set of empirical scoring functions to assess the binding affinity, involving terms for intermolecular hydrogen bonds and contact surface. The results show that our methodology works better to predict protein-ligand affinity when compared with XSCORE, a popular empirical scoring function.

  10. High affinity α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands AT-1001 and AT-1012 attenuate cocaine-induced conditioned place preference and behavioral sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Khroyan, Taline V; Yasuda, Dennis; Toll, Lawrence; Polgar, Willma E; Zaveri, Nurulain T

    2015-10-15

    Cholinergic signaling via the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the mesolimbic circuitry is involved in the rewarding effects of abused drugs such as cocaine and opioids. In mouse studies, nonselective nAChR antagonist mecamylamine blocks cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and behavioral sensitization. Among subtype-selective nAChR antagonists, the β2-selective antagonist dihydrobetaerythroidine and α7 antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), but not MLA alone prevent behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Since the role of the α3β4 nAChR subtype in the rewarding and behavioral effects of cocaine is unknown, the present study investigated the effect of two potent and selective α3β4 nAChR ligands, AT-1001 and AT-1012, on the acquisition of cocaine-induced CPP and behavioral sensitization in mice. At 5-30mg/kg, cocaine produced robust CPP, whereas behavioral sensitization of locomotor activity was only observed at the higher doses (20-30mg/kg). Pretreatment with AT-1001 (1-10mg/kg) or AT-1012 (3-10mg/kg) blocked CPP induced by 5mg/kg cocaine, but not by 30mg/kg cocaine. Lower doses of AT-1001 (0.3-1mg/kg) and AT-1012 (1-3mg/kg) did not affect the increase in locomotor activity induced by 5 or 30mg/kg cocaine. But AT-1001, at these doses, blocked locomotor sensitization induced by 30mg/kg cocaine. These results indicate that the α3β4 nAChR play a role in the rewarding and behavioral effects of cocaine, and that selective α3β4 nAChR ligands can attenuate cocaine-induced behavioral phenomena. Since the selective α3β4 nAChR functional antagonist AT-1001 has also been shown to block nicotine self-administration in rats, the present results suggest that α3β4 nAChRs may be a target for the treatment of cocaine addiction as well as for cocaine-nicotine comorbid addiction.

  11. Synthesis and resolution of (+-)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-1-(3'-iodophenyl)-3-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro- 1H-3- benzazepine (TISCH): A high affinity and selective iodinated ligand for CNS D1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Chumpradit, S.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J.J.; Kung, H.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The synthesis and resolution of (+-)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-1-(3'-iodophenyl)-3-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 H-3- benzazepine, (+/-)-TISCH (8) has been achieved by resolution of intermediate 4, the O-methoxyl, 3'-bromo derivative, as the diastereomeric camphor sulfonate salt. The final products, R-(+)-8 and S-(-)-8, were prepared by treatment of R-(+)- or S-(-)-7, the 3'-tributyltin intermediates, with iodine in chloroform, followed by O-demethylation. By using HPLC with a chiral column, the optical purity (greater than 99%) of the intermediates and the final compounds was determined. Radioiodination was achieved by an iodo-destannylation reaction with sodium (125I)iodide and hydrogen peroxide. As expected, the R-(+)-(125I)-8 (the active isomer) displayed high affinity and selectivity to the CNS D-1 receptor in rat striatum tissue preparation (Kd = 0.205 nM). The rank order of potency was as follows: SCH-23390 (1a) greater than (+/-)-8 greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than spiperone, WB4101 greater than dopamine, 5-HT. After an iv injection, the R-(+)-(125I)-8 penetrated the blood-brain barrier with ease and displayed specific regional distribution corresponding to the D-1 receptor density, while the S-(-)-(125I)-8 showed no specific uptake. The data suggest that the ligand may be useful as a pharmacological tool for characterizing the D-1 dopamine receptor. When labeled with I-123, this ligand is a potential agent for in vivo imaging of CNS D-1 dopamine receptor.

  12. Mimicking of Arginine by Functionalized N(ω)-Carbamoylated Arginine As a New Broadly Applicable Approach to Labeled Bioactive Peptides: High Affinity Angiotensin, Neuropeptide Y, Neuropeptide FF, and Neurotensin Receptor Ligands As Examples.

    PubMed

    Keller, Max; Kuhn, Kilian K; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Hübner, Harald; Biselli, Sabrina; Mollereau, Catherine; Wifling, David; Svobodová, Jaroslava; Bernhardt, Günther; Cabrele, Chiara; Vanderheyden, Patrick M L; Gmeiner, Peter; Buschauer, Armin

    2016-03-10

    Derivatization of biologically active peptides by conjugation with fluorophores or radionuclide-bearing moieties is an effective and commonly used approach to prepare molecular tools and diagnostic agents. Whereas lysine, cysteine, and N-terminal amino acids have been mostly used for peptide conjugation, we describe a new, widely applicable approach to peptide conjugation based on the nonclassical bioisosteric replacement of the guanidine group in arginine by a functionalized carbamoylguanidine moiety. Four arginine-containing peptide receptor ligands (angiotensin II, neurotensin(8-13), an analogue of the C-terminal pentapeptide of neuropeptide Y, and a neuropeptide FF analogue) were subject of this proof-of-concept study. The N(ω)-carbamoylated arginines, bearing spacers with a terminal amino group, were incorporated into the peptides by standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis. The synthesized chemically stable peptide derivatives showed high receptor affinities with Ki values in the low nanomolar range, even when bulky fluorophores had been attached. Two new tritiated tracers for angiotensin and neurotensin receptors are described.

  13. Blind prediction of charged ligand binding affinities in a model binding site

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Boyce, Sarah E.; Fischer, Marcus; Fish, Inbar; Mobley, David L.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting absolute protein-ligand binding affinities remains a frontier challenge in ligand discovery and design. This becomes more difficult when ionic interactions are involved, because of the large opposing solvation and electrostatic attraction energies. In a blind test, we examined whether alchemical free energy calculations could predict binding affinities of 14 charged and 5 neutral compounds previously untested as ligands for a cavity binding site in Cytochrome C Peroxidase. In this simplified site, polar and cationic ligands compete with solvent to interact with a buried aspartate. Predictions were tested by calorimetry, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Of the 15 compounds predicted to bind, 13 were experimentally confirmed, while four compounds were false negative predictions. Predictions had an RMSE of 1.95 kcal/mol to the experimental affinities, and predicted poses had an average RMSD of 1.7 Å to the crystallographic poses. This test serves as a benchmark for these thermodynamically rigorous calculations at predicting binding affinities for charged compounds, and gives insights into the existing sources of error, which are primarily electrostatic interactions inside proteins. Our experiments also provide a useful set of ionic binding affinities in a simplified system for testing new affinity prediction methods. PMID:23896298

  14. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media.

  15. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media. PMID:27524303

  16. New polymer-supported ion-complexing agents: design, preparation and metal ion affinities of immobilized ligands.

    PubMed

    Alexandratos, Spiro D

    2007-01-31

    Polymer-supported reagents are comprised of crosslinked polymer networks that have been modified with ligands capable of selective metal ion complexation. Applications of these polymers are in environmental remediation, ion chromatography, sensor technology, and hydrometallurgy. Bifunctional polymers with diphosphonate/sulfonate ligands have a high selectivity for actinide ions. The distribution coefficient for the uranyl ion from 1 M nitric acid is 70,000, compared to 900 for the monophosphonate/sulfonate polymer and 200 for the sulfonic acid ion-exchange resin. A bifunctional trihexyl/triethylammonium polymer has a high affinity and selectivity for pertechnetate and perchlorate anions from groundwater. In one example, its distribution coefficient for perchlorate ions in the presence of competing anions is 3,300,000, compared to 203,180 for a commercially available anion-exchange resin. Polystyrene modified with N-methyl-D-glucamine ligands is capable of selectively complexing arsenate from groundwater. It complexes 99% of the arsenate present in a solution of 100 mg/L arsenate with 560 mg/L sulfate ions. Its selectivity is retained even in the presence of 400 mg/L phosphate. There is no affinity for arsenate above pH 9, allowing for the polymer to be regenerated with moderate alkali solution. In studies aimed at developing a Hg(II)-selective resin, simple amine resins were found to have a high Hg(II) affinity and that affinity is dependent upon the solution pH and the counterion.

  17. T cell recognition of weak ligands: roles of signaling, receptor number, and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lindsay J.

    2011-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen is a crucial aspect of the adaptive immune response. One of the most common means of pathogen immune evasion is mutation of T cell epitopes. T cell recognition of such ligands can result in a variety of outcomes including activation, apoptosis and anergy. The ability of a given T cell to respond to a specific peptide–MHC ligand is regulated by a number of factors, including the affinity, on- and off-rates and half-life of the TCR–peptide–MHC interaction. Interaction of T cells with low-potency ligands results in unique signaling patterns and requires engagement with a larger number of T cell receptors than agonist ligands. This review will address these aspects of T cell interaction with weak ligands and the ways in which these ligands have been utilized therapeutically. PMID:21365321

  18. A fullerene C60-based ligand in a stationary phase for affine chromatography of membrane porphyrin-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirshakhi, N.; Alyautdin, R. N.; Orlov, A. P.; Poloznikov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    A new affine chromatography technique is suggested for the purification of porphyrin-binding proteins (PBP) from mammal cell membranes. The procedure uses new fullerene-porphyrin ligands immobilized on agarose and bound to the polysaccharide matrix via the epoxycyclohexyl residue. A selective PBP stationary phase was used in a single-column chromatography run for the complete purification of a monomeric protein (17.6 kDa) from mitochondrial membranes of rat myocardium. This protein was characterized by high affinity for porphyrin-related structures. To separate it from other nonspecifically sorbed membrane proteins, synchronous linear pH and ionic strength gradients were used.

  19. A carbohydrate-binding affinity ligand for the specific enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; El Khoury, Graziella; Zhang, Peiqing; Rudd, Pauline M; Lowe, Christopher R

    2016-04-29

    One challenge facing the production of glycoprotein therapeutics is the lack of stable and selective affinity ligands for their enrichment. Synthetic affinity ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction represent a desirable option, particularly those incorporating benzoboroxole and its derivatives, which have been shown to enrich glycoproteins under physiological conditions. Thus, an Ugi ligand, A21C11I8, comprising 5-amino-2-hydroxymethylphenylboronic acid was synthesised on aldehyde-functionalised Sepharose™. Immobilised A21C11I8 displayed affinity for the glycosylated protein, glucose oxidase (GOx), which bound primarily through its glycan moiety. The ligand had a preference for sugar alcohols and the furanose form of the monosaccharides tested. Compared with immobilised 3-aminophenylboronic acid and Concanavalin A, the Ugi ligand was able to purify GOx from spiked Escherichia coli supernatants with retention of its maximum enzymatic activity and protein recovery. Glycan profiles of human immunoglobulin G tested on A21C11I8 columns suggested that the adsorbent possesses the potential to resolve sialylated and neutral glycoforms. The benzoboroxole-functionalised Ugi ligand may find application in selective glycoform separation.

  20. Synthesis and Binding Affinity of Novel Mono- and Bivalent Morphinan Ligands for κ, μ and δ Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Tangzhi; Sromek, Anna W.; Scrimale, Thomas; Bidlack, Jean M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel series of homo- and heterodimeric ligands containing κ/μ agonist and μ agonist/antagonist pharmacophores joined by a 10-carbon ester linker chain were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity at κ, μ, and δ opioid receptors and their functional activities were determined at κ and μ receptors in [35S]GTPγS functional assays. Most of these compounds had high binding affinity at μ and κ receptors (Ki values less than 1 nM). Compound 15b, which contains butorphan (1) at one end of linking chain and butorphanol (5) at the other end, was the most potent ligand in this series with binding affinity Ki values of 0.089 nM at the μ receptor and 0.073 nM at the κ receptor. All of the morphinan-derived ligands were found to be partial κ and μ agonists; ATPM-derived ligands 12 and 11 were found to be full κ agonists and partial μ agonists. PMID:21482470

  1. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  2. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  3. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  4. Mapping Protein–Protein Interactions of the Resistance-Related Bacterial Zeta Toxin–Epsilon Antitoxin Complex (ε2ζ2) with High Affinity Peptide Ligands Using Fluorescence Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bachiller, María Isabel; Brzozowska, Iwona; Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Urszula; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin systems constitute a native survival strategy of pathogenic bacteria and thus are potential targets of antibiotic drugs. Here, we target the Zeta–Epsilon toxin–antitoxin system, which is responsible for the stable maintenance of certain multiresistance plasmids in Gram-positive bacteria. Peptide ligands were designed on the basis of the ε2ζ2 complex. Three α helices of Zeta forming the protein–protein interaction (PPI) site were selected and peptides were designed conserving the residues interacting with Epsilon antitoxin while substituting residues binding intramolecularly to other parts of Zeta. Designed peptides were synthesized with an N-terminal fluoresceinyl-carboxy-residue for binding assays and provided active ligands, which were used to define the hot spots of the ε2ζ2 complex. Further shortening and modification of the binding peptides provided ligands with affinities <100 nM, allowing us to determine the most relevant PPIs and implement a robust competition binding assay. PMID:27438853

  5. Affinity Interaction between Hexamer Peptide Ligand HWRGWV and Immunoglobulin G Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fei

    Immunoglobulins (Ig), also referred to as antibodies, act as protective agents against pathogens trying to invade an organism. Human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), as the most prominent immunoglobulin presented in serum and other human fluids, has broad applications in fields like immunotherapy and clinical diagnostics. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A and Streptococcus Protein G are the most common affinity ligands for IgG purifaction and detection. However, drawbacks associated with these two protein ligands have motivated searches for alternative affinity ligands. The hexamer peptide ligand HWRGWV identified from a one-bead-one-peptide combinatorial library synthesized on chromatography resins has demonstrated high affinity and specificity to the Fc fragment of hIgG. A chromatography resin with HWRGWV can purify human IgG (hIgG) from complete minimum essential medium (cMEM) with purities and yields as high as 95%, which are comparable to using Protein A as affinity ligand (4). As a short peptide ligand, HWRGWV can be produced at relatively low costs under good manufacturing practices (GMP) conditions, it is highly robust, less immunogenic and allows for milder elution conditions for the bound antibody (3, 5). Although this short peptide ligand has exhibited promising properties for IgG capture and purification, limited information is available on the intrinsic mechanisms of affinity interaction between the peptide ligand and target protein. In this study, the affinity interaction between hIgG and peptide ligand immobilized on solid surfaces was studied by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Compared with previous methods employed for the peptide characterization, QCM and SPR can provide direct measurements of equilibrium adsorption isotherms and rates of adsorption, allowing a complete kinetic and thermodynamics analyses of the ligand-target interactions. New methods were developed to modify gold and silica surfaces of QCM and SPR

  6. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands.

    PubMed

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand-receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket.

  7. Binding affinity prediction for protein-ligand complexes based on β contacts and B factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Li, Jinyan

    2013-11-25

    Accurate determination of protein-ligand binding affinity is a fundamental problem in biochemistry useful for many applications including drug design and protein-ligand docking. A number of scoring functions have been proposed for the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity. However, accurate prediction is still a challenging problem because poor performance is often seen in the evaluation under the leave-one-cluster-out cross-validation (LCOCV). We introduce a new scoring function named B2BScore to improve the prediction performance. B2BScore integrates two physicochemical properties for protein-ligand binding affinity prediction. One is the property of β contacts. A β contact between two atoms requires no other atoms to interrupt the atomic contact and assumes that the two atoms should have enough direct contact area. The other is the property of B factor to capture the atomic mobility in the dynamic protein-ligand binding process. Tested on the PDBBind2009 data set, B2BScore shows superior prediction performance to existing methods on independent test data as well as under the LCOCV evaluation framework. In particular, B2BScore achieves a significant LCOCV improvement across 26 protein clusters-a big increase of the averaged Pearson's correlation coefficients from 0.418 to 0.518 and a significant decrease of standard deviation of the coefficients from 0.352 to 0.196. We also identified several important and intuitive contact descriptors of protein-ligand binding through the random forest learning in B2BScore. Some of these descriptors are closely related to contacts between carbon atoms without covalent-bond oxygen/nitrogen, preferred contacts of metal ions, interfacial backbone atoms from proteins, or π rings. Some others are negative descriptors relating to those contacts with nitrogen atoms without covalent-bond hydrogens or nonpreferred contacts of metal ions. These descriptors can be directly used to guide protein-ligand docking.

  8. Synthesis, structure activity relationship, radiolabeling and preclinical evaluation of high affinity ligands for the ion channel of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor as potential imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Klein, Pieter J; Christiaans, Johannes A M; Metaxas, Athanasios; Schuit, Robert C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M; Windhorst, Albert D

    2015-03-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) is involved in many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Currently, it is not possible to assess NMDAr availability in vivo. The purpose of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for the NMDAr ion channel. A series of di- and tri-N-substituted diarylguanidines was synthesized. In addition, in vitro binding affinity for the NMDAr ion channel in rat forebrain membrane fractions was assessed. Compounds 10, 11 and 32 were radiolabeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Ligands [(11)C]10 and [(18)F]32 were evaluated ex vivo in B6C3 mice. Biodistribution studies showed higher uptake of [(11)C]10 and [(18)F]32 in forebrain regions compared with cerebellum. In addition, for [(11)C]10 54% and for [(18)F]32 70% of activity in the brain at 60min was due to intact tracer. Pre-treatment with MK-801 (0.6mg·kg(-1), ip) slightly decreased uptake in NMDAr-specific regions for [(18)F]32, but not for [(11)C]10. As such [(18)F]32 has the best characteristics as a PET tracer for the ion channel of the NMDAr. PMID:25648682

  9. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand–receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket. PMID:26124882

  10. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  11. Thermodynamic mixing of molecular states of the epidermal growth factor receptor modulates macroscopic ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, M R; Slakey, L L; Gross, D J

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr), when expressed on the cell surface, has long been known to display two distinct affinities for epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding. In addition, the treatment of cells expressing the EGFr with phorbol esters has been shown to cause a loss of the high-affinity binding capacity of the receptor. In the present study, point mutations that alter acidic or phosphorylation sites have been made in an intracellular domain near Tyr-992 (residues 988-992) of the EGFr. Equilibrium (125)I-EGF binding studies demonstrate that the conversion of Tyr-992 into glutamate induces a 4-fold decrease in the EGFr apparent low-affinity dissociation constant, whereas the mutation of two acidic residues, Asp-988 and Glu-991, or the conversion of Tyr-992 into phenylalanine does not alter EGFr affinity. Phorbol ester treatment of EGFr-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells results in a loss of high-affinity binding and an increase in the apparent low-affinity dissociation constant of the receptor, similar to the effect of a truncation mutant in which the C-terminal 190 residues are deleted. These results are examined in the context of a new model for regulation of the affinity of the EGFr for EGF in which a cytosolic particle stabilizes the high-affinity conformation of the EGFr and a rapid equilibrium exists between EGFr high-affinity and low-affinity conformations. This model demonstrates that the macroscopic affinities of the EGFr can differ from the affinities of individual EGFr molecules and provides a theoretical framework whereby the measured affinities of the EGFr are modulated by intracellular interactions. PMID:11062062

  12. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  13. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M. PMID:23325100

  14. Compressed images for affinity prediction-2 (CIFAP-2): an improved machine learning methodology on protein-ligand interactions based on a study on caspase 3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Erdas, Ozlem; Andac, Cenk A; Gurkan-Alp, A Selen; Alpaslan, Ferda Nur; Buyukbingol, Erdem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to propose an improved computational methodology, which is called Compressed Images for Affinity Prediction-2 (CIFAP-2) to predict binding affinities of structurally related protein-ligand complexes. CIFAP-2 method is established based on a protein-ligand model from which computational affinity information is obtained by utilizing 2D electrostatic potential images determined for the binding site of protein-ligand complexes. The quality of the prediction of the CIFAP-2 algorithm was tested using partial least squares regression (PLSR) as well as support vector regression (SVR) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy ınference system (ANFIS), which are highly promising prediction methods in drug design. CIFAP-2 was applied on a protein-ligand complex system involving Caspase 3 (CASP3) and its 35 inhibitors possessing a common isatin sulfonamide pharmacophore. As a result, PLSR affinity prediction for the CASP3-ligand complexes gave rise to the most consistent information with reported empirical binding affinities (pIC(50)) of the CASP3 inhibitors. PMID:25578823

  15. Jacalin-carbohydrate interactions: distortion of the ligand molecule as a determinant of affinity.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Kaushal; Swaminathan, C P; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2015-02-01

    Jacalin is among the most thoroughly studied lectins. Its carbohydrate-binding site has also been well characterized. It has been postulated that the lower affinity of β-galactosides for jacalin compared with α-galactosides is caused by steric interactions of the substituents in the former with the protein. This issue has been explored energetically and structurally using different appropriate carbohydrate complexes of jacalin. It turns out that the earlier postulation is not correct. The interactions of the substituent with the binding site remain essentially the same irrespective of the anomeric nature of the substitution. This is achieved through a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The difference in energy, and therefore in affinity, is caused by a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The elucidation of this unprecedented distortion of the ligand as a strategy for modulating affinity is of general interest. The crystal structures also provide a rationale for the relative affinities of the different carbohydrate ligands for jacalin. PMID:25664742

  16. Jacalin-carbohydrate interactions: distortion of the ligand molecule as a determinant of affinity.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Kaushal; Swaminathan, C P; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2015-02-01

    Jacalin is among the most thoroughly studied lectins. Its carbohydrate-binding site has also been well characterized. It has been postulated that the lower affinity of β-galactosides for jacalin compared with α-galactosides is caused by steric interactions of the substituents in the former with the protein. This issue has been explored energetically and structurally using different appropriate carbohydrate complexes of jacalin. It turns out that the earlier postulation is not correct. The interactions of the substituent with the binding site remain essentially the same irrespective of the anomeric nature of the substitution. This is achieved through a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The difference in energy, and therefore in affinity, is caused by a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The elucidation of this unprecedented distortion of the ligand as a strategy for modulating affinity is of general interest. The crystal structures also provide a rationale for the relative affinities of the different carbohydrate ligands for jacalin.

  17. Binding of angiogenesis inhibitor kringle 5 to its specific ligands by frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Li, Qian; Ji, Xu

    2015-07-01

    The interactions between angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 and its five specific ligands were investigated by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with fluorescence spectra and site-directed molecular docking. The binding constants of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCHA), epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA), benzylamine, 7-aminoheptanoic acid (7-AHA) and L-lysine to Kringle 5 were 19.0×10(3), 7.97×10(3), 6.45×10(3), 6.07×10(3) and 4.04×10(3) L/mol, respectively. The five ligands bound to Kringle 5 on the lysine binding site in equimolar amounts, which was pushed mainly by hydrogen bond and Van der Waals force. This binding affinity was believed to be dependent on the functional group and flexible feature in ligands. This study will provide an important insight into the binding mechanism of angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 to its specific ligands. PMID:25981289

  18. Effect of receptor-ligand affinity on the strength of endothelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Y; Truskey, G A

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of receptor-ligand affinity on the strength of endothelial cell adhesion. Linear and cyclic forms of the fibronectin (Fn) cell-binding domain peptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) were covalently immobilized to glass, and Fn was adsorbed onto glass slides. Bovine aortic endothelial cells attached to the surfaces for 15 min. The critical wall shear stress at which 50% of the cells detached increased nonlinearly with ligand density and was greater with immobilized cyclic RGD than with immobilized linear RGD or adsorbed Fn. To directly compare results for the different ligand densities, the receptor-ligand dissociation constant and force per bond were estimated from data for the critical shear stress and contact area. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was used to measure the contact area as a function of separation distance. Contact area increased with increasing ligand density. Contact areas were similar for the immobilized peptides but were greater on surfaces with adsorbed Fn. The dissociation constant was determined by nonlinear regression of the net force on the cells to models that assumed that bonds were either uniformly stressed or that only bonds on the periphery of the contact region were stressed (peeling model). Both models provided equally good fits for cells attached to immobilized peptides whereas the peeling model produced a better fit of data for cells attached to adsorbed Fn. Cyclic RGD and linear RGD both bind to the integrin alpha v beta 3, but immobilized cyclic RGD exhibited a greater affinity than did linear RGD. Receptor affinities of Fn adsorbed to glycophase glass and Fn adsorbed to glass were similar. The number of bonds was calculated assuming binding equilibrium. The peeling model produced good linear fits between bond force and number of bonds. Results of this study indicate that 1) bovine aortic endothelial cells are more adherent on immobilized cyclic RGD peptide than linear

  19. Complementary three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of binding affinity and functional potency: a study on alpha4beta2 nicotinic ligands.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Ahring, Philip K; Dyhring, Tino; Peters, Dan; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liljefors, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2009-04-23

    Complementary 3D-QSAR modeling of binding affinity and functional potency is proposed as a tool to pinpoint the molecular features of the ligands, and the corresponding amino acids in the receptor, responsible for high affinity binding vs those driving agonist behavior and receptor activation. This approach proved successful on a series of nicotinic alpha(4)beta(2) ligands, whose partial/full agonist profile could be linked to the size of the scaffold as well as to the nature of the substituents.

  20. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier.

  1. Superparamagnetic silica nanoparticles with immobilized metal affinity ligands for protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiya; Guan, Yueping; Liu, Huizhou

    2006-06-01

    Superparamagnetic silica-coated magnetite (Fe 3O 4) nanoparticles with immobilized metal affinity ligands were prepared for protein adsorption. First, magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitating Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in an ammonia solution. Then silica was coated on the Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles using a sol-gel method to obtain magnetic silica nanoparticles. The condensation product of 3-Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA) was immobilized on them and after charged with Cu 2+, the magnetic silica nanoparticles with immobilized Cu 2+ were applied for the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Scanning electron micrograph showed that the magnetic silica nanoparticles with an average size of 190 nm were well dispersed without aggregation. X-ray diffraction showed the spinel structure for the magnetite particles coated with silica. Magnetic measurement revealed the magnetic silica nanoparticles were superparamagnetic and the saturation magnetization was about 15.0 emu/g. Protein adsorption results showed that the nanoparticles had high adsorption capacity for BSA (73 mg/g) and low nonspecific adsorption. The regeneration of these nanoparticles was also studied.

  2. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier. PMID:27100851

  3. Interactions between alkaline earth cations and oxo ligands. DFT study of the affinity of the Mg²+ cation for phosphoryl ligands.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Leonardo Moreira; de Mesquita Carneiro, José Walkimar; Paes, Lilian Weitzel Coelho

    2011-08-01

    DFT (B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) calculations of Mg(2+) affinities for a set of phosphoryl ligands were performed. Two types of ligands were studied: a set of trivalent [O = P(R)] and a set of pentavalent phosphoryl ligands [O = P(R)(3)] (R = H, F, Cl, Br, OH, OCH(3), CH(3), CN, NH(2) and NO(2)), with R either bound directly to the phosphorus atom or to the para position of a phenyl ring. The affinity of the Mg(2+) cation for the ligands was quantified by means of the enthalpy for the substitution of one water molecule in the [Mg(H(2)O)(6)](2+) complex for a ligand. The enthalpy of substitution was correlated with electronic and geometric parameters. Electron-donor groups increase the interaction between the cation and the ligand, while electron-acceptor groups decrease the interaction enthalpy. PMID:21161556

  4. Synthesis and Opioid Receptor Binding Affinities of 2-Substituted and 3-Aminomorphinans: Ligands for mu, kappa and delta Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michael; Si, Yu-Gui; Knapp, Brian I.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Neumeyer, John L.

    2009-01-01

    The phenolic group of the potent μ and κ opioid morphinan agonist/antagonists cyclorphan and butorphan was replaced by phenylamino and benzylamino groups including compounds with p-substituents in the benzene ring. These compounds are highly potent μ and κ ligands, e. g. p-methoxyphenylaminocyclorphan showing a Ki of 0.026 nM at the mu and a Ki of 0.03 nM at the kappa receptor. Phenyl carbamates and phenylureas were synthesized and investigated. Selective o-formylation of butorphan and levorphanol was achieved. This reaction opened the way to a large set of 2-substituted 3-hydroxymorphinans, including 2-hydroxymethyl-, 2-aminomethyl-, and N-substituted 2-aminomethyl-3-hydroxymorphinans. Bivalent ligands bridged in the 2-position were also synthesized and connected with secondary and tertiary aminomethyl groups, amide bonds or hydroxymethylene groups, respectively. Although most of the 2-substituted morphinans showed considerably lower affinities compared to their parent compounds, the bivalent ligand approach led to significantly higher affinities compared to the univalent aminomethylmorphinans. PMID:19928862

  5. Affinity Interaction between Hexamer Peptide Ligand HWRGWV and Immunoglobulin G Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fei

    Immunoglobulins (Ig), also referred to as antibodies, act as protective agents against pathogens trying to invade an organism. Human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), as the most prominent immunoglobulin presented in serum and other human fluids, has broad applications in fields like immunotherapy and clinical diagnostics. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A and Streptococcus Protein G are the most common affinity ligands for IgG purifaction and detection. However, drawbacks associated with these two protein ligands have motivated searches for alternative affinity ligands. The hexamer peptide ligand HWRGWV identified from a one-bead-one-peptide combinatorial library synthesized on chromatography resins has demonstrated high affinity and specificity to the Fc fragment of hIgG. A chromatography resin with HWRGWV can purify human IgG (hIgG) from complete minimum essential medium (cMEM) with purities and yields as high as 95%, which are comparable to using Protein A as affinity ligand (4). As a short peptide ligand, HWRGWV can be produced at relatively low costs under good manufacturing practices (GMP) conditions, it is highly robust, less immunogenic and allows for milder elution conditions for the bound antibody (3, 5). Although this short peptide ligand has exhibited promising properties for IgG capture and purification, limited information is available on the intrinsic mechanisms of affinity interaction between the peptide ligand and target protein. In this study, the affinity interaction between hIgG and peptide ligand immobilized on solid surfaces was studied by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Compared with previous methods employed for the peptide characterization, QCM and SPR can provide direct measurements of equilibrium adsorption isotherms and rates of adsorption, allowing a complete kinetic and thermodynamics analyses of the ligand-target interactions. New methods were developed to modify gold and silica surfaces of QCM and SPR

  6. Molecular insight in the purification of immunoglobulin by pseudobiospecific ligand l-histidine and histidyl moieties in histidine ligand affinity chromatography (HLAC) by molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Savane, Tushar S; Kumar, Sanjit; Janakiraman, Vignesh Narasimhan; Kamalanathan, Agamudi S; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A

    2016-05-15

    Pseudobiospecific ligand l-histidine is an inexpensive, highly stable, non-toxic ligand explored successfully over the last twenty years for the purification of immunoglobulins in immobilised histidine ligand affinity chromatography. It is of great interest to know the molecular recognition sites of IgG to immobilized l-histidine. Here, we have used an in silico approach to explore the molecular recognition of l-histidine by IgG. We have assessed the feasible binding modes of histidine and its moieties at different sites of IgG and considered only those binding conformations which are exhibited via the imidazole ring NH group or any other OH donating group apart from the ones which are terminally conjugated with the support matrix. We categorised binding site into two categories; category I: inner binding groove and category II: surface binding groove and observed that the hinge region of IgG has most favourable binding pocket for l-histidine and histidyl moieties. Ser and Tyr residues on the hinge region make several significant interactions with l-histidine and histidyl moieties. In case of Fc region of IgG, l-histidine and histidyl moieties closely resemble the binding modes of Protein A, biomimetic ligand 22/8 and B domain of SpA to IgG. In addition to these we have also observed a significant binding site for l-histidine and histidyl moieties at Fab region of IgG. PMID:26476866

  7. Development of a sensitive method for selection of affinity ligand for trypsin using quartz crystal microbalance sensor.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Yakup Arica, M

    2012-03-01

    In this work, a new methodology is developed for selection of affinity ligands towards the enzyme "trypsin" using quartz crystals microbalance (QCM) technique. To achieve this goal, the surface amination of gold plated QCM crystals was achieved in 13.56 MHz plasma polymerization system by using ethylenediamine. Three different ligands (i.e., 4-aminobenzamidine, 4-aminobenzoic acid, and phenylalanine) were immobilized on the aminated QCM crystals surface via glutaraldehyde coupling. All three ligand immobilized QCM crystals were characterized and compared under different experimental conditions. It was observed that the benzamidine ligand showed higher affinity to trypsin with a dissociation constant on the order of 1.76 × 10(-9) M, which is within the range of 10(-4)-10(-8) M for affinity ligands. Thus, its selectivity was suitable for purification of trypsin from biological fluids. PMID:21853329

  8. A computational study of ligand binding affinities in iron(III) porphine and protoporphyrin IX complexes.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Marcus C

    2014-07-01

    The search for novel anti-malarial drugs that can disrupt biomineralization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX to haemozoin requires an understanding of the fundamental chemistry of the porphyrin's iron(iii) centre at the water-lipid interface. Towards this end, the binding affinities for a diverse set of 31 small ligands with iron(iii) porphine have been calculated using density functional theory, in the gas phase and also with implicit solvent corrections for both water and n-octanol. In addition, the binding of hydroxide, chloride, acetate, methylamine and water to ferriprotoporphyrin IX has been studied, and very similar trends are observed for the smaller and larger models. Anionic ligands generally give stronger binding than neutral ones; the strongest binding is observed for RO(-) and OH(-) ligands, whilst acetate binds relatively weakly among the anions studied. Electron-rich nitrogen donors tend to bind more strongly than electron-deficient ones, and the weakest binding is found for neutral O and S donors such as oxazole and thiophene. In all cases, ligand binding is stronger in n-octanol than in water, and the differences in binding energies for the two solvents are greater for ionic ligands than for neutrals. Finally, dimerization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX by means of iron(iii)-carboxylate bond formation has been modelled. The results are discussed in terms of haemozoin crystal growth and its disruption by known anti-malarial drugs.

  9. Analysis of affinities between specific biological ligands using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2015-12-21

    In the cell, protein-ligand recognition involves association and dissociation processes controlled by the affinity of the two binding partners and chemical harvesting of adenosine triphosphate energy. Fundamental knowledge of selected recognition events is currently translated in a synthetic environment for biosensors, immunoassays and diagnosis applications, or for pharmaceutical development. However, in order to advance such fields, one needs to determine the lifetime and binding efficiency of the two partners, as well as the complex energy landscape parameters. We employed contact mode atomic force microscopy to evaluate the association and dissociation events between streptavidin protein and its anti-streptavidin antibody ligand currently used for nucleotide array, ELISA, and flow cytometry applications, just to name a few. Using biotin as the control, our analysis helped characterize and differentiate multi- or single bonds of different strengths as well as associated energy landscapes to determine the protein-ligand structural arrangement at nanointerfaces and how these depend on the specificity of the ligand-recognition reaction. Our results suggest that understanding the importance of the rupture forces between a protein and its ligand could serve as the first step to protect on-off switches for biomedical research applications where specificity and selectivity are foremost sought. PMID:26525901

  10. Synthesis and characterization of pseudo-affinity ligand for penicillin acylase purification.

    PubMed

    Keçili, Rüstem; Say, Ridvan; Yavuz, Handan

    2006-11-15

    The aim of this work was to test a chromatographic affinity support containing methacryloyl antipyrine (MAAP) for penicillin acylase (PA) purification by using pure penicillin acylase and crude extract. First, MAAP as a pseudo-specific ligand was synthesized by using methacryloyl chloride and 4-aminoantipyrine. Polymer beads (average size diameter: 40-120 micro m) were prepared by suspension polymerization of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and MAAP. This approach for the preparation of adsorbent has several advantages over conventional preparation protocols. An expensive and time consuming step in the preparation of adsorbent is immobilization of a ligand to the adsorption matrix. In this procedure, affinity ligand MAAP acts as comonomer without further modification steps. Poly(EGDMA-MAAP) beads were characterized by FTIR, NMR and screen analysis. Elemental analysis of MAAP for nitrogen was estimated as 89.3 micro mol/g. The prepared adsorbent was then used for the capture of penicillin acylase in batch system. The maximum penicillin acylase adsorption capacity of the poly(EGDMA-MAAP) beads was found to be 82.2 mg/g at pH 5.0. Chromatography with crude feedstock resulted in 23.2-fold purification and 93% recovery with 1.0 M NaOH.

  11. Evaluation and optimization of the metal-binding properties of a complex ligand for immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Li, Rong; Li, Shiyu; Chen, Xiaoli; Yang, Kaidi; Chen, Guoliang; Ma, Xiaoxun

    2016-02-01

    The simultaneous determination of two binding parameters for metal ions on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography column was performed by frontal chromatography. In this study, the binding parameters of Cu(2+) to l-glutamic acid were measured, the metal ion-binding characteristics of the complex ligand were evaluated. The linear correlation coefficients were all greater than 99%, and the relative standard deviations of two binding parameters were 0.58 and 0.059%, respectively. The experiments proved that the frontal chromatography method was accurate, reproducible, and could be used to determine the metal-binding parameters of the affinity column. The effects of buffer pH, type, and concentration on binding parameters were explored by uniform design experiment. Regression, matching and residual analyses of the models were performed. Meanwhile, the optimum-binding conditions of Cu(2+) on the l-glutamic acid-silica column were obtained. Under these binding conditions, observations and regression values of two parameters were similar, and the observation values were the best. The results demonstrated that high intensity metal affinity column could be effectively prepared by measuring and evaluating binding parameters using frontal chromatography combined with a uniform design experiment. The present work provided a new mode for evaluating and preparing immobilized metal affinity column with good metal-binding behaviors. PMID:26632098

  12. Metal-ligand binding affinity vs reactivity: qualitative studies in Rh(I)-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening reactions.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Gavin Chit; Dougan, Patrick; Lautens, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Rh(I)-catalyzed asymmetric ring opening (ARO) of oxabenzonorbornadiene is used as a model system to qualitatively study reactions involving multiple metal-ligand interactions. The key feature of this approach is the use of product ee as an indicator to quickly gain important information such as the relative ligand binding affinity and relative reactivity of catalysts.

  13. Affinity-based methodologies and ligands for antibody purification: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ana C A; Silva, Cláudia S O; Taipa, M Angela

    2007-08-10

    Many successful, recent therapies for life-threatening diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are based on the recognition between native or genetically engineered antibodies and cell-surface receptors. Although naturally produced by the immune system, the need for antibodies with unique specificities and designed for single application, has encouraged the search for novel antibody purification strategies. The availability of these products to the end-consumer is strictly related to manufacture costs, particularly those attributed to downstream processing. Over the last decades, academia and industry have developed different types of interactions and separation techniques for antibody purification, affinity-based strategies being the most common and efficient methodologies. The affinity ligands utilized range from biological to synthetic designed molecules with enhanced resistance and stability. Despite the successes achieved, the purification "paradigm" still moves interests and efforts in the continuous demand for improved separation performances. This review will focus on recent advances and perspectives in antibody purification by affinity interactions using different techniques, with particular emphasis on affinity chromatography.

  14. Affinity-based methodologies and ligands for antibody purification: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ana C A; Silva, Cláudia S O; Taipa, M Angela

    2007-08-10

    Many successful, recent therapies for life-threatening diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are based on the recognition between native or genetically engineered antibodies and cell-surface receptors. Although naturally produced by the immune system, the need for antibodies with unique specificities and designed for single application, has encouraged the search for novel antibody purification strategies. The availability of these products to the end-consumer is strictly related to manufacture costs, particularly those attributed to downstream processing. Over the last decades, academia and industry have developed different types of interactions and separation techniques for antibody purification, affinity-based strategies being the most common and efficient methodologies. The affinity ligands utilized range from biological to synthetic designed molecules with enhanced resistance and stability. Despite the successes achieved, the purification "paradigm" still moves interests and efforts in the continuous demand for improved separation performances. This review will focus on recent advances and perspectives in antibody purification by affinity interactions using different techniques, with particular emphasis on affinity chromatography. PMID:17618635

  15. FYWHCLDE-based affinity chromatography of IgG: effect of ligand density and purifications of human IgG and monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-08-15

    This work reports the development of an octapeptide-based affinity adsorbent for the purification of human IgG (hIgG) and monoclonal antibody (mAb). The octapeptide was FYWHCLDE selected earlier by the biomimetic design of affinity peptide ligands for hIgG. The ligand was coupled to Sepharose gel at four densities from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL, and the effect of peptide density on the adsorption of hIgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was first investigated. The binding capacity of hIgG increased from 104.2 to 176.4mg/mL within the ligand density range, and the binding affinity (dissociation constant) kept at 2.4-3.7μM. Batch adsorption revealed that the selectivity of FYWHCLDE-Sepharose for IgG was 30-40 times over BSA. The effective pore diffusivity of IgG decreased somewhat with increasing ligand density, but the dynamic binding capacity at 10% breakthrough, measured by using 10-fold diluted human serum as feedstock, doubled with increasing ligand density from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL due to the remarkable increase of static binding capacity. By using the affinity column with a ligand density of 23.9μmol/mL, hIgG and humanized mAb purifications from human serum and cell culture supernatant, respectively, were achieved at high purities and recovery yields. Finally, the robustness of the peptide gel was demonstrated by recycled use of the affinity column in 20 breakthrough cycles. PMID:24947889

  16. Affinity chromatography of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases. Small organic ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C M; Knowles, J R

    1977-01-01

    The usefulness of affinity chromatography for the purification of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases was explored by using column ligands derived from the corresponding amino acid and aminoalkyladenylate, a non-labile analogue of the aminoacyladenylate reaction intermediate. Four modes of attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate to Sepharose were studied. The interaction between amino acid derivatives and the corresponding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is too weak to allow their use as ligands for affinity chromatography. Attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate via the alpha-nitrogen atom of the amino acid or via C-8 of the nucleotide abolishes synthetase binding, and immobilization via the oxidized ribose ring is only marginally useful. However, attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate to the matrix via N-6 of the nucleotide allows strong and specific synthetase binding, and the use of such columns permits the isolation of homogeneous synthetase from crude mixtures. The effect of non-specific adsorption and the utility of pre-columns and of specific substrate elution are investigated and discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:597251

  17. Influence of Sulfolane on ESI-MS Measurements of Protein-Ligand Affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuyu; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    The results of an investigation into the influence of sulfolane, a commonly used supercharging agent, on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements of protein-ligand affinities are described. Binding measurements carried out on four protein-carbohydrate complexes, lysozyme with β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)- d-GlcNAc, a single chain variable fragment and α- d-Gal-(1→2)-[α- d-Abe-(1→3)]-α- d-Man-OCH3, cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer with β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GalNAc-(1→4)[α- d-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, and a fragment of galectin 3 and α- l-Fuc-(1→2)-β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→3)-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, revealed that sulfolane generally reduces the apparent (as measured by ESI-MS) protein-ligand affinities. To establish the origin of this effect, a detailed study was undertaken using the lysozyme-tetrasaccharide interaction as a model system. Measurements carried out using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that sulfolane reduces the binding affinity in solution but does not cause any significant change in the higher order structure of lysozyme or to the intermolecular interactions. These observations confirm that changes to the structure of lysozyme in bulk solution are not responsible for the supercharging effect induced by sulfolane. Moreover, the agreement between the ESI-MS and ITC-derived affinities indicates that there is no dissociation of the complex during ESI or in the gas phase (i.e., in-source dissociation). This finding suggests that supercharging of lysozyme by sulfolane is not related to protein unfolding during the ESI process. Binding measurements performed using liquid sample desorption ESI-MS revealed that protein supercharging with sulfolane can be achieved without a reduction in affinity.

  18. Influence of Sulfolane on ESI-MS Measurements of Protein-Ligand Affinities.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuyu; Richards, Michele R; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2016-03-01

    The results of an investigation into the influence of sulfolane, a commonly used supercharging agent, on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements of protein-ligand affinities are described. Binding measurements carried out on four protein-carbohydrate complexes, lysozyme with β-D-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1→4)-D-GlcNAc, a single chain variable fragment and α-D-Gal-(1→2)-[α-D-Abe-(1→3)]-α-D-Man-OCH3, cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer with β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-D-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-D-Gal-(1→4)-β-D-Glc, and a fragment of galectin 3 and α-L-Fuc-(1→2)-β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1→3)-β-D-Gal-(1→4)-β-D-Glc, revealed that sulfolane generally reduces the apparent (as measured by ESI-MS) protein-ligand affinities. To establish the origin of this effect, a detailed study was undertaken using the lysozyme-tetrasaccharide interaction as a model system. Measurements carried out using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that sulfolane reduces the binding affinity in solution but does not cause any significant change in the higher order structure of lysozyme or to the intermolecular interactions. These observations confirm that changes to the structure of lysozyme in bulk solution are not responsible for the supercharging effect induced by sulfolane. Moreover, the agreement between the ESI-MS and ITC-derived affinities indicates that there is no dissociation of the complex during ESI or in the gas phase (i.e., in-source dissociation). This finding suggests that supercharging of lysozyme by sulfolane is not related to protein unfolding during the ESI process. Binding measurements performed using liquid sample desorption ESI-MS revealed that protein supercharging with sulfolane can be achieved without a reduction in affinity.

  19. A comparison of myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity among selected teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H I; Yee, N; Shiels, H A; Brauner, C; Farrell, A P

    2000-11-01

    This study quantified the cell surface beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity in the ventricular tissue of seven teleost species; skipjack tuna (Katsowonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), mahimahi (dolphin fish; Coryphaena hippurus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an Antarctic nototheniid (Trematomus bernacchii). Beta-Adrenoreceptor density varied by almost fourfold among these species, being highest for the athletic fish: sockeye salmon among the salmonids and skipjack tuna among the scombrids. Beta-Adrenoreceptor density was lowest for the Antarctic icefish. Beta-Adrenoreceptor binding affinity varied by almost threefold. We conclude that there is a significant species-specific variability in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and binding affinity and these interspecific differences cannot be attributed to temperature even though intraspecifically cold temperature can stimulate an increase in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density. Instead, we suggest that interspecifically myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density is highest in fish that inhabit tropical water. PMID:11128445

  20. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  1. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  2. Dual-display of small molecules enables the discovery of ligand pairs and facilitates affinity maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Moreno; Krall, Nikolaus; Decurtins, Willy; Franzini, Raphael M.; Pretto, Francesca; Schneider, Petra; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to standard fragment-based drug discovery approaches, dual-display DNA-encoded chemical libraries have the potential to identify fragment pairs that bind simultaneously and benefit from the chelate effect. However, the technology has been limited by the difficulty in unambiguously decoding the ligand pairs from large combinatorial libraries. Here we report a strategy that overcomes this limitation and enables the efficient identification of ligand pairs that bind to a target protein. Small organic molecules were conjugated to the 5‧ and 3‧ ends of complementary DNA strands that contain a unique identifying code. DNA hybridization followed by an inter-strand code-transfer created a stable dual-display DNA-encoded chemical library of 111,100 members. Using this approach we report the discovery of a low micromolar binder to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and the affinity maturation of a ligand to carbonic anhydrase IX, an established marker of renal cell carcinoma. The newly discovered subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase IX binder dramatically improved tumour targeting performance in vivo.

  3. Nonlinear scoring functions for similarity-based ligand docking and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-11-25

    A common strategy for virtual screening considers a systematic docking of a large library of organic compounds into the target sites in protein receptors with promising leads selected based on favorable intermolecular interactions. Despite a continuous progress in the modeling of protein-ligand interactions for pharmaceutical design, important challenges still remain, thus the development of novel techniques is required. In this communication, we describe eSimDock, a new approach to ligand docking and binding affinity prediction. eSimDock employs nonlinear machine learning-based scoring functions to improve the accuracy of ligand ranking and similarity-based binding pose prediction, and to increase the tolerance to structural imperfections in the target structures. In large-scale benchmarking using the Astex/CCDC data set, we show that 53.9% (67.9%) of the predicted ligand poses have RMSD of <2 Å (<3 Å). Moreover, using binding sites predicted by recently developed eFindSite, eSimDock models ligand binding poses with an RMSD of 4 Å for 50.0-39.7% of the complexes at the protein homology level limited to 80-40%. Simulations against non-native receptor structures, whose mean backbone rearrangements vary from 0.5 to 5.0 Å Cα-RMSD, show that the ratio of docking accuracy and the estimated upper bound is at a constant level of ∼0.65. Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental and predicted by eSimDock Ki values for a large data set of the crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes from BindingDB is 0.58, which decreases only to 0.46 when target structures distorted to 3.0 Å Cα-RMSD are used. Finally, two case studies demonstrate that eSimDock can be customized to specific applications as well. These encouraging results show that the performance of eSimDock is largely unaffected by the deformations of ligand binding regions, thus it represents a practical strategy for across-proteome virtual screening using protein models. eSimDock is freely

  4. Nonlinear scoring functions for similarity-based ligand docking and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-11-25

    A common strategy for virtual screening considers a systematic docking of a large library of organic compounds into the target sites in protein receptors with promising leads selected based on favorable intermolecular interactions. Despite a continuous progress in the modeling of protein-ligand interactions for pharmaceutical design, important challenges still remain, thus the development of novel techniques is required. In this communication, we describe eSimDock, a new approach to ligand docking and binding affinity prediction. eSimDock employs nonlinear machine learning-based scoring functions to improve the accuracy of ligand ranking and similarity-based binding pose prediction, and to increase the tolerance to structural imperfections in the target structures. In large-scale benchmarking using the Astex/CCDC data set, we show that 53.9% (67.9%) of the predicted ligand poses have RMSD of <2 Å (<3 Å). Moreover, using binding sites predicted by recently developed eFindSite, eSimDock models ligand binding poses with an RMSD of 4 Å for 50.0-39.7% of the complexes at the protein homology level limited to 80-40%. Simulations against non-native receptor structures, whose mean backbone rearrangements vary from 0.5 to 5.0 Å Cα-RMSD, show that the ratio of docking accuracy and the estimated upper bound is at a constant level of ∼0.65. Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental and predicted by eSimDock Ki values for a large data set of the crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes from BindingDB is 0.58, which decreases only to 0.46 when target structures distorted to 3.0 Å Cα-RMSD are used. Finally, two case studies demonstrate that eSimDock can be customized to specific applications as well. These encouraging results show that the performance of eSimDock is largely unaffected by the deformations of ligand binding regions, thus it represents a practical strategy for across-proteome virtual screening using protein models. eSimDock is freely

  5. Crystal structure and ligand affinity of avidin in the complex with 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelczyk, Paweł; Bujacz, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Avidin is a protein found in egg white that binds numerous organic compounds with high affinity, especially biotin and its derivatives. Due to its extraordinary affinity for its ligands, avidin is extensively used in biotechnology. X-ray crystallography and fluorescence-based biophysical techniques were used to show that avidin binds the dye 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid (HABA) with a lower affinity than biotin. The apparent dissociation constant determined for the avidin complex with HABA by microscale thermophoresis (MST) is 4.12 μM. The crystal structure of avidin-HABA complex was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å (PDB entry 5chk). The crystals belong to a hexagonal system, in the space group P6422. In that structure, the hydrazone tautomer of HABA is bound at the bottom part of the central calyx near the polar residues. We show interactions of the dye with avidin and compare them with the previously reported avidin-biotin complex.

  6. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  7. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  8. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  9. Fluorescence polarization competition assay: the range of resolvable inhibitor potency is limited by the affinity of the fluorescent ligand.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi

    2003-02-01

    For the development of fluorescence polarization (FP) competition assays, there is a widespread belief that tight-binding fluorescent ligands should be avoided to identify inhibitors of low or intermediate potency in the screening of small-molecule compound libraries. It is demonstrated herein that this statement is a misconception; in fact, the higher the affinity of the fluorescent ligand, the wider the range of inhibitor potency that can be resolved. An approximate estimate for the low end of inhibitor K(i) values that can be resolved is the K(d) value of the fluorescent ligand. Because FP competition assays are typically conducted under nonstoichiometric titration conditions, it is suggested that a fluorescent ligand of highest affinity that also has an adequate quantum yield to satisfy such conditions be selected.

  10. Generating new ligand-binding RNAs by affinity maturation and disintegration of allosteric ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, G A; DeRose, E C; Koizumi, M; Breaker, R R

    2001-01-01

    Allosteric ribozymes are engineered RNAs that operate as molecular switches whose rates of catalytic activity are modulated by the binding of specific effector molecules. New RNA molecular switches can be created by using "allosteric selection," a molecular engineering process that combines modular rational design and in vitro evolution strategies. In this report, we describe the characterization of 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP)-dependent hammerhead ribozymes that were created using allosteric selection (Koizumi et al., Nat Struct Biol, 1999, 6:1062-1071). Artificial phylogeny data generated by random mutagenesis and reselection of existing cGMP-, cCMP-, and cAMP-dependent ribozymes indicate that each is comprised of distinct effector-binding and catalytic domains. In addition, patterns of nucleotide covariation and direct mutational analysis both support distinct secondary-structure organizations for the effector-binding domains. Guided by these structural models, we were able to disintegrate each allosteric ribozyme into separate ligand-binding and catalytic modules. Examinations of the independent effector-binding domains reveal that each retains its corresponding cNMP-binding function. These results validate the use of allosteric selection and modular engineering as a means of simultaneously generating new nucleic acid structures that selectively bind ligands. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the binding affinity of an allosteric ribozyme can be improved through random mutagenesis and allosteric selection under conditions that favor tighter binding. This "affinity maturation" effect is expected to be a valuable attribute of allosteric selection as future endeavors seek to apply engineered allosteric ribozymes as biosensor components and as controllable genetic switches. PMID:11345431

  11. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N–H and O–H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  12. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  13. Ligand-Protein Affinity Studies Using Long-Lived States of Fluorine-19 Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Buratto, Roberto; Mammoli, Daniele; Canet, Estel; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-03-10

    The lifetimes TLLS of long-lived states or TLLC of long-lived coherences can be used for the accurate determination of dissociation constants of weak protein-ligand complexes. The remarkable contrast between signals derived from LLS or LLC in free and bound ligands can be exploited to search for weak binders with large dissociation constants KD > 1 mM that are important for fragment-based drug discovery but may escape detection by other screening techniques. Alternatively, the high sensitivity of the proposed method can be exploited to work with large ligand-to-protein ratios, with an evident advantage of reduced consumption of precious proteins. The detection of (19)F-(19)F long-lived states in suitably designed fluorinated spy molecules allows one to perform competition binding experiments with high sensitivity while avoiding signal overlap that tends to hamper the interpretation of proton spectra of mixtures. PMID:26800391

  14. Ligand-Protein Affinity Studies Using Long-Lived States of Fluorine-19 Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Buratto, Roberto; Mammoli, Daniele; Canet, Estel; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-03-10

    The lifetimes TLLS of long-lived states or TLLC of long-lived coherences can be used for the accurate determination of dissociation constants of weak protein-ligand complexes. The remarkable contrast between signals derived from LLS or LLC in free and bound ligands can be exploited to search for weak binders with large dissociation constants KD > 1 mM that are important for fragment-based drug discovery but may escape detection by other screening techniques. Alternatively, the high sensitivity of the proposed method can be exploited to work with large ligand-to-protein ratios, with an evident advantage of reduced consumption of precious proteins. The detection of (19)F-(19)F long-lived states in suitably designed fluorinated spy molecules allows one to perform competition binding experiments with high sensitivity while avoiding signal overlap that tends to hamper the interpretation of proton spectra of mixtures.

  15. Affinity of An(VI) for N4-Tetradentate Donor Ligands: Complexation of the Actinyl(VI) Ions with N4-Tetradentate Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-05-01

    In this report the affinity of four N4-tetradentate ligands that incorporate the 2- methylpyridyl functionality with hexavalent actinides (AnO2+2 ) has been investigated in methanol solution. The ligands studied include N,N*-bis(2-methylpyridyl)diaminoethane (BPMDAE), N,N-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (BPMDAP), N,N*-bis(2-pyridylmethyl) piperazine (BPMPIP), and trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC). Conditional stability constants describing the strength of the interaction were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry. The log10K101 values for both U(VI) and Pu(VI) are comparable and show the same trend of stability with ligand structure. Dinuclear complexes are also indicated as being important. The log10K201 values for Pu(VI) complexation with the N4-ligands are identical for the four ligands (within experimental error), indicating that the structure of the ligand backbone has little effect on the stability of the (PuO2)2L2+ complex. The exception to this trend is the behavior of N,N*- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine (BPMPIP) with Pu(VI). This ligand displays a tendency to reduce Pu(VI) within the experimental time frame of 45 minutes. BPMPIP is the only ligand tested that contains tertiary amines in the ligand backbone. The decomposition of BPMPIP by Pu(VI) suggests a susceptibility of tertiary amines to oxidative degradation.

  16. Ligand affinity chromatography, an indispensable method for the purification of soluble cytokine receptors and binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Novick, Daniela; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2012-01-01

    Ligand affinity chromatography separation is based on unique interaction between the target analyte and a ligand, which is coupled covalently to a resin. It is a simple, rapid, selective, and efficient purification procedure of proteins providing tens of thousands fold purification in one step. The biological activity of the isolated proteins is retained in most cases thus function is revealed concomitantly with the isolation. Prior to the completion of the genome project this method facilitated rapid and reliable cloning of the corresponding gene. Upon completion of this project, a partial protein sequence is enough for retrieving its complete mRNA and hence its complete protein sequence. This method is indispensable for the isolation of both expected (e.g. receptors) but mainly unexpected, unpredicted and very much surprising binding proteins. No other approach would yield the latter. This chapter provides examples for both the expected target proteins, isolated from rich sources of human proteins, as well as the unexpected binding proteins, found by serendipity. PMID:22131033

  17. The MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to estimate ligand-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Genheden, Samuel; Ryde, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The molecular mechanics energies combined with the Poisson–Boltzmann or generalized Born and surface area continuum solvation (MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA) methods are popular approaches to estimate the free energy of the binding of small ligands to biological macromolecules. They are typically based on molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor–ligand complex and are therefore intermediate in both accuracy and computational effort between empirical scoring and strict alchemical perturbation methods. They have been applied to a large number of systems with varying success. Areas covered: The authors review the use of MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to calculate ligand-binding affinities, with an emphasis on calibration, testing and validation, as well as attempts to improve the methods, rather than on specific applications. Expert opinion: MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA are attractive approaches owing to their modular nature and that they do not require calculations on a training set. They have been used successfully to reproduce and rationalize experimental findings and to improve the results of virtual screening and docking. However, they contain several crude and questionable approximations, for example, the lack of conformational entropy and information about the number and free energy of water molecules in the binding site. Moreover, there are many variants of the method and their performance varies strongly with the tested system. Likewise, most attempts to ameliorate the methods with more accurate approaches, for example, quantum-mechanical calculations, polarizable force fields or improved solvation have deteriorated the results. PMID:25835573

  18. Engineered protein A ligands, derived from a histidine-scanning library, facilitate the affinity purification of IgG under mild acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In antibody purification processes, the acidic buffer commonly used to elute the bound antibodies during conventional affinity chromatograph, can damage the antibody. Herein we describe the development of several types of affinity ligands which enable the purification of antibodies under much milder conditions. Results Staphylococcal protein A variants were engineered by using both structure-based design and combinatorial screening methods. The frequency of amino acid residue substitutions was statistically analyzed using the sequences isolated from a histidine-scanning library screening. The positions where the frequency of occurrence of a histidine residue was more than 70% were thought to be effective histidine-mutation sites. Consequently, we identified PAB variants with a D36H mutation whose binding of IgG was highly sensitive to pH change. Conclusion The affinity column elution chromatograms demonstrated that antibodies could be eluted at a higher pH (∆pH**≧2.0) than ever reported (∆pH = 1.4) when the Staphylococcal protein A variants developed in this study were used as affinity ligands. The interactions between Staphylococcal protein A and IgG-Fab were shown to be important for the behavior of IgG bound on a SpA affinity column, and alterations in the affinity of the ligands for IgG-Fab clearly affected the conditions for eluting the bound IgG. Thus, a histidine-scanning library combined with a structure-based design was shown to be effective in engineering novel pH-sensitive proteins. PMID:25057290

  19. EF5 Is the High-Affinity Mg(2+) Site in ALG-2.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J; Frey, Benjamin B; Pemberton, Travis; Henzl, Michael T

    2016-09-13

    The penta-EF-hand (PEF) protein ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2) has been implicated in several important physiological processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi vesicular transport and endosomal biogenesis/transport. ALG-2 was recently shown to harbor a metal ion-binding site with a high affinity for Mg(2+) and a low affinity for Ca(2+). We herein present the X-ray structure of Mg(2+)-bound ALG-2des23(wt). Although the C(α) trace is nearly indistinguishable from that of the Ca(2+)-free protein, the orientation of the C-terminal helix differs in the two structures. Consistent with that observation, replacement of the +x ligand in EF5, D169, with alanine eliminates high-affinity Mg(2+) binding. It also eliminates the low-affinity Ca(2+) site and lowers the affinity of the remaining Ca(2+)-binding sites, EF3 and EF1. The coordination environment in EF5 approaches ideal Mg(2+) octahedral geometry. The ligand array, consisting of three carboxylates (+x, +y, +z), a backbone carbonyl (-y), and two water molecules (-x, -z), may offer a recipe for a high-affinity, high-selectivity Mg(2+)-binding site. Sequence data for other PEF proteins indicate that select calpain large subunits, notably CAPN1 and CAPN8, may also possess a high-affinity Mg(2+)-binding site. In Mg(2+)-bound ALG-2, the carbonyl of F188 and the C-terminal carboxylate of V191 interact with the ε-ammonium group of K137 in the opposing subunit, suggesting that Mg(2+) binding could have an impact on dimerization. Interestingly, EF1 and EF3 are also occupied in the crystal, despite having modest affinity for Mg(2+). The results of a calorimetry-based analysis indicate that their Mg(2+) binding constants are 2 orders of magnitude lower than that determined for EF5. PMID:27541325

  20. MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) for identifying protein–ligand fragment interaction, pathways and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Tanramluk, Duangrudee; Narupiyakul, Lalita; Akavipat, Ruj; Gong, Sungsam; Charoensawan, Varodom

    2016-01-01

    Protein–ligand interaction analysis is an important step of drug design and protein engineering in order to predict the binding affinity and selectivity between ligands to the target proteins. To date, there are more than 100 000 structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), of which ∼30% are protein–ligand (MW below 1000 Da) complexes. We have developed the integrative web server MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) with the aim of providing a user-friendly web interface to assist structural study and design of protein–ligand interactions. In brief, the server allows the users to input the chemical fragments and present all the unique molecular interactions to the target proteins with available three-dimensional structures in the PDB. The users can also link the ligands of interest to assess possible off-target proteins, human variants and pathway information using our all-in-one integrated tools. Taken together, we envisage that the server will facilitate and improve the study of protein–ligand interactions by allowing observation and comparison of ligand interactions with multiple proteins at the same time. (http://manoraa.org). PMID:27131358

  1. Baculovirus display for discovery of low-affinity extracellular receptor-ligand interactions using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tom, Irene; Estevez, Alberto; Bowman, Krista; Gonzalez, Lino C

    2015-06-15

    When used in conjunction with multivalent protein probes, protein microarrays offer a robust technology for discovery of low-affinity extracellular protein-protein interactions. Probes for receptor-matching screens generally consist of purified extracellular domains fused to affinity tags. Given that approximately two-thirds of extracellular proteins are transmembrane domain-containing proteins, it would be desirable to develop a system to express and display probe receptors in a native-like membrane environment. Toward this end, we evaluated baculovirus display as a platform for generating multivalent probes for protein microarray screens. Virion particles were generated displaying single-transmembrane domain receptors BTLA, CD200, and EFNB2, representing a range of affinities for their interacting partners. Virions directly labeled with Cy5 fluorophore were screened against a microarray containing more than 600 extracellular proteins, and the results were compared with data derived from soluble Fc protein or probe-coated protein A microbeads. An optimized protocol employing a blocking step with a nonrelated probe-expressing control baculovirus allowed identification of the expected interactions with a signal-to-noise ratio similar to or higher than those obtained with the other formats. Our results demonstrate that baculovirus display is suitable for detection of high- and low-affinity extracellular protein-protein interactions on protein microarrays. This platform eliminates the need for protein purification and provides a native-like lipid environment for membrane-associated receptors. PMID:25797350

  2. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Lund, Line Naomi; Gustavsson, Per-Erik; Michael, Roice; Lindgren, Johan; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Lund, Martin; Houen, Gunnar; Staby, Arne; St Hilaire, Phaedria M

    2012-02-17

    Small synthetic ligands for protein purification have become increasingly interesting with the growing need for cheap chromatographic materials for protein purification and especially for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Today, Protein A-based chromatographic resins are the most commonly used capture step in mAb down stream processing; however, the use of Protein A chromatography is less attractive due to toxic ligand leakage as well as high cost. Whether used as an alternative to the Protein A chromatographic media or as a subsequent polishing step, small synthetic peptide ligands have an advantage over biological ligands; they are cheaper to produce, ligand leakage by enzymatic degradation is either eliminated or significantly reduced, and they can in general better withstand cleaning in place (CIP) conditions such as 0.1M NaOH. Here, we present a novel synthetic peptide ligand for purification of human IgG. Immobilized on WorkBeads, an agarose-based base matrix from Bio-Works, the ligand has a dynamic binding capacity of up to 48 mg/mL and purifies IgG from harvest cell culture fluid with purities and recovery of >93%. The binding affinity is ∼10⁵ M⁻¹ and the interaction is favorable and entropy-driven with an enthalpy penalty. Our results show that the binding of the Fc fragment of IgG is mediated by hydrophobic interactions and that elution at low pH is most likely due to electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we have separated aggregated IgG from non-aggregated IgG, indicating that the ligand could be used both as a primary purification step of IgG as well as a subsequent polishing step.

  3. The Influence of the Linker Geometry in Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) Ligands on Solution-Phase Uranyl Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-08-12

    Seven water-soluble, tetradentate bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO) ligands were synthesized that vary only in linker geometry and rigidity. Solution phase thermodynamic measurements were conducted between pH 1.6 and pH 9.0 to determine the effects of these variations on proton and uranyl cation affinity. Proton affinity decreases by introduction of the solubilizing triethylene glycol group as compared to un-substituted reference ligands. Uranyl affinity was found to follow no discernable trends with incremental geometric modification. The butyl-linked 4Li-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand exhibited the highest uranyl affinity, consistent with prior in vivo decorporation results. Of the rigidly-linked ligands, the o-phenylene linker imparted the best uranyl affinity to the bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand platform.

  4. Rapid screening of textile dyes employed as affinity ligands to purify enzymes from yeast.

    PubMed

    Raya-Tonetti, G; Perotti, N

    1999-04-01

    A rapid method for screening potential dye ligands for use in affinity chromatography is described. Textile dyes were non-covalently coupled to a cross-linked polysaccharide Sepharose(R) matrix. Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was used as the model protein for evaluating the screening system. A homogenate from baker's yeast was used as the crude source of enzyme. Batchwise adsorption and elution were used to evaluate the individual dyes. The influence of pH and ionic strength in the binding and elution steps was evaluated. Batch isotherms were used to evaluate parameter characteristics. Experimental data obtained were fitted to Langmuir isotherms to determine the maximum binding capacity and the dissociation constant for each dye evaluated in this study. A dynamic binding capacity of 107.6 units of ADH/g of resin was determined for Procion Turquoise MXG dye by frontal analysis. Specific elution with NAD+ and non-specific elution with 50 mM Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5, were tested when Procion Turquoise MXG was used, giving purification factors of 53.5 and 4.4 respectively. This screening technique is inexpensive and can be performed in a few hours. It was possible to predict the performance of different reactive dyes in this way, and the influence of pH and salt on the binding behaviour was demonstrated. PMID:10075911

  5. Rapid screening of textile dyes employed as affinity ligands to purify enzymes from yeast.

    PubMed

    Raya-Tonetti, G; Perotti, N

    1999-04-01

    A rapid method for screening potential dye ligands for use in affinity chromatography is described. Textile dyes were non-covalently coupled to a cross-linked polysaccharide Sepharose(R) matrix. Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was used as the model protein for evaluating the screening system. A homogenate from baker's yeast was used as the crude source of enzyme. Batchwise adsorption and elution were used to evaluate the individual dyes. The influence of pH and ionic strength in the binding and elution steps was evaluated. Batch isotherms were used to evaluate parameter characteristics. Experimental data obtained were fitted to Langmuir isotherms to determine the maximum binding capacity and the dissociation constant for each dye evaluated in this study. A dynamic binding capacity of 107.6 units of ADH/g of resin was determined for Procion Turquoise MXG dye by frontal analysis. Specific elution with NAD+ and non-specific elution with 50 mM Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5, were tested when Procion Turquoise MXG was used, giving purification factors of 53.5 and 4.4 respectively. This screening technique is inexpensive and can be performed in a few hours. It was possible to predict the performance of different reactive dyes in this way, and the influence of pH and salt on the binding behaviour was demonstrated.

  6. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  7. Synergistic effect of high-affinity binding and flow preconditioning on endothelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Anshu B; Truskey, George A; Reichert, William M

    2003-01-01

    The current study examined whether the combined introduction of high-affinity avidin-biotin bonds and fibronectin-integrin bonds (i.e., dual ligand treatment) would further augment the adhesion of flow-preconditioned endothelial cells to model substrates via contributions to the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of focal contacts. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were grown under static conditions or exposed to a flow-preconditioning regimen for 24 h. Cell retention was determined by exposure to 75 dynes/cm(2). The combination of flow preconditioning and the dual ligand treatment yielded higher cell retention under flow compared to the cells adherent via fibronectin-integrin bonds only. This increase in adhesion strength correlated with a greater focal contact area. Elongation of the HUVEC occurred after exposure to flow preconditioning; however, orientation of dual ligand adherent cells was restricted due to the presence of the high-affinity ligand. Flow-preconditioned cells showed increased stress fiber formation compared to nonconditioned cells although the stress fibers per cell for flow-preconditioned cells were the same on both the ligand systems employed. The results indicate that enhanced adhesion strength is due to a combination of increased focal contact area, stress fiber formation, and cell alignment. PMID:12483708

  8. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  9. Specificity and Ligand Affinities of the Cocaine Aptamer: Impact of Structural Features and Physiological NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ashish; Ilgu, Muslum; Kempema, Aaron; Kraus, George A; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2016-08-01

    The cocaine aptamer has been seen as a good candidate for development as a probe for cocaine in many contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the aptamer binds cocaine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene with similar affinities and aminoglycosides with similar or higher affinities in a mutually exclusive manner with cocaine. Analysis of its affinities for a series of cocaine derivatives shows that the aptamer specificity is the consequence of its interaction with all faces of the cocaine molecule. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and 2-aminopurine (2AP) fluorescence studies show no evidence of large structural rearrangement of the cocaine aptamer upon ligand binding, which is contrary to the general view of this aptamer. The aptamer's affinity for cocaine and neomycin-B decreases with the inclusion of physiological NaCl. The substitution of 2AP for A in position 6 (2AP6) of the aptamer sequence eliminated the effect of NaCl on its affinities for cocaine and analogues, but not for neomycin-B, showing a selective effect of 2AP substitution on cocaine binding. The affinity for cocaine also decreased with increasing concentrations of serum or urine, with the 2AP6 substitution blunting the effect of urine. Its low affinities for cocaine and metabolites and its ability to bind irrelevant compounds limit the opportunities for application of this aptamer in its current form as a selective and reliable sensor for cocaine. However, these studies also show that a small structural adjustment to the aptamer (2AP exchanged for adenine) can increase its specificity for cocaine in physiological NaCl relative to an off-target ligand.

  10. Specificity and Ligand Affinities of the Cocaine Aptamer: Impact of Structural Features and Physiological NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ashish; Ilgu, Muslum; Kempema, Aaron; Kraus, George A; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2016-08-01

    The cocaine aptamer has been seen as a good candidate for development as a probe for cocaine in many contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the aptamer binds cocaine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene with similar affinities and aminoglycosides with similar or higher affinities in a mutually exclusive manner with cocaine. Analysis of its affinities for a series of cocaine derivatives shows that the aptamer specificity is the consequence of its interaction with all faces of the cocaine molecule. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and 2-aminopurine (2AP) fluorescence studies show no evidence of large structural rearrangement of the cocaine aptamer upon ligand binding, which is contrary to the general view of this aptamer. The aptamer's affinity for cocaine and neomycin-B decreases with the inclusion of physiological NaCl. The substitution of 2AP for A in position 6 (2AP6) of the aptamer sequence eliminated the effect of NaCl on its affinities for cocaine and analogues, but not for neomycin-B, showing a selective effect of 2AP substitution on cocaine binding. The affinity for cocaine also decreased with increasing concentrations of serum or urine, with the 2AP6 substitution blunting the effect of urine. Its low affinities for cocaine and metabolites and its ability to bind irrelevant compounds limit the opportunities for application of this aptamer in its current form as a selective and reliable sensor for cocaine. However, these studies also show that a small structural adjustment to the aptamer (2AP exchanged for adenine) can increase its specificity for cocaine in physiological NaCl relative to an off-target ligand. PMID:27348073

  11. 3-Chlorotyramine Acting as Ligand of the D2 Dopamine Receptor. Molecular Modeling, Synthesis and D2 Receptor Affinity.

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio; Andujar, Sebastian; Moreno, Laura; Garibotto, Francisco; Párraga, Javier; Peruchena, Nelida; Cabedo, Nuria; Villecco, Margarita; Cortes, Diego; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine as a ligand of the D2 dopamine receptor. This compound displayed a similar affinity by this receptor to that previously reported for dopamine. In order to understand further the experimental results we performed a molecular modeling study of 3-chlorotyramine and structurally related compounds. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with semiempirical (PM6), ab initio and density functional theory calculations, a simple and generally applicable procedure to evaluate the binding energies of these ligands interacting with the D2 dopamine receptors is reported here. These results provided a clear picture of the binding interactions of these compounds from both structural and energetic view points. A reduced model for the binding pocket was used. This approach allowed us to perform more accurate quantum mechanical calculations as well as to obtain a detailed electronic analysis using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) technique. Molecular aspects of the binding interactions between ligands and the D2 dopamine receptor are discussed in detail. A good correlation between the relative binding energies obtained from theoretical calculations and experimental IC50 values was obtained. These results allowed us to predict that 3-chlorotyramine possesses a significant affinity by the D2 -DR. Our theoretical predictions were experimentally corroborated when we synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine which displayed a similar affinity by the D2 -DR to that reported for DA.

  12. Femtomolar Zn(II) affinity in a peptide-based ligand designed to model thiolate-rich metalloprotein active sites.

    PubMed

    Petros, Amy K; Reddi, Amit R; Kennedy, Michelle L; Hyslop, Alison G; Gibney, Brian R

    2006-12-11

    data demonstrate that FeII-IGA and CoII-IGA have formation constant values of 5.0 x 10(8) and 4.2 x 10(11) M-1, which are highly attenuated at physiological pH values. The data also evince that the formation constant for ZnII-IGA is 8.0 x 10(15) M-1, a value that exceeds the tightest natural protein Zn(II)-binding affinities. The formation constant demonstrates that the metal-ligand binding energy of a ZnII(S-Cys)4 site can stabilize a metalloprotein by -21.6 kcal/mol. Rigorous thermodynamic analyses such as those demonstrated here are critical to current research efforts in metalloprotein design, metal-induced protein folding, and metal-ion trafficking.

  13. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  14. Homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities based on quenching fluorescence of tyrosine/tryptophan residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanling; Yang, Xiaolan; Pu, Jun; Zhao, Yunsheng; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Guoming; Zheng, Jun; Yuan, Huidong; Liao, Fei

    2010-11-01

    A new homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities was proposed based on quenching the fluorescence of tryptophan/tyrosine residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer using a fluorescent reference ligand as the acceptor. Under excitation around 280 nm, the fluorescence of a protein or a bound acceptor was monitored upon competitive binding against a nonfluorescent candidate ligand. Chemometrics for deriving the binding ratio of the acceptor with either fluorescence signal was discussed; the dissociation constant ( Kd) of a nonfluorescent candidate ligand was calculated from its concentration to displace 50% binding of the acceptor. N-biotinyl-N'-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine (BNEDA) and N-biotinyl-N'-dansyl-ethylenediamine (BDEDA) were used as the reference ligands and acceptors to streptavidin to test this new homogeneous competitive assay. Upon binding of an acceptor to streptavidin, there were the quench of streptavidin fluorescence at 340 nm and the characteristic fluorescence at 430 nm for BNEDA or at 525 nm for BDEDA. Kd of BNEDA and BDEDA was obtained via competitive binding against biotin. By quantifying BNEDA fluorescence, Kd of each tested nonfluorescent biotin derivative was consistent with that by quantifying streptavidin fluorescence using BNEDA or BDEDA as the acceptor. The overall coefficients of variation were about 10%. Therefore, this homogeneous competitive assay was effective and promising to high-throughput-screening.

  15. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach. PMID:27498895

  16. Purification of a ligand for the EPH-like receptor HEK using a biosensor-based affinity detection approach.

    PubMed Central

    Lackmann, M; Bucci, T; Mann, R J; Kravets, L A; Viney, E; Smith, F; Moritz, R L; Carter, W; Simpson, R J; Nicola, N A; Mackwell, K; Nice, E C; Wilks, A F; Boyd, A W

    1996-01-01

    Advances in screening technologies allowing the identification of growth factor receptors solely by virtue of DNA or protein sequence comparison call for novel methods to isolate corresponding ligand growth factors. The EPH-like receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) HEK (human EPH-like kinase) was identified previously as a membrane antigen on the LK63 human pre-B-cell line and overexpression in leukemic specimens and cell lines suggested a role in oncogenesis. We developed a biosensor-based approach using the immobilized HEK receptor exodomain to detect and monitor purification of the HEK ligand. A protein purification protocol, which included HEK affinity chromatography, achieved a 1.8 X 10(6)-fold purification of an approximately 23-kDa protein from human placental conditioned medium. Analysis of specific sHEK (soluble extracellular domain of HEK) ligand interactions in the first and final purification steps suggested a ligand concentration of 40 pM in the source material and a Kd of 2-3 nM. Since the purified ligand was N-terminally blocked, we generated tryptic peptides and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of 7 tryptic fragments of the S-pyridylethylated protein unequivocally matched the sequence for AL-1, a recently reported ligand for the related EPH-like RTK REK7 (Winslow, J.W., Moran, P., Valverde, J., Shih, A., Yuan, J.Q., Wong, S.C., Tsai, S.P., Goddard, A., Henzel, W.J., Hefti, F., Beck, K.D., & Caras, I.W. (1995) Neuron 14, 973-981). Our findings demonstrate the application of biosensor technology in ligand purification and show that AL-1, as has been found for other ligands of the EPH-like RTK family, binds more than one receptor. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8637907

  17. Multidentate polymeric ligands for long-term bioimaging using highly stable and functionalized quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanelli, Emerson; Muro, Eleonora; Tasso, Mariana; Sitbon, Gary; Hanafi, Mohamed; Pons, Thomas; Dubertret, Benoît.; Lequeux, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Colloidal fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals, named "quantum dots", possess unique features, such as a tunable peak wavelength (according to their composition and their size) or a large absorption cross-section, that make them very attractive for biomedical imaging. Nevertheless, typical syntheses provide nanoparticles capped with hydrophobic ligands. To be used in long-term bioexperiments, they have thus to be modified to exhibit essentially a high colloidal stability in aqueous conditions, but also a low non-specific adsorption, a small size and functionalization moities. As all of these properties are controlled by the layer of coating ligands, we designed a bidentate monozwitterionic ligand, to first address the need of small-sized and antibiofouling hydrophilic probes. But the corresponding quantum dots revealed to be unstable in highly diluted conditions and difficult to functionalize. To further increase the affinity between the nanoparticles and their surrounding ligands, we synthesized a multidentate polyzwitterionic ligand, issued from the copolymerization of a bidentate monomer and a monozwitterionic one. The nanocrystals passivated by this polymeric ligand showed an exceptional colloidal stability, regardless of the medium conditions (pH, salinity, dilution, and biological environment), and we demonstrated the affinity of the polymer exceeded by three orders of magnitude that of the bidentate ligand. The synthesis of the multidentate polyzwitterionic ligand proved also to be easily tunable and allowed the facile introduction of reacting moieties. Further functionalization of the corresponding quantum dots with biomolecules led to successful specific targeting, which could be confirmed, as an example, through FRET experiments.

  18. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  19. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  20. C-X...H contacts in biomolecular systems: how they contribute to protein-ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunxiang; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zhijian; Yan, Xiuhua; Luo, Xiaoming; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhu, Weiliang

    2009-09-17

    The hydrogen bond acceptor capability of halogens has long been underappreciated in the field of biology. In this work, we have surveyed structures of protein complexes with halogenated ligands to characterize geometrical preferences of C-X...H contacts and contributions of such interactions to protein-ligand binding affinity. Notably, F...H interactions in biomolecules exhibit a remarkably different behavior as compared to three other kinds of X...H (X = Cl, Br, I) interactions, which has been rationalized by means of ab initio calculations using simple model systems. The C-X...H contacts in biological systems are characterized as weak hydrogen bonding interactions. Furthermore, the electrophile "head on" and nucleophile "side on" interactions of halogens have been extensively investigated through the examination of interactions in protein structures and a two-layer ONIOM-based QM/MM method. In biomolecular systems, C-X...H contacts are recognized as secondary interaction contributions to C-X...O halogen bonds that play important roles in conferring specificity and affinity for halogenated ligands. The results presented here are within the context of their potential applications in drug design, including relevance to the development of accurate force fields for halogens.

  1. Resolution and in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation of isomers of iodine-125-labeled 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-alpha-phenylacetate: a high-affinity ligand for the muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D W; Lambert, C R; Jahn, K; Sood, V; McRee, R C; Zeeberg, B; Reba, R C; Knapp, F F

    1995-09-29

    1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)- alpha-phenylacetate (IQNP, 1), is a highly selective ligand for the muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mAChR). There are eight stereoisomers in the racemic mixture. The optical isomers of alpha-hydroxy-alpha-phenyl-alpha-(1-propyn-3-yl)acetic acid were resolved as the alpha-methylbenzylamine salts, and the optical isomers of 3-quinuclidinol were resolved as the tartrate salts. The E and Z isomers were prepared by varying the reaction conditions for the stannylation of the triple bond followed by purification utilizing flash column chromatography. In vitro binding assay of the four stereoisomers containing the (R)-(-)-3-quinuclidinyl ester demonstrated that each isomer of 1 bound to mAChR with high affinity. In addition, (E)-(-)-(-)-IQNP demonstrated the highest receptor subtype specificity between the m1 molecular subtype (KD, nM, 0.383 +/- 0.102) and the m2 molecular subtype (29.6 +/- 9.70). In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that iodine-125-labeled (E)-(-)-(+)-1 cleared rapidly from the brain and heart. In contrast, iodine-125-labeled (E)-(-)-(-)-, (Z)-(-)-(-)-, and (Z)-(-)-(+)-1 have high uptake and retention in mAChR rich areas of the brain. It was also observed that (E)-(-)-(-)-IQNP demonstrated an apparent subtype selectivity in vivo with retention in M1 (m1, m4) mAChR areas of the rain. In addition, (Z)-(-)-(-)-IQNP also demonstrated significant uptake in tissues containing the M2 (m2) mAChR subtype. These results demonstrate that the iodine-123-labeled analogues of the (E)-(-)-(-)- and (Z)-(-)-(-)-IQNP isomers are attractive candidates for single-photon emission-computed tomographic imaging of cerebral and cardiac mAChR receptor densities.

  2. Univalent and Bivalent Ligands of Butorphan: Characteristics of the Linking Chain determine the Affinity and Potency of Such Opioid Ligands†

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michael; Fulton, Brian S.; Zhang, Bin; Knapp, Brian I.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Neumeyer, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Bivalent morphinan compounds containing ester linkers were synthesized and their binding affinities at the μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors determined. Addition of methyl groups adjacent to the hydrolytically labile ester linkage increased stability while only partially affecting binding affinity. The resulting bivalent ligands with optimized spacer-length and structure show potent binding profiles with the most potent compound (4b) having Ki values of 0.47 nM for both the μ and κ opioid receptors, and 4a having Ki values of 0.95 and 0.62 nM for the μ and κ receptors, respectively. Both 4a and 4b were partial agonists at the κ and μ receptors in the [35S]GTPγS binding assay. PMID:19634902

  3. Afi-Chip: An Equipment-Free, Low-Cost, and Universal Binding Ligand Affinity Evaluation Platform.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Li, Xingrui; Ma, Yanli; Gao, Mingxuan; Liu, Dan; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Zhi; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-16

    Binding affinity characterization is of great importance for aptamer screening because the dissociation constant (Kd) value is a key parameter for evaluating molecular interaction. However, conventional methods often require sophisticated equipment and time-consuming processing. Here, we present a portable device, Afi-Chip, as an equipment-free, rapid, low-cost, and universal platform for evaluation of the aptamer affinity. The Afi-Chip displays a distance readout based on the reaction of an enzyme catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 for gas generation to push the movement of ink bar. Taking advantage of translating the recognition signal to distance signal and realizing the regents mixing and quantitative readout on the chip, we successfully monitored the aptamer evolution process and characterized binding affinity of aptamers against multiple types of targets, including small molecule glucose, cancer biomarker protein EpCAM, and tumor cell SW620. We also applied the Afi-Chip for rapid characterization of the affinity between anti-HCG and HCG to demonstrate the generality for the molecular interaction study. All of the Kd values obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature or obtained by sophisticated instruments such as a flow cytometer. The Afi-Chip offers a new approach for equipment-free investigation of molecular interactions, such as aptamer identification, ligand selection monitoring, and drug screening. PMID:27454185

  4. Afi-Chip: An Equipment-Free, Low-Cost, and Universal Binding Ligand Affinity Evaluation Platform.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Li, Xingrui; Ma, Yanli; Gao, Mingxuan; Liu, Dan; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Zhi; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-16

    Binding affinity characterization is of great importance for aptamer screening because the dissociation constant (Kd) value is a key parameter for evaluating molecular interaction. However, conventional methods often require sophisticated equipment and time-consuming processing. Here, we present a portable device, Afi-Chip, as an equipment-free, rapid, low-cost, and universal platform for evaluation of the aptamer affinity. The Afi-Chip displays a distance readout based on the reaction of an enzyme catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 for gas generation to push the movement of ink bar. Taking advantage of translating the recognition signal to distance signal and realizing the regents mixing and quantitative readout on the chip, we successfully monitored the aptamer evolution process and characterized binding affinity of aptamers against multiple types of targets, including small molecule glucose, cancer biomarker protein EpCAM, and tumor cell SW620. We also applied the Afi-Chip for rapid characterization of the affinity between anti-HCG and HCG to demonstrate the generality for the molecular interaction study. All of the Kd values obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature or obtained by sophisticated instruments such as a flow cytometer. The Afi-Chip offers a new approach for equipment-free investigation of molecular interactions, such as aptamer identification, ligand selection monitoring, and drug screening.

  5. Molecular simulations of β-lactoglobulin complexed with fatty acids reveal the structural basis of ligand affinity to internal and possible external binding sites.

    PubMed

    Evoli, Stefania; Guzzi, Rita; Rizzuti, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of saturated fatty acids of different length (C8:0 to C18:0) with β-lactoglobulin (βLG) was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and docking approaches. The results show that the presence of such ligands in the hydrophobic central cavity of βLG, known as the protein calyx, determines an enhancement of atomic fluctuations compared with the unliganded form, especially for loops at the entrance of the binding site. Concerted motions are evidenced for protein regions that could favor the binding of ligands. The mechanism of anchoring of fatty acids of different length is similar for the carboxylate head-group, through electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Lys60/Lys69. The key protein residues to secure the hydrocarbon chain are Phe105/Met107, which adapt their conformation upon ligand binding. In particular, Phe105 provides an additional hydrophobic clamp only for the tail of the two fatty acids with the longest chains, palmitic, and stearic acid, which are known to bind βLG with a high affinity. The search of additional external binding sites for fatty acids, distinct from the calyx, was also carried out for palmitic acid. Two external sites with a lower affinity were identified as secondary sites, one consisting in a hydrophobic cavity allowing two distinct binding modes for the fatty acid, and the other corresponding to a surface crevice close to the protein α-helix. The overall results provide a comprehensive picture of the dynamical behavior of βLG in complex with fatty acids, and elucidate the structural basis of the binding of these physiological ligands.

  6. Evolved Streptavidin Mutants Reveal Key Role of Loop Residue in High-affinity Binding

    SciTech Connect

    M Magalhaes; C Melo Czekster; R Guan; V Malashkevich; S Almo; M Levy

    2011-12-31

    We have performed a detailed analysis of streptavidin variants with altered specificity towards desthiobiotin. In addition to changes in key residues which widen the ligand binding pocket and accommodate the more structurally flexible desthiobiotin, the data revealed the role of a key, non-active site mutation at the base of the flexible loop (S52G) which slows dissociation of this ligand by approximately sevenfold. Our data suggest that this mutation results in the loss of a stabilizing contact which keeps this loop open and accessible in the absence of ligand. When this mutation was introduced into the wild-type protein, destabilization of the opened loop conferred a {approx}10-fold decrease in both the on-rate and off-rate for the ligand biotin-4-fluoroscein. A similar effect was observed when this mutation was added to a monomeric form of this protein. Our results provide key insight into the role of the streptavidin flexible loop in ligand binding and maintaining high affinity interactions.

  7. Increasing the molecular contacts between maurotoxin and Kv1.2 channel augments ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    M'Barek, Sarrah; Chagot, Benjamin; Andreotti, Nicolas; Visan, Violeta; Mansuelle, Pascal; Grissmer, Stephan; Marrakchi, Mohamed; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Sampieri, François; Darbon, Hervé; Fajloun, Ziad; De Waard, Michel; Sabatier, Jean-Marc

    2005-08-15

    Scorpion toxins interact with their target ion channels through multiple molecular contacts. Because a "gain of function" approach has never been described to evaluate the importance of the molecular contacts in defining toxin affinity, we experimentally examined whether increasing the molecular contacts between a toxin and an ion channel directly impacts toxin affinity. For this purpose, we focused on two scorpion peptides, the well-characterized maurotoxin with its variant Pi1-like disulfide bridging (MTX(Pi1)), used as a molecular template, and butantoxin (BuTX), used as an N-terminal domain provider. BuTX is found to be 60-fold less potent than MTX(Pi1) in blocking Kv1.2 (IC(50) values of 165 nM for BuTX versus 2.8 nM for MTX(Pi1)). Removal of its N-terminal domain (nine residues) further decreases BuTX affinity for Kv1.2 by 5.6-fold, which is in agreement with docking simulation data showing the importance of this domain in BuTX-Kv1.2 interaction. Transfer of the BuTX N-terminal domain to MTX(Pi1) results in a chimera with five disulfide bridges (BuTX-MTX(Pi1)) that exhibits 22-fold greater affinity for Kv1.2 than MTX(Pi1) itself, in spite of the lower affinity of BuTX as compared to MTX(Pi1). Docking experiments performed with the 3-D structure of BuTX-MTX(Pi1) in solution, as solved by (1)H-NMR, reveal that the N-terminal domain of BuTX participates in the increased affinity for Kv1.2 through additional molecular contacts. Altogether, the data indicate that acting on molecular contacts between a toxin and a channel is an efficient strategy to modulate toxin affinity.

  8. Engineering high-affinity PD-1 variants for optimized immunotherapy and immuno-PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Maute, Roy L; Gordon, Sydney R; Mayer, Aaron T; McCracken, Melissa N; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Ring, Nan Guo; Kimura, Richard; Tsai, Jonathan M; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Weissman, Irving L; Ring, Aaron M

    2015-11-24

    Signaling through the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) enables tumor progression by dampening antitumor immune responses. Therapeutic blockade of the signaling axis between PD-1 and its ligand programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) with monoclonal antibodies has shown remarkable clinical success in the treatment of cancer. However, antibodies have inherent limitations that can curtail their efficacy in this setting, including poor tissue/tumor penetrance and detrimental Fc-effector functions that deplete immune cells. To determine if PD-1:PD-L1-directed immunotherapy could be improved with smaller, nonantibody therapeutics, we used directed evolution by yeast-surface display to engineer the PD-1 ectodomain as a high-affinity (110 pM) competitive antagonist of PD-L1. In contrast to anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies, high-affinity PD-1 demonstrated superior tumor penetration without inducing depletion of peripheral effector T cells. Consistent with these advantages, in syngeneic CT26 tumor models, high-affinity PD-1 was effective in treating both small (50 mm(3)) and large tumors (150 mm(3)), whereas the activity of anti-PD-L1 antibodies was completely abrogated against large tumors. Furthermore, we found that high-affinity PD-1 could be radiolabeled and applied as a PET imaging tracer to efficiently distinguish between PD-L1-positive and PD-L1-negative tumors in living mice, providing an alternative to invasive biopsy and histological analysis. These results thus highlight the favorable pharmacology of small, nonantibody therapeutics for enhanced cancer immunotherapy and immune diagnostics. PMID:26604307

  9. Engineering high-affinity PD-1 variants for optimized immunotherapy and immuno-PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Maute, Roy L.; Gordon, Sydney R.; Mayer, Aaron T.; McCracken, Melissa N.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Ring, Nan Guo; Kimura, Richard; Tsai, Jonathan M.; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Weissman, Irving L.; Ring, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) enables tumor progression by dampening antitumor immune responses. Therapeutic blockade of the signaling axis between PD-1 and its ligand programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) with monoclonal antibodies has shown remarkable clinical success in the treatment of cancer. However, antibodies have inherent limitations that can curtail their efficacy in this setting, including poor tissue/tumor penetrance and detrimental Fc-effector functions that deplete immune cells. To determine if PD-1:PD-L1–directed immunotherapy could be improved with smaller, nonantibody therapeutics, we used directed evolution by yeast-surface display to engineer the PD-1 ectodomain as a high-affinity (110 pM) competitive antagonist of PD-L1. In contrast to anti–PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies, high-affinity PD-1 demonstrated superior tumor penetration without inducing depletion of peripheral effector T cells. Consistent with these advantages, in syngeneic CT26 tumor models, high-affinity PD-1 was effective in treating both small (50 mm3) and large tumors (150 mm3), whereas the activity of anti–PD-L1 antibodies was completely abrogated against large tumors. Furthermore, we found that high-affinity PD-1 could be radiolabeled and applied as a PET imaging tracer to efficiently distinguish between PD-L1–positive and PD-L1–negative tumors in living mice, providing an alternative to invasive biopsy and histological analysis. These results thus highlight the favorable pharmacology of small, nonantibody therapeutics for enhanced cancer immunotherapy and immune diagnostics. PMID:26604307

  10. Affinity chromatography of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases. Cognate transfer ribonucleic acid as a ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C M; Knowles, J R

    1977-01-01

    The use of tRNA affinity columns for the purification of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases was investigated. A purification method for valyl-tRNA synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus is described that uses two affinity columns, one containing the pure cognate tRNA, and the other containing all tRNA species except the cognate tRNA. A method for the rapid preparation of the two columns was developed, which does not require prior isolation of cognate tRNA but makes use of the ability of the target synthetase to select its cognate tRNA. The usefulness of tRNA columns is compared with that of affinity columns derived from the aminoalkyladenylate reported in the preceding paper [Clarke & Knowles (1977) Biochem J. 167, 405-417]. PMID:23108

  11. CORAL: prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) for binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors based on attributes of molecular structure extracted from simplified molecular input-line entry systems (SMILES) are established using the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is used as the measure of the binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors. Molecular features which are statistically reliable promoters of increase and decrease for IC50 are suggested. The examples of modifications of molecular structure which lead to the increase or to the decrease of the endpoint are represented. PMID:26188619

  12. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  13. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jae Hong; Nakane, Takashi; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Toru; Kitamoto, Dai

    2001-01-01

    Background There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand for immunoglobulins, and undertook the investigation on the binding between mannosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A) and human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). Results In ELISA assay, MEL-A showed nearly the same binding affinity towards HIgG as that of bovine ganglioside GM1. Fab of human IgG was considered to play a more important role than Fc in the binding of HIgG by MEL-A. The bound amount of HIgG increased depending on the attached amount of MEL-A onto poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) beads, whereas the amount of human serum albumin slightly decreased. Binding-amount and -selectivity of HIgG towards MEL-A were influenced by salt species, salt concentration and pH in the buffer solution. The composite of MEL-A and polyHEMA, exhibited a significant binding constant of 1.43 × 106 (M-1) for HIgG, which is approximately 4-fold greater than that of protein A reported. Conclusions MEL-A shows high binding-affinity towards HIgG, and this is considered to be due to "multivalent effect" based on the binding molar ratio. This is the first report on the binding of a natural human antibody towards a yeast glycolipid. PMID:11604104

  14. Does the tissue concentration in receptor binding studies change the affinity of the labelled ligand?

    PubMed

    Ensing, K; De Zeeuw, R A

    1984-12-14

    When the tissue concentration in a radioreceptor assay for anticholinergic drugs was varied in order to obtain optimum conditions, and the receptor concentration Cr and the equilibrium dissociation constant KD were determined by Scatchard analysis, the KD increased with increasing tissue concentrations. This phenomenon was considered as an artefact caused by non-specific binding of the labelled ligand to constituents of the receptor preparation which were not completely retained on the glass-fibre filters used for the separation of bound and free fraction of radio-labelled ligand. The increase in KD in these experiments could be described with a mathematical model of the binding experiments. PMID:6514542

  15. Sialic acid-specific affinity chromatography for the separation of erythropoietin glycoforms using serotonin as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Stepath, M; Hennig, R; Cajic, S; Rapp, E; Rotering, H; Wolff, M W; Reichl, U

    2016-02-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is an important CHO cell-derived glycoprotein and the degree of sialylation of this hormone is crucial for its in vivo bioactivity. In order to improve the purification process serotonin as a potential affinity ligand was tested for preparative chromatographic separation of rhEPO glycoforms into fractions of different degrees of sialylation. Therefore, two chromatographic matrices were prepared by immobilizing serotonin on CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™. First it was shown both matrices bind rhEPO only in its sialylated form. Results indicate that binding is pH independent between pH 3.5 to 8 suggesting it is not only based on electrostatic interactions. Second, after optimal binding conditions were identified, semi-purified rhEPO was loaded onto both matrices and eluted using a stepwise elution gradient of sodium chloride. For comparison same affinity purification experiments were performed using wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, a lectin known for its affinity towards sialylated glycoproteins. To monitor changes in N-glycan fingerprint, eluate fractions were analyzed by multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (xCGE-LIF). For the serotonin matrices an increasing degree of sialylation was observed from the first to the third elution fraction while purity of rhEPO could be increased at the same time. The late elution fractions of serotonin-coupled CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™ also showed an overall sialylation degree exceeding that of the starting material. In contrast, for rhEPO bound to wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, no distinct change in the degree of sialylation could be observed after elution. Overall, these encouraging results highlight the potential of serotonin as a chromatographic ligand for the improvement of pharmaceutical purification processes of rhEPO.

  16. Sialic acid-specific affinity chromatography for the separation of erythropoietin glycoforms using serotonin as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Stepath, M; Hennig, R; Cajic, S; Rapp, E; Rotering, H; Wolff, M W; Reichl, U

    2016-02-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is an important CHO cell-derived glycoprotein and the degree of sialylation of this hormone is crucial for its in vivo bioactivity. In order to improve the purification process serotonin as a potential affinity ligand was tested for preparative chromatographic separation of rhEPO glycoforms into fractions of different degrees of sialylation. Therefore, two chromatographic matrices were prepared by immobilizing serotonin on CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™. First it was shown both matrices bind rhEPO only in its sialylated form. Results indicate that binding is pH independent between pH 3.5 to 8 suggesting it is not only based on electrostatic interactions. Second, after optimal binding conditions were identified, semi-purified rhEPO was loaded onto both matrices and eluted using a stepwise elution gradient of sodium chloride. For comparison same affinity purification experiments were performed using wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, a lectin known for its affinity towards sialylated glycoproteins. To monitor changes in N-glycan fingerprint, eluate fractions were analyzed by multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (xCGE-LIF). For the serotonin matrices an increasing degree of sialylation was observed from the first to the third elution fraction while purity of rhEPO could be increased at the same time. The late elution fractions of serotonin-coupled CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™ also showed an overall sialylation degree exceeding that of the starting material. In contrast, for rhEPO bound to wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, no distinct change in the degree of sialylation could be observed after elution. Overall, these encouraging results highlight the potential of serotonin as a chromatographic ligand for the improvement of pharmaceutical purification processes of rhEPO. PMID:26851523

  17. CSAR Data Set Release 2012: Ligands, Affinities, Complexes, and Docking Decoys

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A major goal in drug design is the improvement of computational methods for docking and scoring. The Community Structure Activity Resource (CSAR) has collected several data sets from industry and added in-house data sets that may be used for this purpose (www.csardock.org). CSAR has currently obtained data from Abbott, GlaxoSmithKline, and Vertex and is working on obtaining data from several others. Combined with our in-house projects, we are providing a data set consisting of 6 protein targets, 647 compounds with biological affinities, and 82 crystal structures. Multiple congeneric series are available for several targets with a few representative crystal structures of each of the series. These series generally contain a few inactive compounds, usually not available in the literature, to provide an upper bound to the affinity range. The affinity ranges are typically 3–4 orders of magnitude per series. For our in-house projects, we have had compounds synthesized for biological testing. Affinities were measured by Thermofluor, Octet RED, and isothermal titration calorimetry for the most soluble. This allows the direct comparison of the biological affinities for those compounds, providing a measure of the variance in the experimental affinity. It appears that there can be considerable variance in the absolute value of the affinity, making the prediction of the absolute value ill-defined. However, the relative rankings within the methods are much better, and this fits with the observation that predicting relative ranking is a more tractable problem computationally. For those in-house compounds, we also have measured the following physical properties: logD, logP, thermodynamic solubility, and pKa. This data set also provides a substantial decoy set for each target consisting of diverse conformations covering the entire active site for all of the 58 CSAR-quality crystal structures. The CSAR data sets (CSAR-NRC HiQ and the 2012 release) provide substantial, publically

  18. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  19. Irreversible blockade of the high and low affinity ( sup 3 H) naloxone binding sites by C-6 derivatives of morphinane-6-ones

    SciTech Connect

    Krizsan, D. ); Varga, E.; Benyhe, S.; Szucs, M.; Borsodi, A. ); Hosztafi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    C-6 derivatives-hydrazones, phenylhydrazones, dinitrophenylhydrazones, oximes and semicarbazones - of morphinane-6-ones were synthesized and their binding characteristics were studied on rat brain membranes. The dihydromorphinone and oxymorphone derivatives compete for the ({sup 3}H)naloxone binding sites with high affinity, while the dihydrocodeinone and oxycodone derivatives are less potent. The affinity of the new compounds is decreased for the delta sites as compared to the parent ligands. The ligands bearing bulky substituents also bind with low affinity to the kappa sites. The modification decreased the Na{sup +}-index of compounds indicating their mixed agonist-antagonist character. The dihydromorphinone derivatives are all capable to block irreversibly the high affinity binding site of ({sup 3}H)naloxone, whereas the dihydrocodeinone derivatives block irreversibly the low affinity site. A possible mechanism for the inhibition is suggested.

  20. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  1. Nexus Between Protein–Ligand Affinity Rank-Ordering, Biophysical Approaches, and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The confluence of computational and biophysical methods to accurately rank-order the binding affinities of small molecules and determine structures of macromolecular complexes is a potentially transformative advance in the work flow of drug discovery. This viewpoint explores the impact that advanced computational methods may have on the efficacy of small molecule drug discovery and optimization, particularly with respect to emerging fragment-based methods. PMID:24900579

  2. Information theory-based scoring function for the structure-based prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Kulharia, Mahesh; Goody, Roger S; Jackson, Richard M

    2008-10-01

    The development and validation of a new knowledge based scoring function (SIScoreJE) to predict binding energy between proteins and ligands is presented. SIScoreJE efficiently predicts the binding energy between a small molecule and its protein receptor. Protein-ligand atomic contact information was derived from a Non-Redundant Data set (NRD) of over 3000 X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes. This information was classified for individual "atom contact pairs" (ACP) which is used to calculate the atomic contact preferences. In addition to the two schemes generated in this study we have assessed a number of other common atom-type classification schemes. The preferences were calculated using an information theoretic relationship of joint entropy. Among 18 different atom-type classification schemes "ScoreJE Atom Type set2" (SATs2) was found to be the most suitable for our approach. To test the sensitivity of the method to the inclusion of solvent, Single-body Solvation Potentials (SSP) were also derived from the atomic contacts between the protein atom types and water molecules modeled using AQUARIUS2. Validation was carried out using an evaluation data set of 100 protein-ligand complexes with known binding energies to test the ability of the scoring functions to reproduce known binding affinities. In summary, it was found that a combined SSP/ScoreJE (SIScoreJE) performed significantly better than ScoreJE alone, and SIScoreJE and ScoreJE performed better than GOLD::GoldScore, GOLD::ChemScore, and XScore.

  3. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  4. [3H]-RS-45041-190: a selective high-affinity radioligand for I2 imidazoline receptors.

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, A. C.; Redfern, W. S.; Brown, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. RS-45041-190 (4-chloro-2-(imidazolin-2-yl)isoindoline) is an I2 imidazoline receptor ligand with the highest affinity and selectivity so far described; [3H]-RS-45041-190 has a tritium atom attached to the 7-position on the isoindoline ring. 2. [3H]-RS-45041-190 binding to rat kidney membranes was saturable (Bmax = 223.1 +/- 18.4 fmol mg-1 protein) and of high affinity (Kd = 2.71 +/- 0.59 nM). Kinetic studies revealed that the binding was rapid and reversible, with [3H]-RS-45041-190 interacting with two sites or two affinity states. 3. Competition studies showed that 60-70% of [3H]-RS-45041-190 binding (1 nM) was specifically to imidazoline binding sites of the I2 subtype, characterized by high affinity for idazoxan (pIC50 7.85 +/- 0.03) and cirazoline (pIC50 8.16 +/- 0.05). The remaining 30-40% was displaced specifically by the monoamine oxidase A inhibitors, clorgyline and pargyline. 4. alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor, I1 imidazoline, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine or dopamine receptor ligands had low affinity suggesting that [3H]-RS-45041-190 did not label receptors of these classes. 5. In autoradiography studies, [3H]-RS-45041-190 labelled discrete regions of rat brain corresponding to the distribution of I2 subtypes, notably the subfornical organ, arcuate nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, medial habenular nucleus and lateral mammillary nucleus, and additional sites in the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe and dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus. 6. [3H]-RS-45041-190 therefore labels I2 receptors with high affinity, and an additional site which has high affinity for some monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8528552

  5. Enhancing ligand-protein binding in affinity thermoprecipitation: elucidation of spacer effects

    PubMed

    Vaidya; Lele; Kulkarni; Mashelkar

    1999-08-20

    Copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and N-acryloyl amino acid spacers of varying chain length were synthesized. p-Aminobenzamidine (PABA) was chemically linked to the pendant carboxyl groups of these polymers to obtain thermoprecipitating affinity polymers. The inhibition constant (Ki) of these polymers for trypsin decreased, i. e., the efficiency of PABA-trypsin binding increased with increase in the spacer chain length. The polymer to which PABA was linked through a spacer of five methylene groups exhibited eleven times lower Ki than that of the polymer containing PABA without a spacer. Investigations on model inhibitors N-acyl-p-aminobenzamidines showed that this enhancement in trypsin binding by the polymers was due to the spacer as well as to microenvironmental effects. Recovery and specific activity of the trypsin recovered increased with the spacer chain length. Separation of trypsin from a mixture of trypsin and chymotrypsin was also enhanced with the spacer chain length. The inhibition constants of these affinity polymers were not adversely affected by the crowding effect. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10397880

  6. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  7. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  8. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  9. Stable high capacity, F-actin affinity column

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, E.J.; Wang, Y.L.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Branton, D.; Taylor, D.L.

    1982-11-10

    A high capacity F-actin affinity matrix is constructed by binding fluorescyl-actin to rabbit anti-fluorescein IgG that is covalently bound to Sepharose 4B. When stabilized with phalloidin, the actin remains associated with the Sepharose beads during repeated washes, activates the ATPase activity of myosin subfragment 1, and specifically binds /sup 125/I-heavy meromyosin and /sup 125/I-tropomyosin. The associations between the F-actin-binding proteins are monitored both by affinity chromatography and by a rapid, low speed sedimentation assay. Anti-fluorescein IgG-Sepharose should be generally useful as a matrix for the immobilization of proteins containing accessible, covalently bound fluorescein groups.

  10. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  11. Tripartite ATP-independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporters Use an Arginine-mediated Selectivity Filter for High Affinity Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marcus; Hopkins, Adam P.; Severi, Emmanuele; Hawkhead, Judith; Bawdon, Daniel; Watts, Andrew G.; Hubbard, Roderick E.; Thomas, Gavin H.

    2015-01-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters are secondary transporters that have evolved an obligate dependence on a substrate-binding protein (SBP) to confer unidirectional transport. Different members of the DctP family of TRAP SBPs have binding sites that recognize a diverse range of organic acid ligands but appear to only share a common electrostatic interaction between a conserved arginine and a carboxylate group in the ligand. We investigated the significance of this interaction using the sialic acid-specific SBP, SiaP, from the Haemophilus influenzae virulence-related SiaPQM TRAP transporter. Using in vitro, in vivo, and structural methods applied to SiaP, we demonstrate that the coordination of the acidic ligand moiety of sialic acid by the conserved arginine (Arg-147) is essential for the function of the transporter as a high affinity scavenging system. However, at high substrate concentrations, the transporter can function in the absence of Arg-147 suggesting that this bi-molecular interaction is not involved in further stages of the transport cycle. As well as being required for high affinity binding, we also demonstrate that the Arg-147 is a strong selectivity filter for carboxylate-containing substrates in TRAP transporters by engineering the SBP to recognize a non-carboxylate-containing substrate, sialylamide, through water-mediated interactions. Together, these data provide biochemical and structural support that TRAP transporters function predominantly as high affinity transporters for carboxylate-containing substrates. PMID:26342690

  12. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  13. High-throughput and multiplexed regeneration buffer scouting for affinity-based interactions.

    PubMed

    Geuijen, Karin P M; Schasfoort, Richard B; Wijffels, Rene H; Eppink, Michel H M

    2014-06-01

    Affinity-based analyses on biosensors depend partly on regeneration between measurements. Regeneration is performed with a buffer that efficiently breaks all interactions between ligand and analyte while maintaining the active binding site of the ligand. We demonstrated a regeneration buffer scouting using the combination of a continuous flow microspotter with a surface plasmon resonance imaging platform to simultaneously test 48 different regeneration buffers on a single biosensor. Optimal regeneration conditions are found within hours and consume little amounts of buffers, analyte, and ligand. This workflow can be applied to any ligand that is coupled through amine, thiol, or streptavidin immobilization.

  14. High affinity of water-soluble cryptophanes for cesium cations.

    PubMed

    Brotin, Thierry; Montserret, Roland; Bouchet, Aude; Cavagnat, Dominique; Linares, Mathieu; Buffeteau, Thierry

    2012-01-20

    Exceptionally high affinity for cesium cations was achieved in aqueous solution using two enantiopure cryptophanes. Complexation of cesium was evidenced by (133)Cs NMR spectroscopy and by electronic circular dichroism (ECD). Binding constants as high as 6 × 10(9) M(-1) have been measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Very strong complexation of rubidium cations (K ~10(6) M(-1)) has also been measured. Chiral hosts allowed the detection of the two cations at low concentrations (μM) using ECD.

  15. Protein–Polymer Conjugation via Ligand Affinity and Photoactivation of Glutathione S-Transferase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A photoactivated, site-selective conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to the glutathione (GSH) binding pocket of glutathione S-transferase (GST) is described. To achieve this, a GSH analogue (GSH-BP) was designed and chemically synthesized with three functionalities: (1) the binding affinity of GSH to GST, (2) a free thiol for polymer functionalization, and (3) a photoreactive benzophenone (BP) component. Different molecular weights (2 kDa, 5 kDa, and 20 kDa) of GSH-BP modified PEGs (GSBP-PEGs) were synthesized and showed conjugation efficiencies between 52% and 76% to GST. Diazirine (DA) PEG were also prepared but gave conjugation yields lower than for GSBP-PEGs. PEGs with different end-groups were also synthesized to validate the importance of each component in the end-group design. End-groups included glutathione (GS-PEG) and benzophenone (BP-PEG). Results showed that both GSH and BP were crucial for successful conjugation to GST. In addition, conjugations of 5 kDa GSBP-PEG to different proteins were investigated, including bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (Lyz), ubiquitin (Ubq), and GST-fused ubiquitin (GST-Ubq) to ensure specific binding to GST. By combining noncovalent and covalent interactions, we have developed a new phototriggered protein–polymer conjugation method that is generally applicable to GST-fusion proteins. PMID:25315970

  16. Preparation, optimization and application of affinity absorbent with a polysaccharide YCP as the ligand.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ran; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Xian; Zhu, Rui; Yao, Wen-Bing; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2014-04-15

    YCP, an α-glucan from the mycelium of marine filamentous fungus Phoma herbarum YS4108, has great antitumor potential via enhancement of host immune through Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 signaling. In the current study, YCP was coupled to EAH Sepharose 4B agarose beads to prepare the YCP-Sepharose affinity absorbent using 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as the activating agent. An orthogonal experiment L9 (3)(4) was applied to optimize the coupling procedure, giving the optimal parameters as follows: molar ratio of CDAP to YCP of 1:2, CDAP-activation time of 5 min, gel volume of 0.1 mL, and gel-incubation time of 72 h, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated successfully preparation of YCP immobilized sepharose beads, while these beads essentially maintained biological properties of free YCP since they can interact with TLR2 and TLR4 specifically at comparable level. Collectively, our findings provide an alternative approach to immobilize carbohydrate-based molecules for studying the carbohydrate-protein interaction.

  17. The High-Affinity E. Coli Methionine ABC Transporter: Structure And Allosteric Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadaba, N.S.; Kaiser, J.T.; Johnson, E.; Lee, A.; Rees, D.C.

    2009-05-18

    The crystal structure of the high-affinity Escherichia coli MetNI methionine uptake transporter, a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been solved to 3.7 angstrom resolution. The overall architecture of MetNI reveals two copies of the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) MetN in complex with two copies of the transmembrane domain MetI, with the transporter adopting an inward-facing conformation exhibiting widely separated nucleotide binding domains. Each MetI subunit is organized around a core of five transmembrane helices that correspond to a subset of the helices observed in the larger membrane-spanning subunits of the molybdate (ModBC) and maltose (MalFGK) ABC transporters. In addition to the conserved nucleotide binding domain of the ABC family, MetN contains a carboxyl-terminal extension with a ferredoxin-like fold previously assigned to a conserved family of regulatory ligand-binding domains. These domains separate the nucleotide binding domains and would interfere with their association required for ATP binding and hydrolysis. Methionine binds to the dimerized carboxyl-terminal domain and is shown to inhibit ATPase activity. These observations are consistent with an allosteric regulatory mechanism operating at the level of transport activity, where increased intracellular levels of the transported ligand stabilize an inward-facing, ATPase-inactive state of MetNI to inhibit further ligand translocation into the cell.

  18. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 1. Regional rat brain distribution of iodinated benzamides

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Ansari, M.S.; de Paulis, T.; Schmidt, D.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, H.E.; Manning, R.G.; Gillespie, D.; Ebert, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Five 125I-labeled substituted benzamides, which are close structural analogues of (S)-sulpiride, eticlopride, and isoremoxipride, were evaluated for their selective in vivo uptake into dopamine D2 receptor rich tissue of the rat brain. Iodopride (KD 0.88 nM), an iodine substituted benzamide structurally related to sulpiride, displayed a maximal striatum: cerebellar uptake ratio of 7.6. Demonstration of saturation of the receptor with (125I)iodopride in striatum required uptake in frontal cortex to be used, rather than cerebellar uptake, to define nonspecific binding. Two other ligands structurally related to eticlopride, iclopride (KD 0.23 nM) and itopride (KD 0.16 nM), displayed maximal striatal: cerebellar uptake ratios of 9.8 and 3.3, respectively. The most potent ligands, epidepride (KD 0.057 nM) and ioxipride (KD 0.070 nM) showed striatal:cerebellar uptake ratios of 234 and 65, respectively. The observed uptake ratios correlated poorly with the affinity constants for the dopamine D2 receptor alone, but were highly correlated (r = 0.92) with the product of the receptor dissociation constant (KD) and the apparent lipophilicity (kw), as determined by reverse-phase HPLC at pH 7.5. Total striatal uptake also appeared dependent on lipophilicity, with maximal uptake occurring for ligands having log kw 2.4-2.8.

  19. Structural requirements to obtain highly potent and selective 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) Ligands.

    PubMed

    Taliani, Sabrina; Pugliesi, Isabella; Da Settimo, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The (18 kDa) Translocator Protein (TSPO), was initially identified in 1977 as peripheral binding site for the benzodiazepine diazepam and named "Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)". It is an evolutionarily well-conserved protein particularly located at the outer/inner mitochondrial membrane contact sites, in closely association with the 32 kDa voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and the 30 kDa adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), thus forming the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). TSPO is ubiquitary expressed in peripheral tissues (steroid producing tissues, liver, heart, kidney, lung, immune system) and in lower levels in the central nervous system, where it is mainly located in glial cells, and in neurons. TSPO is involved in a variety of biological processes such as cholesterol transport, steroidogenesis, calcium homeostasis, lipid metabolism, mitochondrial oxidation, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis induction, and regulation of immune functions. In the last decade, many studies have reported that TSPO basal expression is altered in a number of human pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders (Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases), as well as in various forms of brain injury and inflammation and anxiety. Consequently, TSPO has not only been suggested as a promising drug target for a number of therapeutic applications (anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, immunomodulating, etc.), but also as valid diagnostic marker for related-disease state and progression, prompting the development of specific labelled ligands as powerful tools for imaging techniques. A number of structurally different classes of ligands have been reported, showing high affinity and selectivity towards TSPO. Indeed, most of these ligands have been designed starting from selective CBR ligands which were structurally modified in order to shift their affinity towards TSPO. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies were performed allowing to

  20. The Dipole Potential Modifies the Clustering and Ligand Binding Affinity of ErbB Proteins and Their Signaling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Tamás; Batta, Gyula; Hajdu, Tímea; Szabó, Ágnes; Váradi, Tímea; Zákány, Florina; Csomós, István; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although activation of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbB1-4) is driven by oligomerization mediated by intermolecular interactions between the extracellular, the kinase and the transmembrane domains, the transmembrane domain has been largely neglected in this regard. The largest contributor to the intramembrane electric field, the dipole potential, alters the conformation of transmembrane peptides, but its effect on ErbB proteins is unknown. Here, we show by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and number and brightness (N&B) experiments that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced increase in the homoassociation of ErbB1 and ErbB2 and their heteroassociation are augmented by increasing the dipole potential. These effects were even more pronounced for ErbB2 harboring an activating Val → Glu mutation in the transmembrane domain (NeuT). The signaling capacity of ErbB1 and ErbB2 was also correlated with the dipole potential. Since the dipole potential decreased the affinity of EGF to ErbB1, the augmented growth factor-induced effects at an elevated dipole potential were actually induced at lower receptor occupancy. We conclude that the dipole potential plays a permissive role in the clustering of ErbB receptors and that the effects of lipid rafts on ligand binding and receptor signaling can be partially attributed to the dipole potential. PMID:27775011

  1. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher's attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with Kd 56±7.3nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  2. Simultaneous targeting of two ligand-binding sites on VEGFR2 using biparatopic Affibody molecules results in dramatically improved affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Klint, Susanne; Hanze, Martin; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and ophthalmic disorders such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and corresponding receptors are regulators of angiogenesis and have been much investigated as therapeutic targets. The aim of this work was to generate antagonistic VEGFR2-specific affinity proteins having adjustable pharmacokinetic properties allowing for either therapy or molecular imaging. Two antagonistic Affibody molecules that were cross-reactive for human and murine VEGFR2 were selected by phage and bacterial display. Surprisingly, although both binders independently blocked VEGF-A binding, competition assays revealed interaction with non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor. Biparatopic molecules, comprising the two Affibody domains, were hence engineered to potentially increase affinity even further through avidity. Moreover, an albumin-binding domain was included for half-life extension in future in vivo experiments. The best-performing of the biparatopic constructs demonstrated up to 180-fold slower dissociation than the monomers. The new Affibody constructs were also able to specifically target VEGFR2 on human cells, while simultaneously binding to albumin, as well as inhibit VEGF-induced signaling. In summary, we have generated small antagonistic biparatopic Affibody molecules with high affinity for VEGFR2, which have potential for both future therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25515662

  3. Mu/sub 1/: A very high affinity subtype of enkephalin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, R.A.; Cruciani, R.A.; Munson, P.J.; Rodbard, D.

    1985-06-10

    Displacement studies of (/sup 3/H)-(D-Ala/sup 2/-MePhe/sup 4/-Gly-ol/sup 5/)-enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)-DAGO) and (/sup 3/H)-(D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/)-enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)-DADL) by the corresponding unlabeled ligands show that there are at least three classes of sites which bind these enkephalin analogs with high affinity. Using computer modeling, the introduction of the third site significantly improved the goodness of fit in ten consecutive experiments. These sites appear to correspond to the ..mu.., delta, and ..mu../sub 1/ sites, with mean dissociation constants of 11, 1.3 and 0.9 nM for DADL and 2.5, 300 and 0.3 nM for DAGO, respectively. 15 reference, 3 figures, 1 table.

  4. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR.

  5. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  6. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  7. Open tubular columns containing the immobilized ligand binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ for dual agonists characterization by frontal affinity chromatography with MS detection

    PubMed Central

    Temporini, C.; Pochetti, G.; Fracchiolla, G.; Piemontese, L.; Montanari, R.; Moaddel, R.; Laghezza, A.; Altieri, F.; Cervoni, L.; Ubiali, D.; Prada, E.; Loiodice, F.; Massolini, G.; Calleri, E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. In the last years novel PPARs ligands have been identified and these include PPARα/γ dual agonists. To rapidly identify novel PPARs dual ligands, a robust binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening towards PPAR isoforms would be desirable. In this work we describe a parallel assay based on the principles of Frontal Affinity Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (FAC-MS) that can be used to characterize dual agonists. For this purpose the ligand binding domain of PPARα receptor was immobilized onto the surface of open tubular capillaries to create new PPAR-alpha-OT columns to be used in parallel with PPAR-gamma-OT columns. The two biochromatographic systems were used in both ranking and Kd experiments towards new ureidofibrate-like dual agonists for subtype selectivity ratio determination. In order to validate the system, the Kd values determined by frontal analysis chromatography were compared to the affinity constants obtained by ITC experiments. The results of this study strongly demonstrate the specific nature of the interaction of the ligands with the two immobilized receptor subtypes. PMID:23466198

  8. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display

    PubMed Central

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C.; Van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M.P.; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens. PMID:27472381

  9. Devices and approaches for generating specific high-affinity nucleic acid aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kylan; Craighead, Harold G.

    2014-09-01

    High-affinity and highly specific antibody proteins have played a critical role in biological imaging, medical diagnostics, and therapeutics. Recently, a new class of molecules called aptamers has emerged as an alternative to antibodies. Aptamers are short nucleic acid molecules that can be generated and synthesized in vitro to bind to virtually any target in a wide range of environments. They are, in principal, less expensive and more reproducible than antibodies, and their versatility creates possibilities for new technologies. Aptamers are generated using libraries of nucleic acid molecules with random sequences that are subjected to affinity selections for binding to specific target molecules. This is commonly done through a process called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, in which target-bound nucleic acids are isolated from the pool, amplified to high copy numbers, and then reselected against the desired target. This iterative process is continued until the highest affinity nucleic acid sequences dominate the enriched pool. Traditional selections require a dozen or more laborious cycles to isolate strongly binding aptamers, which can take months to complete and consume large quantities of reagents. However, new devices and insights from engineering and the physical sciences have contributed to a reduction in the time and effort needed to generate aptamers. As the demand for these new molecules increases, more efficient and sensitive selection technologies will be needed. These new technologies will need to use smaller samples, exploit a wider range of chemistries and techniques for manipulating binding, and integrate and automate the selection steps. Here, we review new methods and technologies that are being developed towards this goal, and we discuss their roles in accelerating the availability of novel aptamers.

  10. A New Method for Navigating Optimal Direction for Pulling Ligand from Binding Pocket: Application to Ranking Binding Affinity by Steered Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quan Van; Nguyen, Tin Trung; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-12-28

    In this paper we present a new method for finding the optimal path for pulling a ligand from the binding pocket using steered molecular dynamics (SMD). Scoring function is defined as the steric hindrance caused by a receptor to ligand movement. Then the optimal path corresponds to the minimum of this scoring function. We call the new method MSH (Minimal Steric Hindrance). Contrary to existing navigation methods, our approach takes into account the geometry of the ligand while other methods including CAVER only consider the ligand as a sphere with a given radius. Using three different target + receptor sets, we have shown that the rupture force Fmax and nonequilibrium work Wpull obtained based on the MSH method show a much higher correlation with experimental data on binding free energies compared to CAVER. Furthermore, Wpull was found to be a better indicator for binding affinity than Fmax. Thus, the new MSH method is a reliable tool for obtaining the best direction for ligand exiting from the binding site. Its combination with the standard SMD technique can provide reasonable results for ranking binding affinities using Wpull as a scoring function. PMID:26595261

  11. Heptameric targeting ligands against EGFR and HER2 with high stability and avidity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Yan, Yitang; Valencia, C Alexander; Liu, Rihe

    2012-01-01

    Multivalency of targeting ligands provides significantly increased binding strength towards their molecular targets. Here, we report the development of a novel heptameric targeting system, with general applications, constructed by fusing a target-binding domain with the heptamerization domain of the Archaeal RNA binding protein Sm1 through a flexible hinge peptide. The previously reported affibody molecules against EGFR and HER2, Z(EGFR) and Z(HER2), were used as target binding moieties. The fusion molecules were highly expressed in E. coli as soluble proteins and efficiently self-assembled into multimeric targeting ligands with the heptamer as the predominant form. We demonstrated that the heptameric molecules were resistant to protease-mediated digestion or heat- and SDS-induced denaturation. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that both heptameric Z(EGFR) and Z(HER2) ligands have a significantly enhanced binding strength to their target receptors with a nearly 100 to 1000 fold increase relative to the monomeric ligands. Cellular binding assays showed that heptameric ligands maintained their target-binding specificities similar to the monomeric forms towards their respective receptor. The non-toxic property of each heptameric ligand was demonstrated by the cell proliferation assay. In general,, the heptamerization strategy we describe here could be applied to the facile and efficient engineering of other protein domain- or short peptide-based affinity molecules to acquire significantly improved target-binding strengths with potential applications in the targeted delivery of various imaging or therapeutic agents.. PMID:22912791

  12. Rapid and efficient cancer cell killing mediated by high-affinity death receptor homotrimerizing TRAIL variants

    PubMed Central

    Reis, C R; van der Sloot, A M; Natoni, A; Szegezdi, E; Setroikromo, R; Meijer, M; Sjollema, K; Stricher, F; Cool, R H; Samali, A; Serrano, L; Quax, W J

    2010-01-01

    The tumour necrosis factor family member TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells through the activation of death receptors 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5) and is considered a promising anticancer therapeutic agent. As apoptosis seems to occur primarily via only one of the two death receptors in many cancer cells, the introduction of DR selectivity is thought to create more potent TRAIL agonists with superior therapeutic properties. By use of a computer-aided structure-based design followed by rational combination of mutations, we obtained variants that signal exclusively via DR4. Besides an enhanced selectivity, these TRAIL-DR4 agonists show superior affinity to DR4, and a high apoptosis-inducing activity against several TRAIL-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines in vitro. Intriguingly, combined treatment of the DR4-selective variant and a DR5-selective TRAIL variant in cancer cell lines signalling by both death receptors leads to a significant increase in activity when compared with wild-type rhTRAIL or each single rhTRAIL variant. Our results suggest that TRAIL induced apoptosis via high-affinity and rapid-selective homotrimerization of each DR represent an important step towards an efficient cancer treatment. PMID:21368856

  13. A high-affinity, radioiodinatable neuropeptide FF analogue incorporating a photolabile p-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Bray, Lauriane; Moulédous, Lionel; Tafani, Jean A M; Germanier, Maryse; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-15

    A new radioiodinated photoaffinity compound, [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFNH2, derived from a peptide present in the rat neuropeptide FF (NPFF) precursor was synthesized, and its binding characteristics were investigated on a neuroblastoma clone, SH-SY5Y, stably expressing rat NPFF2 receptors tagged with the T7 epitope. The binding of the probe was saturable and revealed a high-affinity interaction (KD=0.24nM) with a single class of binding sites. It was also able to affinity label NPFF2 receptor in a specific and efficient manner given that 38% of the bound radioligand at saturating concentration formed a wash-resistant binding after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Photoaffinity labeling with [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFamide showed two molecular forms of NPFF2 receptor with apparent molecular weights of 140 and 95kDa in a 2:1 ratio. The comparison of the results between photoaffinity labeling and Western blot analysis suggests that all receptor forms bind the probe irreversibly with the same efficiency. On membranes of mouse olfactory bulb, only the high molecular weight form of NPFF2 receptor is observed. [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFamide is an excellent radioiodinated peptidic ligand for direct and selective labeling of NPFF2 receptors in vitro.

  14. Cucurbiturils: from synthesis to high-affinity binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Khaleel I; Nau, Werner M

    2015-01-21

    In the wide area of supramolecular chemistry, cucurbit[n]urils (CBn) present themselves as a young family of molecular containers, able to form stable complexes with various guests, including drug molecules, amino acids and peptides, saccharides, dyes, hydrocarbons, perfluorinated hydrocarbons, and even high molecular weight guests such as proteins (e.g., human insulin). Since the discovery of the first CBn, CB6, the field has seen tremendous growth with respect to the synthesis of new homologues and derivatives, the discovery of record binding affinities of guest molecules in their hydrophobic cavity, and associated applications ranging from sensing to drug delivery. In this review, we discuss in detail the fundamental properties of CBn homologues and their cyclic derivatives with a focus on their synthesis and their applications in catalysis.

  15. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  16. KW-3902, a selective high affinity antagonist for adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, H.; Ichimura, M.; Takeda, M.; Kanda, T.; Shimada, J.; Suzuki, F.; Kase, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We demonstrate that 8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine (KW-3902) is a very potent and selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, assessed by radioligand binding and cyclic AMP response in cells. 2. In rat forebrain adenosine A1 receptors labelled with [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), KW-3902 had a Ki value of 0.19 nM, whereas it showed a Ki value of 170 nM in rat striatal A2A receptors labelled with [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine (CGS21680), indicating 890 fold A1 receptor selectivity versus the A2A receptor. KW-3902 at 10 microM showed no effect on recombinant rat A3 receptors expressed on CHO cells. 3. Saturation studies with [3H]-KW-3902 revealed that it bound with high affinity (Kd = 77 pM) and limited capacity (Bmax = 470 fmol mg-1 of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. A high positive correlation was observed between the pharmacological profile of adenosine ligands inhibiting the binding of [3H]-KW-3902 and that of [3H]-CHA. 4. KW-3902 showed potent A1 antagonism against the inhibition of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT1 MF-2 cells by the A1-selective agonist, cyclopentyladenosine with a dissociation constant (KB value) of 0.34 nM. KW-3902 antagonized 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-elicited cyclic AMP accumulation via A2B receptors with a KB value of 52 nM. 5. KW-3902 exhibited marked species-dependent differences in the binding affinities. The highest affinity was for the rat A1 receptor (ki = 0.19 nM) and these values for guinea-pig and dog A1 receptors were 1.3 and 10 nM, respectively. PMID:8732272

  17. Development and Characterization of High Affinity Leptins and Leptin Antagonists*

    PubMed Central

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin. PMID:21119198

  18. Development and characterization of high affinity leptins and leptin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-02-11

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin.

  19. Single-molecule dissection of the high-affinity cohesin–dockerin complex

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Stefan W.; Nash, Michael A.; Fried, Daniel B.; Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Bayer, Edward A.; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose-degrading enzyme systems are of significant interest from both a scientific and technological perspective due to the diversity of cellulase families, their unique assembly and substrate binding mechanisms, and their potential applications in several key industrial sectors, notably cellulose hydrolysis for second-generation biofuel production. Particularly fascinating are cellulosomes, the multimodular extracellular complexes produced by numerous anaerobic bacteria. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we analyzed the mechanical stability of the intermolecular interfaces between the cohesin and the dockerin modules responsible for self-assembly of the cellulosomal components into the multienzyme complex. The observed cohesin–dockerin rupture forces (>120 pN) are among the highest reported for a receptor–ligand system to date. Using an atomic force microscope protocol that quantified single-molecule binding activity, we observed force-induced dissociation of calcium ions from the duplicated loop–helix F-hand motif located within the dockerin module, which in the presence of EDTA resulted in loss of affinity to the cohesin partner. A cohesin amino acid mutation (D39A) that eliminated hydrogen bonding with the dockerin’s critically conserved serine residues reduced the observed rupture forces. Consequently, no calcium loss occurred and dockerin activity was maintained throughout multiple forced dissociation events. These results offer insights at the single-molecule level into the stability and folding of an exquisite class of high-affinity protein–protein interactions that dictate fabrication and architecture of cellulose-degrading molecular machines. PMID:23188794

  20. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L.

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  1. Sequential class switching is required for the generation of high affinity IgE antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Huizhong; Dolpady, Jayashree; Wabl, Matthias; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    IgE antibodies with high affinity for their antigens can be stably cross-linked at low concentrations by trace amounts of antigen, whereas IgE antibodies with low affinity bind their antigens weakly. In this study, we find that there are two distinct pathways to generate high and low affinity IgE. High affinity IgE is generated through sequential class switching (μ→γ→ε) in which an intermediary IgG phase is necessary for the affinity maturation of the IgE response, where the IgE inherits somatic hypermutations and high affinity from the IgG1 phase. In contrast, low affinity IgE is generated through direct class switching (μ→ε) and is much less mutated. Mice deficient in IgG1 production cannot produce high affinity IgE, even after repeated immunizations. We demonstrate that a small amount of high affinity IgE can cause anaphylaxis and is pathogenic. Low affinity IgE competes with high affinity IgE for binding to Fcε receptors and prevents anaphylaxis and is thus beneficial. PMID:22249450

  2. Identification and affinity of very high affinity binding sites for the phenylalkylamine series of Ca/sup +/ channel blockers in the Drosophila nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Pauron, D.; Qar, J.; Barhanin, J.; Fournier, D.; Cuany, A.; Pralavorio, M.; Berge, J.B.; Lazdunski, M.

    1987-10-06

    The interaction of putative Ca/sup 2 +/ channels of Drosophila head membranes with molecules of the phenylalkylamine series was studied from binding experiments using (-)-(/sup 3/H)D888 and (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)verapamil. These ligands recognize a single class of very high affinity binding sites. The most potent molecule in the phenylalkylamine series was (-)-verapamil with a K/sub d/ value as exceptional low as 4.7 pM. Molecules in the benzothiazepine and diphenylbutylpiperidine series of Ca/sup 2 +/ channel blockers as well as bepridil inhibited (-)-(/sup 3/H)D888 binding in a competitive way with K/sub d/ values between 12 and 190 nM, suggesting a close correlation, as in the mammalian system, between these receptor sites and those recognizing phenylalkylamines. A tritiated (arylazido)phenylalkylamine with high affinity for the Drosophila head membranes, phenylalkylamine receptor was used in photoaffinity experiments. A protein of M/sub r/ 135,000 +/- 5000 was specifically labeled after ultraviolet irradiation.

  3. Selection of a high-affinity and in vivo bioactive ssDNA aptamer against angiotensin II peptide.

    PubMed

    Heiat, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Reza; Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2016-08-01

    Unique features of aptamers have attracted interests for a broad range of applications. Aptamers are able to specifically bind to targets and inhibit their functions. This study, aimed to isolate the high affinity ssDNA aptamers against bio-regulator peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) and investigate their bioactivity in cellular and animal models. To isolate ssDNA aptamers, 12 rounds of affinity chromatography SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) procedure were carried out. The SPR (surface plasmon resonance) and ELONA (enzyme linked oligonucleotide assay) analysis were used to determine the affinity and specificity of aptamers. The ability of selected aptamers to inhibit the proliferative effect of Ang II on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HA-VSMCs) and their performance on Wistar rat urinary system and serum electrolyte levels were investigated. Two full-length aptamers (FLC112 and FLC125) with high affinity of respectively 7.52±2.44E-10 and 5.87±1.3E-9M were isolated against Ang II. The core regions of these aptamers (CRC112 and CRC125) also showed affinity of 5.33±1.15E-9 and 4.11±1.09E-9M. In vitro analysis revealed that FLC112 and FLC125 can inhibit the proliferative effect of Ang II on HA-VSMCs (P<0.05). They also significantly reduced the serum sodium level and increased the urine volume (P<0.05). The core regions of aptamers did not show high inhibitory potential against Ang II. It can be a spotlight that ssDNA aptamers have high potential for blocking Ang II. In conclusion, it appears that the researches focusing on high affinity and bioactive aptamers may lead to excellent results in blocking Ang II activity. PMID:27298205

  4. Structural Basis of the High Affinity Interaction between the Alphavirus Nonstructural Protein-3 (nsP3) and the SH3 Domain of Amphiphysin-2.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, Helena; Aitio, Olli; Hellman, Maarit; Saksela, Kalle; Permi, Perttu

    2016-07-29

    We show that a peptide from Chikungunya virus nsP3 protein spanning residues 1728-1744 binds the amphiphysin-2 (BIN1) Src homology-3 (SH3) domain with an unusually high affinity (Kd 24 nm). Our NMR solution complex structure together with isothermal titration calorimetry data on several related viral and cellular peptide ligands reveal that this exceptional affinity originates from interactions between multiple basic residues in the target peptide and the extensive negatively charged binding surface of amphiphysin-2 SH3. Remarkably, these arginines show no fixed conformation in the complex structure, indicating that a transient or fluctuating polyelectrostatic interaction accounts for this affinity. Thus, via optimization of such dynamic electrostatic forces, viral peptides have evolved a superior binding affinity for amphiphysin-2 SH3 compared with typical cellular ligands, such as dynamin, thereby enabling hijacking of amphiphysin-2 SH3-regulated host cell processes by these viruses. Moreover, our data show that the previously described consensus sequence PXRPXR for amphiphysin SH3 ligands is inaccurate and instead define it as an extended Class II binding motif PXXPXRpXR, where additional positive charges between the two constant arginine residues can give rise to extraordinary high SH3 binding affinity.

  5. Designing a mutant CCL2-HSA chimera with high glycosaminoglycan-binding affinity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Gerlza, Tanja; Winkler, Sophie; Atlic, Aid; Zankl, Christina; Konya, Viktoria; Kitic, Nikola; Strutzmann, Elisabeth; Knebl, Kerstin; Adage, Tiziana; Heinemann, Akos; Weis, Roland; Kungl, Andreas J

    2015-08-01

    Chemokines like CCL2 mediate leukocyte migration to inflammatory sites by binding to G-protein coupled receptors on the target cell as well as to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the endothelium of the inflamed tissue. We have recently shown that the dominant-negative Met-CCL2 mutant Y13A/S21K/Q23R with improved GAG binding affinity is highly bio-active in several animal models of inflammatory diseases. For chronic indications, we have performed here a fusion to human serum albumin (HSA) in order to extend the serum half-life of the chemokine mutant. To compensate a potential drop in GAG-binding affinity due to steric hindrance by HSA, a series of novel CCL2 mutants was generated with additional basic amino acids which were genetically introduced at sites oriented towards the GAG ligand. From this set of mutants, the Met-CCL2 variant Y13A/N17K/S21K/Q23K/S34K exhibited high GAG-binding affinity and a similar selectivity as wild type (wt) CCL2. From a set of different HSA-chemokine chimeric constructs, the linked HSA(C34A)(Gly)4Ser-Met-CCL2(Y13A/N17K/S21K/Q23K/S34K) fusion protein was found to show the best overall GAG-binding characteristics. Molecular modeling demonstrated an energetically beneficial fold of this novel protein chimera. This was experimentally supported by GdmCl-induced unfolding studies, in which the fusion construct exhibited a well-defined secondary structure and a transition point significantly higher than both the wt and the unfused CCL2 mutant protein. Unlike the wt chemokine, the quaternary structure of the HSA-fusion protein is monomeric according to size-exclusion chromatography experiments. In competition experiments, the HSA-fusion construct displaced only two of seven unrelated chemokines from heparan sulfate, whereas the unfused CCL2 mutant protein displaced five other chemokines. The most effective concentration of the HSA-fusion protein in inhibiting CCL2-mediated monocyte attachment to endothelial cells, as detected in the flow chamber

  6. Ligand-Binding Affinity at the Insulin Receptor Isoform-A and Subsequent IR-A Tyrosine Phosphorylation Kinetics are Important Determinants of Mitogenic Biological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Harinda; Forbes, Briony E.

    2015-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A) arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signaling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival, and migration by activating some unique signaling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signaling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signaling (MAPK and Akt) and receptor internalization rates (related to mitogenic signaling). We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic [(His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51) IGF-I, qIGF-I] or metabolic (S597 peptide) biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signaling through the IR-A. The threefold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316, and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide, it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphorylation rather than potency that was associated with a low mitogenic potential. We conclude that both decreased affinity of IR-A binding and kinetics of IR-A phosphorylation can independently lead to a lower mitogenic activity. None of the studied parameters could account for the lower metabolic activity of qIGF-I. PMID:26217307

  7. Specific affinity-labeling of the nociceptin ORL1 receptor using a thiol-activated Cys(Npys)-containing peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ayami; Nishimura, Hirokazu; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Liu, Xiaohui; Costa, Tommaso; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    We previously showed that an antagonist-based peptide ligand, H-Cys(Npys)-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg- Ile-Lys-NH2 , captures the free thiol groups in the ligand-binding site of the nociceptin receptor ORL1. However, the exact receptor sites of this thiol-disulfide exchange reaction have not been uncovered, although such identification would help to clarify the ligand recognition site. Since the Cys→Ala substitution prevents the reaction, we performed the so-called Ala scanning for all the Cys residues in the transmembrane (TM) domains of the ORL1 receptor. Seven different mutant receptors were soundly expressed in the COS-7 cells and examined for their specific affinity labeling by a competitive binding assay using nociceptin and [(3) H]nociceptin. The results of in vitro Ala scanning analyses revealed that the labeled residues were Cys59 in TM1, Cys215 and Cys231 in TM5, and Cys310 in TM7. The present study has provided a novel method of Cys(Npys)-affinity labeling for identification of the ligand-binding sites in the ORL1 receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 460-469, 2016.

  8. Multiple mode of binding of phencyclidines: high affinity association between phencyclidine receptors in rat brain and a monovalent ion-sensitive polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Haring, R.; Kloog, Y.; Harshak-Felixbrodt, N.A.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-01-30

    Two populations of phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites are shown to exist in the rat brain: a high-affinity monovalent ion-sensitive site (Kd of 10-14 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP, (/sup 3/H)N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine), which exists in both the frontal cortex and the hippocampus, and a lower affinity site (Kd of 80-130 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP) which is found in the hippocampus but not in the frontal cortex. The nature of the interactions between the ion-binding sites and the high affinity PCP receptors depend on both ligand structure (PCP or TCP) and the ion involved (K or Na). The high-affinity sites are associated with an Mr 90,000 polypeptide whose labeling by (/sup 3/H)azido phencyclidine is selectively inhibited by monovalent ions.

  9. Tritiation of delta opioid-receptor selective antagonist dipeptide ligands with extraordinary affinity containing 2', 6'dimethyltyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, I.; Tóth, G.; Balboni, G.; Guerrini, R.; Salvadori, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a new class of δ opioid antagonists has been discovered by using Tyr-Tic sequence. The substitution of Tyr1 by Dmt resulted in a new analogue (H-Dmt-Tic-OH) with enhanced affinity and selectivity. Because of its excellent property we chose it for labelling with tritium. At the same time peptides containing Tic at position 2 undergo spontaneous diketopiperazine formation in some solvents, and they lose some of their binding ability. To avoid this unwanted side-reaction we synthetized the N-methylated analogue (N,N(Me)2-Dmt-Tic-OH), and it was more stable under storage condition, but δ affinity declined moderately. On the basis of this information we prepared diiodinated analogues of these dipeptides. Catalytic dehalotritiation of precursors resulted in tritiated peptides. High specific radioactivity, 44.67 Ci/mmol with [3H]Dmt-Tic-OH and 59.88 Ci/mmol with N,N(Me)2-[3H]Dmt-Tic-OH were achieved.

  10. Tritiation of delta opioid-receptor selective antagonist dipeptide ligands with extraordinary affinity containing 2‧, 6‧dimethyltyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, I.; Tóth, G.; Balboni, G.; Guerrini, R.; Salvadori, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a new class of δ opioid antagonists has been discovered by using Tyr-Tic sequence. The substitution of Tyr1 by Dmt resulted in a new analogue (H-Dmt-Tic-OH) with enhanced affinity and selectivity. Because of its excellent property we chose it for labelling with tritium. At the same time peptides containing Tic at position 2 undergo spontaneous diketopiperazine formation in some solvents, and they lose some of their binding ability. To avoid this unwanted side-reaction we synthetized the N-methylated analogue (N,N(Me)2-Dmt-Tic-OH), and it was more stable under storage condition, but δ affinity declined moderately. On the basis of this information we prepared diiodinated analogues of these dipeptides. Catalytic dehalotritiation of precursors resulted in tritiated peptides. High specific radioactivity, 44.67 Ci/mmol with [3H]Dmt-Tic-OH and 59.88 Ci/mmol with N,N(Me)2-[3H]Dmt-Tic-OH were achieved.

  11. SwellGel: a sample preparation affinity chromatography technology for high throughput proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Haney, Paul J; Draveling, Connie; Durski, Wendy; Romanowich, Kathryn; Qoronfleh, M Walid

    2003-04-01

    Development of high throughput systems for purification and analysis of proteins is essential for the success of today's proteomic research. We have developed an affinity chromatography technology that allows the customization of high capacity/high throughput chromatographic separation of proteins. This technology utilizes selected chromatography media that are dehydrated to form uniform SwellGel discs. Unlike wet resin slurries, these discs are easily adaptable to a variety of custom formats, eliminating problems associated with resin dispensing, equilibration, or leakage. Discs can be made in assorted sizes (resin volume 15 microl-3 ml) dispensed in various formats (384-, 96-, 48-, and 24-well microplates or columns) and different ligands can be attached to the matrix. SwellGel discs rapidly hydrate upon addition of either water or the protein sample, providing dramatically increased capacity compared to coated plates. At the same time, the discs offer greater stability, reproducibility, and ease of handling than standard wet chromatography resins. We previously reported the development of SwellGel for the purification of 6x His- and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged fusion proteins [Prot. Exp. Purif. 22 (2001) 359-366]. In this paper, we discuss an expanded list of SwellGel stabilized chromatographic methods that have been adapted to high throughput formats for processing protein samples ranging from 10 microl to 10 ml (1 microg to 50 mg protein). Data are presented applying SwellGel discs to high throughput proteomic applications such as affinity tag purification, protein desalting, the removal of abundant proteins from serum including albumin and immunoglobulin, and the isolation of phosphorylated peptides for mass spectrometry. PMID:12699691

  12. Backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the A147T polymorph of mouse TSPO in complex with a high-affinity radioligand.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The integral polytopic membrane protein TSPO is the target for numerous endogenous and synthetic ligands. However, the affinity of many ligands is influenced by a common polymorphism in TSPO, in which an alanine at position 147 is replaced by threonine, thereby complicating the use of several radioligands for clinical diagnosis. In contrast, the best-characterized TSPO ligand (R)-PK11195 binds with similar affinity to both variants of mitochondrial TSPO (wild-type and A147T variant). Here we report the (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the A147T polymorph of TSPO from Mus Musculus in complex with (R)-PK11195 in DPC detergent micelles. More than 90 % of all resonances were sequence-specifically assigned, demonstrating the ability to obtain high-quality spectral data for both the backbone and the side-chains of medically relevant integral membrane proteins.

  13. Biophysical Fragment Screening of the β1-Adrenergic Receptor: Identification of High Affinity Arylpiperazine Leads Using Structure-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biophysical fragment screening of a thermostabilized β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enabled the identification of moderate affinity, high ligand efficiency (LE) arylpiperazine hits 7 and 8. Subsequent hit to lead follow-up confirmed the activity of the chemotype, and a structure-based design approach using protein–ligand crystal structures of the β1AR resulted in the identification of several fragments that bound with higher affinity, including indole 19 and quinoline 20. In the first example of GPCR crystallography with ligands derived from fragment screening, structures of the stabilized β1AR complexed with 19 and 20 were determined at resolutions of 2.8 and 2.7 Å, respectively. PMID:23517028

  14. Synthesis of tetravalent LacNAc-glycoclusters as high-affinity cross-linker against Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Chuma, Yasushi; Yasumoto, Yoshinori; Onoda, Takashi; Umemura, Myco; Usui, Taichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of tetravalent double-headed glycoclusters [(LacNAc)4-DHGs] were designed with linkers of varying lengths consisting of alkanedioic carboxyamido groups (C6, C12, C18 and C24) between two bi-antennary LacNAc-glycosides. These glycoclusters served as high-affinity cross-linking ligands for the LacNAc-binding lectin Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA). The binding activity and cross-linking between each ligand and ECA were characterized by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a quantitative precipitation assay and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the precipitation assay and DLS measurement, the synthesized (LacNAc)4-DHGs were found to be capable of binding and precipitating the ECA as multivalent ligands. ITC analysis indicated the binding of (LacNAc)4-DHGs was driven by a favorable enthalpy change. Furthermore, the entropy penalty from binding (LacNAc)4-DHGs clearly decreased in a spacer length-dependent manner. The binding affinities of flexible (LacNAc)4-DHGs (C18 and C24) with long spacers were found to be more favorable than those of the clusters having short spacers (C6 and C12). These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules for the tetravalent glycoclusters with ECA. We concluded that the subtle modification in the epitope-presenting scaffolds exerts the significant effect in the recognition efficiency involved in the LacNAc moieties by ECA.

  15. Synthesis of tetravalent LacNAc-glycoclusters as high-affinity cross-linker against Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Chuma, Yasushi; Yasumoto, Yoshinori; Onoda, Takashi; Umemura, Myco; Usui, Taichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of tetravalent double-headed glycoclusters [(LacNAc)4-DHGs] were designed with linkers of varying lengths consisting of alkanedioic carboxyamido groups (C6, C12, C18 and C24) between two bi-antennary LacNAc-glycosides. These glycoclusters served as high-affinity cross-linking ligands for the LacNAc-binding lectin Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA). The binding activity and cross-linking between each ligand and ECA were characterized by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a quantitative precipitation assay and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the precipitation assay and DLS measurement, the synthesized (LacNAc)4-DHGs were found to be capable of binding and precipitating the ECA as multivalent ligands. ITC analysis indicated the binding of (LacNAc)4-DHGs was driven by a favorable enthalpy change. Furthermore, the entropy penalty from binding (LacNAc)4-DHGs clearly decreased in a spacer length-dependent manner. The binding affinities of flexible (LacNAc)4-DHGs (C18 and C24) with long spacers were found to be more favorable than those of the clusters having short spacers (C6 and C12). These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules for the tetravalent glycoclusters with ECA. We concluded that the subtle modification in the epitope-presenting scaffolds exerts the significant effect in the recognition efficiency involved in the LacNAc moieties by ECA. PMID:26672510

  16. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  17. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  18. Jen1p: A High Affinity Selenite Transporter in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Joseph R.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2010-01-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient in most eukaryotes, including humans, which is well known for having an extremely thin border between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Soluble tetravalent selenite is the predominant environmental form and also the form that is applied in the treatment of human diseases. To acquire this nutrient from low environmental concentrations as well as to avoid toxicity, a well-controlled transport system is required. Here we report that Jen1p, a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter in S. cerevisiae, catalyzes high-affinity uptake of selenite. Disruption of JEN1 resulted in selenite resistance, and overexpression resulted in selenite hypersensitivity. Transport assay showed that overexpression of Jen1p enables selenite accumulation in yeast compared with a JEN1 knock out strain, indicating the Jen1p transporter facilitates selenite accumulation inside cells. Selenite uptake by Jen1p had a Km of 0.91 mM, which is comparable to the Km for lactate. Jen1p transported selenite in a proton-dependent manner which resembles the transport mechanism for lactate. In addition, selenite and lactate can inhibit the transport of each other competitively. Therefore, we postulate selenite is a molecular mimic of monocarboxylates which allows selenite to be transported by Jen1p. PMID:20861301

  19. Solubilization and partial characterization of a microsomal high affinity GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Nicchitta, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    Isolated rat liver microsomes release sequestered Ca/sup 2 +/ following addition of GTP. In contrast to permeabilized cells, GTP dependent microsomal Ca/sup 2 +/ release requires low concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG). They have identified a microsomal, PEG-sensitive high affinity GTPase which shares a number of characteristics with the GTP-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ release system. To aid in further characterization of this activity they have initiated studies on the solubilization and purification of the microsomal GTPases. When microsomes are solubilized under the following conditions (150 mM NaCl, 5 mg protein/ml, 1% Triton X-114) PEG sensitive GTPase activity selectively partitions into the detergent rich phase of the Triton X-114 extract. As observed in intact microsomal membranes the Triton X-114 soluble GTPase is maximally stimulated by 3% PEG. Half maximal stimulation is observed at 1% PEG. PEG increases the Vmax of this activity; no effects on Km were observed. The Km for GTP of the detergent soluble GTPase is 5 ..mu..M. This GTPase is sensitive to inhibition by sulfhydryl reagents. PEG-sensitive GTPase activity was completely inhibited in the presence of 25 ..mu..M p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (PHMB); half maximal inhibition was observed at 5 ..mu..M. Labeling of the Triton X-114 extract with the photosensitive compound (/sup 32/P) 8-azido GTP indicated the presence of two prominent GTP binding proteins of approximate molecular weights 17 and 54 kD.

  20. Phosphatidylserine Reversibly Binds Cu2+ with Extremely High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Christopher F.; Cong, Xiao; Robison, Aaron; Pace, Hudson P.; Liu, Chunming; Poyton, Matthew F.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) embedded within supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) was found to bind Cu2+ from solution with extraordinarily high affinity. In fact, the equilibrium dissociation constant was in the femtomolar range. The resulting complex formed in a 1:2 Cu2+ to PS ratio and quenches a broad spectrum of lipid-bound fluorophores in a reversible and pH-dependent fashion. At acidic pH values, the fluorophores were almost completely unquenched, while at basic pH values significant quenching (85–90%) was observed. The pH at which the transition occurred was dependent on the PS concentration and ranged from approximately pH 5 to 8. The quenching kinetics was slow at low Cu2+ concentrations and basic values pH (up to several hours), while the unquenching reaction was orders of magnitude more rapid upon lowering the pH. This was consistent with diffusion limited complex formation at basic pH, but rapid dissociation under acidic conditions. The tight binding of Cu2+ to PS may have physiological consequences under certain circumstances. PMID:22548290

  1. The crystal structure of oxy hemoglobin from high oxygen affinity bird emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae).

    PubMed

    Mohamed Abubakkar, Mohamed H; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ponnuswamy, Mon Nanjappa G

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin is an honorary enzyme, a two-way respiratory carrier, transporting oxygen from the lungs to the tissues and facilitating the return transport of carbon dioxide. Hemoglobin has high affinity for oxygen and low affinity for carbon dioxide and other substances in the arterial circulation, whereas in the venous circulation these relative affinities are upturned. The oxygen affinity of hemoglobin increases with the fall in temperature and decreases with the increase in pH and 2, 3-bisphosphoglycerate; point mutations also affect the tetrameric arrangement and alter the oxygen affinity. Though several studies have revealed the specific reasons for the adaptation of increased oxygen affinity of avian hemoglobins at high-altitudes, further structural insights on hemoglobins from high oxygen affinity species are required to understand the detailed oxygen adaptation at the molecular level. Herein, we describe the structural investigation of hemoglobin from emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), a high oxygen affinity bird. Hemoglobin from emu was purified using anion-exchange chromatography, crystallized and determined the structure in the oxy form at a resolution of 2.3 Å; the R-factor of the model was 19.2%. The structure was compared with other oxy hemoglobins of high oxygen affinity avian species; significant changes are noted at intra-subunit contacts which provide the clues for increased oxygen affinity of emu hemoglobin. PMID:25146185

  2. Peptide-based protein capture agents with high affinity, selectivity, and stability as antibody replacements in biodetection assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrow, Blake; Warner, Candice; Finch, Amethist S.; Lai, Bert; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Heath, James R.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2014-05-01

    Current biodetection assays that employ monoclonal antibodies as primary capture agents exhibit limited fieldability, shelf life, and performance due to batch-to-batch production variability and restricted thermal stability. In order to improve upon the detection of biological threats in fieldable assays and systems for the Army, we are investigating protein catalyzed capture (PCC) agents as drop-in replacements for the existing antibody technology through iterative in situ click chemistry. The PCC agent oligopeptides are developed against known protein epitopes and can be mass produced using robotic methods. In this work, a PCC agent under development will be discussed. The performance, including affinity, selectivity, and stability of the capture agent technology, is analyzed by immunoprecipitation, western blotting, and ELISA experiments. The oligopeptide demonstrates superb selectivity coupled with high affinity through multi-ligand design, and improved thermal, chemical, and biochemical stability due to non-natural amino acid PCC agent design.

  3. Synthesis and structure-affinity relationships of new 4-(6-iodo-H-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)-N-dimethylbenzeneamine derivatives as ligands for human beta-amyloid plaques.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lisheng; Cuevas, Jessica; Temme, Sebastian; Herman, Mary M; Dagostin, Claudio; Widdowson, David A; Innis, Robert B; Pike, Victor W

    2007-09-20

    A new and extensive set of 4-(6-iodo-H-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)-N-dimethylbenzeneamine (IMPY) derivatives was synthesized and assayed for affinity toward human Abeta plaques. 6-Ethylthio- (12h), 6-cyano- (12e), 6-nitro- (12f), and 6-p-methoxybenzylthio- (15d) analogues were discovered to have high affinity (KI < 10 nM). However, introduction of a hydrophilic thioether group in the 6-position (15a-c, 15e-g) reduced or abolished affinity. In secondary N-methyl analogues, a bromo substituent in the adjacent ring position (14a) imparted high affinity (KI = 7.4 nM) whereas a methyl substituent did not (14c). The tolerance for nonhydrophilic thioether substituents in the 6-position opens up the possibility of developing new sensitive positron emission tomography radioligands for imaging human Abeta plaques in Alzheimer's disease, especially in view of the amenability of thioethers to be labeled with carbon-11 or fluorine-18 through S-alkylation reactions. The structure-activity relationships revealed in this study extends insight into the topography of the binding site for IMPY-like ligands in human Abeta plaques. PMID:17722900

  4. Molecular docking approaches in identification of High affinity inhibitors of Human SMO receptor

    PubMed Central

    Akare, Uday Raj; Bandaru, Srinivas; Shaheen, Uzma; Singh, Pramod Kumar; Tiwari, Geet; Singare, Paramanand; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Banerjee, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the Hh signaling pathway has been implicated in the development of several types of cancers including prostate, lung, pancreas, breast, brain and skin. Present study identified the binding affinities of eight established inhibitors viz., Cyclopamine, Saridegib, Itraconazole, LDE-225, TAK-441, BMS-833923 (XL139), PF-04449913 and Vismodegib targeting SMO receptor - a candidate protein involved in hedgehog pathway and sought to identify the best amongst the established inhibitors through by molecular docking. Exelxis® BMS 833923 (XL 139) demonstrated superior binding affinity aided by MolDock scoring docking algorithm. Further BMS 833923 (XL 139) was evaluated for pharmacophoric features which revealed appreciable ligand receptor interactions. PMID:25670876

  5. Re-exploring the N-phenylpicolinamide derivatives to develop mGlu4 ligands with improved affinity and in vitro microsomal stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoda; Kil, Kun-Eek; Poutiainen, Pekka; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Kang, Hye-Jin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2015-09-15

    In recent years, mGlu4 has received great attention and research effort because of the potential benefits of mGlu4 activation in treating numerous brain disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Many positive allosteric modulators of mGlu4 have been developed. To better understand the role of mGlu4 in healthy and disease conditions, we are interested in developing an mGlu4 selective radioligand for in vivo studies. Thus, we had synthesized and studied [(11)C]2 as a PET tracer for mGlu4, which demonstrated some promising features as a PET radioligand as well as the limitation need to be improved. In order to develop an mGlu4 ligand with enhanced affinity and improved metabolic stability, we have modified, synthesized and evaluated a series of new N-phenylpicolinamide derivatives. The SAR study has discovered a number of compounds with low nM affinity to mGlu4. The dideuteriumfluoromethoxy modified compound 24 is identified as a very promising mGlu4 ligand, which has demonstrated enhanced affinity, improved in vitro microsomal stability, good selectivity and good permeability. PMID:26231155

  6. Monitoring β-arrestin recruitment via β-lactamase enzyme fragment complementation: purification of peptide E as a low-affinity ligand for mammalian bombesin receptors.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Motozawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Seitaro; Takeda, Norifumi; Toko, Haruhiro; Takimoto, Eiki; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Komuro, Issei; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cognate ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provides a starting point for understanding novel regulatory mechanisms. Although GPCR ligands have typically been evaluated through the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, recent studies have shown that GPCRs signal not only through G proteins but also through β-arrestins. As such, monitoring β-arrestin signaling instead of G protein signaling will increase the likelihood of identifying currently unknown ligands, including β-arrestin-biased agonists. Here, we developed a cell-based assay for monitoring ligand-dependent GPCR-β-arrestin interaction via β-lactamase enzyme fragment complementation. Inter alia, β-lactamase is a superior reporter enzyme because of its cell-permeable fluorescent substrate. This substrate makes the assay non-destructive and compatible with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). In a reporter cell, complementary fragments of β-lactamase (α and ω) were fused to β-arrestin 2 and GPCR, respectively. Ligand stimulation initiated the interaction of these chimeric proteins (β-arrestin-α and GPCR-ω), and this inducible interaction was measured through reconstituted β-lactamase activity. Utilizing this system, we screened various mammalian tissue extracts for agonistic activities on human bombesin receptor subtype 3 (hBRS3). We purified peptide E as a low-affinity ligand for hBRS3, which was also found to be an agonist for the other two mammalian bombesin receptors such as gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and neuromedin B receptor (NMBR). Successful purification of peptide E has validated the robustness of this assay. We conclude that our newly developed system will facilitate the discovery of GPCR ligands.

  7. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  8. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  9. Immunotherapy Expands and Maintains the Function of High-Affinity Tumor-Infiltrating CD8 T Cells In Situ.

    PubMed

    Moran, Amy E; Polesso, Fanny; Weinberg, Andrew D

    2016-09-15

    Cancer cells harbor high-affinity tumor-associated Ags capable of eliciting potent antitumor T cell responses, yet detecting these polyclonal T cells is challenging. Therefore, surrogate markers of T cell activation such as CD69, CD44, and programmed death-1 (PD-1) have been used. We report in this study that in mice, expression of activation markers including PD-1 is insufficient in the tumor microenvironment to identify tumor Ag-specific T cells. Using the Nur77GFP T cell affinity reporter mouse, we highlight that PD-1 expression can be induced independent of TCR ligation within the tumor. Given this, we characterized the utility of the Nur77GFP model system in elucidating mechanisms of action of immunotherapies independent of PD-1 expression. Coexpression of Nur77GFP and OX40 identifies a polyclonal population of high-affinity tumor-associated Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, which produce more IFN-γ in situ than OX40 negative and doubles in quantity with anti-OX40 and anti-CTLA4 mAb therapy but not with anti-PD-1 or programmed death ligand-1. Moreover, expansion of these high-affinity CD8 T cells prolongs survival of tumor-bearing animals. Upon chronic stimulation in tumors and after adoptive cell therapy, CD8 TCR signaling and Nur77GFP induction is impaired, and tumors progress. However, this can be reversed and overall survival significantly enhanced after adoptive cell therapy with agonist OX40 immunotherapy. Therefore, we propose that OX40 agonist immunotherapy can maintain functional TCR signaling of chronically stimulated tumor-resident CD8 T cells, thereby increasing the frequency of cytotoxic, high-affinity, tumor-associated Ag-specific cells. PMID:27503208

  10. A solid-phase combinatorial approach for indoloquinolizidine-peptides with high affinity at D(1) and D(2) dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Molero, Anabel; Vendrell, Marc; Bonaventura, Jordi; Zachmann, Julian; López, Laura; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluis, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Albericio, Fernando; Casadó, Vicent; Royo, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    Ligands acting at multiple dopamine receptors hold potential as therapeutic agents for a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Specifically, compounds able to bind at D1R and D2R with high affinity could restore the effects of dopamine depletion and enhance motor activation on degenerated nigrostriatal dopaminergic systems. We have directed our research towards the synthesis and characterisation of heterocycle-peptide hybrids based on the indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidine core. This privileged structure is a water-soluble and synthetically accessible scaffold with affinity for diverse GPCRs. Herein we have prepared a solid-phase combinatorial library of 80 indoloquinolizidine-peptides to identify compounds with enhanced binding affinity at D2R, a receptor that is crucial to re-establish activity on dopamine-depleted degenerated GABAergic neurons. We applied computational tools and high-throughput screening assays to identify 9a{1,3,3} as a ligand for dopamine receptors with nanomolar affinity and agonist activity at D2R. Our results validate the application of indoloquinolizidine-peptide combinatorial libraries to fine-tune the pharmacological profiles of multiple ligands at D1 and D2 dopamine receptors.

  11. Expression of high-affinity IL-4 receptors on human melanoma, ovarian and breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Obiri, N I; Siegel, J P; Varricchio, F; Puri, R K

    1994-01-01

    It has previously been shown that murine sarcoma cells express high-affinity IL-4 receptors (IL-4R) which are internalized after binding to the ligand (Puri et al., Cancer Res 1991; 51:3011-7). We have also reported that human renal cell carcinoma cells express high-affinity IL-4R, and IL-4 inhibits tumour growth in vitro (Obiri et al., J Clin Invest 1993; 91:88). In this study we investigated the expression and function of IL-4R on other human solid tumours. Human melanoma, ovarian carcinoma and breast carcinoma cell lines were assessed for the cell surface expression of IL-4R by radio-ligand receptor binding and for IL-4R gene expression by Northern blot analysis. Primary cultures of mesothelioma and neurofibrosarcoma cells were similarly investigated. Human melanoma, ovarian carcinoma and breast carcinoma cell lines expressed IL-4R on their cell surface with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 140-549 pM. These tumour lines expressed a single 4 kb species of mRNA for IL-4R. Similarly, primary cultures of mesothelioma and neurofibrosarcoma cells were positive for the IL-4R mRNA by Northern blot analysis. Fresh, non-cultured mesothelioma and neurofibrosarcoma tumour sections were also positive for the presence of IL-4R as determined by immunohistochemistry of frozen sections using anti-IL-4R antibody. In order to study possible functions of IL-4R, we evaluated the effects of IL-4 on cell growth and its effect on MHC antigen expression in the presence or absence of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). In tissue culture, IL-4 reduced the growth of tumour cell lines and primary cell cultures studied. IL-4 had very little effect on MHC class I antigen expression on ovarian, breast and melanoma cell lines; however, MHC class II (HLA-DR) expression was enhanced on melanoma and breast carcinoma cells. IL-4 also enhanced the IFN-gamma-induced class II expression on melanoma and breast carcinoma cells. Taken together, our observations indicate that IL-4R are expressed on a variety of

  12. Describing high-dimensional dynamics with low-dimensional piecewise affine models: applications to renewable energy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a low-dimensional description for a high-dimensional system, which is a piecewise affine model whose state space is divided by permutations. We show that the proposed model tends to predict wind speeds and photovoltaic outputs for the time scales from seconds to 100 s better than by global affine models. In addition, computations using the piecewise affine model are much faster than those of usual nonlinear models such as radial basis function models.

  13. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  14. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests. PMID:24832237

  15. A Highly Selective Hsp90 Affinity Chromatography Resin with a Cleavable Linker

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Philip F; Barrott, Jared J; Carlson, David A; Loiselle, David R; Speer, Brittany L; Bodoor, Khaldon; Rund, Lauretta A; Haystead, Timothy A J

    2012-01-01

    Over 200 proteins have been identified that interact with the protein chaperone Hsp90, a recognized therapeutic target thought to participate in non-oncogene addiction in a variety of human cancers. However, defining Hsp90 clients is challenging because interactions between Hsp90 and its physiologically relevant targets involve low affinity binding and are thought to be transient. Using a chemo-proteomic strategy, we have developed a novel orthogonally cleavable Hsp90 affinity resin that allows purification of the native protein and is quite selective for Hsp90 over its immediate family members, GRP94 and TRAP 1. We show that the resin can be used under low stringency conditions for the rapid, unambiguous capture of native Hsp90 in complex with a native client. We also show that the choice of linker used to tether the ligand to the insoluble support can have a dramatic effect on the selectivity of the affinity media. PMID:22520629

  16. Identification of proteins associated with ligand-activated estrogen receptor α in human breast cancer cell nuclei by tandem affinity purification and nano LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Roberta; Bamundo, Angela; Nassa, Giovanni; Nola, Ernesto; Paris, Ornella; Ambrosino, Concetta; Facchiano, Angelo; Baumann, Marc; Nyman, Tuula A; Weisz, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ER-α) is a key mediator of estrogen actions in breast cancer (BC) cells. Understanding the effects of ligand-activated ER-α in target cells requires identification of the molecular partners acting in concert with this nuclear receptor to transduce the hormonal signal. We applied tandem affinity purification (TAP), glycerol gradient centrifugation and MS analysis to isolate and identify proteins interacting with ligand-activated ER-α in MCF-7 cell nuclei. This led to the identification of 264 ER-associated proteins, whose functions highlight the hinge role of ER-α in the coordination of multiple hormone-regulated nuclear processes in BC cells. PMID:21182205

  17. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  18. High affinity DNA-microtubule associated protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Marx, K A

    1992-07-01

    We have isolated the MAP/tau proteins from twice-cycled chick brain microtubule preparations and demonstrated that they are responsible for the nitrocellulose DNA binding activity we and others have measured. Using the isolated MAP/tau proteins we then measured the apparent affinity constant K(app) for the homologous chick DNA interaction and found evidence for two equilibrium affinity classes-a K(app) = 6 x 10(7) M-1, responsible for the bulk of the DNA binding activity and a small (less than 10%) higher affinity K(app) = 10(8) - 10(9) M-1, likely due to sequence specific binding protein species. Using the same chick brain MAP-tau protein, a heterologous interaction with D. melanogaster DNA, was found to possess just the lower affinity class-K(app) = 2 x 10(7) M-1. Under stringent binding conditions we carried out equilibrium nitrocellulose filter binding experiments in a ternary reaction mixture at constant MAP/tau protein and 35S radiolabelled chick DNA concentration using increasing and excess concentrations of competitor DNAs of different sources. The order of competitor strengths found was-chick DNA greater than mouse DNA greater than D. melanogaster = E. coli. DNA. These data and specifically the homologous DNA: protein case being the strongest competitor corroborate our previous studies using total microtubule protein and provide new evidence for a conserved interaction of a small DNA sequence class with MAP/tau protein species. Moreover, these data allow us to conclude that the conserved DNA sequence: MAP/tau protein interactions do not critically depend upon any energetic feature co-involving tubulin for their properties since tubulin is absent from these preparations.

  19. Large-scale purification of staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B, and C2 by dye ligand affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, R D; Tranter, H S; Hambleton, P; Melling, J

    1990-01-01

    A simple method for the purification of staphylococcal enterotoxins A (SEA), B (SEB), and C2 (SEC2) from fermentor-grown cultures was developed. The toxins were purified by pseudo-affinity chromatography by using the triazine textile dye "Red A" and gave overall yields of 49% (SEA), 44% (SEB), and 53% (SEC2). The purified toxins were homogeneous when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but isoelectric focusing of the preparations revealed the microheterogeneity associated with these toxins. The SEA and SEB preparations each consisted of two isoelectric forms with pI values of 7.3 and 6.8 (SEA) and 8.9 and 8.55 (SEB); in contrast, SEC2 contained five different isoelectric forms, with pI values ranging between 7.6 and 6.85. The pattern of elution of the isoelectric forms from the column indicated a cationic-exchange process involved in the binding of toxin to Red A. Such a method forms the basis of a high-yielding, rapid means of purifying the staphylococcal enterotoxins that can easily be adapted to large-scale production. Images PMID:2339869

  20. PHOENIX: A Scoring Function for Affinity Prediction Derived Using High-Resolution Crystal Structures and Calorimetry Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yat T.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2011-01-01

    Binding affinity prediction is one of the most critical components to computer-aided structure-based drug design. Despite advances in first-principle methods for predicting binding affinity, empirical scoring functions that are fast and only relatively accurate are still widely used in structure-based drug design. With the increasing availability of X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank and continuing application of biophysical methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry to measure thermodynamic parameters contributing to binding free energy, sufficient experimental data exists that scoring functions can now be derived by separating enthalpic (ΔH) and entropic (TΔS) contributions to binding free energy (ΔG). PHOENIX, a scoring function to predict binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes, utilizes the increasing availability of experimental data to improve binding affinity predictions by the following: model training and testing using high-resolution crystallographic data to minimize structural noise, independent models of enthalpic and entropic contributions fitted to thermodynamic parameters assumed to be thermodynamically biased to calculate binding free energy, use of shape and volume descriptors to better capture entropic contributions. A set of 42 descriptors and 112 protein-ligand complexes were used to derive functions using partial least squares for change of enthalpy (ΔH) and change of entropy (TΔS) to calculate change of binding free energy (ΔG), resulting in a predictive r2 (r2pred) of 0.55 and a standard error (SE) of 1.34 kcal/mol. External validation using the 2009 version of the PDBbind “refined set” (n = 1612) resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (Rp) of 0.575 and a mean error (ME) of 1.41 pKd. Enthalpy and entropy predictions were of limited accuracy individually. However, their difference resulted in a relatively accurate binding free energy. While the development of an accurate and applicable

  1. A HIGH-LEVEL CALCULATION OF THE PROTON AFFINITY OF DIBORANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The experimental proton affinity of diborane (B2H6) is based on an unstable species, B2H,+, 4 which has been observed only at low temperatures. The present work calculates the proton 5 affinity of diborane using the Gaussian-3 method and other high-level compound ab initio 6 met...

  2. High speed immuno-affinity chromatography on supports with gigapores and porous glass.

    PubMed

    Schuste, M; Wasserbauer, E; Neubauer, A; Jungbauer, A

    2000-01-01

    Immuno-affinity chromatography exploiting the Ca2+ dependent interaction of the anti-Flag antibody and Flag-tagged proteins has been investigated. The antibody has been immobilized on porous glass beads (Prosep) containing gigapores and on a monolith, the polymethacrylate based Convective Interactive Media (CIM) column at a ligand density of 2 mg/g and 10 mg/ml respectively. The performance of the columns was assessed by applying clarified yeast culture supernatant containing overexpressed Flag-human serum albumin. Dynamic binding capacity and purity was checked at various flow rates ranging from 100 cm/h to 800 cm/h. 95% purity could be obtained. Anti Flag-CIM columns showed a higher unspecific adsorption, requiring a longer wash cycle to obtain the same purity compared to the Prosep column. Anti Flag-CIM columns showed a flow independent performance, which is explained by its monolithic structure. A decreasing dynamic binding capacity with flow was observed with anti-Flag-Prosep columns. Both columns are suited to purify milligrams of protein out of a yeast culture supernatant within a few minutes. We considered them as promising candidates for high throughput screening, where fast purification is a necessity.

  3. Positive modulation of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors by an antagonist of the high affinity benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Middendorp, Simon J; Maldifassi, Maria C; Baur, Roland; Sigel, Erwin

    2015-08-01

    GABAA receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are the target for many clinically important drugs such as the benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines act at the high-affinity binding site at the α+/γ- subunit interface. Previously, an additional low affinity binding site for diazepam located in the transmembrane (TM) domain has been described. The compound SJM-3 was recently identified in a prospective screening of ligands for the benzodiazepine binding site and investigated for its site of action. We determined the binding properties of SJM-3 at GABAA receptors recombinantly expressed in HEK-cells using radioactive ligand binding assays. Impact on function was assessed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with electrophysiological experiments using the two-electrode voltage clamp method. SJM-3 was shown to act as an antagonist at the α+/γ- site. At the same time it strongly potentiated GABA currents via the binding site for diazepam in the transmembrane domain. Mutation of a residue in M2 of the α subunit strongly reduced receptor modulation by SJM-3 and a homologous mutation in the β subunit abolished potentiation. SJM-3 acts as a more efficient modulator than diazepam at the site in the trans-membrane domain. In contrast to low concentrations of benzodiazepines, SJM-3 modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. A detailed exploration of the membrane site may provide the basis for the design and identification of subtype-selective modulatory drugs.

  4. Affinophoresis of pea lectin and fava bean lectin with an anionic affinophore, bearing rho-aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannoside as an affinity ligand.

    PubMed

    Shimura, K; Kasai, K

    1987-07-29

    Affinophoresis is an electrophoretic separation technique for biological polymers with the aid of an affinophore, which is a macromolecular polyelectrolyte bearing affinity ligands. The affinophore migrates rapidly in an electric field, and consequently the electrophoretic mobility of molecules having an affinity for the ligand is specifically changed. An anionic affinophore-bearing mannosyl residue was synthesized for the affinophoresis of lectins. rho-Aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and aminomethanesulphonic acid were coupled to about one-tenth and one-fifth, respectively, of the carboxyl groups of succinyl-poly-L-lysine with an average degree of polymerization of 120 by the use of a water-soluble carbodiimide. Extracts of seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) or fava bean (Vicia fava) were subjected to two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, in which the first dimension was ordinary agarose gel electrophoresis and the second dimension was affinophoresis with the affinophore. The separated proteins were stained with Coomassie Blue R250. The lectins in both seed extracts were separated from a diagonal line formed by other proteins in the extracts. About 10 ng of the separated pea lectin was detected on a nitrocellulose blot by immunostaining with a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated second antibody.

  5. Affinophoresis of pea lectin and fava bean lectin with an anionic affinophore, bearing rho-aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannoside as an affinity ligand.

    PubMed

    Shimura, K; Kasai, K

    1987-07-29

    Affinophoresis is an electrophoretic separation technique for biological polymers with the aid of an affinophore, which is a macromolecular polyelectrolyte bearing affinity ligands. The affinophore migrates rapidly in an electric field, and consequently the electrophoretic mobility of molecules having an affinity for the ligand is specifically changed. An anionic affinophore-bearing mannosyl residue was synthesized for the affinophoresis of lectins. rho-Aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and aminomethanesulphonic acid were coupled to about one-tenth and one-fifth, respectively, of the carboxyl groups of succinyl-poly-L-lysine with an average degree of polymerization of 120 by the use of a water-soluble carbodiimide. Extracts of seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) or fava bean (Vicia fava) were subjected to two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, in which the first dimension was ordinary agarose gel electrophoresis and the second dimension was affinophoresis with the affinophore. The separated proteins were stained with Coomassie Blue R250. The lectins in both seed extracts were separated from a diagonal line formed by other proteins in the extracts. About 10 ng of the separated pea lectin was detected on a nitrocellulose blot by immunostaining with a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated second antibody. PMID:3667759

  6. Generation of high-performance binding proteins for peptide motifs by affinity clamping

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Shohei; Huang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    We describe concepts and methodologies for generating “Affinity Clamps”, a new class of recombinant binding proteins that achieve high affinity and high specificity toward short peptide motifs of biological importance, which is a major challenge in protein engineering. The Affinity Clamping concept exploits the potential of nonhomologous recombination of protein domains in generating large changes in protein function and the inherent binding affinity and specificity of the so-called modular interaction domains toward short peptide motifs. Affinity Clamping creates a clamshell architecture that clamps onto a target peptide. The design processes involve (i) choosing a starting modular interaction domain appropriate for the target and applying structure-guided modifications, (ii) attaching a second domain, termed “enhancer domain” and (iii) optimizing the peptide-binding site located between the domains by directed evolution. The two connected domains work synergistically to achieve high levels of affinity and specificity that are unattainable with either domain alone. Because of the simple and modular architecture, affinity clamps are particularly well suited as building blocks for designing more complex functionalities. Affinity Clamping represents a major advance in protein design that is broadly applicable to the recognition of peptide motifs. PMID:23422435

  7. Molecular Determinants for Ligand Binding at Serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C GPCRs: Experimental Affinity Results Analyzed by Molecular Modeling and Ligand Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sakhuja, Rajeev; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Canal, Clinton E.; Booth, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    Ligands that activate the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) may be therapeutic for psychoses, addiction, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Ligands that are antagonists at the closely related 5-HT2A GPCR also may treat neuropsychiatric disorders; in contrast, 5-HT2A activation may cause hallucinations. 5-HT2C-specific agonist drug design is challenging because 5-HT2 GPCRs share 80% transmembrane (TM) homology, same second messenger signaling, and no crystal structures are reported. To help delineate molecular determinants underlying differential binding and activation of 5-HT2 GPCRs, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C homology models were built from the β2-adrenergic GPCR crystal structure and equilibrated in a lipid phosphatidyl choline bilayer performing molecular dynamics simulations. Ligand docking studies at the 5-HT2 receptor models were conducted with the (2R, 4S)- and (2S, 4R)-enantiomers of the novel 5-HT2C agonist/5-HT2A/2B antagonist trans-4-phenyl-N,N-dimethyl-2-aminotetralin (PAT) and its 4′-chlorophenyl congners. Results indicate PAT–5-HT2 molecular interactions especially in TM domain V are important for the (2R, 4S) enantiomer, whereas, TM domain VI and VII interactions are more important for the (2S, 4R) enantiomer. PMID:23913978

  8. Structural and chemical basis for enhanced affinity and potency for a large series of estrogen receptor ligands: 2D and 3D QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Salum, Lívia de B; Polikarpov, Igor; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2007-09-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is an important drug target for the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Progress towards the design of more potent and selective ER modulators requires the optimization of multiple ligand-receptor interactions. Comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and hologram quantitative structure-activity relationships (HQSAR) were conducted on a large set of ERalpha modulators. Two training sets containing either 127 or 69 compounds were used to generate QSAR models for in vitro binding affinity and potency, respectively. Significant correlation coefficients (affinity models, CoMFA, r(2)=0.93 and q(2)=0.79; HQSAR, r(2)=0.92 and q(2)=0.71; potency models, CoMFA, r(2)=0.94 and q(2)=0.72; HQSAR, r(2)=0.92 and q(2)=0.74) were obtained, indicating the potential of the models for untested compounds. The generated models were validated using external test sets, and the predicted values were in good agreement with the experimental results. The final QSAR models as well as the information gathered from 3D contour maps should be useful for the design of novel ERalpha modulators having improved affinity and potency.

  9. Preparative separation of 1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt from the color additive D&C Green No. 8 by affinity-ligand pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Adrian; Mazzola, Eugene P.; Ito, Yoichiro

    2011-01-01

    In developing analytical methods for batch certification of the color additive D&C Green No. 8 (G8), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration needed the trisodium salt of 1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (P3S) for use as a reference material. Since P3S was not commercially available, preparative quantities of it were separated from portions of a sample of G8 that contained ~ 3.5% P3S. The separations were performed by affinity-ligand pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography using dodecylamine (DA) as the ligand. The added ligand enabled partitioning of the polysulfonated components into the organic stationary phase of the two-phase solvent system used, 1-butanol – water (1:1). A typical separation that involved 20.3 g of G8, using sulfuric acid as the retainer acid and 20% DA in the stationary phase and 0.1M sodium hydroxide as the mobile phase, resulted in ~0.58 g of P3S of greater than 99% purity. The identification and characterization of the separated P3S were performed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance, high-resolution mass spectrometry, ultra-violet spectra and high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:21982993

  10. Interleukin-21-dependent modulation of T cell antigen receptor reactivity towards low affinity peptide ligands in autoreactive CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bobbala, Diwakar; Orkhis, Sakina; Kandhi, Rajani; Ramanathan, Sheela; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-09-01

    IL-21 promotes autoimmune type-1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice by facilitating CD4(+) T cell help to CD8(+) T cells. IL-21 also enables autoreactive CD8(+) T cells to respond to weak TCR ligands and induce T1D. Here, we assessed whether IL-21 is essential for T1D induction in a mouse model where the disease can occur independently of CD4 help. In this model, which expresses lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein (GP) antigen under the rat insulin promoter (RIP-GP), LCMV infection activates CD8(+) T cells reactive to the GP-derived GP33 peptide that attack pancreatic islets and cause T1D. We show that IL-21 deficiency in RIP-GP mice did not impair T1D induction by LCMV expressing the wildtype GP33 peptide. Surprisingly, LCMV-L6F, expressing a weak peptide mimic of GP33, induced T1D more efficiently in Il21(-/-)RIP-GP mice than in controls. However, LCMV-C4Y expressing a very weak peptide mimic of GP33 did not induce T1D in Il21(-/-) mice, but T cells from the infected mice caused disease in lymphopenic RIP-GP mice upon adoptive transfer. Using Nur77(GFP) reporter mice, we show that CD8(+) T cells from Il21(-/-) mice expressing the GP33-specific transgenic P14 TCR showed increased reactivity towards low affinity TCR ligands. Collectively, our findings show that IL-21 is not always required for T1D induction by autoreactive CD8(+) T cells, and suggest that IL-21 may play an important role in regulating CD8(+) T cell reactivity towards low affinity TCR ligands. PMID:27300756

  11. Topography of the high-affinity lysine binding site of plasminogen as defined with a specific antibody probe

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, L.A.; Plow, E.F.

    1986-11-04

    An antibody population that reacted with the high-affinity lysine binding site of human plasminogen was elicited by immunizing rabbits with an elastase degradation product containing kringles 1-3 (EDP I). This antibody was immunopurified by affinity chromatography on plasminogen-Sepharose and elution with 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The eluted antibodies bound (/sup 125/I)EDP I, (/sup 125/I)Glu-plasminogen, and (/sup 125/I)Lys-plasminogen in radioimmunoassays, and binding of each ligand was at least 99% inhibited by 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The concentrations for 50% inhibition of (/sup 125/I)EDP I binding by tranexamic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and lysine were 2.6, 46, and l730 ..mu..M, respectively. Similar values were obtained with plasminogen and suggested that an unoccupied high-affinity lysine binding site was required for antibody recognition. The antiserum reacted exclusively with plasminogen derivatives containing the EDP I region and did not react with those lacking an EDP I region, or with tissue plasminogen activator or prothrombin, which also contains kringles. By immunoblotting analyses, a chymotryptic degradation product of M/sub r/ 20,000 was derived from EDP I that retained reactivity with the antibody. ..cap alpha../sub 2/-Antiplasmin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled EDP I, Glu-plasminogen, or Lys-plasminogen by the antiserum, suggesting that the recognized site is involved in the noncovalent interaction of the inhibitor with plasminogen. The binding of (/sup 125/I)EDP I to fibrin was also inhibited by the antiserum. The observations provide independent evidence for the role of the high-affinity lysine binding site in the functional interactions of plasminogen with its primary substrate and inhibitor.

  12. Affinity enhancement of antibodies: how low-affinity antibodies produced early in immune responses are followed by high-affinity antibodies later and in memory B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Herman N

    2014-05-01

    The antibodies produced initially in response to most antigens are high molecular weight (MW) immunoglobulins (IgM) with low affinity for the antigen, while the antibodies produced later are lower MW classes (e.g., IgG and IgA) with, on average, orders of magnitude higher affinity for that antigen. These changes, often termed affinity maturation, take place largely in small B-cell clusters (germinal center; GC) in lymphoid tissues in which proliferating antigen-stimulated B cells express the highly mutagenic cytidine deaminase that mediates immunoglobulin class-switching and sequence diversification of the immunoglobulin variable domains of antigen-binding receptors on B cells (BCR). Of the large library of BCR-mutated B cells thus rapidly generated, a small minority with affinity-enhancing mutations are selected to survive and differentiate into long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. BCRs are also endocytic receptors; they internalize and cleave BCR-bound antigen, yielding peptide-MHC complexes that are recognized by follicular helper T cells. Imperfect correlation between BCR affinity for antigen and cognate T-cell engagement may account for the increasing affinity heterogeneity that accompanies the increasing average affinity of antibodies. Conservation of mechanisms underlying mutation and selection of high-affinity antibodies over the ≈200 million years of evolution separating bird and mammal lineages points to the crucial role of antibody affinity enhancement in adaptive immunity.

  13. Binding Affinity Prediction for Ligands and Receptors Forming Tautomers and Ionization Species: Inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 (MK2)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of ionization and tautomerism of ligands and receptors is one of the unresolved issues in structure-based prediction of binding affinities. Our solution utilizes the thermodynamic master equation, expressing the experimentally observed association constant as the sum of products, each valid for a specific ligand–receptor species pair, consisting of the association microconstant and the fractions of the involved ligand and receptor species. The microconstants are characterized by structure-based simulations, which are run for individual species pairs. Here we incorporated the multispecies approach into the QM/MM linear response method and used it for structural correlation of published inhibition data on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) by 66 benzothiophene and pyrrolopyridine analogues, forming up to five tautomers and seven ionization species under experimental conditions. Extensive cross-validation showed that the resulting models were stable and predictive. Inclusion of all tautomers and ionization ligand species was essential: the explained variance increased to 90% from 66% for the single-species model. PMID:22280316

  14. Studies with an immobilized metal affinity chromatography cassette system involving binuclear triazacyclononane-derived ligands: automation of batch adsorption measurements with tagged recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Martin; Coghlan, Campbell J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-07-18

    This study describes the determination of the adsorption isotherms and binding kinetics of tagged recombinant proteins using a recently developed IMAC cassette system and employing automated robotic liquid handling procedures for IMAC resin screening. These results confirm that these new IMAC resins, generated from a variety of different metal-charged binuclear 1,4,7-triaza-cyclononane (tacn) ligands, interact with recombinant proteins containing a novel N-terminal metal binding tag, NT1A, with static binding capacities similar to those obtained with conventional hexa-His tagged proteins, but with significantly increased association constants. In addition, higher kinetic binding rates were observed with these new IMAC systems, an attribute that can be positively exploited to increase process productivity. The results from this investigation demonstrate that enhancements in binding capacities and affinities were achieved with these new IMAC resins and chosen NT1A tagged protein. Further, differences in the binding performances of the bis(tacn) xylenyl-bridged ligands were consistent with the distance between the metal binding centres of the two tacn moieties, the flexibility of the ligand and the potential contribution from the aromatic ring of the xylenyl group to undergo π/π stacking interactions with the tagged proteins.

  15. Bioadhesive nanoareas in antifouling matrix for highly efficient affinity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannelli, I.; Valsesia, A.; Lisboa, P.; Anger-Leroy, M.; Mornet, S.; Colpo, P.; Rossi, F.

    2008-08-01

    A procedure for fabricating nanopatterned surfaces at the sub-500 nm scale comprising a hexagonal close packed array of bioadhesive gold nanoareas in a protein resistant matrix (PEO-like polymer), has been optimized. The surfaces were characterized by AFM analysis and their interaction with amino functionalised gold nanoparticles as models were investigated. The AFM images show the crystalline arrangement of nanopattern array and the localized adsorption of the H2N-Au nanoparticles in the bioadhesive nanoareas. A Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) system was used to assess the detection performances of these surfaces when employed as a transduction platform for studying biomolecule interactions. The investigated surfaces showed an enhancement of the affinity reaction efficiency with respect to the non structured surfaces. The obtained preliminary results show that nanostructuring the surfaces improve the binding site accessibility of the immobilized biological probes without significantly modifying the native biomolecule conformation.

  16. Myo1e binds anionic phospholipids with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Feeser, Elizabeth A; Ignacio, Cherry Mae G; Krendel, Mira; Ostap, E Michael

    2010-11-01

    Myo1e is a single-headed motor protein that has been shown to play roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis in HeLa cells and podocyte function in the kidney. The myo1e C-terminal tail domain includes a basic region that is required for localization to clathrin-coated vesicles and contains a putative pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain that has been shown to play a role in phospholipid binding in other myosin-I proteins. We used sedimentation assays, stopped-flow fluorescence, and fluorescence microscopy to determine the membrane binding affinities, kinetics, and in vivo localization of fluorescently labeled recombinant myo1e-tail constructs. We found that the myo1e tail binds tightly to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing physiological concentrations of the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) or phosphatidylserine. The rate of myo1e attachment to LUVs nears the diffusion limit while the calculated rate of detachment from LUVs is slow (k(diss) ≤ 0.4 s(-1)). Mutation of conserved residues in the myo1e PH domain has little effect on lipid binding in vitro or membrane localization in vivo. Soluble inositol phosphate headgroups, such as inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, can compete with PtdIns(4,5)P(2) for binding, but the apparent affinity for the soluble inositol phosphate is substantially lower than that for PtdIns(4,5)P(2). These results suggest that myo1e binds lipids through nonspecific electrostatic interactions rather than a stereospecific protein-phosphoinositide interaction. PMID:20860408

  17. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  18. Glial high-affinity binding site with specificity for angiotensin II not angiotensin III: a possible N-terminal-specific converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Printz, M.P.; Jennings, C.; Healy, D.P.; Kalter, V.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous binding properties of angiotensin II to fetal rat brain primary cultures suggested a possible contribution from contaminating glia. To investigate this possibility, cultures of C6 glioma, a clonal rat cell line, were examined for the presence of angiotensin II receptors. A specific high-affinity site for (/sup 125/I)angiotensin II was measured both by traditional methodology using whole cells and by autoradiography. This site shared properties similar to that found with the brain cells, namely low ligand internalization and markedly decreased affinity for N-terminal sarcosine or arginine-angiotensin analogs. The competition rank order was angiotensin II much greater than (Sar1,Ile8)angiotensin II greater than or equal to des(Asp1,Arg2)angiotensin II. Angiotensin III did not compete for binding to the site. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the ligand either in the incubation or bound to the site was stable at 15 degrees C, but there was very rapid and extensive degradation by the C6 glioma cells at 37 degrees C. It is concluded that the site exhibits unusual N-terminal specificity for angiotensin with nanomolar affinity for angiotensin II. If angiotensin III is an active ligand in the brain, the site may have a converting enzyme function. Alternatively, it may form the des-Asp derivatives of angiotensin for subsequent degradation by other enzymatic pathways. Either way, it is proposed that the site may modulate the brain-angiotensin system.

  19. Characterization of a common high-affinity receptor for reovirus serotypes 1 and 3 on endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verdin, E.M.; King, G.L.; Maratos-Flier, E.

    1989-03-01

    During viremia, viruses may be cleared from the blood stream and taken up by specific organs. The uptake of virus from the blood stream is dependent on the association of viral particles with endothelial cells that line the luminal surfaces of large and small blood vessels. To understand the nature of this interaction, the authors have studied the binding of reovirus serotypes 1 and 3 to these cells in vitro. Both serotypes of reovirus productively infected endothelial cells. By using (/sup 35/S)methionine-biolabeled reovirus as a tracer ligand, they found that both viruses rapidly bind to endothelial cells and that equilibrium is reached after 4 h. The binding of the radiolabeled viruses was saturable and mediated by a homogeneous population of cellular receptors with very high affinity for the virus ligands. Exposure of labeled virus to monoclonal antibodies directed against the viral hemagglutinin inhibited binding, demonstrating that the attachment of reovirus to endothelial cells is mediated by the hemagglutinin for both serotypes. By using a novel ligand-blotting assay, the binding of both viruses to a 54,000-dalton protein could be demonstrated. By using cell fractionation after homogenization, they demonstrated that this 54-kilodalton protein is a membrane protein, in agreement with its proposed role as a cell surface receptor for reovirus serotypes 1 and 3.

  20. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  1. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    PubMed

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  2. Mathematical modeling of the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmettin

    2012-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in E. coli. The model is a system of three ordinary differential equations and takes the dynamics of mRNAs for the araE and araFGH proteins and the internal arabinose into account. Special attention was paid to estimate the model parameters from the literature. Our analysis and simulations suggest that the high affinity transport system helps the low affinity transport system to respond to high concentration of extracellular arabinose faster, whereas the high affinity transport system responds to a small amount of extracellular arabinose. Steady state analysis of the model also predicts that there is a regime for the extracellular concentration of arabinose where the arabinose system can show bistable behavior.

  3. ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sike; Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Columns containing immobilized lipoproteins were prepared for the analysis of drug interactions with these particles by high-performance affinity chromatography. This approach was evaluated by using it to examine the binding of high density lipoprotein (HDL) to the drugs propranolol or verapamil. HDL was immobilized by the Schiff base method onto silica and gave HPLC columns with reproducible binding to propranolol over four to five days of continuous operation at pH 7.4. Frontal analysis experiments indicated that two types of interactions were occurring between R/S-propranolol and HDL at 37°C: saturable binding with an association equilibrium constant (Ka) of 1.1–1.9 × 105 M−1, and non-saturable binding with an overall affinity constant (n Ka) of 3.7–4.1 × 104 M−1. Similar results were found at 4 and 27°C. Verapamil also gave similar behavior, with a Ka of 6.0 × 104 M−1 at 37°C for the saturable sites and a n Ka value for the non-saturable sites of 2.5 × 104 M−1. These measured affinities gave good agreement with solution-phase values. The results indicated HPAC can be used to study drug interactions with HDL, providing information that should be valuable in obtaining a better description of how drugs are transported within the body. PMID:19833090

  4. Selective and high affinity labeling of neuronal and recombinant nociceptin receptors with the hexapeptide radioprobe [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol.

    PubMed

    Bojnik, Engin; Farkas, Judit; Magyar, Anna; Tömböly, Csaba; Güçlü, Umit; Gündüz, Ozge; Borsodi, Anna; Corbani, Maïthe; Benyhe, Sándor

    2009-12-01

    The synthetic hexapeptide Ac-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg-Ile-Lys-ol (Ac-RYYRIK-ol) represents a highly potent and selective partial agonist ligand for the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (nociceptin receptor, NOPr). Ac-RYYRIK-ol has been labeled with tritium yielding [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol with exceptionally high specific radioactivity of 94Ci/mmol. The radioprobe is chemically stable even at 24 degrees C in ethanol solution for at least 4 days. No significant decomposition of the [(3)H]ligand occurred under the condition of the binding experiments indicating a fine enzymatic stability of the peptide. Radioreceptor binding studies were conducted using native neuronal NOPr preparation of rat brain membrane fractions and recombinant human nociceptin receptor ((h)NOPr) preparations from cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing (h)NOPr. Specific binding of the compound was reversible, saturable and of high affinity. No cross-reaction with the opioid receptors was observed suggesting superior NOPr selectivity of the ligand. Monophasic isotherm curves obtained in radioligand binding saturation and homologous displacement experiments indicated the presence of single binding sites in both preparations. Average densities of the [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol recognition sites were 237 and 749fmol/mg protein in rat brain and transfected cells, respectively. Equilibrium affinity values (K(d)s) were determined by three independent way providing identical results. In rat brain membranes K(d)s of 0.3-1.3nM were found depending upon the assay type. In homologous competition studies performed on (h)NOP-CHO cell membranes almost the same binding affinities were measured for Ac-RYYRIK-ol either with [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol (K(i) 2.8nM) or with [(3)H](Leu(14))nociceptin (2.3nM). A number of NOPr and opioid ligands were screened in heterologous displacement experiments and displayed a rank order of affinity profile being consistent with fairly good NOPr selectivity of the sites

  5. A combination of docking, QM/MM methods, and MD simulation for binding affinity estimation of metalloprotein ligands.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Akash; Lukacova, Viera; Comez, Dogan; Kroll, Daniel M; Raha, Soumyendu; Balaz, Stefan

    2005-08-25

    To alleviate the problems in the receptor-based design of metalloprotein ligands due to inadequacies in the force-field description of coordination bonds, a four-tier approach was devised. Representative ligand-metalloprotein interaction energies are obtained by subsequent application of (1) docking with metal-binding-guided selection of modes, (2) optimization of the ligand-metalloprotein complex geometry by combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, (3) conformational sampling of the complex with constrained metal bonds by force-field-based molecular dynamics (MD), and (4) a single point QM/MM energy calculation for the time-averaged structures. The QM/MM interaction energies are, in a linear combination with the desolvation-characterizing changes in the solvent-accessible surface areas, correlated with experimental data. The approach was applied to structural correlation of published binding free energies of a diverse set of 28 hydroxamate inhibitors to zinc-dependent matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Inclusion of steps 3 and 4 significantly improved both correlation and prediction. The two descriptors explained 90% of variance in inhibition constants of all 28 inhibitors, ranging from 0.08 to 349 nM, with the average unassigned error of 0.318 log units. The structural and energetic information obtained from the time-averaged MD simulation results helped understand the differences in binding modes of related compounds.

  6. Synthesis of 3-alkyl naphthalenes as novel estrogen receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jing; Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Britton, Jonathan E.; Katamreddy, Subba R.; Navas III, Frank; Miller, Aaron B.; Williams, Shawn P.; Gray, David W.; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Shearin, Jean; Heyer, Dennis

    2009-06-24

    A series of estrogen receptor ligands based on a 3-alkyl naphthalene scaffold was synthesized using an intramolecular enolate-alkyne cycloaromatization as the key step. Several of these compounds bearing a C6-OH group were shown to be high affinity ligands. All compounds had similar ER{alpha} and ER{beta} binding affinity ranging from micromolar to low nanomolar.

  7. Achieving high affinity towards a bacterial lectin through multivalent topological isomers of calix[4]arene glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Cecioni, Samy; Lalor, Ruth; Blanchard, Bertrand; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Imberty, Anne; Matthews, Susan E; Vidal, Sébastien

    2009-12-01

    A family of seven topologically isomeric calix[4]arene glycoconjugates was prepared through the synthesis of a series of alkyne-derivatised calix[4]arene precursors that are suitable for the attachment of sugar moieties by microwave-assisted copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The glycoconjugates thus synthesised comprised one mono-functionalised derivative, two 1,2- or 1,3-divalent regioisomers, one trivalent and three tetravalent topoisomers in the cone, partial cone or 1,3-alternate conformations. The designed glycoconjugates were evaluated as ligands for the galactose-binding lectin PA-IL from the opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major causative agent of lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Binding affinities were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and the interaction with the lectin was shown to be strongly dependant on both the valence and the topology. Whereas the trivalent conjugate displayed enhanced affinity when compared to a monosaccharide model, the tetravalent conjugates are to-date the highest-affinity ligands measured by ITC. The topologies presenting carbohydrates on both faces of calixarene are the most potent ones with dissociation constants of approximately 200 nM. Molecular modelling suggests that such a multivalent molecule can efficiently chelate two of the binding sites of the tetrameric lectin; this explains the 800-fold increase of affinity achieved by the tetravalent molecule. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments confirmed that this glycoconjugate is the strongest inhibitor for binding of PA-IL to galactosylated surfaces for potential applications as an anti-adhesive agent.

  8. Molecular editing of cellular responses by the high-affinity receptor for IgE.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Leach, Sarah; Liu, Wenhua; Ralston, Evelyn; Scheffel, Jörg; Zhang, Weiguo; Lowell, Clifford A; Rivera, Juan

    2014-02-28

    Cellular responses elicited by cell surface receptors differ according to stimulus strength. We investigated how the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE) modulates the response of mast cells to a high- or low-affinity stimulus. Both high- and low-affinity stimuli elicited similar receptor phosphorylation; however, differences were observed in receptor cluster size, mobility, distribution, and the cells' effector responses. Low-affinity stimulation increased receptor association with the Src family kinase Fgr and shifted signals from the adapter LAT1 to the related adapter LAT2. LAT1-dependent calcium signals required for mast cell degranulation were dampened, but the role of LAT2 in chemokine production was enhanced, altering immune cell recruitment at the site of inflammation. These findings uncover how receptor discrimination of stimulus strength can be interpreted as distinct in vivo outcomes.

  9. Quantification of ventricular β2 -adrenoceptor density and ligand binding affinity in wild sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts using a novel modification to the tritiated ligand technique.

    PubMed

    Goulding, A T; Farrell, A P

    2016-05-01

    A new, image-based, tritiated ligand technique for measuring cardiac β2 -adrenoceptor (β2 -AR) binding characteristics was developed and validated with adult rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss hearts so that the tissue limitation of traditional receptor binding techniques could be overcome and measurements could be made in hearts nearly 14-times smaller than previously used. The myocardial cell-surface (functional) β2 -AR density of O. nerka smolts sampled at the headwaters of the Chilko River was 54·2 fmol mg protein(-1) and about half of that previously found in return migrating adults of the same population, but still more than twice that of adult hatchery O. mykiss (21·1 fmol mg protein(-1) ). This technique now opens the possibility of investigating cardiac receptor density in a much wider range of fish species and life stages. PMID:27095288

  10. ELISA-mimic screen for synthetic polymer nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Hoshino, Yu; Shea, Kenneth J

    2012-09-10

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) that display high affinity to protein targets have significant potential for medical and biotechnological applications as protein capture agents or functional replacements of antibodies ("plastic antibodies"). In this study, we modified an immunological assay (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: ELISA) into a high-throughput screening method to select nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins. Histone and fibrinogen were chosen as target proteins to demonstrate this concept. The selection process utilized a biotinylated NP library constructed with combinations of functional monomers. The screen identified NPs with distinctive functional group compositions that exhibited high affinity to either histone or fibrinogen. The variation of protein affinity with changes in the nature and amount of functional groups in the NP provided chemical insight into the principle determinants of protein-NP binding. The NP affinity was semiquantified using the ELISA-mimic assay by varying the NP concentrations. The screening results were found to correlate with solution-based assay results. This screening system utilizing a biotinylated NP is a general approach to optimize functional monomer compositions and can be used to rapidly search for synthetic polymers with high (or low) affinity for target biological macromolecules. PMID:22813352

  11. The high-affinity maltose switch MBP317-347 has low affinity for glucose: implications for targeting tumors with metabolically directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Gilmer; Schulte, Reinhard W; Ostermeier, Marc; Iwamoto, Keisuke S

    2014-03-01

    Development of agents with high affinity and specificity for tumor-specific markers is an important goal of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we propose a shift in paradigm using a strategy that relies on low affinity for fundamental metabolites found in different concentrations in cancerous and non-cancerous tissues: glucose and lactate. A molecular switch, MBP317-347, originally designed to be a high-affinity switch for maltose and maltose-like polysaccharides, was demonstrated to be a low-affinity switch for glucose, that is, able to be activated by high concentrations (tens of millimolar) of glucose. We propose that such a low-affinity glucose switch could be used as a proof of concept for a new prodrug therapy strategy denominated metabolically directed enzyme prodrug therapy (MDEPT) where glucose or, preferably, lactate serves as the activator. Accordingly, considering the typical differential concentrations of lactate found in tumors and in healthy tissues, a low-affinity lactate-binding switch analogous to the low-affinity glucose-binding switch MBP317-347 would be an order of magnitude more active in tumors than in normal tissues and therefore can work as a differential activator of anticancer drugs in tumors.

  12. Stereoselective Binding of Chiral Ligands to Single Nucleotide Polymorphs (SNPs) of the Human Organic Cation Transporter-1 Determined Using Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Moaddel, R.; Bighi, F.; Yamaguchi, R.; Patel, S.; Ravichandran, S.; Wainer, I.W.

    2010-01-01

    Membranes from stably transfected cell lines that expresses two point mutations of the human organic cation 1 transporter (hOCT1), R488M and G465R, have been immobilized on the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) liquid chromatographic stationary phase to form the Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography (CMAC) (hOCT1G465R) and CMAC(hOCT1R488M). Columns were created using both stationary phases and frontal displacement chromatography experiments were conducted using [3H]-methyl phenyl pyridinium, [3H]-MPP+, as the marker ligand and various displacers, including the single enantiomers of verapamil, fenoterol and isoproterenol. The chromatographic data obtained was used to refine a previously developed pharmacophore for the hOCT1 transporter. PMID:20206116

  13. Development of BODIPY FL Vindoline as a Novel and High-Affinity Pregnane X Receptor Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics and endobiotics by regulating the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. The unique structure of PXR allows it to bind many drugs and drug leads, possibly causing undesired drug–drug interactions. Therefore, it is crucial to evaluate whether chemicals or drugs bind to PXR. Fluorescence-based assays are preferred because of their sensitivity and nonradioactive nature. On the basis of our previously characterized 4 (BODIPY FL vinblastine), a high-affinity PXR probe, we developed 20 (BODIPY FL vindoline) and showed that it is a novel and potent PXR fluorescent probe with Kd of 256 nM in a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) binding assay with PXR. By using 20 (BODIPY FL vindoline) in the PXR TR-FRET assay, we obtained a more than 7-fold signal-to-background ratio and high signal stability (signal was stable for at least 120 min, and Z′-factor > 0.85 from 30 to 240 min). The assay can tolerate DMSO up to 2%. This assay has been used to evaluate a panel of PXR ligands for their PXR-binding affinities. The performance of 20 (BODIPY FL vindoline) in the PXR TR-FRET assay makes it an ideal PXR fluorescent probe, and the newly developed PXR TR-FRET assay with 20 (BODIPY FL vindoline) as a fluorescent probe is suitable for high-throughput screening to identify PXR-binding ligands. PMID:25133934

  14. Fundamental and practical studies on high-performance liquid affinity chromatography of biopolymers with novel stationary phases

    SciTech Connect

    Bacolod, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Rigid microparticulate stationary phases having surface-bound metal chelating functions were developed and evaluated in high performance metal chelate affinity chromatography of proteins. Silica- and polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based metal chelate sorbents were produced in wide pore and in non-porous type of column packings. A major effort has been placed on development of non-porous highly crosslinked polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PSDVB). These PSDVB microparticles were produced by a two-step swelling polymerization, and exhibited excellent mechanical strength over a wide range of flow-rates and composition used in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Simple and reproducible hydrophilic coatings were developed for the surface modification of hydrophobic PSDVB supports. A tetradentate metal chelating ligand, ethylenediamine-N, N[prime]-diacetic acid (EDDA), was covalently bound to the surface of the various supports. Sorbents having iminodiacetic acid (IDA) metal chelating functions were also evaluated. The hydrophilic character and surface coverage of various stationary phases were assessed chromatographically. Studies concerning the effects of eluent pH as well as the nature and concentration of salts on retention and selectivity with different metal chelate stationary phases having various immobilized metal ions were carried out. Elution schemes were developed for rapid separation of proteins in metal chelate affinity chromatography. EDDA stationary phases in metal forms can be viewed as complementary to IDA stationary phases since they afforded different selectivity and retentivity toward proteins. Hydrophilic PSDVB could be functionalized with IDA or EDDA metal chelating ligands or lectins. The non-porous metal chelate stationary phases afforded rapid separation of proteins by the development of multiple gradient systems, which permitted higher column peak capacity, enabling the separation of a greater number of proteins in a single chromatographic run.

  15. Love-Hate ligands for high resolution analysis of strain in ultra-stable protein/small molecule interaction.

    PubMed

    Fairhead, Michael; Shen, Di; Chan, Louis K M; Lowe, Ed D; Donohoe, Timothy J; Howarth, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The pathway of ligand dissociation and how binding sites respond to force are not well understood for any macromolecule. Force effects on biological receptors have been studied through simulation or force spectroscopy, but not by high resolution structural experiments. To investigate this challenge, we took advantage of the extreme stability of the streptavidin-biotin interaction, a paradigm for understanding non-covalent binding as well as a ubiquitous research tool. We synthesized a series of biotin-conjugates having an unchanged strong-binding biotin moiety, along with pincer-like arms designed to clash with the protein surface: 'Love-Hate ligands'. The Love-Hate ligands contained various 2,6-di-ortho aryl groups, installed using Suzuki coupling as the last synthetic step, making the steric repulsion highly modular. We determined binding affinity, as well as solving 1.1-1.6Å resolution crystal structures of streptavidin bound to Love-Hate ligands. Striking distortion of streptavidin's binding contacts was found for these complexes. Hydrogen bonds to biotin's ureido and thiophene rings were preserved for all the ligands, but biotin's valeryl tail was distorted from the classic conformation. Streptavidin's L3/4 loop, normally forming multiple energetically-important hydrogen bonds to biotin, was forced away by clashes with Love-Hate ligands, but Ser45 from L3/4 could adapt to hydrogen-bond to a different part of the ligand. This approach of preparing conflicted ligands represents a direct way to visualize strained biological interactions and test protein plasticity.

  16. BIOINTERACTION ANALYSIS BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: KINETIC STUDIES OF IMMOBILIZED ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mary Anne; Moser, Annette; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    A system based on high-performance affinity chromatography was developed for characterizing the binding, elution and regeneration kinetics of immobilized antibodies and immunoaffinity supports. This information was provided by using a combination of frontal analysis, split-peak analysis and peak decay analysis to determine the rate constants for antibody-antigen interactions under typical sample application and elution conditions. This technique was tested using immunoaffinity supports that contained monoclonal antibodies for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Association equilibrium constants measured by frontal analysis for 2,4-D and related compounds with the immobilized antibodies were 1.7–12 × 106 M−1 at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Split-peak analysis gave association rate constants of 1.4–12 × 105 M−1s−1 and calculated dissociation rate constants of 0.01–0.4 s−1 under the application conditions. Elution at pH 2.5 for the analytes from the antibodies was examined by peak decay analysis and gave dissociation rate constants of 0.056–0.17 s−1. A comparison of frontal analysis results after various periods of column regeneration allowed the rate of antibody regeneration to be examined, with the results giving a first-order regeneration rate constant of 2.4 × 10−4 s−1. This combined approach and the information it provides should be useful in the design and optimization of immunoaffinity chromatography and other analytical methods that employ immobilized antibodies. The methods described are not limited to the particular analytes and antibodies employed in this study but should be useful in characterizing other targets, ligands and supports. PMID:19394281

  17. Human and rat mast cell high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors: Characterization of putative. alpha. -chain gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Akira; Benfey, P.N.; Leder, P. ); Tepler, I. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Berenstein, E.H.; Siraganian, R.P. )

    1988-03-01

    The authors have cloned and determined the entire nucleotide sequence of cDNAs corresponding to the putative {alpha} subunits of the human and rat mast cell high-affinity IgE receptors. Both human and rat cDNAs encode an NH{sub 2}-terminal signal peptide, two immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains (encoded by discrete exons), a hydrophobic transmembrane region, and a positively charged cytoplasmic tail. The human and rat {alpha} subunits share an overall homology with one another and the immunoglobulin gene family, suggesting that they arose from a common ancestral gene and continue to share structural homology with their ligands. In addition, the rat gene is transcribed into at least three distinct forms, each of which yields a somewhat different coding sequence.

  18. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization.

  19. AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors for protein-peptide binding affinity study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Geng-Yen; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Hsu, You-Ren; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Fen; Sun, Yuh-Chang; Chen, Chih-Chen; Li, Sheng-Shian; Yeh, J Andrew; Yao, Da-Jeng; Ren, Fan; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2013-03-15

    Antibody-immobilized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect a short peptide consisting of 20 amino acids. One-binding-site model and two-binding-site model were used for the analysis of the electrical signals, revealing the number of binding sites on an antibody and the dissociation constants between the antibody and the short peptide. In the binding-site models, the surface coverage ratio of the short peptide on the sensor surface is relevant to the electrical signals resulted from the peptide-antibody binding on the HEMTs. Two binding sites on an antibody were observed and two dissociation constants, 4.404×10(-11) M and 1.596×10(-9) M, were extracted from the binding-site model through the analysis of the surface coverage ratio of the short peptide on the sensor surface. We have also shown that the conventional method to extract the dissociation constant from the linear regression of curve-fitting with Langmuir isotherm equation may lead to an incorrect information if the receptor has more than one binding site for the ligand. The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor observed in the experimental result (~10 pM of the short peptide) is very close to the LOD (around 2.7-3.4 pM) predicted from the value of the smallest dissociation constants. The sensitivity of the sensor is not only dependent on the transistors, but also highly relies on the affinity of the ligand-receptor pair. The results demonstrate that the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs cannot only be used for biosensors, but also for the biological affinity study.

  20. Odorant-binding proteins display high affinities for behavioral attractants and repellents in the natural predator Chrysopa pallens.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Qun; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Si-Bao; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Cui, Jin-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Chrysopa pallens is an important natural predator of various pests in many different cropping systems. Understanding the sophisticated olfactory system of insect antennae is crucial for studying the physiological bases of olfaction and could also help enhance the effectiveness of C. pallens in biological control. However, functional studies of the olfactory genes in C. pallens are still lacking. In this study, we cloned five odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes from C. pallens (CpalOBPs). Quantitative RT-PCR results indicated that the five CpalOBPs had different tissue expression profiles. Ligand-binding assays showed that farnesol, farnesene, cis-3-hexenyl hexanoate, geranylacetone, beta-ionone, octyl aldehyde, decanal, nerolidol (Ki<20 μM), and especially 2-pentadecanone (Ki=1.19 μM) and 2-hexyl-1-decanol (Ki=0.37 μM) strongly bound to CpalOBP2. CpalOBP15 exhibited high binding affinities for beta-ionone, 2-tridecanone, trans-nerolidol, and dodecyl aldehyde. Behavioral trials using the 14 compounds exhibiting high binding affinities for the CpalOBPs revealed that nine were able to elicit significant behavioral responses from C. pallens. Among them, farnesene and its corresponding alcohol, farnesol, elicited remarkable repellent behavioral responses from C. pallens. Our study provides several compounds that could be selected to develop slow-release agents that attract/repel C. pallens and to improve the search for strategies to eliminate insect pests. PMID:25810363

  1. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo. In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein–DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein–DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein–DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein–DNA binding. PMID:26635393

  2. Intra-clonal competition inhibits the formation of high affinity antibody secreting cells1

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thuc-vy L.; Kim, Tea Hyun; Chaplin, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Protective immunity requires a diverse, polyclonal B cell repertoire. We demonstrate that affinity maturation of the humoral response to a hapten is impaired when pre-existing clonally restricted cells recognizing the hapten are dominant in the B cell repertoire. B1- 8i+/− mice, which feature a high frequency of B cells with nitrophenyl (NP) binding specificity, respond to NP-haptenated proteins with the production of NP-specific antibodies, but affinity maturation is impaired due to insufficient generation of high affinity antibody producing cells. We manipulated the frequency of NP-specific B cells by adoptive transfer of B1-8 B cells into naïve, wild-type recipients. Remarkably, when 104 B1-8 B cells were transferred, these cells supported efficient affinity maturation and plasma cell differentiation. In contrast, when 106 B1-8 cells were transferred, affinity maturation did not occur. These data indicate that restricting the frequency of clonally related B cells is required to support affinity maturation. PMID:18941192

  3. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein-DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein-DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein-DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein-DNA binding.

  4. Highly selective ligand binding by Methylophilus methylotrophus cytochrome c''.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Pedro O; Catarino, Teresa; Todorovic, Smilja; Turner, David L

    2011-06-28

    Cytochrome c'' (cyt c'') from Methylophilus methylotrophus is unusual insofar as the heme has two axial histidine ligands in the oxidized form but one is detached when the protein is reduced. Despite cyt c'' having an axial site available for binding small ligands, we show here that only NO binds readily to the ferrous cyt c''. Binding of CO, as well as CN(-), on the other hand requires considerable structural reorganization, or reduction of the disulfide bridge close to the heme. Standard free energies for the binding of NO and CO reveal high selectivity of the ferrous cyt c'' for NO, indicating its putative physiological role. In this work, we characterize in detail the kinetics of NO binding and the structural features of the Fe(2+)-NO adduct by stopped-flow and resonance Raman spectroscopy, respectively.

  5. High-Throughput Screening for Ligands of the HEPN Domain of Sacsin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinlu; Ménade, Marie; Kozlov, Guennadi; Hu, Zheping; Dai, Zheng; McPherson, Peter S.; Brais, Bernard; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    Sacsin is a large protein implicated in the neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS), which features the loss of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. Although the domain architecture of sacsin suggests that it is a neuronal chaperone assisting in protein quality control, the precise function of sacsin remains elusive. Using fluorescence polarization (FP) assays, we confirmed that the HEPN domain of sacsin binds to nucleotides with low micromolar affinities. FP competition assays with a variety of nucleotides and nucleotide analogs revealed that the binding is primarily mediated by the phosphate groups of nucleotides. A high-throughput screen subsequently identified novel small molecule ligands of HEPN, providing new chemical probes for cell culture studies and drug development. Together, the results are consistent with the HEPN domain contributing to the functional activity of sacsin by binding to nucleotides or other multiply charged anionic compounds in neurons. PMID:26366743

  6. (/sup 3/H)-(Thr4,Gly7)OT: a highly selective ligand for central and peripheral OT receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Elands, J.; Barberis, C.; Jard, S.

    1988-01-01

    Oxytocin receptors in rat hippocampal synaptic plasma membranes were compared with mammary gland and uterine oxytocin receptors. For this purpose, a highly specific oxytocic agonist (Thr4,Gly7)oxytocin was tritiated. We demonstrated that this ligand labels oxytocin receptors selectively. Scatchard analyses revealed a high affinity for all the oxytocin receptors investigated, with equilibrium dissociation constants between 1.0 and 2.0 nM. Binding appeared to take place at a single population of receptor sites. Competition experiments confirmed the high affinity of arginine vasopressin for hippocampal oxytocin receptors but also revealed that mammary gland and uterine oxytocin receptors do not discriminate more efficiently between oxytocin and arginine vasopressin. This lack in specificity is not affected by applying different concentrations of Mg ions.

  7. Fullerenes and their derivatives as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α with highly promoted affinities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaoyin; Gao, Xuejiao J; Jang, Joonkyung; Gao, Xingfa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cell signalling protein involved in systemic inflammation in infectious and other malignant diseases. Physiologically, it plays an important role in regulating host defence, but its overexpression can lead to serious illnesses including cancer, autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease. Gadolinium-based metallofullerenols, e.g., Gd@C82(OH) x (x ≈ 22), are well known for their abundant biological activities with low toxicity experimentally and theoretically; however, their activity in direct TNF-α inhibition has not been explored. In this work, we investigated the inhibiting effects of four types of fullerene-based ligands: fullerenes, fullerenols, metallofullerenes, and metallofullerenols. We reported previously that fullerenes, metallofullerenes and their hydroxylated derivatives (fullerenols) can reside in the same pocket of the TNF-α dimer as that of SPD304-a known inhibitor of TNF-α [He et al. (2005) Science 310:1022, 18]. Ligand docking and binding free energy calculations suggest that, with a similar nonpolar interaction dominated binding pattern, the fullerene-based ligands, C60, C60(OH)12, Gd@C60, C82, C82(OH)12, Gd@C82, Gd@C82(OH)13 and Gd@C82(OH)21, have larger affinity than currently known inhibitors, and could be used to design novel inhibitors of TNF-α in the future. Graphical Abstract Fullerene-material/TNF-α.

  8. Fullerenes and their derivatives as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α with highly promoted affinities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaoyin; Gao, Xuejiao J; Jang, Joonkyung; Gao, Xingfa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cell signalling protein involved in systemic inflammation in infectious and other malignant diseases. Physiologically, it plays an important role in regulating host defence, but its overexpression can lead to serious illnesses including cancer, autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease. Gadolinium-based metallofullerenols, e.g., Gd@C82(OH) x (x ≈ 22), are well known for their abundant biological activities with low toxicity experimentally and theoretically; however, their activity in direct TNF-α inhibition has not been explored. In this work, we investigated the inhibiting effects of four types of fullerene-based ligands: fullerenes, fullerenols, metallofullerenes, and metallofullerenols. We reported previously that fullerenes, metallofullerenes and their hydroxylated derivatives (fullerenols) can reside in the same pocket of the TNF-α dimer as that of SPD304-a known inhibitor of TNF-α [He et al. (2005) Science 310:1022, 18]. Ligand docking and binding free energy calculations suggest that, with a similar nonpolar interaction dominated binding pattern, the fullerene-based ligands, C60, C60(OH)12, Gd@C60, C82, C82(OH)12, Gd@C82, Gd@C82(OH)13 and Gd@C82(OH)21, have larger affinity than currently known inhibitors, and could be used to design novel inhibitors of TNF-α in the future. Graphical Abstract Fullerene-material/TNF-α. PMID:27316702

  9. NON-COMPETITIVE PEAK DECAY ANALYSIS OF DRUG-PROTEIN DISSOCIATION BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The peak decay method is an affinity chromatographic technique that has been used to examine the dissociation of solutes from immobilized ligands in the presence of excess displacing agent. However, it can be difficult to find a displacing agent that does not interfere with detection of the eluting analyte. In this study, a non-competitive peak decay method was developed in which no displacing agent was required for analyte elution. This method was evaluated for the study of drug-protein interactions by using it along with high-performance affinity chromatography to measure the dissociation rate constants for R- and S-warfarin from columns containing immobilized human serum albumin (HSA). Several factors were considered in the optimization of this method, including the amount of applied analyte, the column size, and the flow rate. The dissociation rate constants for R- and S-warfarin from HSA were measured at several temperatures by this approach, giving values of 0.56 (± 0.01) and 0.66 (± 0.01) s−1 at pH 7.4 and 37°C. These results were in good agreement with previous values obtained by other methods. This approach is not limited to warfarin and HSA but could be employed in studying additional drug-protein interactions or other systems with weak-to-moderate binding. PMID:19472288

  10. Review article: high-throughput affinity-based technologies for small-molecule drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhengrong; Cuozzo, John

    2009-12-01

    High-throughput affinity-based technologies are rapidly growing in use as primary screening methods in drug discovery. In this review, their principles and applications are described and their impact on small-molecule drug discovery is evaluated. In general, these technologies can be divided into 2 groups: those that detect binding interactions by measuring changes to the protein target and those that detect bound compounds. Technologies detecting binding interactions by focusing on the protein have limited throughput but can reveal mechanistic information about the binding interaction; technologies detecting bound compounds have very high throughput, some even significantly higher than current high-throughput screening technologies, but offer limited information about the binding interaction. In addition, the appropriate use of affinity-based technologies is discussed. Finally, nanotechnology is predicted to generate a significant impact on the future of affinity-based technologies. PMID:19822881

  11. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)neurotensin of rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Pettibone, D.J.; Totaro, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 3/H)Neurotensin (NT) was found to bind specifically and with high affinity to crude membranes prepared from rat uterus. Scatchard analysis of saturation binding studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)NT apparently binds to two sites (high affinity Kd 0.5 nM; low affinity Kd 9 nM) with the density of high affinity sites (41 fmoles/mg prot.) being about one-third that of the low affinity sites (100 fmoles/mg prot.). In competition studies, NT and various fragments inhibited (/sup 3/H)NT binding with the following potencies (approximately IC50): NT 8-13 (0.4 nM), NT 1-13 (4 nM), NT 9-13 (130 nM), NT 1-11, NT 1-8 (greater than 100 microM). Quantitatively similar results were obtained using brain tissue. These findings raise the possibility of a role for NT in uterine function.

  12. Concurrent low- and high-affinity sulfate reduction kinetics in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder Tarpgaard, Irene; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    Bacterial sulfate reduction in marine sediments generally occurs in the presence of high millimolar concentrations of sulfate. Published data indicate that low sulfate concentrations may limit sulfate reduction rates below 0.2-2 mM. Yet, high sulfate reduction rates occur in the 1-100 μM range in freshwater sediments and at the sulfate-methane transition in marine sediments. Through a combination of 35S-tracer experiments, including initial velocity experiments and time course experiments, we searched for different sulfate affinities in the mixed community of sulfate reducers in a marine sediment. We supported the radiotracer experiments with a highly sensitive ion chromatographic technique for sulfate with a detection limit of 0.15 μM SO 42- in marine pore water. Our results showed that high and low affinities for sulfate co-occur and that the applied experimental approach may determine the observed apparent half saturation constant, Km. Our experimental and model data both show that sulfate reduction in the studied marine sediment could be explained by two dominating affinities for sulfate: a low affinity with a mean half saturation constant, Km, of 430 μM SO 42- and a high affinity with a mean Km of 2.6 μM SO 42-. The high-affinity sulfate reduction was thermodynamically un-constrained down to <1 μM SO 42-, both in our experiments and under in situ conditions. The reduction of radio-labeled sulfate was partly reversible due to concurrent re-oxidation of sulfide by Fe(III) and possibly due to a reversibility of the enzymatic pathway of sulfate reduction. A literature survey of apparent Km values for sediments and pure cultures is presented and discussed.

  13. Architecture of high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers toward pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hanson, Charlotte; Sanford, Michael; Young, Howard A; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a remodeling method for high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers to augment their thermal stability and nuclease resistance, for use as drug candidates targeting specific proteins. Introducing a unique mini-hairpin DNA provides robust stability to unnatural-base DNA aptamers generated by SELEX using genetic alphabet expansion, without reducing their high affinity. By this method, >80% of the remodeled DNA aptamer targeting interferon-γ (KD of 33 pM) survived in human serum at 37 °C after 3 days under our experimental conditions, and sustainably inhibited the biological activity of interferon-γ. PMID:26690672

  14. "Clickable" agarose for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Punna, Sreenivas; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Finn, M G

    2005-01-01

    Successful purification of biological molecules by affinity chromatography requires the attachment of desired ligands to biocompatible chromatographic supports. The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides and alkynes-the premier example of "click chemistry"-is an efficient way to make covalent connections among diverse molecules and materials. Both azide and alkyne units are highly selective in their reactivity, being inert to most chemical functionalities and stable to wide ranges of solvent, temperature, and pH. We show that agarose beads bearing alkyne and azide groups can be easily made and are practical precursors to functionalized agarose materials for affinity chromatography.

  15. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  16. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  17. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications.

  18. RNA mango aptamer-fluorophore: a bright, high-affinity complex for RNA labeling and tracking.

    PubMed

    Dolgosheina, Elena V; Jeng, Sunny C Y; Panchapakesan, Shanker Shyam S; Cojocaru, Razvan; Chen, Patrick S K; Wilson, Peter D; Hawkins, Nancy; Wiggins, Paul A; Unrau, Peter J

    2014-10-17

    Because RNA lacks strong intrinsic fluorescence, it has proven challenging to track RNA molecules in real time. To address this problem and to allow the purification of fluorescently tagged RNA complexes, we have selected a high affinity RNA aptamer called RNA Mango. This aptamer binds a series of thiazole orange (fluorophore) derivatives with nanomolar affinity, while increasing fluorophore fluorescence by up to 1,100-fold. Visualization of RNA Mango by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, together with injection and imaging of RNA Mango/fluorophore complex in C. elegans gonads demonstrates the potential for live-cell RNA imaging with this system. By inserting RNA Mango into a stem loop of the bacterial 6S RNA and biotinylating the fluorophore, we demonstrate that the aptamer can be used to simultaneously fluorescently label and purify biologically important RNAs. The high affinity and fluorescent properties of RNA Mango are therefore expected to simplify the study of RNA complexes. PMID:25101481

  19. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  20. Structure of the high-affinity binding site for noncompetitive blockers of the acetylcholine receptor: serine-262 of the delta subunit is labeled by [3H]chlorpromazine.

    PubMed Central

    Giraudat, J; Dennis, M; Heidmann, T; Chang, J Y; Changeux, J P

    1986-01-01

    The membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata was photolabeled by the noncompetitive channel blocker [3H]chlorpromazine under equilibrium conditions in the presence of agonist. Incorporation of radioactivity into all subunits occurred and was reduced by addition of phencyclidine, a specific ligand for the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers. The delta subunit was purified and digested with trypsin, and the resulting fragments were fractionated by reversed-phase HPLC. The labeled peptide could not be purified to homogeneity because of its marked hydrophobic character, but a combination of differential CNBr subcleavage and cosequencing of partially purified fragments enabled us to identify Ser-262 as being labeled by [3H]chlorpromazine. The labeling of this particular residue was prevented by phencyclidine and thus took place at the level of, or in proximity to, the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers. Ser-262 is located in a hydrophobic and potentially transmembrane segment termed MII. Images PMID:3085104

  1. Characterization of a common high-affinity receptor for reovirus serotypes 1 and 3 on endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Verdin, E M; King, G L; Maratos-Flier, E

    1989-01-01

    During viremia, viruses may be cleared from the bloodstream and taken up by specific organs. The uptake of virus from the bloodstream is dependent on the association of viral particles with endothelial cells that line the luminal surfaces of large and small blood vessels. To understand the nature of this interaction, we have studied the binding of reovirus serotypes 1 and 3 to these cells in vitro. Both serotypes of reovirus productively infected endothelial cells. By using [35S]methionine-biolabeled reovirus as a tracer ligand, we found that both viruses rapidly bind to endothelial cells and that equilibrium is reached after 4 h. The binding of the radiolabeled viruses was saturable and mediated by a homogeneous population of cellular receptors with very high affinity (Kd = 0.5 nM) for the virus ligands. Both serotypes bind to the same receptor, since the attachment of each radiolabeled serotype is inhibited by both the homologous and heterologous unlabeled virus. Exposure of labeled virus to monoclonal antibodies directed against the viral hemagglutinin (sigma 1 protein) inhibited binding, demonstrating that the attachment of reovirus to endothelial cells is mediated by the hemagglutinin for both serotypes. By using a novel ligand-blotting assay, the binding of both viruses to a 54,000-dalton protein could be demonstrated. The binding of each radiolabeled serotype to this protein was inhibited by the homologous and heterologous unlabeled serotype. By using cell fractionation after homogenization, we demonstrated that this 54-kilodalton protein is a membrane protein, in agreement with its proposed role as a cell surface receptor for reovirus serotypes 1 and 3. Images PMID:2915382

  2. Hollow fiber based affinity selection combined with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy for rapid screening lipase inhibitors from lotus leaf.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yiyu

    2013-06-27

    A novel kind of immobilized enzyme affinity selection strategy based on hollow fibers has been developed for screening inhibitors from extracts of medicinal plants. Lipases from porcine pancreas were adsorbed onto the surface of polypropylene hollow fibers to form a stable matrix for ligand fishing, which was called hollow fibers based affinity selection (HF-AS). A variety of factors related to binding capability, including enzyme concentration, incubation time, temperature, buffer pH and ion strength, were optimized using a known lipase inhibitor hesperidin. The proposed approach was applied in screening potential lipase bound ligands from extracts of lotus leaf, followed by rapid characterization of active compounds using high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Three flavonoids including quercetin-3-O-β-D-arabinopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-galactopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide and kaempferol-3-O-β-d-glucuronide were identified as lipase inhibitors by the proposed HF-AS approach. Our findings suggested that the hollow fiber-based affinity selection could be a rapid and convenient approach for drug discovery from natural products resources. PMID:23764446

  3. Biocompatible silicon surfaces through orthogonal click chemistries and a high affinity silicon oxide binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Pagel, Mareen; Ming, Zhou; Häupl, Tilmann; Abel, Bernd; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-10-17

    Multifunctionality is gaining more and more importance in the field of improved biomaterials. Especially peptides feature a broad chemical variability and are versatile mediators between inorganic surfaces and living cells. Here, we synthesized a unique peptide that binds to SiO(2) with nM affinity. We equipped the peptide with the bioactive integrin binding c[RGDfK]-ligand and a fluorescent probe by stepwise Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand and copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. For the first time, we report the generation of a multifunctional peptide by combining these innovative coupling reactions. The resulting peptide displayed an outstanding binding to silicon oxide and induced a significant increase in cell spreading and cell viability of osteoblasts on the oxidized silicon surface.

  4. Low density and high affinity of platelet [3H]paroxetine binding in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Agneta; Sundblad-Elverfors, Charlotta; Landén, Mikael; Eriksson, Tomas; Eriksson, Elias

    2006-06-15

    Impaired serotonin transmission has been suggested to be implicated in the pathophysiology of bulimia nervosa. As an indirect measure of brain serotonergic activity, the binding of tritiated ligands to platelet serotonin transporters has been studied in bulimia nervosa as well as in other putatively serotonin-related psychiatric disorders. In this study, the density and affinity of platelet serotonin transporters were assessed in 20 women meeting the DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa and in 14 controls without previous or ongoing eating disorder using [(3)H]paroxetine as a ligand. In comparison to controls, women with bulimia nervosa had a significantly reduced number of platelet binding sites (B(max) = 721 +/- 313 vs. 1145 +/- 293 fmol/mg protein) and an increase in the affinity for the ligand demonstrated by a lower dissociaton constant (K(d) = 33 +/- 10 vs. 44 +/- 10 pM). A significant correlation between B(max) and K(d) values was found in patients but not in controls. Our results support the notion that bulimia nervosa is associated with a reduction in platelet serotonin transporter density. In addition, our study is the first to report that this reduced transporter density in women with bulimia nervosa is accompanied by an increase in the affinity of the transporter for the ligand.

  5. Preparation of high capacity affinity adsorbents using new hydrazino-carriers and their use for low and high performance affinity chromatography of lectins.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yamasaki, Y; Seno, N; Matsumoto, I

    1986-04-01

    Two kinds of carriers with high concentrations of hydrazino groups were prepared by simple and convenient procedures. Hydrazino-carriers (I) and (II) were obtained on incubation of epoxy-activated carriers with hydrazine hydrate and adipic acid dihydrazide, respectively. Disaccharides were coupled to the hydrazino carriers through reductive amination in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride. The reaction time was much shorter (24 h) than that in the case of the method involving amino-Sepharose 6B (800 h) [Matsumoto, I., Kitagaki, H., Akai, Y., Ito, Y., & Seno, N. (1981) Anal. Biochem. 116, 103-110]. The glycamyl-Sepharose thus obtained showed high adsorption capacities for lectins. Glycamyl-TSKgel G3000 PW obtained by the same method with TSKgel G3000 PW, which is a hydrophobic vinyl polymer matrix for high performance gel permeation liquid chromatography, could be successfully used for the high performance liquid affinity chromatography of lectins. N-Acetylglutamic acid was coupled to hydrazino-Sepharose 4B (I) in the presence of N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline. The adsorbent obtained was used for the affinity chromatography of Japanese horseshoe crab lectin. PMID:3711062

  6. High-affinity lead binding proteins in rat kidney cytosol mediate cell-free nuclear translocation of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, P.; Lucier, G.W.; Fowler, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PbII binding characteristics of the previously reported PbII binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol were investigated further. Saturation and Scatchard analysis of /sup 203/Pb binding in whole cytosol and in 40% saturated ammonium sulfate precipitated fractions disclosed a class of relatively high-affinity sites with an apparent Kd of approximately 50 nM and binding capacities of approximately 41 and 9 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. Two /sup 203/Pb binding proteins with approximate molecular masses of 63K and 11.5K daltons and a high molecular weight component (greater than 200K) were isolated by Sepharose-6B column chromatography. The time course of association of /sup 203/Pb with cytosol and the 63K protein showed maximum binding at 18 hr which was stable up to 25 hr at 4 degrees C. The approximate half-time dissociation rate (T 1/2) of specifically bound /sup 203/Pb to the 63K protein was 100 min at 4 degrees C whereas the 11.5K protein showed little dissociation of specifically bound ligand at this temperature. Saturation analysis of the three isolated proteins disclosed low capacity, high-affinity sites with similar apparent Kd values to the cytosol assay. Sucrose density gradient analysis of kidney cytosol showed approximate sedimentation coefficients of 2S, 4.6S and 7S for the 11.5K, 63K and the high molecular weight proteins, respectively. Competitive binding studies with cytosol demonstrated displacement of /sup 203/Pb by PbII, CdII and ZnII ions but not CaII ions.

  7. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  8. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  9. Novel Ubiquitin-derived High Affinity Binding Proteins with Tumor Targeting Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Lorey, Susan; Fiedler, Erik; Kunert, Anja; Nerkamp, Jörg; Lange, Christian; Fiedler, Markus; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva; Meysing, Maren; Gloser, Manja; Rundfeldt, Chris; Rauchhaus, Una; Hänssgen, Ilka; Göttler, Thomas; Steuernagel, Arnd; Fiedler, Ulrike; Haupts, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Targeting effector molecules to tumor cells is a promising mode of action for cancer therapy and diagnostics. Binding proteins with high affinity and specificity for a tumor target that carry effector molecules such as toxins, cytokines, or radiolabels to their intended site of action are required for these applications. In order to yield high tumor accumulation while maintaining low levels in healthy tissues and blood, the half-life of such conjugates needs to be in an optimal range. Scaffold-based binding molecules are small proteins with high affinity and short systemic circulation. Due to their low molecular complexity, they are well suited for combination with effector molecules as well as half-life extension technologies yielding therapeutics with half-lives adapted to the specific therapy. We have identified ubiquitin as an ideal scaffold protein due to its outstanding biophysical and biochemical properties. Based on a dimeric ubiquitin library, high affinity and specific binding molecules, so-called Affilin® molecules, have been selected against the extradomain B of fibronectin, a target almost exclusively expressed in tumor tissues. Extradomain B-binding molecules feature high thermal and serum stability as well as strong in vitro target binding and in vivo tumor accumulation. Application of several half-life extension technologies results in molecules of largely unaffected affinity but significantly prolonged in vivo half-life and tumor retention. Our results demonstrate the utility of ubiquitin as a scaffold for the generation of high affinity binders in a modular fashion, which can be combined with effector molecules and half-life extension technologies. PMID:24474690

  10. Interaction of amatoxins with plant cells and RNA polymerases II: selection of amanitin-resistant cell lines and synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Little, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments directed toward deriving basic information regarding plant RNA polymerase II is presented. The experiments described relate to the potential of isolating RNA polymerase II mutants in plants, using carrot cell cultures as models. Additionally, the synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands to immobilize isolated plant RNA polymerase II and associated transcriptional complexes is described. RNA polymerase II activities have been isolated from suspension cultures of carrot and compared to other plant RNA polymerases II with respect to subunit analysis and inhibition with ..cap alpha..-amanitin. RNA polymerase II purified by polymin P absorption, DE52, phosphocellulose, and RNA-agarose chromatography is shown to copurify with proteins of 175 (and 200), 135, 70, 43, 28, 22, and 17 kdaltons apparent molecular weights. Conditions for accurate determination of amanitin inhibition of the enzyme are established using /sup 3/H-amanitin and are presented for the first time for plant RNA polymerase II; RNA polymerase II from these cultures is shown to be inhibited by 50% at 3-5 nM by ..cap alpha..-amanitin, a value 10-50 times lower than previously reported.

  11. The importance of helix P1 stability for structural pre-organization and ligand binding affinity of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain

    PubMed Central

    Nozinovic, Senada; Reining, Anke; Kim, Yong-Boum; Noeske, Jonas; Schlepckow, Kai; Wöhnert, Jens; Schwalbe, Harald

    2014-01-01

    We report here an in-depth characterization of the aptamer domain of the transcriptional adenine-sensing riboswitch (pbuE) by NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. By NMR studies, the structure of two aptamer sequences with different lengths of the helix P1, the central element involved in riboswitch conformational switching, was characterized. Hydrogen-bond interactions could be mapped at nucleotide resolution providing information about secondary and tertiary structure, structure homogeneity and dynamics. Our study reveals that the elongation of helix P1 has pronounced effects not only on the local but on the global structure of the apo aptamer domain. The structural differences induced by stabilizing helix P1 were found to be linked to changes of the ligand binding affinity as revealed from analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained from stopped-flow fluorescence studies. The results provide new insight into the sequence-dependent fine tuning of the structure and function of purine-sensing riboswitches. PMID:24921630

  12. Characterization of p-aminobenzamidine-based sorbent and its use for high-performance affinity chromatography of trypsin-like proteases.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Suzuki, Takao; Hasegawa, Masazumi; Kato, Yoshio; Sasaki, Hiroo; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2003-08-15

    An affinity sorbent, hydrophilic polymer-based carrier of different pore size (Toyopearl) with immobilized p-aminobenzamidine (ABA), has been prepared. Its basic properties and some applications for protein purification were studied. ABA, which is a synthetic inhibitor for trypsin-like proteases, was covalently immobilized to Toyopearl by reductive amination. The ligand density and binding capacity for porcine trypsin varied depending on the pore size of Toyopearl. The maximum binding capacity of the immobilized p-aminobenzamidine Toyopearl (ABA-Toyopearl) for trypsin was more than 40 mg/ml gel. ABA-Toyopearl thus obtained was very stable below pH 8 and was successfully used for high-performance affinity chromatography of trypsin-like proteases such as trypsin, thrombin, tissue-type plasminogen activator or urokinase in a single step at 25 degrees C. PMID:13677653

  13. Synthesis, structure information, DNA/BSA binding affinity and in vitro cytotoxic studies of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes containing a phenylalanine derivative and diimine co-ligands.

    PubMed

    Annaraj, B; Balakrishnan, C; Neelakantan, M A

    2016-07-01

    Binary [Cu(PAIC)(H2O)2]·H2O (1) and mixed ligand [Cu(PAIC)(L)]·2H2O complexes, where PAIC=phenylalanine imidazole carboxylic acid, L=diimine coligands [2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (2) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3)] have been synthesized and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. The X-ray structure of [Cu(PAIC)(phen)]·2H2O (3) shows a N4O coordination with square pyramidal geometry around the copper (II) atom. The spin Hamiltonian parameters calculated for the complexes account for the distorted square planar structure and rules out the possibility of a trigonal bipyramidal structure. Interaction of the complexes (1-3) with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was studied by using different techniques (absorption titration, fluorescence quenching and thermal melting) and the studies suggest that these complexes bind to CT DNA through intercalation. The DNA-binding affinity of the complexes has further been explained by DFT computational results. Binding activity of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) reveals that the complexes can strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching mechanism. DNA cleavage experiments using plasmid DNA pUC 19 show that the complexes exhibit efficient chemical nuclease activity even in the absence of any external additives. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against human normal cell line (HBL 100) and human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) shows that metal complexation of the ligands results in a significant enhancement in the cell death of MCF-7. Finally, docking studies on DNA and protein binding interactions were performed. PMID:27155593

  14. Screening of high-affinity scFvs from a ribosome displayed library using BIAcore biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Wang, Zhongkang; Nian, Siji; Yin, Youping; Chen, Gang; Xia, Yuxian

    2009-02-01

    An experimental protocol was developed to screen high-affinity single-chain Fv antibody fragments (scFvs) from a Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) immunized ribosome display library using BIAcore biosensor. The screening methods involved immobilizing antigen [lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Xac] on sensor chip HPA and then unpurified expression products of scFvs flowing over the immobilized sensor chip. The affinity-improved scFvs were selected based on dissociation rate constants (k (d)). Thirty-five enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-positive scFvs were analyzed by BIAcore, and three of those (scFv A1, B2, and C5) with lower k (d) were screened. To demonstrate the accuracy of the screening method, the three scFvs were expressed in Escherichia coli HB2151 and purified. The purified scFvs were subsequently further identified according to association rate and affinity constants. The results showed that the three scFvs (A1, B2, and C5) had high affinity for LPS of Xac (3.51 x 10(-11), 1.13 x 10(-10), 5.06 x 10(-10) M, respectively). Furthermore, the scFv B2 was highly specific for LPS of Xac and had no any cross-reactions with bovine serum albumin and LPS from Xac-related bacteria. This provided evidence that the information from the BIAcore screening assay could be accurate. PMID:18574567

  15. High-affinity no-carrier-added 99mTc-labeled chemotactic peptides for studies of inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, K E; Scheffel, U; Stathis, M; Finley, P; Lever, S Z; Zhan, Y; Wagner, H N

    1998-01-01

    Nalpha-for-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys, a chemotactic peptide that binds with high affinity to the chemoattractant receptor on granulocytes and monocytes, was labeled with 99mTc using the diaminedithiol (DADT) chelating system to coordinate the Tc. 99mTc labeling of the DADT-coupled peptide was accomplished in 84% overall yield (room temperature for 10 min) using [99mTc]glucoheptonate as the donor of prereduced Tc. HPLC analysis showed two major 99mTc-labeled peptide peaks, 99mTc-DADT-Pep-I and 99mTc-DADT-Pep-II, were obtained in a ratio of 1:0.85. Using an iodoacetamide-derivatized gel to remove unlabeled peptide from the 99mTc labeling mixtures, essentially no-carrier-added (nca) high-specific activity 99mTc-labeled chemotactic peptides were obtained. The 99Tc analogues of the peptides were synthesized (72% yield) in a similar fashion and correlated with 99mTc complexes I and II by HPLC. In vitro competitive receptor binding assays of the isolated 99Tc analogues were performed against the tritiated chemotactic peptide [3H]N-for-Met-Leu-Phe ([3H]fMLF) using isolated granulocytes. The 99Tc-derivatized peptides showed similar binding affinities to the chemoattractant receptor as the unlabeled Nalpha-for-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys. The nca 99mTc-labeled peptides gave high contrast images of experimental inflammation in rabbits without causing neutropenia. Thus, it is feasible to attach the Tc-DADT chelate to low-molecular weight receptor binding chemotactic peptides and retain substantial binding to the receptor. Chemotactic peptides labeled with 99mTc via the DADT ligand system have the potential for imaging focal sites of inflammation without toxic effects, an important consideration in the successful utilization of chemotactic peptide agonists.

  16. Effectors of hemoglobin. Separation of allosteric and affinity factors.

    PubMed Central

    Marden, M C; Bohn, B; Kister, J; Poyart, C

    1990-01-01

    The relative contributions of the allosteric and affinity factors toward the change in p50 have been calculated for a series of effectors of hemoglobin (Hb). Shifts in the ligand affinity of deoxy Hb and the values for 50% ligand saturation (p50) were obtained from oxygen equilibrium data. Because the high-affinity parameters (liganded conformation) are poorly determined from the equilibrium curves, they were determined from kinetic measurements of the association and dissociation rates with CO as ligand. The CO on-rates were obtained by flash photolysis measurements. The off-rates were determined from the rate of oxidation of HbCO by ferricyanide, or by replacement of CO with NO. The partition function of fully liganded hemoglobin for oxygen and CO is only slightly changed by the effectors. Measurements were made in the presence of the effectors 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG), inositol hexakisphosphate (IHP), bezafibrate (Bzf), and two recently synthesized derivatives of Bzf (LR16 and L35). Values of p50 change by over a factor of 60; the on-rates decrease by nearly a factor of 8, with little change in the off-rates for the liganded conformation. The data indicate that both allosteric and affinity parameters are changed by the effectors; the changes in ligand affinity represent the larger contribution toward shifts in p50. PMID:2306490

  17. High throughput screening of ligand binding to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.; D'Amico, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    A process is provided for the high throughput screening of binding of ligands to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction data including producing a first sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and a solvent, producing a second sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material, one or more ligands and the solvent, obtaining a high resolution powder diffraction pattern on each of said first sample slurry and the second sample slurry, and, comparing the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the first sample slurry and the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the second sample slurry whereby a difference in the high resolution powder diffraction patterns of the first sample slurry and the second sample slurry provides a positive indication for the formation of a complex between the selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and at least one of the one or more ligands.

  18. [125I]AT-1012, a New High Affinity Radioligand for the α3β4 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinhua; Perry, David C.; Bupp, James E.; Jiang, Faming; Polgar, Willma E.; Toll, Lawrence; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent genetic and pharmacological studies have implicated the α3, β4 and a5 subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in dependence to nicotine and other abused drugs and nicotine withdrawal. The α3β4* nAChR subtype has been shown to co-assemble with the α5 or β3 nAChR subunits, and is found mainly in the autonomic ganglia and select brain regions. It has been difficult to study the α3β4 nAChR because there have been no selective nonpeptidic ligands available to independently examine its pharmacology. We recently reported the synthesis of a [125I]-radiolabeled analog of a high affinity, selective small-molecule α3β4 nAChR ligand, AT-1012. We report here the vitro characterization of this radioligand in receptor binding and in vitro autoradiographic studies targeting the α3β4* nAChR. Binding of [125I]AT-1012 was characterized at the rat α3β4- and α4β2 nAChR transfected into HEK cells as well as at the human α3β4α5 nAChR in HEK cells. Binding affinity of [125I]AT-1012 at the rat α3β4 nAChR was 1.4 nM, with a Bmax of 10.3 pmol/mg protein, similar to what was determined using [3H]epibatidine. Saturation isotherms suggested that [125I]AT-1012 binds to a single site on the α3β4 nAChR. Similar high binding affinity was also observed for [125I]AT-1012 at human α3β4α5 nAChR in a human α3β4aα nAChR transfected cell line. [125I]AT-1012 did not bind with high affinity to membranes from α4β2 nAChR-transfected HEK cells, and [3H]epibatidine binding studies showed that AT-1012 had over 100-fold binding selectivity for the α3β4 over α4β2 nAChR. Ki values determined for known nAChR compounds using [125I]AT-1012 as radioligand were comparable to those obtained with [3H]epibatidine. [125I]AT-1012 was also used to label the α3β4 nAChR in rat brain slices in vitro using autoradiography which showed highly localized binding of the radioligand in brain regions consistent with the discreet localization of the α3β4 nAChR. We

  19. Mechanism of high affinity inhibition of the human urate transporter URAT1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Philip K.; Ostertag, Traci M.; Miner, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Gout is caused by elevated serum urate levels, which can be treated using inhibitors of the uric acid transporter, URAT1. We exploited affinity differences between the human and rat transporters to map inhibitor binding sites in URAT1. Human-rat transporter chimeras revealed that human URAT1 serine-35, phenylalanine-365 and isoleucine-481 are necessary and sufficient to provide up to a 100-fold increase in affinity for inhibitors. Moreover, serine-35 and phenylalanine-365 are important for high-affinity interaction with the substrate urate. A novel URAT1 binding assay provides support for direct interaction with these amino acids; thus, current clinically important URAT1 inhibitors likely bind the same site in URAT1. A structural model suggests that these three URAT1 residues are in close proximity potentially projecting within the channel. Our results indicate that amino acids from several transmembrane segments functionally cooperate to form a high-affinity URAT1 inhibitor binding site that, when occupied, prevents substrate interactions. PMID:27713539

  20. High-content affinity-based proteomics: unlocking protein biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Brody, Edward N; Gold, Larry; Lawn, Richard M; Walker, Jeffrey J; Zichi, Dom

    2010-11-01

    Single protein biomarkers measured with antibody-based affinity assays are the basis of molecular diagnostics in clinical practice today. There is great hope in discovering new protein biomarkers and combinations of protein biomarkers for advancing medicine through monitoring health, diagnosing disease, guiding treatment, and developing new therapeutics. The goal of high-content proteomics is to unlock protein biomarker discovery by measuring many (thousands) or all (∼23,000) proteins in the human proteome in an unbiased, data-driven approach. High-content proteomics has proven technically difficult due to the diversity of proteins, the complexity of relevant biological samples, such as blood and tissue, and large concentration ranges (in the order of 10(12) in blood). Mass spectrometry and affinity methods based on antibodies have dominated approaches to high-content proteomics. For technical reasons, neither has achieved adequate simultaneous performance and high-content. Here we review antibody-based protein measurement, multiplexed antibody-based protein measurement, and limitations of antibodies for high-content proteomics due to their inherent cross-reactivity. Finally, we review a new affinity-based proteomic technology developed from the ground up to solve the problem of high content with high sensitivity and specificity. Based on a new generation of slow off-rate modified aptamers (SOMAmers), this technology is unlocking biomarker discovery.

  1. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  2. Practical strategies for the evaluation of high-affinity protein/nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Sarah E; Lewis, Karen A; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of binding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids is highly sensitive to a variety of experimental conditions. Optimization of these conditions is critical for obtaining high quality, reproducible data, particularly in the context of very high affinity interactions. Here, we discuss the practical considerations involved in optimizing the apparent binding constant of an interaction as measured by two common quantitative assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and double-filter binding when measuring extremely tight protein/nucleic acid interactions with sub-nanomolar binding affinities. We include specific examples from two telomere end-binding protein systems, Schizo -saccharomyces pombe Pot1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc13, to demonstrate potential experimental pitfalls and some useful strategies for optimization.

  3. Practical strategies for the evaluation of high-affinity protein/nucleic acid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Sarah E.; Lewis, Karen A.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of binding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids is highly sensitive to a variety of experimental conditions. Optimization of these conditions is critical for obtaining high quality, reproducible data, particularly in the context of very high affinity interactions. Here, we discuss the practical considerations involved in optimizing the apparent binding constant of an interaction as measured by two common quantitative assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and double-filter binding when measuring extremely tight protein/nucleic acid interactions with sub-nanomolar binding affinities. We include specific examples from two telomere end-binding protein systems, Schizo -saccharomyces pombe Pot1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc13, to demonstrate potential experimental pitfalls and some useful strategies for optimization. PMID:25197549

  4. Crystal Structure of the SH3 Domain of beta PIX in Complex with a High Affinity Peptide from PAK2

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelz,A.; Janz, J.; Lawrie, S.; Corwin, B.; Lee, A.; Sakmar, T.

    2006-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are important effector proteins of the small GTPases Cdc42 and Rac and control cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell proliferation. The direct interaction of PAKs with guanine nucleotide exchange factors from the PIX/Cool family, which is responsible for the localization of PAK kinases to focal complexes in the cell, is mediated by a 24-residue peptide segment in PAKs and an N-terminal src homology 3 (SH3) domain in PIX/Cool. The SH3-binding segment of PAK contains the atypical consensus-binding motif PxxxPR, which is required for unusually high affinity binding. In order to understand the structural basis for the high affinity and specificity of the PIX-PAK interaction, we solved crystal structures for the N-terminal SH3 domain of {beta}PIX and for the complex of the atypical binding segment of PAK2 with the N-terminal SH3 domain of {beta}PIX at 0.92 Angstroms and 1.3 Angstroms resolution, respectively. The asymmetric unit of the crystal contains two SH3 domains and two peptide ligands. The bound peptide adopts a conformation that allows for intimate contacts with three grooves on the surface of the SH3 domain that lie between the n-Src and RT-loops. Most notably, the arginine residue of the PxxxPR motif forms a salt-bridge and is tightly coordinated by a number of residues in the SH3 domain. This arginine-specific interaction appears to be the key determinant for the high affinity binding of PAK peptides. Furthermore, C-terminal residues of the peptide engage in additional interactions with the surface of the RT-loop, which significantly increases binding specificity. Compared to a recent NMR structure of a similar complex, our crystal structure reveals an alternate binding mode. Finally, we compare our crystal structure with the recently published {beta}PIX/Cbl-b complex structure, and suggest the existence of a molecular switch.

  5. High-aluminum-affinity silica is a nanoparticle that seeds secondary aluminosilicate formation.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Brown, Andy; Dietzel, Martin; Powell, Jonathan J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance and abundance of aluminosilicates throughout our natural surroundings, their formation at neutral pH is, surprisingly, a matter of considerable debate. From our experiments in dilute aluminum and silica containing solutions (pH ~ 7) we previously identified a silica polymer with an extraordinarily high affinity for aluminium ions (high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer, HSP). Here, further characterization shows that HSP is a colloid of approximately 2.4 nm in diameter with a mean specific surface area of about 1,000 m(2) g(-1) and it competes effectively with transferrin for Al(III) binding. Aluminum binding to HSP strongly inhibited its decomposition whilst the reaction rate constant for the formation of the β-silicomolybdic acid complex indicated a diameter between 3.6 and 4.1 nm for these aluminum-containing nanoparticles. Similarly, high resolution microscopic analysis of the air dried aluminum-containing silica colloid solution revealed 3.9 ± 1.3 nm sized crystalline Al-rich silica nanoparticles (ASP) with an estimated Al:Si ratio of between 2 and 3 which is close to the range of secondary aluminosilicates such as imogolite. Thus the high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer is a nanoparticle that seeds early aluminosilicate formation through highly competitive binding of Al(III) ions. In niche environments, especially in vivo, this may serve as an alternative mechanism to polyhydroxy Al(III) species binding monomeric silica to form early phase, non-toxic aluminosilicates.

  6. Basis of the 1:1 stoichiometry of the high affinity receptor Fc epsilon RI-IgE complex.

    PubMed

    Keown, M B; Ghirlando, R; Mackay, G A; Sutton, B J; Gould, H J

    1997-01-01

    A soluble fragment of the high-affinity IgE receptor Fc epsilon RI alpha-chain (sFc epsilon RI alpha) binds to the Fc fragment of IgE (IgE-Fc) as a 1:1 complex. IgE-Fc consists of a dimer of the C epsilon 2, C epsilon 3 and C epsilon 4 domains of the epsilon-heavy chain of IgE. This region of IgE has been modelled on the crystal structure of the Fc region of IgG1, which exhibits twofold rotational symmetry. This implies that IgE should be divalent with respect to its ligands. X-ray scattering studies reveal however that the twofold rotational symmetry of IgE-Fc is perturbed by a bend in the linker region between the C epsilon 2 and C epsilon 3 domains. The 1:1 stoichiometry could then arise from the conformational asymmetry or from steric occlusion of one of the sites by the overhanging C epsilon 2 domains. To test this hypothesis we have expressed a recombinant epsilon-chain fragment containing C epsilon 3 and C epsilon 4. This product, Fc epsilon 3-4, is secreted from cells as a disulphide linked dimer and binds with higher affinity than either IgE or IgE-Fc to cell surface Fc epsilon RI. Titration experiments, together with molecular mass measurements of the Fc epsilon 3-4/sFc epsilon RI alpha complex, reveal that Fc epsilon 3-4 binds only a single receptor molecule. This excludes the possibility that steric hindrance by C epsilon 2 accounts for the unexpected stoichiometry.

  7. The C2 domains of granuphilin are high-affinity sensors for plasma membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Lyakhova, Tatyana A; Knight, Jefferson D

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-targeting proteins are crucial components of many cell signaling pathways, including the secretion of insulin. Granuphilin, also known as synaptotagmin-like protein 4, functions in tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane prior to exocytosis. Granuphilin docks to insulin secretory vesicles through interaction of its N-terminal domain with vesicular Rab proteins; however, the mechanisms of granuphilin plasma membrane targeting and release are less clear. Granuphilin contains two C2 domains, C2A and C2B, that interact with the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. The goal of this study was to determine membrane-binding mechanisms, affinities, and kinetics of both granuphilin C2 domains using fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that both C2A and C2B bind anionic lipids in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. The C2A domain binds liposomes containing a physiological mixture of lipids including 2% PI(4,5)P2 or PI(3,4,5)P3 with high affinity (apparent K(d, PIPx) of 2-5 nM), and binds nonspecifically with moderate affinity to anionic liposomes lacking phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIPx) lipids. The C2B domain binds with sub-micromolar affinity to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P2 but does not have a measurable affinity for background anionic lipids. Both domains can be competed away from their target lipids by the soluble PIPx analog inositol-(1,2,3,4,5,6)-hexakisphosphate (IP6), which is a positive regulator of insulin secretion. Potential roles of these interactions in the docking and release of granuphilin from the plasma membrane are discussed.

  8. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  9. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (KD) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  10. The presence of high-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β binding in rainbow trout scale indicates a possible endocrine route for the regulation of scale resorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persson, Petra; Shrimpton, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur

    2000-01-01

    High-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β (E2) binding is present in rainbow trout scale. The Kd and Bmax of the scale E2 binding are similar to those of the liver E2 receptor (Kd is 1.6 ± 0.1 and 1.4 ± 0.1 nM, and Bmax is 9.1 ± 1.2 and 23.1 ± 2.2 fmol x mg protein-1, for scale and liver, respectively), but different from those of the high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding in plasma (Kd is 4.0 ± 0.4 nM and Bmax is 625.4 ± 63.1 fmol x mg protein-1). The E2 binding in scale was displaced by testosterone, but not by diethylstilbestrol. Hence, the ligand binding specificity is different from that of the previously characterized liver E2 receptor, where E2 is displaced by diethylstilbestrol, but not by testosterone. The putative scale E2 receptor thus appears to bind both E2 and testosterone, and it is proposed that the increased scale resorption observed during sexual maturation in both sexes of several salmonid species may be mediated by this receptor. No high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding could be detected in rainbow trout gill or skin.

  11. Development of high-affinity single chain Fv against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Goo; Jeong, Gu Min; Yim, Sung Sun; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2016-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is caused by the FMD virus (FMDV) and results in severe economic losses in livestock farming. For rapid FMD diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, an effective antibody against FMDV is needed. Here, we developed a high-affinity antibody against FMDV by FACS-based high throughput screening of a random library. With the FITC-conjugated VP1 epitope of FMDV and high-speed FACS sorting, we screened the synthetic antibody (scFv) library in which antibody variants are displayed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After three rounds of sorting, we isolated one antibody fragment (#138-scFv) against the VP1 epitope of FMDV. Next, to improve its affinity, a mutation library of #138-scFV was constructed by error-prone PCR and screened by FACS. After three rounds of sorting, we isolated one antibody (AM-32 scFv), which has a higher binding affinity (KD=42.7nM) than that of the original #138-scFv. We also confirmed that it specifically binds to whole inactivated FMDV. PMID:26827774

  12. Humanization of high-affinity antibodies targeting glypican-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have generated a group of high-affinity mouse monoclonal antibodies targeting GPC3. Here, we report the humanization and testing of these antibodies for clinical development. We compared the affinity and cytotoxicity of recombinant immunotoxins containing mouse single-chain variable regions fused with a Pseudomonas toxin. To humanize the mouse Fvs, we grafted the combined KABAT/IMGT complementarity determining regions (CDR) into a human IgG germline framework. Interestingly, we found that the proline at position 41, a non-CDR residue in heavy chain variable regions (VH), is important for humanization of mouse antibodies. We also showed that two humanized anti-GPC3 antibodies (hYP7 and hYP9.1b) in the IgG format induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent-cytotoxicity in GPC3-positive cancer cells. The hYP7 antibody was tested and showed inhibition of HCC xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. This study successfully humanizes and validates high affinity anti-GPC3 antibodies and sets a foundation for future development of these antibodies in various clinical formats in the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27667400

  13. Comparative investigation of surface transfer doping of hydrogen terminated diamond by high electron affinity insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verona, C.; Ciccognani, W.; Colangeli, S.; Limiti, E.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a comparative study of transfer doping of hydrogenated single crystal diamond surface by insulators featured by high electron affinity, such as Nb2O5, WO3, V2O5, and MoO3. The low electron affinity Al2O3 was also investigated for comparison. Hole transport properties were evaluated in the passivated hydrogenated diamond films by Hall effect measurements, and were compared to un-passivated diamond films (air-induced doping). A drastic improvement was observed in passivated samples in terms of conductivity, stability with time, and resistance to high temperatures. The efficiency of the investigated insulators, as electron accepting materials in hydrogenated diamond surface, is consistent with their electronic structure. These surface acceptor materials generate a higher hole sheet concentration, up to 6.5 × 1013 cm-2, and a lower sheet resistance, down to 2.6 kΩ/sq, in comparison to the atmosphere-induced values of about 1 × 1013 cm-2 and 10 kΩ/sq, respectively. On the other hand, hole mobilities were reduced by using high electron affinity insulator dopants. Hole mobility as a function of hole concentration in a hydrogenated diamond layer was also investigated, showing a well-defined monotonically decreasing trend.

  14. Cutting Edge: Resident Memory CD8 T Cells Express High-Affinity TCRs.

    PubMed

    Frost, Elizabeth L; Kersh, Anna E; Evavold, Brian D; Lukacher, Aron E

    2015-10-15

    Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells serve as vanguards of antimicrobial host defense in nonlymphoid tissues, particularly at barrier epithelia and in organs with nonrenewable cell types (e.g., brain). In this study, we asked whether an augmented ability to sense Ag complemented their role as early alarms of pathogen invasion. Using mouse polyomavirus, we show that brain-resident mouse polyomavirus-specific CD8 T cells, unlike memory cells in the spleen, progressively increase binding to MHC class I tetramers and CD8 coreceptor expression. Using the two-dimensional micropipette adhesion-frequency assay, we show that TRM cells in brain, as well as in kidney, express TCRs with up to 20-fold higher affinity than do splenic memory T cells, whereas effector cells express TCRs of similar high affinity in all organs. Together, these data demonstrate that TRM cells retain high TCR affinity, which endows them with the high Ag sensitivity needed for front-line defense against infectious agents. PMID:26371252

  15. High-Affinity Accumulation of a Maytansinoid in Cells via Weak Tubulin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Goldmacher, Victor S.; Audette, Charlene A.; Guan, Yinghua; Sidhom, Eriene-Heidi; Shah, Jagesh V.; Whiteman, Kathleen R.; Kovtun, Yelena V.

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule-targeting maytansinoids accumulate in cells and induce mitotic arrest at 250- to 1000-fold lower concentrations than those required for their association with tubulin or microtubules. To identify the mechanisms of this intracellular accumulation and exceptional cytotoxicity of maytansinoids we studied interaction of a highly cytotoxic maytansinoid, S-methyl DM1 and several other maytansinoids with cells. S-methyl DM1 accumulated inside the cells with a markedly higher apparent affinity than to tubulin or microtubules. The apparent affinities of maytansinoids correlated with their cytotoxicities. The number of intracellular binding sites for S-methyl DM1 in MCF7 cells was comparable to the number of tubulin molecules per cell (~ 4–6 × 107 copies). Efflux of 3 [H]-S-methyl DM1 from cells was enhanced in the presence of an excess of non-labeled S-methyl DM1, indicating that re-binding of 3 [H]-S-methyl DM1 to intracellular binding sites contributed to its intracellular retention. Liposomes loaded with non-polymerized tubulin recapitulated the apparent high-affinity association of S-methyl DM1 to cells. We propose a model for the intracellular accumulation of maytansinoids in which molecules of the compounds diffuse into a cell and associate with tubulin. Affinities of maytansinoids for individual tubulin molecules are weak, but the high intracellular concentration of tubulin favors, after dissociation of a compound-tubulin complex, their re-binding to a tubulin molecule, or to a tip of a microtubule in the same cell, over their efflux. As a result, a significant fraction of microtubule tips is occupied with a maytansinoid when added to cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, inducing mitotic arrest and cell death. PMID:25671541

  16. Robotic high-throughput purification of affinity-tagged recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Simone C; Weinzierl, Robert O J

    2015-01-01

    Affinity purification of recombinant proteins has become the method of choice to obtain good quantities and qualities of proteins for a variety of downstream biochemical applications. While manual or FPLC-assisted purification techniques are generally time-consuming and labor-intensive, the advent of high-throughput technologies and liquid handling robotics has simplified and accelerated this process significantly. Additionally, without the human factor as a potential source of error, automated purification protocols allow for the generation of large numbers of proteins simultaneously and under directly comparable conditions. The delivered material is ideal for activity comparisons of different variants of the same protein. Here, we present our strategy for the simultaneous purification of up to 24 affinity-tagged proteins for activity measurements in biochemical assays. The protocol described is suitable for the scale typically required in individual research laboratories. PMID:25749949

  17. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity. PMID:26583259

  18. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17812.001 PMID:27436096

  19. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. PMID:27436096

  20. In silico investigation of PARP-1 catalytic domains in holo and apo states for the design of high-affinity PARP-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Unlu, Ayhan; Yurtsever, Mine; Noskov, Sergei Y; Durdagi, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    The rational design of high-affinity inhibitors of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is at the heart of modern anti-cancer drug design. While relevance of enzyme to DNA repair processes in cellular environment is firmly established, the structural and functional understanding of the main determinants for high-affinity ligands controlling PARP-1 activity is still lacking. The conserved active site of PARP-1 represents an ideal target for inhibitors and may offer a novel target at the treatment of breast cancer. To fill the gap in the structural knowledge, we report on the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, principal component analysis (PCA), and conformational analysis that analyzes in great details novel binding mode for a number of inhibitors at the PARP-1. While optimization of the binding affinity for original target is an important goal in the drug design, many of the promising molecules for treatment of the breast cancer are plagued by significant cardiotoxicity. One of the most common side-effects reported for a number of polymerase inhibitors is its off-target interactions with cardiac ion channels and hERG1 channel, in particular. Thus, selected candidate PARP-1 inhibitors were also screened in silico at the central cavities of hERG1 potassium ion channel.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of binuclear metal complexes of a new asymmetrical Schiff base ligand: DNA binding affinity of copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    The 1:1 condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane under condition of high dilution gives the mono-condensed Schiff base, (E)-3-(1-aminopropan-2-ylimino)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one. The mono-condensed Schiff base has been used for further condensation with isatin to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, (E)-3-(2-((E)-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxobutan-2-ylideneamino) propylimino)indolin-2-one (H3L) with a N2O3 donor set. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts give a series of new binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. The analytical and spectroscopic tools showed that the complexes can be formulated as: [(HL)(VO)2(SO4)(H2O)]·4H2O, [(HL)Fe2Cl4(H2O)3]·EtOH, [(HL)Fe2(ox)Cl2(H2O)3]·2H2O, [(L)M2(OAc)(H2O)m]·nH2O; M = Co, Ni or Cu, m = 4, 0 and n = 2, 3, [(HL)Cu2Cl]Cl·6H2O and [(L)(UO2)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·6H2O. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements except copper complexes that exhibited tetrahedral geometries and uranyl complex in which the metal ion is octa-coordinated. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active. The DNA-binding properties of the copper complexes (6 and 7) have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The results obtained indicate that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant, Kb of 1.34 × 104 and 2.5 × 104 M-1, respectively.

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel high affinity metal-binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M R; Simorre, J P; Hanson, P; Mokler, V; Bellon, L; Beigelman, L; Pardi, A

    1999-01-01

    A novel metal-binding site has been identified in the hammerhead ribozyme by 31P NMR. The metal-binding site is associated with the A13 phosphate in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme and is distinct from any previously identified metal-binding sites. 31P NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the metal-binding affinity for this site and leads to an apparent dissociation constant of 250-570 microM at 25 degrees C for binding of a single Mg2+ ion. The NMR data also show evidence of a structural change at this site upon metal binding and these results are compared with previous data on metal-induced structural changes in the core of the hammerhead ribozyme. These NMR data were combined with the X-ray structure of the hammerhead ribozyme (Pley HW, Flaherty KM, McKay DB. 1994. Nature 372:68-74) to model RNA ligands involved in binding the metal at this A13 site. In this model, the A13 metal-binding site is structurally similar to the previously identified A(g) metal-binding site and illustrates the symmetrical nature of the tandem G x A base pairs in domain 2 of the hammerhead ribozyme. These results demonstrate that 31P NMR represents an important method for both identification and characterization of metal-binding sites in nucleic acids. PMID:10445883

  3. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-09-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  4. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  5. High blood oxygen affinity in the air-breathing swamp eel Monopterus albus.

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Christian; Findorf, Inge; Helbo, Signe; Kocagoz, Yigit; Buchanan, Rasmus; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Weber, Roy E; Fago, Angela; Bayley, Mark; Wang, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    The Asian swamp eel (Monopterus albus, Zuiew 1793) is a facultative air-breathing fish with reduced gills. Previous studies have shown that gas exchange seems to occur across the epithelium of the buccopharyngeal cavity, the esophagus and the integument, resulting in substantial diffusion limitations that must be compensated by adaptations in others steps of the O₂ transport system to secure adequate O₂ delivery to the respiring tissues. We therefore investigated O₂ binding properties of whole blood, stripped hemoglobin (Hb), two major isoHb components and the myoglobin (Mb) from M. albus. Whole blood was sampled using indwelling catheters for blood gas analysis and determination of O₂ equilibrium curves. Hb was purified to assess the effects of endogenous allosteric effectors, and Mb was isolated from heart and skeletal muscle to determine its O₂ binding properties. The blood of M. albus has a high O₂ carrying capacity [hematocrit (Hct) of 42.4±4.5%] and binds O₂ with an unusually high affinity (P₅₀=2.8±0.4mmHg at 27°C and pH7.7), correlating with insensitivity of the Hb to the anionic allosteric effectors that normally decrease Hb-O₂ affinity. In addition, Mb is present at high concentrations in both heart and muscle (5.16±0.99 and 1.08±0.19mg ∙ g wet tissue⁻¹, respectively). We suggest that the high Hct and high blood O₂ affinity serve to overcome the low diffusion capacity in the relatively inefficient respiratory surfaces, while high Hct and Mb concentration aid in increasing the O₂ flux from the blood to the muscles.

  6. Probing high-affinity 11-mer DNA aptamer against Lup an 1 (β-conglutin).

    PubMed

    Nadal, P; Svobodova, M; Mairal, T; O'Sullivan, C K

    2013-11-01

    Aptamers are synthetic nucleic acids with great potential as analytical tools. However, the length of selected aptamers (typically 60-100 bases) can affect affinity, due to the presence of bases not required for interaction with the target, and therefore, the truncation of these selected sequences and identification of binding domains is a critical step to produce potent aptamers with higher affinities and specificities and lowered production costs. In this paper we report the truncation of an aptamer that specifically binds to β-conglutin (Lup an 1), an anaphylactic allergen. Through comparing the predicted secondary structures of the aptamers, a hairpin structure with a G-rich loop was determined to be the binding motif. The highest affinity was observed with a truncation resulting in an 11-mer sequence that had an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (K D) of 1.7 × 10(-9) M. This 11-mer sequence was demonstrated to have high specificity for β-conglutin and showed no cross-reactivity to other lupin conglutins (α-, δ-, γ-conglutins) and closely related proteins such as gliadin. Finally, the structure of the truncated 11-mer aptamer was preliminarily elucidated, and the GQRS Mapper strongly predicted the presence of a G-quadruplex, which was subsequently corroborated using one-dimensional NMR, thus highlighting the stability of the truncated structure. PMID:24126837

  7. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    SciTech Connect

    Briers, Yves; Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J.; Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  8. Monoclonal IgM antibody exhibiting high-affinity binding and cryoglobulin properties.

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, D W; Kranz, D M; Voss, E W

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal IgM antibody (18-2-3) derived from cell fusion of (NZB X NZW) F1 splenocytes following secondary immunization with fluorescein-conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin was shown to exhibit high intrinsic binding affinity and cryoinsolubility. Affinity-purified preparations were determined to be IgM by immunochemical, electrophoretic, and chromatographic analyses. An intrinsic association constant (Ka) of 2.9 X 10(10) M-1 (at 2 degrees C) was measured by first-order dissociation-rate analysis. Antibody solubility at low concentration (approximately equal to 50 micrograms/ml) was shown, by absorption spectroscopy, to be temperature dependent between 4 degrees C and 32 degrees C. Insolubility at low temperature (4 degrees C) was reversible in the presence of homologous fluorescyl hapten, indicative of active site involvement in the mechanism of cryoglobulin-18-2-3 complex formation. Characteristics of clone 18-2-3 are discussed in terms of (i) its potential use as a model for examining the mechanism of cryoprecipitation and (ii) the proposed relationship between affinity maturation and the IgM to IgG class switch. Images PMID:6348779

  9. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  10. CaRuby-Nano: a novel high affinity calcium probe for dual color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Collot, Mayeul; Wilms, Christian D; Bentkhayet, Asma; Marcaggi, Païkan; Couchman, Kiri; Charpak, Serge; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Häusser, Michael; Feltz, Anne; Mallet, Jean-Maurice

    2015-01-01

    The great demand for long-wavelength and high signal-to-noise Ca2+ indicators has led us to develop CaRuby-Nano, a new functionalizable red calcium indicator with nanomolar affinity for use in cell biology and neuroscience research. In addition, we generated CaRuby-Nano dextran conjugates and an AM-ester variant for bulk loading of tissue. We tested the new indicator using in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrating the high sensitivity of CaRuby-Nano as well as its power in dual color imaging experiments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05808.001 PMID:25824291

  11. High-Aluminum-Affinity Silica Is a Nanoparticle That Seeds Secondary Aluminosilicate Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Brown, Andy; Dietzel, Martin; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance and abundance of aluminosilicates throughout our natural surroundings, their formation at neutral pH is, surprisingly, a matter of considerable debate. From our experiments in dilute aluminum and silica containing solutions (pH ~ 7) we previously identified a silica polymer with an extraordinarily high affinity for aluminium ions (high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer, HSP). Here, further characterization shows that HSP is a colloid of approximately 2.4 nm in diameter with a mean specific surface area of about 1,000 m2 g-1 and it competes effectively with transferrin for Al(III) binding. Aluminum binding to HSP strongly inhibited its decomposition whilst the reaction rate constant for the formation of the β-silicomolybdic acid complex indicated a diameter between 3.6 and 4.1 nm for these aluminum-containing nanoparticles. Similarly, high resolution microscopic analysis of the air dried aluminum-containing silica colloid solution revealed 3.9 ± 1.3 nm sized crystalline Al-rich silica nanoparticles (ASP) with an estimated Al:Si ratio of between 2 and 3 which is close to the range of secondary aluminosilicates such as imogolite. Thus the high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer is a nanoparticle that seeds early aluminosilicate formation through highly competitive binding of Al(III) ions. In niche environments, especially in vivo, this may serve as an alternative mechanism to polyhydroxy Al(III) species binding monomeric silica to form early phase, non-toxic aluminosilicates. PMID:24349573

  12. Characterization of specific high affinity receptors for human tumor necrosis factor on mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, P.E.; Hotchkiss, A.; Mohler, M.; Aggarwal, B.B.

    1985-10-05

    Mouse L-929 fibroblasts, an established line of cells, are very sensitive to lysis by human lymphotoxin (hTNF-beta). Specific binding of a highly purified preparation of hTNF-beta to these cells was examined. Recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was radiolabeled with (TH)propionyl succinimidate at the lysine residues of the molecule to a specific activity of 200 microCi/nmol of protein. (TH)hTNF-beta was purified by high performance gel permeation chromatography and the major fraction was found to be monomeric by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The labeled hTNF-beta was fully active in causing lysis of L-929 fibroblasts and bound specifically to high affinity binding sites on these cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptors with an apparent Kd of 6.7 X 10(-11) M and a capacity of 3200 binding sites/cell. Unlabeled recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was found to be approximately 5-fold more effective competitive inhibitor of binding than the natural hTNF-beta. The binding of hTNF-beta to these mouse fibroblasts was also correlated with the ultimate cell lysis. Neutralizing polyclonal antibodies to hTNF-beta efficiently inhibited the binding of (TH)hTNF-beta to the cells. The authors conclude that the specific high affinity binding site is the receptor for hTNF-beta and may be involved in lysis of cells.

  13. Development of 3-Phenyltropane Analogs with High Affinity for the Dopamine and Serotonin Transporters and Low Affinity for the Norepinephrine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunyang; Navarro, Hernán A.; Carroll, F. Ivy

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that the mixed monoamine transporter inhibitor (6, RTI-112) reduced cocaine self-administration at a high level of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) occupancy with no detectable dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy. In this study, a series of 3β-(substituted phenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid methyl esters 7a-g, 3β-(4-methoxyphenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid esters 8a-j, and 3β-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2β-[3-(4′-methylphenyl)isoxazol-5-yl]tropane (9) were synthesized and evaluated for their monoamine transporter binding affinities to identify potent and selective compounds for both the DAT and 5-HTT relative to the norepinephrine transporter (NET). A number of compounds showed high binding affinities for both the DAT and 5-HTT and low affinity for the NET. 3β-(4-Methoxyphenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid 2-(3-iodo-4-aminophenyl)ethyl ester (8i) with an IC50 value of 2.5 nM for the DAT and Ki values of 3.5 nM and 2040 nM for the 5-HTT and NET, respectively, is the most potent and selective compound for the DAT and 5-HTT relative to the NET in this study. PMID:19053748

  14. CGRP 27-37 analogues with high affinity to the CGRP1 receptor show antagonistic properties in a rat blood flow assay.

    PubMed

    Rist, B; Lacroix, J S; Entzeroth, M; Doods, H N; Beck-Sickinger, A G

    1999-02-01

    CGRP Y0-28-37 is known as a selective CGRP1 receptor antagonist. We succeeded in optimising the CGRP1 receptor affinity of this fragment by multiple amino acid replacement. The analogues [p34, F35]CGRP 27-37 and [D31, p34, F35]CGRP 27-37 exhibit a 100-fold increased affinity compared to the unmodified segment. Receptor binding studies were performed with human neuroblastoma cells SK-N-MC, which selectively express the hCGRP1 receptor. Blood flow, which is increased by exogenous CGRP, was measured in the right femoral artery. Preincubation of the rats with [p34, F35]CGRP 27-37 and [D31, p34, F35]CGRP 27-37 led to a significant decrease in CGRP induced increase in vascular conductance indicating the antagonistic properties of these compounds. Interestingly, an exchange of the amino acid Asn31 to Asp31 in [p34, F35]CGRP 27-37 shortened the period of the antagonistic effect significantly, suggestive of a different rate of metabolism for the two ligands. Secondary structure investigations obtained by circular dichroism measurements revealed that an increase in ordered structure correlates with high binding affinity.

  15. Multispecific Organic Cation Transporter 1 (OCT1) from Bos taurus Has High Affinity and Slow Binding Kinetics towards Prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Garza, Denisse; Nigam, Sanjay K; Chang, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, SLC22A1), like many solute carrier 22 (SLC22) family members, is important for the disposition of clinically important drugs, metabolites and signaling molecules. Several studies suggest that SLC22 family (eg. organic anion transporters or OATs and OCTs) bind and possibly transport prostaglandins with relatively high affinity (submicromolar). The affinities of OCT1 and OATs toward PGE2 and PGF2a reported in these cell-based transport studies are considerably greater than for xenobiotics and natural metabolite substrates--in many cases over 100-fold higher. This raises the possibility that prostaglandins are key endogenous substrates and/or that they act on the transporter in a manner different from other substrates such as xenobiotics and lower affinity metabolites. To further investigate OCT1-prostaglandin interactions, we designed biophysical studies using purified bovine OCT1 (Bos taurus, btOCT1/SLC22A1) with PGE2 analogs, in fluorescently labeled and label-free formats. Using fluorescence polarization (FP), we detected a binding of btOCT1 to the PGE2-Rhodamine conjugate at submicromolar affinity, consistent with affinity data for PGE2 from cells over-expressing the related human OCT1. Using purified native btOCT1 as analyte and biotinylated PGE2 analog as ligand, our data from surface plasmon resonance (SPR) revealed that btOCT1 specifically interacts to PGE2 with KD values in the hundred nanomolar range. BtOCT1 also demonstrated a slow association (ka) in the range of 103 M(-1) s(-1) and an even slower dissociation rate (kd) in the range of 10-4 s(-1) for PGE2, suggesting the possibility of a different mode of binding compared to other structurally unrelated transported substrates of low-affinity (eg. drugs, metabolites). Our results complement in vitro transport studies and provide direct evidence that OCT1--which is normally expressed in liver and other tissues--interacts with prostaglandin analogs. While it is not

  16. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tran, Elizabeth N.; Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Ng, Preston S. K.; King, Rebecca M.; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A.; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein–glycan or protein–protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host–glycan:bacterial–glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  17. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Tran, Elizabeth N; Semchenko, Evgeny A; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Ng, Preston S K; King, Rebecca M; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-12-29

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein-glycan or protein-protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host-glycan:bacterial-glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  18. High-affinity antibodies to the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.P.; Sharp, A.; Strom, M.; Kahl, S.D.

    1986-05-01

    Antibodies with high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers have been produced in rabbits by immunization with dihydropyridine-protein conjugates. Anti-dihydropyridine antibodies were found to specifically bind (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine, (/sup 3/H)-nimodipine, (/sup 3/H)nisoldipine, and (/sup 3/H)PN 200-110 (all 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers) with high affinity, while (/sup 3/H)verapamil, (/sup 3/H)diltiazem, and (/sup 3/H)trifluoperazine were not recognized. The average dissociation constant of the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine-antibody complex was 0.06 (+/- 0.02) X 10(-9) M for an antiserum studied in detail and ranged from 0.01 to 0.24 X 10(-9) M for all antisera. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding was specific for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel modifiers and the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition ranged between 0.25 and 0.90 nM. Structurally unrelated Ca2+-channel blockers, calmodulin antagonists, inactive metabolites of nitrendipine, and UV-inactivated nisoldipine did not modify (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to the anti-dihydropyridine antibodies. Dihydropyridines without a bulky substituent in the 4-position of the heterocycle were able to displace (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding, but the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition were greater than 800 nM. In summary, anti-dihydropyridine antibodies have been shown to have high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers and to exhibit dihydropyridine binding properties similar to the membrane receptor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers.

  19. Deciphering the specific high-affinity binding of cucurbit[7]uril to amino acids in water.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Wha; Lee, Hyun Hee L; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Kim, Hugh I

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a systematic study on the host-guest interactions between the macrocyclic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and amino acids (AAs) including three basic AAs (Lys, Arg, and His) and three aromatic AAs (Phe, Tyr, and Trp) to elucidate the origin of the high selectivity of CB[7] toward AA residues in proteins. Complex formation between CB[7] and each AA was examined in solution (by isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR) as well as in the gas phase (by ion mobility mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation), and the results were further combined with computational investigations. Generally, the aromatic AAs show higher binding affinities than the basic AAs in buffer solutions with various pH values. On the contrary, the gas-phase stabilities of the basic AA complex ions are higher than those of the aromatic AA complex ions, suggesting that the direct ion-dipole interactions between the charged side chains of the basic AAs and the polar carbonyl groups of CB[7] predominate in the absence of water. The ion-dipole interactions are less significant in water, since the original interactions of the guests with water are lost upon complex formation. In contrast, the transfer of the hydrophobic groups from the bulk into the hydrophobic CB[7] cavity suffers less from the desolvation penalty, resulting in higher binding affinities in water. Therefore, initial guest solvation is another key factor which should be considered when designing high-affinity host-guest systems, in addition to the contribution from the release of high-energy water molecules from the CB[7] cavity (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 15318-15323).

  20. High-affinity nasal extraction of vinyl acetate vapor is carboxylesterase dependent.

    PubMed

    Bogdanffy, M S; Manning, L A; Sarangapani, R

    1999-10-01

    Vinyl acetate induces nasal tumors in rats, but not mice. Species differences in airflow patterns, physiology, and biochemistry complicate extrapolation of nasal dosimetry from rats to humans. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of vinyl acetate dosimetry in rats suggested the presence of a saturable metabolic removal pathway in rat nasal mucus. We explored the possibility that this pathway is either a cytochrome P-450 2E1 (CYP2E1) or high-affinity carboxylesterase. Nasal extraction of vinyl acetate vapor (150 ppm) was measured in the surgically isolated nasal cavity of anesthetized rats. Vinyl acetate (150 ppm) was extracted with 73% efficiency in controls. Pretreatment of rats with the CYP2E1 inhibitor diallyl sulfide (DAS) had no effect on extraction, despite significantly reducing CYP2E1 activity. Pretreatment with bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP), a carboxylesterase inhibitor, reduced extraction to approximately 41%. Acetaldehyde production was similarly unaffected by DAS but was reduced to 55% of control by BNPP. Rat nasal mucus carboxylesterase activity had a K(m) value (32 microM) similar, within a factor of 2, to the value predicted by the physiologically based model, although V(max) was significantly lower than the model prediction. Histochemical observations support the inference that the high-affinity carboxylesterase is bound to the luminal plasma membrane of nasal tissue and is not readily released by nasal lavage, providing an explanation for the low V(max) of the lavage enzyme. This high-affinity isoenzyme could be important in the removal of odorants from the sensory cell-rich nasal olfactory epithelium.

  1. Deciphering the specific high-affinity binding of cucurbit[7]uril to amino acids in water.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Wha; Lee, Hyun Hee L; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Kim, Hugh I

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a systematic study on the host-guest interactions between the macrocyclic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and amino acids (AAs) including three basic AAs (Lys, Arg, and His) and three aromatic AAs (Phe, Tyr, and Trp) to elucidate the origin of the high selectivity of CB[7] toward AA residues in proteins. Complex formation between CB[7] and each AA was examined in solution (by isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR) as well as in the gas phase (by ion mobility mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation), and the results were further combined with computational investigations. Generally, the aromatic AAs show higher binding affinities than the basic AAs in buffer solutions with various pH values. On the contrary, the gas-phase stabilities of the basic AA complex ions are higher than those of the aromatic AA complex ions, suggesting that the direct ion-dipole interactions between the charged side chains of the basic AAs and the polar carbonyl groups of CB[7] predominate in the absence of water. The ion-dipole interactions are less significant in water, since the original interactions of the guests with water are lost upon complex formation. In contrast, the transfer of the hydrophobic groups from the bulk into the hydrophobic CB[7] cavity suffers less from the desolvation penalty, resulting in higher binding affinities in water. Therefore, initial guest solvation is another key factor which should be considered when designing high-affinity host-guest systems, in addition to the contribution from the release of high-energy water molecules from the CB[7] cavity (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 15318-15323). PMID:25757499

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BINDING OF SULFONYLUREA DRUGS TO HSA BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfonylurea drugs are often prescribed as a treatment for type II diabetes to help lower blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin secretion. These drugs are believed to primarily bind in blood to human serum albumin (HSA). This study used high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) to examine the binding of sulfonylureas to HSA. Frontal analysis with an immobilized HSA column was used to determine the association equilibrium constants (Ka) and number of binding sites on HSA for the sulfonylurea drugs acetohexamide and tolbutamide. The results from frontal analysis indicated HSA had a group of relatively high affinity binding regions and weaker binding sites for each drug, with average Ka values of 1.3 (± 0.2) × 105 M−1 and 3.5 (± 3.0) × 102 M−1 for acetohexamide and values of 8.7 (± 0.6) × 104 and 8.1 (± 1.7) × 103 M−1 for tolbutamide. Zonal elution and competition studies with site-specific probes were used to further examine the relatively high affinity interactions of these drugs by looking directly at the interactions that were occurring at Sudlow sites I and II of HSA (i.e., the major drug binding sites on this protein). It was found that acetohexamide was able to bind at both Sudlow sites I and II, with Ka values of 1.3 (± 0.1) × 105 and 4.3 (± 0.3) × 104 M−1, respectively, at 37°C. Tolbutamide also appeared to interact with both Sudlow sites I and II, with Ka values of 5.5 (± 0.2) × 104 and 5.3 (± 0.2) × 104 M−1, respectively. The results provide a more quantitative picture of how these drugs bind with HSA and illustrate how HPAC and related tools can be used to examine relatively complex drug-protein interactions. PMID:20435530

  3. Zinc Coordination Geometry and Ligand Binding Affinity: The Structural and Kinetic Analysis of the Second-Shell Serine 228 Residue and the Methionine 180 Residue of the Aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Ataie, Niloufar J.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Zahniser, Megan P.D.; Tu, Yupeng; Milne, Amy; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar

    2008-07-28

    The chemical properties of zinc make it an ideal metal to study the role of coordination strain in enzymatic rate enhancement. The zinc ion and the protein residues that are bound directly to the zinc ion represent a functional charge/dipole complex, and polarization of this complex, which translates to coordination distortion, may tune electrophilicity, and hence, reactivity. Conserved protein residues outside of the charge/dipole complex, such as second-shell residues, may play a role in supporting the electronic strain produced as a consequence of functional polarization. To test the correlation between charge/dipole polarity and ligand binding affinity, structure?function studies were carried out on the dizinc aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus. Alanine substitutions of S228 and M180 resulted in catalytically diminished enzymes whose crystal structures show very little change in the positions of the metal ions and the protein residues. However, more detailed inspections of the crystal structures show small positional changes that account for differences in the zinc ion coordination geometry. Measurements of the binding affinity of leucine phosphonic acid, a transition state analogue, and leucine, a product, show a correlation between coordination geometry and ligand binding affinity. These results suggest that the coordination number and polarity may tune the electrophilicity of zinc. This may have provided the evolving enzyme with the ability to discriminate between reaction coordinate species.

  4. Hemoglobin affinity and structure in high-altitude and sea-level carnivores from Peru.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, F; de Muizon, C; Palacios, J A; Clark, D; Monge, C

    1996-04-01

    We compared hemoglobin affinity (P50) and structure of high altitude (HA) carnivores with populations of the same species or genus living at sea level (SL). P50 was measured in cats, pumas and foxes. It differed in animals occupying both niches. SL: cat 29.3 torr, puma 36.3 torr, fox 26.2 torr; HA: cat 22.5 torr, puma 31.1 torr, fox 18.5 torr. Heme and globins were fractionated by HPLC. Puma and fox hemoglobins also showed structural differences. P50 is lower in genotypically HA-adapted species studied and can differentiate SL and HA populations of the same species.

  5. Highly selective affinity labelling of RNA polymerase B (II) from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Grachev, M A; Hartmann, G R; Maximova, T G; Mustaev, A A; Schäffner, A R; Sieber, H; Zaychikov, E F

    1986-05-12

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase B (II) from wheat germ was modified by incubation with 4-[N-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-N-methyl]benzaldehyde esters of AMP, ADP or ATP, followed by reduction with NaBH4. Reaction of the modified enzyme with [alpha-32P]UTP in the presence of various DNA templates led to a highly selective affinity labelling of the subunit with Mr 140 000 by covalently linked ApU. Labelling was inhibited by 1 microgram/ml alpha-amanitin.

  6. Diacylglycerol kinase η1 is a high affinity isozyme for diacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Komenoi, Suguru; Takemura, Fumika; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) η plays important roles in various patho-physiological events such as oncogenesis. In this study, we performed an enzymological characterization of DGKη splice variant 1 (DGKη1). The Km value for diacylglycerol was 0.14 mol%. Intriguingly, the Km value of DGKη1 for diacylglycerol was at least 9-fold lower than those of other DGK isozymes including DGKα, indicating that DGKη1 is a high affinity isozyme for diacylglycerol. Therefore, DGKη1 is a unique DGK isozyme, which may function at particular membrane sites where only low concentrations of diacylglycerol are supplied.

  7. Antibody Binding Selectivity: Alternative Sets of Antigen Residues Entail High-Affinity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Nominé, Yves; Choulier, Laurence; Travé, Gilles; Vernet, Thierry; Altschuh, Danièle

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between protein sequence and molecular recognition selectivity remains a major challenge. The antibody fragment scFv1F4 recognizes with sub nM affinity a decapeptide (sequence 6TAMFQDPQER15) derived from the N-terminal end of human papilloma virus E6 oncoprotein. Using this decapeptide as antigen, we had previously shown that only the wild type amino-acid or conservative replacements were allowed at positions 9 to 12 and 15 of the peptide, indicating a strong binding selectivity. Nevertheless phenylalanine (F) was equally well tolerated as the wild type glutamine (Q) at position 13, while all other amino acids led to weaker scFv binding. The interfaces of complexes involving either Q or F are expected to diverge, due to the different physico-chemistry of these residues. This would imply that high-affinity binding can be achieved through distinct interfacial geometries. In order to investigate this point, we disrupted the scFv–peptide interface by modifying one or several peptide positions. We then analyzed the effect on binding of amino acid changes at the remaining positions, an altered susceptibility being indicative of an altered role in complex formation. The 23 starting variants analyzed contained replacements whose effects on scFv1F4 binding ranged from minor to drastic. A permutation analysis (effect of replacing each peptide position by all other amino acids except cysteine) was carried out on the 23 variants using the PEPperCHIP® Platform technology. A comparison of their permutation patterns with that of the wild type peptide indicated that starting replacements at position 11, 12 or 13 modified the tolerance to amino-acid changes at the other two positions. The interdependence between the three positions was confirmed by SPR (Biacore® technology). Our data demonstrate that binding selectivity does not preclude the existence of alternative high-affinity recognition modes. PMID:26629896

  8. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply. PMID:25164101

  9. High-affinity transport of L-glutamine by a plasma membrane preparation from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Roon, R J; Shofner, S A; Koerner, J F

    1989-10-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles prepared from rat brain contain a saturable, high-affinity transport system for L-glutamine that exhibits the following characteristics: (1) The rate of L-glutamine transport is linear up to 200 micrograms/mL membrane protein. (2) Transport of [3H]-L-glutamine is linear with time for at least 10 min, is significantly reduced by lowering the assay temperature to 4 degrees C, and is essentially abolished by the addition of excess unlabeled L-glutamine. (3) The transport rate is optimal in the range of pH 7.4-8.2. (4) The system exhibits a Km for L-glutamine of approximately 1.7 microM and a Vmax of approximately 46 pmol/(min.mg of protein). (5) The system is not highly dependent upon the addition of monovalent or divalent cations. (6) Inhibitor studies reveal that the amino acid amides exhibit the highest affinity for the system and that there is a high specificity for the L-isomers.

  10. The human organic cation transporter OCT1 mediates high affinity uptake of the anticancer drug daunorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Emil; Brosseau, Nicolas; Carmona, Euridice; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines such as daunorubicin are anticancer agents that are transported into cells, and exert cytotoxicity by blocking DNA metabolism. Although there is evidence for active uptake of anthracyclines into cells, the specific transporter involved in this process has not been identified. Using the high-grade serous ovarian cancer cell line TOV2223G, we show that OCT1 mediated the high affinity (Km ~ 5 μM) uptake of daunorubicin into the cells, and that micromolar amounts of choline completely abolished the drug entry. OCT1 downregulation by shRNA impaired daunorubicin uptake into the TOV2223G cells, and these cells were significantly more resistant to the drug in comparison to the control shRNA. Transfection of HEK293T cells, which accommodated the ectopic expression of OCT1, with a plasmid expressing OCT1-EYFP showed that the transporter was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. These transfected cells exhibited an increase in the uptake of daunorubicin in comparison to control cells transfected with an empty EYFP vector. Furthermore, a variant of OCT1, OCT1-D474C-EYFP, failed to enhance daunorubicin uptake. This is the first report demonstrating that human OCT1 is involved in the high affinity transport of anthracyclines. We postulate that OCT1 defects may contribute to the resistance of cancer cells treated with anthracyclines. PMID:26861753

  11. High-affinity capture of proteins by diamond nanoparticles for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, X L; Huang, L C L; Hsu, C-M; Chen, W-H; Han, C-C; Chang, H-C

    2005-01-01

    Carboxylated/oxidized diamond nanoparticles (nominal size 100 nm) exhibit exceptionally high affinity for proteins through both hydrophilic and hydrophobic forces. The affinity is so high that proteins in dilute solution can be easily captured by diamonds, simply separated by centrifugation, and directly analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). No preseparation of the adsorbed molecules from diamonds is required for the mass spectrometric analysis. Compared to conventional MALDI-TOF-MS, an enhancement in detection sensitivity by more than 2 orders of magnitude is achieved for dilute solution containing cytochrome c, myoglobin, and albumin because of preconcentration of the probed molecules. The lowest concentration detectable is 100 pM for a 1-mL solution. Aside from the enhanced sensitivity, the overall performance of this technique does not show any sign of deterioration for highly contaminated protein solutions, and furthermore, no significant peak broadening and band shift were observed in the mass spectra. The promise of this new method for clinical proteomics research is demonstrated with an application to human blood serum.

  12. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  13. Determination of the kinetic rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems by high-performance affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwen; Li, Haiyan; Sun, Lixin; Wang, Caifen

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of the association and dissociation are fundamental kinetic processes for the host-guest interactions (such as the drug-target and drug-excipient interactions) and the in vivo performance of supramolecules. With advantages of rapid speed, high precision and ease of automation, the high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is one of the best techniques to measure the interaction kinetics of weak to moderate affinities, such as the typical host-guest interactions of drug and cyclodextrins by using a cyclodextrin-immobilized column. The measurement involves the equilibration of the cyclodextrin column, the upload and elution of the samples (non-retained substances and retained solutes) at different flow rates on the cyclodextrin and control column, and data analysis. It has been indicated that cyclodextrin-immobilized chromatography is a cost-efficient high-throughput tool for the measurement of (small molecule) drug-cyclodextrin interactions as well as the dissociation of other supramolecules with relatively weak, fast, and extensive interactions. PMID:25749964

  14. Dephosphorylation and quantification of organic phosphorus in poultry litter by purified phytic-acid high affinity Aspergillus phosphohydrolases.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thanh H; Hoang, Khanh Q

    2008-08-01

    Extracellular phosphohydrolases mediate the dephosphorylation of phosphoesters and influence bioavailability and loss of agricultural P to the environment to pose risks of impairment of sensitive aquatic ecosystems. Induction and culture of five strains of Aspergillus were conducted to develop a source of high-affinity and robust phosphohydrolases for detecting environmental P and quantifying bioactive P pools in heterogeneous environmental specimens. Enzyme stability and activity against organic P in poultry litter were evaluated in 71 samples collected across poultry producing regions of Arkansas, Maryland, and Oklahoma of the US Differences existed in strains' adaptability to fermentation medium as they showed a wide range of phytate-degrading activity. Phosphohydrolases from Aspergillus ficuum had highest activity when the strain was cultured on a primarily chemical medium, compared to Aspergillus oryzae which preferred a wheat bran-based organic medium. Kinetics parameters of A. ficuum enzymes (K(m)=210 microM; V(max) of 407 nmol s(-1)) indicated phytic acid-degrading potential equivalent to that of commercial preparations. Purified A. ficuum phosphohydrolases effectively quantified litter bioactive P pools, showing that organic P occurred at an average of 54 (+/-14)% of total P, compared to inorganic phosphates, which averaged 41 (+/-12)%. Litter management and land application options must consider the high water-extractable and organic P concentrations and the biological availability of the organic enzyme-labile P pool. Robustness of A. ficuum enzymes and simplicity of the in situ ligand-based enzyme assay may thus increase routine assessment of litter bioactive P composition to sense for on-farm accumulation of such environmentally-sensitive P forms. PMID:18555509

  15. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kaval; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Smith, Kenneth; Huang, Min; Li, Lie; Pauli, Noel T.; Henry Dunand, Carole J.; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Morrissey, Michael; Wu, Yixuan; Joachims, Michelle L.; Munroe, Melissa E.; Lau, Denise; Qu, Xinyan; Krammer, Florian; Wrammert, Jens; Palese, Peter; Ahmed, Rafi; James, Judith A.; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC) reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus. PMID:25951191

  16. Genetic evidence of a high-affinity cyanuric acid transport system in Pseudomonas sp. ADP.

    PubMed

    Platero, Ana I; Santero, Eduardo; Govantes, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    The Pseudomonas sp. ADP plasmid pADP-1 encodes the activities involved in the hydrolytic degradation of the s-triazine herbicide atrazine. Here, we explore the presence of a specific transport system for the central intermediate of the atrazine utilization pathway, cyanuric acid, in Pseudomonas sp. ADP. Growth in fed-batch cultures containing limiting cyanuric acid concentrations is consistent with high-affinity transport of this substrate. Acquisition of the ability to grow at low cyanuric acid concentrations upon conjugal transfer of pADP1 to the nondegrading host Pseudomonas putida KT2442 suggests that all activities required for this phenotype are encoded in this plasmid. Co-expression of the pADP1-borne atzDEF and atzTUVW genes, encoding the cyanuric acid utilization pathway and the subunits of an ABC-type solute transport system, in P. putida KT2442 was sufficient to promote growth at cyanuric acid concentrations as low as 50 μM in batch culture. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the atzTUVW gene products are involved in high-affinity transport of cyanuric acid.

  17. Characterization of the Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) meliloti high- and low-affinity phosphate uptake systems.

    PubMed Central

    Voegele, R T; Bardin, S; Finan, T M

    1997-01-01

    Genetic studies have suggested that Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) meliloti contains two distinct phosphate (Pi) transport systems, encoded by the phoCDET genes and the orfA-pit genes, respectively. Here we present data which show that the ABC-type PhoCDET system has a high affinity for Pi (Km, 0.2 microM) and that Pi uptake by this system is severely inhibited by phosphonates. This high-affinity uptake system was induced under Pi-limiting conditions and was repressed in the presence of excess Pi. Uptake via the OrfA-Pit system was examined in (i) a phoC mutant which showed increased expression of the orfA-pit genes as a result of a promoter-up mutation and (ii) a phoB mutant (PhoB is required for phoCDET expression). Pi uptake in both strains exhibited saturation kinetics (Km, 1 to 2 microM) and was not inhibited by phosphonates. This uptake system was active in wild-type cells grown with excess Pi and appeared to be repressed when the cells were starved for Pi. Thus, our biochemical data show that the OrfA-Pit and PhoCDET uptake systems are differentially expressed depending on the state of the cell with respect to phosphate availability. PMID:9393684

  18. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, K; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 10(7) M(-1)) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  19. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M‑1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  20. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M−1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies. PMID:27032526

  1. High-affinity receptors for bombesin-like peptides in normal guinea pig lung membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, E.; Trifilieff, A.; Landry, Y.; Gies, J.P. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding of the radiolabeled bombesin analogue ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin to guinea-pig lung membranes was investigated. Binding of ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin was specific, saturable, reversible and linearly related to the protein concentration. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding data at 25C indicated the presence of a single class of non-interacting binding sites for bombesin (B{sub max} = 7.7 fmol/mg protein). The value of the equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub D} = 90 pM) agrees with a high-affinity binding site. Bombesin and structurally related peptides such as ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin, neuromedin B and neuromedin C inhibited the binding of ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin in an order of potencies as follows: ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin {gt} bombesin {ge} neuromedin C {much gt} neuromedin B. These results indicate that guinea-pig lung membranes possess a single class of bombesin receptors with a high affinity for bombesin and a lower one for neuromedin B.

  2. High affinity binding of /sup 125/I-labeled mouse interferon to a specific cell surface receptor. II. Analysis of binding properties

    SciTech Connect

    Aguet, M.; Blanchard, B.

    1981-12-01

    Direct ligand-binding studies with highly purified /sup 125/I-labeled virus-induced mouse interferon on mouse lymphoma L 1210 cells revealed a direct correlation of specific high-affinity binding with the biologic response to interferon. Neutralization of the antiviral effect by anti-interferon gamma globulin occurred at the same antibody concentration as the inhibition of specific binding. These results suggest that specific high-affinity binding of /sup 125/I-interferon occurred at a biologically functional interferon receptor. Competitive inhibition experiments using /sup 125/I- and /sup 127/I-labeled interferon provided strong evidence that the fraction of /sup 125/I-interferon inactivated upon labeling did not bind specifically. Scatchard analysis of the binding data yielded linear plots and thus suggested that interferon binds to homogeneous noncooperative receptor sites. In contrast to a characteristic property of several peptide hormone systems, binding of /sup 125/I-interferon to its specific receptor did not induce subsequent ligand degradation. At 37/sup o/ bound interferon was rapidly released in a biologically active form without evidence for molecular degradation. The expression of interferon receptors was not modified by treatment with interferon. Trypsin treatment of target cells and inhibition of protein synthesis abolished the specific binding of /sup 125/I-interferon. Three major molecular weight species of Newcastle disease virus-induced mouse C 243 cell interferon were isolated, separated, and identified as mouse ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. interferons. These interferons were shown to inhibit competitively the specific binding of the highly purified labeled starting material thus providing evidence for a common receptor site for mouse interferon.

  3. Integrin alphaVbeta6 is a high-affinity receptor for coxsackievirus A9.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Outi; Susi, Petri; Stanway, Glyn; Hyypiä, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A9 (CAV9), a member of the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae, possesses an integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif in the C terminus of VP1 capsid protein. CAV9 has been shown to utilize integrins alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6 as primary receptors for cell attachment. While CAV9 RGD-mutants (RGE and RGDdel) are capable of infecting rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell line, they grow very poorly in an epithelial lung carcinoma cell line (A549). In this study, the relationships between CAV9 infectivity in A549 and RD cells, receptor expression and integrin binding were analysed. A549 cells were shown to express both integrins alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6, whereas alphaVbeta6 expression was not detected on the RD cells. Native CAV9 but not RGE and RGDdel mutants bound efficiently to immobilized alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6. Adhesion of CAV9 but not RGE/RGDdel to A549 cells was also significantly higher than to RD cells. In contrast, no affinity or adhesion of bacterially produced VP1 proteins to the integrins or to the cells was detected. Function-blocking antibodies against alphaV-integrins blocked CAV9 but not CAV9-RGDdel infectivity, indicating that the viruses use different internalization routes; this may explain the differential infection kinetics of CAV9 and RGDdel. In an affinity assay, soluble alphaVbeta6, but not alphaVbeta3, bound to immobilized CAV9. Similarly, only soluble alphaVbeta6 blocked virus infectivity. These data suggest that CAV9 binding to alphaVbeta6 is a high-affinity interaction, which may indicate its importance in clinical infections; this remains to be determined.

  4. Identification of high- and low-affinity NGF receptors during development of the chicken central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Escandon, E.; Chao, M.V. )

    1990-12-01

    In order to study regulation of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor during embryogenesis in chick brain, we have used affinity crosslinking of tissues with {sup 125}I-NGF. NGF interacts with high- and low-affinity receptors; high-affinity receptors are required for the majority of NGF's actions. Most measurements of receptor levels do not distinguish between high- and low-affinity forms of the receptor. We have used the lipophilic crosslinking agent HSAB to identify the high-affinity, functional receptor during development of the chicken central nervous system. A peak of expression during Embryonic Days 5-10 was detected in all regions of the chicken central nervous system, but, shortly after birth, only the cerebellar region displays significant levels of NGF receptor protein. The time course of expression confirms the dramatic regulation of the NGF receptor gene during defined embryonic periods. The detection of high-affinity NGF receptors in brain and neural retina provides strong evidence that NGF is involved in essential ontogenetic events in the development of the chicken central nervous system.

  5. Biochemical characterization of high-affinity 3H-opioid binding. Further evidence for Mu1 sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.L.; Recht, L.D.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    In saturation studies with (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine, unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (1 nM) inhibited the high-affinity binding component far more potently than the lower-affinity one. Similarly, morphine (1 nM) inhibited the higher-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin to a greater extent than its lower-affinity binding component, consistent with a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and enkephalins. Treatment of tissue with either trypsin (1 microgram/ml) or N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) effectively eliminated the high-affinity binding component of a series of /sup 3/H-opiates and opioid peptides. Competition studies following both treatments were consistent with a common high-affinity binding site. Both treatments also eliminated the ability of low morphine concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin binding and of low D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding. Protection experiments examining N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding showed significant protection (p less than 0.002) by both unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin and morphine (both at 1 nM). When studied together, both naloxonazine and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding to a similar extent. Equally important, tissue previously treated with naloxonazine was far less sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide than was untreated control tissue, consistent with the possibility that both treatments affected the same site. Together, these results support the concept of a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and opioid peptides.

  6. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  7. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  8. A genetic response to high altitude hypoxia: high hemoglobin-oxygen affinity in chicken (Gallus gallus) from the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Velarde, F L; Espinoza, D; Monge, C; de Muizon, C

    1991-01-01

    A population of chicken (Gallus gallus) from the Peruvian Andes (4,000 m) carrying a high hemoglobin-oxygen affinity has been identified. This property remained stable after over 1 year residence at sea level and was transmitted to the descendants born at sea level. Chicken were introduced in South America during the Spanish conquest and therefore their adaptation time to high altitude is less than 500 years. This finding shows that a genotypic change in hemoglobin function can occur in an extremely short evolutionary time and leads to some reflections on the high altitude adaptation of the mammals that migrated to South America during the great Plio-Pleistocene interchange.

  9. Measurements of relative binding of cohesin and dockerin mutants using an advanced ELISA technique for high-affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Reshef, Dan; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    The cellulosome is a large bacterial extracellular multienzyme complex able to degrade crystalline cellulosic substrates. The complex contains catalytic and noncatalytic subunits, interconnected by high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interactions. In this chapter, we introduce an optimized method for comparative binding among different cohesins or cohesin mutants to the dockerin partner. This assay offers advantages over other methods (such as ELISA, cELIA, SPR, and ITC) for particularly high-affinity binding interactions. In this approach, the high-affinity interaction of interest occurs in the liquid phase during the equilibrated binding step, whereas the interaction with the immobilized phase is used only for detection of the unbound dockerins that remain in the solution phase. Once equilibrium conditions are reached, the change in free energy of binding (ΔΔG(binding)), as well as the affinity constant of mutants, can be estimated against the known affinity constant of the wild-type interaction. In light of the above, we propose this method as a preferred alternative for the relative quantification of high-affinity protein interactions. PMID:22608739

  10. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  11. Identification of a high affinity nucleocapsid protein binding element from the bovine leukemia virus genome.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, F Zehra; Babalola, Kathlene; Summers, Michael F

    2013-02-01

    Retroviral genome recognition is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein and cognate RNA packaging elements that, for most retroviruses, appear to reside primarily within the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the genome. Recent studies suggest that a major packaging determinant of bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a member of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)/BLV family and a non-primate animal model for HTLV-induced leukemogenesis, resides within the gag open reading frame. We have prepared and purified the recombinant BLV NC protein and conducted electrophoretic mobility shift and isothermal titration calorimetry studies with RNA fragments corresponding to these proposed packaging elements. The gag-derived RNAs did not exhibit significant affinity for NC, suggesting an alternate role in packaging. However, an 83-nucleotide fragment of the 5'-UTR that resides just upstream of the gag start codon binds NC stoichiometrically and with high affinity (K(d)=136±21 nM). These nucleotides were predicted to form tandem hairpin structures, and studies with smaller fragments indicate that the NC binding site resides exclusively within the distal hairpin (residues G369-U399, K(d)=67±8 nM at physiological ionic strength). Unlike all other structurally characterized retroviral NC binding RNAs, this fragment is not expected to contain exposed guanosines, suggesting that RNA binding may be mediated by a previously uncharacterized mechanism.

  12. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95/sup 0/C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na/sup +/ ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC/sub 50/ = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC/sub 50/ values below ..mu..M concentrations.

  13. Identification of high-affinity calmodulin-binding proteins in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, R.M.; Dedman, J.R.; Shenolikar, S.

    1987-03-01

    The Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of (/sup 125/I) calmodulin (CaM) to hepatic proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was utilized to identify CaM binding or acceptor proteins or CAPs. Two proteins of apparent molecular weight of 60,000 (CAP-60) and 45,000 (CAP-45) comprised > 80% of the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in rat liver cytosol. CAP-60 and CAP-45 were partially purified by a variety of chromatographic steps, including affinity chromatography on CaM Sepharose. CAP-60 possessed a native molecular size of 400,000, indicating it to be the CaM-binding subunit of a larger oligomeric complex. In contrast, CAP-45 was monomeric as judged by gel filtration. Neither CAP-60 nor CAP-45 possessed chromatographic properties consistent with known CaM-dependent enzymes reported in the literature. Two-dimensional peptide mapping provided convincing evidence that CAP-60 and CAP-45 were unrelated to other well-characterized CAPs, namely Ca/sup 2 +/ (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II, calcineurin, or the CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The relative abundance and high affinity for CaM could suggest that these novel target proteins, CAP-60 and CAP-45, represent a dominant pathway for CaM action in the mammalian liver.

  14. High-Performance Affinity Chromatography: Applications in Drug-Protein Binding Studies and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya R; Bi, Cong; Suresh, D; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins and other agents in serum is of interest in personalized medicine because this process can affect the dosage and action of drugs. The extent of this binding may also vary with a given disease state. These interactions may involve serum proteins, such as human serum albumin or α1-acid glycoprotein, or other agents, such as lipoproteins. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tool that has received increasing interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review discusses the general principles of HPAC and the various approaches that have been used in this technique to examine drug-protein binding and in work related to personalized medicine. These approaches include frontal analysis and zonal elution, as well as peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, and chromatographic immunoassays. The operation of each method is described and examples of applications for these techniques are provided. The type of information that can be obtained by these methods is also discussed, as related to the analysis of drug-protein binding and the study of clinical or pharmaceutical samples. PMID:26827600

  15. ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH VERY LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was utilized to examine the binding of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with drugs, using R/S-propranolol as a model. These studies indicated that two mechanisms existed for the binding of R- and S-propranolol with VLDL. The first mechanism involved non-saturable partitioning of these drugs with VLDL, which probably occurred with the lipoprotein's non-polar core. This partitioning was described by overall affinity constants of 1.2 (± 0.3) × 106 M-1 for R-propranolol and 2.4 (± 0.6) × 106 M-1 for S-propranolol at pH 7.4 and 37 °C. The second mechanism occurred through saturable binding by these drugs at fixed sites on VLDL, such as represented by apolipoproteins on the surface of the lipoprotein. The association equilibrium constants for this saturable binding at 37 °C were 7.0 (± 2.3) × 104 M-1 for R-propranolol and 9.6 (± 2.2) × 104 M-1 for S-propranolol. Comparable results were obtained at 20 °C and 27 °C for the propranolol enantiomers. This work provided fundamental information on the processes involved in the binding of R- and S-propranolol to VLDL, while also illustrating how HPAC can be used to evaluate relatively complex interactions between agents such as VLDL and drugs or other solutes. PMID:25103529

  16. DETECTION OF HETEROGENEOUS DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY FRONTAL ANALYSIS AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of frontal analysis and high-performance affinity chromatography for detecting heterogeneous binding in biomolecular interactions, using the binding of acetohexamide with human serum albumin (HSA) as a model. It was found through the use of this model system and chromatographic theory that double-reciprocal plots could be used more easily than traditional isotherms for the initial detection of binding site heterogeneity. The deviations from linearity that were seen in double-reciprocal plots as a result of heterogeneity were a function of the analyte concentration, the relative affinities of the binding sites in the system and the amount of each type of site that was present. The size of these deviations was determined and compared under various conditions. Plots were also generated to show what experimental conditions would be needed to observe these deviations for general heterogeneous systems or for cases in which some preliminary information was available on the extent of binding heterogeneity. The methods developed in this work for the detection of binding heterogeneity are not limited to drug interactions with HSA but could be applied to other types of drug-protein binding or to additional biological systems with heterogeneous binding. PMID:21612784

  17. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost. PMID:25856265

  18. Ga(+) Basicity and Affinity Scales Based on High-Level Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Brea, Oriana; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2015-10-26

    The structure, relative stability and bonding of complexes formed by the interaction between Ga(+) and a large set of compounds, including hydrocarbons, aromatic systems, and oxygen-, nitrogen-, fluorine and sulfur-containing Lewis bases have been investigated through the use of the high-level composite ab initio Gaussian-4 theory. This allowed us to establish rather accurate Ga(+) cation affinity (GaCA) and Ga(+) cation basicity (GaCB) scales. The bonding analysis of the complexes under scrutiny shows that, even though one of the main ingredients of the Ga(+) -base interaction is electrostatic, it exhibits a non-negligible covalent character triggered by the presence of the low-lying empty 4p orbital of Ga(+) , which favors a charge donation from occupied orbitals of the base to the metal ion. This partial covalent character, also observed in AlCA scales, is behind the dissimilarities observed when GaCA are compared with Li(+) cation affinities, where these covalent contributions are practically nonexistent. Quite unexpectedly, there are some dissimilarities between several Ga(+) -complexes and the corresponding Al(+) -analogues, mainly affecting the relative stability of π-complexes involving aromatic compounds.

  19. Further characterization of the subunits of the receptor with high affinity for immunoglobulin E

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, G.; Kinet, J.P.; Liu, T.Y.; Metzger, H.

    1987-05-05

    The ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., ..gamma.. subunits of the receptor with high affinity for immunoglobulin E were isolated and their compositions assessed by direct amino acid analysis and by incorporation of radioactive precursors. The compositions show no unusual features other than a rather high content of tryptophan in the ..cap alpha.. chain as assessed from the incorporation studies. The results combined with future sequence data will permit unambiguous determination of the multiplicity of the chains in the receptor. Chymotryptic peptide maps of the extrinsically iodinated subunits show several similar peptides, particularly for ..cap alpha.. and ..beta... However, these putative homologies were not apparent when tryptic maps of the biosynthetically ((/sup 3/H)leucine) labeled subunits were analyzed.

  20. Demonstration of a second ligand for the low affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (CD23) using recombinant CD23 reconstituted into fluorescent liposomes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant full-length human CD23 has been incorporated into fluorescent liposomes to demonstrate the existence of a ligand for CD23 that is different from the previously known ligand, immunoglobulin E (IgE). The novel ligand for CD23 is expressed on subsets of normal T cells and B cells as well as on some myeloma cell lines. The interaction of full-length CD23 with its ligand is specifically inhibited by anti-CD23 monoclonal antibodies and by IgE, and it is Ca2+ dependent. Moreover, tunicamycin treatment of a CD23-binding cell line, RPMI 8226, significantly reduced the binding of CD23 incorporated into fluorescent liposomes, and a sugar, fucose-1-phosphate, was found to inhibit CD23-liposome binding to RPMI 8226 cells, suggesting the contribution of sugar structures on the CD23 ligand. In addition, CD23- transfected COS cells were shown to form specific conjugates with the cell line RPMI 8226. These data demonstrate that CD23 interacts with a ligand, which is different from IgE, and that CD23 can be considered as a new surface adhesion molecule involved in cell-cell interactions. PMID:1386872

  1. Discovery of high affinity inhibitors of Leishmania donovani N-myristoyltransferase† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. The coordinates and structure factor files have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank under the accession codes 5A27 and 5A28. See DOI: 10.1039/c5md00241a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Rackham, Mark D.; Yu, Zhiyong; Brannigan, James A.; Heal, William P.; Paape, Daniel; Barker, K. Victoria; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Smith, Deborah F.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT) is a potential drug target in Leishmania parasites. Scaffold-hopping from published inhibitors yielded the serendipitous discovery of a chemotype selective for Leishmania donovani NMT; development led to high affinity inhibitors with excellent ligand efficiency. The binding mode was characterised by crystallography and provides a structural rationale for selectivity. PMID:26962429

  2. High kinetic stability of Zn(II) coordinated by the tris(histidine) unit of carbonic anhydrase towards solvolytic dissociation studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Solvolytic dissociation rate constants (kd) of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and its metallovariants (M-CAs, M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) were estimated by a ligand substitution reaction, which was monitored by affinity capillary electrophoresis to selectively detect the undissociated CAs in the reaction mixture. Using EDTA as the competing ligand for Zn-CA, the dissociation followed the unimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN1) mechanism with kd=1.0×10(-7)s(-1) (pH7.4, 25°C). The corresponding solvolysis half-life (t1/2) was 80days, showing the exceptionally high kinetic stability of t Zn-CA, in contrast to the highly labile [Zn(II)(H2O)6](2+), where the water exchange rate (kex) is high. This behavior is attributed to the tetrahedral coordination geometry supported by the tris(histidine) unit (His3) of CA. In the case of Co-CA, it showed a somewhat larger kd value (5.7×10(-7)s(-1), pH7.4, 25°C) even though it shares the same tetrahedral coordination environment with Zn-CA, suggesting that the d(7) electronic configuration of Co(II) in the transition state of the dissociation is stabilized by the ligand field. Among M-CAs, only Ni-CA showed a bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction path in its reaction with EDTA, implying that the large coordination number (6) of Ni(II) in Ni-CA allows EDTA to form an EDTA-Ni-CA intermediate. Overall, kd values roughly correlated with kex values among M-CAs, with the kd value of Zn-CA deviating strongly from the trend and highlighting the exceptionally high kinetic stabilization of Zn-CA by the His3 unit. PMID:27235274

  3. Affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS): high-throughput screening for specific small molecule interactions with frozen tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, T; Kawabata, S; Taira, S; Okuno, A; Mikawa, R; Murayama, S; Tanaka, K; Takikawa, O

    2015-11-01

    A novel screening system, using affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS), has been developed to identify protein aggregates or organ structures in unfixed human tissue. Frozen tissue sections are positioned on small (millimetre-scale) stainless steel chips and incubated with an extensive library of small molecules. Candidate molecules showing specific affinity for the tissue section are identified by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). As an example application, we screened over a thousand compounds against Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue and identified several compounds with high affinity for AD brain sections containing tau deposits compared to age-matched controls. It should also be possible to use AIMS to isolate chemical compounds with affinity for tissue structures or components that have been extensively modified by events such as oxidation, phosphorylation, acetylation, aggregation, racemization or truncation, for example, due to aging. It may also be applicable to biomarker screening programs. PMID:26365298

  4. The presence of high-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β binding in rainbow trout scale indicates a possible endocrine route for the regulation of scale resorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persson, Petra; Shrimpton, J. Mark; McCormick, Stephen D.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur

    2000-01-01

    High-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β (E2) binding is present in rainbow trout scale. The Kd and Bmax of the scale E2 binding are similar to those of the liver E2 receptor (Kd is 1.6 ± 0.1 and 1.4 ± 0.1 nM, and Bmax is 9.1 ± 1.2 and 23.1 ± 2.2 fmol × mg protein-1, for scale and liver, respectively), but different from those of the high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding in plasma (Kd is 4.0 ± 0.4 nM and Bmax is 625.4 ± 63.1 fmol × mg protein−1). The E2 binding in scale was displaced by testosterone, but not by diethylstilbestrol. Hence, the ligand binding specificity is different from that of the previously characterized liver E2 receptor, where E2 is displaced by diethylstilbestrol, but not by testosterone. The putative scale E2 receptor thus appears to bind both E2 and testosterone, and it is proposed that the increased scale resorption observed during sexual maturation in both sexes of several salmonid species may be mediated by this receptor. No high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding could be detected in rainbow trout gill or skin.

  5. Discovery and Labeling of High Affinity 3,4-Diarylpyrazolines as Candidate Radioligands for In Vivo Imaging of Cannabinoid Subtype-1 (CB1) Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Sean R.; Pike, Victor W.; Finnema, Sjoerd J.; Truong, Phong; Andersson, Jan; Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer

    2008-01-01

    Imaging of cannabinoid subtype-1 (CB1) receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) is likely to be important for understanding their role in neuropsychiatric disorders and for drug development. Radioligands for imaging with PET are required for this purpose. We synthesized new ligands from a 3,4-diarylpyrazoline platform of which (-)-12a ((-)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-N’-[(4-cyanophenyl)sulfonyl]-4-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine) was found to have high-affinity and selectivity for binding to CB1 receptors. (-)-12a and its lower affinity enantiomer ((+)-12a) were labeled with carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) using [11C]cyanide ion as labeling agent and evaluated as PET radioligands in cynomolgus monkey. After injection of [11C](-)-12a there was high uptake and retention of radioactivity across brain according to the rank order of CB1 receptor densities. The distomer, [11C](+)-12a, failed to give a sustained CB1 receptor-specific distribution. Polar radiometabolites of [11C](-)-12a appeared moderately slowly in plasma. Radioligand [11C](-)-12a is promising for the study of brain CB1 receptors and merits further investigation in human subjects. PMID:18754613

  6. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  7. Nanoparticles Self-Assembly Driven by High Affinity Repeat Protein Pairing.

    PubMed

    Gurunatha, Kargal L; Fournier, Agathe C; Urvoas, Agathe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Marchi, Valérie; Minard, Philippe; Dujardin, Erik

    2016-03-22

    Proteins are the most specific yet versatile biological self-assembling agents with a rich chemistry. Nevertheless, the design of new proteins with recognition capacities is still in its infancy and has seldom been exploited for the self-assembly of functional inorganic nanoparticles. Here, we report on the protein-directed assembly of gold nanoparticles using purpose-designed artificial repeat proteins having a rigid but modular 3D architecture. αRep protein pairs are selected for their high mutual affinity from a library of 10(9) variants. Their conjugation onto gold nanoparticles drives the massive colloidal assembly of free-standing, one-particle thick films. When the average number of proteins per nanoparticle is lowered, the extent of self-assembly is limited to oligomeric particle clusters. Finally, we demonstrate that the aggregates are reversibly disassembled by an excess of one free protein. Our approach could be optimized for applications in biosensing, cell targeting, or functional nanomaterials engineering.

  8. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  9. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R.; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface

  10. Molecular engineering of high affinity single-chain antibody fragment for endothelial targeting of proteins and nanocarriers in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Greineder, Colin F; Hood, Elizabeth D; Yao, Anning; Khoshnejad, Makan; Brenner, Jake S; Johnston, Ian H; Poncz, Mortimer; Gottstein, Claudia; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2016-03-28

    Endothelial cells (EC) represent an important target for pharmacologic intervention, given their central role in a wide variety of human pathophysiologic processes. Studies in lab animal species have established that conjugation of drugs and carriers with antibodies directed to surface targets like the Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1, a highly expressed endothelial transmembrane protein) help to achieve specific therapeutic interventions in ECs. To translate such "vascular immunotargeting" to clinical practice, it is necessary to replace antibodies by advanced ligands that are more amenable to use in humans. We report the molecular design of a single chain variable antibody fragment (scFv) that binds with high affinity to human PECAM-1 and cross-reacts with its counterpart in rats and other animal species, allowing parallel testing in vivo and in human endothelial cells in microfluidic model. Site-specific modification of the scFv allows conjugation of protein cargo and liposomes, enabling their endothelial targeting in these models. This study provides a template for molecular engineering of ligands, enabling studies of drug targeting in animal species and subsequent use in humans. PMID:26855052

  11. Potential Modes of Interaction of 9-Aminomethyl-9,10-dihydroanthracene (AMDA) Derivatives with the 5-HT2A Receptor: A Ligand Structure-Affinity Relationship, Receptor Mutagenesis and Receptor Modeling Investigation⊕

    PubMed Central

    Runyon, Scott P.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Glennon, Richard A.; Westkaemper, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 3-position substitution of 9-aminomethyl-9,10-dihydroanthracene (AMDA) on 5-HT2A receptor affinity were determined and compared to a parallel series of DOB-like 1-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-aminopropanes substituted at the 4-position. The results were interpreted within the context of 5-HT2A receptor models that suggest that members of the DOB-like series can bind to the receptor in two distinct modes that correlate with the compounds’ functional activity. Automated ligand docking and molecular dynamics suggest that all of the AMDA derivatives, the parent of which is a 5-HT2A antagonist, bind in a fashion analogous to that for the sterically demanding antagonist DOB-like compounds. The failure of the F3406.52L mutation to adversely affect the affinity of AMDA and the 3-bromo derivative is consistent with the proposed modes of orientation. Evaluation of ligand-receptor complex models suggest that a valine/threonine exchange between the 5-HT2A and D2 receptors may be the origin of selectivity for AMDA and two substituted derivatives. PMID:18847250

  12. High and Low Affinity Urea Root Uptake: Involvement of NIP5;1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huayiu; Menz, Jochen; Häussermann, Iris; Benz, Martin; Fujiwara, Toru; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Urea is the most widespread nitrogen (N) fertilizer worldwide and is rapidly degraded in soil to ammonium by urease. Ammonium is either taken up by plant roots or is further processed to nitrate by soil microorganisms. However, urea can be taken up by roots and is further degraded to ammonium by plant urease for assimilation. When urea is supplied under sterile conditions, it acts as a poor N source for seedlings or adult Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Here, the gene expression of young seedlings exposed to urea and ammonium nitrate nutrition was compared. Several primary metabolism and transport genes, including those for nitrate and urea, were differentially expressed in seedlings. However, urease and most major intrinsic proteins were not differentially expressed, with the exception of NIP6;1, a urea-permeable channel, which was repressed. Furthermore, little overlap with the gene expression with ammonium as the sole N source was observed, confirming that pure urea nutrition is not associated with the ammonium toxicity syndrome in seedlings. The direct root uptake of urea was increased under boron deficiency, in both the high and low affinity range. This activity was entirely mediated by the NIP5;1 channel, which was confirmed to transport urea when expressed in oocytes. The uptake of urea in the high and low affinity range was also determined for maize and wheat roots. The urea uptake by maize roots was only about half that of wheat, but was not stimulated by boron deficiency or N deficiency in either species. This analysis identifies novel components of the urea uptake systems in plants, which may become agronomically relevant to urea uptake and utilization, as stabilized urea fertilizers become increasingly popular. PMID:25957355

  13. High affinity binding of an engineered, modular peptide to bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Brounts, Sabrina H; Lee, Jae Sung; Weinberg, Sean; Lan Levengood, Sheeny K; Smith, Everett L; Murphy, William L

    2013-05-01

    Bone grafting procedures have become common due in part to a global trend of population aging. Native bone graft is a popular choice when compared to various synthetic bone graft substitutes, owing to superior biological activity. Nonetheless, the insufficient ability of bone allograft to induce new bone formation and the insufficient remodeling of native bone grafts call for osteoinductive factors during bone repair, exemplified by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP2). We previously developed a modular bone morphogenetic peptide (mBMP) to address complications associated with the clinical use of rhBMP2 as a bone graft substitute. The mBMP is designed to strongly bind to hydroxyapatite, the main inorganic component of bone and teeth, and to provide pro-osteogenic properties analogous to rhBMP2. Our previous in vivo animal studies showed that mBMP bound to hydroxyapatite-coated orthopedic implants with high affinity and stimulated new bone formation. In this study, we demonstrate specific binding of mBMP to native bone grafts. The results show that mBMP binds with high affinity to both cortical and trabecular bones, and that the binding is dependent on the mBMP concentration and incubation time. Importantly, efficient mBMP binding is also achieved in an ex vivo bone bioreactor where bone tissue is maintained viable for several weeks. In addition, mBMP binding can be localized with spatial control on native bone tissue via simple methods, such as dip-coating, spotting, and direct writing. Taken together with the pro-osteogenic activity of mBMP established in previous bone repair models, these results suggest that mBMP may promote bone healing when coated on native bone grafts in a clinically compatible manner.

  14. High and Low Affinity Urea Root Uptake: Involvement of NIP5;1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huayiu; Menz, Jochen; Häussermann, Iris; Benz, Martin; Fujiwara, Toru; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Urea is the most widespread nitrogen (N) fertilizer worldwide and is rapidly degraded in soil to ammonium by urease. Ammonium is either taken up by plant roots or is further processed to nitrate by soil microorganisms. However, urea can be taken up by roots and is further degraded to ammonium by plant urease for assimilation. When urea is supplied under sterile conditions, it acts as a poor N source for seedlings or adult Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Here, the gene expression of young seedlings exposed to urea and ammonium nitrate nutrition was compared. Several primary metabolism and transport genes, including those for nitrate and urea, were differentially expressed in seedlings. However, urease and most major intrinsic proteins were not differentially expressed, with the exception of NIP6;1, a urea-permeable channel, which was repressed. Furthermore, little overlap with the gene expression with ammonium as the sole N source was observed, confirming that pure urea nutrition is not associated with the ammonium toxicity syndrome in seedlings. The direct root uptake of urea was increased under boron deficiency, in both the high and low affinity range. This activity was entirely mediated by the NIP5;1 channel, which was confirmed to transport urea when expressed in oocytes. The uptake of urea in the high and low affinity range was also determined for maize and wheat roots. The urea uptake by maize roots was only about half that of wheat, but was not stimulated by boron deficiency or N deficiency in either species. This analysis identifies novel components of the urea uptake systems in plants, which may become agronomically relevant to urea uptake and utilization, as stabilized urea fertilizers become increasingly popular.

  15. Glycomimetic ligands for the human asialoglycoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Mamidyala, Sreeman K; Dutta, Sanjay; Chrunyk, Boris A; Préville, Cathy; Wang, Hong; Withka, Jane M; McColl, Alexander; Subashi, Timothy A; Hawrylik, Steven J; Griffor, Matthew C; Kim, Sung; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Price, David A; Menhaji-Klotz, Elnaz; Mascitti, Vincent; Finn, M G

    2012-02-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is a high-capacity galactose-binding receptor expressed on hepatocytes that binds its native substrates with low affinity. More potent ligands are of interest for hepatic delivery of therapeutic agents. We report several classes of galactosyl analogues with varied substitution at the anomeric, C2-, C5-, and C6-positions. Significant increases in binding affinity were noted for several trifluoromethylacetamide derivatives without covalent attachment to the protein. A variety of new ligands were obtained with affinity for ASGPR as good as or better than that of the parent N-acetylgalactosamine, showing that modification on either side of the key C3,C4-diol moiety is well tolerated, consistent with previous models of a shallow binding pocket. The galactosyl pyranose motif therefore offers many opportunities for the attachment of other functional units or payloads while retaining low-micromolar or better affinity for the ASGPR.

  16. High affinity of sigma1-binding sites for sterol isomerization inhibitors: evidence for a pharmacological relationship with the yeast sterol C8–C7 isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Moebius, Fabian F; Reiter, Raphael J; Hanner, Markus; Glossmann, Hartmut

    1997-01-01

    The sigma-drug binding site of guinea-pig liver is carried by a protein which shares significant amino acid sequence similarities with the yeast sterol C8–C7 isomerase (ERG2 protein). Pharmacologically - but not structurally - the sigma1-site is also related to the emopamil binding protein, the mammalian sterol C8–C7 isomerase. We therefore investigated if sterol C8–C7 isomerase inhibitors are high affinity ligands for the (+)-[3H]-pentazocine labelled sigma1-binding site.Among the compounds which bound with high affinity to native hepatic and cerebral as well as to yeast expressed sigma1-binding sites were the agricultural fungicide fenpropimorph (Ki 0.005 nM), the antihypocholesterinaemic drugs triparanol (Ki 7.0 nM), AY-9944 (Ki 0.46 nM) and MDL28,815 (Ki 0.16 nM), the enantiomers of the ovulation inducer clomiphene (Ki 5.5 and 12 nM, respectively) and the antioestrogene tamoxifen (Ki 26 nM).Except for tamoxifen these affinities are essentially identical with those for the [3H]-ifenprodil labelled sterol C8–C7 isomerase of S. cerevisiae. This demonstrates that sigma1-binding protein and yeast isomerase are not only structurally but also pharmacologically related. Because of its affiliations with yeast and mammalian sterol isomerases we propose that the sigma1-binding site is localized on a sterol isomerase related protein, involved in postsqualene sterol biosynthesis. PMID:9146879

  17. A combined prediction strategy increases identification of peptides bound with high affinity and stability to porcine MHC class I molecules SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Søren; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-02-01

    Affinity and stability