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Sample records for high altitude hypoxia

  1. Aging, Tolerance to High Altitude, and Cardiorespiratory Response to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Lhuissier, François J

    2015-06-01

    Richalet, Jean-Paul, and François J. Lhuissier. Aging, tolerance to high altitude, and cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:117-124, 2015.--It is generally accepted that aging is rather protective, at least at moderate altitude. Some anecdotal reports even mention successful ascent of peaks over 8000 m and even Everest by elderly people. However, very few studies have explored the influence of aging on tolerance to high altitude and prevalence of acute high altitude related diseases, taking into account all confounding factors such as speed of ascent, altitude reached, sex, training status, and chemo-responsiveness. Changes in physiological responses to hypoxia with aging were assessed through a cross-sectional 20-year study including 4675 subjects (2789 men, 1886 women; 14-85 yrs old) and a longitudinal study including 30 subjects explored at a mean 10.4-year interval. In men, ventilatory response to hypoxia increased, while desaturation was less pronounced with aging. Cardiac response to hypoxia was blunted with aging in both genders. Similar results were found in the longitudinal study, with a decrease in cardiac and an increase in ventilatory response to hypoxia with aging. These adaptive responses were less pronounced or absent in post-menopausal untrained women. In conclusion, in normal healthy and active subjects, aging has no deleterious effect on cardiac and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, at least up to the eighth decade. Aging is not a contraindication for high altitude, as far as no pathological condition interferes and physical fitness is compatible with the intensity of the expected physical demand of one's individual. Physiological evaluation through hypoxic exercise testing before going to high altitude is helpful to detect risk factors of severe high altitude-related diseases.

  2. [Newest research progress in hypoxia genetic adaptation to high altitude].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Futao; Sun, Xuechuan

    2010-06-01

    The genetic adaptation of Plateau residents to hypoxia of low-pressure has been the hot spot for study. In terms of physiology, the adaptation involves the regulation responses of blood vessels, the changes in blood cells, antioxidant capacity and energy metabolism, as well as the hypoxia-induced changes in nuclear transcription. Physiological adaptation is heritable, so people who have already adapted themselves to high altitude are bound to be different, in regard to gene level, from the crowd who have not yet adapted themselves to high altitude environment. For this reason, researchers have studied a great deal of gene related-enzymes, the receptors, polypeptide, as well as transcription factors in body, and they found a number of the DNA polymorphism sites in the people who have adapted themsevles to high altitude being different from those in the people who do not get acclimatized. In this paper is reviewed the newest advance in research of these gene polymorphisms. The data could serve as references for further study of hypoxia genetic adaptation to high altitude.

  3. Sustained high-altitude hypoxia increases cerebral oxygen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary M.; Krizay, Erin; Guo, Jia; Shin, David D.; Scadeng, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common condition occurring within hours of rapid exposure to high altitude. Despite its frequent occurrence, the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie the condition remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in AMS. The purpose of this study was to test 1) if CMRO2 changes in response to hypoxia, and 2) if there is a difference in how individuals adapt to oxygen metabolic changes that may determine who develops AMS and who does not. Twenty-six normal human subjects were recruited into two groups based on Lake Louise AMS score (LLS): those with no AMS (LLS ≤ 2), and those with unambiguous AMS (LLS ≥ 5). [Subjects with intermediate scores (LLS 3–4) were not included.] CMRO2 was calculated from cerebral blood flow and arterial-venous difference in O2 content. Cerebral blood flow was measured using arterial spin labeling MRI; venous O2 saturation was calculated from the MRI of transverse relaxation in the superior sagittal sinus. Arterial O2 saturation was measured via pulse oximeter. Measurements were made during normoxia and after 2-day high-altitude exposure at 3,800 m. In all subjects, CMRO2 increased with sustained high-altitude hypoxia [1.54 (0.37) to 1.82 (0.49) μmol·g−1·min−1, n = 26, P = 0.045]. There was no significant difference in CMRO2 between AMS and no-AMS groups. End-tidal Pco2 was significantly reduced during hypoxia. Low arterial Pco2 is known to increase neural excitability, and we hypothesize that the low arterial Pco2 resulting from ventilatory acclimatization causes the observed increase in CMRO2. PMID:23019310

  4. High altitude hypoxia and blood pressure dysregulation in adult chickens.

    PubMed

    Herrera, E A; Salinas, C E; Blanco, C E; Villena, M; Giussani, D A

    2013-02-01

    Although it is accepted that impaired placental perfusion in complicated pregnancy can slow fetal growth and programme an increased risk of cardiovascular dysfunction at adulthood, the relative contribution of reductions in fetal nutrition and in fetal oxygenation as the triggering stimulus remains unclear. By combining high altitude (HA) with the chick embryo model, we have previously isolated the direct effects of HA hypoxia on embryonic growth and cardiovascular development before hatching. This study isolated the effects of developmental hypoxia on cardiovascular function measured in vivo in conscious adult male and female chickens. Chick embryos were incubated, hatched and raised at sea level (SL, nine males and nine females) or incubated, hatched and raised at HA (seven males and seven females). At 6 months of age, vascular catheters were inserted under general anaesthesia. Five days later, basal blood gas status, basal cardiovascular function and cardiac baroreflex responses were investigated. HA chickens had significantly lower basal arterial PO2 and haemoglobin saturation, and significantly higher haematocrit than SL chickens, independent of the sex of the animal. HA chickens had significantly lower arterial blood pressure than SL chickens, independent of the sex of the animal. Although the gain of the arterial baroreflex was decreased in HA relative to SL male chickens, it was increased in HA relative to SL female chickens. We show that development at HA lowers basal arterial blood pressure and alters baroreflex sensitivity in a sex-dependent manner at adulthood.

  5. Transthoracic Electrical Impedance in Cases of High-altitude Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sujoy B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Khan, M. R.; Kaushik, V. S.; Manchanda, S. C.; Guha, S. K.

    1974-01-01

    Changes in transthoracic electrical impedance (T.E.I.) due to high-altitude hypoxia (3,658 m) have been measured in 20 young, healthy Indian soldiers. They were first studied at sea level (198 m) and then rapidly transported by air to 3,658 m, where they were studied daily from day 1 to day 5 and then on days 8 and 10. The mean (±S.D.) T.E.I. at sea level (34·6±0·6Ω) fell sharply to 29·6±0·8Ω, 30·3±0·9Ω, and 30·5±1·1Ω on days 1, 2, and 3 (P <0·001) and levelled off at 31·5±0·7Ω on day 10, which was comparable to the mean value obtained in 13 persons permanently resident at high altitude (32·2±0·7Ω). Five sea-level residents who had acute mountain sickness (A.M.S.) or high-altitude pulmonary oedema (H.A.P.O.) had a still lower mean value (22·5±1·1Ω). One normal healthy subject who at sea level had a T.E.I. of 34·7Ω developed H.A.P.O. when the T.E.I. fell to 21·1Ω. Ninety minutes after the administration of 80 mg of intravenous frusemide the value increased to 35·5Ω. In another subject with A.M.S. who received 40 mg of frusemide intravenously the T.E.I. rose from 21·9 to 33·2Ω. Since the study was non-invasive the changes in impedance could not be correlated objectively with alterations in either pulmonary blood volume or pulmonary extravascular water space. In the subject, however, with x-ray evidence of H.A.P.O. and a low T.E.I. intravenous frusemide produced a marked rise in T.E.I. together with clearing of the chest x-ray picture within 24 hours, indicating an inverse relationship between impedance and thoracic fluid volume. It is suggested that with further objective verification in man the measurement of T.E.I. may be a potentially promising technique for the early detection of increased pulmonary fluid volume. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4416705

  6. Control of breathing and ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in deer mice native to high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Ivy, C M; Scott, G R

    2017-06-22

    We compared the control of breathing and heart rate by hypoxia between high- and low-altitude populations of Peromyscus mice, to help elucidate the physiological specializations that help high-altitude natives cope with O2 limitation. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) native to high altitude and congeneric mice native to low altitude (Peromyscus leucopus) were bred in captivity at sea level. The F1 progeny of each population were raised to adulthood and then acclimated to normoxia or hypobaric hypoxia (12 kPa, simulating hypoxia at ~4300 m) for 5 months. Responses to acute hypoxia were then measured during stepwise reductions in inspired O2 fraction. Lowlanders exhibited ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH), in which hypoxia acclimation enhanced the hypoxic ventilatory response, made breathing pattern more effective (higher tidal volumes and lower breathing frequencies at a given total ventilation), increased arterial O2 saturation and heart rate during acute hypoxia, augmented respiratory water loss and led to significant growth of the carotid body. In contrast, highlanders did not exhibit VAH - exhibiting a fixed increase in breathing that was similar to hypoxia-acclimated lowlanders - and they maintained even higher arterial O2 saturations in hypoxia. However, the carotid bodies of highlanders were not enlarged by hypoxia acclimation and were similar in size to those of normoxic lowlanders. Highlanders also maintained consistently higher heart rates than lowlanders during acute hypoxia. Our results suggest that highland deer mice have evolved high rates of alveolar ventilation and respiratory O2 uptake without the significant enlargement of the carotid bodies that is typical of VAH in lowlanders, possibly to adjust the hypoxic chemoreflex for life in high-altitude hypoxia. © 2017 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. "Omics" of High Altitude Biology: A Urinary Metabolomics Biomarker Study of Rats Under Hypobaric Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koundal, Sunil; Gandhi, Sonia; Kaur, Tanzeer; Mazumder, Avik; Khushu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    High altitude medicine is an emerging subspecialty that has crosscutting relevance for 21(st) century science and society: from sports medicine and aerospace industry to urban and rural communities living in high altitude. Recreational travel to high altitude has also become increasingly popular. Rarely has the biology of high altitude biology been studied using systems sciences and omics high-throughput technologies. In the present study, 1H-NMR-based metabolomics, along with multivariate analyses, were employed in a preclinical rat model to characterize the urinary metabolome under hypobaric hypoxia stress. Rats were exposed to simulated altitude of 6700 m above the sea level. The urine samples were collected from pre- and post-exposure (1, 3, 7, and 14 days) of hypobaric hypoxia. Metabolomics urinalysis showed alterations in TCA cycle metabolites (citrate, α-ketoglutarate), cell membrane metabolism (choline), gut micro-flora metabolism (hippurate, phenylacetylglycine), and others (N-acetyl glutamate, creatine, taurine) in response to hypobaric hypoxia. Taurine, a potential biomarker of hepatic function, was elevated after 3 days of hypobaric hypoxia, which indicates altered liver functioning. Liver histopathology confirmed the damage to tissue architecture due to hypobaric hypoxia. The metabolic pathway analysis identified taurine metabolism and TCA as important pathways that might have contributed to hypobaric hypoxia-induced pathophysiology. This study demonstrates the use of metabolomics as a promising tool for discovery and understanding of novel biochemical responses to hypobaric hypoxia exposure, providing new insight in the field of high altitude medicine and the attendant health problems that occur in response to high altitude. The findings reported here also have potential relevance for sports medicine and aviation sciences.

  8. Phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Storz, Jay F; Scott, Graham R; Cheviron, Zachary A

    2010-12-15

    High-altitude environments provide ideal testing grounds for investigations of mechanism and process in physiological adaptation. In vertebrates, much of our understanding of the acclimatization response to high-altitude hypoxia derives from studies of animal species that are native to lowland environments. Such studies can indicate whether phenotypic plasticity will generally facilitate or impede adaptation to high altitude. Here, we review general mechanisms of physiological acclimatization and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in birds and mammals. We evaluate whether the acclimatization response to environmental hypoxia can be regarded generally as a mechanism of adaptive phenotypic plasticity, or whether it might sometimes represent a misdirected response that acts as a hindrance to genetic adaptation. In cases in which the acclimatization response to hypoxia is maladaptive, selection will favor an attenuation of the induced phenotypic change. This can result in a form of cryptic adaptive evolution in which phenotypic similarity between high- and low-altitude populations is attributable to directional selection on genetically based trait variation that offsets environmentally induced changes. The blunted erythropoietic and pulmonary vasoconstriction responses to hypoxia in Tibetan humans and numerous high-altitude birds and mammals provide possible examples of this phenomenon. When lowland animals colonize high-altitude environments, adaptive phenotypic plasticity can mitigate the costs of selection, thereby enhancing prospects for population establishment and persistence. By contrast, maladaptive plasticity has the opposite effect. Thus, insights into the acclimatization response of lowland animals to high-altitude hypoxia can provide a basis for predicting how altitudinal range limits might shift in response to climate change.

  9. Phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Scott, Graham R.; Cheviron, Zachary A.

    2010-01-01

    High-altitude environments provide ideal testing grounds for investigations of mechanism and process in physiological adaptation. In vertebrates, much of our understanding of the acclimatization response to high-altitude hypoxia derives from studies of animal species that are native to lowland environments. Such studies can indicate whether phenotypic plasticity will generally facilitate or impede adaptation to high altitude. Here, we review general mechanisms of physiological acclimatization and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in birds and mammals. We evaluate whether the acclimatization response to environmental hypoxia can be regarded generally as a mechanism of adaptive phenotypic plasticity, or whether it might sometimes represent a misdirected response that acts as a hindrance to genetic adaptation. In cases in which the acclimatization response to hypoxia is maladaptive, selection will favor an attenuation of the induced phenotypic change. This can result in a form of cryptic adaptive evolution in which phenotypic similarity between high- and low-altitude populations is attributable to directional selection on genetically based trait variation that offsets environmentally induced changes. The blunted erythropoietic and pulmonary vasoconstriction responses to hypoxia in Tibetan humans and numerous high-altitude birds and mammals provide possible examples of this phenomenon. When lowland animals colonize high-altitude environments, adaptive phenotypic plasticity can mitigate the costs of selection, thereby enhancing prospects for population establishment and persistence. By contrast, maladaptive plasticity has the opposite effect. Thus, insights into the acclimatization response of lowland animals to high-altitude hypoxia can provide a basis for predicting how altitudinal range limits might shift in response to climate change. PMID:21112992

  10. Whole-genome sequencing of six dog breeds from continuous altitudes reveals adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Xiao; Wang, Zhen; Li, Ning; Qiu, Feng; Xu, Ze; Yan, Dawei; Yang, Shuli; Jia, Jia; Kong, Xiaoyan; Wei, Zehui; Lu, Shaoxiong; Lian, Linsheng; Wu, Changxin; Wang, Xueyan; Li, Guozhi; Ma, Teng; Jiang, Qiang; Zhao, Xue; Yang, Jiaqiang; Liu, Baohong; Wei, Dongkai; Li, Hong; Yang, Jianfa; Yan, Yulin; Zhao, Guiying; Dong, Xinxing; Li, Mingli; Deng, Weidong; Leng, Jing; Wei, Chaochun; Wang, Chuan; Mao, Huaming; Zhang, Hao; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxic environment imposes severe selective pressure on species living at high altitude. To understand the genetic bases of adaptation to high altitude in dogs, we performed whole-genome sequencing of 60 dogs including five breeds living at continuous altitudes along the Tibetan Plateau from 800 to 5100 m as well as one European breed. More than 150× sequencing coverage for each breed provides us with a comprehensive assessment of the genetic polymorphisms of the dogs, including Tibetan Mastiffs. Comparison of the breeds from different altitudes reveals strong signals of population differentiation at the locus of hypoxia-related genes including endothelial Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein 1 (EPAS1) and beta hemoglobin cluster. Notably, four novel nonsynonymous mutations specific to high-altitude dogs are identified at EPAS1, one of which occurred at a quite conserved site in the PAS domain. The association testing between EPAS1 genotypes and blood-related phenotypes on additional high-altitude dogs reveals that the homozygous mutation is associated with decreased blood flow resistance, which may help to improve hemorheologic fitness. Interestingly, EPAS1 was also identified as a selective target in Tibetan highlanders, though no amino acid changes were found. Thus, our results not only indicate parallel evolution of humans and dogs in adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia, but also provide a new opportunity to study the role of EPAS1 in the adaptive processes. PMID:24721644

  11. Influences of hypoxia on hatching performance in chickens with different genetic adaptation to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Wang, X T; Chamba, Y; Ling, Y; Wu, C X

    2008-10-01

    The experiments were conducted to assess how hatching performance is affected by chicken breeds and environment of high altitude and to analyze the vital factor of the low hatchability at a 2,900-m altitude. Eggs of Tibetan and Dwarf chickens were incubated at conditions of normobaric normoxia, normobaric hypoxia, hypobaric hypoxia, and supplemental O2 at high altitude (hypobaric normoxia) during the whole incubation or at 0 to 7, 8 to 14, and 15 to 22 d of incubation, respectively. The results showed that the Tibetan chickens had greater hatchability (79.72%), lower water loss (12.90%), greater relative embryo weight (38.08%), and relative chick weight (68.41%) compared with the Dwarf chickens (31.69, 15.79, 30.71, and 65.21%, respectively) when both of them were incubated at a 2,900-m altitude. The hatchability was 71.60% in Tibetan chicken and 36.23% in Dwarf chicken under the normobaric hypoxia condition. The hatchability of chicken was efficiently increased with supplemental O2. The previous results indicated that the O2 deficit is the main factor resulting in the low hatchability and the poor chick quality of the lowland chicken breed when incubated at a 2,900-m altitude. Breeding chickens for adaptability to hypoxia and supplemental O2 is a good way to improve the hatchability and chick quality at that altitude.

  12. A study of high-altitude hypoxia-induced cell stress in murine model.

    PubMed

    Juan, Hu; Qijun, Wang; Yuanheng, Hu; Yangfang, Li

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of high-altitude hypoxic stress in the murine model. For this purpose, 36 CR-mice in group A were maintained at the altitude of 3,820 m for hypoxia-induced factor (HIF)-1α expression analysis by immunohistochemistry. The 36 Wistar rats in group B were maintained in low-pressure (400-420 kPa) oxygen chamber, and the effects of hypoxia on myocardial mitochondria were studied. In the 36 CR-mice of group C, plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were determined using strept-avidin-biotin complex/diaminobenzidine method after exposure to different altitudes/O(2)-concentrations. The data show that in experimental group A1, endothelin (ET)-1α concentrations gradually increased whereas HIF-1α expression in myocardial cells was higher (P < 0.01) than in control group A2. In rats of group B, the myocardial mitochondria numbers were reduced during the initial phase of acute stress response to hypoxia and cellular injury but, later, mitochondrial numbers were restored to normal values. In mice of experimental group C1, plasma VEGF concentrations increased under hypoxia, which were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of control group C2. We, therefore, concluded that high-altitude hypoxia: (i) induced HIF-1α expression; (ii) prompted adaptation/acclimatization after initial stress and cellular injury; and (iii) enhanced VEGF expression in murine.

  13. Shared Genetic Signals of Hypoxia Adaptation in Drosophila and in High-Altitude Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Aashish R.; Zhou, Dan; Brown, Christopher D.; Kreitman, Martin; Haddad, Gabriel G.; White, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to withstand low oxygen (hypoxia tolerance) is a polygenic and mechanistically conserved trait that has important implications for both human health and evolution. However, little is known about the diversity of genetic mechanisms involved in hypoxia adaptation in evolving populations. We used experimental evolution and whole-genome sequencing in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the role of natural variation in adaptation to hypoxia. Using a generalized linear mixed model we identified significant allele frequency differences between three independently evolved hypoxia-tolerant populations and normoxic control populations for approximately 3,800 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Around 50% of these variants are clustered in 66 distinct genomic regions. These regions contain genes that are differentially expressed between hypoxia-tolerant and normoxic populations and several of the differentially expressed genes are associated with metabolic processes. Additional genes associated with respiratory and open tracheal system development also show evidence of directional selection. RNAi-mediated knockdown of several candidate genes’ expression significantly enhanced survival in severe hypoxia. Using genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism data from four high-altitude human populations—Sherpas, Tibetans, Ethiopians, and Andeans, we found that several human orthologs of the genes under selection in flies are also likely under positive selection in all four high-altitude human populations. Thus, our results indicate that selection for hypoxia tolerance can act on standing genetic variation in similar genes and pathways present in organisms diverged by hundreds of millions of years. PMID:26576852

  14. Acclimatization of skeletal muscle mitochondria to high-altitude hypoxia during an ascent of Everest.

    PubMed

    Levett, Denny Z; Radford, Elizabeth J; Menassa, David A; Graber, E Franziska; Morash, Andrea J; Hoppeler, Hans; Clarke, Kieran; Martin, Daniel S; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Montgomery, Hugh E; Grocott, Michael P W; Murray, Andrew J

    2012-04-01

    Ascent to high altitude is associated with a fall in the partial pressure of inspired oxygen (hypobaric hypoxia). For oxidative tissues such as skeletal muscle, resultant cellular hypoxia necessitates acclimatization to optimize energy metabolism and restrict oxidative stress, with changes in gene and protein expression that alter mitochondrial function. It is known that lowlanders returning from high altitude have decreased muscle mitochondrial densities, yet the underlying transcriptional mechanisms and time course are poorly understood. To explore these, we measured gene and protein expression plus ultrastructure in muscle biopsies of lowlanders at sea level and following exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Subacute exposure (19 d after initiating ascent to Everest base camp, 5300 m) was not associated with mitochondrial loss. After 66 d at altitude and ascent beyond 6400 m, mitochondrial densities fell by 21%, with loss of 73% of subsarcolemmal mitochondria. Correspondingly, levels of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α fell by 35%, suggesting down-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Sustained hypoxia also decreased expression of electron transport chain complexes I and IV and UCP3 levels. We suggest that during subacute hypoxia, mitochondria might be protected from oxidative stress. However, following sustained exposure, mitochondrial biogenesis is deactivated and uncoupling down-regulated, perhaps to improve the efficiency of ATP production.

  15. High Altitude Journeys, Flights and Hypoxia: Any Role for Disease Flares in IBD Patients?

    PubMed

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Rogler, Gerhard; Biedermann, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The importance of environmental factors in the pathogenesis including their disease-modifying potential are increasingly recognized in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, largely driven by the perception that the prevalence and incidence of IBD are on the rise within the last few years, especially in non-western countries. One of those factors is believed to be hypoxia. The role of hypoxia as a modifying or even causative factor in the genesis and maintenance of inflammation has been increasingly elucidated in recent years. Hypoxia is believed to be a main inducing factor of inflammation. This has been studied in different animal experiments as well as in humans exposed to hypoxia. In several studies - mainly in mice - animals exposed to short-term hypoxia accumulated inflammatory cells in multiple organs and showed elevated cytokines in the blood. Comparable studies were performed in humans, mainly in healthy mountaineers. Recently, we reported on the association between IBD flare-up episodes and antecedent journeys to high-altitude region and aircraft travels. According to these findings, we concluded that flights and stays at high altitudes of >2,000 mg are a risk factor for increased disease activity in IBD. To evaluate the potential influence of hypoxia on the course of IBD on a biomolecular level and to test the effects of hypoxia under standardized conditions, we initiated a prospective and controlled investigation in both healthy controls and IBD patients in stable remission. The study participants underwent a 3-hour exposure to hypoxic conditions simulating an altitude of 4,000 m above sea level in a hyperbaric pressure chamber and clinical parameters as well as blood and stool samples were collected at several time points. The first results of this study are expected in the near future. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Hypoxia triggers high-altitude headache with migraine features: A prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Broessner, Gregor; Rohregger, Johanna; Wille, Maria; Lackner, Peter; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Given the high prevalence and clinical impact of high-altitude headache (HAH), a better understanding of risk factors and headache characteristics may give new insights into the understanding of hypoxia being a trigger for HAH or even migraine attacks. In this prospective trial, we simulated high altitude (4500 m) by controlled normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 12.6%) to investigate acute mountain sickness (AMS) and headache characteristics. Clinical symptoms of AMS according to the Lake Louise Scoring system (LLS) were recorded before and after six and 12 hours in hypoxia. O2 saturation was measured using pulse oximetry at the respective time points. History of primary headache, especially episodic or chronic migraine, was a strict exclusion criterion. In total 77 volunteers (43 (55.8%) males, 34 (44.2%) females) were enrolled in this study. Sixty-three (81.18%) and 40 (71.4%) participants developed headache at six or 12 hours, respectively, with height and SpO2 being significantly different between headache groups at six hours (p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression model revealed a significant association of SpO2 and headache development (p < 0.05, OR 1.123, 95% CI 1.001-1.259). In a subgroup of participants, with history of migraine being a strict exclusion criterion, hypoxia triggered migraine-like headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) in n = 5 (8%) or n = 6 (15%), at six and 12 hours, respectively. Normobaric hypoxia is a trigger for HAH and migraine-like headache attacks even in healthy volunteers without any history of migraine. Our study confirms the pivotal role of hypoxia in the development of AMS and beyond that suggests hypoxia may be involved in migraine pathophysiology. © International Headache Society 2015.

  17. The body weight loss during acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia in sea level residents.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ri-Li; Wood, Helen; Yang, Hui-Huang; Liu, Yi-Ning; Wang, Xiu-Juan; Babb, Tony

    2010-12-25

    altitude group (2.97±1.38), and was significantly correlated with baseline body weight. These results indicate that (1) the person with higher body weight during stay at high altitude loses more weight, and this is more pronounced in sea level natives when compared with that in moderate altitude natives; (2) heavier individuals are more likely to develop AMS than leaner individuals during exposure to high-altitude hypoxia.

  18. Shared Genetic Signals of Hypoxia Adaptation in Drosophila and in High-Altitude Human Populations.

    PubMed

    Jha, Aashish R; Zhou, Dan; Brown, Christopher D; Kreitman, Martin; Haddad, Gabriel G; White, Kevin P

    2016-02-01

    The ability to withstand low oxygen (hypoxia tolerance) is a polygenic and mechanistically conserved trait that has important implications for both human health and evolution. However, little is known about the diversity of genetic mechanisms involved in hypoxia adaptation in evolving populations. We used experimental evolution and whole-genome sequencing in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the role of natural variation in adaptation to hypoxia. Using a generalized linear mixed model we identified significant allele frequency differences between three independently evolved hypoxia-tolerant populations and normoxic control populations for approximately 3,800 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Around 50% of these variants are clustered in 66 distinct genomic regions. These regions contain genes that are differentially expressed between hypoxia-tolerant and normoxic populations and several of the differentially expressed genes are associated with metabolic processes. Additional genes associated with respiratory and open tracheal system development also show evidence of directional selection. RNAi-mediated knockdown of several candidate genes' expression significantly enhanced survival in severe hypoxia. Using genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism data from four high-altitude human populations-Sherpas, Tibetans, Ethiopians, and Andeans, we found that several human orthologs of the genes under selection in flies are also likely under positive selection in all four high-altitude human populations. Thus, our results indicate that selection for hypoxia tolerance can act on standing genetic variation in similar genes and pathways present in organisms diverged by hundreds of millions of years. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Markers of physiological stress during exercise under conditions of normoxia, normobaric hypoxia, hypobaric hypoxia, and genuine high altitude.

    PubMed

    Woods, David Richard; O'Hara, John Paul; Boos, Christopher John; Hodkinson, Peter David; Tsakirides, Costas; Hill, Neil Edward; Jose, Darren; Hawkins, Amanda; Phillipson, Kelly; Hazlerigg, Antonia; Arjomandkhah, Nicola; Gallagher, Liam; Holdsworth, David; Cooke, Mark; Green, Nicholas Donald Charles; Mellor, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether there is a differential response at rest and following exercise to conditions of genuine high altitude (GHA), normobaric hypoxia (NH), hypobaric hypoxia (HH), and normobaric normoxia (NN). Markers of sympathoadrenal and adrenocortical function [plasma normetanephrine (PNORMET), metanephrine (PMET), cortisol], myocardial injury [highly sensitive cardiac troponin T (hscTnT)], and function [N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)] were evaluated at rest and with exercise under NN, at 3375 m in the Alps (GHA) and at equivalent simulated altitude under NH and HH. Participants cycled for 2 h [15-min warm-up, 105 min at 55% Wmax (maximal workload)] with venous blood samples taken prior (T0), immediately following (T120) and 2-h post-exercise (T240). Exercise in the three hypoxic environments produced a similar pattern of response with the only difference between environments being in relation to PNORMET. Exercise in NN only induced a rise in PNORMET and PMET. Biochemical markers that reflect sympathoadrenal, adrenocortical, and myocardial responses to physiological stress demonstrate significant differences in the response to exercise under conditions of normoxia versus hypoxia, while NH and HH appear to induce broadly similar responses to GHA and may, therefore, be reasonable surrogates.

  20. Hypoxia: adapting to high altitude by mutating EPAS-1, the gene encoding HIF-2α.

    PubMed

    van Patot, Martha C Tissot; Gassmann, Max

    2011-01-01

    Living at high altitude is demanding and thus drives adaptational mechanisms. The Tibetan population has had a longer evolutionary period to adapt to high altitude than other mountain populations such as Andeans. As a result, some Tibetans living at high altitudes do not show markedly elevated red blood cell production as compared to South American high altitude natives such as Quechuas or Aymaras, thereby avoiding high blood viscosity creating cardiovascular risk. Unexpectedly, the responsible mutation(s) reducing red blood cell production do not involve either the gene encoding the blood hormone erythropoietin (Epo), or the corresponding regulatory sequences flanking the Epo gene. Similarly, functional mutations in the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) gene that represents the oxygen-dependent subunit of the HIF-1 heterodimer, the latter being the main regulator of over 100 hypoxia-inducible genes, have not been described so far. It was not until very recently that three independent groups showed that the gene encoding HIF-2α, EPAS-1 (Wenger et al. 1997), represents a key gene mutated in Tibetan populations adapted to living at high altitudes (Beall et al. 2010 , Yi et al. 2010 , Simonson et al. 2010). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors were first identified by the description of HIF-1 (Semenza et al. 1991 , 1992), which was subsequently found to enhance transcription of multiple genes that encode proteins necessary for rescuing from hypoxic exposure, including erythropoietic, angiogenic and glycolytic proteins. Then HIF-2 was identified (Ema et al. 1997 ; Flamme et al. 1997 ; Hogenesch et al. 1997 ; and Tian et al. 1997) and although it is highly similar to HIF-1 and has the potential to bind (Camenisch et al. 2001) and mediate (Mole et al. 2009) many of the same genes as HIF-1, its biological actions in response to hypoxia are distinct from those of HIF-1 (reviewed by Loboda et al. 2010). By now, several of these HIF-2 mediated

  1. Progress in Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Hypoxia-Related Diseases and High-Altitude Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiqi; Luo, Gang; Ni, Bing

    2017-06-01

    Human migration, influenced by social conflict and natural disasters as well as global climate change, has become recognized as a major "planetary force." It has also brought to the forefront, new specialties of integrative biology-such as high-altitude medicine-and the impact of hitherto understudied environmental factors on human pathophysiology in these new geographical settings. For people migrating to or living in high-altitude regions, environmental hypoxia is a primary challenge. Decreased partial pressure of oxygen in environmental air, caused by lower barometric pressure, puts living organisms in a hypoxic state. When there is a serious inability to adapt, death may ensue. Research efforts over the past few years have applied mass spectrometry-based proteomics analyses to uncover the mechanisms of hypoxia-related high-altitude pathophysiology. The differential proteomic profiles in plasma and tissues under high-altitude hypoxia conditions, as compared with sea level controls, and the multitudinous hypoxia-specific proteins identified elucidate mechanisms underlying high-altitude hypoxia acclimatization and diseases, and provide a foundation for development of new therapeutic, prophylactic, and diagnostic approaches. In this expert review and innovation analysis, we highlight the current proteomics findings on high-altitude hypoxia, and suggest paths forward toward effective interventions to address this key challenge in high-altitude medicine.

  2. Acclimation to hypoxia increases carbohydrate use during exercise in high-altitude deer mice.

    PubMed

    Lau, Daphne S; Connaty, Alex D; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Wall, Nastashya; Cheviron, Zachary A; Storz, Jay F; Scott, Graham R; McClelland, Grant B

    2017-03-01

    The low O2 experienced at high altitude is a significant challenge to effective aerobic locomotion, as it requires sustained tissue O2 delivery in addition to the appropriate allocation of metabolic substrates. Here, we tested whether high- and low-altitude deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) have evolved different acclimation responses to hypoxia with respect to muscle metabolism and fuel use during submaximal exercise. Using F1 generation high- and low-altitude deer mice that were born and raised in common conditions, we assessed 1) fuel use during exercise, 2) metabolic enzyme activities, and 3) gene expression for key transporters and enzymes in the gastrocnemius. After hypoxia acclimation, highland mice showed a significant increase in carbohydrate oxidation and higher relative reliance on this fuel during exercise at 75% maximal O2 consumption. Compared with lowland mice, highland mice had consistently higher activities of oxidative and fatty acid oxidation enzymes in the gastrocnemius. In contrast, only after hypoxia acclimation did activities of hexokinase increase significantly in the muscle of highland mice to levels greater than lowland mice. Highland mice also responded to acclimation with increases in muscle gene expression for hexokinase 1 and 2 genes, whereas both populations increased mRNA expression for glucose transporters. Changes in skeletal muscle with acclimation suggest that highland mice had an increased capacity for the uptake and oxidation of circulatory glucose. Our results demonstrate that highland mice have evolved a distinct mode of hypoxia acclimation that involves an increase in carbohydrate use during exercise. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Thoracic skeletal morphology and high-altitude hypoxia in Andean prehistory.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Karen J

    2007-09-01

    Living humans from the highland Andes exhibit antero-posteriorly and medio-laterally enlarged chests in response to high-altitude hypoxia. This study hypothesizes that morphological responses to high-altitude hypoxia should also be evident in pre-Contact Andean groups. Thoracic skeletal morphology in four groups of human skeletons (N = 347) are compared: two groups from coastal regions (Ancón, Peru, n = 79 and Arica, Chile, n = 123) and two groups from high altitudes (San Pedro de Atacama, Chile, n = 102 and Machu Picchu and Cuzco, Peru, n = 43). Osteometric variables that represent proportions of chest width and depth include sternal and clavicular lengths and breadths and rib length, curvature, and area. Each variable was measured relative to body size, transformed into logarithmic indices, and compared across sex-specific groups using ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests. Atacama highlanders have the largest sternal and clavicular proportions and ribs with the greatest area and least amount of curvature, features that suggest an antero-posteriorly deep and mediolaterally wide thoracic skeleton. Ancón lowlanders exhibit proportions indicating narrower and shallower chests. Machu Picchu and Cuzco males cluster with the other highland group in rib curvature and area at the superior levels of the thorax, whereas chest proportions in Machu Picchu and Cuzco females resemble those of lowlanders. The variation in Machu Picchu and Cuzco males and females is interpreted as the result of population migrations. The presence of morphological traits indicative of enlarged chests in some highland individuals suggests that high-altitude hypoxia was an environmental stressor shaping the biology of highland Andean groups during the pre-Contact period. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Exhaled nitric oxide decreases upon acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel E; Beall, Cynthia M; Strohl, Kingman P; Mills, Phoebe S

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator that plays a role in blood flow and oxygen delivery. Acute hypoxia down regulates NO synthesis, a response that may exacerbate hypoxic stress by decreasing blood flow. This study was designed to test the hypotheses that pulmonary NO decreases upon acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia and that relatively low levels of NO at altitude are associated with greater stress as reflected in more symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS). A sample of 47 healthy, adult, nonsmoking, sea-level residents provided measurements at sea level, at 2,800 m, and at 0-, 2-, and 3-h exposure times at 4,200 m altitude on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Measurements were made of exhaled NO, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, heart rate, and reported symptoms of AMS. The partial pressure of NO concentration in exhaled breath decreased significantly from a sea level mean of 4.2 nmHg to 3.8 nmHg at 2,800 m and 3.4 nmHg at 4,200 m. NO concentration in exhaled breath did not change significantly over a 3-h exposure at 4,200 m and recovered to pre-exposure baseline upon return to sea level. There was no significant association between the level of NO exhaled and the number of self-reported symptoms of AMS during this brief exposure. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 18:196-202, 2006. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Using a new plateau hyperbaric chamber to alleviate high altitude hypoxia: Rabbit and human studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Ding, Meng-Jiang; Cai, Tian-Cai; Fan, Hao-Jun; Gao, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Jian-Peng

    2017-04-19

    To validate the effects of the new plateau hyperbaric chamber on alleviating high altitude hypoxia on Mount Kun Lun. A prospective, controlled study of rabbits and adult volunteers was conducted at altitudes of 355, 2880 and 4532m. We obtained arterial blood samples from rabbits and volunteers before and after hyperbaric treatment. The respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood pressure (BP) of adult volunteers were monitored during hyperbaric treatment. The mean PaO2 levels of experimental group rabbits and volunteers increased significantly after 60min of hyperbaric treatment at 350, 2880 and 4532m. The mean PaCO2 and pH levels of rabbits were not significant different before and after hyperbaric treatment at each altitude. The mean PaCO2 and pH levels were not significant different at 355m in the human study. However, at 2880 and 4532m, pH fell with increasing PaCO2 levels in humans before and after hyperbaric treatment. The new multiplace plateau hyperbaric chamber may be used to alleviate plateau hypoxia by increasing patient PaO2. However, its value in treating AMS must be confirmed in field conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A Four-Way Comparison of Cardiac Function with Normobaric Normoxia, Normobaric Hypoxia, Hypobaric Hypoxia and Genuine High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Boos, Christopher John; O’Hara, John Paul; Mellor, Adrian; Hodkinson, Peter David; Tsakirides, Costas; Reeve, Nicola; Gallagher, Liam; Green, Nicholas Donald Charles; Woods, David Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been considerable debate as to whether different modalities of simulated hypoxia induce similar cardiac responses. Materials and Methods This was a prospective observational study of 14 healthy subjects aged 22–35 years. Echocardiography was performed at rest and at 15 and 120 minutes following two hours exercise under normobaric normoxia (NN) and under similar PiO2 following genuine high altitude (GHA) at 3,375m, normobaric hypoxia (NH) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to simulate the equivalent hypoxic stimulus to GHA. Results All 14 subjects completed the experiment at GHA, 11 at NN, 12 under NH, and 6 under HH. The four groups were similar in age, sex and baseline demographics. At baseline rest right ventricular (RV) systolic pressure (RVSP, p = 0.0002), pulmonary vascular resistance (p = 0.0002) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) scores were higher and the SpO2 lower (p<0.0001) among all three hypoxic groups (GHA, NH and HH) compared with NN. At both 15 minutes and 120 minutes post exercise, AMS scores, Cardiac output, septal S’, lateral S’, tricuspid S’ and A’ velocities and RVSP were higher and SpO2 lower with all forms of hypoxia compared with NN. On post-test analysis, among the three hypoxia groups, SpO2 was lower at baseline and 15 minutes post exercise with GHA (89.3±3.4% and 89.3±2.2%) and HH (89.0±3.1 and (89.8±5.0) compared with NH (92.9±1.7 and 93.6±2.5%). The RV Myocardial Performance (Tei) Index and RVSP were significantly higher with HH than NH at 15 and 120 minutes post exercise respectively and tricuspid A’ was higher with GHA compared with NH at 15 minutes post exercise. Conclusions GHA, NH and HH produce similar cardiac adaptations over short duration rest despite lower SpO2 levels with GHA and HH compared with NH. Notable differences emerge following exercise in SpO2, RVSP and RV cardiac function. PMID:27100313

  7. A Four-Way Comparison of Cardiac Function with Normobaric Normoxia, Normobaric Hypoxia, Hypobaric Hypoxia and Genuine High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Boos, Christopher John; O'Hara, John Paul; Mellor, Adrian; Hodkinson, Peter David; Tsakirides, Costas; Reeve, Nicola; Gallagher, Liam; Green, Nicholas Donald Charles; Woods, David Richard

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether different modalities of simulated hypoxia induce similar cardiac responses. This was a prospective observational study of 14 healthy subjects aged 22-35 years. Echocardiography was performed at rest and at 15 and 120 minutes following two hours exercise under normobaric normoxia (NN) and under similar PiO2 following genuine high altitude (GHA) at 3,375 m, normobaric hypoxia (NH) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to simulate the equivalent hypoxic stimulus to GHA. All 14 subjects completed the experiment at GHA, 11 at NN, 12 under NH, and 6 under HH. The four groups were similar in age, sex and baseline demographics. At baseline rest right ventricular (RV) systolic pressure (RVSP, p = 0.0002), pulmonary vascular resistance (p = 0.0002) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) scores were higher and the SpO2 lower (p<0.0001) among all three hypoxic groups (GHA, NH and HH) compared with NN. At both 15 minutes and 120 minutes post exercise, AMS scores, Cardiac output, septal S', lateral S', tricuspid S' and A' velocities and RVSP were higher and SpO2 lower with all forms of hypoxia compared with NN. On post-test analysis, among the three hypoxia groups, SpO2 was lower at baseline and 15 minutes post exercise with GHA (89.3±3.4% and 89.3±2.2%) and HH (89.0±3.1 and (89.8±5.0) compared with NH (92.9±1.7 and 93.6±2.5%). The RV Myocardial Performance (Tei) Index and RVSP were significantly higher with HH than NH at 15 and 120 minutes post exercise respectively and tricuspid A' was higher with GHA compared with NH at 15 minutes post exercise. GHA, NH and HH produce similar cardiac adaptations over short duration rest despite lower SpO2 levels with GHA and HH compared with NH. Notable differences emerge following exercise in SpO2, RVSP and RV cardiac function.

  8. High altitude hypoxia as a factor that promotes tibial growth plate development in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shucheng; Zhang, Lihong; Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Lan, Yanfang; Mehmood, Khalid; Zhang, Hui; Qiu, Gang; Nabi, Fazul; Yao, Wangyuan; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiakui

    2017-01-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is one of the most common problems in the poultry industry and leads to lameness by affecting the proximal growth plate of the tibia. However, due to the unique environmental and geographical conditions of Tibet, no case of TD has been reported in Tibetan chickens (TBCs). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of high altitude hypoxia on blood parameters and tibial growth plate development in chickens using the complete blood count, morphology, and histological examination. The results of this study showed an undesirable impact on the overall performance, body weight, and mortality of Arbor Acres chickens (AACs) exposed to a high altitude hypoxic environment. However, AACs raised under hypoxic conditions showed an elevated number of red blood cells (RBCs) and an increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit values on day 14 compared to the hypobaric normoxia group. Notably, the morphology and histology analyses showed that the size of tibial growth plates in AACs was enlarged and that the blood vessel density was also higher after exposure to the hypoxic environment for 14 days, while no such change was observed in TBCs. Altogether, our results revealed that the hypoxic environment has a potentially new role in increasing the blood vessel density of proximal tibial growth plates to strengthen and enhance the size of the growth plates, which may provide new insights for the therapeutic manipulation of hypoxia in poultry TD.

  9. High altitude hypoxia as a factor that promotes tibial growth plate development in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shucheng; Zhang, Lihong; Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Lan, Yanfang; Mehmood, Khalid; Zhang, Hui; Qiu, Gang; Nabi, Fazul; Yao, Wangyuan; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiakui

    2017-01-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is one of the most common problems in the poultry industry and leads to lameness by affecting the proximal growth plate of the tibia. However, due to the unique environmental and geographical conditions of Tibet, no case of TD has been reported in Tibetan chickens (TBCs). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of high altitude hypoxia on blood parameters and tibial growth plate development in chickens using the complete blood count, morphology, and histological examination. The results of this study showed an undesirable impact on the overall performance, body weight, and mortality of Arbor Acres chickens (AACs) exposed to a high altitude hypoxic environment. However, AACs raised under hypoxic conditions showed an elevated number of red blood cells (RBCs) and an increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit values on day 14 compared to the hypobaric normoxia group. Notably, the morphology and histology analyses showed that the size of tibial growth plates in AACs was enlarged and that the blood vessel density was also higher after exposure to the hypoxic environment for 14 days, while no such change was observed in TBCs. Altogether, our results revealed that the hypoxic environment has a potentially new role in increasing the blood vessel density of proximal tibial growth plates to strengthen and enhance the size of the growth plates, which may provide new insights for the therapeutic manipulation of hypoxia in poultry TD. PMID:28282429

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes erythrocyte glycolysis and oxygen release for adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Song, Anren; Wu, Hongyu; Liu, Hong; Adebiyi, Morayo; Huang, Aji; Wen, Yuan E.; Bogdanov, Mikhail V.; Vila, Alejandro; O'Brien, John; Kellems, Rodney E.; Dowhan, William; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Safo, Martin; Hansen, Kirk C.; Roach, Robert C.; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive signalling lipid highly enriched in mature erythrocytes, with unknown functions pertaining to erythrocyte physiology. Here by employing nonbiased high-throughput metabolomic profiling, we show that erythrocyte S1P levels rapidly increase in 21 healthy lowland volunteers at 5,260 m altitude on day 1 and continue increasing to 16 days with concurrently elevated erythrocyte sphingonisne kinase 1 (Sphk1) activity and haemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O2) release capacity. Mouse genetic studies show that elevated erythrocyte Sphk1-induced S1P protects against tissue hypoxia by inducing O2 release. Mechanistically, we show that intracellular S1P promotes deoxygenated Hb anchoring to the membrane, enhances the release of membrane-bound glycolytic enzymes to the cytosol, induces glycolysis and thus the production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), an erythrocyte-specific glycolytic intermediate, which facilitates O2 release. Altogether, we reveal S1P as an intracellular hypoxia-responsive biolipid promoting erythrocyte glycolysis, O2 delivery and thus new therapeutic opportunities to counteract tissue hypoxia. PMID:27417539

  11. A journey between high altitude hypoxia and critical patient hypoxia: What can it teach us about compression and the management of critical disease?

    PubMed

    Avellanas Chavala, M L

    2017-09-14

    High altitude sickness (hypobaric hypoxia) is a form of cellular hypoxia similar to that suffered by critically ill patients. The study of mountaineers exposed to extreme hypoxia offers the advantage of involving a relatively homogeneous and healthy population compared to those typically found in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), which are heterogeneous and generally less healthy. Knowledge of altitude physiology and pathology allows us to understanding how hypoxia affects critical patients. Comparable changes in mitochondrial biogenesis between both groups may reflect similar adaptive responses and suggest therapeutic interventions based on the protection or stimulation of such mitochondrial biogenesis. Predominance of the homozygous insertion (II) allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene is present in both individuals who perform successful ascensions without oxygen above 8000 m and in critical patients who overcome certain disease conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Intestinal Barrier Function in Rats Exposed to High Altitude Hypoxia Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Xu, Cuicui; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining; Chao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the role of vitamin E in the high altitude hypoxia-induced damage to the intestinal barrier in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (Control), high altitude hypoxia (HH), and high altitude hypoxia+vitamin E (250 mg/kg BW*d) (HV) groups. After the third day, the HH and HV groups were placed in a hypobaric chamber at a stimulated elevation of 7000 m for 5 days. The rats in the HV group were given vitamin E by gavage daily for 8 days. The other rats were given equal volume saline. The results showed that high altitude hypoxia caused the enlargement of heart, liver, lung and kidney, and intestinal villi damage. Supplementation with vitamin E significantly alleviated hypoxia-caused damage to the main organs including intestine, increased the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p< 0.05), diamino oxidase (DAO) (p< 0.01) levels, and decreased the serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) (p< 0.01), interleukin-4 (IL-4) (p<0.001), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) (p<0.01) and malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.001), and decreased the serum erythropoietin (EPO) activity (p<0.05). Administration of vitamin E significantly increased the S-IgA (p<0.001) in ileum and significantly improved the expression levels of occludin and IκBα, and decreased the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and 2 alpha (HIF-1α and HIF-2α), Toll-like receptors (TLR4), P-IκBα and nuclear factor-κB p65(NF-κB P65) in ileum compared to the HH group. This study suggested that vitamin E protectis from intestinal injury caused by high altitude hypoxia environment. These effects may be related to the HIF and TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25177163

  13. Dark Adaptation at High Altitude: An Unexpected Pupillary Response to Chronic Hypoxia in Andean Highlanders.

    PubMed

    Healy, Katherine; Labrique, Alain B; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Danz, David; Davila-Roman, Victor G; Huicho, Luis; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Checkley, William

    2016-09-01

    Healy, Katherine, Alain B. Labrique, J. Jaime Miranda, Robert H. Gilman, David Danz, Victor G. Davila-Roman, Luis Huicho, Fabiola León-Velarde, and William Checkley. Dark adaptation at high altitude: an unexpected pupillary response to chronic hypoxia in Andean highlanders. High Alt Med Biol. 17:208-213, 2016.-Chronic mountain sickness is a maladaptive response to high altitude (>2500 m above sea level) and is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis and hypoxemia resulting from long-term hypobaric hypoxia. There is no known early predictor of chronic mountain sickness and the diagnosis is based on the presence of excessive erythrocytosis and clinical features. Impaired dark adaptation, or an inability to visually adjust from high- to low-light settings, occurs in response to mild hypoxia and may serve as an early predictor of hypoxemia and chronic mountain sickness. We aimed to evaluate the association between pupillary response assessed by dark adaptometry and daytime hypoxemia in resident Andean highlanders aged ≥35 years living in Puno, Peru. Oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2) was recorded using a handheld pulse oximeter. Dark adaptation was quantitatively assessed as the magnitude of pupillary contraction to light stimuli of varying intensities (-2.9 to 0.1 log-cd/m(2)) using a portable dark adaptometer. Individual- and stimulus-specific multilevel analyses were conducted using mixed-effect models to elicit the relationship between SpO2 and pupillary responsiveness. Among 93 participants, mean age was 54.9 ± 11.0 years, 48% were male, 44% were night blind, and mean SpO2 was 89.3% ± 3.4%. The magnitude of pupillary contraction was greater with lower SpO2 (p < 0.01), and this dose relationship remained significant in multiple variable analyses (p = 0.047). Pupillary responsiveness to light stimuli under dark-adapted conditions was exaggerated with hypoxemia and may serve as an early predictor of chronic mountain sickness. This unexpected

  14. Altitude matters: differences in cardiovascular and respiratory responses to hypoxia in bar-headed geese reared at high and low altitudes.

    PubMed

    Lague, Sabine L; Chua, Beverly; Farrell, Anthony P; Wang, Yuxiang; Milsom, William K

    2016-07-01

    Bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) fly at high altitudes during their migration across the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau. However, we know relatively little about whether rearing at high altitude (i.e. phenotypic plasticity) facilitates this impressive feat because most of what is known about their physiology comes from studies performed at sea level. To provide this information, a comprehensive analysis of metabolic, cardiovascular and ventilatory responses to progressive decreases in the equivalent fractional composition of inspired oxygen (FiO2 : 0.21, 0.12, 0.09, 0.07 and 0.05) was made on bar-headed geese reared at either high altitude (3200 m) or low altitude (0 m) and on barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis), a low-altitude migrating species, reared at low altitude (0 m). Bar-headed geese reared at high altitude exhibited lower metabolic rates and a modestly increased hypoxic ventilatory response compared with low-altitude-reared bar-headed geese. Although the in vivo oxygen equilibrium curves and blood-oxygen carrying capacity did not differ between the two bar-headed goose study groups, the blood-oxygen carrying capacity was higher than that of barnacle geese. Resting cardiac output also did not differ between groups and increased at least twofold during progressive hypoxia, initially as a result of increases in stroke volume. However, cardiac output increased at a higher FiO2  threshold in bar-headed geese raised at high altitude. Thus, bar-headed geese reared at high altitude exhibited a reduced oxygen demand at rest and a modest but significant increase in oxygen uptake and delivery during progressive hypoxia compared with bar-headed geese reared at low altitude. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Glucose intolerance associated with hypoxia in people living at high altitudes in the Tibetan highland

    PubMed Central

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Sakamoto, Ryota; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Ishikawa, Motonao; Suwa, Kuniaki; Imai, Hissei; Chen, Wenling; Kato, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yoriko; Fujisawa, Michiko; Wada, Taizo; Wang, Hongxin; Dai, Qingxiang; Xu, Huining; Qiao, Haisheng; Ge, Ri-Li; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Kosaka, Yasuyuki; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ando, Kazuo; Inamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shinya; Ishine, Masayuki; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To clarify the association between glucose intolerance and high altitudes (2900–4800 m) in a hypoxic environment in Tibetan highlanders and to verify the hypothesis that high altitude dwelling increases vulnerability to diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerated by lifestyle change or ageing. Design Cross-sectional epidemiological study on Tibetan highlanders. Participants We enrolled 1258 participants aged 40–87 years. The rural population comprised farmers in Domkhar (altitude 2900–3800 m) and nomads in Haiyan (3000–3100 m), Ryuho (4400 m) and Changthang (4300–4800 m). Urban area participants were from Leh (3300 m) and Jiegu (3700 m). Main outcome measure Participants were classified into six glucose tolerance-based groups: DM, intermediate hyperglycaemia (IHG), normoglycaemia (NG), fasting DM, fasting IHG and fasting NG. Prevalence of glucose intolerance was compared in farmers, nomads and urban dwellers. Effects of dwelling at high altitude or hypoxia on glucose intolerance were analysed with the confounding factors of age, sex, obesity, lipids, haemoglobin, hypertension and lifestyle, using multiple logistic regression. Results The prevalence of DM (fasting DM)/IHG (fasting IHG) was 8.9% (6.5%)/25.1% (12.7%), respectively, in all participants. This prevalence was higher in urban dwellers (9.5% (7.1%)/28.5% (11.7%)) and in farmers (8.5% (6.1%)/28.5% (18.3%)) compared with nomads (8.2% (5.7%)/15.7% (9.7%)) (p=0.0140/0.0001). Dwelling at high altitude was significantly associated with fasting IHG+fasting DM/fasting DM (ORs for >4500 and 3500–4499 m were 3.59/4.36 and 2.07/1.76 vs <3500 m, respectively). After adjusting for lifestyle change, hypoxaemia and polycythaemia were closely associated with glucose intolerance. Conclusions Socioeconomic factors, hypoxaemia and the effects of altitudes >3500 m play a major role in the high prevalence of glucose intolerance in highlanders. Tibetan highlanders may be vulnerable to glucose

  16. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600–4,100 m) residents aged 18–25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  17. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-08-15

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600-4,100 m) residents aged 18-25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. [Protective effect of salidroside against high altitude hypoxia-induced brain injury in rats].

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoru; Zhang, Xiangnan; Li, Dan; Li, Bin; Wang, Jiye; Meng, Shanshan; Luo, Wenjing; Zhang, Wenbin

    2015-10-01

    To observe the protective effect of salidroside against brain injury in rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia, and investigate the molecular mechanism of salidroside in the prevention of hypobaric hypoxia-induced brain injury. Rats were placed in experiment module simulating 6000 m altitude to establish acute hypobaric hypoxia-induced brain injury models. Their respiratory frequency was observed and recorded. Cell apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was detected by TUNEL assay; the expressions of Ras homolog family member A (RhoA), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) were detected by Western blotting. After acute exposure to 6000 m altitude, the respiratory frequency of the rats increased remarkably. The simulation of hypobaric hypoxia induced cell apoptosis in hippocampal DG region, and salidroside intervention inhibited the process of cell apoptosis. The expressions of RhoA, p-ERK, p-JNK decreased after hypobaric hypoxia exposure. Salidroside intervention reversed RhoA expression and raised the levels of p-ERK and p-JNK. Acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia can induce cell apoptosis in rat hippocampal DG, and salidroside can protect the cells from the exposure-induced apoptosis.

  19. High-altitude ancestry and hypoxia acclimation have distinct effects on exercise capacity and muscle phenotype in deer mice.

    PubMed

    Lui, Mikaela A; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Patel, Paras; Connaty, Alex D; Ivy, Catherine M; Cheviron, Zachary A; Storz, Jay F; McClelland, Grant B; Scott, Graham R

    2015-05-01

    The hypoxic and cold environment at high altitudes requires that small mammals sustain high rates of O2 transport for exercise and thermogenesis while facing a diminished O2 availability. We used laboratory-born and -raised deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) from highland and lowland populations to determine the interactive effects of ancestry and hypoxia acclimation on exercise performance. Maximal O₂consumption (V̇o(2max)) during exercise in hypoxia increased after hypoxia acclimation (equivalent to the hypoxia at ∼4,300 m elevation for 6-8 wk) and was consistently greater in highlanders than in lowlanders. V̇o(2max) during exercise in normoxia was not affected by ancestry or acclimation. Highlanders also had consistently greater capillarity, oxidative fiber density, and maximal activities of oxidative enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase) in the gastrocnemius muscle, lower lactate dehydrogenase activity in the gastrocnemius, and greater cytochrome c oxidase activity in the diaphragm. Hypoxia acclimation did not affect any of these muscle traits. The unique gastrocnemius phenotype of highlanders was associated with higher mRNA and protein abundances of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA) transcript abundance was lower in highlanders, and hypoxia acclimation reduced the expression of numerous genes that regulate angiogenesis and energy metabolism, in contrast to the observed population differences in muscle phenotype. Lowlanders exhibited greater increases in blood hemoglobin content, hematocrit, and wet lung mass (but not dry lung mass) than highlanders after hypoxia acclimation. Genotypic adaptation to high altitude, therefore, improves exercise performance in hypoxia by mechanisms that are at least partially distinct from those underlying hypoxia acclimation.

  20. High-altitude ancestry and hypoxia acclimation have distinct effects on exercise capacity and muscle phenotype in deer mice

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Mikaela A.; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Patel, Paras; Connaty, Alex D.; Ivy, Catherine M.; Cheviron, Zachary A.; Storz, Jay F.; McClelland, Grant B.

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxic and cold environment at high altitudes requires that small mammals sustain high rates of O2 transport for exercise and thermogenesis while facing a diminished O2 availability. We used laboratory-born and -raised deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) from highland and lowland populations to determine the interactive effects of ancestry and hypoxia acclimation on exercise performance. Maximal O2 consumption (V̇o2max) during exercise in hypoxia increased after hypoxia acclimation (equivalent to the hypoxia at ∼4,300 m elevation for 6–8 wk) and was consistently greater in highlanders than in lowlanders. V̇o2max during exercise in normoxia was not affected by ancestry or acclimation. Highlanders also had consistently greater capillarity, oxidative fiber density, and maximal activities of oxidative enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase) in the gastrocnemius muscle, lower lactate dehydrogenase activity in the gastrocnemius, and greater cytochrome c oxidase activity in the diaphragm. Hypoxia acclimation did not affect any of these muscle traits. The unique gastrocnemius phenotype of highlanders was associated with higher mRNA and protein abundances of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA) transcript abundance was lower in highlanders, and hypoxia acclimation reduced the expression of numerous genes that regulate angiogenesis and energy metabolism, in contrast to the observed population differences in muscle phenotype. Lowlanders exhibited greater increases in blood hemoglobin content, hematocrit, and wet lung mass (but not dry lung mass) than highlanders after hypoxia acclimation. Genotypic adaptation to high altitude, therefore, improves exercise performance in hypoxia by mechanisms that are at least partially distinct from those underlying hypoxia acclimation. PMID:25695288

  1. Down-Regulation of EPAS1 Transcription and Genetic Adaptation of Tibetans to High-Altitude Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Cui, Chaoying; He, Yaoxi; Ouzhuluobu; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Qu; Bianbazhuoma; Yang, Lixin; He, Yibo; Xiang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Bhandari, Sushil; Shi, Peng; Yangla; Dejiquzong; Baimakangzhuo; Duojizhuoma; Pan, Yongyue; Cirenyangji; Baimayangji; Gonggalanzi; Bai, Caijuan; Bianba; Basang; Ciwangsangbu; Xu, Shuhua; Chen, Hua; Liu, Shiming; Wu, Tianyi; Qi, Xuebin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tibetans are well adapted to the hypoxic environments at high altitude, yet the molecular mechanism of this adaptation remains elusive. We reported comprehensive genetic and functional analyses of EPAS1, a gene encoding hypoxia inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) with the strongest signal of selection in previous genome-wide scans of Tibetans. We showed that the Tibetan-enriched EPAS1 variants down-regulate expression in human umbilical endothelial cells and placentas. Heterozygous EPAS1 knockout mice display blunted physiological responses to chronic hypoxia, mirroring the situation in Tibetans. Furthermore, we found that the Tibetan version of EPAS1 is not only associated with the relatively low hemoglobin level as a polycythemia protectant, but also is associated with a low pulmonary vasoconstriction response in Tibetans. We propose that the down-regulation of EPAS1 contributes to the molecular basis of Tibetans’ adaption to high-altitude hypoxia. PMID:28096303

  2. Chronic hypoxia, physical exercise and PSA: correlation during high-altitude trekking (2004 K2 expedition).

    PubMed

    Verratti, Vittore; Di Giulio, Camillo; Di Francesco, Simona; Berardinelli, Francesco; Pellicciotta, Mario; Gidaro, Stefano; Zezza, Andrea; Tenaglia, Raffaele

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of physical exercise on PSA serum levels and the diagnostic validity of PSA in the screening of prostate cancer in subjects undergoing physical exercise during chronic hypoxia. The study was performed during trekking between 3,200 and 5,600 meters of altitude on K2 mountain for 26 days. Mean serum PSA values before and after exposure did not show significant difference due to physical exercise. These data indicate that physical exercise or mountain hypoxia do not affect the diagnostic validity of PSA.

  3. HIF2A Variants Were Associated with Different Levels of High-Altitude Hypoxia among Native Tibetans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Yang, La; Liu, Lan; Cui, Chaoying; Lanzi, Gongga; Yuzhen, Nima; Duo, Ji; Zheng, Hongxiang; Wang, Yi; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors, including HIF1A and HIF2A, play central roles in response to high-altitude hypoxia and genetic variants of HIF1A or HIF2A were associated with high-altitude sickness or adaptation. However, it remains to determine whether they are associated with tolerance to different levels of high-altitude selection pressure among native Tibetans. We recruited 189 Tibetan subjects living at 2,700 meters (Low level of high altitude, LHA), 197 at 3,200 meters (Middle level of high altitude of high altitude, MHA), 249 at 3,700 meters (High level of high altitude, HHA) and 269 at 4,700 meters (Very high level of high altitude, VHA) and performed association analysis of twelve tSNPs (tagging SNPs) in HIF1A and HIF2A with high-altitude. We found (1) a increasing trend of HIF2A rs5621780-C(18.4%, 15.9%, 32.8% and 31.1%, respectively, in LHA, MHA, HHA and VHA)(P = 3.56E-9); (2) increasing trends of HIF2A rs6756667-A(68.7%, 73.4%, 79.9% and 89.6%), rs7589621- G(74.6%, 77.9%, 83.7%, and 92.1%) and rs1868092-A(64.1%, 67.3%, 75.1% and 84.4%) (P = 3.56E-9, 4.68E-16, 1.17E-13 and 7.09E-14, respectively); (3) a increasing trend of haplotype AG (68.7%, 73.1%, 79.9% and 89.6%) (P = 2.22E-7) which was constructed by rs6756667 and rs7589621; (4) a strong linear correlation between major alleles of rs6756667-A (R2 = 0.997, P = 0.002), rs7589621-G (R2 = 0.994, P = 0.003), rs1868092-A (R2 = 0.985, P = 0.008) and altitude by linear correlation test. The associations between HIF2A variants and different level of high altitude support that extremely high-altitude hypoxia challenge imposes selective effects on HIF2A variants among native Tibetans. PMID:26368009

  4. Ventilatory responses to hypoxia and high altitude during sleep in Aconcagua climbers.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Eric M; Stepanek, Jan; Bishop, Sheryl L; Johnson, Bruce D

    2007-01-01

    We examined the changes in ventilation during sleep at high altitude using the LifeShirt monitoring system on 2 climbers who were attempting to summit Mount Aconcagua (6956 m). Prior to the summit attempt, we measured cardiovascular and pulmonary function at 401 m (Rochester, MN) and gathered respiratory and cardiovascular data during sleep using the LifeShirt monitoring system with exposure to normobaric normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (simulated 4300 m). We then monitored the ventilatory response during sleep at 3 altitudes (4100 m, 4900 m, and 5900 m). During normoxic sleep, subjects had normal oxygen saturation (O(2sat)), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (V(T)) and minute ventilation (V(E)), and exhibited no periodic breathing (O(2sat) = 100 +/- 2%, HR = 67 +/- 1 beats/min, RR = 16 +/- 3 breaths/min, V(T) = 516 +/- 49 mL, and V(E) = 9 +/- 1 L/min, mean +/- SD). Sleep during simulated 4300 m caused a reduction in O(2sat), an increase in HR, RR, V(T), and V(E), and induced periodic breathing in both climbers (O(2sat) = 79 +/- 4%, HR = 72 +/- 14 beats/min, RR = 20 +/- 3 breaths/min, V(T) = 701 +/- 180 mL, and V(E) = 14 +/- 3 L/min). All 3 levels of altitude had profound effects on O(2sat), HR, and the ventilatory strategy during sleep (O(2sat) = 79 +/- 2, 70 +/- 8, 60 +/- 2%; HR = 70 +/- 12, 76 +/- 6, 80 +/- 3 beats/min; RR = 17 +/- 6, 18 +/- 4, 20 +/- 6 breaths/min; V(T) = 763 +/- 300, 771 +/- 152, 1145 +/- 123 mL; and V(E) = 13 +/- 1, 14 +/- 0, 22 +/- 4 L/min; for 4100 m, 4900 m, and 5900 m, respectively). There were strong negative correlations between O(2sat) and V(E) and ventilatory drive (V(T)/T(i), where T(i) is the inspiratory time) throughout the study. Interestingly, the changes in ventilatory response during simulated altitude and at comparable altitude on Aconcagua during the summit attempt were similar, suggesting reductions in FiO(2), rather than in pressure, alter this response.

  5. Regional differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity response to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Feddersen, Berend; Neupane, Pritam; Thanbichler, Florian; Hadolt, Irmgard; Sattelmeyer, Vera; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Waanders, Robb; Noachtar, Soheyl; Ausserer, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) may appear above 2,500 m altitude, if the time allowed for acclimatization is insufficient. As the mechanisms underlying brain adaptation to the hypobaric hypoxic environment are not fully understood, a prospective study was performed investigating neurophysiological changes by means of near infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalograpy (EEG), and transcranial doppler sonography at 100, 3,440 and 5,050 m above sea level in the Khumbu Himal, Nepal. Fourteen of the 26 mountaineers reaching 5,050 m altitude developed symptoms of AMS between 3,440 and 5,050 m altitude (Lake-Louise Score ⩾3). Their EEG frontal beta activity and occipital alpha activity increased between 100 and 3,440 m altitude, i.e., before symptoms appeared. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) increased in all mountaineers between 100 and 3,440 m altitude. During further ascent to 5,050 m altitude, mountaineers with AMS developed a further increase in CBFV in the MCA, whereas in all mountaineers CBFV decreased continuously with increasing altitude in the posterior cerebral arteries. These results indicate that hypobaric hypoxia causes different regional changes in CBFV despite similar electrophysiological changes. PMID:26082017

  6. [The intensity of respiration in pea and corn seedlings under high-altitude hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Astafurova, T P; Ageev, B G; Sapozhnikova, V A; Ponomarev, Iu N; Zaĭtseva, T A; Zotnikova, A P

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of CO2 gas-exchange and enzymatic activity of the respiratory metabolism of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings during hypobaric hypoxia simulating the altitude of 5000 m above the sea level was studied. In the 48-hour chamber experiment (total barometric pressure is 54 kPa, partial O2 pressure is 11 kPa), the relative intensity of CO2 emission was found to increase and be essentially higher for pea than maize. Periodic reactions with small upward spikes and time offset were recorded in the pea plants. The initial increase of CO2 emission velocity by maize rapidly reached the level of saturation and since then remained constant. High velocity of the main catabolic ways and carboxylating activity in maize seedlings was the effect of hypoxic stress. Utilisation of respiratory substrates by pea seedlings was blocked at the Krebs cycle level, whereas glycolysis and oxidizing pentose phosphate pathways were activated. Weak activity of the carboxylate system does not provide refixation of endogenous carbon dioxide, excessive quantities of which invade the environment.

  7. The effect of acute hypoxia at low altitude and acute normoxia at high altitude on performance during a 30-s Wingate test in children.

    PubMed

    Blonc, S; Falgairette, G; Bedu, M; Fellmann, N; Spielvogel, H; Coudert, J

    1994-10-01

    The effect of acute hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.137 +/- 0.001) at Low Altitude (LA: Clermont-Ferrand, 330 m) and acute normoxia (FIO2 = 0.306 +/- 0.006) at High Altitude (HA: La Paz, 3600 m) on performance during a 30-s Wingate test has been investigated in prepubertal children (Tanner stage 1). Twenty five boys (LA, n = 10; HA, n = 15) aged from 10.6 to 12.7 years performed two Wingate tests at random: at LA, one in normoxia (ambient air) and one in acute hypoxia and at HA, one in chronic hypoxia (ambient air) and one in acute normoxia. The subjects performed the two tests using the same calibrated cycle ergometer. Peak Power (PP), Mean Power (MP), O2 uptake during the 30 s (VO2) and blood lactate accumulation (delta [L]s) were measured. Compared to normoxia, acute hypoxia at LA did not alter PP (8.0 +/- 1.1 vs 7.9 +/- 1.3 W.kg-1 BW) and MP (6.1 +/- 0.7 vs 6.1 +/- 1.1 W.kg-1 BW). Similarly, compared to chronic hypoxia, acute normoxia at HA did not modify these parameters (PP: 7.4 +/- 1.5 vs 7.3 +/- 1.8; MP: 5.4 +/- 1.2 vs 5.5 +/- 1.1; W.kg-1 BW). VO2 and delta [L]s were neither significantly changed by acute hypoxia at LA (520 +/- 50 vs 550 +/- 60 ml O2; 5.3 +/- 1.7 vs 4.8 +/- 1.7 mmol.l-1) nor by acute normoxia at HA (530 +/- 110 vs 500 +/- 90 ml O2; 3.4 +/- 1.3 vs 3.3 +/- 1.0 mmol.l-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Human adaptation to the hypoxia of high altitude: the Tibetan paradigm from the pregenomic to the postgenomic era.

    PubMed

    Petousi, Nayia; Robbins, Peter A

    2014-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is one of the highest regions on Earth. Tibetan highlanders are adapted to life and reproduction in a hypoxic environment and possess a suite of distinctive physiological traits. Recent studies have identified genomic loci that have undergone natural selection in Tibetans. Two of these loci, EGLN1 and EPAS1, encode major components of the hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional system, which has a central role in oxygen sensing and coordinating an organism's response to hypoxia, as evidenced by studies in humans and mice. An association between genetic variants within these genes and hemoglobin concentration in Tibetans at high altitude was demonstrated in some of the studies (8, 80, 96). Nevertheless, the functional variants within these genes and the underlying mechanisms of action are still not known. Furthermore, there are a number of other possible phenotypic traits, besides hemoglobin concentration, upon which natural selection may have acted. Integration of studies at the genomic level with functional molecular studies and studies in systems physiology has the potential to provide further understanding of human evolution in response to high-altitude hypoxia. The Tibetan paradigm provides further insight on the role of the hypoxia-inducible factor system in humans in relation to oxygen homeostasis.

  9. Human adaptation to the hypoxia of high altitude: the Tibetan paradigm from the pregenomic to the postgenomic era

    PubMed Central

    Petousi, Nayia

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is one of the highest regions on Earth. Tibetan highlanders are adapted to life and reproduction in a hypoxic environment and possess a suite of distinctive physiological traits. Recent studies have identified genomic loci that have undergone natural selection in Tibetans. Two of these loci, EGLN1 and EPAS1, encode major components of the hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional system, which has a central role in oxygen sensing and coordinating an organism's response to hypoxia, as evidenced by studies in humans and mice. An association between genetic variants within these genes and hemoglobin concentration in Tibetans at high altitude was demonstrated in some of the studies (8, 80, 96). Nevertheless, the functional variants within these genes and the underlying mechanisms of action are still not known. Furthermore, there are a number of other possible phenotypic traits, besides hemoglobin concentration, upon which natural selection may have acted. Integration of studies at the genomic level with functional molecular studies and studies in systems physiology has the potential to provide further understanding of human evolution in response to high-altitude hypoxia. The Tibetan paradigm provides further insight on the role of the hypoxia-inducible factor system in humans in relation to oxygen homeostasis. PMID:24201705

  10. Down-Regulation of EPAS1 Transcription and Genetic Adaptation of Tibetans to High-Altitude Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi; Cui, Chaoying; He, Yaoxi; Ouzhuluobu; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Qu; Bianbazhuoma; Yang, Lixin; He, Yibo; Xiang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Bhandari, Sushil; Shi, Peng; Yangla; Dejiquzong; Baimakangzhuo; Duojizhuoma; Pan, Yongyue; Cirenyangji; Baimayangji; Gonggalanzi; Bai, Caijuan; Bianba; Basang; Ciwangsangbu; Xu, Shuhua; Chen, Hua; Liu, Shiming; Wu, Tianyi; Qi, Xuebin; Su, Bing

    2017-04-01

    Tibetans are well adapted to the hypoxic environments at high altitude, yet the molecular mechanism of this adaptation remains elusive. We reported comprehensive genetic and functional analyses of EPAS1, a gene encoding hypoxia inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) with the strongest signal of selection in previous genome-wide scans of Tibetans. We showed that the Tibetan-enriched EPAS1 variants down-regulate expression in human umbilical endothelial cells and placentas. Heterozygous EPAS1 knockout mice display blunted physiological responses to chronic hypoxia, mirroring the situation in Tibetans. Furthermore, we found that the Tibetan version of EPAS1 is not only associated with the relatively low hemoglobin level as a polycythemia protectant, but also is associated with a low pulmonary vasoconstriction response in Tibetans. We propose that the down-regulation of EPAS1 contributes to the molecular basis of Tibetans' adaption to high-altitude hypoxia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Predicting hypoxia in cystic fibrosis patients during exposure to high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Kamin, Wolfgang; Fleck, Birthe; Rose, Dirk-Mathias; Thews, Oliver; Thielen, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    For patients with cystic fibrosis (CF)-related partial respiratory insufficiency and reduced arterial oxygen tension at ground level, the mild hypobaric environment on commercial jet aircraft poses the risk of severe hypoxemia. Thus, physicians should be able to estimate the extent of in-flight hypoxia. To derive tools for estimating the expected drop in arterial oxygen partial pressure (paO(2)) and oxygen saturation (saO(2)) in young adult CF patients with mild to moderate airway obstruction during exposure to the hypobaric conditions aboard commercial aircraft and to test the predictive power of a hypobaric chamber simulation. Blood gases of 12 CF patients were measured at ground level, at two altitudes in a hypobaric chamber (2000 and 3000 m) and during two 3.5-h flights at cabin altitudes of 1855 m and 1700 m. The altitude dependence of paO(2) and saO(2) in the chamber and during the flights was calculated and results were used to derive estimation equations for in-flight values. In the chamber, saO(2) decreased by 0.33% per 100 m vertical ascent, and this rate increased significantly at altitudes >2000 m. Predicted saO(2) differed from in-flight value by <5%, and agreement between in-flight saO(2) decrease rate and chamber data was good. paO(2) decreased at a rate of 0.99 mm Hg/100 m in the chamber and by 1.33 mm Hg/100 m during flights. None of the subjects showed any clinical symptoms during the flights and the chamber simulation. During our worst-case scenario, i.e. the hypobaric chamber simulation at 3000 m, 90% of patients tolerated paO(2) values below the commonly recommended threshold of 50 mm Hg, probably due to adaptation to chronic hypoxemia and lung function impairment. We propose the following equations for an estimation of the expected extent of in-flight hypoxemia in CF patients with mild to moderate airway obstruction and a flight duration of up to 3.5 h: -paO2[Alt]=paO2[ground] -1.33 x Alt[mm Hg], and -saO2[Alt]=saO2[ground] -0.33 x Alt

  12. Diaphragm Muscle Adaptation to Sustained Hypoxia: Lessons from Animal Models with Relevance to High Altitude and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Philip; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary inspiratory pump muscle of breathing. Notwithstanding its critical role in pulmonary ventilation, the diaphragm like other striated muscles is malleable in response to physiological and pathophysiological stressors, with potential implications for the maintenance of respiratory homeostasis. This review considers hypoxic adaptation of the diaphragm muscle, with a focus on functional, structural, and metabolic remodeling relevant to conditions such as high altitude and chronic respiratory disease. On the basis of emerging data in animal models, we posit that hypoxia is a significant driver of respiratory muscle plasticity, with evidence suggestive of both compensatory and deleterious adaptations in conditions of sustained exposure to low oxygen. Cellular strategies driving diaphragm remodeling during exposure to sustained hypoxia appear to confer hypoxic tolerance at the expense of peak force-generating capacity, a key functional parameter that correlates with patient morbidity and mortality. Changes include, but are not limited to: redox-dependent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and MAP kinases; time-dependent carbonylation of key metabolic and functional proteins; decreased mitochondrial respiration; activation of atrophic signaling and increased proteolysis; and altered functional performance. Diaphragm muscle weakness may be a signature effect of sustained hypoxic exposure. We discuss the putative role of reactive oxygen species as mediators of both advantageous and disadvantageous adaptations of diaphragm muscle to sustained hypoxia, and the role of antioxidants in mitigating adverse effects of chronic hypoxic stress on respiratory muscle function. PMID:28018247

  13. Diaphragm Muscle Adaptation to Sustained Hypoxia: Lessons from Animal Models with Relevance to High Altitude and Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary inspiratory pump muscle of breathing. Notwithstanding its critical role in pulmonary ventilation, the diaphragm like other striated muscles is malleable in response to physiological and pathophysiological stressors, with potential implications for the maintenance of respiratory homeostasis. This review considers hypoxic adaptation of the diaphragm muscle, with a focus on functional, structural, and metabolic remodeling relevant to conditions such as high altitude and chronic respiratory disease. On the basis of emerging data in animal models, we posit that hypoxia is a significant driver of respiratory muscle plasticity, with evidence suggestive of both compensatory and deleterious adaptations in conditions of sustained exposure to low oxygen. Cellular strategies driving diaphragm remodeling during exposure to sustained hypoxia appear to confer hypoxic tolerance at the expense of peak force-generating capacity, a key functional parameter that correlates with patient morbidity and mortality. Changes include, but are not limited to: redox-dependent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and MAP kinases; time-dependent carbonylation of key metabolic and functional proteins; decreased mitochondrial respiration; activation of atrophic signaling and increased proteolysis; and altered functional performance. Diaphragm muscle weakness may be a signature effect of sustained hypoxic exposure. We discuss the putative role of reactive oxygen species as mediators of both advantageous and disadvantageous adaptations of diaphragm muscle to sustained hypoxia, and the role of antioxidants in mitigating adverse effects of chronic hypoxic stress on respiratory muscle function.

  14. High altitude hypoxia, a mask and a Street. Donation of an aviation BLB oxygen mask apparatus from World War 2.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M G; Street, N E

    2017-03-01

    The history of hypoxia prevention is closely inter-related with high altitude mountain and aviation physiology. One pioneering attempt to overcome low inspired oxygen partial pressures in aviation was the BLB mask-named after the three designers-Walter M Boothby, W Randolph Lovelace II and Arthur H Bulbulian. This mask and its variations originated just prior to World War 2 when aircraft were able to fly higher than 10,000 feet and pilot hypoxia affecting performance was an increasing problem. We give a brief description of the mask and its designers and discuss the donation of a model used by the British War Office in October 1940 and donated to the Harry Daly Museum at the Australian Society of Anaesthetists by the family of Dr Fred Street. Dr Street was a pioneering paediatric surgeon in Australia and served as a doctor in the Middle East and New Guinea in World War 2. He received the Military Cross.

  15. Association Between Serum Concentrations of Hypoxia Inducible Factor Responsive Proteins and Excessive Erythrocytosis in High Altitude Peru

    PubMed Central

    Painschab, Matthew S.; Malpartida, Gary E.; Dávila-Roman, Victor G.; Gilman, Robert H.; Kolb, Todd M.; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Painschab, Matthew S., Gary E. Malpartida, Victor G. Davila-Roman, Robert H. Gilman, Todd M. Kolb, Fabiola Leon-Velarde, J. Jaime Miranda, and William Checkley. Association between serum concentrations of hypoxia inducible factor responsive proteins and excessive erythrocytosis in high altitude Peru. High Alt Med Biol 16:26–33, 2015.—Long-term residence at high altitude is associated with the development of chronic mountain sickness (CMS), which is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis (EE). EE occurs under chronic hypoxia, and a strongly selected mutation in hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2A) has been found in native Tibetans that correlates with having a normal hemoglobin at high altitude. We sought to evaluate differences in plasma levels of four HIF-responsive proteins in 20 participants with EE (hemoglobin >21 g/dL in men and >19 in women) and in 20 healthy, age- and sex-matched participants without EE living at high altitude in Puno, Peru. We performed ELISA to measure plasma levels of the four HIF-responsive proteins: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sVEGF-R1), endothelin-1, and erythropoietin. As a secondary aim, we evaluated the association between HIF-responsive proteins and echocardiography-estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) in a subset of 26 participants. sVEGF-R1 was higher in participants with vs. without EE (mean 107 pg/mL vs. 90 pg/mL; p=0.007). Although plasma concentrations of endothelin-1, VEGF, and erythropoietin were higher in participants with vs. without EE, they did not achieve statistical significance (all p>0.25). Both sVEGF-R1 (p=0.04) and erythropoietin (p=0.04) were positively associated with PASP after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI. HIF-responsive proteins may play a pathophysiological role in altitude-related, chronic diseases but our results did not show consistent changes in all measured HIF-responsive proteins. Larger studies are needed to evaluate for

  16. Evaluation of hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in rats under chronic hypobaric hypoxia for targeted therapy at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gola, Shefali; Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Nath, Madhu; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-03-20

    With studies indicative of altered drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) under high altitude (HA)-induced hypobaric hypoxia, consideration of better therapeutic approaches has continuously been aimed in research for HA related illness management. DMPK of drugs like ibuprofen may get affected under hypoxia which establishes the requirement of different therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe and effective therapy at HA. This study examined the effects of the chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) on hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen in rats. Experimental animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for CHH exposure (7 or 14 days) in decompression chamber and administered with ibuprofen (80 mg/kg, body weight, p.o.). Results demonstrated that CHH significantly altered PK variables of ibuprofen and activities of both phase-I and II hepatic metabolic enzymes as compared to the animals under normoxic conditions. Hepatic histopathological observations also revealed marked alterations. Increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines viz. IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α exhibited close relevance with diminished CYP2C9 expression under CHH. Moreover, the down-regulated CYP2C9 level further supported the underlying mechanism for reduced metabolism of ibuprofen and as a result, increased retention of parent drug in the system. Increased mean retention time, Vd, T½ of ibuprofen, and decreased AUC, Cmax and clearance during CHH further strengthened the present findings. In conclusion, CHH exposure significantly affects hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen, which may further influence the usual therapeutic dose-regimen. Further, there is requirement of human studies to evaluate their susceptibility toward hypobaric hypoxia.

  17. High altitude illness

    PubMed

    Hartman-Ksycińska, Anna; Kluz-Zawadzka, Jolanta; Lewandowski, Bogumił

    High-altitude illness is a result of prolonged high-altitude exposure of unacclimatized individuals. The illness is seen in the form of acute mountain sickness (AMS) which if not treated leads to potentially life-threatening high altitude pulmonary oedema and high-altitude cerebral oedema. Medical problems are caused by hypobaric hypoxia stimulating hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) release. As a result, the central nervous system, circulation and respiratory system function impairment occurs. The most important factor in AMS treatment is acclimatization, withdrawing further ascent and rest or beginning to descent; oxygen supplementation, and pharmacological intervention, and, if available, a portable hyperbaric chamber. Because of the popularity of high-mountain sports and tourism better education of the population at risk is essential.

  18. Ventilation during simulated altitude, normobaric hypoxia and normoxic hypobaria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Icenogle, M.; Scotto, P.; Robergs, R.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Roach, R. C.; Leoppky, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the possible effect of hypobaria on ventilation (VE) at high altitude, we exposed nine men to three conditions for 10 h in a chamber on separate occasions at least 1 week apart. These three conditions were: altitude (PB = 432, FIO2 = 0.207), normobaric hypoxia (PB = 614, FIO2 = 0.142) and normoxic hypobaria (PB = 434, FIO2 = 0.296). In addition, post-test measurements were made 2 h after returning to ambient conditions at normobaric normoxia (PB = 636, FIO2 = 0.204). In the first hour of exposure VE was increased similarly by altitude and normobaric hypoxia. The was 38% above post-test values and end-tidal CO2 (PET(CO2) was lower by 4 mmHg. After 3, 6 and 9 h, the average VE in normobaric hypoxia was 26% higher than at altitude (p < 0.01), resulting primarily from a decline in VE at altitude. The difference between altitude and normobaric hypoxia was greatest at 3 h (+ 39%). In spite of the higher VE during normobaric hypoxia, the PET(CO2) was higher than at altitude. Changes in VE and PET(CO2) in normoxic hypobaria were minimal relative to normobaric normoxia post-test measurements. One possible explanation for the lower VE at altitude is that CO2 elimination is relatively less at altitude because of a reduction in inspired gas density compared to normobaric hypoxia; this may reduce the work of breathing or alveolar deadspace. The greater VE during the first hour at altitude, relative to subsequent measurements, may be related to the appearance of microbubbles in the pulmonary circulation acting to transiently worsen matching. Results indicate that hypobaria per se effects ventilation under altitude conditions.

  19. Ventilation during simulated altitude, normobaric hypoxia and normoxic hypobaria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Icenogle, M.; Scotto, P.; Robergs, R.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Roach, R. C.; Leoppky, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the possible effect of hypobaria on ventilation (VE) at high altitude, we exposed nine men to three conditions for 10 h in a chamber on separate occasions at least 1 week apart. These three conditions were: altitude (PB = 432, FIO2 = 0.207), normobaric hypoxia (PB = 614, FIO2 = 0.142) and normoxic hypobaria (PB = 434, FIO2 = 0.296). In addition, post-test measurements were made 2 h after returning to ambient conditions at normobaric normoxia (PB = 636, FIO2 = 0.204). In the first hour of exposure VE was increased similarly by altitude and normobaric hypoxia. The was 38% above post-test values and end-tidal CO2 (PET(CO2) was lower by 4 mmHg. After 3, 6 and 9 h, the average VE in normobaric hypoxia was 26% higher than at altitude (p < 0.01), resulting primarily from a decline in VE at altitude. The difference between altitude and normobaric hypoxia was greatest at 3 h (+ 39%). In spite of the higher VE during normobaric hypoxia, the PET(CO2) was higher than at altitude. Changes in VE and PET(CO2) in normoxic hypobaria were minimal relative to normobaric normoxia post-test measurements. One possible explanation for the lower VE at altitude is that CO2 elimination is relatively less at altitude because of a reduction in inspired gas density compared to normobaric hypoxia; this may reduce the work of breathing or alveolar deadspace. The greater VE during the first hour at altitude, relative to subsequent measurements, may be related to the appearance of microbubbles in the pulmonary circulation acting to transiently worsen matching. Results indicate that hypobaria per se effects ventilation under altitude conditions.

  20. Hypoxia, hypocapnia and spirometry at altitude.

    PubMed

    Pollard, A J; Barry, P W; Mason, N P; Collier, D J; Pollard, R C; Pollard, P F; Martin, I; Fraser, R S; Miller, M R; Milledge, J S

    1997-06-01

    1. Both hypoxia and hypocapnia can cause broncho-constriction in humans, and this could have a bearing on performance at high altitude or contribute to altitude sickness. We studied the relationship between spirometry, arterial oxygen saturation and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) concentration in a group of healthy lowland adults during a stay at high altitude, and then evaluated the response to supplementary oxygen and administration of a beta 2 agonist. 2. We collected spirometric data from 51 members of the 1994 British Mount Everest Medical Expedition at sea level (barometric pressure 101.2-101.6 kPa) and at Mount Everest Base Camp in Nepal (altitude 5300 m, barometric pressure 53-54.7 kPa) using a pocket turbine spirometer. A total of 205 spirometric measurements were made on the 51 subjects during the first 6 days after arrival at Base Camp. Further measurements were made before and after inhalation of oxygen (n = 47) or a beta 2 agonist (n = 39). ETCO2 tensions were measured on the same day as spirometric measurements in 30 of these subjects. 3. In the first 6 days after arrival at 5300 m, lower oxygen saturations were associated with lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1; P < 0.02) and forced vital capacity (FVC; P < 0.01), but not with peak expiratory flow (PEF). Administration of supplementary oxygen for 5 min increased oxygen saturation from a mean of 81%-94%, but there was no significant change in FEV1 or FVC, whilst PEF fell by 2.3% [P < 0.001; 95% confidence intervals (CI) -4 to -0.7%]. After salbutamol administration, there was no significant change in PEF, FEV1 or FVC in 35 non-asthmatic subjects. Mean ETCO2 at Everest Base Camp was 26 mmHg, and a low ETCO2 was weakly associated with a larger drop in FVC at altitude compared with sea level (r = 0.38, P < 0.05). There was no correlation between either ETCO2 or oxygen saturation and changes in FEV1 or PEF compared with sea-level values. 4. In this study, in normal subjects who were

  1. Cerebral spinal fluid dynamics: effect of hypoxia and implications for high-altitude illness.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Justin S; Levine, Benjamin D; Williams, Michael A; Malm, Jon; Eklund, Anders; Polaner, David M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Hackett, Peter H; Roach, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    The pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral edema, the cerebral forms of high-altitude illness, remain uncertain and controversial. Persistently elevated or pathological fluctuations in intracranial pressure are thought to cause symptoms similar to those reported by individuals suffering cerebral forms of high-altitude illness. This review first focuses on the basic physiology of the craniospinal system, including a detailed discussion of the long-term and dynamic regulation of intracranial pressure. Thereafter, we critically examine the available literature, based primarily on invasive pressure monitoring, that suggests intracranial pressure is acutely elevated at altitude due to brain swelling and/or elevated sagittal sinus pressure, but normalizes over time. We hypothesize that fluctuations in intracranial pressure occur around a slightly elevated or normal mean intracranial pressure, in conjunction with oscillations in arterial Po2 and arterial blood pressure. Then these modest fluctuations in intracranial pressure, in concert with direct vascular stretch due to dilatation and/or increased blood pressure transmission, activate the trigeminal vascular system and cause symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Elevated brain water (vasogenic edema) may be due to breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. However, new information suggests cerebral spinal fluid flux into the brain may be an important factor. Regardless of the source (or mechanisms responsible) for the excess brain water, brain swelling occurs, and a "tight fit" brain would be a major risk factor to produce symptoms; activities that produce large changes in brain volume and cause fluctuations in blood pressure are likely contributing factors. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Angus calves born and raised at high altitude adapt to hypobaric hypoxia by increasing alveolar ventilation rate but not hematocrit.

    PubMed

    Gulick, A K; Garry, F B; Holt, T N; Retallick-Trennepohl, K; Enns, R M; Thomas, M G; Neary, J M

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of altitude on arterial blood-gases and hematocrit in Angus-based calves. It was hypothesized that alveolar ventilation rate, as indicated by arterial pCO, would increase with altitude but hematocrit would not. Five Angus-based herds ( = 30 to 80 per cohort) located at 105 m, 1,470 m, 2,010 m, 2,170 m, and 2,730 m above sea level were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. A portable analyzer measured blood-gas tensions in coccygeal arterial blood. Calves at 1,470 m, 2,170 m, and 2,730 m were sampled twice, at approximately 4 mo and 7 mo of age. Calves at 105 m and 2,010 m were sampled once, at 7 or 4 mo of age, respectively. Linear regression analyses were used to determine the fixed effect of herd (a proxy for altitude) on the 4 outcome variables pCO, pO, pH, and hematocrit, while controlling for age and sex. As hypothesized, alveolar ventilation rate increased with altitude ( < 0.001). Hematocrit, however, did not show a clear association with altitude except for an increase from 105 m to ≥ 1,470 m ( < 0.001). Arterial pO decreased significantly with increasing altitude in calves at 4 mo and 7 mo of age ( < 0.001). The adjusted mean values of the 4 variables studied were similar at 4 and 7 mo of age for all of the herds studied. This indicates that suckling calves show minimal respiratory or erythrocytic adaptation to hypoxemia and hypocapnia with increasing age, regardless of altitude. We propose that the lack of an erythrocytic response in hypoxemic calves born and raised at high altitude prevents a deleterious increase in viscous resistance and, consequently, pulmonary arterial pressure. This physiological response, or lack thereof, may be a survival adaptation in a species predisposed to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  3. Evidence from high altitude acclimatization for an integrated cerebrovascular and ventilatory hypercapnic response, but different responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zachary M; Krizay, Erin; Sa, Rui Carlos; Li, Ethan T; Scadeng, Miriam; Powell, Frank L; Dubowitz, David J

    2017-07-13

    Ventilation and cerebral blood flow (CBF) are both sensitive to hypoxia and hypercapnia. To compare chemosensitivity in these two systems, we made simultaneous measurements of ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in 35 normal human subjects before and after acclimatization to hypoxia. Ventilation and CBF were measured during stepwise changes in isocapnic hypoxia and iso-oxic hypercapnia. We used MRI to quantify actual cerebral perfusion. Measurements were repeated after 2-days of acclimatization to hypoxia at 3,800m altitude (PiO2 = 90 Torr) to compare plasticity in the chemosensitivity of these two systems. Potential effects of hypoxic and hypercapnic responses on acute mountain sickness (AMS) were assessed also. The pattern of CBF and ventilatory responses to hypercapnia were almost identical. CO2 responses were augmented to a similar degree in both systems by concomitant acute hypoxia, or acclimatization to sustained hypoxia. Conversely, the pattern of CBF and ventilatory responses to hypoxia were markedly different. Ventilation showed the well-known increase with acute hypoxia and a progressive decline in absolute value over 25 minutes of sustained hypoxia. With acclimatization to hypoxia for 2 days, the absolute values of ventilation and O2-sensitivity increased. By contrast, O2-sensitivity of CBF or its absolute value did not change during sustained hypoxia for up to 2 days. The results suggest a common or integrated control mechanism for CBF and ventilation by CO2 but different mechanisms of O2-sensitivity and plasticity between the systems. Ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses were the same for all subjects irrespective of AMS symptoms. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  4. The activity, protein, and mRNA expression of CYP2E1 and CYP3A1 in rats after exposure to acute and chronic high altitude hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyang; Wang, Xuejun; Li, Yongping; Zhu, Junbo; Su, Xiaodong; Yao, Xingchen; Fan, Xueru; Duan, Yabin

    2014-12-01

    The effects of exposure to acute and chronic high altitude hypoxia on the activity and expression of CYP2E1 and CYP3A1 were examined in rats. Rats were divided into low altitude (LA, 400 m), acute moderate altitude hypoxia (AMH, 2800 m), chronic moderate altitude hypoxia (CMH, 2800 m), acute high altitude hypoxia (AHH, 4300 m), and chronic high altitude hypoxia groups (CHH, 4300 m). Probe drugs were administrated orally to all five groups. Then the serum concentration of probe drug and its metabolite was determined by RP-HPLC. The activity of CYP2E1 and CYP3A1 was evaluated using the ratio of the metabolite to chlorzoxazone and testosterone, respectively. ELISA and real-time PCR were used to analyze the protein and mRNA expression of CYP2E1 and CYP3A1 in liver microsomes, respectively. Chronic high altitude hypoxia caused significant decreases in the activity and protein and mRNA expression of rat CYP2E1 and CYP3A1 in vivo. Acute high altitude hypoxia was not found to change the activity, protein or mRNA expression of rat CYP2E1 or CYP3A1. This study showed significant changes in the activity and protein and mRNA expression of CYP2E1 or CYP3A1 in rats after exposure to chronic high altitude hypoxia.

  5. Cardiovascular medicine at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2014-07-01

    Altitude physiology began with Paul Bert in 1878. Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) was defined by Carlos Monge in the 1940s in the Peruvian Andes as consisting of excess polycythemia. Hurtado et al performed studies in the Peruvian Andes in the 1950s to 1960s which defined acclimatization in healthy altitude natives, including polycythemia, moderate pulmonary hypertension, and low systemic blood pressure (BP). Electrocardiographic changes of right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) were noted. Acclimatization of newcomers to altitude involves hyperventilation stimulated by hypoxia and is usually benign. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) in travelers to altitude is characterized by hypoxia-induced anorexia, dyspnea, headache, insomnia, and nausea. The extremes of AMS are high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema. The susceptible high-altitude resident can lose their tolerance to altitude and develop CMS, also referred to as Monge disease. The CMS includes extreme polycythemia, severe RVH, excess pulmonary hypertension, low systemic BP, arterial oxygen desaturation, and hypoventilation.

  6. Changes in brain iron concentration after exposure to high-altitude hypoxia measured by quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Cai, Congbo; Yang, Tianhe; Lin, Jianzhong; Cai, Shuhui; Zhang, Jiaxing; Chen, Zhong

    2017-02-15

    Hypoxia can induce physiological changes. This study aims to explore effects of high-altitude (HA) hypoxia on cerebral iron concentration. Twenty-nine healthy sea-level participants were tested shortly before and after approximately 4-week adaptation to the HA environment at fQinghai-Tibet Plateau (4200m), and were re-investigated after re-adaptation to the sea-level environment one year later. Iron concentration was quantified with quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), and the results were compared with transverse relaxation rate (R(*)2) measurements. The variations of magnetic susceptibility indicate that the iron concentration in gray matter regions, especially in basal ganglia, including caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and substantia nigra, increases significantly after HA exposure. This increase appears consistent with the conclusion from R(*)2 value variations. However, unlike QSM, the R(*)2 value fails to demonstrate the statistical difference of iron content in red nucleus. The re-investigation results show that most variations are recovered after sea-level re-adaptation for one year. Additionally, hemisphere- and gender-related differences in iron concentration changes were analyzed among cerebral regions. The results show greater possibilities in the right hemisphere and females. Further studies based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) suggest that the fractional anisotropy increases and the mean diffusivity decreases after HA exposure in six deep gray matter nuclei, with linear dependence on iron concentration only in putamen. In conclusion, the magnetic susceptibility value can serve as a quantitative marker of brain iron, and variations of regional susceptibility reported herein indicate that HA hypoxia can result in significant iron deposition in most deep gray matter regions. Additionally, the linear dependence of DTI metrics on iron concentration in putamen indicates a potential relationship between ferritin and water diffusion

  7. Brain Food at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Scenic view at high altitude is a pleasure to the eyes, but it has some shortcoming effects as well. High altitude can be divided into different categories, i.e., high altitude (3000-5000 ft), very high altitude (5000-8000 ft), and extreme altitude (above 8000 ft). Much of the population resides at high altitude, and others go there for tourism. Military personnel are also posted there to defend boundaries. As we ascent to high altitude, partial pressure of oxygen reduces, whereas concentration remains the same; this reduces the availability of oxygen to different body parts. This pathophysiological condition is known as hypobaric hypoxia (HH) which leads to oxidative stress and further causes cognitive dysfunction in some cases. Hypoxia causes neurodegeneration in different brain regions; however, the hippocampus is found to be more prone in comparison to other brain regions. As the hippocampus is affected most, therefore, spatial memory is impaired most during such condition. This chapter will give a brief review of the damaging effect of high altitude on cognition and also throw light on possible herbal interventions at high altitude, which can improve cognitive performance as well as provide protection against the deteriorating effect of hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude.

  8. Endothelin receptor B, a candidate gene from human studies at high altitude, improves cardiac tolerance to hypoxia in genetically engineered heterozygote mice

    PubMed Central

    Stobdan, Tsering; Zhou, Dan; Ao-Ieong, Eilleen; Ortiz, Daniel; Ronen, Roy; Hartley, Iain; Gan, Zhuohui; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Bafna, Vineet; Cabrales, Pedro; Haddad, Gabriel G.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand human adaptation to stress, and in particular to hypoxia, we took advantage of one of nature’s experiments at high altitude (HA) and studied Ethiopians, a population that is well-adapted to HA hypoxic stress. Using whole-genome sequencing, we discovered that EDNRB (Endothelin receptor type B) is a candidate gene involved in HA adaptation. To test whether EDNRB plays a critical role in hypoxia tolerance and adaptation, we generated EdnrB knockout mice and found that when EdnrB−/+ heterozygote mice are treated with lower levels of oxygen (O2), they tolerate various levels of hypoxia (even extreme hypoxia, e.g., 5% O2) very well. For example, they maintain ejection fraction, cardiac contractility, and cardiac output in severe hypoxia. Furthermore, O2 delivery to vital organs was significantly higher and blood lactate was lower in EdnrB−/+ compared with wild type in hypoxia. Tissue hypoxia in brain, heart, and kidney was lower in EdnrB−/+ mice as well. These data demonstrate that a lower level of EDNRB significantly improves cardiac performance and tissue perfusion under various levels of hypoxia. Transcriptomic profiling of left ventricles revealed three specific genes [natriuretic peptide type A (Nppa), sarcolipin (Sln), and myosin light polypeptide 4 (Myl4)] that were oppositely expressed (q < 0.05) between EdnrB−/+ and wild type. Functions related to these gene networks were consistent with a better cardiac contractility and performance. We conclude that EDNRB plays a key role in hypoxia tolerance and that a lower level of EDNRB contributes, at least in part, to HA adaptation in humans. PMID:26240367

  9. Endothelin receptor B, a candidate gene from human studies at high altitude, improves cardiac tolerance to hypoxia in genetically engineered heterozygote mice.

    PubMed

    Stobdan, Tsering; Zhou, Dan; Ao-Ieong, Eilleen; Ortiz, Daniel; Ronen, Roy; Hartley, Iain; Gan, Zhuohui; McCulloch, Andrew D; Bafna, Vineet; Cabrales, Pedro; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2015-08-18

    To better understand human adaptation to stress, and in particular to hypoxia, we took advantage of one of nature's experiments at high altitude (HA) and studied Ethiopians, a population that is well-adapted to HA hypoxic stress. Using whole-genome sequencing, we discovered that EDNRB (Endothelin receptor type B) is a candidate gene involved in HA adaptation. To test whether EDNRB plays a critical role in hypoxia tolerance and adaptation, we generated EdnrB knockout mice and found that when EdnrB (-/+) heterozygote mice are treated with lower levels of oxygen (O2), they tolerate various levels of hypoxia (even extreme hypoxia, e.g., 5% O2) very well. For example, they maintain ejection fraction, cardiac contractility, and cardiac output in severe hypoxia. Furthermore, O2 delivery to vital organs was significantly higher and blood lactate was lower in EdnrB (-/+) compared with wild type in hypoxia. Tissue hypoxia in brain, heart, and kidney was lower in EdnrB (-/+) mice as well. These data demonstrate that a lower level of EDNRB significantly improves cardiac performance and tissue perfusion under various levels of hypoxia. Transcriptomic profiling of left ventricles revealed three specific genes [natriuretic peptide type A (Nppa), sarcolipin (Sln), and myosin light polypeptide 4 (Myl4)] that were oppositely expressed (q < 0.05) between EdnrB (-/+) and wild type. Functions related to these gene networks were consistent with a better cardiac contractility and performance. We conclude that EDNRB plays a key role in hypoxia tolerance and that a lower level of EDNRB contributes, at least in part, to HA adaptation in humans.

  10. EFFECT OF POMEGRANATE (Punica granatum L) JUICE ON CHANGES IN TISSUE GLUTATHIONE LEVELS OF RATS EXPOSED TO HIGH ALTITUDE HYPOXIA

    PubMed Central

    Gaurava; Praveenvats; Shyam, Radhey; Suri, Shoba; Kumria, MML; Sridharan, K; Sharmaa, PC; Singh, Som Nath

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative stress due to excessive production of free radicals in living organisms during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is well documented. In search of a suitable antioxidant from natural sources, in the present study effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum, family Punicaceae) juice (PG) was evaluated on glutathione levels and related enzymes in tissues of rats exposed to simulated altitude of 6096 m. Twenty four male Sprague Dawley rats were divided in three groups i.e. 1) Normal, 2) Exposed to hypoxia and 3) Exposed to hypoxia and treated prior with PG (0.1g/rat) for 15 days. Blood glucose, liver glycogen, glutathione (reduced, GSH; oxidized, GSSG), glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, Y-glutamyl transpeptidase were estimated in liver, muscle and blood/RBC. Marked alterations were observed in these variables during hypoxia exposure. There was decrease in lipid peroxidation in muscle and restoration of GSH:GSSG ratio in PG treated group in comparison with untreated exposed animals. Results confirm recently reported antioxidant property of pomegranate. PMID:22557035

  11. The protein level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha is increased in the plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) inhabiting high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Ge; Ren, Yong-Ming; Guo, Song-Chang; Cheng, Long; Wang, De-Peng; Yang, Jie; Chang, Zhi-Jie; Zhao, Xin-Quan

    2009-02-01

    The plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) is a high hypoxia-tolerant species living only at 3,000-5,000 m above sea-level on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key transcription factor that regulates a variety of cellular and systemic adaptations to hypoxia. To investigate how the plateau pika adapts to a high-altitude hypoxic environment at the molecular level, we examined the expression pattern of the HIF-1alpha protein in the pika by Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. We found that HIF-1alpha protein is expressed at a significantly high level in the pika, which is higher in most tissues (particularly in the lung, liver, spleen and kidney) of the plateau pika than that of mice living at sea-level. Importantly, we found that the protein levels of HIF-1alpha in the lung, liver, spleen and kidney of the pika were increased with increased habitat altitudes. We observed that the plateau pika HIF-1alpha localized to the nucleus of cells by an immunostaining analysis, and enhanced HRE-driven gene expression by luciferase reporter assays. Our study suggests that the HIF-1alpha protein levels are related to the adaptation of the plateau pika to the high-altitude hypoxic environment.

  12. Effects of hypobaric hypoxia exposure at high altitude on left ventricular twist in healthy subjects: data from HIGHCARE study on Mount Everest.

    PubMed

    Osculati, Giuseppe; Revera, Miriam; Branzi, Giovanna; Faini, Andrea; Malfatto, Gabriella; Bilo, Grzegorz; Giuliano, Andrea; Gregorini, Francesca; Ciambellotti, Francesca; Lombardi, Carolina; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies investigating the effect of hypoxia on left ventricle focused on its global function, an approach that may not detect a selective dysfunction of subendocardial layers that are most sensitive to an inadequate oxygen supply. In the HIGHCARE study, aimed at exploring the effects of high altitude hypoxia on multiple biological variables and their modulation by an angiotensin receptor blocker, we addressed the effects of hypobaric hypoxia on both systolic and diastolic left ventricular geometry and function, focusing on echocardiographic assessment of left ventricle twist to indirectly examine subendocardial left ventricular systolic function. In 39 healthy subjects, physiological and echocardiographic variables, including left ventricular twist and a simplified torsion-to-shortening ratio (sTSR), were recorded at sea level, at 3400 m, and at 5400 m altitude (Mount Everest base camp). Both left ventricular twist and sTSR were greater at 5400 m than at sea level (12.6° vs. 9.6° and 0.285 vs. 0.202, P < 0.05 for both), were linearly related to the reduction in arterial oxygen partial pressure (P < 0.01 for both), and were associated with significant changes in LV dimensions and contractility. No effects of angiotensin receptor blockade were observed on these variables throughout the study. Our study, for the first time, demonstrates an increase in left ventricular twist at high altitude in healthy subjects exposed to high altitude hypoxia, suggesting the occurrence of subendocardial systolic dysfunction in such condition. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Steroidogenesis in sheep pregnancy with intrauterine growth retardation by high-altitude hypoxia: effects of maternal altitudinal status and antioxidant treatment.

    PubMed

    Parraguez, Víctor H; Urquieta, Bessie; De los Reyes, Mónica; González-Bulnes, Antonio; Astiz, Susana; Muñoz, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Sheep pregnancy in high-altitude environments frequently involves hypoxia and oxidative stress and causes intrauterine growth retardation. The adverse effects of altitude on fetal growth can be prevented by the administration of antioxidant vitamins, but the mechanisms responsible are not well known. The maintenance of a viable pregnancy depends largely on adequate placental steroidogenesis, especially in the last two-thirds of pregnancy. Thus, in the present study we evaluated the effect of antioxidant vitamins (C and E) on plasma concentrations of progesterone and 17β-oestradiol during the last two-thirds of high-altitude pregnancies in ewes both native and naïve to the high-altitude environment. In addition, pregnancy outcomes were evaluated by determining the bodyweight of newborn lambs. Sex steroid patterns differed between ewes with and without vitamin supplementation. Concentrations of plasma progesterone and 17β-oestradiol were significantly higher in the supplemented groups from approximately 40 days before parturition until near term. Newborn weights were significantly lower in animals not adapted to the higher altitude, and vitamin supplementation prevented this decrease. In conclusion, the administration of antioxidant vitamins in the present study enhanced placental steroidogenesis, thus favouring fetal development in pregnancies developing at high altitudes.

  14. Cardio-respiratory adaptation to physical exercise and hypoxia after a high-altitude expedition.

    PubMed

    Motyka, K; Kozłowski, S

    1979-01-01

    Seven young, male subjects were tested before and immediately after 6 weeks high-mountain expedition. Cardio-respiratory measurements were performed at rest and during standard physical excercise (10 min, 100 W) when breathing atmospheric air or hypoxic mixture (14% O2 in N2). After the expedition an increased V o2 max (16% an average) and diminished heart rate response to submaximal exercise were found. This was observed during air and hypoxic mixture breathing. There was significant increase in stroke volume and cardiac output during the exercise. No significant differences in ventilatory parameters were found nor at rest or during exercise under condition of breathing atmospheric air or hypoxic mixture. No changes in erythrocyte count or haemoglobin concentration in the blood were found. The physiological changes which developed during high-mountain expedition were more dependent on physical that hypoxic training.

  15. CYBA and GSTP1 variants associate with oxidative stress under hypobaric hypoxia as observed in high-altitude pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aastha; Ali, Zahara; Vibhuti, Arpana; Kumar, Rahul; Alam, Perwez; Ram, Rekhbala; Thinlas, Tashi; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2012-03-01

    HAPE (high-altitude pulmonary oedema) is characterized by pulmonary hypertension, vasoconstriction and an imbalance in oxygen-sensing redox switches. Excess ROS (reactive oxygen species) contribute to endothelial damage under hypobaric hypoxia, hence the oxidative-stress-related genes CYBA (cytochrome b-245 α polypeptide) and GSTP1 (glutathione transferase Pi 1) are potential candidate genes for HAPE. In the present study, we investigated the polymorphisms -930A/G and H72Y (C/T) of CYBA and I105V (A/G) and A114V (C/T) of GSTP1, individually and in combination, in 150 HAPE-p (HAPE patients), 180 HAPE-r (HAPE-resistant lowland natives) and 180 HLs (healthy highland natives). 8-Iso-PGF2α (8-iso-prostaglandin F2α) levels were determined in plasma and were correlated with individual alleles, genotype, haplotype and gene-gene interactions. The relative expression of CYBA and GSTP1 were determined in peripheral blood leucocytes. The genotype distribution of -930A/G, H72Y (C/T) and I105V (A/G) differed significantly in HAPE-p compared with HAPE-r and HLs (P≤0.01). The haplotypes G-C of -930A/G and H72Y (C/T) in CYBA and G-C and G-T of I105V (A/G) and A114V (C/T) in GSTP1 were over-represented in HAPE-p; in contrast, haplotypes A-T of -930A/G and H72Y (C/T) in CYBA and A-C of I105V (A/G) and A114V (C/T) in GSTP1 were over-represented in HAPE-r and HLs. 8-Iso-PGF2α levels were significantly higher in HAPE-p and in HLs than in HAPE-r (P=2.2×10(-16) and 1.2×10(-14) respectively) and the expression of CYBA and GSTP1 varied differentially (P<0.05). Regression analysis showed that the risk alleles G, C, G and T of -930A/G, H72Y (C/T), I105V (A/G) and A114V (C/T) were associated with increased 8-iso-PGF2α levels (P<0.05). Interaction between the two genes revealed over-representation of most of the risk-allele-associated genotype combinations in HAPE-p and protective-allele-associated genotype combinations in HLs. In conclusion, the risk alleles of CYBA and GSTP1, their

  16. Exposure to Hypoxia at High Altitude (5380 m) for 1 Year Induces Reversible Effects on Semen Quality and Serum Reproductive Hormone Levels in Young Male Adults.

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Cui, Jianhua; Wang, Rui; Gao, Liang; Gao, Xiaokang; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Qiong; Cao, Jinjun; Yu, Wuzhong

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of hypoxia at high altitude on the semen quality and the serum reproductive hormone levels in male adults. A total of 52 male soldiers were enrolled in this cohort study. They were exposed to hypoxia at high altitude (5380 m) for 12 months when undergoing a service. After exposure, they were followed up for 6 months. The samples of semen and peripheral blood were collected at 1 month before exposure (M0), 6 months of exposure (M6), 12 months of exposure (M12), and 6 months after exposure (M18). The semen quality was assessed with computer-assisted analysis system, and the serum levels of reproductive hormones, including prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and testosterone were analyzed by ELISA. Compared with those at M0, total sperm count, sperm density, motility, survival rate, and serum levels of LH, PRL and testosterone were significantly decreased, whereas the liquefaction time was significantly prolonged and serum FSH level was significantly increased at M6 (p<0.05). At M12, total sperm count and sperm density increased, whereas sperm motility, survival rate, and the liquefaction time further decreased. Sperm velocities, progression ratios, and lateral head displacements were also decreased. Serum FSH level decreased while serum LH, PRL, and testosterone levels increased. Compared with those at M6, the changes in these detected parameters of semen and hormone at M12 were significant (p<0.05). At M18, all these detected parameters except testosterone level returned to levels comparable to those before exposure. In conclusion, hypoxia at high altitude causes adverse effects on semen quality and reproductive hormones, and these effects are reversible.

  17. Lung Disease at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Stream, JO; Luks, AM; Grissom, CK

    2016-01-01

    Large numbers of people travel to high altitudes, entering an environment of hypobaric hypoxia. Exposure to low oxygen tension leads to a series of important physiologic responses that allow individuals to tolerate these hypoxic conditions. However, in some cases hypoxia triggers maladaptive responses that lead to various forms of acute and chronic high altitude illness, such as high-altitude pulmonary edema or chronic mountain sickness. Because the respiratory system plays a critical role in these adaptive and maladaptive responses, patients with underlying lung disease may be at increased risk for complications in this environment and warrant careful evaluation before any planned sojourn to higher altitudes. In this review, we describe respiratory disorders that occur with both acute and chronic exposures to high altitudes. These disorders may occur in any individual who ascends to high altitude, regardless of his/her baseline pulmonary status. We then consider the safety of high-altitude travel in patients with various forms of underlying lung disease. The available data regarding how these patients fare in hypoxic conditions are reviewed, and recommendations are provided for management prior to and during the planned sojourn. PMID:20477353

  18. Infectious Diseases at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Buddha; Starling, Jennifer M

    2015-08-01

    Travel to elevations above 2,500 m is an increasingly common activity undertaken by a diverse population of individuals. These may be trekkers, climbers, miners in high-altitude sites in South America, and more recently, soldiers deployed for high-altitude duty in remote areas of the world. What is also being increasingly recognized is the plight of the millions of pilgrims, many with comorbidities, who annually ascend to high-altitude sacred areas. There are also 400 million people who reside permanently in high mountain ranges, which cover one-fifth of the Earth's surface. Many of these high-altitude areas are in developing countries, for example, the Himalayan range in South Asia. Although high-altitude areas may not harbor any specific infectious disease agents, it is important to know about the pathogens encountered in the mountains to be better able to help both the ill sojourner and the native high-altitude dweller. Often the same pathogens prevalent in the surrounding lowlands are found at high altitude, but various factors such as immunomodulation, hypoxia, poor physiological adaptation, and harsh environmental stressors at high altitude may enhance susceptibility to these pathogens. Against this background, various gastrointestinal, respiratory, dermatological, neurological, and other infections encountered at high altitude are discussed.

  19. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan G; Galilea, Pedro A; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest P(mean) obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max) (∼ 3%) and maximal strength (1 RM) (∼ 6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean) and P(peak) in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press.

  20. Effect of Acute Exposure to Moderate Altitude on Muscle Power: Hypobaric Hypoxia vs. Normobaric Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch- Góngora, Juan G.; Galilea, Pedro A.; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest Pmean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to Pmax (∼3%) and maximal strength (1RM) (∼6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on Pmean and Ppeak in the middle-high part of the curve (≥60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press. PMID:25474104

  1. Genome Resequencing Identifies Unique Adaptations of Tibetan Chickens to Hypoxia and High-Dose Ultraviolet Radiation in High-Altitude Environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Gou, Wenyu; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Yawen; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Hongliang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Hao

    2016-02-23

    Tibetan chicken, unlike their lowland counterparts, exhibit specific adaptations to high-altitude conditions. The genetic mechanisms of such adaptations in highland chickens were determined by resequencing the genomes of four highland (Tibetan and Lhasa White) and four lowland (White Leghorn, Lindian, and Chahua) chicken populations. Our results showed an evident genetic admixture in Tibetan chickens, suggesting a history of introgression from lowland gene pools. Genes showing positive selection in highland populations were related to cardiovascular and respiratory system development, DNA repair, response to radiation, inflammation, and immune responses, indicating a strong adaptation to oxygen scarcity and high-intensity solar radiation. The distribution of allele frequencies of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms between highland and lowland populations was analyzed using chi-square test, which showed that several differentially distributed genes with missense mutations were enriched in several functional categories, especially in blood vessel development and adaptations to hypoxia and intense radiation. RNA sequencing revealed that several differentially expressed genes were enriched in gene ontology terms related to blood vessel and respiratory system development. Several candidate genes involved in the development of cardiorespiratory system (FGFR1, CTGF, ADAM9, JPH2, SATB1, BMP4, LOX, LPR, ANGPTL4, and HYAL1), inflammation and immune responses (AIRE, MYO1F, ZAP70, DDX60, CCL19, CD47, JSC, and FAS), DNA repair, and responses to radiation (VCP, ASH2L, and FANCG) were identified to play key roles in the adaptation to high-altitude conditions. Our data provide new insights into the unique adaptations of highland animals to extreme environments.

  2. Genome Resequencing Identifies Unique Adaptations of Tibetan Chickens to Hypoxia and High-Dose Ultraviolet Radiation in High-Altitude Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Gou, Wenyu; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Yawen; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Hongliang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan chicken, unlike their lowland counterparts, exhibit specific adaptations to high-altitude conditions. The genetic mechanisms of such adaptations in highland chickens were determined by resequencing the genomes of four highland (Tibetan and Lhasa White) and four lowland (White Leghorn, Lindian, and Chahua) chicken populations. Our results showed an evident genetic admixture in Tibetan chickens, suggesting a history of introgression from lowland gene pools. Genes showing positive selection in highland populations were related to cardiovascular and respiratory system development, DNA repair, response to radiation, inflammation, and immune responses, indicating a strong adaptation to oxygen scarcity and high-intensity solar radiation. The distribution of allele frequencies of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms between highland and lowland populations was analyzed using chi-square test, which showed that several differentially distributed genes with missense mutations were enriched in several functional categories, especially in blood vessel development and adaptations to hypoxia and intense radiation. RNA sequencing revealed that several differentially expressed genes were enriched in gene ontology terms related to blood vessel and respiratory system development. Several candidate genes involved in the development of cardiorespiratory system (FGFR1, CTGF, ADAM9, JPH2, SATB1, BMP4, LOX, LPR, ANGPTL4, and HYAL1), inflammation and immune responses (AIRE, MYO1F, ZAP70, DDX60, CCL19, CD47, JSC, and FAS), DNA repair, and responses to radiation (VCP, ASH2L, and FANCG) were identified to play key roles in the adaptation to high-altitude conditions. Our data provide new insights into the unique adaptations of highland animals to extreme environments. PMID:26907498

  3. Role of Rho kinases in PKG-mediated relaxation of pulmonary arteries of fetal lambs exposed to chronic high altitude hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuansheng; Portugal, Ada D; Negash, Sewite; Zhou, Weilin; Longo, Lawrence D; Usha Raj, J

    2007-03-01

    An increase in Rho kinase (ROCK) activity is implicated in chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. In the present study, we determined the role of ROCKs in cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated pulmonary vasodilation of fetal lambs exposed to chronic hypoxia. Fourth generation pulmonary arteries were isolated from near-term fetuses ( approximately 140 days of gestation) delivered from ewes exposed to chronic high altitude hypoxia for approximately 110 days and from control ewes. In vessels constricted to endothelin-1, 8-bromoguanosine-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) caused a smaller relaxation in chronically hypoxic (CH) vessels compared with controls. Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS, a PKG inhibitor, attenuated relaxation to 8-Br-cGMP in control vessels to a greater extent than in CH vessels. Y-27632, a ROCK inhibitor, significantly potentiated 8-Br-cGMP-induced relaxation of CH vessels and had only a minor effect in control vessels. The expression of PKG was increased but was not accompanied with an increase in the activity of the enzyme in CH vessels. The expression of type II ROCK and activity of ROCKs were increased in CH vessels. The phosphorylation of threonine (Thr)696 and Thr850 of the regulatory subunit MYPT1 of myosin light chain phosphatase was inhibited by 8-Br-cGMP to a lesser extent in CH vessels than in controls. The difference was eliminated by Y-27632. These results suggest that chronic hypoxia in utero attenuates PKG-mediated relaxation in pulmonary arteries, partly due to inhibition of PKG activity and partly due to enhanced ROCK activity. Increased ROCK activity may inhibit PKG action through increased phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr850.

  4. Pulmonary Adaptation to High Altitude.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-12

    Thus far several of our findings point to the occurrence of excessive flow- resistive work and perhaps even diaphragmatic fatigue during heavy...hypoxia have been the subject of our investigations. Our work has detailed the critical limitations to oxygen transport presented by the failure of the...nesurements of arterial 02 saturation--should provide excellent prediction of gas exchange " failure " at high altitudes. Our recent findings

  5. Acute ventilatory response to simulated altitude, normobaric hypoxia, and hypobaria.

    PubMed

    Loeppky, J A; Scotto, P; Roach, R C

    1996-11-01

    Some reports claim that ventilation (VE) is greater in human subjects in normobaric hypoxia than at altitude following an equivalent drop in inspired PO2 (PIO2). It has been suggested that reduced barometric pressure (PB) may decrease chemoreceptor sensitivity and account for these results. In this pilot study we tested the hypothesis that VE and hypoxic chemoresponsiveness would not be different after 30 min of normobaric hypoxia and altitude. We exposed three male and three female subjects to four conditions in an environmental chamber, varying the order. The four conditions were: air (PB = 640, FIO2 = 0.204), hypobaria (434, 0.298), hypoxia (640, 0.141) and altitude (434, 0.203). We measured VE, end-tidal O2 and CO2 and arterial O2 saturation (SpO2) after 30 min in each environment, and while breathing 100% O2 for 1 min immediately thereafter. The mean increase in VE relative to air was 14%, 20% and 26% for hypobaria, hypoxia and altitude, respectively, with corresponding reductions in PETCO2 in the three conditions. The reduction in VE with 100% O2 was inversely proportional to the rise in SpO2 in all cases, indicating that chemoresponsiveness was unchanged by PB. When hypobaria preceded altitude, the VE at altitude increased less, relative to air, than when altitude was given first (not significant). The VE and chemosensitivity are about the same after 30 min of altitude and equivalent hypoxia. However, when the drop in PIO2 is not synchronous with the drop in PB, like at altitude, the VE values may be altered. Air density, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and circulating microbubbles may interact to account for the observed findings.

  6. Hypoxia symptoms during altitude training in professional Iranian fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Alagha, Babak; AhmadBeygi, Shervin; Ahmadbeigy, Shervin; Moosavi, Seyed Ali Javad; Jalali, Seyed Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to hypoxia is influenced by a multitude of factors, including fatigue, physical activity, illnesses, ambient temperature, rate of ascent, destination altitude, medications, and alcohol. Anecdotally, several reports have been made regarding changes in the form of hypoxia presentation in Iranian fighter pilots in the absence of these factors. This study focused specifically on the effect of pilot age on susceptibility to hypoxia and its initial presentation. We assumed that a pilot's age may increase his susceptibility to hypoxia and consequently reduce the amount of time it takes for hypoxia to present. Because our literature review did not reveal any previous study addressing the possible relationship between age and susceptibility to hypoxia, the purpose of this study is to address and clarify this relationship. In this retrospective study, we collected information from Iranian fighter pilots (n = 30) through an anonymous questionnaire in 2000. The form of hypoxia presentation of each subject was evaluated during five altitude chamber training (ACT) sessions that were conducted routinely from 1972 to 1984. To enhance the accuracy of the study's results, confounding factors such as prior hypoxia experience in an ACT session have been taken into consideration. The results revealed a statistically significant relationship between age and a change in the form of hypoxia presentation in our subjects. Increased age reduced the amount of time before the first individual hypoxia symptom appeared (P < .000002). Although having previous hypoxia experience may help pilots to recognize their symptoms earlier, its effect was not statistically significant (P < .18). A few changes in the nature of individual symptoms were observed; however, we did not find a meaningful statistical correlation between pilot age and change in the nature of symptoms. Susceptibility ot hypoxia increases with pilot age. Copyright © 2012 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by

  7. Long-term exposure to high-altitude chronic hypoxia during gestation induces neonatal pulmonary hypertension at sea level

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Riquelme, Raquel A.; Ebensperger, Germán; Reyes, Roberto V.; Ulloa, César E.; Cabello, Gertrudis; Krause, Bernardo J.; Parer, Julian T.; Giussani, Dino A.

    2010-01-01

    We determined whether postnatal pulmonary hypertension induced by 70% of pregnancy at high altitude (HA) persists once the offspring return to sea level and investigated pulmonary vascular mechanisms operating under these circumstances. Pregnant ewes were divided into two groups: conception, pregnancy, and delivery at low altitude (580 m, LLL) and conception at low altitude, pregnancy at HA (3,600 m) from 30% of gestation until delivery, and return to lowland (LHL). Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) was measured in vivo. Vascular reactivity and morphometry were assessed in small pulmonary arteries (SPA). Protein expression of vascular mediators was determined. LHL lambs had higher basal PAP and a greater increment in PAP after NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (20.9 ± 1.1 vs. 13.7 ± 0.5 mmHg; 39.9 ± 5.0 vs. 18.3 ± 1.3 mmHg, respectively). SPA from LHL had a greater maximal contraction to K+ (1.34 ± 0.05 vs. 1.16 ± 0.05 N/m), higher sensitivity to endothelin-1 and nitroprusside, and persistence of dilatation following blockade of soluble guanylate cyclase. The heart ratio of the right ventricle-to-left ventricle plus septum was higher in the LHL relative to LLL. The muscle area of SPA (29.3 ± 2.9 vs. 21.1 ± 1.7%) and the protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (1.7 ± 0.1 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2), phosphodiesterase (1.4 ± 0.1 vs. 0.7 ± 0.1), and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (0.76 ± 0.16 vs. 0.30 ± 0.01) were greater in LHL compared with LLL lambs. In contrast, LHL had decreased heme oxygenase-1 expression (0.82 ± 0.26 vs. 2.22 ± 0.44) and carbon monoxide production (all P < 0.05). Postnatal pulmonary hypertension induced by 70% of pregnancy at HA promotes cardiopulmonary remodeling that persists at sea level. PMID:20881096

  8. High altitude decelerator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silbert, Mendel N.; Moltedo, A. David; Gilbertson, Gaylord S.

    1989-01-01

    High Altitude Decelerator Systems are used to provide a stable descending platform when deployed from a sounding rocket at altitudes greater than 40 kilometers allowing a scientific mission to be conducted in a specific altitude region. The High Altitude Decelerator is designed to provide a highly stable, high drag area system packed in a minimum volume to deploy successfully from a sounding rocket. Deployment altitudes greater than 100 kilometers have been successfully demonstrated at dynamic pressures as low as 0.004 pounds per square foot.

  9. High-Altitude Medicine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas J; Luks, Andrew M

    2016-03-01

    Individuals may seek the advice of medical providers when considering travel to high altitude. This article provides a basic framework for counseling and evaluating such patients. After defining "high altitude" and describing the key environmental features at higher elevations, the physiologic changes that occur at high altitude and how these changes are experienced by the traveler are discussed. Clinical features and strategies for prevention and treatment of the main forms of acute altitude illness are outlined, and frameworks for approaching the common clinical scenarios that may be encountered regarding high-altitude travelers are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Athletes at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Khodaee, Morteza; Grothe, Heather L.; Seyfert, Jonathan H.; VanBaak, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletes at different skill levels perform strenuous physical activity at high altitude for a variety of reasons. Multiple team and endurance events are held at high altitude and may place athletes at increased risk for developing acute high altitude illness (AHAI). Training at high altitude has been a routine part of preparation for some of the high level athletes for a long time. There is a general belief that altitude training improves athletic performance for competitive and recreational athletes. Evidence Acquisition: A review of relevant publications between 1980 and 2015 was completed using PubMed and Google Scholar. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: AHAI is a relatively uncommon and potentially serious condition among travelers to altitudes above 2500 m. The broad term AHAI includes several syndromes such as acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). Athletes may be at higher risk for developing AHAI due to faster ascent and more vigorous exertion compared with nonathletes. Evidence regarding the effects of altitude training on athletic performance is weak. The natural live high, train low altitude training strategy may provide the best protocol for enhancing endurance performance in elite and subelite athletes. High altitude sports are generally safe for recreational athletes, but they should be aware of their individual risks. Conclusion: Individualized and appropriate acclimatization is an essential component of injury and illness prevention. PMID:26863894

  11. Fulminant high altitude blindness.

    PubMed

    Mashkovskiy, Evgeny; Szawarski, Piotr; Ryzhkov, Pavel; Goslar, Tomaz; Mrak, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Prolonged altitude exposure even with acclimatization continues to present a physiological challenge to all organ systems including the central nervous system. We describe a case of a 41-year-old Caucasian female climber who suffered severe visual loss that was due to possible optic nerve pathology occurring during a high altitude expedition in the Himalayas. This case is atypical of classic high altitude cerebral oedema and highlights yet another danger of prolonged sojourn at extreme altitudes. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Detection of bacterial diversity in rat's periodontitis model under imitational altitude hypoxia environment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Gang; Gao, Yuqi; Kong, Yan; Liu, Min; Tan, Yinghui

    2012-01-01

    Oral epidemiologic investigations in China western territory have showed that the immigrants in the plateau have a higher morbidity with periodontitis. To find the possible relationship between the pathogenesis of periodontitis and altitude hypoxia, we designed a periodontitis rat model via housed in low pressure oxygen chamber and investigated the bacterial diversity in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into CON-normal, CON-hypoxia, EXP-normal and EXP-hypoxia group, without or with periodontal induce, breeding in normal environment or altitude hypoxia environment. Periodontal parameters (including gingival index, GI, and tooth mobility, TM) were measured after 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks; periodontal samples were collected for histological analysis after rats were sacrificed at the 8th week. The 16S rDNA of bacteria in GCF was amplified by PCR at the 8th week, and separated by the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approach. EXP-hypoxia group's GI and TM showed later and more severe periodontal tissue damage than EXP-normal (p<0.05 or 0.01). The histologic analyses did not find any pathologic difference between EXP-hypoxia and EXP-normal groups except for a slight difference on the lesion degree. By the DGGE analyses, the bacteria of five samples in the same group showed high concordance, but the bacteria in the different groups showed a great diversity. The course of periodontitis in altitude hypoxia environment is later than normal, but the degree of periodontal lesion was more severe and microbial community in GCF can be affected by the altitude hypoxia environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High Altitude Pilgrimage Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Religious pilgrims have been going to high altitude pilgrimages long before trekkers and climbers sojourned in high altitude regions, but the medical literature about high altitude pilgrimage is sparse. Gosainkunda Lake (4300 m) near Kathmandu, Nepal, and Shri Amarnath Yatra (3800 m) in Sri Nagar, Kashmir, India, are the two sites in the Himalayas from where the majority of published reports of high altitude pilgrimage have originated. Almost all travels to high altitude pilgrimages are characterized by very rapid ascents by large congregations, leading to high rates of acute mountain sickness (AMS). In addition, epidemiological studies of pilgrims from Gosainkunda Lake show that some of the important risk factors for AMS in pilgrims are female sex and older age group. Studies based on the Shri Amarnath Yatra pilgrims show that coronary artery disease, complications of diabetes, and peptic ulcer disease are some of the common, important reasons for admission to hospital during the trip. In this review, the studies that have reported these and other relevant findings will be discussed and appropriate suggestions made to improve pilgrims' safety at high altitude. PMID:25330393

  14. The morbid anatomy of high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Donald

    1979-01-01

    The morbid anatomical changes which take place in man and animals exposed to the chronic hypoxia of residence at high altitude are briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:493205

  15. Developmental functional adaptation to high altitude: review.

    PubMed

    Frisancho, A Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Various approaches have been used to understand the origins of the functional traits that characterize the Andean high-altitude native. Based on the conceptual framework of developmental functional adaptation which postulates that environmental influences during the period of growth and development have long lasting effects that may be expressed during adulthood, we initiated a series of studies addressed at determining the pattern of physical growth and the contribution of growth and development to the attainment of full functional adaptation to high-altitude of low and high altitude natives living under rural and urban conditions. Current research indicate that: (a) the pattern of growth at high altitude due to limited nutritional resources, physical growth in body size is delayed but growth in lung volumes is accelerated because of hypoxic stress); (b) low-altitude male and female urban natives can attain a full functional adaptation to high altitude by exposure to high-altitude hypoxia during the period of growth and development; (c) both experimental studies on animals and comparative human studies indicate that exposure to high altitude during the period of growth and development results in the attainment of a large residual lung volume; (d) this developmentally acquired enlarged residual lung volume and its associated increase in alveolar area when combined with the increased tissue capillarization and moderate increase in red blood cells and hemoglobin concentration contributes to the successful functional adaptation of the Andean high-altitude native to hypoxia; and (e) any specific genetic traits that are related to the successful functional adaptation of Andean high-altitude natives have yet to be identified.

  16. High Altitude Medical Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hultgren, Herbert N.

    1979-01-01

    Increased travel to high altitude areas by mountaineers and nonclimbing tourists has emphasized the clinical problems associated with rapid ascent. Acute mountain sickness affects most sojourners at elevations above 10,000 feet. Symptoms are usually worse on the second or third day after arrival. Gradual ascent, spending one to three days at an intermediate altitude, and the use of acetazolamide (Diamox) will prevent or ameliorate symptoms in most instances. Serious and potentially fatal problems, such as high altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema, occur in approximately 0.5 percent to 1.0 percent of visitors to elevations above 10,000 feet—especially with heavy physical exertion on arrival, such as climbing or skiing. Early recognition, high flow oxygen therapy and prompt descent are crucially important in management. Our knowledge of the causes of these and other high altitude problems, such as retinal hemorrhage, systemic edema and pulmonary hypertension, is still incomplete. Even less is known of the effect of high altitudes on medical conditions common at sea level or on the action of commonly used drugs. ImagesFigure 2. PMID:483805

  17. High-altitude medicine

    PubMed Central

    Paralikar, Swapnil J.; Paralikar, Jagdish H.

    2010-01-01

    Sojourns to high altitude have become common for recreation and adventure purposes. In most individuals, gradual ascent to a high altitude leads to a series of adaptive changes in the body, termed as acclimatization. These include changes in the respiratory, cardiovascular, hematologic systems and cellular adaptations that enhance oxygen delivery to the tissues and augment oxygen uptake. Thus there is an increase in pulmonary ventilation, increase in diffusing capacity in the lung, an increase in the cardiac output and increase in the red blood cell count due to an increase in erythropoietin secretion by the kidney, all of which enhance oxygen delivery to the cells. Cellular changes like increase in the number of mitochondria and augmentation of cytochrome oxidase systems take months or years to develop. Too rapid an ascent or inability to acclimatize leads to high-altitude illnesses. These include acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Acute mountain sickness is self limiting if recognized early. Both HACE and HAPE are life threatening and need to be treated aggressively. The key to treatment of these illnesses is early recognition; administration of supplemental oxygen; and descent if required. Drugs like acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine may be administered as recommended. PMID:20808661

  18. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia induces altitude acclimation and improves the lactate threshold.

    PubMed

    Casas, M; Casas, H; Pagés, T; Rama, R; Ricart, A; Ventura, J L; Ibáñez, J; Rodríguez, F A; Viscor, G

    2000-02-01

    The physiological responses to short-term intermittent exposure to hypoxia in a hypobaric chamber were evaluated. The exposure to hypoxia was compatible with normal daily activity. The ability of the hypoxia program to induce hematological and ventilatory adaptations leading to altitude acclimation and to improve physical performance capacity was tested. Six members of a high-altitude expedition were exposed to intermittent hypoxia and low-intensity exercise (in cycle-ergometer) in the INEFC-UB hypobaric chamber over 17 d, 3-5 h x d(-1), at simulated altitude of 4,000 m to 5,500 m. Following this hypoxia exposure program, significant increases were found in packed cell volume (41 to 44.6%; p<0.05), red blood cells count (4.607 to 4.968 10(6) cells x microL(-1); p<0.05), and hemoglobin concentration (14.8 to 16.4 g x dL(-1); p<0.05), thus implying an increase in the blood oxygen transport capacity. Significant differences in exercise blood lactate kinetics and heart rate were also observed. The lactate vs. exercise load curve shifted to the right and heart rate decreased, thus indicating an improvement of aerobic endurance. These results were associated with a significant increase in the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (p<0.05). Significant increases (p<0.05) in pulmonary ventilation, tidal volume, respiratory frequency, O2 uptake, CO2 output and ventilatory equivalents to oxygen (VE/Vo2) and carbon dioxide (VE/co2) were observed at the ventilatory threshold and within the transitional zone of the curves. We conclude that short-term intermittent exposure to moderate hypoxia, in combination with low-intensity exercise in a hypobaric chamber, is sufficient to improve aerobic capacity and to induce altitude acclimation.

  19. Travelling to new heights: practical high altitude medicine.

    PubMed

    Plant, Tracie; Aref-Adib, Golnar

    2008-06-01

    Over 40 million people travel to high altitude for both work and pleasure each year, and all of them are at risk of the acute effects of hypoxia. This article reviews the prevention, diagnostic features and treatments of these illnesses.

  20. Changes in BOLD and ADC weighted imaging in acute hypoxia during sea-level and altitude adapted states.

    PubMed

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, Henrik B W; Born, Alfred P; Knudsen, Gitte M; Paulson, Olaf B

    2005-12-01

    Acute normobaric hypoxia as well as longstanding hypobaric hypoxia induce pronounced physiological changes and may eventually lead to impairment of cerebral function. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the cerebral activation response as well as to explore possible structural changes as measured by diffusion weighted imaging. Eleven healthy sea-level residents were studied after 5 weeks of adaptation to high altitude conditions at Chacaltaya, Bolivia (5260 m). The subjects were studied immediately after return to sea-level in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and the examinations repeated 6 months later after re-adaptation to sea-level conditions. The BOLD response, measured at 1.5 T, was severely reduced during acute hypoxia both in the altitude and sea-level adapted states (50% reduction during an average S(a)O(2) of 75%). On average, the BOLD response magnitude was 23% lower in altitude than sea-level adaptation in the normoxic condition, but in the hypoxic condition, no significant differences were found. A small but statistically significant decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was seen in some brain regions during acute hypoxia, whereas ADC was slightly elevated in high altitude as compared to sea-level adaptation. It is concluded that hypoxia significantly diminishes the BOLD response, and the mechanisms underlying this finding are discussed. Furthermore, altitude adaptation may influence both the magnitude of the activation-related response, as well as micro-structural features.

  1. Growth of Han migrants at high altitude in central Asia.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Charles A; Garruto, Ralph M

    2004-01-01

    Han Chinese of low-altitude descent have been living in Qinghai Province of Western China for at least two millennia. For most of this time they have lived at elevations under 2,500 m. However, during the last four decades an increasing number of Han have moved into high-altitude towns at elevations over 3,000 m, and some above 4,000 m. There are now sufficient numbers of Han descendants who have been born and raised at high altitude to allow a comparison of their morphological and physiological growth patterns with low-altitude Han to detect the effect of hypoxia. The field study reported here was conducted by collaborating Chinese and American researchers over a 6-year period, and included 1,227 Han living at high altitude in Qinghai and at low altitude near Beijing. This study demonstrates that Han born and raised at high altitude are smaller and lighter than those at low altitude-particularly as children and adolescents. Slower growth at high altitude may be a consequence of hypoxia, but it also corresponds to poorer economic conditions in rural Qinghai Province, and thus may reflect nutritional inadequacies. Differences in altitude and/or nutrition do not seem to affect thorax dimensions, since, relative to stature, chest dimensions are similar at both high and low altitudes. Nevertheless, lung volumes are higher among Han at high altitude, possibly reflecting the influence of hypoxia on alveolar growth. The hematological values of Han growing up at 3,200 m are not different from those at low altitude-an unusual finding relative to other low-altitude groups that may reflect population differences in response to hypoxia. At 3,800 m and 4,300 m, however, Han show elevated hemoglobin relative to Han at low altitude.

  2. A longitudinal study of cerebral blood flow under hypoxia at high altitude using 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjia; Liu, Jie; Lou, Xin; Zheng, Dandan; Wu, Bing; Wang, Danny J J; Ma, Lin

    2017-02-27

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) may occur with acute exposure to high altitude; however, the CBF of the brain parenchyma has not been studied to date. In this study, identical magnetic resonance scans using arterial spin labeling (ASL) were performed to study the haemodynamic changes at both sea level and high altitude. We found that with acute exposure to high altitude, the CBF in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subjects was higher (P < 0.05), while the CBF of non-AMS subjects was lower (P > 0.05) compared with those at sea level. Moreover, magnetic resonance angiography in both AMS and non-AMS subjects showed a significant increase in the cross-sectional areas of the internal carotid, basilar, and middle cerebral arteries on the first day at high altitude. These findings support that AMS may be related to increased CBF rather than vasodilation; these results contradict most previous studies that reported no relationship between CBF changes and the occurrence of AMS. This discrepancy may be attributed to the use of ASL for CBF measurement at both sea level and high altitude in this study, which has substantial advantages over transcranial Doppler for the assessment of CBF.

  3. A longitudinal study of cerebral blood flow under hypoxia at high altitude using 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjia; Liu, Jie; Lou, Xin; Zheng, Dandan; Wu, Bing; Wang, Danny J. J.; Ma, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) may occur with acute exposure to high altitude; however, the CBF of the brain parenchyma has not been studied to date. In this study, identical magnetic resonance scans using arterial spin labeling (ASL) were performed to study the haemodynamic changes at both sea level and high altitude. We found that with acute exposure to high altitude, the CBF in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subjects was higher (P < 0.05), while the CBF of non-AMS subjects was lower (P > 0.05) compared with those at sea level. Moreover, magnetic resonance angiography in both AMS and non-AMS subjects showed a significant increase in the cross-sectional areas of the internal carotid, basilar, and middle cerebral arteries on the first day at high altitude. These findings support that AMS may be related to increased CBF rather than vasodilation; these results contradict most previous studies that reported no relationship between CBF changes and the occurrence of AMS. This discrepancy may be attributed to the use of ASL for CBF measurement at both sea level and high altitude in this study, which has substantial advantages over transcranial Doppler for the assessment of CBF. PMID:28240265

  4. [Normal ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia at an altitude of 2240 meters].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-García, J C; Arellano-Vega, S L; Regalado-Pineda, J; Pérez-Padilla, J R

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia in healthy residents of Mexico City at 2240 m above sea level. 15 healthy subjects, 10 women and 5 men, were studied (mean age 38; range 26-76). All completed one or two tests of ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia as described by Rebuck-Campbell and Read, respectively. The results were analyzed by linear regression using the minute ventilation as the dependent variable and SaO2 (hypoxia) or PCO2 (hypercapnia) as the independent variables. Seven subjects had very low or no response to hypoxia. The mean hypoxia slope was 0.7 +/- 0.6 L/min/% (+/- SD) and the hypercapnia slope was 3.0 +/- 1.4 L/min/mmHg. The intercepts were 176 +/- 278 for SaO2 and 3.0 +/- 7 for PCO2. A low respiratory response to hypoxia was found in Mexico City Healthy residents. The response to hypercapnia was similar in slope to other studies but had an intercept shifted to lower values. The Mexico City residents showed a behavior typical of patients with chronic hypoxemia or of dwellers at high altitudes.

  5. Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Huicho, Luis

    2007-09-30

    Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude constitute a key component of any set of responses developed to face high altitude hypoxia. Such responses are required ultimately to meet the energy demands necessary for adequate functioning at cell and organism level. After a brief insight on general and cardiopulmonary comparative studies in growing and adult organisms, differences and possible explanations for varying cardiopulmonary pathology, pulmonary artery hypertension, persistent right ventricular predominance and subacute high altitude pulmonary hypertension in different populations of children living at high altitude are discussed. Potential long-term implications of early chronic hypoxic exposure on later diseases are also presented. It is hoped that this review will help the practicing physician working at high altitude to make informed decisions concerning individual pediatric patients, specifically with regard to diagnosis and management of altitude-related cardiopulmonary pathology. Finally, plausibility and the knowledge-base of public health interventions to reduce the risks posed by suboptimal or inadequate postnatal cardiopulmonary responses to high altitude are discussed.

  6. HIGH-ALTITUDE CHAMPIONS: BIRDS THAT LIVE AND MIGRATE AT ALTITUDE.

    PubMed

    Lague, Sabine Lina

    2017-08-24

    High altitude is physiologically challenging for vertebrate life for many reasons, including hypoxia (low environmental oxygen); yet, many birds thrive at altitude. Compared to mammals, birds have additional enhancements to their oxygen transport cascade, the conceptual series of steps responsible for acquiring oxygen from the environment and transporting it to the mitochondria. These adaptations have allowed them to inhabit a number of high-altitude regions. Waterfowl are a taxon prolific at altitude. This mini-review explores the physiological responses of high-altitude waterfowl (geese and ducks), comparing the strategies of lifelong high-altitude residents to those of transient high-altitude performers, providing insight into how birds champion high-altitude life. In particular, this review highlights and contrasts the physiological hypoxia responses of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus), birds that migrate biannually through the Himalayas (4,500-6,500 m), and Andean geese (Chloephaga melanoptera), lifelong residents of the Andes (4,000-5,500m). These two species exhibit markedly different ventilatory and cardiovascular strategies for coping with hypoxia: bar-headed geese robustly increase convective oxygen transport elements (i.e. heart rate and total ventilation) whereas Andean geese rely predominantly on enhancements that are likely morphological in origin (i.e. increases in lung oxygen diffusion and cardiac stroke volume). The mini-review compares the short- and long-term cardiovascular and ventilatory trade-offs of these different physiological strategies and offers hypotheses surrounding their origins. It also draws parallels to high-altitude human physiology and research, and identifies a number of areas of further research. The field of high-altitude avian physiology offers a unique and broadly applicable insight into physiological enhancements in hypoxia. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  7. Can High Altitude Influence Cytokines and Sleep?

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino Lemos, Valdir; dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Lira, Fabio Santos; Rodrigues, Bruno; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2013-01-01

    The number of persons who relocate to regions of high altitude for work, pleasure, sport, or residence increases every year. It is known that the reduced supply of oxygen (O2) induced by acute or chronic increases in altitude stimulates the body to adapt to new metabolic challenges imposed by hypoxia. Sleep can suffer partial fragmentation because of the exposure to high altitudes, and these changes have been described as one of the responsible factors for the many consequences at high altitudes. We conducted a review of the literature during the period from 1987 to 2012. This work explored the relationships among inflammation, hypoxia and sleep in the period of adaptation and examined a novel mechanism that might explain the harmful effects of altitude on sleep, involving increased Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production from several tissues and cells, such as leukocytes and cells from skeletal muscle and brain. PMID:23690660

  8. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... to the eardrum) and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  9. High altitude diving depths.

    PubMed

    Paulev, Poul-Erik; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    In order to make any sea level dive table usable during high altitude diving, a new conversion factor is created. We introduce the standardized equivalent sea depth (SESD), which allows conversion of the actual lake diving depth (ALDD) to an equivalent sea dive depth. SESD is defined as the sea depth in meters or feet for a standardized sea dive, equivalent to a mountain lake dive at any altitude, such that [image omitted] [image omitted] [image omitted] Mountain lakes contain fresh water with a relative density that can be standardized to 1,000 kg m(-3), and sea water can likewise be standardized to a relative density of 1,033 kg m(-3), at the general gravity of 9.80665 m s(-2). The water density ratio (1,000/1,033) refers to the fresh lake water and the standardized sea water densities. Following calculation of the SESD factor, we recommend the use of our simplified diving table or any acceptable sea level dive table with two fundamental guidelines: 1. The classical decompression stages (30, 20, and 10 feet or 9, 6, and 3 m) are corrected to the altitude lake level, dividing the stage depth by the SESD factor. 2. Likewise, the lake ascent rate during diving is equal to the sea ascent rate divided by the SESD factor.

  10. Sleep at high altitude: guesses and facts.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Buenzli, Jana C; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-12-15

    Lowlanders commonly report a poor sleep quality during the first few nights after arriving at high altitude. Polysomnographic studies reveal that reductions in slow wave sleep are the most consistent altitude-induced changes in sleep structure identified by visual scoring. Quantitative spectral analyses of the sleep electroencephalogram have confirmed an altitude-related reduction in the low-frequency power (0.8-4.6 Hz). Although some studies suggest an increase in arousals from sleep at high altitude, this is not a consistent finding. Whether sleep instability at high altitude is triggered by periodic breathing or vice versa is still uncertain. Overnight changes in slow wave-derived encephalographic measures of neuronal synchronization in healthy subjects were less pronounced at moderately high (2,590 m) compared with low altitude (490 m), and this was associated with a decline in sleep-related memory consolidation. Correspondingly, exacerbation of breathing and sleep disturbances experienced by lowlanders with obstructive sleep apnea during a stay at 2,590 m was associated with poor performance in driving simulator tests. These findings suggest that altitude-related alterations in sleep may adversely affect daytime performance. Despite recent advances in our understanding of sleep at altitude, further research is required to better establish the role of gender and age in alterations of sleep at different altitudes, to determine the influence of acclimatization and of altitude-related illness, and to uncover the characteristics of sleep in highlanders that may serve as a study paradigm of sleep in patients exposed to chronic hypoxia due to cardiorespiratory disease.

  11. Early history of high-altitude physiology.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-02-01

    High-altitude physiology can be said to have begun in 1644 when Torricelli described the first mercury barometer and wrote the immortal words "We live submerged at the bottom of an ocean of the element air." Interestingly, the notion of atmospheric pressure had eluded his teacher, the great Galileo. Blaise Pascal was responsible for describing the fall in pressure with increasing altitude, and Otto von Guericke gave a dramatic demonstration of the enormous force that could be developed by atmospheric pressure. Robert Boyle learned of Guericke's experiment and, with Robert Hooke, constructed the first air pump that allowed small animals to be exposed to a low pressure. Hooke also constructed a small low-pressure chamber and exposed himself to a simulated altitude of about 2400 meters. With the advent of ballooning, humans were rapidly exposed to very low pressures, sometimes with tragic results. For example, the French balloon, Zénith, rose to over 8000 m, and two of the three aeronauts succumbed to the hypoxia. Paul Bert was the first person to clearly state that the deleterious effects of high altitude were caused by the low partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), and later research was accelerated by high-altitude stations and expeditions to high altitude.

  12. [Hemoglobin and testosterone: importance on high altitude acclimatization and adaptation].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2011-03-01

    The different types of response mechanisms that the organism uses when exposed to hypoxia include accommodation, acclimatization and adaptation. Accommodation is the initial response to acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia and is characterized by an increase in ventilation and heart rate. Acclimatization is observed in individuals temporarily exposed to high altitude, and to some extent, it enables them to tolerate the high altitudes. In this phase, erythropoiesis is increased, resulting in higher hemoglobin and hematocrit levels to improve oxygen delivery capacity. Adaptation is the process of natural acclimatization where genetical variations and acclimatization play a role in allowing subjects to live without any difficulties at high altitudes. Testosterone is a hormone that regulates erythropoiesis and ventilation and could be associated to the processes of acclimatization and adaptation to high altitude. Excessive erythrocytosis, which leads to chronic mountain sickness, is caused by low arterial oxygen saturation, ventilatory inefficiency and reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia. Testosterone increases during acute exposure to high altitude and also in natives at high altitude with excessive erythrocytosis. Results of current research allow us to conclude that increase in serum testosterone and hemoglobin is adequate for acclimatization, as they improve oxygen transport, but not for high altitude adaptation, since high serum testosterone levels are associated to excessive erythrocytosis.

  13. Genomic insights into adaptation to high-altitude environments

    PubMed Central

    Cheviron, Z A; Brumfield, R T

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular genetic basis of adaptive traits is a central goal of evolutionary genetics. The cold, hypoxic conditions of high-altitude habitats impose severe metabolic demands on endothermic vertebrates, and understanding how high-altitude endotherms cope with the combined effects of hypoxia and cold can provide important insights into the process of adaptive evolution. The physiological responses to high-altitude stress have been the subject of over a century of research, and recent advances in genomic technologies have opened up exciting opportunities to explore the molecular genetic basis of adaptive physiological traits. Here, we review recent literature on the use of genomic approaches to study adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in terrestrial vertebrates, and explore opportunities provided by newly developed technologies to address unanswered questions in high-altitude adaptation at a genomic scale. PMID:21934702

  14. Energy at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hill, N E; Stacey, M J; Woods, D R

    2011-03-01

    For the military doctor, an understanding of the metabolic effects of high altitude (HA) exposure is highly relevant. This review examines the acute metabolic challenge and subsequent changes in nutritional homeostasis that occur when troops deploy rapidly to HA. Key factors that impact on metabolism include the hypoxic-hypobaric environment, physical exercise and diet. Expected metabolic changes include augmentation of basal metabolic rate (BMR), decreased availability of oxygen in peripheral metabolic tissues, reduction in VO2 max, increased glucose dependency and lactate accumulation during exercise. The metabolic demands of exercise at HA are crucial. Equivalent activity requires greater effort and more energy than it does at sea level. Soldiers working at HA show high energy expenditure and this may exceed energy intake significantly. Energy intake at HA is affected adversely by reduced availability, reduced appetite and changes in endocrine parameters. Energy imbalance and loss of body water result in weight loss, which is extremely common at HA. Loss of fat predominates over loss of fat-free mass. This state resembles starvation and the preferential primary fuel source shifts from carbohydrate towards fat, reducing performance efficiency. However, these adverse effects can be mitigated by increasing energy intake in association with a high carbohydrate ration. Commanders must ensure that individuals are motivated, educated, strongly encouraged and empowered to meet their energy needs in order to maximise mission-effectiveness.

  15. The Use of Dexamethasone in Support of High-Altitude Ground Operations: Review of the Literature & Current Training of U.S. Special Operations Medical Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-14

    that can alter judgment and physical performance, potentially impacting mission success. The effect of hypobaric/high-altitude hypoxia is ubiquitous...capacity at high altitudes [8]. Additionally, the combination of low temperatures, hypoxia , strong winds, and dehydration can readily induce...physiological stressors such as hypoxia , dehydration, and cold injury as altitude increases. These stressors further contribute to declines in physical

  16. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High Altitude Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lt Col G K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs) and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA) every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV) light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc.), cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc.) nail changes (koilonychias), airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma) are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place.

  18. High Altitude Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lt. Col. G K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs) and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA) every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV) light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc.), cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc.) nail changes (koilonychias), airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma) are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place. PMID:28216727

  19. High altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdo, Renee Anna; Moller, David

    1990-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000 plus feet, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The Universities Space Research Association, in cooperation with NASA, is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 feet for six hours at Mach 0.7, while carrying 3,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum range of 6,000 miles. In consideration of the novel nature of this project, the pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforeseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable - a joined-wing, a biplane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The performance of each configuration was analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  20. Effects of acute hypoxia at moderate altitude on stroke volume and cardiac output during exercise.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Taira; Maegawa, Taketeru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Komatsu, Yutaka; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Nagai, Ryozo; Kawahara, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    It has been unclear how acute hypoxia at moderate altitude affects stroke volume (SV), an index of cardiac function, during exercise. The present study was conducted to reveal whether acute normobaric hypoxia might alter SV during exercise.Nine healthy male subjects performed maximal exercise testing under normobaric normoxic, and normobaric hypoxic conditions (O(2): 14.4%) in a randomized order. A novel thoracic impedance method was used to continuously measure SV and cardiac output (CO) during exercise. Acute hypoxia decreased maximal work rate (hypoxia; 247 + or - 6 [SE] versus normoxia; 267 + or - 8 W, P < 0.005) and VO(2) max (hypoxia; 2761 + or - 99 versus normoxia; 3039 + or - 133 mL/min, P < 0.005). Under hypoxic conditions, SV and CO at maximal exercise decreased (SV: hypoxia; 145 + or - 11 versus normoxia; 163 + or - 11 mL, P < 0.05, CO: hypoxia; 26.7 + or - 2.1 versus normoxia; 30.2 + or - 1.8 L/min, P < 0.05). In acute hypoxia, SV during submaximal exercise at identical work rate decreased. Furthermore, in hypoxia, 4 of 9 subjects attained their highest SV at maximal exercise, while in normoxia, 8 of 9 subjects did.Acute normobaric hypoxia attenuated the increment of SV and CO during exercise, and SV reached a plateau earlier under hypoxia than in normoxia. Cardiac function during exercise at this level of acute normobaric hypoxia might be attenuated.

  1. Hypoxic hypoxia at moderate altitudes: review of the state of the science.

    PubMed

    Petrassi, Frank A; Hodkinson, Peter D; Walters, P Lynne; Gaydos, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    Unpressurized aircraft routinely operate at altitudes where hypoxia may be of concern. A systematic literature review was conducted regarding hypoxic impairment, including mental functions, sensory deficits, and other pertinent research findings that may affect aviation-related duties at moderate altitude (8000 to 15,000 ft/2438 to 4572 m). The results of this review suggest that cognitive and psychomotor deficits may include learning, reaction time, decision-making, and certain types of memory. However, results are difficult to quantify and reliably reproduce. Inconsistency of results may be related to the subtlety of deficits compared to high altitude, differences among individual compensatory mechanisms, variation in methodology or sensitivity of metrics, presence or absence of exercise, heterogeneous neuronal central nervous system (CNS) response, and interindividual variation. Literature regarding hypoxic visual decrements is more consistent. Rod photoreceptors are more susceptible to hypoxia; visual degradation has been demonstrated at 4000 to 5000 ft (1219 to 1524 m) under scotopic and 10,000 ft (3048 m) under photopic conditions. Augmented night vision goggle resolution demonstrates more resilience to mild hypoxic effects than the unaided eye under starlight conditions. Hypocapnia enhances visual sensitivity and contrast discrimination. Hyperventilation with resulting respiratory alkalosis and cerebral vasoconstriction may confound both cognitive/ psychomotor and visual experimental results. Future research should include augmentation of validated neuropsychological metrics (surrogate investigational end points) with actual flight metrics, investigation of mixed gas formulations, contribution of hypocapnic vasoconstrictive effects on hypoxic performance, and further investigation into cellular- and systems-level approaches for heterogeneous CNS response. Research is also required into the contribution of mild-moderate hypoxia in human factors- and spatial

  2. Cardiovascular and renal effects of chronic exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Abdias; Escudero, Elizabeth; Pando, Jackeline; Sharma, Shailendra; Johnson, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Over 140 million people live at high altitude, defined as living at an altitude of 2400 m or more above sea level. Subjects living under these conditions are continuously living under hypoxic conditions and, depending on the population, various adaptations have developed. Interestingly, subjects living chronically at high altitude appear to have a decreased frequency of obesity, diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, these benefits on health are balanced by the frequent development of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, it has been recognized that subjects living at high altitude are at risk for developing high-altitude renal syndrome (HARS), which is a syndrome consisting of polycythemia, hyperuricemia, systemic hypertension and microalbuminuria, but with preserved glomerular filtration rate. More studies should be performed to characterize the mechanisms and etiology of HARS; as such studies may be of benefit not only to the high-altitude population, but also to better understanding of the renal consequences of acute and chronic hypoxia.

  3. Medical Problems Related to Altitude in: Human Performance Physiology and Environmental Medicine at Terrestrial Extremes. Chapter 14,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, high altitude pulmonary edema, high altitude retinal hemorrhages, qeneralizellpripheral edema...discusses medical problems associated with the acute hypoxia of altitude in- cluding: acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, high altitude...Acute Hypoxia a. Acute Mountain Sickness b. High Altitude Cerebral Edema c. High Altitude Pulmonary Edema d. High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhages e

  4. Electroretinographic assessment of retinal function at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Andreas; Willmann, Gabriel; Fischer, M Dominik; Schommer, Kai; Messias, André; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Gekeler, Florian

    2013-08-01

    Although hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of many common and well studied retinal diseases, little is known about the effects of high-altitude hypoxia on retinal function. The aim of the present study was to assess retinal function during exposure to high-altitude hypoxia using electroretinography (ERG). This work is related to the Tübingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO) study. Electroretinography was performed in 14 subjects in Tübingen, Germany (341 m) and at high altitude at La Capanna Regina Margherita, Italy (4,559 m) using an extended protocol to assess functional integrity of various retinal layers. To place findings in the context of acute mountain sickness, correlations between ERG measurements and oxygen saturation, heart rate, and scores of acute mountain sickness (AMS) were calculated. At high altitude, the maximum response of the scotopic sensitivity function, the implicit times of the a- and b-wave of the combined rod-cone responses, and the implicit times of the photopic negative responses (PhNR) were significantly altered. A-wave slopes and i-waves were significantly decreased at high altitude. The strongest correlation was found for PhNR and O2 saturation (r = 0.68; P < 0.05). Of all tested correlations, only the photopic b-wave implicit time (10 cd·s/m(2)) was significantly correlated with severity of AMS (r = 0.57; P < 0.05). ERG data show that retinal function of inner, outer, and ganglion cell layer is altered at high-altitude hypoxia. Interestingly, the most affected ERG parameters are related to combined rod-cone responses, which indicate that phototransduction and visual processing, especially under conditions of rod-cone interaction, are primarily affected at high altitude.

  5. Energy metabolism and the high-altitude environment.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    At high altitude the barometric pressure falls, challenging oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, whilst hypoxia is not the only physiological stress encountered at high altitude, low arterial P(O2) is a sustained feature, even after allowing adequate time for acclimatization. Cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism is altered in subjects at, or returning from, high altitude. In the heart, energetic reserve falls, as indicated by lower phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but in the hypoxic rat heart fatty acid oxidation and respiratory capacity are decreased, whilst pyruvate oxidation is also lower after sustained hypoxic exposure. In skeletal muscle, there is not a consensus. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m) a loss of muscle mitochondrial density is seen, but this was not observed in a simulated ascent of Everest in hypobaric chambers. At more moderate high altitude, decreased respiratory capacity may occur without changes in mitochondrial volume density, and fat oxidation may be downregulated, although this is not seen in all studies. The underlying mechanisms, including the possible role of hypoxia-signalling pathways, remain to be resolved, particularly in light of confounding factors in the high-altitude environment. In high-altitude-adapted Tibetan natives, however, there is evidence of natural selection centred around the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, and metabolic features in this population (e.g. low cardiac phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios, increased cardiac glucose uptake and lower muscle mitochondrial densities) share similarities with those in acclimatized lowlanders, supporting a possible role for the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway in the metabolic response of cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism to high altitude.

  6. The yak genome and adaptation to life at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qiang; Zhang, Guojie; Ma, Tao; Qian, Wubin; Wang, Junyi; Ye, Zhiqiang; Cao, Changchang; Hu, Quanjun; Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Ma, Jian; Lewin, Harris A; Qian, Xiaoju; Lang, Yongshan; Zhou, Ran; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jinquan; Liao, Shengguang; Pan, Shengkai; Lu, Xu; Hou, Haolong; Wang, Yan; Zang, Xuetao; Yin, Ye; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Zhaofeng; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhang, Dawei; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Shengxiang; Long, Ruijun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Lenstra, Johannes A; Cooper, David N; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianquan

    2012-07-01

    Domestic yaks (Bos grunniens) provide meat and other necessities for Tibetans living at high altitude on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and in adjacent regions. Comparison between yak and the closely related low-altitude cattle (Bos taurus) is informative in studying animal adaptation to high altitude. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of a female domestic yak generated using Illumina-based technology at 65-fold coverage. Genomic comparisons between yak and cattle identify an expansion in yak of gene families related to sensory perception and energy metabolism, as well as an enrichment of protein domains involved in sensing the extracellular environment and hypoxic stress. Positively selected and rapidly evolving genes in the yak lineage are also found to be significantly enriched in functional categories and pathways related to hypoxia and nutrition metabolism. These findings may have important implications for understanding adaptation to high altitude in other animal species and for hypoxia-related diseases in humans.

  7. Acclimatization to middle altitude hypoxia protects against developmental and cognitive deficits caused by acute fetal hypoxia in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Lang; Sun, Yong-Mei; Li, Chuan-Yu; Niu, Hai-Chen; Su, Min; Wang, Jing-Kun

    2017-04-25

    Acute fetal hypoxia (AFH) can elicit postnatal motor deficits and cognitive impairments. To test whether lifelong acclimatization to middle altitude (MA) hypoxia has protective effects on the impairments caused by AFH, ICR mice bred at 1 900 m altitude for 6-7 generations were evaluated under AFH. On gestation day 9 (GD 9), 13 (GD 13) or 17 (GD 17), pregnant mice received a single exposure to acute hypoxia (7% O2, 6 h). Physiological and neurodevelopmental behaviors, motor function (open field), spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze), and anxiety level (elevated plus maze) were examined in the offspring from neonate to adulthood. In the neonatal age, among all the physiological and behavioral landmarks, almost no differences were found in the hypoxia groups. In the juvenile period, no obvious impairments of motor function and anxiety level were found in the hypoxia groups. In the adult period, no obvious impairment of motor function was found in hypoxia groups; Interestingly, AFH groups' offspring showed normal or enhanced long-term spatial memory ability after AFH. These data suggest that AFH cause little abnormalities in the offspring of MA-adapted mice. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, the neuronal numbers in behavior-related brain areas (accumbens nucleus, basal amygdala and hippocampus) were counted, and the physiological parameters of the blood were measured. The morphological data showed that no obvious neuronal necrosis was found in all hypoxia groups. In addition, blood tests showed that red blood corpuscle count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit levels in mice raised at MA were markedly higher in both males and females, compared with controls raised at the sea level. These data suggest that lifelong acclimatization to MA hypoxia has protective effects against development delay, motor deficits and spatial learning and memory impairments induced by AFH, and the protective effects may be due to higher hemoglobin concentration

  8. Comparative aspects of high-altitude adaptation in human populations.

    PubMed

    Moore, L G; Armaza, F; Villena, M; Vargas, E

    2000-01-01

    The conditions and duration of high-altitude residence differ among high-altitude populations. The Tibetan Plateau is larger, more geographically remote, and appears to have been occupied for a longer period of time than the Andean Altiplano and, certainly, the Rocky Mountain region as judged by archaeological, linguistic, genetic and historical data. In addition, the Tibetan gene pool is less likely to have been constricted by small numbers of initial migrants and/or severe population decline, and to have been less subject to genetic admixture with lowland groups. Comparing Tibetans to other high-altitude residents demonstrates that Tibetans have less intrauterine growth retardation better neonatal oxygenation higher ventilation and hypoxic ventilatory response lower pulmonary arterial pressure and resistance lower hemoglobin concentrations and less susceptibility to CMS These findings are consistent with the conclusion that "adaptation" to high altitude increases with time, considering time in generations of high-altitude exposure. Future research is needed to compare the extent of IUGR and neonatal oxygenation in South American high-altitude residents of Andean vs. European ancestry, controlling for gestational age and other characteristics. Another fruitful line of inquiry is likely to be determining whether persons with CMS or other altitude-associated problems experienced exaggerated hypoxia during prenatal or neonatal life. Finally, the comparison of high-altitude populations with respect to the frequencies of genes involved in oxygen sensing and physiologic response to hypoxia will be useful, once candidate genes have been identified.

  9. Breathing and sleep at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Philip N; Lucas, Samuel J E; Burgess, Keith R

    2013-09-15

    We provide an updated review on the current understanding of breathing and sleep at high altitude in humans. We conclude that: (1) progressive changes in pH initiated by the respiratory alkalosis do not underlie early (<48 h) ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) because this still proceeds in the absence of such alkalosis; (2) for VAH of longer duration (>48 h), complex cellular and neurochemical re-organization occurs both in the peripheral chemoreceptors as well as within the central nervous system. The latter is likely influenced by central acid-base changes secondary to the extent of the initial respiratory responses to initial exposure to high altitude; (3) sleep at high altitude is disturbed by various factors, but principally by periodic breathing; (4) the extent of periodic breathing during sleep at altitude intensifies with duration and severity of exposure; (5) complex interactions between hypoxic-induced enhancement in peripheral and central chemoreflexes and cerebral blood flow--leading to higher loop gain and breathing instability--underpin this development of periodic breathing during sleep; (6) because periodic breathing may elevate rather than reduce mean SaO2 during sleep, this may represent an adaptive rather than maladaptive response; (7) although oral acetazolamide is an effective means to reduce periodic breathing by 50-80%, recent studies using positive airway pressure devices to increase dead space, hyponotics and theophylline are emerging but appear less practical and effective compared to acetazolamide. Finally, we suggest avenues for future research, and discuss implications for understanding sleep pathology.

  10. High-Altitude Illnesses: Physiology, Risk Factors, Prevention, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    High-altitude illnesses encompass the pulmonary and cerebral syndromes that occur in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The most common syndrome is acute mountain sickness (AMS) which usually begins within a few hours of ascent and typically consists of headache variably accompanied by loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, disturbed sleep, fatigue, and dizziness. With millions of travelers journeying to high altitudes every year and sleeping above 2,500 m, acute mountain sickness is a wide-spread clinical condition. Risk factors include home elevation, maximum altitude, sleeping altitude, rate of ascent, latitude, age, gender, physical condition, intensity of exercise, pre-acclimatization, genetic make-up, and pre-existing diseases. At higher altitudes, sleep disturbances may become more profound, mental performance is impaired, and weight loss may occur. If ascent is rapid, acetazolamide can reduce the risk of developing AMS, although a number of high-altitude travelers taking acetazolamide will still develop symptoms. Ibuprofen can be effective for headache. Symptoms can be rapidly relieved by descent, and descent is mandatory, if at all possible, for the management of the potentially fatal syndromes of high-altitude pulmonary and cerebral edema. The purpose of this review is to combine a discussion of specific risk factors, prevention, and treatment options with a summary of the basic physiologic responses to the hypoxia of altitude to provide a context for managing high-altitude illnesses and advising the non-acclimatized high-altitude traveler. PMID:23908794

  11. Increased Intraregional Synchronized Neural Activity in Adult Brain After Prolonged Adaptation to High-Altitude Hypoxia: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Fan, Cunxiu; Li, Jinqiang; Han, Qiaoqing; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Zhang, Jiaxing

    2016-03-01

    The human brain is intrinsically plastic such that its functional architecture can be reorganized in response to environmental pressures and physiological changes. However, it remains unclear whether a compensatory modification of spontaneous neural activity occurs in adult brain during prolonged high-altitude (HA) adaptation. In this study, we obtained resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) images in 16 adults who have immigrated to Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (2300-4400 m) for 2 years and in 16 age-matched sea level (SL) controls. A validated regional homogeneity (Reho) method was employed to investigate the local synchronization of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals. Seed connectivity analysis was carried out subsequently. Cognitive and physiological assessments were made and correlated with the image metrics. Compared with SL controls, global mean Reho was significantly increased in HA immigrants as well as a regional increase in the right inferolateral sensorimotor cortex. Furthermore, mean z-Reho value extracted within the inferolateral sensorimotor area showed trend-level significant inverse correlation with memory search reaction time in HA immigrants. These observations, for the first time, provide evidence of adult brain resilience of spontaneous neural activity after long-term HA exposure without inherited and developmental effects. Resting-state fMRI could yield valuable information for central mechanisms underlying respiratory and cognitive compensations in adults during prolonged environmentally hypoxic adaptation, paving the way for future HA-adaptive training.

  12. Genetically based low oxygen affinities of felid hemoglobins: lack of biochemical adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in the snow leopard

    PubMed Central

    Janecka, Jan E.; Nielsen, Simone S. E.; Andersen, Sidsel D.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Weber, Roy E.; Anderson, Trevor; Storz, Jay F.; Fago, Angela

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetically based modifications of hemoglobin (Hb) function that increase blood–O2 affinity are hallmarks of hypoxia adaptation in vertebrates. Among mammals, felid Hbs are unusual in that they have low intrinsic O2 affinities and reduced sensitivities to the allosteric cofactor 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG). This combination of features compromises the acclimatization capacity of blood–O2 affinity and has led to the hypothesis that felids have a restricted physiological niche breadth relative to other mammals. In seeming defiance of this conjecture, the snow leopard (Panthera uncia) has an extraordinarily broad elevational distribution and occurs at elevations above 6000 m in the Himalayas. Here, we characterized structural and functional variation of big cat Hbs and investigated molecular mechanisms of Hb adaptation and allosteric regulation that may contribute to the extreme hypoxia tolerance of the snow leopard. Experiments revealed that purified Hbs from snow leopard and African lion exhibited equally low O2 affinities and DPG sensitivities. Both properties are primarily attributable to a single amino acid substitution, β2His→Phe, which occurred in the common ancestor of Felidae. Given the low O2 affinity and reduced regulatory capacity of feline Hbs, the extreme hypoxia tolerance of snow leopards must be attributable to compensatory modifications of other steps in the O2-transport pathway. PMID:26246610

  13. Genetically based low oxygen affinities of felid hemoglobins: lack of biochemical adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in the snow leopard.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Jan E; Nielsen, Simone S E; Andersen, Sidsel D; Hoffmann, Federico G; Weber, Roy E; Anderson, Trevor; Storz, Jay F; Fago, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Genetically based modifications of hemoglobin (Hb) function that increase blood-O2 affinity are hallmarks of hypoxia adaptation in vertebrates. Among mammals, felid Hbs are unusual in that they have low intrinsic O2 affinities and reduced sensitivities to the allosteric cofactor 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG). This combination of features compromises the acclimatization capacity of blood-O2 affinity and has led to the hypothesis that felids have a restricted physiological niche breadth relative to other mammals. In seeming defiance of this conjecture, the snow leopard (Panthera uncia) has an extraordinarily broad elevational distribution and occurs at elevations above 6000 m in the Himalayas. Here, we characterized structural and functional variation of big cat Hbs and investigated molecular mechanisms of Hb adaptation and allosteric regulation that may contribute to the extreme hypoxia tolerance of the snow leopard. Experiments revealed that purified Hbs from snow leopard and African lion exhibited equally low O2 affinities and DPG sensitivities. Both properties are primarily attributable to a single amino acid substitution, β2His→Phe, which occurred in the common ancestor of Felidae. Given the low O2 affinity and reduced regulatory capacity of feline Hbs, the extreme hypoxia tolerance of snow leopards must be attributable to compensatory modifications of other steps in the O2-transport pathway.

  14. A genetic mechanism for Tibetan high-altitude adaptation.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Felipe R; Huff, Chad; Myllymäki, Mikko; Olenchock, Benjamin; Swierczek, Sabina; Tashi, Tsewang; Gordeuk, Victor; Wuren, Tana; Ri-Li, Ge; McClain, Donald A; Khan, Tahsin M; Koul, Parvaiz A; Guchhait, Prasenjit; Salama, Mohamed E; Xing, Jinchuan; Semenza, Gregg L; Liberzon, Ella; Wilson, Andrew; Simonson, Tatum S; Jorde, Lynn B; Kaelin, William G; Koivunen, Peppi; Prchal, Josef T

    2014-09-01

    Tibetans do not exhibit increased hemoglobin concentration at high altitude. We describe a high-frequency missense mutation in the EGLN1 gene, which encodes prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2), that contributes to this adaptive response. We show that a variant in EGLN1, c.[12C>G; 380G>C], contributes functionally to the Tibetan high-altitude phenotype. PHD2 triggers the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which mediate many physiological responses to hypoxia, including erythropoiesis. The PHD2 p.[Asp4Glu; Cys127Ser] variant exhibits a lower K(m) value for oxygen, suggesting that it promotes increased HIF degradation under hypoxic conditions. Whereas hypoxia stimulates the proliferation of wild-type erythroid progenitors, the proliferation of progenitors with the c.[12C>G; 380G>C] mutation in EGLN1 is significantly impaired under hypoxic culture conditions. We show that the c.[12C>G; 380G>C] mutation originated ∼8,000 years ago on the same haplotype previously associated with adaptation to high altitude. The c.[12C>G; 380G>C] mutation abrogates hypoxia-induced and HIF-mediated augmentation of erythropoiesis, which provides a molecular mechanism for the observed protection of Tibetans from polycythemia at high altitude.

  15. Cardiac and vascular disease prior to hatching in chick embryos incubated at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Salinas, C E; Blanco, C E; Villena, M; Camm, E J; Tuckett, J D; Weerakkody, R A; Kane, A D; Shelley, A M; Wooding, F B P; Quy, M; Giussani, D A

    2010-02-01

    The partial contributions of reductions in fetal nutrition and oxygenation to slow fetal growth and a developmental origin of cardiovascular disease remain unclear. By combining high altitude with the chick embryo model, we have previously isolated the direct effects of high-altitude hypoxia on growth. This study isolated the direct effects of high-altitude hypoxia on cardiovascular development. Fertilized eggs from sea-level or high-altitude hens were incubated at sea level or high altitude. Fertilized eggs from sea-level hens were also incubated at high altitude with oxygen supplementation. High altitude promoted embryonic growth restriction, cardiomegaly and aortic wall thickening, effects which could be prevented by incubating eggs from high-altitude hens at sea level or by incubating eggs from sea-level hens at high altitude with oxygen supplementation. Embryos from high-altitude hens showed reduced effects of altitude incubation on growth restriction but not on cardiovascular remodeling. The data show that: (1) high-altitude hypoxia promotes embryonic cardiac and vascular disease already evident prior to hatching and that this is associated with growth restriction; (2) the effects can be prevented by increased oxygenation; and (3) the effects are different in embryos from sea-level or high-altitude hens.

  16. High Altitude Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Supersonics Project is presented. The overview includes project objectives, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Technical challenges include: 1) Environmental impact of supersonic cruise emissions is greater due to higher flight altitudes which makes emissions reduction increasingly important. 2) Accurate prediction tools to enable combustor designs that reduce emissions at supersonic cruise are needed as well as intelligent systems to minimize emissions. 3) Combustor operating conditions at supersonic cruise are different than at subsonic cruise since inlet fuel and air temperatures are considerably increased.

  17. Elevated Suicide Rates at High Altitude: Sociodemographic and Health Issues May Be to Blame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Marian E.; Valley, Morgan A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.; Hedegaard, Holly; Thomas, Deborah; Stallones, Lorann; Honigman, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes; some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. We examined 8,871 suicides recorded in 2006 in 15 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System, with the victim's home county altitude determined from the National Elevation Dataset through FIPS code matching. We grouped cases by altitude (low less…

  18. Elevated Suicide Rates at High Altitude: Sociodemographic and Health Issues May Be to Blame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Marian E.; Valley, Morgan A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.; Hedegaard, Holly; Thomas, Deborah; Stallones, Lorann; Honigman, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes; some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. We examined 8,871 suicides recorded in 2006 in 15 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System, with the victim's home county altitude determined from the National Elevation Dataset through FIPS code matching. We grouped cases by altitude (low less…

  19. Acute high-altitude sickness.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M; Swenson, Erik R; Bärtsch, Peter

    2017-01-01

    At any point 1-5 days following ascent to altitudes ≥2500 m, individuals are at risk of developing one of three forms of acute altitude illness: acute mountain sickness, a syndrome of nonspecific symptoms including headache, lassitude, dizziness and nausea; high-altitude cerebral oedema, a potentially fatal illness characterised by ataxia, decreased consciousness and characteristic changes on magnetic resonance imaging; and high-altitude pulmonary oedema, a noncardiogenic form of pulmonary oedema resulting from excessive hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction which can be fatal if not recognised and treated promptly. This review provides detailed information about each of these important clinical entities. After reviewing the clinical features, epidemiology and current understanding of the pathophysiology of each disorder, we describe the current pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches to the prevention and treatment of these diseases. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  20. Genetics of human origin and evolution: high-altitude adaptations.

    PubMed

    Bigham, Abigail W

    2016-12-01

    High altitude, defined as elevations lying above 2500m sea level, challenges human survival and reproduction. This environment provides a natural experimental design wherein specific populations, Andeans, Ethiopians, and Tibetans, have lived in a chronic hypoxia state for millennia. These human groups have overcome the low ambient oxygen tension of high elevation via unique physiologic and genetic adaptations. Genomic studies have identified several genes that underlie high-altitude adaptive phenotypes, many of which are central components of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) pathway. Further study of mechanisms governing the adaptive changes responsible for high-altitude adaptation will contribute to our understanding of the molecular basis of evolutionary change and assist in the functional annotation of the human genome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulated rugby performance at 1550-m altitude following adaptation to intermittent normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Michael J; Hinckson, Erica A; Wood, Matthew R; Hopkins, Will G

    2008-11-01

    Team-sport athletes who normally reside at sea level occasionally play games at altitudes sufficient to impair endurance performance. To investigate the effect of intermittent normobaric hypoxic exposure on performance in generic and game-specific tests at altitude, 22 senior club level rugby players performed baseline tests before single-blind random assignment to one of three groups: hypoxia-altitude (n=9), normoxia-altitude (n=6), and normoxia-sea level (n=7). The hypoxia-altitude group underwent 9-13 sessions of intermittent hypoxic exposure (concentration of inspired oxygen=13-10%) over 15 days, then repeated the performance tests within 12h of travelling to 1550m. The normoxia-altitude group underwent placebo exposures by breathing room air before repeating the tests at altitude, whereas the normoxia-sea level group underwent placebo exposures before repeating the tests at sea level. Hypoxic exposure consisted of alternately breathing 6min hypoxic gas and 4min ambient air for 1h at rest. Performance measures gathered at each testing session were maximum speed, sub-maximum heart-rate speed and sub-maximum lactate speed during a 20-m incremental running test, mean time in six 70-m sprints, repetitive explosive power and other measures from seven 5.5-min circuits of a rugby simulation. Repetitive explosive power ( approximately -16%) and 20-m shuttle performance ( approximately -3%) decreased substantially at altitude compared to sea level. Acclimatisation to hypoxia had a beneficial effect on sub-maximum heart rate and lactate speed but little effect on other performance measures. In conclusion, 1550-m altitude substantially impaired some measures of performance and the effects of prior adaptation via 9-13 sessions of intermittent hypoxia were mostly unclear.

  2. High-altitude physiology and pathophysiology: implications and relevance for intensive care medicine

    PubMed Central

    Grocott, Michael; Montgomery, Hugh; Vercueil, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Cellular hypoxia is a fundamental mechanism of injury in the critically ill. The study of human responses to hypoxia occurring as a consequence of hypobaria defines the fields of high-altitude medicine and physiology. A new paradigm suggests that the physiological and pathophysiological responses to extreme environmental challenges (for example, hypobaric hypoxia, hyper-baria, microgravity, cold, heat) may be similar to responses seen in critical illness. The present review explores the idea that human responses to the hypoxia of high altitude may be used as a means of exploring elements of the pathophysiology of critical illness. PMID:17291330

  3. Metabolic aspects of high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ri-Li; Simonson, Tatum S; Gordeuk, Victor; Prchal, Josef T; McClain, Donald A

    2015-11-01

    What is the topic of this review? The topic of this review is how Tibetans have adapted genetically to high altitude, particularly with reference to altitude-induced changes in metabolism. What advances does it highlight? It highlights recent work on metabolic phenotyping in Tibetans and demonstrates that selected genetic haplotypes influence their metabolism of fats and glucose. Recent studies have identified genes involved in high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Three of these genes (EPAS1, EGLN1 and PPARA) are associated with decreased haemoglobin levels compared with non-Tibetans living at altitude. Consistent with the phenotype, EGLN1 in Tibetans has a gain-of-function mutation that confers a higher affinity for oxygen, hence less sensitivity to hypoxia. Considering the demands imposed upon metabolism in meeting energy demands despite limitations on fuel oxidation, we hypothesized that other selected genes might alter metabolism to allow adaptation to altitude despite the desensitization of the upstream hypoxia sensing caused by the EGLN1 mutation that results in the failure to sense hypoxia. A shift in fuel preference to glucose oxidation and glycolysis at the expense of fatty acid oxidation would provide adaptation to decreased oxygen availability. Measurements of serum metabolites from Tibetans living at high altitude are consistent with this hypothesis; the EPAS1 haplotype is significantly associated with increased lactate levels (suggesting increased anaerobic metabolism), and the PPARA haplotype and serum free fatty acids are positively related (suggesting decreased fat oxidation). These data suggest that the high-altitude adaptations may offer protection from diabetes at high altitude but increase the risk of diabetes at lower elevations and/or with adoption of a non-traditional diet. It should also be considered in future work in the field that because iron is a cofactor for EGLN1, there may be significant associations of phenotypes with the

  4. AltitudeOmics: The Basic Biology of Human Acclimatization to High Altitude. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    exposed to high altitude, and we propose to treat chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases where hypoxia is a threat. REFERENCES 1. Amann M...invasive arterial pressure in cardiovascular disease . Anaesthesia 65, 1119–1125. Brugniaux JV, Hodges AN, Hanly PJ & Poulin MJ (2007). Cerebrovascular...Goudoever J, Westerhof BE, van Lieshout JJ. Pulse contour cardiac output derived from non-invasive arterial pressure in cardiovascular disease

  5. Reducing body fat with altitude hypoxia training in swimmers: role of blood perfusion to skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Chia, Michael; Liao, Chin-An; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Wen-Chih; Hou, Chien-Wen; Yu, Szu-Hsien; Harris, M Brennan; Hsu, Tung-Shiung; Lee, Shin-Da; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-02-28

    Swimmers tend to have greater body fat than athletes from other sports. The purpose of the study was to examine changes in body composition after altitude hypoxia exposure and the role of blood distribution to the skeletal muscle in swimmers. With a constant training volume of 12.3 km/day, young male swimmers (N = 10, 14.8 ± 0.5 years) moved from sea-level to a higher altitude of 2,300 meters. Body composition was measured before and after translocation to altitude using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) along with 8 control male subjects who resided at sea level for the same period of time. To determine the effects of hypoxia on muscle blood perfusion, total hemoglobin concentration (THC) was traced by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in the triceps and quadriceps muscles under glucose-ingested and insulin-secreted conditions during hypoxia exposure (16% O2) after training. While no change in body composition was found in the control group, subjects who trained at altitude had unequivocally decreased fat mass (-1.7 ± 0.3 kg, -11.4%) with increased lean mass (+0.8 ± 0.2 kg, +1.5%). Arterial oxygen saturation significantly decreased with increased plasma lactate during hypoxia recovery mimicking 2,300 meters at altitude (~93% versus ~97%). Intriguingly, hypoxia resulted in elevated muscle THC, and sympathetic nervous activities occurred in parallel with greater-percent oxygen saturation in both muscle groups. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that increased blood distribution to the skeletal muscle under postprandial condition may contribute to the reciprocally increased muscle mass and decreased body mass after a 3-week altitude exposure in swimmers.

  6. Antioxidant defense and oxidative damage vary widely among high-altitude residents.

    PubMed

    Janocha, Allison J; Comhair, Suzy A A; Basnyat, Buddha; Neupane, Maniraj; Gebremedhin, Amha; Khan, Anam; Ricci, Kristin S; Zhang, Renliang; Erzurum, Serpil C; Beall, Cynthia M

    2017-07-20

    People living at high altitude experience unavoidable low oxygen levels (hypoxia). While acute hypoxia causes an increase in oxidative stress and damage despite higher antioxidant activity, the consequences of chronic hypoxia are poorly understood. The aim of the present study is to assess antioxidant activity and oxidative damage in high-altitude natives and upward migrants. Individuals from two indigenous high-altitude populations (Amhara, n = 39), (Sherpa, n = 34), one multigenerational high-altitude population (Oromo, n = 42), one upward migrant population (Nepali, n = 12), and two low-altitude reference populations (Amhara, n = 29; Oromo, n = 18) provided plasma for measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as a marker of antioxidant capacity, and urine for measurement of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as a marker of DNA oxidative damage. High-altitude Amhara and Sherpa had the highest SOD activity, while highland Oromo and Nepalis had the lowest among high-altitude populations. High-altitude Amhara had the lowest DNA damage, Sherpa intermediate levels, and high-altitude Oromo had the highest. High-altitude residence alone does not associate with high antioxidant defenses; residence length appears to be influential. The single-generation upward migrant sample had the lowest defense and nearly the highest DNA damage. The two high-altitude resident samples with millennia of residence had higher defenses than the two with multiple or single generations of residence. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ergogenic properties of metformin in simulated high altitude.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Rebecca L; Paris, Hunter L; Binns, Scott E; Davis, Janelle L; Beals, Joseph W; Melby, Christopher L; Luckasen, Gary J; Hickey, Matthew S; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L; Bell, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Metformin augments glucose/glycogen regulation and may acutely promote fatigue resistance during high-intensity exercise. In hypobaric environments, such as high altitude, the important contribution of carbohydrates to physiological function is accentuated as glucose/glycogen dependence is increased. Because hypoxia/hypobaria decreases insulin sensitivity, replenishing skeletal muscle glycogen in high altitude becomes challenging and subsequent physical performance may be compromised. We hypothesized that in conditions where glycogen repletion was critical to physical outcomes, metformin would attenuate hypoxia-mediated decrements in exercise performance. On three separate randomly ordered occasions, 13 healthy men performed glycogen-depleting exercise and ingested a low-carbohydrate dinner (1200 kcals, <10% carbohydrate). The next morning, in either normoxia or hypoxia (FiO2 =0.15), they ingested a high-carbohydrate breakfast (1225 kcals, 70% carbohydrate). Placebo (719 mg maltodextrin) or metformin (500 mg BID) was consumed 3 days prior to each hypoxia visit. Subjects completed a 12.5 km cycle ergometer time trial 3.5 hours following breakfast. Hypoxia decreased resting and exercise oxyhemoglobin saturation (P<.001). Neither hypoxia nor metformin affected the glucose response to breakfast (P=.977), however, compared with placebo, metformin lowered insulin concentration in hypoxia 45 minutes after breakfast (64.1±6.6 μU/mL vs 48.5±7.8 μU/mL; mean±SE; P<.001). Post-breakfast, pre-exercise vastus lateralis glycogen content increased in normoxia (+33%: P=.025) and in hypoxia with metformin (+81%; P=.006), but not in hypoxia with placebo (+27%; P=.167). Hypoxia decreased time trial performance compared with normoxia (P<.01). This decrement was similar with placebo (+2.6±0.8 minutes) and metformin (+1.6±0.3 minutes). These results indicate that metformin promotes glycogen synthesis but not endurance exercise performance in healthy men exposed to

  8. Cognitive function at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Kramer, A F; Coyne, J T; Strayer, D L

    1993-06-01

    The effects of altitude on human performance and cognition were evaluated in a field study performed on Mount Denali in Alaska during the summer of 1990. Climbers performed a series of perceptual, cognitive, and sensory-motor tasks before, during, and after climbing the West Buttress route on Denali. Relative to a matched control group that performed the tasks at sea level, the climbers showed deficits of learning and retention in perceptual and memory tasks. Furthermore, climbers performed more slowly on most tasks than did the control group, suggesting long-term deficits that may be attributed to repeated forays to high altitudes.

  9. Hypoxic Hypoxia at Moderate Altitudes: State of the Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Guinet, A., and Travers, S. 2003. Normo- and hypobaric hypoxia: are there any physiological differences? European Journal of Applied Physiology...and Hendley, C. D. 1952. Visual functions as indices of physiological changes in the acid-base balance of the blood. American Journal of Optometry...of safety. Journal of the Australian Society of Aerospace Medicine. 5(1): 4-6. Chevion, S. et al. 2007. Reactive oxygen species production in

  10. Alaska High Altitude Photography Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Earl V.; Knutson, Martin A.; Ekstrand, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, the Alaska High Altitude Photography Program was initiated to obtain simultaneous black and white and color IR aerial photography of Alaska. Dual RC-10 and Zeiss camera systems were used for this program on NASA's U-2 and WB-57F, respectively. Data collection, handling, and distribution are discussed as well as general applications and the current status.

  11. Alaska High Altitude Photography Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Earl V.; Knutson, Martin A.; Ekstrand, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, the Alaska High Altitude Photography Program was initiated to obtain simultaneous black and white and color IR aerial photography of Alaska. Dual RC-10 and Zeiss camera systems were used for this program on NASA's U-2 and WB-57F, respectively. Data collection, handling, and distribution are discussed as well as general applications and the current status.

  12. 'Ome' on the range: update on high-altitude acclimatization/adaptation and disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Wang, Yuxiao; Lu, Hongxiang; Gao, Yuqi

    2014-11-01

    The main physiological challenge in high-altitude plateau environments is hypoxia. When people living in a plain environment migrate to the plateau, they face the threat of hypoxia. Most people can acclimatize to high altitudes; the acclimatization process mainly consists of short-term hyperventilation and long-term compensation by increased oxygen uptake, transport, and use due to increased red blood cell mass, myoglobin, and mitochondria. If individuals cannot acclimatize to high altitude, they may suffer from a high-altitude disease, such as acute mountain disease (AMS), high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Because some individuals are more susceptible to high altitude diseases than others, the incidence of these high-altitude diseases is variable and cannot be predicted. Studying "omes" using genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, immunomics, glycomics and RNomics can help us understand the factors that mediate susceptibility to high altitude illnesses. Moreover, analysis of the "omes" using a systems biology approach may provide a greater understanding of high-altitude illness pathogenesis and improve the efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of high-altitude illnesses in the future. Below, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of "omes" in high-altitude acclimatization/adaptation and disease and discuss key research gaps to better understand the contribution of "omes" to high-altitude illness susceptibility.

  13. High altitude atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, Alan E.

    1988-01-01

    Five empirical models were compared with 13 data sets, including both atmospheric drag-based data and mass spectrometer data. The most recently published model, MSIS-86, was found to be the best model overall with an accuracy around 15 percent. The excellent overall agreement of the mass spectrometer-based MSIS models with the drag data, including both the older data from orbital decay and the newer accelerometer data, suggests that the absolute calibration of the (ensemble of) mass spectrometers and the assumed drag coefficient in the atomic oxygen regime are consistent to 5 percent. This study illustrates a number of reasons for the current accuracy limit such as calibration accuracy and unmodeled trends. Nevertheless, the largest variations in total density in the thermosphere are accounted for, to a very high degree, by existing models. The greatest potential for improvements is in areas where we still have insufficient data (like the lower thermosphere or exosphere), where there are disagreements in technique (such as the exosphere) which can be resolved, or wherever generally more accurate measurements become available.

  14. Physiological characteristics of elite high-altitude climbers.

    PubMed

    Puthon, L; Bouzat, P; Rupp, T; Robach, P; Favre-Juvin, A; Verges, S

    2016-09-01

    Factors underlying the amplitude of exercise performance reduction at altitude and the development of high-altitude illnesses are not completely understood. To better describe these mechanisms, we assessed cardiorespiratory and tissue oxygenation responses to hypoxia in elite high-altitude climbers. Eleven high-altitude climbers were matched with 11 non-climber trained controls according to gender, age, and fitness level (maximal oxygen consumption, VO2 max ). Subjects performed two maximal incremental cycling tests, in normoxia and in hypoxia (inspiratory oxygen fraction: 0.12). Cardiorespiratory measurements and tissue (cerebral and muscle) oxygenation were assessed continuously. Hypoxic ventilatory and cardiac responses were determined at rest and during exercise; hypercapnic ventilatory response was determined at rest. In hypoxia, climbers exhibited similar reductions to controls in VO2 max (climbers -39 ± 7% vs controls -39 ± 9%), maximal power output (-27 ± 5% vs -26 ± 4%), and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 ). However, climbers had lower hypoxic ventilatory response during exercise (1.7 ± 0.5 vs 2.6 ± 0.7 L/min/%; P < 0.05) and lower hypercapnic ventilatory response (1.8 ± 1.4 vs 3.8 ± 2.5 mL/min/mmHg; P < 0.05). Finally, climbers exhibited slower breathing frequency, larger tidal volume and larger muscle oxygenation index. These results suggest that elite climbers show some specific ventilatory and muscular responses to hypoxia possibly because of genetic factors or adaptation to frequent high-altitude climbing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roy E

    2007-09-30

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O(2) transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O(2) loading and unloading tensions and the O(2)-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin's intrinsic O(2)-affinity and its allosteric interaction with cellular effectors (organic phosphates, protons and chloride). Whereas short-term altitudinal adaptations predominantly involve adjustments in allosteric interactions, long-term, genetically-coded adaptations typically involve changes in the structure of the haemoglobin molecules. The latter commonly comprise substitutions of amino acid residues at the effector binding sites, the heme-protein contacts, or at intersubunit contacts that stabilize either the low-affinity ('Tense') or the high-affinity ('Relaxed') structures of the molecules. Molecular heterogeneity (multiple isoHbs with differentiated oxygenation properties) can further broaden the range of physico-chemical conditions where Hb functions under altitudinal hypoxia. This treatise reviews the molecular and cellular mechanisms that adapt haemoglobin-oxygen affinities in mammals, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude.

  16. Pulmonary Adaptation to High Altitude.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    following active expiration) and may even spare diaphragmatic contraction at the initia- tion of inspiration. On the other hand, the fall in FRC reduces...the failure of the lung’s gas exchange and ventilatory control system and chest wall mechanics to respond adequately and/or efficiently to heavy work in...prediction of gas exchange I" failure " at high altitudes. Our recent findings also strongly implicate a highly significant role for pulmonary and chest

  17. Pulmonary vascular disease in a rabbit a high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David; Rios-Datenz, Jaime; Gosney, John

    1990-03-01

    A male weanling rabbit of the New Zealand White strain, born and living at an altitude of 3800 m in La Paz, Bolivia, developed right ventricular hypertrophy. This was found to be associated with growth of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intima of pulmonary arterioles, and contrasted with muscularization of the walls of pulmonary arterioles, without extension into the intima, found in a healthy, high-altitude control rabbit of the same strain. A low-altitude control showed no such muscularization. It is concluded that alveolar hypoxia, acting directly or through an intermediate agent, is a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells in pulmonary arterioles. This is the first report of pulmonary vascular disease due to high altitude in rabbits.

  18. High-altitude headache and acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, F J

    2014-01-01

    Headache is the most common complication associated with exposure to high altitude, and can appear as an isolated high-altitude headache (HAH) or in conjunction with acute mountain sickness (AMS). The purpose of this article is to review several aspects related to diagnosis and treatment of HAH. HAH occurs in 80% of all individuals at altitudes higher than 3000 meters. The second edition of ICHD-II includes HAH in the chapter entitled "Headaches attributed to disorder of homeostasis". Hypoxia elicits a neurohumoral and haemodynamic response that may provoke increased capillary pressure and oedema. Hypoxia-induced cerebral vasodilation is a probable cause of HAH. The main symptom of AMS is headache, frequently accompanied by sleep disorders, fatigue, dizziness and instability, nausea and anorexia. Some degree of individual susceptibility and considerable inter-individual variability seem to be present in AMS. High-altitude cerebral oedema is the most severe form of AMS, and may occur above 2500 meters. Brain MRI studies have found variable degrees of oedema in subcortical white matter and the splenium of the corpus callosum. HAH can be treated with paracetamol or ibuprofen. Pharmacological treatment of AMS is intended to increase ventilatory drive with drugs such as acetazolamide, and reduce inflammation and cytokine release by means of steroids. Symptom escalation seems to be present along the continuum containing HAH, AMS, and high-altitude cerebral oedema. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Blood characteristics for high altitude adaptation in Tibetan chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Wu, C X; Chamba, Y; Ling, Y

    2007-07-01

    Tibetan chickens, a unique chicken breed native to high altitude, have good adaptation to hypoxia. The experiment was conducted to determine the adaptive blood characteristics in Tibetan chickens. Fertile eggs from Tibetan and Dwarf Recessive White chickens were incubated, and the chicks were reared until 10 wk of age at low altitude (100 m) and high altitude (2,900 m). At 1 d and 2, 6, and 10 wk of age, the hematological characteristics, blood gas value, and blood volume were measured. Tibetan chickens had more red blood cells (RBC), smaller mean cell volume, lower pH and partial pressure of oxygen, and higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide at high altitude and had lower blood volume, erythrocyte volume, and plasma volume at low and high altitude than Dwarf Recessive White chickens. Tibetan chickens reared at high altitude retained a high level of RBC and a stable level of hematocrit from younger to older, but Dwarf Recessive White chickens reared at high altitude presented an increase in RBC and hematocrit values. It was concluded the adaptation was achieved in Tibetan chickens by increase in RBC and blood oxygen affinity, decrease in mean cell volume, and reducing susceptivity to hypocapnia.

  20. Travel to High Altitude Following Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2016-09-01

    Luks, Andrew M. Clinician's corner: travel to high altitude following solid organ transplantation. High Alt Med Biol. 17:147-156, 2016.-As they regain active lifestyles following successful organ transplantation, transplant recipients may travel to high altitude for a variety of activities, including skiing, climbing, and trekking. This review is intended to provide information for medical providers who may encounter transplant patients seeking advice before planned high altitude travel or care for medical issues that develop during the actual sojourn. There is currently limited information in the literature about outcomes during high-altitude travel following solid organ transplantation, but the available evidence suggests that the physiologic responses to hypobaric hypoxia are comparable to those seen in nontransplanted individuals and well-selected transplant recipients with no evidence of organ rejection can tolerate ascents as high as 6200 m. All transplant recipients planning high-altitude travel should undergo pretravel assessment and counseling with an emphasis on the recognition, prevention, and treatment of altitude illness, as well as the importance of preventing infection and limiting sun exposure. Transplant recipients can use the standard medications for altitude illness prophylaxis and treatment, but the choice and dose of medication should take into account the patient's preexisting medication regimen and current renal function. With careful attention to these and other details, the healthy transplant recipient can safely experience the rewards of traveling in the mountains.

  1. Control of breathing and the circulation in high-altitude mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Catherine M; Scott, Graham R

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxia is an unremitting stressor at high altitudes that places a premium on oxygen transport by the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Phenotypic plasticity and genotypic adaptation at various steps in the O2 cascade could help offset the effects of hypoxia on cellular O2 supply in high-altitude natives. In this review, we will discuss the unique mechanisms by which ventilation, cardiac output, and blood flow are controlled in high-altitude mammals and birds. Acclimatization to high altitudes leads to some changes in respiratory and cardiovascular control that increase O2 transport in hypoxia (e.g., ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia). However, acclimatization or development in hypoxia can also modify cardiorespiratory control in ways that are maladaptive for O2 transport. Hypoxia responses that arose as short-term solutions to O2 deprivation (e.g., peripheral vasoconstriction) or regional variation in O2 levels in the lungs (i.e., hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction) are detrimental at in chronic high-altitude hypoxia. Evolved changes in cardiorespiratory control have arisen in many high-altitude taxa, including increases in effective ventilation, attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and changes in catecholamine sensitivity of the heart and systemic vasculature. Parallel evolution of some of these changes in independent highland lineages supports their adaptive significance. Much less is known about the genomic bases and potential interactive effects of adaptation, acclimatization, developmental plasticity, and trans-generational epigenetic transfer on cardiorespiratory control. Future work to understand these various influences on breathing and circulation in high-altitude natives will help elucidate how complex physiological systems can be pushed to their limits to maintain cellular function in hypoxia.

  2. Measuring high-altitude adaptation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lorna G

    2017-08-31

    High altitudes (>8000 ft or 2500 m) provide an experiment of nature for measuring adaptation and the physiological processes involved. Studies conducted over the past ~25 years in Andeans, Tibetans, and less often Ethiopians show varied but distinct O2 transport traits from those of acclimatized newcomers, providing indirect evidence for genetic adaptation to high altitude. Short-term (acclimatization, developmental) and long-term (genetic) responses to high altitude exhibit a temporal gradient such that, while all influence O2 content, the latter also improve O2 delivery and metabolism. Much has been learned concerning the underlying physiological processes but additional studies are needed on the regulation of blood flow and O2 utilization. Direct evidence of genetic adaptation comes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome scans and whole-genome sequencing studies that have identified gene regions acted upon by natural selection. Efforts have begun to understand the connections between the two with Andean studies on the genetic factors raising uterine blood flow, fetal growth, and susceptibility to Chronic Mountain Sickness and Tibetan studies on genes serving to lower hemoglobin and pulmonary arterial pressure. Critical for future studies will be the selection of phenotypes with demonstrable effects on reproductive success, the calculation of actual fitness costs, and greater inclusion of women among the subjects being studied. The well-characterized nature of the O2 transport system, the presence of multiple long-resident populations, and relevance for understanding hypoxic disorders in all persons underscore the importance of understanding how evolutionary adaptation to high altitude has occurred. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  3. The impact of moderate-altitude staging on pulmonary arterial hemodynamics after ascent to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Baggish, Aaron L; Fulco, Charles S; Muza, Stephen; Rock, Paul B; Beidleman, Beth; Cymerman, Allen; Yared, Kibar; Fagenholz, Peter; Systrom, David; Wood, Malissa J; Weyman, Arthur E; Picard, Michael H; Harris, N Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Staged ascent (SA), temporary residence at moderate altitude en route to high altitude, reduces the incidence and severity of noncardiopulmonary altitude illness such as acute mountain sickness. To date, the impact of SA on pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that SA would attenuate the PAP increase that occurs during rapid, direct ascent (DA). Transthoracic echocardiography was used to estimate mean PAP in 10 healthy males at sea level (SL, P(B) approximately 760 torr), after DA to simulated high altitude (hypobaric chamber, P(B) approximately 460 torr), and at 2 times points (90 min and 4 days) during exposure to terrestrial high altitude (P(B) approximately 460 torr) after SA (7 days, moderate altitude, P(B) approximately 548 torr). Alveolar oxygen pressure (Pao(2)) and arterial oxygenation saturation (Sao(2)) were measured at each time point. Compared to mean PAP at SL (mean +/- SD, 14 +/- 3 mmHg), mean PAP increased after DA to 37 +/- 8 mmHg (Delta = 24 +/- 10 mmHg, p < 0.001) and was negatively correlated with both Pao(2) (r(2) = 0.57, p = 0.011) and Sao(2) (r(2) = 0.64, p = 0.005). In comparison, estimated mean PAP after SA increased to only 25 +/- 4 mmHg (Delta = 11 +/- 6 mmHg, p < 0.001), remained unchanged after 4 days of high altitude residence (24 +/- 5 mmHg, p = not significant, or NS), and did not correlate with either parameter of oxygenation. SA significantly attenuated the PAP increase associated with continuous direct ascent to high altitude and appeared to uncouple PAP from both alveolar hypoxia and arterial hypoxemia.

  4. Population variation revealed high-altitude adaptation of Tibetan mastiffs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wu, Dong-Dong; Boyko, Adam R; Wang, Guo-Dong; Wu, Shi-Fang; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-05-01

    With the assistance of their human companions, dogs have dispersed into new environments during the expansion of human civilization. Tibetan Mastiff (TM), a native of the Tibetan Plateau, was derived from the domesticated Chinese native dog and, like Tibetans, has adapted to the extreme environment of high altitude. Here, we genotyped genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 32 TMs and compared them with SNPs from 20 Chinese native dogs and 14 gray wolves (Canis lupus). We identified 16 genes with signals of positive selection in the TM, with 12 of these candidate genes associated with functions that have roles in adaptation to high-altitude adaptation, such as EPAS1, SIRT7, PLXNA4, and MAFG that have roles in responses to hypoxia. This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of the TM and potential mechanisms for adaptation to hypoxia.

  5. High-altitude balloon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, William M.; Olson, David S.; Keenan, Donald E.

    1998-09-01

    The mission of the High Altitude Balloon Experiment (HABE) is to resolve critical acquisition, tracking, and pointing (ATP) and fire control issues, validate enabling technologies, and acquire supporting data for future space- based laser experiments. HABE is integrating components from existing technologies into a payload that can autonomously acquire, track, and point a lower power laser at a ballistic missile in its boost phase of flight. For its primary mission the payload will be flown multiple times to an altitude of 85,000 feet above the White Sands Missile Range. From the near-space environment of the balloon flight, HABE will demonstrate the ATP functions required for a space- based laser in a ballistic missile defense role. The HABE platform includes coarse and fine gimbal pointing, infrared and visible passive tracking, active fine tracking, internal auto-alignment and boresighting, and precision line-of-sight stabilization functions. This paper presents an overview and status of the HABE program.

  6. High Altitude Ozone Research Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Timothy A.; Daniel, Leslie A.; Herrick, Sally C.; Rock, Stacey G.; Varias, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to create a mission model of the high altitude ozone research balloon (HAORB) several options for flight preparation, altitude control, flight termination, and payload recovery were considered. After the optimal launch date and location for two separate HAORB flights were calculated, a method for reducing the heat transfer from solar and infrared radiation was designed and analytically tested. This provided the most important advantage of the HAORB over conventional balloons, i.e., its improved flight duration. Comparisons of different parachute configurations were made, and a design best suited for the HAORB's needs was determined to provide for payload recovery after flight termination. In an effort to avoid possible payload damage, a landing system was also developed.

  7. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. [Pulmonary hypertension and lung edema at high altitude. Role of endothelial dysfunction and fetal programming].

    PubMed

    Schwab, Marcos; Allemann, Yves; Rexhaj, Emrush; Rimoldi, Stefano F; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs

    2012-01-01

    High altitude constitutes an exciting natural laboratory for medical research. While initially, the aim of high-altitude research was to understand the adaptation of the organism to hypoxia and find treatments for altitude-related diseases, over the past decade or so, the scope of this research has broadened considerably. Two important observations led to the foundation for the broadening of the scientific scope of high-altitude research. First, high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) represents a unique model which allows studying fundamental mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension and lung edema in humans. Secondly, the ambient hypoxia associated with high-altitude exposure facilitates the detection of pulmonary and systemic vascular dysfunction at an early stage. Here, we review studies that, by capitalizing on these observations, have led to the description of novel mechanisms underpinning lung edema and pulmonary hypertension and to the first direct demonstration of fetal programming of vascular dysfunction in humans.

  9. Do Bar-Headed Geese Train for High Altitude Flights?

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Lucy A; Batbayar, Nyambayar; Butler, Patrick J; Chua, Beverley; Frappell, Peter B; Meir, Jessica U; Milsom, William K; Natsagdorj, Tseveenmyadag; Parr, Nicole; Scott, Graham R; Takekawa, John Y; WikeIski, Martin; Witt, Matthew J; Bishop, Charles M

    2017-08-01

    Exercise at high altitude is extremely challenging, largely due to hypobaric hypoxia (low oxygen levels brought about by low air pressure). In humans, the maximal rate of oxygen consumption decreases with increasing altitude, supporting progressively poorer performance. Bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) are renowned high altitude migrants and, although they appear to minimize altitude during migration where possible, they must fly over the Tibetan Plateau (mean altitude 4800 m) for much of their annual migration. This requires considerable cardiovascular effort, but no study has assessed the extent to which bar-headed geese may train prior to migration for long distances, or for high altitudes. Using implanted loggers that recorded heart rate, acceleration, pressure, and temperature, we found no evidence of training for migration in bar-headed geese. Geese showed no significant change in summed activity per day or maximal activity per day. There was also no significant change in maximum heart rate per day or minimum resting heart rate, which may be evidence of an increase in cardiac stroke volume if all other variables were to remain the same. We discuss the strategies used by bar-headed geese in the context of training undertaken by human mountaineers when preparing for high altitude, noting the differences between their respective cardiovascular physiology. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Health and Work at High Altitude - a Study of the Mauna-Kea Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, P. J. G.

    1984-06-01

    The low oxygen environment of high altitude decreases the efficiency and poses risks to the health of personnel manning telescopes at high altitudes. In a study at the Mauna Kea observatories (4200 m) in Hawaii, symptoms of acute mountain sickness were prevalent amongst telescope staff. Memory and psychomotor ability deteriorated on initial exposure to high altitude. Altitude-sickness symptoms abated and performance improved after several days on the mountain. Individual workers reacted to the stress of hypoxia in a reproducible manner on each ascent. Episodes of potentially fatal altitude sickness (pulmonary and cerebral edema) were unexpectedly rare. Provision for immediate descent and awareness of the hazards of hypoxia are the most effective precautions to ensure safe working at high-altitude-based observatories.

  11. Shilajit: A panacea for high-altitude problems.

    PubMed

    Meena, Harsahay; Pandey, H K; Arya, M C; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2010-01-01

    High altitude problems like hypoxia, acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, pulmonary edema, insomnia, tiredness, lethargy, lack of appetite, body pain, dementia, and depression may occur when a person or a soldier residing in a lower altitude ascends to high-altitude areas. These problems arise due to low atmospheric pressure, severe cold, high intensity of solar radiation, high wind velocity, and very high fluctuation of day and night temperatures in these regions. These problems may escalate rapidly and may sometimes become life-threatening. Shilajit is a herbomineral drug which is pale-brown to blackish-brown, is composed of a gummy exudate that oozes from the rocks of the Himalayas in the summer months. It contains humus, organic plant materials, and fulvic acid as the main carrier molecules. It actively takes part in the transportation of nutrients into deep tissues and helps to overcome tiredness, lethargy, and chronic fatigue. Shilajit improves the ability to handle high altitudinal stresses and stimulates the immune system. Thus, Shilajit can be given as a supplement to people ascending to high-altitude areas so that it can act as a "health rejuvenator" and help to overcome high-altitude related problems.

  12. PHOTOGRAPHIC TRACKING FOR HIGH ALTITUDE SATELLITES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TRACKING, *COMMUNICATION SATELLITES, ARTIFICIAL SATELLITES, TRACKING CAMERAS, COMMUNICATION SATELLITES, PHOTOGRAPHY, SATELLITE ATTITUDE, ORBITS, ERRORS, CORRECTIONS, HIGH ALTITUDE , ILLUMINATION, STARS.

  13. Elevated suicide rates at high altitude: sociodemographic and health issues may be to blame.

    PubMed

    Betz, Marian E; Valley, Morgan A; Lowenstein, Steven R; Hedegaard, Holly; Thomas, Deborah; Stallones, Lorann; Honigman, Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes; some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. We examined 8,871 suicides recorded in 2006 in 15 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System, with the victim's home county altitude determined from the National Elevation Dataset through FIPS code matching. We grouped cases by altitude (low<1000m; middle=1000-1999m; high≥2000m). Of reported suicides, 5% were at high and 83% at low altitude, but unadjusted suicide rates per 100,000 population were higher at high (17.7) than at low (5.7) altitude. High and low altitude victims differed with respect to race, ethnicity, rural residence, intoxication, depressed mood preceding the suicide, firearm use and recent financial, job, legal, or interpersonal problems. Even after multivariate adjustment, there were significant differences in personal, mental health, and suicide characteristics among altitude groups. Compared to low altitude victims, high altitude victims had higher odds of having family or friends report of a depressed mood preceding the suicide (OR 1.78; 95%CI:1.46-2.17) and having a crisis within 2weeks before death (OR 2.00; 95%CI:1.63-1.46). Suicide victims at high and low altitudes differ significantly by multiple demographic, psychiatric, and suicide characteristics; these factors, rather than hypoxia or altitude itself, may explain increased suicide rates at high altitude. © 2011 The American Association of Suicidology.

  14. The effects of energy beverages in counteracting the symptoms of mild hypoxia at legal general aviation altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Daniel Mark

    The purpose of this thesis was to conduct preliminary research, in the form of a pilot study, concerning the natural effects of hypoxia compared to the effects of hypoxia experienced after the consumption of an energy beverage. The study evaluated the effects of hypoxia on FAA certificated pilots at a simulated legal general aviation altitude, utilizing the normobaric High Altitude Lab (HAL) located at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida. The researcher tested 11 subjects, who completed three simulated flight tasks within the HAL using the Frasca International Mentor Advanced Aviation Training Device (AATD). The flight tasks were completed after consuming Red BullRTM, MonsterRTM , or a placebo beverage. The researcher derived three test variables from core outputs of the AATD: lateral deviations from the glide slope, vertical deviations from the localizer, and airspeed deviations from the target speed of 100 knots. A repeated-measures ANOVA was carried out to determine effects of the beverages on the test variables. While results were non-significant, the researcher concluded that further research should be conducted with a larger sample.

  15. Pulmonary Adaptation to High Altitude.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Fluorometric assays of high energy phosphates in respiratory and limb muscles plus a variety of histochemical techniques to more fully describe the...phenomenon--in the form of the critical level of CO2 required to maintain rhythmic breathing during sleep and explains the effect of acute oxygen therapy on...AD-AR140 51.4 PULMONARY ADAPTATION TO HIGH ALTITUDE(U) WISCONSIN i/i UNIV-MADISON J R DEMPSEY AUG 82 DAMD17-77-C-786 UNCLAS51FIED F/G 619 ML

  16. Is Normobaric Hypoxia an Effective Treatment for Sustaining Previously Acquired Altitude Acclimatization?

    PubMed

    Beidleman, Beth A; Fulco, Charles S; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cymerman, Allen; Buller, Mark J; Salgado, Roy M; Posch, Alexander M; Staab, Janet E; Sils, Ingrid V; Yurkevicius, Beau R; Luippold, Adam J; Welles, Alexander P; Muza, Stephen R

    2017-07-13

    This study examined whether normobaric hypoxia (NH) treatment is more efficacious for sustaining high altitude (HA) acclimatization during re-introduction to altitude (RA) than no treatment at all. Seventeen sea level (SL) residents (age=23±6yrs; mean±SE) completed in the following order: 1)4d of SL testing, 2)12d of high altitude (HA) acclimatization at 4300m, 3)12d at SL post HA acclimatization (Post) where each received either NH (n=9;FiO2=0.122) or Sham (n=8;FiO2=0.207) treatment, and 4)24-h re-introduction to 4300m altitude (RA) in a hypobaric chamber. End-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (PETCO2), hematocrit (Hct), and Acute Mountain Sickness(AMS-C) were assessed at SL, HA2, HA11 and after the 20th h of RA. Cognitive function was assessed using the SynWin at SL, HA1, HA11, and after the 4th h of RA. There was no difference between NH and Sham treatment so data were combined. PETCO2 (mmHg) decreased from SL (37.2±0.5) to HA2 (32.2±0.6)and HA11 (27.1±0.4) and then increased from HA11 during RA (29.3±0.6). Hct(%) increased from SL (42.3±1.1) to HA2 (45.9±1.0)and HA11 (48.5±0.8) and then decreased from HA11 during RA (46.4±1.2). AMS prevalence (%) increased from SL (0±0) to HA2 (76±11) and then decreased at HA11 (0±0) and remained depressed during RA (17±10). SynWin scores decreased from SL (1615±62) to HA1 (1306±94), improved from HA1 to HA11 (1770±82) and remained increased during RA (1707±75). These results demonstrate that HA acclimatization-induced improvements in ventilatory and hematologic responses, AMS, and cognitive function are partially retained during RA after 12 days at SL whether or not NH treatment is utilized. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  17. Pulmonary vascular remodelling in a high-altitude Aymara Indian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David

    1991-12-01

    A histological study of the pulmonary vasculature in a young male high-altitude Aymara Indian revealed four aspects of interest. There was muscularization of the terminal portion of the pulmonary arterial tree to involve pulmonary arterioles as small as 15 μm in diameter, thus forming a basis for the slightly increased pulmonary vascular resistance of native highlanders. Intimal longitudinal muscle was found in pulmonary arteries and arterioles and thought to be due to chronic alveolar hypoxia. Inner muscular tubes similar to those found in chronic obstructive lung disease were present. Pulmonary veins and venules also showed intimal muscularization suggesting that alveolar hypoxia affects vascular smooth muscle cells per se irrespective of their situation. The nature of the remodelling in a pulmonary blood vessel depends on a combination of hypoxia and haemodynamics.

  18. Increased Hypoxic Dose After Training at Low Altitude with 9h Per Night at 3000m Normobaric Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Amelia J.; Saunders, Philo U.; Vallance, Brent S.; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A.; Gore, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined effects of low altitude training and a live-high: train-low protocol (combining both natural and simulated modalities) on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), time to exhaustion, and submaximal exercise measures. Eighteen elite-level race-walkers were assigned to one of two experimental groups; lowHH (low Hypobaric Hypoxia: continuous exposure to 1380 m for 21 consecutive days; n = 10) or a combined low altitude training and nightly Normobaric Hypoxia (lowHH+NHnight: living and training at 1380 m, plus 9 h.night-1 at a simulated altitude of 3000 m using hypoxic tents; n = 8). A control group (CON; n = 10) lived and trained at 600 m. Measurement of Hbmass, time to exhaustion and VO2max was performed before and after the training intervention. Paired samples t-tests were used to assess absolute and percentage change pre and post-test differences within groups, and differences between groups were assessed using a one-way ANOVA with least significant difference post-hoc testing. Statistical significance was tested at p < 0.05. There was a 3.7% increase in Hbmass in lowHH+NHnight compared with CON (p = 0.02). In comparison to baseline, Hbmass increased by 1.2% (±1.4%) in the lowHH group, 2.6% (±1.8%) in lowHH+NHnight, and there was a decrease of 0.9% (±4.9%) in CON. VO2max increased by ~4% within both experimental conditions but was not significantly greater than the 1% increase in CON. There was a ~9% difference in pre and post-intervention values in time to exhaustion after lowHH+NH-night (p = 0.03) and a ~8% pre to post-intervention difference (p = 0.006) after lowHH only. We recommend low altitude (1380 m) combined with sleeping in altitude tents (3000 m) as one effective alternative to traditional altitude training methods, which can improve Hbmass. Key points In some countries, it may not be possible to perform classical altitude training effectively, due to the low elevation at altitude training venues. An

  19. The genetic architecture of adaptations to high altitude in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Beall, Cynthia M; Witonsky, David B; Gebremedhin, Amha; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Although hypoxia is a major stress on physiological processes, several human populations have survived for millennia at high altitudes, suggesting that they have adapted to hypoxic conditions. This hypothesis was recently corroborated by studies of Tibetan highlanders, which showed that polymorphisms in candidate genes show signatures of natural selection as well as well-replicated association signals for variation in hemoglobin levels. We extended genomic analysis to two Ethiopian ethnic groups: Amhara and Oromo. For each ethnic group, we sampled low and high altitude residents, thus allowing genetic and phenotypic comparisons across altitudes and across ethnic groups. Genome-wide SNP genotype data were collected in these samples by using Illumina arrays. We find that variants associated with hemoglobin variation among Tibetans or other variants at the same loci do not influence the trait in Ethiopians. However, in the Amhara, SNP rs10803083 is associated with hemoglobin levels at genome-wide levels of significance. No significant genotype association was observed for oxygen saturation levels in either ethnic group. Approaches based on allele frequency divergence did not detect outliers in candidate hypoxia genes, but the most differentiated variants between high- and lowlanders have a clear role in pathogen defense. Interestingly, a significant excess of allele frequency divergence was consistently detected for genes involved in cell cycle control and DNA damage and repair, thus pointing to new pathways for high altitude adaptations. Finally, a comparison of CpG methylation levels between high- and lowlanders found several significant signals at individual genes in the Oromo.

  20. [Children and pregnant women at high altitude].

    PubMed

    Rehakova, P; Rexhaj, E; Farron, F; Duplain, H

    2014-05-07

    Nowadays, high altitude resorts have become popular destinations for family vacations. Based on a limited number of publications and international guidelines, this article summarizes the effects of high altitude on children and pregnant women. Children also suffer from high altitude-related diseases, however their presentation and clinical significance are different from their adult counterparts. Careful planning of the itinerary with respect to altitude of the overnight stays, access to medical services and potential evacuation routes is the cornerstone of a successful vacation.

  1. Mitogenomic analyses propose positive selection in mitochondrial genes for high-altitude adaptation in galliform birds.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Taicheng; Shen, Xuejuan; Irwin, David M; Shen, Yongyi; Zhang, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Galliform birds inhabit very diverse habitats, including plateaus that are above 3000 m in altitude. At high altitude, lower temperature and hypoxia are two important factors influencing survival. Mitochondria, as the ultimate oxygen transductor, play an important role in aerobic respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We analyzed the mitochondrial genomes of six high-altitude phasianidae birds and sixteen low-altitude relatives in an attempt to determine the role of mitochondrial genes in high-altitude adaptation. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of these phasianidae birds and relatives and found at least four lineages that independently occupied this high-altitude habitat. Selective analyses revealed significant evidence for positive selection in the genes ND2, ND4, and ATP6 in three of the high-altitude lineages. This result strongly suggests that adaptive evolution of mitochondrial genes played a critical role during the independent acclimatization to high altitude by galliform birds.

  2. Why Are High Altitude Natives So Strong at High Altitude? Nature vs. Nurture: Genetic Factors vs. Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Brutsaert, Tom

    Among high-altitude natives there is evidence of a general hypoxia tolerance leading to enhanced performance and/or increased capacity in several important domains. These domains likely include an enhanced physical work capacity, an enhanced reproductive capacity, and an ability to resist several common pathologies of chronic high-altitude exposure. The "strength" of the high-altitude native in this regard may have both a developmental and a genetic basis, although there is better evidence for the former (developmental effects) than for the latter. For example, early-life hypoxia exposure clearly results in lung growth and remodeling leading to an increased O2 diffusing capacity in adulthood. Genetic research has yet to reveal a population genetic basis for enhanced capacity in high-altitude natives, but several traits are clearly under genetic control in Andean and Tibetan populations e.g., resting and exercise arterial O2 saturation (SaO2). This chapter reviews the effects of nature and nurture on traits that are relevant to the process of gas exchange, including pulmonary volumes and diffusion capacity, the maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), the SaO2, and the alveolar-arterial oxygen partial pressure difference (A-aDO2) during exercise.

  3. Growth and nutritional status of Tibetan children at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Argnani, Lisa; Cogo, Annalisa; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela

    2008-09-01

    Growth and development are clearly affected by high-altitude exposure to hypoxia, nutritional stress, cold or a combination of these factors. Very little research has been conducted on the growth and nutritional status of children living on the Tibetan Plateau. The present study evaluated the environmental impact on human growth by analyzing anthropometric characteristics of Tibetan children aged 8-14, born and raised above 4000 m altitude on the Himalayan massif in the prefecture of Shegar in Tibet Autonomous Region. Data on anthropometric traits, never measured in this population, were collected and the nutritional status was assessed. A reference data set is provided for this population. There was no evidence of wasting but stunting was detected (28.3%). Children permanently exposed to the high-altitude environment above 4000 m present a phenotypic form of adaptation and a moderate reduction in linear growth. However, it is also necessary to consider the effects of socioeconomic deprivation.

  4. High-altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdi, Renee Anna

    1991-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000+ ft, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft. This project is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer. The aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. The first is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.m. at 100,000 ft with a 2500-lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission with a decreased altitude and an increased payload. For the third mission, the aircraft will take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft, and land in Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to make an excursion to 120,000 ft. All four missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained because of constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the requirements. The performance of each is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the mission requirements.

  5. Evolutionary adaptation to high altitude: a view from in utero

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Wilson, Megan J.; Moore, Lorna G.

    2010-01-01

    A primary focus within biological anthropology has been to elucidate the processes of evolutionary adaptation. A. Roberto Frisancho helped move anthropology towards more mechanistic explanations of human adaptation by drawing attention to the importance of the functional relevance of human variation. Using the natural laboratory of high altitude, he and others asked whether the unique physiology of indigenous high-altitude residents was the result of acclimatization, developmental plasticity and/or genetic adaptation in response to the high-altitude environment. We approach the question of human adaptation to high altitude from a somewhat unique vantage point; namely, by examining physiological characteristics – pregnancy and pregnancy outcome -- that are most closely associated with reproductive fitness. Here we review the potent example of high-altitude native population’s resistance to hypoxia-associated reductions in birth weight, which is often associated with higher infant morbidity and mortality at high altitude. With the exception of two recent publications, these comparative birth weight studies have utilized surnames, self-identification and/or linguistic characteristics to assess ancestry, and none have linked ‘advantageous’ phenotypes to specific genetic variations. Recent advancements in genetic and statistical tools have enabled us to assess individual ancestry with higher resolution, identify the genetic basis of complex phenotypes and to infer the effect of natural selection on specific gene regions. Using these technologies our studies are now directed to determine the genetic variations that underlie the mechanisms by which high-altitude ancestry protects fetal growth and, in turn, to further our understanding of evolutionary processes involved in human adaptation to high altitude. PMID:19367578

  6. Blood-Brain Barrier Changes in High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, José V; Bermudez, Garazi; Camargo-Arce, Lorena; Bulnes, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral syndromes related to high-altitude exposure are becoming more frequent as the number of trips to high altitudes has increased in the last decade. The commonest symptom is headache, followed by acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), which can be fatal. The pathophysiology of these syndromes is not fully understood. The classical "tight-fit hypothesis" posits that there are some anatomical variations that would obstruct the sinovenous outflow and worsen vasogenic edema and intracranial hypertension reactive to hypoxia. This could explain microhemorrhages seen in autopsies. However, recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have demonstrated some components of cytotoxic edema in HACE absent in AMS, suggesting a dysfunction in water balance at the cellular level. Currently, the "red-ox theory" supports trigemino-vascular system activation by free radicals formed after hypoxia and the consequent oxidative stress cascades. Apart from trigemino-vascular system activation, free radicals can also provoke membrane destabilisation mediated by lipid peroxidation, inflammation, and local hypoxia inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor activation, resulting in gross blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Besides alterations in endothelial cells such as increased pinocytotic vesicles and disassembly of interendothelial tight junction proteins, capillary permeability may also increase with subsequent swelling of astrocyte end-feet. In conclusion, although the pathophysiology of AMS and HACE is not completely understood, recent evidence proposes a multifactorial entity, with brain swelling and compromise of the BBB considered to play an important role. A fuller comprehension of these processes is crucial to reduce and prevent BBB alterations during high-altitude exposure.

  7. Thin Air Resulting in High Pressure: Mountain Sickness and Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Manuel; Tello, Khodr; Sommer, Natascha; Gall, Henning; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir

    2017-01-01

    With rising altitude the partial pressure of oxygen falls. This phenomenon leads to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude. Since more than 140 million people permanently live at heights above 2500 m and more than 35 million travel to these heights each year, understanding the mechanisms resulting in acute or chronic maladaptation of the human body to these circumstances is crucial. This review summarizes current knowledge of the body's acute response to these circumstances, possible complications and their treatment, and health care issues resulting from long-term exposure to high altitude. It furthermore describes the characteristic mechanisms of adaptation to life in hypobaric hypoxia expressed by the three major ethnic groups permanently dwelling at high altitude. We additionally summarize current knowledge regarding possible treatment options for hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by reviewing in vitro, rodent, and human studies in this area of research. PMID:28522921

  8. Fire Fighting from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent; Ambrosia, Vince

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on high altitude fire fighting is shown. The topics include: 1) Yellowstone Fire - 1988; 2) 2006 Western States Fire Mission Over-View; 3) AMS-Wildfire Scanner; 4) October 24-25 Mission: Yosemite NP and NF; 5) October 24-25 Mission MODIS Overpass; 6) October 24-25 Mission Highlights; 7) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire, California; 8) Response to the Esperanza Fire in Southern California -- Timeline Oct 27-29 2006; 9) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Flight Routing; 10) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Over-Flights; 11) October 28-29 Mission Highlights; 12) Results from the Esperanza Fire Response; 13) 2007 Western States Fire Mission; and 14) Western States UAS Fire Mission 2007

  9. Evolved changes in the intracellular distribution and physiology of muscle mitochondria in high-altitude native deer mice.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Sajeni; McClelland, Grant B; Scott, Graham R

    2017-07-15

    Mitochondrial function changes over time at high altitudes, but the potential benefits of these changes for hypoxia resistance remains unclear. We used high-altitude-adapted populations of deer mice, which exhibit enhanced aerobic performance in hypoxia, to examine whether changes in mitochondrial physiology or intracellular distribution in the muscle contribute to hypoxia resistance. Permeabilized muscle fibres from the gastrocnemius muscle had higher respiratory capacities in high-altitude mice than in low-altitude mice. Highlanders also had higher mitochondrial volume densities, due entirely to an enriched abundance of subsarcolemmal mitochondria, such that more mitochondria were situated near the cell membrane and adjacent to capillaries. There were several effects of hypoxia acclimation on mitochondrial function, some of which were population specific, but they differed from the evolved changes in high-altitude natives, which probably provide a better indication of adaptive traits that improve performance and hypoxia resistance at high altitudes. High-altitude natives that have evolved to live in hypoxic environments provide a compelling system to understand how animals can overcome impairments in oxygen availability. We examined whether these include changes in mitochondrial physiology or intracellular distribution that contribute to hypoxia resistance in high-altitude deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Mice from populations native to high and low altitudes were born and raised in captivity, and as adults were acclimated to normoxia or hypobaric hypoxia (equivalent to 4300 m elevation). We found that highlanders had higher respiratory capacities in the gastrocnemius (but not soleus) muscle than lowlanders (assessed using permeabilized fibres with single or multiple inputs to the electron transport system), due in large part to higher mitochondrial volume densities in the gastrocnemius. The latter was attributed to an increased abundance of subsarcolemmal

  10. Skeletal Muscle Myofibrillar and Sarcoplasmic Protein Synthesis Rates Are Affected Differently by Altitude-Induced Hypoxia in Native Lowlanders

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul; van Hall, Gerrit; Calbet, Jose A. L.; Saltin, Bengt; Lundby, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    As a consequence to hypobaric hypoxic exposure skeletal muscle atrophy is often reported. The underlying mechanism has been suggested to involve a decrease in protein synthesis in order to conserve O2. With the aim to challenge this hypothesis, we applied a primed, constant infusion of 1-13C-leucine in nine healthy male subjects at sea level and subsequently at high-altitude (4559 m) after 7–9 days of acclimatization. Physical activity levels and food and energy intake were controlled prior to the two experimental conditions with the aim to standardize these confounding factors. Blood samples and expired breath samples were collected hourly during the 4 hour trial and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained at 1 and 4 hours after tracer priming in the overnight fasted state. Myofibrillar protein synthesis rate was doubled; 0.041±0.018 at sea-level to 0.080±0.018%⋅hr−1 (p<0.05) when acclimatized to high altitude. The sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was in contrast unaffected by altitude exposure; 0.052±0.019 at sea-level to 0.059±0.010%⋅hr−1 (p>0.05). Trends to increments in whole body protein kinetics were seen: Degradation rate elevated from 2.51±0.21 at sea level to 2.73±0.13 µmol⋅kg−1⋅min−1 (p = 0.05) at high altitude and synthesis rate similar; 2.24±0.20 at sea level and 2.43±0.13 µmol⋅kg−1⋅min−1 (p>0.05) at altitude. We conclude that whole body amino acid flux is increased due to an elevated protein turnover rate. Resting skeletal muscle myocontractile protein synthesis rate was concomitantly elevated by high-altitude induced hypoxia, whereas the sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was unaffected by hypoxia. These changed responses may lead to divergent adaptation over the course of prolonged exposure. PMID:21187972

  11. Analysis of High-Altitude De-Acclimatization Syndrome after Exposure to High Altitudes: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mingdong; Qu, Xinming; Wei, Zhenghua; Li, Jin; Chen, Yan; Chen, Huaping; Zhou, Qiquan; Wang, Guansong

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of high-altitude de-acclimatization commonly takes place after long-term exposure to high altitudes upon return to low altitudes. The syndrome severely affects the returnee's quality of life. However, little attention has been paid to careful characterization of the syndrome and their underlying mechanisms. Male subjects from Chongqing (n = 67, 180 m) and Kunming (n = 70, 1800 m) visited a high-altitude area (3650 m) about 6 months and then returned to low-altitude. After they came back, all subjects were evaluated for high-altitude de-acclimatization syndrome on the 3rd, 50th, and 100th. Symptom scores, routine blood and blood gas tests, and myocardial zymograms assay were used for observation their syndrome. The results showed that the incidence and severity of symptoms had decreased markedly on the 50th and 100th days, compared with the 3rd day. The symptom scores and incidence of different symptoms were lower among subjects returning to Kunming than among those returning to Chongqing. On the 3rd day, RBC, Hb, Hct, CK, CK-MB, and LDH values were significantly lower than values recorded at high altitudes, but they were higher than baseline values. On the 50th day, these values were not different from baseline values, but LDH levels did not return to baseline until the 100th day. These data show that, subjects who suffered high-altitude de-acclimatization syndrome, the recovery fully processes takes a long time (≥100th days). The appearance of the syndrome is found to be related to the changes in RBC, Hb, Hct, CK, CK-MB, and LDH levels, which should be caused by reoxygenation after hypoxia. PMID:23650508

  12. Analysis of high-altitude de-acclimatization syndrome after exposure to high altitudes: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    He, Binfeng; Wang, Jianchun; Qian, Guisheng; Hu, Mingdong; Qu, Xinming; Wei, Zhenghua; Li, Jin; Chen, Yan; Chen, Huaping; Zhou, Qiquan; Wang, Guansong

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of high-altitude de-acclimatization commonly takes place after long-term exposure to high altitudes upon return to low altitudes. The syndrome severely affects the returnee's quality of life. However, little attention has been paid to careful characterization of the syndrome and their underlying mechanisms. Male subjects from Chongqing (n = 67, 180 m) and Kunming (n = 70, 1800 m) visited a high-altitude area (3650 m) about 6 months and then returned to low-altitude. After they came back, all subjects were evaluated for high-altitude de-acclimatization syndrome on the 3(rd), 50(th), and 100(th). Symptom scores, routine blood and blood gas tests, and myocardial zymograms assay were used for observation their syndrome. The results showed that the incidence and severity of symptoms had decreased markedly on the 50(th) and 100(th) days, compared with the 3(rd) day. The symptom scores and incidence of different symptoms were lower among subjects returning to Kunming than among those returning to Chongqing. On the 3(rd) day, RBC, Hb, Hct, CK, CK-MB, and LDH values were significantly lower than values recorded at high altitudes, but they were higher than baseline values. On the 50(th) day, these values were not different from baseline values, but LDH levels did not return to baseline until the 100(th) day. These data show that, subjects who suffered high-altitude de-acclimatization syndrome, the recovery fully processes takes a long time (≥ 100(th) days). The appearance of the syndrome is found to be related to the changes in RBC, Hb, Hct, CK, CK-MB, and LDH levels, which should be caused by reoxygenation after hypoxia.

  13. Return to Activity at Altitude After High-Altitude Illness

    PubMed Central

    DeWeber, Kevin; Scorza, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Context: Sports and other activities at high altitude are popular, yet they pose the unique risk for high-altitude illness (HAI). Once those who have suffered from a HAI recover, they commonly desire or need to perform the same activity at altitude in the immediate or distant future. Evidence Acquisition: As based on key text references and peer-reviewed journal articles from a Medline search, this article reviews the pathophysiology and general treatment principles of HAI. Results: In addition to the type of HAI experienced and the current level of recovery, factors needing consideration in the return-to-play plan include physical activity requirements, flexibility of the activity schedule, and available medical equipment and facilities. Most important, adherence to prudent acclimatization protocols and gradual ascent recommendations (when above 3000 m, no more than 600-m net elevation gain per day, and 1 rest day every 1 to 2 ascent days) is powerful in its preventive value and thus strongly recommended. When these are not practical, prophylactic medications (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, salmeterol, nifedipine, or phosphodiesterase inhibitors, depending on the type of prior HAI) may be prescribed and can reduce the risk of illness. Athletes with HAI should be counseled that physical and mental performance may be adversely affected if activity at altitude continues before recovery is complete and that there is a risk of progression to a more serious HAI. Conclusion: With a thoughtful plan, most recurrent HAI in athletes can be prevented. PMID:23015950

  14. Strenuous physical exercise inhibits granulocyte activation induced by high altitude.

    PubMed

    Choukèr, Alexander; Demetz, Florian; Martignoni, André; Smith, Leslie; Setzer, Florian; Bauer, Andreas; Hölzl, Joseph; Peter, Klaus; Christ, Frank; Thiel, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    To test the hypothesis of whether strenuous physical exercise inhibits neutrophils that can get activated by hypobaric hypoxia, we analyzed the effects of both high altitude and strenuous exercise alone and in combination on potentially cytotoxic functions of granulocytes in healthy volunteers (n = 12 men; average age 27.6 yr; range 24-38 yr). To this end, a field study was prospectively performed with an open-labeled within-subject design comprising three protocols. Protocol I (high altitude) involved a helicopter ascent, overnight stay at 3,196 m, and descent on the following day. Protocol II (physical exercise) involved hiking below an altitude of 2,100 m with repetitive ascents amounting to a total ascent to that of protocol III. Protocol III (combination of physical exercise and high altitude) involved climbing from 1,416 to 3,196 m, stay overnight, and descent on the following day. In protocol I, number of granulocytes did not change, but potentially cytotoxic functions of cells (CD18 expression and superoxide production) were early and significantly upregulated. In protocol II, subjects developed granulocytosis, but functions of cells were inhibited. In protocol III, granulocytosis occurred at higher values than those observed under protocol II. Potentially cytotoxic functions of cells, however, were strongly inhibited again. In conclusion, high altitude alone, even moderate in extent, can activate potentially cytotoxic functions of circulating granulocytes. Strenuous physical exercise strongly inhibits this activation, which may give protection from an otherwise inflammatory injury.

  15. High altitude-induced pituitary apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Brar, Kiraninder Singh; Garg, Mahendra Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Sudden ascent to high altitudes beyond 2,438 m can cause life-threatening complications such as acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral and pulmonary oedema. We present a case of pituitary apoplexy in a young man who ascended to high altitude gradually, after proper acclimatisation. He developed headache, nausea, vomiting and persistent hypotension. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enlarged pituitary gland with haemorrhage. His hormonal estimation showed acute adrenal insufficiency due to corticotropin deficiency. The patient responded well to conservative medical management with hormonal replacement therapy. This is most likely the first reported case of high altitude-induced pituitary apoplexy in the literature.

  16. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences.

  17. Jupiter's High-Altitude Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) snapped this incredibly detailed picture of Jupiter's high-altitude clouds starting at 06:00 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, when the spacecraft was only 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the solar system's largest planet. Features as small as 50 kilometers (30 miles) are visible. The image was taken through a narrow filter centered on a methane absorption band near 890 nanometers, a considerably redder wavelength than what the eye can see. Images taken through this filter preferentially pick out clouds that are relatively high in the sky of this gas giant planet because sunlight at the wavelengths transmitted by the filter is completely absorbed by the methane gas that permeates Jupiter's atmosphere before it can reach the lower clouds.

    The image reveals a range of diverse features. The south pole is capped with a haze of small particles probably created by the precipitation of charged particles into the polar regions during auroral activity. Just north of the cap is a well-formed anticyclonic vortex with rising white thunderheads at its core. Slightly north of the vortex are the tendrils of some rather disorganized storms and more pinpoint-like thunderheads. The dark 'measles' that appear a bit farther north are actually cloud-free regions where light is completely absorbed by the methane gas and essentially disappears from view. The wind action considerably picks up in the equatorial regions where giant plumes are stretched into a long wave pattern. Proceeding north of the equator, cirrus-like clouds are shredded by winds reaching speeds of up to 400 miles per hour, and more pinpoint-like thunderheads are visible. Although some of the famous belt and zone structure of Jupiter's atmosphere is washed out when viewed at this wavelength, the relatively thin North Temperate Belt shows up quite nicely, as does a series of waves just north of the belt. The north polar region of

  18. Jupiter's High-Altitude Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) snapped this incredibly detailed picture of Jupiter's high-altitude clouds starting at 06:00 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, when the spacecraft was only 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the solar system's largest planet. Features as small as 50 kilometers (30 miles) are visible. The image was taken through a narrow filter centered on a methane absorption band near 890 nanometers, a considerably redder wavelength than what the eye can see. Images taken through this filter preferentially pick out clouds that are relatively high in the sky of this gas giant planet because sunlight at the wavelengths transmitted by the filter is completely absorbed by the methane gas that permeates Jupiter's atmosphere before it can reach the lower clouds.

    The image reveals a range of diverse features. The south pole is capped with a haze of small particles probably created by the precipitation of charged particles into the polar regions during auroral activity. Just north of the cap is a well-formed anticyclonic vortex with rising white thunderheads at its core. Slightly north of the vortex are the tendrils of some rather disorganized storms and more pinpoint-like thunderheads. The dark 'measles' that appear a bit farther north are actually cloud-free regions where light is completely absorbed by the methane gas and essentially disappears from view. The wind action considerably picks up in the equatorial regions where giant plumes are stretched into a long wave pattern. Proceeding north of the equator, cirrus-like clouds are shredded by winds reaching speeds of up to 400 miles per hour, and more pinpoint-like thunderheads are visible. Although some of the famous belt and zone structure of Jupiter's atmosphere is washed out when viewed at this wavelength, the relatively thin North Temperate Belt shows up quite nicely, as does a series of waves just north of the belt. The north polar region of

  19. Psychological testing at high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M

    1982-02-01

    Psychological testing was done on 20 subjects at various altitudes (sea level, 3,8,10 m, and 5,000 m) during a 35-d mountaineering expedition to Denali (Mt. McKinley). Intellectual functioning and personality changes were studied. While little variation was noted at the lower altitude, at 5,000 m there was a marked deterioration in cognitive ability. This was accompanied by a sharp increase in paranoia and obsessive-compulsiveness and smaller increases in depression and hostility.

  20. Identification of novel serum peptide biomarkers for high-altitude adaptation: a comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Siyuan; Yuan, Dongya; Guo, Yijiao; Jia, Cheng; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to identify serum biomarkers for screening individuals who could adapt to high-altitude hypoxia at sea level. HHA (high-altitude hypoxia acclimated; n = 48) and HHI (high-altitude hypoxia illness; n = 48) groups were distinguished at high altitude, routine blood tests were performed for both groups at high altitude and at sea level. Serum biomarkers were identified by comparing serum peptidome profiling between HHI and HHA groups collected at sea level. Routine blood tests revealed the concentration of hemoglobin and red blood cells were significantly higher in HHI than in HHA at high altitude. Serum peptidome profiling showed that ten significantly differentially expressed peaks between HHA and HHI at sea level. Three potential serum peptide peaks (m/z values: 1061.91, 1088.33, 4057.63) were further sequence identified as regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragment (ITIH4 347–356), regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H1 fragment (ITIH1 205–214), and isoform 1 of fibrinogen α chain precursor (FGA 588–624). Expression of their full proteins was also tested by ELISA in HHA and HHI samples collected at sea level. Our study provided a novel approach for identifying potential biomarkers for screening people at sea level who can adapt to high altitudes.

  1. Travelling safely to places at high altitude - Understanding and preventing altitude illness.

    PubMed

    Parise, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    Greater numbers of people are travelling to places at high altitude each year. Altitude illness is common in places at high altitude and may be life-threatening. General practitioners (GPs) are best placed to provide evidence-based advice to keep travellers well informed of the possible risks they may encounter in places at high altitude. The aim of this article is to review knowledge on altitude illness in order to help GPs assist patients to travel safely to places at high altitude. Acclimatisation to high altitude is a complex process and when inadequate leads to the pathological changes of altitude illness, including high-altitude headache, cerebral oedema, pulmonary oedema and acute mountain sickness. Higher ascent, faster rate of ascent and a previous history of altitude illness increase the risk of altitude illness. Acetazolamide and other medications used to prevent altitude illness are discussed in detail, including the finding that inhaled budesonide may prevent altitude illness.

  2. AltitudeOmics: The Integrative Physiology of Human Acclimatization to Hypobaric Hypoxia and Its Retention upon Reascent

    PubMed Central

    Subudhi, Andrew W.; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Bucher, Jenna; Davis, Christopher; Elliott, Jonathan E.; Eutermoster, Morgan; Evero, Oghenero; Fan, Jui-Lin; Houten, Sonja Jameson-Van; Julian, Colleen G.; Kark, Jonathan; Kark, Sherri; Kayser, Bengt; Kern, Julia P.; Kim, See Eun; Lathan, Corinna; Laurie, Steven S.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Paterson, Ryan; Polaner, David M.; Ryan, Benjamin J.; Spira, James L.; Tsao, Jack W.; Wachsmuth, Nadine B.; Roach, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of human responses to hypoxia is important for the health of millions of people worldwide who visit, live, or work in the hypoxic environment encountered at high altitudes. In spite of dozens of studies over the last 100 years, the basic mechanisms controlling acclimatization to hypoxia remain largely unknown. The AltitudeOmics project aimed to bridge this gap. Our goals were 1) to describe a phenotype for successful acclimatization and assess its retention and 2) use these findings as a foundation for companion mechanistic studies. Our approach was to characterize acclimatization by measuring changes in arterial oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration [Hb], acute mountain sickness (AMS), cognitive function, and exercise performance in 21 subjects as they acclimatized to 5260 m over 16 days. We then focused on the retention of acclimatization by having subjects reascend to 5260 m after either 7 (n = 14) or 21 (n = 7) days at 1525 m. At 16 days at 5260 m we observed: 1) increases in arterial oxygenation and [Hb] (compared to acute hypoxia: PaO2 rose 9±4 mmHg to 45±4 while PaCO2 dropped a further 6±3 mmHg to 21±3, and [Hb] rose 1.8±0.7 g/dL to 16±2 g/dL; 2) no AMS; 3) improved cognitive function; and 4) improved exercise performance by 8±8% (all changes p<0.01). Upon reascent, we observed retention of arterial oxygenation but not [Hb], protection from AMS, retention of exercise performance, less retention of cognitive function; and noted that some of these effects lasted for 21 days. Taken together, these findings reveal new information about retention of acclimatization, and can be used as a physiological foundation to explore the molecular mechanisms of acclimatization and its retention. PMID:24658407

  3. AltitudeOmics: the integrative physiology of human acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia and its retention upon reascent.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Andrew W; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Bucher, Jenna; Davis, Christopher; Elliott, Jonathan E; Eutermoster, Morgan; Evero, Oghenero; Fan, Jui-Lin; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G; Kark, Jonathan; Kark, Sherri; Kayser, Bengt; Kern, Julia P; Kim, See Eun; Lathan, Corinna; Laurie, Steven S; Lovering, Andrew T; Paterson, Ryan; Polaner, David M; Ryan, Benjamin J; Spira, James L; Tsao, Jack W; Wachsmuth, Nadine B; Roach, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of human responses to hypoxia is important for the health of millions of people worldwide who visit, live, or work in the hypoxic environment encountered at high altitudes. In spite of dozens of studies over the last 100 years, the basic mechanisms controlling acclimatization to hypoxia remain largely unknown. The AltitudeOmics project aimed to bridge this gap. Our goals were 1) to describe a phenotype for successful acclimatization and assess its retention and 2) use these findings as a foundation for companion mechanistic studies. Our approach was to characterize acclimatization by measuring changes in arterial oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration [Hb], acute mountain sickness (AMS), cognitive function, and exercise performance in 21 subjects as they acclimatized to 5260 m over 16 days. We then focused on the retention of acclimatization by having subjects reascend to 5260 m after either 7 (n = 14) or 21 (n = 7) days at 1525 m. At 16 days at 5260 m we observed: 1) increases in arterial oxygenation and [Hb] (compared to acute hypoxia: PaO2 rose 9±4 mmHg to 45±4 while PaCO2 dropped a further 6±3 mmHg to 21±3, and [Hb] rose 1.8±0.7 g/dL to 16±2 g/dL; 2) no AMS; 3) improved cognitive function; and 4) improved exercise performance by 8±8% (all changes p<0.01). Upon reascent, we observed retention of arterial oxygenation but not [Hb], protection from AMS, retention of exercise performance, less retention of cognitive function; and noted that some of these effects lasted for 21 days. Taken together, these findings reveal new information about retention of acclimatization, and can be used as a physiological foundation to explore the molecular mechanisms of acclimatization and its retention.

  4. Human high-altitude adaptation: forward genetics meets the HIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Abigail W.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude in several locations, and recent genome-wide studies have indicated a genetic basis. In some populations, genetic signatures have been identified in the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which orchestrates the transcriptional response to hypoxia. In Tibetans, they have been found in the HIF2A (EPAS1) gene, which encodes for HIF-2α, and the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2, also known as EGLN1) gene, which encodes for one of its key regulators, PHD2. High-altitude adaptation may be due to multiple genes that act in concert with one another. Unraveling their mechanism of action can offer new therapeutic approaches toward treating common human diseases characterized by chronic hypoxia. PMID:25319824

  5. High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-09

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 01-2-620A High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP...planning and execution of testing Army/DOD equipment to determine the effects of Horizontal Component High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP... Electromagnetic Pulse Horizontal Electromagnetic Pulse Advanced Fast Electromagnetic Pulse Nuclear Weapons Effect Testing and Environments 16. SECURITY

  6. Physiological adaptation of the cardiovascular system to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Altitude exposure is associated with major changes in cardiovascular function. The initial cardiovascular response to altitude is characterized by an increase in cardiac output with tachycardia, no change in stroke volume, whereas blood pressure may temporarily be slightly increased. After a few days of acclimatization, cardiac output returns to normal, but heart rate remains increased, so that stroke volume is decreased. Pulmonary artery pressure increases without change in pulmonary artery wedge pressure. This pattern is essentially unchanged with prolonged or lifelong altitude sojourns. Ventricular function is maintained, with initially increased, then preserved or slightly depressed indices of systolic function, and an altered diastolic filling pattern. Filling pressures of the heart remain unchanged. Exercise in acute as well as in chronic high-altitude exposure is associated with a brisk increase in pulmonary artery pressure. The relationships between workload, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake are preserved in all circumstances, but there is a decrease in maximal oxygen consumption, which is accompanied by a decrease in maximal cardiac output. The decrease in maximal cardiac output is minimal in acute hypoxia but becomes more pronounced with acclimatization. This is not explained by hypovolemia, acid-bases status, increased viscosity on polycythemia, autonomic nervous system changes, or depressed systolic function. Maximal oxygen uptake at high altitudes has been modeled to be determined by the matching of convective and diffusional oxygen transport systems at a lower maximal cardiac output. However, there has been recent suggestion that 10% to 25% of the loss in aerobic exercise capacity at high altitudes can be restored by specific pulmonary vasodilating interventions. Whether this is explained by an improved maximum flow output by an unloaded right ventricle remains to be confirmed. Altitude exposure carries no identified risk of myocardial ischemia in

  7. High Altitude Illnesses in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High Altitude Headache (HAH), Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), and High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) are all high altitude related illnesses in order of severity from the mildly symptomatic to the potentially life-threatening. High altitude illnesses occur when travelers ascend to high altitudes too rapidly, which does not allow enough time for the body to adjust. Slow graded ascent to the desired altitude and termination of ascent if AMS symptoms present are keys to illness prevention. Early recognition and rapid intervention of AMS can halt progression to HACE. Pharmacologic prophylaxis with acetazolamide is a proven method of prevention and treatment of high altitude illness. If prevention fails then treatment modalities include supplemental oxygen, supportive therapy, hyperbaric treatment, and dexamethasone. Given the multitude of visitors to the mountains of Hawai‘i, high altitude illness will continue to persist as a prevalent local condition. This paper will emphasize the prevention and early diagnosis of AMS so that the illness does not progress to HACE. PMID:25478293

  8. High-Altitude Hydration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  9. Kilimanjaro Abruzzo expedition: effects of high-altitude trekking on anthropometric, cardiovascular and blood biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Verratti, Vittore; Falone, S; Doria, C; Pietrangelo, T; Di Giulio, C

    The effect of the combination of trekking and balanced appropriated diet were studied in mountaineers who spent 6 days at an altitude ranging from 900 to 5895 m above sea level (a.s.l.), during the Kilimanjaro Abruzzo Expedition. This study explored whether anthropometric, cardiovascular and blood biochemical parameters were significantly changed by a regular trekking performed at high altitude, with reduced oxygen levels, together with a macronutrient-containing balanced diet (total daily caloric intake: 3000-3500 Kcals). In consideration of the short period of high-altitude exposure, high-altitude exercise appeared to provide beneficial and rapid effects on the lipid profile and to modulate cardiovascular functions. These effects rely on both high-altitude hypoxia and physical activity. The most interesting observation is that even just a few days of high-altitude exercise, along with a balanced diet, was able to improve plasma lipid profiles.

  10. The Use of Dexamethasone in Support of High-Altitude Ground Operations and Physical Performance: Review of the Literature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    rates vary dramatically, the physiological effect of hypobaric high-altitude hypoxia ( HHH ) is ubiquitous.1,2 Symptoms of less severe cases of HHH ...nausea, headache, and peripheral edema.3-6 More severe cases of HHH may result in acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude pulmonary edema

  11. Obesity as a Conditioning Factor for High-Altitude Diseases.

    PubMed

    San Martin, Rocío; Brito, Julio; Siques, Patricia; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2017-01-01

    Obesity, a worldwide epidemic, has become a major health burden because it is usually accompanied by an increased risk for insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and even some kinds of cancer. It also results in associated increases in healthcare expenditures and labor and economic consequences. There are also other fields of medicine and biology where obesity or being overweight play a major role, such as high-altitude illnesses (acute mountain sickness, hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and chronic mountain sickness), where an increasing relationship among these two morbid statuses has been demonstrated. This association could be rooted in the interactions between obesity-related metabolic alterations and critical ventilation impairments due to obesity, which would aggravate hypobaric hypoxia at high altitudes, leading to hypoxemia, which is a trigger for developing high-altitude diseases. This review examines the current literature to support the idea that obesity or overweight could be major conditioning factors at high altitude. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  12. Pulmonary Adaptation to High Altitude.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    neurotransmitters, periodic breathing in sleep 211 AWTRAr (ftwe - ,Oan MvM 6 N R01001I l ti40MO? Wea1k jihn ’The work a -4-ihed durIng year 0 t ntao was...the effects of hypoxic acclimatization on ventilatory regulation durinyI sleep .> The following conclusions are warranted from the past year sj work...with time in hypoxia (4 days). These trends toward a "stability" in breathing pattern during sleep were clearly the most profound effects on

  13. [High altitude sojourn in lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Braun, P H

    1993-04-01

    Patients with pulmonary diseases and reduced respiratory reserves live 'higher' than healthy persons. Nevertheless, they tolerate staying at medium altitudes ranging between 1500 and 2500 m a.s.l. surprisingly well. In order to establish patients' high-altitude fitness, it is necessary to examine them individually. It is important to differentiate between reversible obstructive and irreversible pulmonary diseases. Despite a drop in arterial oxygen pressure and oxygen saturation, many patients suffering from average obstructive illness feel no discomfort at high altitude and are surprisingly fit. Patients with irreversible pulmonary diseases, pulmonary emphysema or pulmonary fibrosis feel often more comfortable in the mostly drier and cooler mountain air; however, they are physically less fit when compared at lower altitudes. In contrast to the reversible obstructive pulmonary diseases, only slight adaptation is possible. In judging the tolerance to high altitude, one has to consider that a large number of patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary illnesses simultaneously suffer from coronary heart diseases.

  14. Cognitive and psychomotor responses to high-altitude exposure in sea level and high-altitude residents of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Davis, John E; Wagner, Dale R; Garvin, Nathan; Moilanen, David; Thorington, Jessica; Schall, Cory

    2015-02-04

    High-altitude inhabitants have cardiovascular and respiratory adaptations that are advantageous for high-altitude living, but they may have impaired cognitive function. This study evaluated the influence of altitude of residence on cognitive and psychomotor function upon acute exposure to very high altitude. Ecuadorians (31 residing at 0-1,500 m [LOW], 78 from 1,501-3,000 m [MOD], and 23 living >3,000 m [HIGH]) were tested upon their arrival to a hut at 4,860 m on Mount Chimborazo. Cognitive/psychomotor measurements included a go-no-go test (responding to a non-visual stimulus), a verbal fluency test (verbalizing a series of words specific to a particular category), and a hand movement test (rapidly repeating a series of hand positions). Mean differences between the three altitude groups on these cognitive/psychomotor tests were evaluated with one-way ANOVA. There were no significant differences (p = 0.168) between LOW, MOD, and HIGH for the verbal fluency test. However, the go-no-go test was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in the HIGH group (8.8 ± 1.40 correct responses) than the LOW (9.8 ± 0.61) or MOD (9.8 ± 0.55) groups, and both MOD (97.9 ± 31.2) and HIGH (83.5 ± 26.7) groups completed fewer correct hand movements than the LOW (136.6 ± 37.9) subjects (p < 0.001). Based on this field study, high-altitude residents appear to have some impaired cognitive function suggesting the possibility of maladaptation to long-term exposure to hypobaric hypoxia.

  15. High altitude medicine and physiology in the former Soviet Union.

    PubMed

    Gippenreiter, E; West, J B

    1996-06-01

    The countries of the former Soviet Union have a long history of studies in high-altitude medicine and physiology, but much of the information is difficult to obtain in the West because of the inaccessibility of the journals and the lack of familiarity with the language. The purpose of present review is to improve this situation. In the 1880's, Ivan Sechenov (1829-1905), one of the founders of the Russian school of physiology, introduced the notion of the "inner altitude," that is, how the alveolar Po2 changes with barometric pressure. Later in the 19th century, Russian army physicians made extensive studies of the fitness of soldiers at high altitude and of procedures for improving acclimatization. With the birth of Soviet mountaineering in 1923, a large series of expeditions went to high altitude, first in the Alps, and later in the Caucasus. Nikolay N. Sirotinin (1896-1977) led 9 pre-war research expeditions to Mt. Elbrus and other areas, and, because he thought the alkalosis was partly responsible for mountain sickness, he introduced acid mixtures to be taken orally. Zoia I. Barbashova (1910-1980) made extensive studies of tissue adaptation, especially enzyme activities, in animals exposed to hypoxia. More recently Oleg G. Gazenko (1918-) and his colleagues have carried out extensive studies associated with aviation medicine and the selection of cosmonauts for the Soviet space program. Among many topics, one is the study of how adaptation to one type of physiologic stress (e.g., hypoxia) can improve tolerance to another stress (e.g., acceleration).

  16. King of the mountains: Tibetan and Sherpa physiological adaptations for life at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward T; Milledge, James S; Grocott, Michael P W; Martin, Daniel S

    2014-11-01

    Anecdotal evidence surrounding Tibetans' and Sherpas' exceptional tolerance to hypobaric hypoxia has been recorded since the beginning of high-altitude exploration. These populations have successfully lived and reproduced at high altitude for hundreds of generations with hypoxia as a constant evolutionary pressure. Consequently, they are likely to have undergone natural selection toward a genotype (and phenotype) tending to offer beneficial adaptation to sustained hypoxia. With the advent of translational human hypoxic research, in which genotype/phenotype studies of healthy individuals at high altitude may be of benefit to hypoxemic critically ill patients in a hospital setting, high-altitude natives may provide a valuable and intriguing model. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of the scientific literature encompassing Tibetan and Sherpa physiological adaptations to a high-altitude residence. The review demonstrates the extent to which evolutionary pressure has refined the physiology of this high-altitude population. Furthermore, although many physiological differences between highlanders and lowlanders have been found, it also suggests many more potential avenues of investigation. ©2014 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  17. Mechanism of reduced cardiac stroke volume at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J K; Grover, R F

    1983-06-01

    Two postulates have been advanced to account for reduced stroke at high altitude: (1) diminished venous return secondary to contracted plasma volume and (2) left ventricular (LV) dysfunction secondary to hypoxia. To test these hypotheses, we assessed LV dimensions and contractility indices by M-mode echocardiography and systolic time intervals in 11 young men at sealevel and serially for 10 days at 3100 m altitude. Mean LV end-diastolic dimension fell 16% after 6-8 days, with a 20% decrease in plasma volume reflected by hematocrit rise. Pre-ejection period to LV ejection time (PEP/LVET) ratio was increased after 1-2 days. All indices of contractility were unchanged at rest, and slightly enhanced during exercise. Thus stroke volume falls and PEP/LVET ratio rises at 3100 m because of diminished venous return despite preservation of LV systolic performance.

  18. Genetic signals of high-altitude adaptation in amphibians: a comparative transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizhao; Qi, Yin; Fu, Jinzhong

    2016-10-03

    High-altitude adaptation provides an excellent system for studying how organisms cope with multiple environmental stressors and interacting genetic modifications. To explore the genetic basis of high-altitude adaptation in poikilothermic animals, we acquired transcriptome sequences from a high-altitude population and a low-altitude population of the Asiatic toad (Bufo gargarizans). Transcriptome data from another high-altitude amphibian, Rana kukunoris and its low-altitude relative R. chensiensis, which are from a previous study, were also incorporated into our comparative analysis. More than 40,000 transcripts were obtained from each transcriptome, and 5107 one-to-one orthologs were identified among the four taxa for comparative analysis. A total of 29 (Bufo) and 33 (Rana) putative positively selected genes were identified for the two high-altitude species, which were mainly concentrated in nutrient metabolism related functions. Using SNP-tagging and FST outlier analysis, we further tested 89 other nutrient metabolism related genes for signatures of natural selection, and found that two genes, CAPN2 and ITPR1, were likely under balancing selection. We did not detect any positively selected genes associated with response to hypoxia. Amphibians clearly employ different genetic mechanisms for high-altitude adaptation compared to endotherms. Modifications of genes associated with nutrient metabolism feature prominently while genes related to hypoxia tolerance appear to be insignificant. Poikilotherms represent the majority of animal diversity, and we hope that our results will provide useful directions for future studies of amphibians as well as other poikilotherms.

  19. VEGF189 expression is highly related to adaptation of the plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) inhabiting high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongge; Guo, Songchang; Ren, Yongming; Wang, Depeng; Yu, Honghao; Li, Wenjing; Zhao, Xinquan; Chang, Zhijie

    2013-12-01

    The plateau pika (Ochotona curzonia) has adapted to high-altitude hypoxia during evolution. Higher microvessel density in specific tissues and a blunted hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction response are the critical components of this adaptation. VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor, has proved to be a key regulator of angiogenesis in response to tissue hypoxia and to play an important role in vascular vasodilation. However, the role of VEGF in adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in the plateau pika remains unknown. In this study, we cloned cDNAs for VEGF165 and VEGF189 and examined their expression in pikas inhabiting altitudes of 3200 and 4750 m. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that pika VEGF165 and VEGF189 are evolutionarily conserved. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrates that VEGF165 and VEGF189 display tissue and altitude-specific expression patterns. Interestingly, we found that the levels of VEGF189 mRNA are significantly higher than those of VEGF165 in the brain and muscle tissues of the pika, which is different from what was previously observed in sea-level mammals. VEGF189 mRNA levels in brain, muscle, and lung of the pika increased with increased habitat altitude, whereas VEGF165 shows less change. Our study suggests an important role for VEGF189 in adaptation to hypoxia by the plateau pika in the high-altitude environment.

  20. Subjective sleep quality alterations at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Robert K; Sitek, Emilia J; Sławek, Jarosław W; Basiński, Andrzej; Siemiński, Mariusz; Wieczorek, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Sleep pattern at high altitude has been studied, mainly with the use of polysomnography. This study aimed to analyze subjective sleep quality at high altitude using the following standardized scales: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS-8). Thirty-two members of 2 expeditions--28 males and 4 females (mean age 31 years)--participated in this study conducted in Nepal, Himalayas (Lobuche East, 6119 m above sea level [masl]), Kyrgyzstan, Pamirs (Lenin Peak, 7134 masl), and Poland (sea level). The scales were administered twice, at high altitude (mean altitude 4524 masl) and at sea level. Both measures showed a decrease in sleep quality at high altitude (statistical significance, P < .001). Sleep problems affected general sleep quality and sleep induction. Sleep disturbances due to awakenings during the night, temperature-related discomfort, and breathing difficulties were reported. High altitude had no statistically significant effect on sleep duration or daytime dysfunction as measured by PSQI. The overall results of PSQI and AIS-8 confirm the data based on the climbers' subjective accounts and polysomnographic results reported in previous studies. The introduction of standardized methods of subjective sleep quality assessment might resolve the problem of being able to perform precise evaluations and research in the field of sleep disturbances at high altitude.

  1. [Every mountain too high when Nausea strikes: gastrointestinal function at high altitude].

    PubMed

    Frühauf, Heiko

    2014-07-02

    For people unaccustomed to high altitude, exposure to height often leads to Acute Mountain Sickness, with headaches, difficulty breathing and gastrointestinal symptoms. Nausea and loss of appetite may result in less calorie intake and weight loss. At altitudes greater than 4000 m about 50-80% of people are affected. After only short exposure, gastrointestinal mucosal lesions can occur, potentially leading to gastrointestinal bleeding and lessened hunger. Patients with inflammatory bowel disorders may develop an acute exacerbation. At high altitude, an induction of numerous metabolic processes can be observed, including increased iron absorption. While the pathophysiology of hypobaric hypoxia has been well documented for the respiratory and cardiovascular system, this Mini-Review summarizes the current literature concerning the gastrointestinal function in high altitude.

  2. Carbon monoxide studies at high altitude.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J J

    1988-01-01

    In high altitude areas, ambient carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations are rising because of the increasing number of new residents and tourists, and their concomitant use of motor vehicles and heating appliances. There are, however, comparatively few studies of the acute or chronic physiological effects that may be caused by inhaling CO at high altitude. There are data supporting the concept that the effects of breathing CO at high altitude are additive, and data suggesting that the effects may be more than additive. Visual sensitivity and flicker fusion frequency are reduced in humans inhaling CO at high altitude. One provocative study suggests that the increase in coronary capillarity seen with chronic altitude exposure may be blocked by CO. We exposed male, laboratory rats for 6 weeks to 100 ppm CO, 4676 m (15,000 ft) simulated high altitude (SHA), and CO at SHA. SHA increase hematocrit ratio (Hct) and right ventricle weight, but decreased body weight. CO increased Hct and left ventricle weight. Our results indicate that 100 ppm CO does not exacerbate the effects produced by exposure to 4676 m altitude.

  3. Respiratory control in residents at high altitude: physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, Fabiola; Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    Highland population (HA) from the Andes, living above 3000 m, have a blunted ventilatory response to increasing hypoxia, breathe less compared to acclimatized newcomers, but more, compared to sea-level natives at sea level. Subjects with chronic mountain sickness (CMS) breathe like sea-level natives and have excessive erythrocytosis (EE). The respiratory stimulation that arises through the peripheral chemoreflex is modestly less in the CMS group when compared with the HA group at the same P(ET(O2)). With regard to CO(2) sensitivity, CMS subjects seem to have reset their central CO(2) chemoreceptors to operate around the sea-level resting P(ET(CO2)). Acetazolamide, an acidifying drug that increases the chemosensitivity of regions in the brain stem that contain CO(2)/H(+) sensitive neurons, partially reverses this phenomenon, thus, providing CMS subjects with the possibility to have high CO(2) changes, despite small changes in ventilation. However, the same type of adjustments of the breathing pattern established for Andeans has not been found necessarily in Asian humans and/or domestic animals nor in the various high altitude species studied. The differing time frames of exposure to hypoxia among the populations, as well as the reversibility of the different components of the respiratory process at sea level, provide key concepts concerning the importance of time at high altitude in the evolution of an appropriate breathing pattern.

  4. The Impact of Moderate-Altitude Staging on Pulmonary Arterial Hemodynamics after Ascent to High Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    et al., 1956; Sime et al., 1974). The magnitude of the PAP in- crease plays an important role in the development of high altitude pulmonary edema ...implications for travelers to high altitude. High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is an important cause of high altitude morbidity and mortality, and...P., and Oelz O. (1991). Prevention of high-altitude pulmonary edema by nifedipine. N. Engl. J. Med. 325:1284–1289. Beidleman B.A., Fulco C.S., Muza

  5. High Altitude Launch for a Practical SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Denis, Vincent; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Existing engineering materials allow the construction of towers to heights of many kilometers. Orbital launch from a high altitude has significant advantages over sea-level launch due to the reduced atmospheric pressure, resulting in lower atmospheric drag on the vehicle and allowing higher rocket engine performance. High-altitude launch sites are particularly advantageous for single-stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles, where the payload is typically 2% of the initial launch mass. An earlier paper enumerated some of the advantages of high altitude launch of SSTO vehicles. In this paper, we calculate launch trajectories for a candidate SSTO vehicle, and calculate the advantage of launch at launch altitudes 5 to 25 kilometer altitudes above sea level. The performance increase can be directly translated into increased payload capability to orbit, ranging from 5 to 20% increase in the mass to orbit. For a candidate vehicle with an initial payload fraction of 2% of gross lift-off weight, this corresponds to 31% increase in payload (for 5-km launch altitude) to 122% additional payload (for 25-km launch altitude).

  6. High Altitude Launch for a Practical SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Denis, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Existing engineering materials allow the construction of towers to heights of many kilometers. Orbital launch from a high altitude has significant advantages over sea-level launch due to the reduced atmospheric pressure, resulting in lower atmospheric drag on the vehicle and allowing higher rocket engine performance. high-altitude launch sites are particularly advantageous for single-stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles, where the payload is typically 2% of the initial launch mass. An earlier paper enumerated some of the advantages of high altitude launch of SSTO vehicles. In this paper, we calculate launch trajectories for a candidate SSTO vehicle, and calculate the advantage of launch at launch altitudes 5 to 25 kilometer altitudes above sea level. The performance increase can be directly translated in to increased payload capability to orbit, ranging from 5 to 20% increase in the mass to orbit. For a candidate vehicle with an initial payload fraction of 2% of gross lift-off weight, this corresponds to 31 % increase in payload (for 5-km launch altitude) to 122% additional payload (for 25-km launch altitude).

  7. High Altitude Launch for a Practical SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Denis, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Existing engineering materials allow the construction of towers to heights of many kilometers. Orbital launch from a high altitude has significant advantages over sea-level launch due to the reduced atmospheric pressure, resulting in lower atmospheric drag on the vehicle and allowing higher rocket engine performance. High-altitude launch sites are particularly advantageous for single-stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles, where the payload is typically 2 percent of the initial launch mass. An earlier paper enumerated some of the advantages of high altitude launch of SSTO vehicles. In this paper, we calculate launch trajectories for a candidate SSTO vehicle, and calculate the advantage of launch at launch altitudes 5 to 25 kilometer altitudes above sea level. The performance increase can be directly translated into increased payload capability to orbit, ranging from 5 to 20 percent increase in the mass to orbit. For a candidate vehicle with an initial payload fraction of 2 percent of gross lift-off weight, this corresponds to 31 percent increase in payload (for 5-kilometer launch altitude) to 122 percent additional payload (for 25-kilometer launch altitude).

  8. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  9. Carotidynia in high-altitude travelers.

    PubMed

    Parra, Andrea; Okada, Tamuru; Lin, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Background Carotidynia is characterized by focal pain and tenderness of the carotid artery without associated hemodynamic or structural abnormalities. Carotid artery pathology has also been known to occur in high altitude due to aberrant baroreceptor response in the carotid bulb. Case Presentation We herein report two cases of high altitude-related idiopathic carotidynia. The first patient was a geologist who performed oil reserve survey in the Alaska Mountain, while the second patient was hiking in a mountain trail in Peru. Both patients developed acute onset of neck pain while traveling in high-altitude mountainous ranges. Carotid imaging showed transmural inflammation surrounding the carotid artery without intraluminal stenosis. Treatment with low-dose aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug were initiated, which resulted in complete resolution of their symptom. Follow-up carotid ultrasound showed complete resolution of carotid inflammatory tissue density. Discussion This represents the first report linking carotidynia to high-altitude traveling.

  10. Transcriptomic analysis provides insight into high-altitude acclimation in domestic goats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qianzi; Huang, Wenyao; Guan, Jiuqiang; Jin, Long; Che, Tiandong; Fu, Yuhua; Hu, Yaodong; Tian, Shilin; Wang, Dawei; Jiang, Zhi; Li, Xuewei; Li, Mingzhou

    2015-08-10

    Domestic goats are distributed in a wide range of habitats and have acclimated to their local environmental conditions. To investigate the gene expression changes of goats that are induced by high altitude stress, we performed RNA-seq on 27 samples from the three hypoxia-sensitive tissues (heart, lung, and skeletal muscle) in three indigenous populations from distinct altitudes (600 m, 2000 m, and 3000 m). We generated 129Gb of high-quality sequencing data (~4Gb per sample) and catalogued the expression profiles of 12,421 annotated hircine genes in each sample. The analysis showed global similarities and differences of high-altitude transcriptomes among populations and tissues as well as revealed that the heart underwent the most high-altitude induced expression changes. We identified numerous differentially expressed genes that exhibited distinct expression patterns, and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant-containing genes that were highly differentiated between the high- and low-altitude populations. These genes have known or potential roles in hypoxia response and were enriched in functional gene categories potentially responsible for high-altitude stress. Therefore, they are appealing candidates for further investigation of the gene expression and associated regulatory mechanisms related to high-altitude acclimation.

  11. High altitude medicine for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    High altitude medicine deals with a continuum of diseases ranging from a mild discomfort to serious ailments affecting all organ systems, including the lungs, brain, and eyes. Decreased oxygen tension is the primary cause. The main principles of prevention are staging and graded ascent to allow acclimatization. Adventure travel to high altitude destinations is becoming increasingly popular; family physicians should be informed of the medical problems associated with such travel. Images p712-a p715-a p716-a PMID:8199523

  12. High-altitude balloon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, William M.; Olson, David S.; Keenan, Donald E.

    1999-08-01

    The mission of the HABE is to resolve critical acquisition, tracking, and pointing (ATP) and fire control issues, validate enabling technologies, simulations, and models, and acquire supporting data for future space-based lasers experiments. HABE is integrating components from existing technologies into a payload that can autonomously acquire, track, and point a low power laser at a ballistic missile in its boost phase of flight. For its primary mission the payload will be flown multiple times to an altitude of 85,000 feet above the White Sands Missile Range. From the near-space environment of the balloon flight, HABE will demonstrate the ATP functions required for a space-based laser in a ballistic missile defense role. The HABE platform includes coarse and fine gimbal pointing, IR and visible passive tracking, active fine tracking, internal auto- alignment and boresighting,and precision line-of-sight stabilization functions. This paper presents an overview and status of the HABE program.

  13. Short-term responses of the kidney to high altitude in mountain climbers

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander S.; Alper, Seth L.

    2014-01-01

    In high-altitude climbers, the kidneys play a crucial role in acclimatization and in mountain sickness syndromes [acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema, high-altitude pulmonary edema] through their roles in regulating body fluids, electrolyte and acid–base homeostasis. Here, we discuss renal responses to several high-altitude-related stresses, including changes in systemic volume status, renal plasma flow and clearance, and altered acid–base and electrolyte status. Volume regulation is considered central both to high-altitude adaptation and to maladaptive development of mountain sickness. The rapid and powerful diuretic response to the hypobaric hypoxic stimulus of altitude integrates decreased circulating concentrations of antidiuretic hormone, renin and aldosterone, increased levels of natriuretic hormones, plasma and urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, endothelin and urinary adrenomedullin, with increased insensible fluid losses and reduced fluid intake. The ventilatory and hormonal responses to hypoxia may predict susceptibility to AMS, also likely influenced by multiple genetic factors. The timing of altitude increases and adaptation also modifies the body's physiologic responses to altitude. While hypovolemia develops as part of the diuretic response to altitude, coincident vascular leak and extravascular fluid accumulation lead to syndromes of high-altitude sickness. Pharmacological interventions, such as diuretics, calcium blockers, steroids, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and β-agonists, may potentially be helpful in preventing or attenuating these syndromes. PMID:23525530

  14. Impact of extreme exercise at high altitude on oxidative stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Quindry, John; Dumke, Charles; Slivka, Dustin; Ruby, Brent

    2016-09-15

    Exercise and oxidative stress research continues to grow as a physiological subdiscipline. The influence of high altitude on exercise and oxidative stress is among the recent topics of intense study in this area. Early findings indicate that exercise at high altitude has an independent influence on free radical generation and the resultant oxidative stress. This review provides a detailed summary of oxidative stress biochemistry as gleaned mainly from studies of humans exercising at high altitude. Understanding of the human response to exercise at altitude is largely derived from field-based research at altitudes above 3000 m in addition to laboratory studies which employ normobaric hypoxia. The implications of oxidative stress incurred during high altitude exercise appear to be a transient increase in oxidative damage followed by redox-sensitive adaptations in multiple tissues. These outcomes are consistent for lowland natives, high altitude acclimated sojourners and highland natives, although the latter group exhibits a more robust adaptive response. To date there is no evidence that altitude-induced oxidative stress is deleterious to normal training or recovery scenarios. Limited evidence suggests that deleterious outcomes related to oxidative stress are limited to instances where individuals are exposed to extreme elevations for extended durations. However, confirmation of this tentative conclusion requires further investigation. More applicably, altitude-induced hypoxia may have an independent influence on redox-sensitive adaptive responses to exercise and exercise recovery. If correct, these findings may hold important implications for athletes, mountaineers, and soldiers working at high altitude. These points are raised within the confines of published research on the topic of oxidative stress during exercise at altitude. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  15. Endogenous Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Pathway in High Altitude Adapted Yaks

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Shiro; Ishizaki, Takeshi; Toga, Hirohisa; Sakai, Akio; Isakova, Jainagul; Taalaibekova, Elnura; Baiserkeev, Zamirbek; Kojonazarov, Baktybek; Aldashev, Almaz

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced and high altitude pulmonary hypertension are a major problem in the mountain areas of the world. The asymmetric methylarginines (ADMA) inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by competing with L-arginine, and high levels of plasma ADMA predict adverse outcomes in pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the regulation of the ADMA-NO pathway in animals adapted to high altitudes. We measured the plasma ADMA concentration, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAH) protein expression, and DDAH activities in the lungs from yaks. Although the yaks are hypoxemic, cardiac function and pulmonary arterial pressures are almost normal, and we found decreased DDAH expression and activity in association with reduced plasma ADMA concentrations. The eNOS expression was significantly higher in yaks. These results indicate that augmented endogenous NO activity in yaks through the ADMA-DDAH pathway and eNOS upregulation account for the low pulmonary vascular tone observed in high altitude adapted yaks. PMID:26380264

  16. Phenylethanoid glycosides of Pedicularis muscicola Maxim ameliorate high altitude-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Baozhu; Li, Maoxing; Cao, Xinyuan; Zhang, Quanlong; Liu, Yantong; Ma, Qiang; Qiu, Yan; Luan, Fei; Wang, Xianmin

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia causes oxidative stress, neuronal degeneration and apoptosis that leads to memory impairment. Though oxidative stress contributes to neuronal degeneration and apoptosis in hypobaric hypoxia, the ability for phenylethanoid glycosides of Pedicularis muscicola Maxim (PhGs) to reverse high altitude memory impairment has not been studied. Rats were supplemented with PhGs orally for a week. After the fourth day of drug administration, rats were exposed to a 7500 m altitude simulation in a specially designed animal decompression chamber for 3 days. Spatial memory was assessed by the 8-arm radial maze test before and after exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Histological assessment of neuronal degeneration was performed by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. Changes in oxidative stress markers and changes in the expression of the apoptotic marker, caspase-3, were assessed in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that after exposure to hypobaric hypoxia, PhGs ameliorated high altitude memory impairment, as shown by the decreased values obtained for reference memory error (RME), working memory error (WME), and total error (TE). Meanwhile, administration of PhGs decreased hippocampal reactive oxygen species levels and consequent lipid peroxidation by elevating reduced glutathione levels and enhancing the free radical scavenging enzyme system. There was also a decrease in the number of pyknotic neurons and a reduction in caspase-3 expression in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that PhGs may be used therapeutically to ameliorate high altitude memory impairment.

  17. Paschen Considerations for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there have been several proposals submitted to funding agencies for long-lived high altitude (about 70,000 feet) airships for communications, surveillance, etc. In order for these airships to remain at altitude, high power, high efficiency, lightweight solar arrays must be used, and high efficiency power management and distribution systems must be employed. The needs for high power and high efficiency imply high voltage systems. However, the air pressure at these extreme altitudes is such that electrical power systems will be near the Paschen discharge minimum over a wide range of electrode separations. In this paper, preliminary calculations are made for acceptable high voltage design practices under ambient, hydrogen and helium gas atmospheres.

  18. Acute altitude-induced hypoxia suppresses plasma glucose and leptin in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Karen R.; Williamson, David L.; Fealy, Ciarán E.; Kriz, David A.; Krishnan, Raj K.; Huang, Hazel; Ahn, Janice; Loomis, Joseph L.; Kirwan, John P.

    2009-01-01

    To examine the effects of acute altitude-induced hypoxia on the hormonal and metabolic response to ingested glucose, 8 young, healthy subjects (5 men/3 women; 26±2 yrs; BMI, 23.1±1.0 kg/m2) performed two randomized trials in a hypobaric chamber where a 75 g glucose solution was ingested under simulated altitude (ALT, 4,300m), or ambient (AMB, 362m) conditions. Plasma glucose, insulin, c-peptide, epinephrine, leptin and lactate concentrations were measured at baseline and 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after glucose ingestion during both trials. Compared to AMB, the plasma glucose response to glucose ingestion was reduced during the ALT trial (P=0.04). There were no differences in the insulin and c-peptide responses between trials, or in insulin sensitivity based on HOMA-IR. Epinephrine and lactate were both elevated during the ALT trial (P<0.05), while the plasma leptin response was reduced compared to AMB (P<0.05). The data suggest that the plasma glucose response is suppressed at ALT, but this is not due to insulin per se, since insulin and c-peptide levels were similar for both trials. Elevated plasma epinephrine and lactate during ALT is indicative of increased glycogenolysis, which may have masked the magnitude of the reduced glucose response. We conclude that during acute altitude exposure there is a rapid metabolic response that is accompanied by a shift in the hormonal milieu that appears to favor increased glucose utilization. PMID:19765784

  19. [Effects of high altitude on bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Schultze-Werninghaus, G

    2008-03-01

    Sojourns in the high mountains have been recommended to patients with asthma for many decades. It is the aim of this contribution to summarise the published studies about the effects of a stay at > 1500 m above sea level on asthmatic patients. These data from 428 adolescent and adult patients indicate an improvement of asthma symptoms and lung function during sojourns at high altitude. In many patients a reduction of the steroid therapy was achievable. Profound changes in the immune system have been demonstrated at high altitude, with a reduction of B- and T-helper cell activation. Total and mite-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies decrease significantly during longer sojourns. These changes are associated with a reduction of airway inflammation (e. g., reduction of eosinophil activation, NO exhalation and bronchial hyper-responsiveness). The fact that also patients with non-allergic asthma demonstrate a reduction of their airway inflammation at high altitude suggests that the high altitude climate has beneficial effects on asthma beyond the effects of allergen avoidance. High UV exposure and low humidity could be important additional factors, to explain the reductions in asthma severity in the high mountain climate. Larger controlled studies should be performed to prove the positive effects of the high altitude climate on asthma.

  20. High twin resemblance for sensitivity to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Masschelein, Evi; Van Thienen, Ruud; Thomis, Martine; Hespel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Physiological responses to hypoxia vary between individuals, and genetic factors are conceivably involved. Using a monozygotic twin design, we investigated the role of genetic factors in physiological responses to acute hypoxia. Thirteen pairs of monozygotic twin brothers participated in two experimental sessions in a normobaric hypoxic facility with a 2-wk interval. In one session, fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) was gradually reduced to 10.7% (approximately 5300 m altitude) over 5 h. During the next 3 h at 10.7%, FiO2 subjects performed a 20-min submaximal exercise bout (EXSUB, 1.2 W·kg) and a maximal incremental exercise test (EXMAX). An identical control experiment was done in normoxia. Cardiorespiratory measurements were continuously performed, and 8-h urine output was collected. Compared with normoxia, hypoxia decreased (P < 0.05) arterial O2 saturation (%SpO2) at rest (-22%) and during exercise (-28%). Furthermore, V˙O2max (-39%), HRmax (HR, -8%), maximal pulmonary ventilation (V˙Emax, -11%), and urinary norepinephrine excretion (-31%) were reduced (P < 0.05) whereas HR at rest (25%) and during EXSUB (16%) and V˙E at rest (38%) and during EXSUB (70%) were increased (P < 0.05). However, hypoxia-induced changes (Δ) were not randomly distributed between subjects. Between-pair variance was substantially larger than within-pair variance (P < 0.05) for Δ%SpO2 at rest (approximately threefold) and during exercise (approximately fourfold), ΔV˙O2max (approximately fourfold), ΔHR during exercise (approximately seven- to eightfold), hypoxic ventilatory response (approximately sixfold), and Δ urinary norepinephrine output (approximately threefold). Incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) also yielded significant twin similarity (P < 0.05). AMS subjects showed approximately 50% greater drop in urinary norepinephrine and lower hypoxic ventilator response than AMS individuals. Our data suggest that genetic factors regulate cardiorespiratory responses, exercise

  1. A non-synonymous SNP with the allele frequency correlated with the altitude may contribute to the hypoxia adaptation of Tibetan chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Yin, Huadong; Zhou, Lanyun; Zhong, Chengling

    2017-01-01

    The hypoxia adaptation to high altitudes is of considerable interest in the biological sciences. As a breed with adaptability to highland environments, the Tibetan chicken (Gallus gallus domestics), provides a biological model to search for genetic differences between high and lowland chickens. To address mechanisms of hypoxia adaptability at high altitudes for the Tibetan chicken, we focused on the Endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), a key regulatory factor in hypoxia responses. Detected were polymorphisms of EPAS1 exons in 157 Tibetan chickens from 8 populations and 139 lowland chickens from 7 breeds. We then designed 15 pairs of primers to amplify exon sequences by Sanger sequencing methods. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected, including 2 missense mutations (SNP3 rs316126786 and SNP5 rs740389732) and 4 synonymous mutations (SNP1 rs315040213, SNP4 rs739281102, SNP6 rs739010166, and SNP2 rs14330062). There were negative correlations between altitude and mutant allele frequencies for both SNP6 (rs739010166, r = 0.758, p<0.001) and SNP3 (rs316126786, r = 0.844, P<0.001). We also aligned the EPAS1 protein with ortholog proteins from diverse vertebrates and focused that SNP3 (Y333C) was a conserved site among species. Also, SNP3 (Y333C) occurred in a well-defined protein domain Per-AhR-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain). These results imply that SNP3 (Y333C) is the most likely casual mutation for the high-altitude adaption in Tibetan chicken. These variations of EPAS1 provide new insights into the gene’s function. PMID:28222154

  2. A non-synonymous SNP with the allele frequency correlated with the altitude may contribute to the hypoxia adaptation of Tibetan chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichen; Li, Diyan; Zhao, Xiaoling; Wang, Yan; Yin, Huadong; Zhou, Lanyun; Zhong, Chengling; Zhu, Qing

    2017-01-01

    The hypoxia adaptation to high altitudes is of considerable interest in the biological sciences. As a breed with adaptability to highland environments, the Tibetan chicken (Gallus gallus domestics), provides a biological model to search for genetic differences between high and lowland chickens. To address mechanisms of hypoxia adaptability at high altitudes for the Tibetan chicken, we focused on the Endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), a key regulatory factor in hypoxia responses. Detected were polymorphisms of EPAS1 exons in 157 Tibetan chickens from 8 populations and 139 lowland chickens from 7 breeds. We then designed 15 pairs of primers to amplify exon sequences by Sanger sequencing methods. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected, including 2 missense mutations (SNP3 rs316126786 and SNP5 rs740389732) and 4 synonymous mutations (SNP1 rs315040213, SNP4 rs739281102, SNP6 rs739010166, and SNP2 rs14330062). There were negative correlations between altitude and mutant allele frequencies for both SNP6 (rs739010166, r = 0.758, p<0.001) and SNP3 (rs316126786, r = 0.844, P<0.001). We also aligned the EPAS1 protein with ortholog proteins from diverse vertebrates and focused that SNP3 (Y333C) was a conserved site among species. Also, SNP3 (Y333C) occurred in a well-defined protein domain Per-AhR-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain). These results imply that SNP3 (Y333C) is the most likely casual mutation for the high-altitude adaption in Tibetan chicken. These variations of EPAS1 provide new insights into the gene's function.

  3. Establishment and evaluation of an experimental rat model for high-altitude intestinal barrier injury.

    PubMed

    Luo, Han; Zhou, Dai-Jun; Chen, Zhang; Zhou, Qi-Quan; Wu, Kui; Tian, Kun; Li, Zhi-Wei; Xiao, Zhen-Liang

    2017-02-01

    In the present study an experimental high-altitude intestinal barrier injury rat model was established by simulating an acute hypoxia environment, to provide an experimental basis to assess the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of altitude sickness. A total of 70 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: Control group (group C) and a high-altitude hypoxia group (group H). Following 2 days adaptation, the rats in group H were exposed to a simulated 4,000-m, high-altitude hypoxia environment for 3 days to establish the experimental model. To evaluate the model, bacterial translocation, serum lipopolysaccharide level, pathomorphology, ultrastructure and protein expression in rats were assessed. The results indicate that, compared with group C, the rate of bacterial translocation and the apoptotic index of intestinal epithelial cells were significantly higher in group H (P<0.01). Using a light microscope it was determined that the intestinal mucosa was thinner in group H, there were fewer epithelial cells present and the morphology was irregular. Observations with an electron microscope indicated that the intestinal epithelial cells in group H were injured, the spaces among intestinal villi were wider, the tight junctions among cells were open and lanthanum nitrate granules (from the fixing solution) had diffused into the intestinal mesenchyme. The expression of the tight junction protein occludin was also decreased in group H. Therefore, the methods applied in the present study enabled the establishment of a stable, high-altitude intestinal barrier injury model in rats.

  4. Establishment and evaluation of an experimental rat model for high-altitude intestinal barrier injury

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Han; Zhou, Dai-Jun; Chen, Zhang; Zhou, Qi-Quan; Wu, Kui; Tian, Kun; Li, Zhi-Wei; Xiao, Zhen-Liang

    2017-01-01

    In the present study an experimental high-altitude intestinal barrier injury rat model was established by simulating an acute hypoxia environment, to provide an experimental basis to assess the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of altitude sickness. A total of 70 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: Control group (group C) and a high-altitude hypoxia group (group H). Following 2 days adaptation, the rats in group H were exposed to a simulated 4,000-m, high-altitude hypoxia environment for 3 days to establish the experimental model. To evaluate the model, bacterial translocation, serum lipopolysaccharide level, pathomorphology, ultrastructure and protein expression in rats were assessed. The results indicate that, compared with group C, the rate of bacterial translocation and the apoptotic index of intestinal epithelial cells were significantly higher in group H (P<0.01). Using a light microscope it was determined that the intestinal mucosa was thinner in group H, there were fewer epithelial cells present and the morphology was irregular. Observations with an electron microscope indicated that the intestinal epithelial cells in group H were injured, the spaces among intestinal villi were wider, the tight junctions among cells were open and lanthanum nitrate granules (from the fixing solution) had diffused into the intestinal mesenchyme. The expression of the tight junction protein occludin was also decreased in group H. Therefore, the methods applied in the present study enabled the establishment of a stable, high-altitude intestinal barrier injury model in rats. PMID:28352318

  5. Retinal Hemorrhage in a High-Altitude Aid Post Volunteer Doctor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan; Koirala, Pranawa; Regmi, Nirajan; Pant, Sushil

    2017-09-01

    Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan, Pranawa Koirala, Nirajan Regmi, and Sushil Pant. Retinal hemorrhage in a high-altitude aid post volunteer doctor: a case report. High Alt Med Biol. 18: 285-287, 2017.-High-altitude retinal hemorrhages (HARHs) are seen at altitudes more than 3000 m, are usually multiple, flame shaped, and adjacent to blood vessels. Development near the macula causes blurring of vision, otherwise, they are symptomless and self-limiting. They often develop during the first few days after ascent to high altitude and subjects often suffer from acute mountain sickness (AMS) or high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE). People going to high altitude for the first time are more susceptible to retinal hemorrhages than experienced climbers and high-altitude dwellers. We present a case of a 31-year-old male doctor who developed sudden unilateral blurring of vision without any other symptoms after 6 weeks of volunteering at a high-altitude aid post in Nepal. There were no features suggestive of AMS or HACE. All examinations were normal except for fundoscopic examination in the left eye, which determined macular retinal hemorrhage. Although he was reluctant to descend, he was counseled to descend and refrained from further ascent to higher altitude, which could accentuate hypoxemia and any strenuous activities that increase intraocular pressure. He recovered his vision after few weeks in Kathmandu and his retinal hemorrhages regressed. Hypoxia exacerbated by repeated bouts of rapid ascent to further higher altitudes may have contributed to his HARH. This suggests that unilateral retinal hemorrhages can develop even after several weeks at high altitude without concomitant AMS or HACE. People going to high altitude are reluctant to retreat, before reaching their target, when they suffer from HARH. The same is shown by a physician. So it is very important for healthcare professionals working at high altitudes especially in the Himalayas of Nepal to have a good knowledge

  6. Ascent to altitude as a weight loss method: the good and bad of hypoxia inducible factor activation.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2014-02-01

    Given the epidemic of obesity worldwide there is a need for more novel and effective weight loss methods. Altitude is well known to be associated with weight loss and has actually been used as a method of weight reduction in obese subjects. This review demonstrates the critical role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in bringing about reductions in appetite and increases in energy expenditure characteristic of hypobaric hypoxia A MEDLINE search of English language articles through February 2013 identified publications associating altitude or hypobaric hypoxia with key words to include HIF, weight loss, appetite, basal metabolic rate, leptin, cellular energetics, and obesity. The data from these articles were synthesized to formulate a unique and novel mechanism by which HIF activation leads to alterations in appetite, basal metabolic rate, and reductions in body adiposity. A synthesis of previously published literature revealed mechanisms by which altitude induces activation of HIF, thereby suggesting this transcription factor regulates changes in cellular metabolism/energetics, activation of the central nervous system, as well as peripheral pathways leading to reductions in food intake and increases in energy expenditure. Here a unifying hypothesis is present suggesting that activation of HIF under conditions of altitude potentially leads to metabolic benefits that are dose dependent, gender and genetic specific, and results in adverse effects if the exposure is extreme. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  7. High altitude pulmonary edema, down syndrome, and obstructive sleep apneas.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Chenivesse, Cécile; Larmignat, Philippe; Meille, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    A 24-year-old adult with a Down syndrome was admitted in December 2006 at the Moutiers hospital in the French Alps for an acute inaugural episode of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) that occurred in the early morning of day 3 after his arrival to La Plagne (2000 m). This patient presented an interventricular septal defect operated on at the age of 7, a hypothyroidism controlled by 50 microg levothyrox, a state of obesity (BMI 37.8 kg/m(2)), and obstructive sleep apneas with a mean of 42 obstructive apneas or hypopneas per hour, treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The patient refused to use his CPAP during his stay in La Plagne. At echocardiography, resting parameters were normal, with a left ventricular, ejection fraction of 60%, a normokinetic right ventricle, and an estimated systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) of 30 mmHg. At exercise, sPAP rose to 45 mmHg and the right ventricle was still normokinetic and not dilated. An exercise hypoxic tolerance test performed at 60 W and at the equivalent altitude of 3300 m revealed a severe drop in arterial oxygen saturation down to 60%, with an abnormal low ventilatory response to hypoxia, suggesting a defect in peripheral chemosensitivity to hypoxia. In conclusion, patients with Down syndrome, including adults with no cardiac dysfunction and regular physical activity, are at risk of HAPE even at moderate altitude when they suffer from obstructive sleep apneas associated with obesity and low chemoresponsiveness. This observation might be of importance since an increasing number of young adults with Down syndrome participate in recreational or sport activities, including skiing and mountaineering.

  8. Stunting and the Prediction of Lung Volumes Among Tibetan Children and Adolescents at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Charles A; Garruto, Ralph M

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the extent to which stunting (height-for-age Z-scores ≤ -2) compromises the use of low altitude prediction equations to gauge the general increase in lung volumes during growth among high altitude populations. The forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume (FEV1) of 208 stunted and 365 non-stunted high-altitude Tibetan children and adolescents between the ages of 6 and 20 years are predicted using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANESIII) and the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLF) equations, and compared to observed lung volumes. Stunted Tibetan children show smaller positive deviations from both NHANESIII and GLF prediction equations at most ages than non-stunted children. Deviations from predictions do not correspond to differences in body proportions (sitting heights and chest circumferences relative to stature) between stunted and non-stunted children; but appear compatible with the effects of retarded growth and lung maturation that are likely to exist among stunted children. These results indicate that, before low altitude standards can be used to evaluate the effects of hypoxia, or before high altitude populations can be compared to any other group, it is necessary to assess the relative proportion of stunted children in the samples. If the proportion of stunted children in a high altitude population differs significantly from the proportion in the comparison group, lung function comparisons are unlikely to yield an accurate assessment of the hypoxia effect. The best solution to this problem is to (1) use stature and lung function standards based on the same low altitude population; and (2) assess the hypoxic effect by comparing observed and predicted values among high altitude children whose statures are most like those of children on whom the low altitude spirometric standard is based-preferably high altitude children with HAZ-scores ≥ -1.

  9. Exercise economy does not change after acclimatization to moderate to very high altitude.

    PubMed

    Lundby, C; Calbet, J A L; Sander, M; van Hall, G; Mazzeo, R S; Stray-Gundersen, J; Stager, J M; Chapman, R F; Saltin, B; Levine, B D

    2007-06-01

    For more than 60 years, muscle mechanical efficiency has been thought to remain unchanged with acclimatization to high altitude. However, recent work has suggested that muscle mechanical efficiency may in fact be improved upon return from prolonged exposure to high altitude. The purpose of the present work is to resolve this apparent conflict in the literature. In a collaboration between four research centers, we have included data from independent high-altitude studies performed at varying altitudes and including a total of 153 subjects ranging from sea-level (SL) residents to high-altitude natives, and from sedentary to world-class athletes. In study A (n=109), living for 20-22 h/day at 2500 m combined with training between 1250 and 2800 m caused no differences in running economy at fixed speeds despite low typical error measurements. In study B, SL residents (n=8) sojourning for 8 weeks at 4100 m and residents native to this altitude (n=7) performed cycle ergometer exercise in ambient air and in acute normoxia. Muscle oxygen uptake and mechanical efficiency were unchanged between SL and acclimatization and between the two groups. In study C (n=20), during 21 days of exposure to 4300 m altitude, no changes in systemic or leg VO(2) were found during cycle ergometer exercise. However, at the substantially higher altitude of 5260 m decreases in submaximal VO(2) were found in nine subjects with acute hypoxic exposure, as well as after 9 weeks of acclimatization. As VO(2) was already reduced in acute hypoxia this suggests, at least in this condition, that the reduction is not related to anatomical or physiological adaptations to high altitude but to oxygen lack because of severe hypoxia altering substrate utilization. In conclusion, results from several, independent investigations indicate that exercise economy remains unchanged after acclimatization to high altitude.

  10. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353–358, 2016.—Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk. PMID:27768392

  11. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prativa; Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353-358, 2016.-Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk.

  12. Sonic Thermometer for High-Altitude Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bognar, John

    2012-01-01

    The sonic thermometer is a specialized application of well-known sonic anemometer technology. Adaptations have been made to the circuit, including the addition of supporting sensors, which enable its use in the high-altitude environment and in non-air gas mixtures. There is a need to measure gas temperatures inside and outside of superpressure balloons that are flown at high altitudes. These measurements will allow the performance of the balloon to be modeled more accurately, leading to better flight performance. Small thermistors (solid-state temperature sensors) have been used for this general purpose, and for temperature measurements on radiosondes. A disadvantage to thermistors and other physical (as distinct from sonic) temperature sensors is that they are subject to solar heating errors when they are exposed to the Sun, and this leads to issues with their use in a very high-altitude environment

  13. Depression and Altitude: Cross-Sectional Community-Based Study Among Elderly High-Altitude Residents in the Himalayan Regions.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Motonao; Yamanaka, Gaku; Yamamoto, Naomune; Nakaoka, Takashi; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Matsubayashi, Kozo; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Sakura, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes, and some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. There may be a significant correlation between rates of depression and altitude, but little data exist outside the United States. The purpose of the present study is to conduct a survey of depression among the elderly highlanders in Asia. We enrolled 114 persons aged 60 years or older (mean, 69.2 ± 6.7 years; women, 58.8%) in Domkhar (altitude, 3800 m), Ladakh, India and 173 ethnic Tibetans (mean, 66.5 ± 6.1 years; women, 61.3%) in Yushu (altitude, 3700 m), Qinghai Province, China. The two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) and the geriatric depression scale were administered. A psychiatrist interviewed the subjects who had a positive score on the PHQ-2. The results of the interview with the residents conducted by the specialist showed that two cases (1.8%) from Domkhar and four (2.3%) from Qinghai had depression. Despite the high altitude, the probability of depression was low in elderly highlander in Ladakh and Qinghai. Our finding seems to indicate that cultural factors such as religious outlook and social/family relationship inhibit the development of depression.

  14. VEGF189 Expression Is Highly Related to Adaptation of the Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae) Inhabiting High Altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongge; Guo, Songchang; Ren, Yongming; Wang, Depeng; Yu, Honghao; Li, Wenjing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Li, Hongge, Songchang Guo, Yongming Ren, Depeng Wang, Honghao Yu, Wenjing Li, Xinquan Zhao, and Zhijie Chang. VEGF189 expression is highly related to adaptation of the plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) inhabiting high altitudes. High Alt Med Biol 14:395–404, 2013.— The plateau pika (Ochotona curzonia) has adapted to high-altitude hypoxia during evolution. Higher microvessel density in specific tissues and a blunted hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction response are the critical components of this adaptation. VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor, has proved to be a key regulator of angiogenesis in response to tissue hypoxia and to play an important role in vascular vasodilation. However, the role of VEGF in adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in the plateau pika remains unknown. In this study, we cloned cDNAs for VEGF165 and VEGF189 and examined their expression in pikas inhabiting altitudes of 3200 and 4750 m. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that pika VEGF165 and VEGF189 are evolutionarily conserved. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrates that VEGF165 and VEGF189 display tissue and altitude-specific expression patterns. Interestingly, we found that the levels of VEGF189 mRNA are significantly higher than those of VEGF165 in the brain and muscle tissues of the pika, which is different from what was previously observed in sea-level mammals. VEGF189 mRNA levels in brain, muscle, and lung of the pika increased with increased habitat altitude, whereas VEGF165 shows less change. Our study suggests an important role for VEGF189 in adaptation to hypoxia by the plateau pika in the high-altitude environment. PMID:24377347

  15. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  16. High-altitude plume computer code development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audeh, B. J.; Murphy, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The flowfield codes that have been developed to predict rocket motor plumes at high altitude were used to predict plume properties for the RCS motor which show reasonable agreement with experimental data. A systematic technique was established for the calculation of high altitude plumes. The communication of data between the computer codes was standardized. It is recommended that these outlined procedures be more completed, documented and updated as the plume methodology is applied to the varied problems of plume flow and plume impingement encountered by space station design and operation.

  17. Wind study for high altitude platform design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of upper air winds was performed to define the wind environment at potential operating altitudes for high altitude powered platform concepts. Wind conditions of the continental United States, Pacific area (Alaska to Sea of Japan), and European area (Norwegian and Mediterranean Sea) were obtained using a representative network of sites selected based upon adequate high altitude sampling, geographic dispersion, and observed upper wind patterns. A data base of twenty plus years of rawinsonde gathered wind information was used in the analysis. Annual variations from surface to 10 mb pressure altitude were investigated to encompass the practical operating range for the platform concepts. Parametric analysis for the United States and foreign areas was performed to provide a basis for vehicle system design tradeoffs. This analysis of wind magnitudes indicates the feasibility of annual operation at a majority of sites and more selective seasonal operation for the extreme conditions between the pressure altitudes of 100 to 25 mb based upon the assumed design speeds.

  18. Remote ischemic preconditioning for prevention of high-altitude diseases: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Berger, Marc Moritz; Macholz, Franziska; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Bärtsch, Peter

    2015-11-15

    Preconditioning refers to exposure to brief episodes of potentially adverse stimuli and protects against injury during subsequent exposures. This was first described in the heart, where episodes of ischemia/reperfusion render the myocardium resistant to subsequent ischemic injury, which is likely caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory processes. Protection of the heart was also found when preconditioning was performed in an organ different from the target, which is called remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). The mechanisms causing protection seem to include stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, increase in antioxidant enzymes, and downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. These pathways are also thought to play a role in high-altitude diseases: high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is associated with decreased bioavailability of NO and increased generation of ROS, whereas mechanisms causing acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) seem to involve cytotoxic effects by ROS and inflammation. Based on these apparent similarities between ischemic damage and AMS, HACE, and HAPE, it is reasonable to assume that RIPC might be protective and improve altitude tolerance. In studies addressing high-altitude/hypoxia tolerance, RIPC has been shown to decrease pulmonary arterial systolic pressure in normobaric hypoxia (13% O2) and at high altitude (4,342 m). Our own results indicate that RIPC transiently decreases the severity of AMS at 12% O2. Thus preliminary studies show some benefit, but clearly, further experiments to establish the efficacy and potential mechanism of RIPC are needed. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Can liver transplantation achieve similar effects at high altitudes compared with plains: case report.

    PubMed

    Jin, S; Chen, Z; Lunan, Y; Zeng, Y; Wen, T; Li, B; Zhao, J; Wang, W; Xu, M; Yang, J

    2009-06-01

    In orthotopic liver transplantation, particular emphasis must be placed on the unique physiologic, pathologic, and clinical features in residents living in areas at high vs low altitude. Hypobaric hypoxia, hypothermia, heavy radiation, high wind speed, and superevaporation at high altitudes may lead to various diseases. These features have progressive effects on cardiopulmonary and central nervous system functions. A high concentration of red cells in the circulation is likely to result in an increased incidence of hepatic artery and portal vein thrombosis. The immune system is also affected at high altitudes. Exposure to high altitude, which is associated with decreased oxygen pressure, can result in oxidation-reduction stress, enhanced generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and related oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA. Our male patient with liver cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis B virus infectionunderwent orthotopic liver transplantation in Tibet with a successful outcome and good long-term survival.

  20. Tests of artificial flight at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradenwitz, Arthur

    1920-01-01

    If we wish to form an accurate idea of the extraordinary progress achieved in aeronautics, a comparison must be made of the latest altitude records and the figures regarded as highest attainable limit some ten years ago. It is desirable, for two reasons, that we should be able to define the limit of the altitudes that can be reached without artificial aid. First, to know to what extent the human body can endure the inhalation of rarified air. Second, the mental capacity of the aviator must be tested at high altitudes and the limit known below which he is able to make reliable observations without being artificially supplied with oxygen. A pneumatic chamber was used for the most accurate observations.

  1. Impact of extreme exercise at high altitude on oxidative stress in humans

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Charles; Slivka, Dustin; Ruby, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Exercise and oxidative stress research continues to grow as a physiological subdiscipline. The influence of high altitude on exercise and oxidative stress is among the recent topics of intense study in this area. Early findings indicate that exercise at high altitude has an independent influence on free radical generation and the resultant oxidative stress. This review provides a detailed summary of oxidative stress biochemistry as gleaned mainly from studies of humans exercising at high altitude. Understanding of the human response to exercise at altitude is largely derived from field‐based research at altitudes above 3000 m in addition to laboratory studies which employ normobaric hypoxia. The implications of oxidative stress incurred during high altitude exercise appear to be a transient increase in oxidative damage followed by redox‐sensitive adaptations in multiple tissues. These outcomes are consistent for lowland natives, high altitude acclimated sojourners and highland natives, although the latter group exhibits a more robust adaptive response. To date there is no evidence that altitude‐induced oxidative stress is deleterious to normal training or recovery scenarios. Limited evidence suggests that deleterious outcomes related to oxidative stress are limited to instances where individuals are exposed to extreme elevations for extended durations. However, confirmation of this tentative conclusion requires further investigation. More applicably, altitude‐induced hypoxia may have an independent influence on redox‐sensitive adaptive responses to exercise and exercise recovery. If correct, these findings may hold important implications for athletes, mountaineers, and soldiers working at high altitude. These points are raised within the confines of published research on the topic of oxidative stress during exercise at altitude. PMID:26453842

  2. Lockheed ER-2 high altitude research aircraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-04

    ER-2 tail number 706, was one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft were platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They were also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation.

  3. Are Permanent Residents of High Altitude Fully Adapted to Their Hypoxic Environment?

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2017-06-01

    West, John B. Are permanent residents of high altitude fully adapted to their hypoxic environment? High Alt Med Biol. 18:135-139, 2017.-Millions of people live permanently at high altitude and many have been there for generations. It is sometimes claimed that these people have completely adapted to their environment, and certainly some remarkable genetic adaptations have recently been described. However there is now strong evidence that permanent residents are not completely adapted to the high altitude in the sense that they have fully compensated for the environmental hypoxia. By sea level standards, highlanders have severe chronic arterial hypoxemia. Furthermore, their maximum oxygen uptake increases if they descend, and recent measurements suggest that cognitive function is reduced in this population compared with a matched group at a lower altitude. Reproductive success is reduced at high altitude because neonatal mortality increases with altitude. The topic has recently gained importance because new technology enables the physiological altitude of permanent residents to be reduced by adding oxygen to the air of buildings on a large scale, a procedure known as oxygen conditioning. Its feasibility has been questioned, but in essence it is no different from air conditioning that is universally used to improve the well-being and productivity of millions of people in hot climates. Oxygen conditioning has the potential to do the same for permanent residents of high altitude.

  4. Cognitive Impairment of School Children at High Altitude: The Case for Oxygen Conditioning in Schools.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-09-01

    West, John B. Cognitive impairment of school children at high altitude: the case for oxygen conditioning in schools. High Alt Med Biol. 17:203-207, 2016.-The hypoxia of high altitude frequently affects cognitive function. Recent work has shown that high altitude impairs the neuropsychological function of children of school age when compared with a similar control group of children at low altitude. This implies that the learning process is compromised at high altitude. One option is to bus children down to a lower altitude for schooling, but this is generally impracticable. Recently the new technique of oxygen conditioning has been introduced. The procedure is similar to air conditioning except that instead of altering the temperature of the air, the oxygen concentration is increased, thus raising the PO2 in the inspired air of classrooms. The result is that the children are physiologically at a lower altitude. Just as in very hot or cold climates, it is now unacceptable to have schools that are not air conditioned; in the future the same may apply to schools at high altitude that are not oxygen conditioned.

  5. The physiological effects of resveratrol and its potential application in high altitude medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-li; Nie, Hong-jing; Li, Pei-bing; Deng, Bing-nan; Duan, Rui-feng; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhao-li

    2015-11-01

    Resveratrol, as a natural polyphenolic compound, has a wide range of beneficial effects, which includes anti-tumor, cardiovascular protection, anti-oxidant and estrogen-like effects, and so on. Its various physiological properties are closely related to the therapeutic principle for prevention and treatment of high altitude hypoxia injury. Resveratrol may play an important role in relieving or curing high altitude diseases, especially high altitude polycythemia(HAPC). However, the literature about study and application of resveratrol in plateau medicine field is rarely reported up to now. In this review, we summarized the physiological effects of resveratrol, discussed the possible main principle of resveratrol for HAPC therapy, and looked forward to resveratrol's perspective or potential application in high altitude medicine.

  6. [Cardiac enzymes related to high-altitude hypoxic adaptation in Tibetan chicken].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wu, Chang-Xin; Chamba, Yangzom; Ling, Yao; Tang, Xiao-Hui

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the cardiac physiological characteristics for adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in chickens. Tibetan, Dwarf Recessive White and Shouguang chickens were fed at low-and high-altitude, and measurements were made in heart weights, lactic acid (LA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) at the age of 10 weeks. The results showed that Tibetan chickens at high-altitude had lower heart weight and LA content, and similar LDH activity, and higher SDH activity when compared to Dwarf Recessive White and Shouguang chickens. It was concluded that the cardiac mechanisms of high-altitude hypoxic adaptation in Tibetan chickens were increasing neither heart weight, nor level of anaerobic metabolism, but the higher SDH activity was significant to the adaptation. The SDH was a symbol enzyme for hypoxic adaptation in Tibetan chicken.

  7. High-altitude physiology: lessons from Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Peter D.; Simonson, Tatum S.; Wei, Guan; Wagner, Harrieth; Wuren, Tanna; Yan, Ma; Qin, Ga; Ge, Rili

    2013-05-01

    Polycythemia is a universal lowlander response to altitude; healthy Andean high-altitude natives also have elevated [Hb]. While this may enhance O2 transport to tissues, studies have shown that acute isovolumic changes in [Hb] do not affect exercise capacity. Many high-altitude Tibetans have evolved sea-level values of [Hb], providing a natural opportunity to study this issue. In 21 young healthy male Tibetans with [Hb] between 15 and 23 g/dl, we measured VO2MAX and O2 transport capacity at 4200m. VO2MAX was higher when [Hb] was lower (P<0.05), enabled by both higher cardiac output and muscle O2 diffusional conductance, but neither ventilation nor the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference (AaPO2) varied with [Hb]. In contrast, Andean high altitude natives remain polycythemic with larger lungs and higher lung diffusing capacity, a smaller exercising AaPO2, and lower ventilation. The challenges now are (1) to understand the different adaptive pathways used by Andeans and Tibetans, and (2) to determine in Tibetans whether, during evolution, reduced [Hb] appeared first, causing compensatory cardiac and muscle adaptations, or if enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport capacity appeared first, permitting secondary reduction in [Hb]. For (2), further research is necessary to determine the basis of enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport, and identify molecular targets of evolution in heart and muscle. Putative mutations can then be timed and compared to appearance of those affecting [Hb].

  8. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  9. Physical fitness of children resident at high altitude in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Fellmann, N; Coudert, J; Spielvogel, H; Bedu, M; Obert, P; Falgairette, G; Van Praagh, E

    1992-10-01

    In 7-15-yr-old children living in La Paz (Bolivia, altitude 3,700 m) (HA): 1) Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) varies from 35 to 45 ml.min-1.kg-1 and maximal heart rate from 188 to 194 beats.min-1. These values are lower than those of their counterparts at low altitude (LA) by 10-20% and 10-15 b.min-1, respectively. 2) The anaerobic metabolism is not affected by chronic hypoxia if the nutritional conditions and pubertal development of HA and LA boys are the same. When related to percent of VO2max, submaximal O2 debts are similar at HA and LA. After supramaximal exercise, maximal O2 debts (45.7 +/- 2.7 vs 45.9 +/- 3.8 ml.kg-1) and blood lactate concentrations (7.6 +/- 0.6 vs 6.5 +/- 0.6 mmol.l-1) are also the same at HA and LA. No differences are observed between the 2 altitudes in ventilatory (60 vs 56% VO2max) and lactate (60 vs 65% VO2max) thresholds. The altitude of La Paz does not alter the anaerobic performance of a force-velocity test (from 6 to 10 W.kg-1) between the ages of 7 to 15 years but reduces by 14-17% the mean anaerobic power developed during a 30-s Wingate test. This decrease could be linked to a lower participation of glycolysis and aerobic metabolism at HA during this test. 3) Poor socio-economic and nutritional conditions do not modify the aerobic performance of boys living in La Paz but lead to lower maximal anaerobic power (from -17% to -25%) when compared with HA boys from a high socio-economic background.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Dynamics Explorer mission are to investigate the coupling of energy, mass, and momentum among the earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere. At launch, on August 3, 1981, DE-1 was placed into an elliptical polar orbit having an apogee of 23,130 km to allow global auroral imaging and crossings of auroral field lines at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. At the same time DE-2 was placed into a polar orbit, coplanar with that of DE-1 but with a perigee altitude low enough (309 km) for neutral measurements and an apogee altitude of 1012 km. The DE-1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) provided data on low and medium energy electrons and ions from August 13, 1981 until December 1, 1981, when a high-voltage failure occured. Analysis of HAPI data for the time period of this contract has produced new results on the source mechanisms for electron conical distributions, particle acceleration phenomena in auroral acceleration regions, Birkeland currents throughout the nightside auroral regions, the source region for auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), and plasma injection phenomena in the polar cusp.

  11. [High altitude anemia: validity of definition criteria].

    PubMed

    Yepez, R; Estevez, E; Galan, P; Chauliac, M; Davila, M; Calle, A; Estrella, R; Masse-Raimbault, A M; Hercberg, S

    1994-01-01

    The effect of iron and folate supplementation on the hemoglobin response and iron status was studied in male and female equatorian medical students: 66 in Quito (2,800 m altitude) and 40 in Guayaquil (sea level). At the end of the supplementation, there was a nearly complete disappearance of biochemical evidence of iron deficiency in the two groups of students. In Quito, 30% of the men and 26% of the women increased their hemoglobin concentration by more than 1 g/dl after one month of supplementation and could be considered as true anemics, compared to 31% of the men and 29% of the women in Guayaquil. This study shows that at sea level, cut-off points defined by WHO for hemoglobin, taking as reference the impact of a supplementation trial, have a specificity of 100% but poor sensitivity (58%). For people living at high altitudes, cut-off limits adjusted for altitude seem unsuitable: the specificity is 98% but the sensitivity is 0%. Studies taking into account all the factors impacting on the hemoglobin level could be useful for defining cut-off points for high-altitude anemia better than those currently recommended.

  12. Teaching the Physiology of Adaptation to Hypoxic Stress with the Aid of a Classic Paper on High Altitude by Houston and Riley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, Etain A.

    2008-01-01

    Many pathological conditions exist where tissues exhibit hypoxia or low oxygen tension. Hypoxic hypoxia arises when there is a reduction in the amount of oxygen entering the blood and occurs in healthy people at high altitude. In 1946, research sponsored by the United States Navy led to the collection and subsequent publication of masses of data…

  13. Teaching the Physiology of Adaptation to Hypoxic Stress with the Aid of a Classic Paper on High Altitude by Houston and Riley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, Etain A.

    2008-01-01

    Many pathological conditions exist where tissues exhibit hypoxia or low oxygen tension. Hypoxic hypoxia arises when there is a reduction in the amount of oxygen entering the blood and occurs in healthy people at high altitude. In 1946, research sponsored by the United States Navy led to the collection and subsequent publication of masses of data…

  14. High-altitude solar power platform

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.D.; Bower, M.V.

    1992-04-01

    Solar power is a preeminent alternative to conventional aircraft propulsion. With the continued advances in solar cells, fuel cells, and composite materials technology, the solar powered airplane is no longer a simple curiosity constrained to flights of several feet in altitude or minutes of duration. A high altitude solar powered platform (HASPP) has several potential missions, including communications and agriculture. In remote areas, a HASPP could be used as a communication link. In large farming areas, a HASPP could perform remote sensing of crops. The impact of HASPP in continuous flight for one year on agricultural monitoring mission is presented. This mission provides farmers with near real-time data twice daily from an altitude which allows excellant resolution on water conditions, crop diseases, and insect infestation. Accurate, timely data will enable farmers to increase their yield and efficiency. A design for HASPP for the foregoing mission is presented. In the design power derived from solar cells covering the wings is used for propulsion, avionics, and sensors. Excess power produced midday will be stored in fuel cells for use at night to maintain altitude and course.

  15. Metabolic insight into mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ri-Li; Simonson, Tatum S.; Cooksey, Robert C.; Tanna, Uran; Qin, Ga; Huff, Chad D.; Witherspoon, David J.; Xing, Jinchuan; Zhengzhong, Bai; Prchal, Josef T.; Jorde, Lynn B.; McClain, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have identified genes involved in high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Genetic variants/haplotypes within regions containing three of these genes (EPAS1, EGLN1, and PPARA) are associated with relatively decreased hemoglobin levels observed in Tibetans at high altitude, providing corroborative evidence for genetic adaptation to this extreme environment. The mechanisms that afford adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia, however, remain unclear. Considering the strong metabolic demands imposed by hypoxia, we hypothesized that a shift in fuel preference to glucose oxidation and glycolysis at the expense of fatty acid oxidation would improve adaptation to decreased oxygen availability. Correlations between serum free fatty acids and lactate concentrations in Tibetan groups living at high altitude and putatively selected haplotypes provide insight into this hypothesis. An EPAS1 haplotype that exhibits a signal of positive selection is significantly associated with increased lactate concentration, the product of anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, the putatively advantageous PPARA haplotype is correlated with serum free fatty acid levels, suggesting a possible decrease in the activity of fatty acid oxidation. Although further studies are required to assess the molecular mechanisms underlying these patterns, these associations suggest that genetic adaptation to high altitude involves alteration in energy utilization pathways. PMID:22503288

  16. HAWC - The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe, Andreas; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) is an instrument for the detection of high energy cosmic gamma-rays. Its predecessor Milagro has successfully proven that the water Cherenkov technology for gamma-ray astronomy is a useful technique. HAWC is currently under construction at Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m and will include several improvements compared to Milagro. Two complementary DAQ systems of the HAWC detector allow for the observation of a large fraction of the sky with a very high duty cycle and independent of environmental conditions. HAWC will observe the gamma-ray sky from about 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. Also the cosmic ray flux anisotropy on different angular length scales is object of HAWC science. Because of HAWC's large effective area and field of view, we describe its prospects to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as an example for transient sources.

  17. Identifying positive selection candidate loci for high-altitude adaptation in Andean populations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    High-altitude environments (>2,500 m) provide scientists with a natural laboratory to study the physiological and genetic effects of low ambient oxygen tension on human populations. One approach to understanding how life at high altitude has affected human metabolism is to survey genome-wide datasets for signatures of natural selection. In this work, we report on a study to identify selection-nominated candidate genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in one highland group, Andeans from the South American Altiplano. We analysed dense microarray genotype data using four test statistics that detect departures from neutrality. Using a candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism-based approach, we identified genes exhibiting preliminary evidence of recent genetic adaptation in this population. These included genes that are part of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) pathway, a biochemical pathway involved in oxygen homeostasis, as well as three other genomic regions previously not known to be associated with high-altitude phenotypes. In addition to identifying selection-nominated candidate genes, we also tested whether the HIF pathway shows evidence of natural selection. Our results indicate that the genes of this biochemical pathway as a group show no evidence of having evolved in response to hypoxia in Andeans. Results from particular HIF-targeted genes, however, suggest that genes in this pathway could play a role in Andean adaptation to high altitude, even if the pathway as a whole does not show higher relative rates of evolution. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaptation and provide a basis for genotype/phenotype association studies that are necessary to confirm the role of putative natural selection candidate genes and gene regions in adaptation to altitude. PMID:20038496

  18. High altitude syndromes at intermediate altitudes: a pilot study in the Australian Alps.

    PubMed

    Slaney, Graham; Cook, Angus; Weinstein, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Our hypothesis is that symptoms of high altitude syndromes are detectable even at intermediate altitudes, as commonly encountered under Australian conditions (<2500 m above sea level). High altitude medicine has long recognised several syndromes associated with rapid ascent to altitudes above 2500 m, including high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude flatus expulsion (HAFE). Symptoms of high altitude syndromes are of growing concern because of the global trend toward increasing numbers of tourists and workers exposed to both rapid ascent and sustained physical activity at high altitude. However, in Australia, high altitude medicine has almost no profile because of our relatively low altitudes by international standards. Three factors lead us to believe that altitude sickness in Australia deserves more serious consideration: Australia is subject to rapid growth in alpine recreational industries; altitude sickness is highly variable between individuals, and some people do experience symptoms already at 1500 m; and there is potential for an occupational health and safety issue amongst workers. To test this hypothesis we examined the relationship between any high altitude symptoms and a rapid ascent to an intermediate altitude (1800 m) by undertaking an intervention study in a cohort of eight medical clinic staff, conducted during July of the 2012 (Southern Hemisphere) ski season, using self-reporting questionnaires, at Mansfield (316 m above sea level) and at the Ski Resort of Mt Buller (1800 m), Victoria, Australia. The intervention consisted of ascent by car from Mansfield to Mt Buller (approx. 40 min drive). Participants completed a self-reporting questionnaire including demographic data and information on frequency of normal homeostatic processes (fluid intake and output, food intake and output, symptoms including thirst and headaches, and frequency of passing wind or urine). Data were recorded in hourly periods

  19. Reduced autonomic activity during stepwise exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Sevre, K; Bendz, B; Hankø, E; Nakstad, A R; Hauge, A; Kåsin, J I; Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J; Eide, I; Rostrup, M

    2001-12-01

    Several studies have shown increased sympathetic activity during acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. In a recent field study we found reduced plasma catecholamines during the first days after a stepwise ascent to high altitude. In the present study 14 subjects were exposed to a simulated ascent in a hypobaric chamber to test the hypothesis of a temporary reduction in autonomic activity. The altitude was increased stepwise to 4500 m over 3 days. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed continuously in seven subjects. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined in eight subjects with the 'Transfer Function' method at baseline, at 4500 m and after returning to baseline. Resting plasma catecholamines and cardiovascular- and plasma catecholamine- responses to cold pressor- (CPT) and mental stress-test (MST) were assessed daily in all and 12 subjects, respectively. Data are mean +/- SEM. Compared with baseline at 4500 m there were lower total power (TP) (35 457 +/- 26 302 vs. 15 001 +/- 11 176 ms2), low frequency (LF) power (3112 +/- 809 vs. 1741 +/- 604 ms2), high frequency (HF) power (1466 +/- 520 vs. 459 +/- 189 ms2) and HF normalized units (46 +/- 0.007 vs. 44 +/- 0.006%), P < or = 0.001. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity decreased (15.6 +/- 2.1 vs. 9.5 +/- 2.6 ms mmHg(-1), P = 0.015). Resting noradrenaline (NA) decreased (522 +/- 98 vs. 357 +/- 60 pmol L(-1), P = 0.027). The increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and NA during mental stress was less pronounced (21 +/- 4 vs. 10 +/- 2% and 25 +/- 9 vs. -2 +/- 8%, respectively, P < 0.05). The increase in SBP during cold pressor test decreased (16 +/- 3 vs. 1 +/- 6%, P = 0.03). Diastolic blood pressure, HR and adrenaline displayed similar tendencies. We conclude that a transient reduction in parasympathetic and sympathetic activity was demonstrated during stepwise exposure to high altitude.

  20. Higher Estrogen Levels During Pregnancy in Andean Than European Residents of High Altitude Suggest Differences in Aromatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Shelton M.; Julian, Colleen G.; Vargas, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Context: Uteroplacental hypoxia has been reported to lower estrogen levels in preeclampsia as the result of reduced aromatase activity. Objective: We asked whether the chronic hypoxia of residence at high altitude in the absence of preeclampsia lowered estrogen, whether such effects differed in Andean vs European high-altitude residents, and whether such effects were related to uterine artery diameter or blood flow. Design, Setting, and Participants: Studies at weeks 20 and 36 of pregnancy were conducted in 108 healthy Bolivian low- (400 m, n = 53) or high-altitude (3600 m, n = 55) residents of European (n = 28 low and 26 high altitude) or Andean (n = 25 low and 29 high altitude) ancestry. All groups were similar in age, nonpregnant body mass index, and pregnancy weight gain. Results: High-altitude residence increased circulating progesterone, cortisol, estrone, 17β-estradiol, and estriol levels (all P < .01). High-altitude Andeans vs Europeans at week 36 had higher progesterone, estrone, 17β-estradiol, and estriol levels as well as product to substrate ratios for the reactions catalyzed by aromatase, whereas week 36 cortisol levels were greater in the European than Andean women (all P < .05). Lower cortisol, higher estriol (both P < .01), and trends for higher progesterone and 17β-estradiol levels were associated with greater uterine artery diameters and blood flow at high altitude. Conclusions: Chronic hypoxia does not lower but rather raises estrogen levels in multigenerational Andeans vs shorter-term Europeans, possibly as the result of greater aromatase activity. Because hypoxia alone does not lower estrogen, other attributes of the disease may be responsible for the lower estrogen levels seen previously in preeclamptic women. PMID:24684460

  1. Evolution of muscle phenotype for extreme high altitude flight in the bar-headed goose

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Graham R.; Egginton, Stuart; Richards, Jeffrey G.; Milsom, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Bar-headed geese migrate over the Himalayas at up to 9000 m elevation, but it is unclear how they sustain the high metabolic rates needed for flight in the severe hypoxia at these altitudes. To better understand the basis for this physiological feat, we compared the flight muscle phenotype of bar-headed geese with that of low altitude birds (barnacle geese, pink-footed geese, greylag geese and mallard ducks). Bar-headed goose muscle had a higher proportion of oxidative fibres. This increased muscle aerobic capacity, because the mitochondrial volume densities of each fibre type were similar between species. However, bar-headed geese had more capillaries per muscle fibre than expected from this increase in aerobic capacity, as well as higher capillary densities and more homogeneous capillary spacing. Their mitochondria were also redistributed towards the subsarcolemma (cell membrane) and adjacent to capillaries. These alterations should improve O2 diffusion capacity from the blood and reduce intracellular O2 diffusion distances, respectively. The unique differences in bar-headed geese were much greater than the minor variation between low altitude species and existed without prior exercise or hypoxia exposure, and the correlation of these traits to flight altitude was independent of phylogeny. In contrast, isolated mitochondria had similar respiratory capacities, O2 kinetics and phosphorylation efficiencies across species. Bar-headed geese have therefore evolved for exercise in hypoxia by enhancing the O2 supply to flight muscle. PMID:19640884

  2. Is High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Relevant to Hawai‘i?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai‘i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:25478294

  3. Is high altitude pulmonary edema relevant to Hawai'i?

    PubMed

    Cornell, Seth Lewis

    2014-11-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai'i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema.

  4. Advances in the Prevention and Treatment of High Altitude Illness.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher; Hackett, Peter

    2017-05-01

    High altitude illness encompasses a spectrum of clinical entities to include: acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These illnesses occur as a result of a hypobaric hypoxic environment. Although a mild case of acute mountain sickness may be self-limited, high altitude cerebral edema and high altitude pulmonary edema represent critical emergencies that require timely intervention. This article reviews recent advances in the prevention and treatment of high altitude illness, including new pharmacologic strategies for prophylaxis and revised treatment guidelines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Solar radiation monitoring for high altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Ground-based and satellite-based ionizing radiation monitoring systems are considered as alternative methods for ensuring safe radiation levels for high-altitude aircraft. It is found that ground-based methods are of limited accuracy due to insensitivity to solar particles of energies between the riometer upper cutoff of about 50 MeV and the neutron monitor threshold of about 450 MeV. This energy range is demonstrated to be essential for atmospheric radiation monitoring at high altitude, and must be covered by satellite measurement. On the basis of presently available data, the accuracy to which the incident solar particle flux must be measured by satellite-borne detectors is examined and recommendations are made to establish minimum requirements.

  6. High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  7. Effects of acetazolamide on cognitive performance during high-altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiye; Ke, Tao; Zhang, Xiangnan; Chen, Yaoming; Liu, Mingchao; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude hypoxia impedes cognitive performance. It is not well known whether the prophylactic use of acetazolamide for altitude sickness can influence cognitive performance at high altitude. When ascending to high altitude locations, one may face medical risks, including cognitive impairment, which may significantly hinder climbing abilities or exploratory behavior. Effective prophylactic drugs have rarely been reported. Because acetazolamide is commonly used to treat acute mountain sickness (AMS), we assessed the potential effects of acetazolamide on cognitive performance during high-altitude exposure. Twenty-one volunteers aged 22-26 years were randomized to receive a 4-day treatment of acetazolamide (125 mg Bid, n=11) or placebo (n=10) before and after air travel from Xianyang (402 m) to Lhasa (3561 m). Neuropsychological performance was assessed using the digit symbol substitution test (DSST), paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT), operation span task, and free recall test at 6, 30, and 54 h after arrival at Lhasa. The Lake Louise Score (LLS) was used to diagnose AMS. At high altitude, acetazolamide impaired rather than improved neuropsychological measures of concentration, cognitive processing speed, reaction time, short-term memory, and working memory, which were assessed by DSST, PASAT, and operation span task at 6 and 30 h after arrival (p<0.05). However, the prophylactic use of acetazolamide was found to reduce the incidence of AMS compared to the placebo (p<0.05). In conclusion, acetazolamide impairs neuropsychological function, at least in part, shortly after the ascent to high altitude.

  8. Brief Working Memory and Physiological Monitoring During a High-Altitude Expedition.

    PubMed

    Malle, Carine; Ginon, Benoît; Bourrilhon, Cyprien

    2016-12-01

    Malle, Carine, Benoît Ginon, and Cyprien Bourrilhon. Brief working memory and physiological monitoring during a high-altitude expedition. High Alt Med Biol. 17:359-364, 2016.-Background: Various studies have shown the deleterious effects of high-altitude hypoxia on cognitive functions, including attention and memory. Since optimal cognitive abilities may be crucial for mountain safety, this study was aimed to assess the relevance of a brief working memory test to quickly assess cognition at high altitude. A set of physiological and cognitive measurements were collected from four professional climbers at various time points during the course of an expedition to Shishapangma (8043 m). Progressive high-altitude exposure induced a classical physiological response (i.e., decreased SpO2 and increased heart rate). Except for the final ascent, no participants suffered from acute mountain sickness and perceived exertion remained low. With the exception of an increased number of night awakenings, reported sleep quality was good. No working memory decline was observed in any of the participants, even at the highest altitudes. Altogether, these findings show that the participants were properly acclimatized to altitude. They also highlight the technical feasibility of assessing cognitive functions all along high-altitude expeditions. The direct access of such tools on a smartphone may improve mountain climbing safety.

  9. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Miguel; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view experiment comprised of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs) to study transient and steady emission of TeV gamma and cosmic rays. Each 200000 l WCD is instrumented with 4 PMTs providing charge and timing information. The array covers ~22000 m2 at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in Mexico. The high altitude, large active area, and optical isolation of the PMTs allows us to reliably estimate the energy and determine the arrival direction of gamma and cosmic rays with significant sensitivity over energies from several hundred GeV to a hundred TeV. Continuously observing 2 / 3 of the sky every 24 h, HAWC plays a significant role as a survey instrument for multi-wavelength studies. The performance of HAWC makes possible the detection of both transient and steady emissions, the study of diffuse emission and the measurement of the spectra of gamma-ray sources at TeV energies. HAWC is also sensitive to the emission from GRBs above 100 GeV. I will highlight the results from the first year of operation of the full HAWC array, and describe the ongoing site work to expand the array by a factor of 4 to explore the high energy range.

  10. Mini review of high altitude health problems in Ladakh.

    PubMed

    Norboo, T; Saiyed, H N; Angchuk, P T; Tsering, P; Angchuk, S T; Phuntsog, S T; Yahya, M; Wood, Steve; Bruce, N G; Ball, K P

    2004-05-01

    Ladakh is a sparsely populated area of Indian Himalaya lying at 3-4500 m altitude mainly consisting of arid desert. This paper will discuss high altitude health problems in Ladakh under the following headings. 1. Acute altitude illness: acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). 2. Effects of prolonged and permanent exposure to high altitude: (subacute and chronic mountain sickness). 3. Environmental dust and domestic fire pollution resulting in non-occupational pneumoconiosis and high prevalence of respiratory morbidity.

  11. A strategy for oxygen conditioning at high altitude: comparison with air conditioning.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2015-09-15

    Large numbers of people live or work at high altitude, and many visit to trek or ski. The inevitable hypoxia impairs physical working capacity, and at higher altitudes there is also cognitive impairment. Twenty years ago oxygen enrichment of room air was introduced to reduce the hypoxia, and this is now used in dormitories, hotels, mines, and telescopes. However, recent advances in technology now allow large amounts of oxygen to be obtained from air or cryogenic oxygen sources. As a result it is now feasible to oxygenate large buildings and even institutions such as hospitals. An analogy can be drawn between air conditioning that has improved the living and working conditions of millions of people who live in hot climates and oxygen conditioning that can do the same at high altitude. Oxygen conditioning is similar to air conditioning except that instead of cooling the air, the oxygen concentration is raised, thus reducing the equivalent altitude. Oxygen conditioning on a large scale could transform living and working conditions at high altitude, where it could be valuable in homes, hospitals, schools, dormitories, company headquarters, banks, and legislative settings.

  12. The High Altitude Gamma Ray Observatory, HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Volcano Sierra Negra in Puebla, Mexico was selected to host HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov), a unique obervatory of wide field of view (2π sr) capable of observing the sky continously at energies from 0.5 TeV to 100 TeV. HAWC is an array of 300 large water tanks (7.3 m diameter × 5 m depth) at an altitude of 4100 m. a. s. l. Each tank is instrumented with three upward-looking photomultipliers tubes. The full array will be capable of observing the most energetic gamma rays from the most violent events in the universe. HAWC will be 15 times more sensitive than its predecesor, Milagro. We present HAWC, the scientific case and capabilities.

  13. High altitude plumes at Mars morning terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia Muñoz, A.; Garcia Melendo, E.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Gomez Forrellad, J. M.; Pellier, C.; Delcroix, M.; Lopez Valverde, M. A.; González Galindo, F.; Jaeschke, W.; Parker, D.; Phillips, J.; Peach, D.

    2015-10-01

    In March and April 2012 two extremely high altitude plumes were observed at the Martian terminator reaching 200 -250 km or more above the surface[1]. They were located at about 195o West longitude and 45o South latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and extended ˜500 -1,000 km in both North-South and East- West, and lasted for about 10 days. Both plumes exhibited day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb. Another large plume was captured on Hubble Space Telescope images in May 1997 at 99º West longitude and 3º South latitude, but its altitude cannot be pr ecisely determined.Broad-band photometry was performed of both events in the spectral range 255 nm -1052 nm. Based on the observed properties, we discuss different possible scenarios for the mechanism responsible for the formation of these plumes.

  14. Development of a high altitude Spin Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silbert, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    A specially configured 16.6 foot (5.1 meter) Disc Gap Band (DGB) Spin Parachute has been designed, developed, integrated with a sounding rocket, and qualified by flight testing. Design requirements include (1) stable parachute should successfully deploy in the altitude region of 260,000 feet (80 kilometers) from a Super Arcas launch vehicle; (2) after deployment, parachute and payload spin rate should be greater than three rpm; (3) four electric field sensors should be mounted on parachute shroud lines and have provisions to be electrically connected to the suspended payload; and (4) time above 100,000 feet (30 kilometers) should exceed five minutes. The successful meeting of these requirements provided the first known high-altitude deployment of a Spin Parachute.

  15. Endogenous urate production augments plasma antioxidant capacity in healthy lowland subjects exposed to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Baillie, J Kenneth; Bates, Matthew G D; Thompson, A A Roger; Waring, W Stephen; Partridge, Roland W; Schnopp, Martin F; Simpson, Alistair; Gulliver-Sloan, Fiona; Maxwell, Simon R J; Webb, David J

    2007-05-01

    Both tissue hypoxia in vitro, and whole-body hypoxia in vivo, have been found to promote the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are potentially damaging to the cardiovascular system. Antioxidant systems protect against oxidative damage by ROS and may exhibit some degree of responsiveness to oxidative stimuli. Production of urate, a potent soluble antioxidant, is increased in hypoxic conditions. We aimed to determine whether urate is an important antioxidant defense in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia. We conducted a cohort study of 25 healthy lowland volunteers during acute exposure to high altitude (4 days at 3,600 m, followed by 10 days at 5,200 m) on the Apex high-altitude research expedition to Bolivia. We measured markers of oxidative stress (8-isoprostane F2), serum urate concentration, and total plasma antioxidant activity by two techniques: 2,2'-amino-di-[3-ethylbenzthiazole sulfonate] spectrophotometry (total antioxidant status [TAS]) and enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL). On ascent, F2-isoprostane levels were significantly elevated compared with those at sea level (p < 0.01). After 1 week at high altitude, plasma antioxidant capacity (AOC) by both TAS and ECL, and serum urate concentration were significantly elevated (each p < 0.01 vs sea level), and F2-isoprostane levels were reduced to values at sea level. There was a highly significant correlation between plasma urate and AOC at this stage (ECL, r(2) = 0.59, p = 0.0001; TAS, r(2) = 0.30, p = 0.0062). Our results support the hypothesis that urate may act as a responsive endogenous antioxidant in high-altitude hypoxia.

  16. High altitude dives from 7000 to 14,200 feet in the Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Sahni, T K; John, M J; Dhall, A; Chatterjee, A K

    1991-07-01

    Indian Navy divers carried out no-decompression dives at altitudes of 7000 to 14,200 ft (2134-4328 m) in the Nilgiris and Himalayas from May to July 1988. Seventy-eight dives on air and 22 dives on oxygen were carried out at various altitudes. The final dives were at Lake Pangong Tso (4328 m) in Ladakh, Himalayas, to a maximum of 140 feet of sea water (fsw) [42.6 meters of sea water (msw)] equivalent ocean depth in minimum water temperature of 2 degrees C. Oxygen diving at 14,200 ft (4328 m) was not successful. Aspects considered were altitude adaptation, diminished air pressure diving, hypothermia, and remote area survival. Depths at altitude were converted to depths at sea level and were applied to the Royal Navy air tables. Altitude-related manifestations, hypoxia, hypothermia, suspected oxygen toxicity, and equipment failure were observed. It is concluded that stress is due to effects of altitude and cold on man and equipment, as well as changes in diving procedures when diving at high altitudes. Equivalent air depths when applied to Royal Navy tables could be considered a safe method for diving at altitudes.

  17. Design and Development of a High Altitude Protective Assembly.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CWU-3/P ANTIGRAVITY SUITS, CWU-12/P ANTIEXPOSURE SUITS, HAPA(HIGH ALTITUDE PROTECTIVE ASSEMBLIES), *HIGH ALTITUDE PROTECTIVE ASSEMBLIES, LPU-3/P LIFE PRESERVERS, MA-3 VENTILATION GARMENTS, PARACHUTE HARNESSES, PARTIAL PRESSURE SUITS.

  18. [Effect of hypoxia on muscular performance capacity: "living low--training high"].

    PubMed

    Vogt, M; Billeter, R; Hoppeler, H

    2003-07-01

    Altitude training is very popular among endurance athletes. But athletes respond very different on acute altitude exposure and altitude training. There are individual differences in the decrement of maximal oxygen consumption making general advices on the effect of altitude training very difficult. During the last few years different altitude training regimes have been developed. Beside "living high--training low," the concept of "living low--training high" becomes more and more popular. By this regime, athletes train under simulated or natural hypoxic conditions, while recovery time is spent at sea-level. Several studies show that with "living low--training high" maximal oxygen consumption as well as aerobic and anaerobic endurance performance can be improved. Molecular analysis reveal that a transcription factor called Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) acts as a master gene in the regulation of hypoxia-dependent gene expression. In human skeletal muscle "living low-training high" induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, the angiogenic factor VEGF, myoglobin as well as the increase of capillarity and mitochondrial content in parallel to the induction of the HIF-1 system. In trained human skeletal muscle, these adaptations cause a shift of substrate selection to an increased oxidation of carbohydrates as well as to an improvement of the conditions for transport and utilization of oxygen. Depending on the kind of sports, "living low--training high" can be used to train these muscular adaptations and to increase exercise performance.

  19. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  20. Effect of time exposure to high altitude on zinc and copper concentrations in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Rawal, S B; Singh, M V; Tyagi, A K; Roy, J; Dimri, G P; Selvamurthy, W

    1999-12-01

    Research has focused mainly on the relationship of zinc and copper contents and physical stresses like running, cycling, etc. It has also been reported that other forms of stresses change the concentration of these trace elements in humans. However,there are no reports on the effects of high altitude induced hypoxic stress on the plasma levels of these metals. Since hypoxia is one of the important stresses, we considered it appropriate to observe the changes in the levels of zinc and copper concentrations and in certain related zinc and copper enzymes and hormones in the plasma of human volunteers on acute induction to high altitude. From these findings, we intended to ascertain whether supplementation of these trace elements would be required for optimal health under such conditions. On acute induction to hypoxia, contents of these trace elements may change as the requirements of stressed organs and tissue may increase. Hence, further supplementation may be beneficial under hypoxic stress for better adaptability. Volunteers were divided into two groups: with and without zinc and copper salt supplementation. Blood samples were collected at sea level and on induction to acute hypoxia on days 3 and 10. Trace mineral contents and their related enzyme (alkaline phosphatase) and hormone (ceruloplasmin) levels were determined in plasma samples. Plasma zinc contents were significantly reduced upon induction to high altitude in the non-supplemented group, but not in the zinc-supplemented group. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased significantly upon induction to the high altitude stress. The enzyme activity remained elevated up to day 10 of the stress. Plasma copper contents and ceruloplasmin activity did not change upon induction to high altitude. Under hypoxic stress, circulating levels of zinc and alkaline phosphatase in plasma changed appreciably as plasma zinc was transported into the organs and tissues. However, circulating levels of copper and ceruloplasmin in

  1. Impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation at extreme high altitude even after acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Ken-ichi; Zhang, Rong; Zuckerman, Julie H; Ogawa, Yojiro; Hansen, Lærke H; Levine, Benjamin David

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases and dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired by acute hypoxia. We hypothesized that progressive hypocapnia with restoration of arterial oxygen content after altitude acclimatization would normalize CBF and dynamic cerebral autoregulation. To test this hypothesis, dynamic cerebral autoregulation was examined by spectral and transfer function analyses between arterial pressure and CBF velocity variabilities in 11 healthy members of the Danish High-Altitude Research Expedition during normoxia and acute hypoxia (10.5% O(2)) at sea level, and after acclimatization (for over 1 month at 5,260 m at Chacaltaya, Bolivia). Arterial pressure and CBF velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), were recorded on a beat-by-beat basis. Steady-state CBF velocity increased during acute hypoxia, but normalized after acclimatization with partial restoration of SaO(2) (acute, 78% ± 2%; chronic, 89% ± 1%) and progression of hypocapnia (end-tidal carbon dioxide: acute, 34 ± 2 mm Hg; chronic, 21 ± 1 mm Hg). Coherence (0.40 ± 0.05 Units at normoxia) and transfer function gain (0.77 ± 0.13 cm/s per mm Hg at normoxia) increased, and phase (0.86 ± 0.15 radians at normoxia) decreased significantly in the very-low-frequency range during acute hypoxia (gain, 141% ± 24%; coherence, 136% ± 29%; phase, -25% ± 22%), which persisted after acclimatization (gain, 136% ± 36%; coherence, 131% ± 50%; phase, -42% ± 13%), together indicating impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation in this frequency range. The similarity between both acute and chronic conditions suggests that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired by hypoxia even after successful acclimatization to an extreme high altitude.

  2. Impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation at extreme high altitude even after acclimatization

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Ken-ichi; Zhang, Rong; Zuckerman, Julie H; Ogawa, Yojiro; Hansen, Lærke H; Levine, Benjamin David

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases and dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired by acute hypoxia. We hypothesized that progressive hypocapnia with restoration of arterial oxygen content after altitude acclimatization would normalize CBF and dynamic cerebral autoregulation. To test this hypothesis, dynamic cerebral autoregulation was examined by spectral and transfer function analyses between arterial pressure and CBF velocity variabilities in 11 healthy members of the Danish High-Altitude Research Expedition during normoxia and acute hypoxia (10.5% O2) at sea level, and after acclimatization (for over 1 month at 5,260 m at Chacaltaya, Bolivia). Arterial pressure and CBF velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), were recorded on a beat-by-beat basis. Steady-state CBF velocity increased during acute hypoxia, but normalized after acclimatization with partial restoration of SaO2 (acute, 78%±2% chronic, 89%±1%) and progression of hypocapnia (end-tidal carbon dioxide: acute, 34±2 mm Hg; chronic, 21±1 mm Hg). Coherence (0.40±0.05 Units at normoxia) and transfer function gain (0.77±0.13 cm/s per mm Hg at normoxia) increased, and phase (0.86±0.15 radians at normoxia) decreased significantly in the very-low-frequency range during acute hypoxia (gain, 141%±24% coherence, 136%±29% phase, −25%±22%), which persisted after acclimatization (gain, 136%±36% coherence, 131%±50% phase, −42%±13%), together indicating impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation in this frequency range. The similarity between both acute and chronic conditions suggests that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired by hypoxia even after successful acclimatization to an extreme high altitude. PMID:20571521

  3. The effect of high altitude on endothelial and vascular dysfunction markers in preeclamptic patients.

    PubMed

    Bashir, S O; Suekit, H; Elkarib, A O; Dafaalla, M A; Abd Elrouf, M B; Morsy, M D; Eskandar, M

    2015-12-01

    Placental hypoxia, a major component of the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, is associated with various maternal vascular and endothelial dysfunctions. The higher incidence of preeclampsia at high altitude remains incompletely explained. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of high altitude on some endothelial and vascular dysfunction markers in normal and preeclamptic pregnancies. Eighty pregnant women (Paras 2-4) were enrolled in this study, which included four groups (each n = 20): normal pregnancies at low altitude (NL), normal pregnancies at high altitude (NH), preeclamptic pregnancies at low altitude (PL), and preeclamptic pregnancies at high altitude (PH). In normal pregnancies at high altitude serum ET-1, plasma TXA2, and serum TNF-α levels increased significantly with a significant reduction in plasma PGI2 (66.81 ± 7.36, 122.86 ± 13.37, 102.23 ± 13.31, 191.57 ± 19.68, respectively) compared with the NL group (48.92 ± 4.58, 89.03 ± 10.67, 69.86 ± 7.97, 238.01 ± 24.55, respectively). In preeclampsia at low altitude serum ET-1, plasma TXA2, and serum TNF-α levels increased significantly with a significant reduction in plasma PGI2 (88.39 ± 9.54, 162.73 ± 15.92, 142.39 ± 15.37, 149.155 ± 15.66, respectively) compared with both NL and NH groups. High altitude significantly augmented these changes in preeclamptic patients (117.75 ± 12.96, 211.01 ± 22.69, 196.86 ± 17.64, 111.92 ± 10.74) compared with PL, NH and NL groups. In conclusion hypoxia at high altitude aggravated the disturbances in the levels of ET-1, TXA2, PGI2 and TNF-α associated with preeclampsia. This may contribute to the higher risk of preeclampsia at high altitude.

  4. Tracking performance with two breathing oxygen concentrations after high altitude rapid decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesthus, Thomas E.; Schiflett, Samuel G.; Oakley, Carolyn J.

    1992-01-01

    Current military aircraft Liquid Oxygen (LOX) systems supply 99.5 pct. gaseous Aviator's Breathing Oxygen (ABO) to aircrew. Newer Molecular Sieve Oxygen Generation Systems (MSOGS) supply breathing gas concentration of 93 to 95 pct. O2. The margin is compared of hypoxia protection afforded by ABO and MSOGS breathing gas after a 5 psi differential rapid decompression (RD) in a hypobaric research chamber. The barometric pressures equivalent to the altitudes of 46000, 52000, 56000, and 60000 ft were achieved from respective base altitudes in 1 to 1.5 s decompressions. During each exposure, subjects remained at the simulated peak altitude breathing either 100 or 94 pct. O2 with positive pressure for 60 s, followed by a rapid descent to 40000 ft. Subjects used the Tactical Life Support System (TLSS) for high altitude protection. Subcritical tracking task performance on the Performance Evaluation Device (PED) provided psychomotor test measures. Overall tracking task performance results showed no differences between the MSOGS breathing O2 concentration of 94 pct. and ABO. Significance RMS error differences were found between the ground level and base altitude trials compared to peak altitude trials. The high positive breathing pressures occurring at the peak altitudes explained the differences.

  5. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  6. Clinical practice: Acute high-altitude illnesses.

    PubMed

    Bärtsch, Peter; Swenson, Erik R

    2013-06-13

    A 45-year-old healthy man wishes to climb Mount Kilimanjaro (5895 m) in a 5-day period, starting at 1800 m. The results of a recent exercise stress test were normal; he runs 10 km 4 or 5 times per week and finished a marathon in less than 4 hours last year. He wants to know how he can prevent becoming ill at high altitude and whether training or sleeping under normobaric hypoxic conditions in the weeks before the ascent would be helpful. What would you advise?

  7. Prevalence of Hypertension in a Tribal Land Locked Population at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sunil Kumar; Chander, Vishav; Prasher, Chaman Lal; Raina, Sujeet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Extensive pubmed search reveals paucity of data on prevalence of hypertension in tribal population at high altitude. The data is all the more scarce from our part of India. Studies among tribal populations at high altitudes provide an interesting epidemiological window to study human evolution and adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia. Material and Methods. 401 participants above the age of 20 years were evaluated for blood pressure using a stratified simple random technique among villages located at high altitude. Results. Out of a total of 401 individuals studied 43 (males: 35; females: 8) were identified as hypertensive yielding a crude prevalence of 10.7%. The prevalence was higher in males (35/270; 12.9%) as compared to females (8/131; 6%). Prevalence was the highest in the age group of 30–39 among males (16/35; 45.7%) while it was the highest in the age group of 40–49 among females (7/8; 87%). Conclusions. Prevalence of 10.5% is noteworthy when interpreted in light of prevalence of hypertension in general population especially if hypobaric hypoxia is considered to have a protective effect on blood pressure in high altitude native populations. PMID:26989560

  8. Domain specific changes in cognition at high altitude and its correlation with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay K; Das, Saroj K; Dhar, Priyanka; Hota, Kalpana B; Mahapatra, Bidhu B; Vashishtha, Vivek; Kumar, Ashish; Hota, Sunil K; Norboo, Tsering; Srivastava, Ravi B

    2014-01-01

    Though acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is reported to impair cognitive performance, the effects of prolonged exposure on different cognitive domains have been less studied. The present study aimed at investigating the time dependent changes in cognitive performance on prolonged stay at high altitude and its correlation with electroencephalogram (EEG) and plasma homocysteine. The study was conducted on 761 male volunteers of 25-35 years age who had never been to high altitude and baseline data pertaining to domain specific cognitive performance, EEG and homocysteine was acquired at altitude ≤240 m mean sea level (MSL). The volunteers were inducted to an altitude of 4200-4600 m MSL and longitudinal follow-ups were conducted at durations of 03, 12 and 18 months. Neuropsychological assessment was performed for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), attention, information processing rate, visuo-spatial cognition and executive functioning. Total homocysteine (tHcy), vitamin B12 and folic acid were estimated. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) showed temporal increase in the percentage prevalence of MCI from 8.17% on 03 months of stay at high altitude to 18.54% on 18 months of stay. Impairment in visuo-spatial executive, attention, delayed recall and procedural memory related cognitive domains were detected following prolonged stay in high altitude. Increase in alpha wave amplitude in the T3, T4 and C3 regions was observed during the follow-ups which was inversely correlated (r = -0.68) to MMSE scores. The tHcy increased proportionately with duration of stay at high altitude and was correlated with MCI. No change in vitamin B12 and folic acid was observed. Our findings suggest that cognitive impairment is progressively associated with duration of stay at high altitude and is correlated with elevated tHcy in the plasma. Moreover, progressive MCI at high altitude occurs despite acclimatization and is independent of vitamin B12 and folic acid.

  9. Domain Specific Changes in Cognition at High Altitude and Its Correlation with Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Das, Saroj K.; Dhar, Priyanka; Hota, Kalpana B.; Mahapatra, Bidhu B.; Vashishtha, Vivek; Kumar, Ashish; Hota, Sunil K.; Norboo, Tsering; Srivastava, Ravi B.

    2014-01-01

    Though acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is reported to impair cognitive performance, the effects of prolonged exposure on different cognitive domains have been less studied. The present study aimed at investigating the time dependent changes in cognitive performance on prolonged stay at high altitude and its correlation with electroencephalogram (EEG) and plasma homocysteine. The study was conducted on 761 male volunteers of 25–35 years age who had never been to high altitude and baseline data pertaining to domain specific cognitive performance, EEG and homocysteine was acquired at altitude ≤240 m mean sea level (MSL). The volunteers were inducted to an altitude of 4200–4600 m MSL and longitudinal follow-ups were conducted at durations of 03, 12 and 18 months. Neuropsychological assessment was performed for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), attention, information processing rate, visuo-spatial cognition and executive functioning. Total homocysteine (tHcy), vitamin B12 and folic acid were estimated. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) showed temporal increase in the percentage prevalence of MCI from 8.17% on 03 months of stay at high altitude to 18.54% on 18 months of stay. Impairment in visuo-spatial executive, attention, delayed recall and procedural memory related cognitive domains were detected following prolonged stay in high altitude. Increase in alpha wave amplitude in the T3, T4 and C3 regions was observed during the follow-ups which was inversely correlated (r = −0.68) to MMSE scores. The tHcy increased proportionately with duration of stay at high altitude and was correlated with MCI. No change in vitamin B12 and folic acid was observed. Our findings suggest that cognitive impairment is progressively associated with duration of stay at high altitude and is correlated with elevated tHcy in the plasma. Moreover, progressive MCI at high altitude occurs despite acclimatization and is independent of vitamin B12 and folic acid. PMID:24988417

  10. The Andean Adaptive Toolkit to Counteract High Altitude Maladaptation: Genome-Wide and Phenotypic Analysis of the Collas

    PubMed Central

    Eichstaedt, Christina A.; Antão, Tiago; Pagani, Luca; Cardona, Alexia; Kivisild, Toomas; Mormina, Maru

    2014-01-01

    During their migrations out of Africa, humans successfully colonised and adapted to a wide range of habitats, including extreme high altitude environments, where reduced atmospheric oxygen (hypoxia) imposes a number of physiological challenges. This study evaluates genetic and phenotypic variation in the Colla population living in the Argentinean Andes above 3500 m and compares it to the nearby lowland Wichí group in an attempt to pinpoint evolutionary mechanisms underlying adaptation to high altitude hypoxia. We genotyped 730,525 SNPs in 25 individuals from each population. In genome-wide scans of extended haplotype homozygosity Collas showed the strongest signal around VEGFB, which plays an essential role in the ischemic heart, and ELTD1, another gene crucial for heart development and prevention of cardiac hypertrophy. Moreover, pathway enrichment analysis showed an overrepresentation of pathways associated with cardiac morphology. Taken together, these findings suggest that Colla highlanders may have evolved a toolkit of adaptative mechanisms resulting in cardiac reinforcement, most likely to counteract the adverse effects of the permanently increased haematocrit and associated shear forces that characterise the Andean response to hypoxia. Regulation of cerebral vascular flow also appears to be part of the adaptive response in Collas. These findings are not only relevant to understand the evolution of hypoxia protection in high altitude populations but may also suggest new avenues for medical research into conditions where hypoxia constitutes a detrimental factor. PMID:24686296

  11. Adaptation of aeronautical engines to high altitude flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutzbach, K

    1923-01-01

    Issues and techniques relative to the adaptation of aircraft engines to high altitude flight are discussed. Covered here are the limits of engine output, modifications and characteristics of high altitude engines, the influence of air density on the proportions of fuel mixtures, methods of varying the proportions of fuel mixtures, the automatic prevention of fuel waste, and the design and application of air pressure regulators to high altitude flying. Summary: 1. Limits of engine output. 2. High altitude engines. 3. Influence of air density on proportions of mixture. 4. Methods of varying proportions of mixture. 5. Automatic prevention of fuel waste. 6. Design and application of air pressure regulators to high altitude flying.

  12. Evaluating the Risks of High Altitude Travel in Chronic Liver Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M; Swenson, Erik R

    2015-06-01

    Luks, Andrew M., and Erik R. Swenson. Clinician's Corner: Evaluating the risks of high altitude travel in chronic liver disease patients. High Alt Med Biol 16:80-88, 2015.--With improvements in the quality of health care, people with chronic medical conditions are experiencing better quality of life and increasingly participating in a wider array of activities, including travel to high altitude. Whenever people with chronic diseases travel to this environment, it is important to consider whether the physiologic responses to hypobaric hypoxia will interact with the underlying medical condition such that the risk of acute altitude illness is increased or the medical condition itself may worsen. This review considers these questions as they pertain to patients with chronic liver disease. While the limited available evidence suggests there is no evidence of liver injury or dysfunction in normal individuals traveling as high as 5000 m, there is reason to suspect that two groups of cirrhosis patients are at increased risk for problems, hepatopulmonary syndrome patients, who are at risk for severe hypoxemia following ascent, and portopulmonary hypertension patients who may be at risk for high altitude pulmonary edema and acute right ventricular dysfunction. While liver transplant patients may tolerate high altitude exposure without difficulty, no information is available regarding the risks of long-term residence at altitude with chronic liver disease. All travelers with cirrhosis require careful pre-travel evaluation to identify conditions that might predispose to problems at altitude and develop risk mitigation strategies for these issues. Patients also require detailed counseling about recognition, prevention, and treatment of acute altitude illness and may require different medication regimens to prevent or treat altitude illness than used in healthy individuals.

  13. Aerodynamics of heat exchangers for high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Reduction of convective beat transfer with altitude dictates unusually large beat exchangers for piston- engined high-altitude aircraft The relatively large aircraft drag fraction associated with cooling at high altitudes makes the efficient design of the entire heat exchanger installation an essential part of the aircraft's aerodynamic design. The parameters that directly influence cooling drag are developed in the context of high-altitude flight Candidate wing airfoils that incorporate heat exchangers are examined. Such integrated wing-airfoil/heat-exchanger installations appear to be attractive alternatives to isolated heat.exchanger installations. Examples are drawn from integrated installations on existing or planned high-altitude aircraft.

  14. High altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) in an Indian pilgrim.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Sagar; Basnyat, Buddha

    2013-11-01

    Increasing number of Hindu pilgrims visit the Himalayas where some of them suffer from high altitude illness including the life threatening forms, high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral oedema. Compared to tourists and trekkers, pilgrims are usually ignorant about altitude illness. This is a case of a pilgrim who suffered from HAPE on his trip to Kailash-Mansarovar and is brought to a tertiary level hospital in Kathmandu. This report emphasises on how to treat a patient with HAPE, a disease which is increasingly being seen in the high altitude pilgrim population.

  15. The lactate paradox revisited in lowlanders during acclimatization to 4100 m and in high-altitude natives.

    PubMed

    van Hall, G; Lundby, C; Araoz, M; Calbet, J A L; Sander, M; Saltin, B

    2009-03-01

    Chronic hypoxia has been proposed to induce a closer coupling in human skeletal muscle between ATP utilization and production in both lowlanders (LN) acclimatizing to high altitude and high-altitude natives (HAN), linked with an improved match between pyruvate availability and its use in mitochondrial respiration. This should result in less lactate being formed during exercise in spite of the hypoxaemia. To test this hypothesis six LN (22-31 years old) were studied during 15 min warm up followed by an incremental bicycle exercise to exhaustion at sea level, during acute hypoxia and after 2 and 8 weeks at 4100 m above sea level (El Alto, Bolivia). In addition, eight HAN (26-37 years old) were studied with a similar exercise protocol at altitude. The leg net lactate release, and the arterial and muscle lactate concentrations were elevated during the exercise in LN in acute hypoxia and remained at this higher level during the acclimatization period. HAN had similar high values; however, at the moment of exhaustion their muscle lactate, ADP and IMP content and Cr/PCr ratio were higher than in LN. In conclusion, sea-level residents in the course of acclimatization to high altitude did not exhibit a reduced capacity for the active muscle to produce lactate. Thus, the lactate paradox concept could not be demonstrated. High-altitude natives from the Andes actually exhibit a higher anaerobic energy production than lowlanders after 8 weeks of acclimatization reflected by an increased muscle lactate accumulation and enhanced adenine nucleotide breakdown.

  16. Changes in labial capillary density on ascent to and descent from high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Coppel, Jonny; Phillip, Hennis; Grocott, Michael; Ince, Can; Martin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Present knowledge of how the microcirculation is altered by prolonged exposure to hypoxia at high altitude is incomplete and modification of existing analytical techniques may improve our knowledge considerably. We set out to use a novel simplified method of measuring in vivo capillary density during an expedition to high altitude using a CytoCam incident dark field imaging video-microscope. The simplified method of data capture involved recording one-second images of the mucosal surface of the inner lip to reveal data about microvasculature density in ten individuals. This was done on ascent to, and descent from, high altitude. Analysis was conducted offline by two independent investigators blinded to the participant identity, testing conditions and the imaging site.  Additionally we monitored haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit data to see if we could support or refute mechanisms of altered density relating to vessel recruitment. Repeated sets of paired values were compared using Kruskall Wallis Analysis of Variance tests, whilst comparisons of values between sites was by related samples Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Correlation between different variables was performed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and concordance between analysing investigators using intra-class correlation coefficient. There was a significant increase in capillary density from London on ascent to high altitude; median capillaries per field of view area increased from 22.8 to 25.3 (p=0.021). There was a further increase in vessel density during the six weeks spent at altitude (25.3 to 32.5, p=0.017). Moreover, vessel density remained high on descent to Kathmandu (31.0 capillaries per field of view area), despite a significant decrease in haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit. Using a simplified technique, we have demonstrated an increase in capillary density on early and sustained exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at thigh altitude, and that this remains elevated on descent

  17. Changes in labial capillary density on ascent to and descent from high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Coppel, Jonny; Phillip, Hennis; Grocott, Michael; Ince, Can; Martin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Present knowledge of how the microcirculation is altered by prolonged exposure to hypoxia at high altitude is incomplete and modification of existing analytical techniques may improve our knowledge considerably. We set out to use a novel simplified method of measuring in vivo capillary density during an expedition to high altitude using a CytoCam incident dark field imaging video-microscope. The simplified method of data capture involved recording one-second images of the mucosal surface of the inner lip to reveal data about microvasculature density in ten individuals. This was done on ascent to, and descent from, high altitude. Analysis was conducted offline by two independent investigators blinded to the participant identity, testing conditions and the imaging site.  Additionally we monitored haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit data to see if we could support or refute mechanisms of altered density relating to vessel recruitment. Repeated sets of paired values were compared using Kruskall Wallis Analysis of Variance tests, whilst comparisons of values between sites was by related samples Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Correlation between different variables was performed using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, and concordance between analysing investigators using intra-class correlation coefficient. There was a significant increase in capillary density from London on ascent to high altitude; median capillaries per field of view area increased from 22.8 to 25.3 (p=0.021). There was a further increase in vessel density during the six weeks spent at altitude (25.3 to 32.5, p=0.017). Moreover, vessel density remained high on descent to Kathmandu (31.0 capillaries per field of view area), despite a significant decrease in haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit. Using a simplified technique, we have demonstrated an increase in capillary density on early and sustained exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at thigh altitude, and that this remains elevated on

  18. Responses of the autonomic nervous system in altitude adapted and high altitude pulmonary oedema subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Radhakrishnan, U.; Sen Gupta, J.; Nayar, H. S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies were carried out to ascertain the role of sympatho-parasympathetic responses in the process of adaptation to altitude. The assessment of status of autonomic balance was carried out in a group of 20 young male subjects by recording their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, extremity temperatures, pupillary diameter, cold pressor response, oxygen consumption, cardioacceleration during orthostasis and urinary excretion of catecholamines; in a thermoneutral laboratory. The same parameters were repeated on day 3 and at weekly intervals for a period of 3 weeks, after exposing them to 3,500 m; and also after return to sea level. At altitude, similar studies were carried out in a group of 10 acclimatized lowlanders, 10 high altitude natives and 6 patients who had recently recovered from high altitude pulmonary oedema. In another phase, similar studies were done in two groups of subjects, one representing 15 subjects who had stayed at altitude (3,500 4,000 m) without any ill effects and the other comprising of 10 subjects who had either suffered from high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) or acute mountain sickness (AMS). The results revealed sympathetic overactivity on acute induction to altitude which showed gradual recovery on prolonged stay, the high altitude natives had preponderance to parasympathetic system. Sympathetic preponderance may not be an essential etiological factor for the causation of maladaptation syndromes.

  19. Power Budget Analysis for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various potential applications and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The energy source considered for the HAA s power budget is solar photon energy that allows the use of either photovoltaic (PV) cells or advanced thermoelectric (ATE) converters. Both PV cells and an ATE system utilizing high performance thermoelectric materials were briefly compared to identify the advantages of ATE for HAA applications in this study. The ATE can generate a higher quantity of harvested energy than PV cells by utilizing the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE in a tandem mode configuration. Assuming that each stage of ATE material has the figure of merit of 5, the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE system approaches the overall conversion efficiency greater than 60%. Based on this estimated efficiency, the configuration of a HAA and the power utility modules are defined.

  20. Elevated incidence of suicide in people living at altitude, smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma: possible role of hypoxia causing decreased serotonin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Young, Simon N

    2013-08-13

    Recent research indicates that suicide rates are elevated in those living at higher altitudes in both the United States and South Korea. A possible mechanism that was proposed is metabolic stress associated with hypoxia. This commentary discusses these results, and also the association between elevated suicide rates and other conditions associated with hypoxia (smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma). Tryptophan hydroxylase may not normally be saturated with oxygen, so mild hypoxia would decrease serotonin synthesis. Low brain serotonin is known to be associated with suicide. Thus, the commentary proposes and discusses the hypothesis that decreased brain serotonin synthesis associated with hypoxia is a mechanism that may contribute to suicide in conditions causing hypoxia. Finally the commentary proposes various studies that could test aspects of this hypothesis.

  1. Elevated incidence of suicide in people living at altitude, smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma: possible role of hypoxia causing decreased serotonin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Young, Simon N

    2013-11-01

    Recent research indicates that suicide rates are elevated in those living at higher altitudes in both the United States and South Korea. A possible mechanism that was proposed is metabolic stress associated with hypoxia. This commentary discusses these results, and also the association between elevated suicide rates and other conditions associated with hypoxia (smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma). Tryptophan hydroxylase may not normally be saturated with oxygen, so mild hypoxia would decrease serotonin synthesis. Low brain serotonin is known to be associated with suicide. Thus, the commentary proposes and discusses the hypothesis that decreased brain serotonin synthesis associated with hypoxia is a mechanism that may contribute to suicide in conditions causing hypoxia. Finally the commentary proposes various studies that could test aspects of this hypothesis.

  2. Neurologic decompression sickness following cabin pressure fluctuations at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Auten, Jonathan D; Kuhne, Michael A; Walker, Harlan M; Porter, Henry O

    2010-04-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) occurs in diving, altitude chamber exposures, and unpressurized or depressurized high-altitude flights. Because DCS takes many forms, in-flight cases may be misinterpreted as hypoxia, hyperventilation, or viral illness, with resulting failure to respond appropriately. In this case, a 28-yr-old male pilot of a single-seat, tactical aircraft experienced 12 rapid pressure fluctuations while flying at 43,000 ft above sea level. He had no symptoms and decided to complete the flight, which required an additional 2 h in the air. Approximately 1 h later he began to experience fatigue, lightheadedness, and confusion, which he interpreted as onset of a viral illness. However, symptoms progressed to visual, cognitive, motor, and sensory degradations and it was with some difficulty that he landed safely at his destination. Neurologic DCS was suspected on initial evaluation by flight line medical personnel because of the delayed onset and symptom progression. He was transferred to a local Emergency Department and noted to have altered mental status, asymmetric motor deficits, and non-dermatomal paresthesias of the upper and lower extremities. Approximately 3.5 h after the incident and 2.5 h after the onset of symptoms he began hyperbaric oxygen therapy. He received partial relief at 30 min of the Navy DiveTable 6 and full resolution at 90 min; there were no recurrent symptoms at a 1-yr follow-up. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of in-flight DCS symptoms and landing as soon as possible rather than as soon as practical in all likely scenarios.

  3. Changing Patterns of Neuropsychological Functioning in Children Living at High Altitude above and below 4000 M: A Report from the Bolivian Children Living at Altitude (BoCLA) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virues-Ortega, Javier; Bucks, Romola; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Baldeweg, Torsten; Baya-Botti, Ana; Hogan, Alexandra M.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is highly sensitive to environmental hypoxia. Little is known, however, about the neuropsychological effects of high altitude residence in the developing brain. We recently described only minor changes in processing speed in native Bolivian children and adolescents living at approximately 3700 m. However, evidence for loss of cerebral…

  4. Changing Patterns of Neuropsychological Functioning in Children Living at High Altitude above and below 4000 M: A Report from the Bolivian Children Living at Altitude (BoCLA) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virues-Ortega, Javier; Bucks, Romola; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Baldeweg, Torsten; Baya-Botti, Ana; Hogan, Alexandra M.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is highly sensitive to environmental hypoxia. Little is known, however, about the neuropsychological effects of high altitude residence in the developing brain. We recently described only minor changes in processing speed in native Bolivian children and adolescents living at approximately 3700 m. However, evidence for loss of cerebral…

  5. HAWC: The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jordan A.

    2013-02-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is currently being deployed at 4100m above sea level on the Vulcan Sierra Negra near Puebla, Mexico. The HAWC observatory will consist of 250-300 Water Cherenkov Detectors totaling approximately 22,000 m2 of instrumented area. The water Cherenkov technique allows HAWC to have a nearly 100% duty cycle and large field of view, making the HAWC observatory an ideal instrument for the study of transient phenomena. With its large effective area, excellent angular and energy resolutions, and efficient gamma-hadron separation, HAWC will survey the TeV gamma-ray sky, measure spectra of galactic sources from 1 TeV to beyond 100 TeV, and map galactic diffuse gamma ray emission. The science goals, instrument performance and status of the HAWC observatory will be presented.

  6. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  7. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis at high altitude: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zavanone, C; Panebianco, M; Yger, M; Borden, A; Restivo, D; Angelini, C; Pavone, A; Grimod, G; Rosso, C; Dupont, S

    2017-04-01

    High altitude may be a factor associated with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). As our knowledge of CVT at high altitude is limited, it was decided to pool such information from the available case studies to determine whether high altitude can predispose to CVT. A systematic review of the literature was performed for cases reporting CVT at high altitude. Searches of the PubMed database (up to July 2016) were performed for publications, using 'cerebral venous thrombosis' and 'high altitude' as keywords. Cross-referencing was also done to complete the search. Ultimately, 13 articles were included in our systematic review. The population consisted of 17 patients, predominately male (14/17), with a mean age of 32 (range: 19-47) years. Altitude range was 3000-8200m. Nine patients stayed at high altitude for>2 weeks; the duration of high altitude stay was unknown for the remainder. A hypercoagulable state was found in nine patients: secondary polycythemia in five; protein C deficiency in one; protein S deficiency in one; and factor V Leiden mutations in two. No comorbidities were found in any of these patients. Long-term stays at high altitude in association with a hypercoagulable state - in particular, congenital or acquired thrombophilia - appears to predispose to CVT. The association of CVT with a single exposure to high altitude seems low, but the risk cannot as yet be specifically estimated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Acetazolamide pre-treatment before ascending to high altitudes: when to start?

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is the main responsible factor initiating the symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) in susceptible individuals. Measures that improve oxygenation and/or hasten acclimatization like pre-treatment with acetazolamide will prevent the development of AMS. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with acetazolamide the day before arrival at high altitude would elicit improved oxygenation compared to placebo not until the second day of high-altitude exposure. Fifteen study participants were randomly assigned in a double blind fashion to receive placebo or acetazolamide (2 × 125 mg) before (10 hours and 1 hour) exposure to high altitude (Monte Rosa plateau, 3480 m). Beside AMS scoring, heart rate, minute ventilation, and blood gas analyses were performed during rest and submaximal exercise at low altitude and on day 1, 2 and 3 at high altitude. From low altitude to day 1 at high altitude changes of pH (7.41 ± 0.01 vs. 7.48 ± 0.04) and HCO3 (24.0 ± 0.46 vs. 24.6 ± 2.6 mmol/L) within the placebo group differed significantly from those within the acetazolamide group (7.41 ± 0.01 vs. 7.41 ± 0.02; 23.6 ± 0.38 vs. 20.7 ± 1.8 mmol/L) (P < 0.05). AMS incidence tended to be lower with acetazolamide (P < 0.1). From low altitude to day 2 at high altitude changes of paO2 within the placebo group (75.3 ± 5.4 vs. 40.5 ± 3.4 mmHg) differed significantly from those within the acetazolamide group (76.5 ± 4.5 vs. 48.2 ± 4.9 mmHg) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, pre-treatment with low-dose acetazolamide on the day before ascending to high altitude tended to reduce AMS incidence on the first day at high altitude but improved oxygen availability to tissues not until the second day of exposure. Therefore, it is suggested that the beginning of pre-treatment with low-dose acetazolamide at least two days before arrival at high altitude, in contrast to usual recommendations, would be of greater beneficial effect on AMS development. PMID:25550957

  10. High-altitude illness induced by tooth root infection

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, J

    1999-01-01

    High-altitude illness may occur after recent pulmonary infection, but high-altitude illness after root canal therapy has not been described previously. A 44-year-old man is presented who skied to a 3333 m high peak in the Eastern Alps one day after he had undergone root canal therapy because of a tooth root infection. After 4 hours above 3000 m severe symptoms of high-altitude illness, including pulmonary oedema, developed. His condition improved after immediate descent. The next day he presented with local and general signs of infection which were successfully treated with gingival incisions and antibiotics. In conclusion, acute tooth root infection and root canal therapy may induce high-altitude illness at an altitude just above 3000 m.


Keywords: high-altitude illness; pulmonary oedema; root canal therapy; tooth root infection PMID:10715764

  11. Effect of high altitude and exercise on microvascular parameters in acclimatized subjects.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Andreas; Demetz, Florian; Bruegger, Dirk; Schmoelz, Martin; Schroepfer, Sebastian; Martignoni, André; Baschnegger, Heiko; Hoelzl, Josef; Thiel, Manfred; Choukér, Alexander; Peter, Klaus; Gamble, John; Christ, Frank

    2006-02-01

    The role of microvascular fluid shifts in the adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia and its contribution to the pathophysiology of AMS (acute mountain sickness) is unresolved. In a systematic prospective study, we investigated the effects of hypobaric hypoxia and physical exercise alone, and in combination, on microvascular fluid exchange and related factors. We used computer-assisted VCP (venous congestion plethysmography) on the calves of ten altitude-acclimatized volunteers. We investigated the effects of: (i) actively climbing to an altitude of 3196 m, (ii) airlifting these subjects to the same altitude, and (iii) exercise at low altitude. CFC (capillary filtration capacity), Pvi (isovolumetric venous pressure) and Qa (calf blood flow) were assessed before and after each procedure and then repeated after an overnight rest. Measurements of CFC showed no evidence of increased microvascular permeability after any of the procedures. Pvi was significantly decreased (P<0.001) from 20.3+/-4.4 to 8.9+/-4.3 mmHg after active ascent, and was still significantly lower (P=0.009) after overnight rest at high altitude (13.6+/-5.9 mmHg). No such changes were observed after the passive ascent (16.7+/-4.0 mmHg at baseline; 17.3+/-4.5 mmHg after passive ascent; and 19.9+/-5.3 mmHg after overnight rest) or after exercise at low altitude. After the active ascent, Qa was significantly increased. We also found a significant correlation between Qa, Pvi and the number of circulating white blood cells. In conclusion, we found evidence to support the hypothesis that increased microvascular permeability associated with AMS does not occur in acclimatized subjects. We also observed that the microvascular equilibrium pressure (Pvi) fell in inverse relation to the increase in Qa, especially in hypoxic exercise. We hypothesize that this inverse relationship reflects the haemodynamic changes at the microvascular interface, possibly attributable to the flow-induced increases in endothelial surface

  12. Chronic intermittent high altitude exposure, occupation, and body mass index in workers of mining industry.

    PubMed

    Esenamanova, Marina K; Kochkorova, Firuza A; Tsivinskaya, Tatyana A; Vinnikov, Denis; Aikimbaev, Kairgeldy

    2014-09-01

    The obesity and overweight rates in population exposed to chronic intermittent exposure to high altitudes are not well studied. The aim of the retrospective study was to evaluate whether there are differences in body mass index in different occupation groups working in intermittent shifts at mining industry at high altitude: 3800-4500 meters above sea level. Our study demonstrated that obesity and overweight are common in workers of high altitude mining industry exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia. The obesity rate was lowest among miners as compared to blue- and white-collar employees (9.5% vs. 15.6% and 14.7%, p=0.013). Obesity and overweight were associated with older age, higher rates of increased blood pressure (8.79% and 5.72% vs. 1.92%), cholesterol (45.8% and 45.6% vs. 32.8%) and glucose (4.3% and 1.26% vs. 0.57%) levels as compared to normal body mass index category (p<0.0001 for all). There were differences in patterns of cholesterol and glucose levels in men and women employees according to occupation type. In conclusion, obesity and overweight rates are prevalent and associated with increase in blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose levels in workers of mining industry exposed to intermittent high-altitude hypoxia. Therefore, assessment and monitoring of body mass index seems to be essential in those who live and work at high altitudes to supply the correct nutrition, modify risk factors, and prevent related disorders.

  13. High-altitude adaptation of Tibetan chicken from MT-COI and ATP-6 perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoling; Wu, Nan; Zhu, Qing; Gaur, Uma; Gu, Ting; Li, Diyan

    2016-09-01

    The problem of hypoxia adaptation in high altitudes is an unsolved brainteaser in the field of life sciences. As one of the best chicken breeds with adaptability to highland environment, the Tibetan chicken, is genetically different from lowland chicken breeds. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of hypoxic adaptability in high altitude, in the present study, we focused on the MT-COI together with ATP-6 gene to explore the regulatory mechanisms for hypoxia adaptability in Tibet chicken. Here, we sequenced MT-COI of 29 Tibetan chickens and 30 Chinese domestic chickens and ATP-6 gene of 28 Tibetan chickens and 29 Chinese domestic chickens. In MT-COI gene, 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected though none of these was a missense mutation, confirming the fact that MT-COI gene is a largely conservative sequence. In ATP-6 gene, 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected and we found a missense mutation (m.9441G > A) in the ATP-6 gene of Tibetan chicken resulting in an amino acid substitution. Due to the critical role of ATP-6 gene in the proton translocation and energy metabolism, we speculated the possibility of this mutation playing an important role in easier energy conversion and metabolism in Tibetan chickens than Chinese domestic chickens so as to better adapt to the harsh environment of the high-altitude areas. The Median-joining profile also suggested that haplotype Ha2 has the ancestral position to the other haplotypes and has significant relationship with high-altitude adaptation in ATP-6 gene. Therefore, we considered that the polymorphism (m.9441G > A) in the ATP-6 gene may affect the specific functions of ATP-6 enzyme relating to high-altitude adaptation of Tibetan chicken and MT-COI gene is a largely conservative sequence.

  14. Sources of plasma in the high altitude cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Trattner, K. J.

    2012-10-01

    Ambiguities introduced by the inconsistent definitions of the low and high altitude cusp lead to the inconsistency that at low altitudes the region commonly known as the cusp does not include boundary layer plasmas, but at high altitudes it does. Here we examine plasma data from two high altitude cusp intervals where ∼100 keV ionospheric ions were observed. We show that the data are an average over an interval that includes plasma from both boundary layer and newly injected solar wind plasmas. We find that the ∼100 keV ionospheric ions reported in the high altitude cusp are energized by well-known magnetospheric processes bringing energetic ions to the dayside boundary layers. We conclude that there is no need to postulate new processes associated with waves in diamagnetic cavities commonly found in the high altitude cusp to explain the observation of ∼100 keV ionospheric ions found there.

  15. Sublingual microcirculatory blood flow and vessel density in Sherpas at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward T; Coppel, Jonny; Court, Jo; Van Der Kaaij, Jildou; Vercueil, Andre; Feelisch, Martin; Levett, Denny; Mythen, Monty; Grocott, Michael P; Martin, Daniel Stuart

    2017-01-26

    Anecdotal reports suggest that Sherpa highlanders demonstrate extraordinary tolerance to hypoxia at high altitude despite exhibiting a lower arterial oxygen content than acclimatised Lowlanders. This study tested the hypothesis that Sherpas exposed to hypobaric hypoxia on ascent to 5300m, develop increased microcirculatory blood flow as a means of maintaining normal tissue oxygen delivery. Images of the sublingual microcirculation were obtained from 64 Sherpas and 69 Lowlanders using incident dark field imaging. Serial measurements were obtained from participants undertaking an ascent from baseline testing (35m or 1300m) to Everest base camp (5300m), and following subsequent descent in Kathmandu (1300m). Microcirculatory flow index and heterogeneity index were used to provide indices of microcirculatory flow, whilst capillary density was assessed using small vessel density. Sherpas, when compared to Lowlanders, demonstrated significantly greater microcirculatory blood flow at Everest Base Camp, but not at baseline testing or on return in Kathmandu. Additionally, Sherpa blood flow exhibited greater homogeneity at 5300m and 1300m (descent) when compared to Lowlanders. Sublingual small vessel density was not different between the two cohorts at baseline testing or at 1300m, however at 5300m Sherpas capillary density was up to 30% greater. These data suggest that Sherpas have the ability to maintain a significantly greater microcirculatory flow per unit time, and flow per unit volume of tissue at high altitude, when compared to Lowlanders. These findings support the notion that peripheral vascular factors at the microcirculatory level may be important in the process of adaptation to hypoxia.

  16. Genome-wide analysis reveals adaptation to high altitudes in Tibetan sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Caihong; Wang, Huihua; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Fuping; Kijas, James W.; Ma, Youji; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Cao, Jiaxue; Wu, Mingming; Wang, Guangkai; Liu, Ruizao; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Shuzhen; Liu, Chousheng; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan sheep have lived on the Tibetan Plateau for thousands of years; however, the process and consequences of adaptation to this extreme environment have not been elucidated for important livestock such as sheep. Here, seven sheep breeds, representing both highland and lowland breeds from different areas of China, were genotyped for a genome-wide collection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The FST and XP-EHH approaches were used to identify regions harbouring local positive selection between these highland and lowland breeds, and 236 genes were identified. We detected selection events spanning genes involved in angiogenesis, energy production and erythropoiesis. In particular, several candidate genes were associated with high-altitude hypoxia, including EPAS1, CRYAA, LONP1, NF1, DPP4, SOD1, PPARG and SOCS2. EPAS1 plays a crucial role in hypoxia adaption; therefore, we investigated the exon sequences of EPAS1 and identified 12 mutations. Analysis of the relationship between blood-related phenotypes and EPAS1 genotypes in additional highland sheep revealed that a homozygous mutation at a relatively conserved site in the EPAS1 3′ untranslated region was associated with increased mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular volume. Taken together, our results provide evidence of the genetic diversity of highland sheep and indicate potential high-altitude hypoxia adaptation mechanisms, including the role of EPAS1 in adaptation. PMID:27230812

  17. Cerebral autoregulation in subjects adapted and not adapted to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Jansen, G F; Krins, A; Basnyat, B; Bosch, A; Odoom, J A

    2000-10-01

    Impaired cerebral autoregulation (CA) from high-altitude hypoxia may cause high-altitude cerebral edema in newcomers to a higher altitude. Furthermore, it is assumed that high-altitude natives have preserved CA. However, cerebral autoregulation has not been studied at altitude. We studied CA in 10 subjects at sea level and in 9 Sherpas and 10 newcomers at an altitude of 4243 m by evaluating the effect of an increase of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) with phenylephrine infusion on the blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (Vmca), using transcranial Doppler. Theoretically, no change of Vmca in response to an increase in MABP would imply perfect autoregulation. Complete loss of autoregulation is present if Vmca changes proportionally with changes of MABP. In the sea-level group, at a relative MABP increase of 23+/-4% during phenylephrine infusion, relative Vmca did not change essentially from baseline Vmca (2+/-7%, P=0.36), which indicated intact autoregulation. In the Sherpa group, at a relative MABP increase of 29+/-7%, there was a uniform and significant increase of Vmca of 24+/-9% (P<0.0001) from baseline Vmca, which indicated loss of autoregulation. The newcomers showed large variations of Vmca in response to a relative MABP increase of 21+/-6%. Five subjects showed increases of Vmca of 22% to 35%, and 2 subjects showed decreases of Vmca of 21% and 23%. All Sherpas and the majority of the newcomers showed impaired CA. It indicates that an intact autoregulatory response to changes in blood pressure is probably not a hallmark of the normal human cerebral vasculature at altitude and that impaired CA does not play a major role in the occurrence of cerebral edema in newcomers to the altitude.

  18. High-altitude aerostats as astronomical platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bely, Pierre Y.; Ashford, Robert; Cox, Charles D.

    1995-06-01

    The tropopause, typically at 16 to 18 km altitude at the lower latitudes, dips to 8 km in the polar regions. This makes the cold, dry, and nonturbulent lower stratosphere accessible to tethered aerostats. Tethered aerostats can fly as high as 12 km and are extremely reliable, lasting for many years. In contrast to free-flying balloons, they can stay on station for weeks at a time, and payloads can be safely recovered for maintenance and adjustment and relaunched in a matter of hours. We propose to use such a platform, located first in the Arctic (near Fairbanks, Alaska), and then later in the Antarctic, to operate a new technology 4-meter telescope with diffraction-limited performance in the near-IR. Thanks to the low ambient temperature (200 degrees K), thermal emission from the optics is of the same order as that of the zodiacal light in the 2 to 3 micron band. Since this wavelength interval is the darkest part of the zodiacal light spectrum from optical wavelengths to 100 microns, the combination of high resolution images and a very dark sky make it the spectral region of choice for observing the redshifted light from galaxies and clusters of galaxies at moderate to high redshifts.

  19. Microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Yuji

    In JAXA, microgravity experiment system using a high altitude balloon was developed , for good microgravity environment and short turn-around time. In this publication, I give an account of themicrogravity experiment system and a combustion experiment to utilize the system. The balloon operated vehicle (BOV) as a microgravity experiment system was developed from 2004 to 2009. Features of the BOV are (1) BOV has double capsule structure. Outside-capsule and inside-capsule are kept the non-contact state by 3-axis drag-free control. (2) The payload is spherical shape and itsdiameter is about 300 mm. (3) Keep 10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds However, BOV’s payload was small, and could not mount large experiment module. In this study, inherits the results of past, we established a new experimental system called “iBOV” in order toaccommodate larger payload. Features of the iBOV are (1) Drag-free control use for only vertical direction. (2) The payload is a cylindrical shape and its size is about 300 mm in diameter and 700 mm in height. (3) Keep 10-3-10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds We have "Observation experiment of flame propagation behavior of the droplets column" as experiment using iBOV. This experiment is a theme that was selected first for technical demonstration of iBOV. We are conducting the flame propagation mechanism elucidation study of fuel droplets array was placed at regular intervals. We conducted a microgravity experiments using TEXUS rocket ESA and drop tower. For this microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon, we use the Engineering Model (EM) for TEXUS rocket experiment. The EM (This payload) consists of combustion vessel, droplets supporter, droplets generator, fuel syringe, igniter, digital camera, high-speed camera. And, This payload was improved from the EM as follows. (1) Add a control unit. (2) Add inside batteries for control unit and heater of combustion

  20. Evolutionary significance of selected EDAR variants in Tibetan high-altitude adaptations.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jianming; Raza, Muhammad Sohail; Zhuoma, Basang; Zeng, Changqing

    2017-08-08

    Humans have been exposed to many environmental challenges since their evolutionary origins in Africa and subsequent migrations to the rest of the world. A severe environmental challenge to human migrants was hypoxia caused by low barometric oxygen pressure at high altitudes. Several genome-wide scans have elucidated the genetic basis of human high-altitude adaptations. However, the dearth of functional variant information has led to the successful association of only a few candidate genes. In the present study, we employed a candidate gene approach and re-sequenced the EDAR locus in 45 Tibetan individuals to identify mutations involved in hypoxia adaptation. We identified 10 and five quantitative trait-associated mutations for oxygen saturation (SaO2) and blood platelet count, respectively, at the EDAR locus. Among these, rs10865026 and rs3749110 (associated with SaO2 and platelet count, respectively) were identified as functional candidate targets. These data demonstrate that EDAR has undergone natural selection in recent human history and indicate an important role of EDAR variants in Tibetan high-altitude adaptations.

  1. Aldosterone, cortisol, and electrolyte responses to hypobaric hypoxia in moderate-altitude natives.

    PubMed

    Maresh, C M; Noble, B J; Robertson, K L; Harvey, J S

    1985-11-01

    Serum aldosterone, cortisol, and electrolyte concentration, and urinary aldosterone and electrolyte excretion responses were examined in seven low-altitude natives (LAN) (373 m or less, aged 19-25 yr) and nine moderate-altitude natives (MAN) (1,830-2,200 m, aged 19-23 yr) for 2 d at their own residence (home) altitude (PB 740 or 585 mm Hg, respectively) and later for 2 d during decompression at a simulated altitude of 4,270 m (PB 447 mm Hg). The LAN group demonstrated higher (p less than 0.05) serum cortisol concentrations and respiration rates, and lower (p less than 0.05) serum aldosterone and potassium, and urinary aldosterone, sodium, and potassium concentrations at certain times during decompression compared to their home responses. Moderate-altitude native responses, on the other hand, were generally unchanged. Manifestations of acute mountain sickness at PB 447 mm Hg were also significantly greater in the LAN group. Thus, it appears that the MAN subjects were influenced less by the drop in ambient oxygen tension associated with PB 447 mm Hg.

  2. [Altitude and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    A stay at high altitude exposes an individual to various environmental changes (cold, exercise, isolation) but the most stressful for the body is hypoxia. However, the cardiovascular system yields some efficient mechanisms of acclimatization to oxygen lack. Hypoxia activates the adrenergic system and induces a tachycardia that decreases during a prolonged stay at altitude. The desensitization of the adrenergic system leads to a decrease in maximal heart rate and a protection of the myocardium against an energy disequilibrium that could be potentially harmful for the heart. Hypoxia induces a peripheral vasodilation and a pulmonary vasoconstriction, leading to few changes in systemic blood pressure and an increase in pulmonary blood pressure (PHT) that can contribute to a high altitude pulmonary edema. Advice to a cardiac patient who plans to go to high altitude should take into account that all diseases aggravated by increased adrenergic activity or associated with a PHT or a hypoxemia (right-to-left shunt) will be aggravated at high altitude. As altitude increases, a patient with a coronary disease will present an ischemic threshold for a lower power output during an EKG exercise test. The only test allowing predicting the tolerance to high altitude is the hypoxia exercise test realized at 30% of maxVO(2)and at an equivalent altitude of 4,800m.

  3. High Altitude Observatory YBJ and ARGO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; ARGO Collaboration

    A 5800 m2 RPC (Resistive Plate Chamber) full coverage air shower array is under construction in the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory, Tibet of China, by the ChinaItaly ARGO Collaboration. YBJ is a large flat grassland with an area 10 × 70 km2 at 4300m altitude, about 90 north west from Lhasa. Its nearby power station, asphalt road to Lhasa, passing railway (will be constructed during the coming 5 years), optical fiber link to the INTERNET, rare snow and other favourable weather conditions are well suitable for setting an Astrophysical Observatory here. The installation of a large area carpet-like detector in this peculiar site will allow one to perform an all-sky and high duty cycle study of high energy gamma rays from 100GeV to 50 TeV as well as accurate measurements on UHE cosmic rays. To insure the stable and uniform working condition of RPCs, a 104 M2 carpet hall was constructed, the RPC installation have be started in it since last November. The natural distribution and daily variation of temperature in the hall, the data concerning the performances of the installed RPCs, have been measured, the results are presented. ce

  4. The pulmonary circulation of some domestic animals at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, I.; Heath, D.; Williams, D.; Deen, M.; Ferrari, R.; Bergel, D.; Harris, P.

    1988-03-01

    Pulmonary haemodynamics and the histology of the pulmonary vasculature have been studied at high altitude in the yak, in interbreeds between yaks and cattle, and in domestic goats and sheep indigenous to high altitudes together with crosses between them and low-altitude strains. Cattle at high altitude had a higher pulmonary arterial pressure than cattle at low altitude. The yak and two interbreeds with cattle (dzos and stols) had a low pulmonary arterial pressure compared with cattle, while the medial thickness of the small pulmonary arteries was less than would be expected in cattle, suggesting that the yak has a low capacity for hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and that this characteristic is transmitted genetically. Goats and sheep showed haemodynamic evidence of a limited response of the pulmonary circulation to high altitude, but no evidence that the high altitude breeds had lost this response. There were no measurable differences in the thickness of the media of the small pulmonary arteries between high- and low-altitude breeds of goats and sheep. All these species showed prominent intimal protrusions of muscle into the pulmonary veins but no specific effect of high altitude in this respect.

  5. Cerebral venous system and anatomical predisposition to high-altitude headache.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Davagnanam, Indran; Holland, Graeme; Dattani, Raj S; Tamm, Alexander; Hirani, Shashivadan P; Kolfschoten, Nicky; Strycharczuk, Lisa; Green, Cathy; Thornton, John S; Wright, Alex; Edsell, Mark; Kitchen, Neil D; Sharp, David J; Ham, Timothy E; Murray, Andrew; Holloway, Cameron J; Clarke, Kieran; Grocott, Mike P W; Montgomery, Hugh; Imray, Chris

    2013-03-01

    As inspired oxygen availability falls with ascent to altitude, some individuals develop high-altitude headache (HAH). We postulated that HAH results when hypoxia-associated increases in cerebral blood flow occur in the context of restricted venous drainage, and is worsened when cerebral compliance is reduced. We explored this hypothesis in 3 studies. In high-altitude studies, retinal venous distension (RVD) was ophthalmoscopically assessed in 24 subjects (6 female) and sea-level cranial magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 12 subjects ascending to 5,300m. Correlation of headache burden (summed severity scores [0-4]≤24 hours from arrival at each altitude) with RVD, and with cerebral/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/venous compartment volumes, was sought. In a sea-level hypoxic study, 11 subjects underwent gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance venography before and during hypoxic challenge (fraction of inspired oxygen=0.11, 1 hour). In the high-altitude studies, headache burden correlated with both RVD (Spearman rho=0.55, p=0.005) and with the degree of narrowing of 1 or both transverse venous sinuses (r=-0.56, p=0.03). It also related inversely to both the lateral+third ventricle summed volumes (Spearman rho=-0.5, p=0.05) and pericerebellar CSF volume (r=-0.56, p=0.03). In the hypoxic study, cerebral and retinal vein engorgement were correlated, and rose as the combined conduit score fell (a measure of venous outflow restriction; r=-0.66, p<0.05 and r=-0.75, p<0.05, respectively). Arterial hypoxemia is associated with cerebral and retinal venous distension, whose magnitude correlates with HAH burden. Restriction in cerebral venous outflow is associated with retinal distension and HAH. Limitations in cerebral venous efferent flow may predispose to headache when hypoxia-related increases in cerebral arterial flow occur. Copyright © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  6. Serum irisin and myostatin levels after 2 weeks of high-altitude climbing.

    PubMed

    Śliwicka, Ewa; Cisoń, Tomasz; Kasprzak, Zbigniew; Nowak, Alicja; Pilaczyńska-Szcześniak, Łucja

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to high-altitude hypoxia causes physiological and metabolic adaptive changes by disturbing homeostasis. Hypoxia-related changes in skeletal muscle affect the closely interconnected energy and regeneration processes. The balance between protein synthesis and degradation in the skeletal muscle is regulated by several molecules such as myostatin, cytokines, vitamin D, and irisin. This study investigates changes in irisin and myostatin levels in male climbers after a 2-week high-altitude expedition, and their association with 25(OH)D and indices of inflammatory processes. The study was performed in 8 men aged between 23 and 31 years, who participated in a 2-week climbing expedition in the Alps. The measurements of body composition and serum concentrations of irisin, myostatin, 25(OH)D, interleukin-6, myoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, osteoprotegerin, and high-sensitivity soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (sRANKL) were performed before and after expedition. A 2-week exposure to hypobaric hypoxia caused significant decrease in body mass, body mass index (BMI), free fat mass and irisin, 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels. On the other hand, significant increase in the levels of myoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and osteoprotegerin were noted. The observed correlations of irisin with 25(OH)D levels, as well as myostatin levels with inflammatory markers and the OPG/RANKL ratio indicate that these myokines may be involved in the energy-related processes and skeletal muscle regeneration in response to 2-week exposure to hypobaric hypoxia.

  7. Store-operated channels in the pulmonary circulation of high- and low-altitude neonatal lambs.

    PubMed

    Parrau, Daniela; Ebensperger, Germán; Herrera, Emilio A; Moraga, Fernando; Riquelme, Raquel A; Ulloa, César E; Rojas, Rodrigo T; Silva, Pablo; Hernandez, Ismael; Ferrada, Javiera; Diaz, Marcela; Parer, Julian T; Cabello, Gertrudis; Llanos, Aníbal J; Reyes, Roberto V

    2013-04-15

    We determined whether store-operated channels (SOC) are involved in neonatal pulmonary artery function under conditions of acute and chronic hypoxia, using newborn sheep gestated and born either at high altitude (HA, 3,600 m) or low altitude (LA, 520 m). Cardiopulmonary variables were recorded in vivo, with and without SOC blockade by 2-aminoethyldiphenylborinate (2-APB), during basal or acute hypoxic conditions. 2-APB did not have effects on basal mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), cardiac output, systemic arterial blood pressure, or systemic vascular resistance in both groups of neonates. During acute hypoxia 2-APB reduced mPAP and pulmonary vascular resistance in LA and HA, but this reduction was greater in HA. In addition, isolated pulmonary arteries mounted in a wire myograph were assessed for vascular reactivity. HA arteries showed a greater relaxation and sensitivity to SOC blockers than LA arteries. The pulmonary expression of two SOC-forming subunits, TRPC4 and STIM1, was upregulated in HA. Taken together, our results show that SOC contribute to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in newborn sheep and that SOC are upregulated by chronic hypoxia. Therefore, SOC may contribute to the development of neonatal pulmonary hypertension. We propose SOC channels could be potential targets to treat neonatal pulmonary hypertension.

  8. Role of the altitude level on cerebral autoregulation in residents at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Gerard F A; Krins, Anne; Basnyat, Buddha; Odoom, Joseph A; Ince, Can

    2007-08-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is impaired in Himalayan high-altitude residents who live above 4,200 m. This study was undertaken to determine the altitude at which this impairment of autoregulation occurs. A second aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that administration of oxygen can reverse this impairment in autoregulation at high altitudes. In four groups of 10 Himalayan high-altitude dwellers residing at 1,330, 2,650, 3,440, and 4,243 m, arterial oxygen saturation (Sa(O(2))), blood pressure, and middle cerebral artery blood velocity were monitored during infusion of phenylephrine to determine static cerebral autoregulation. On the basis of these measurements, the cerebral autoregulation index (AI) was calculated. Normally, AI is between zero and 1. AI of 0 implies absent autoregulation, and AI of 1 implies intact autoregulation. At 1,330 m (Sa(O(2)) = 97%), 2,650 m (Sa(O(2)) = 96%), and 3,440 m (Sa(O(2)) = 93%), AI values (mean +/- SD) were, respectively, 0.63 +/- 0.27, 0.57 +/- 0.22, and 0.57 +/- 0.15. At 4,243 m (Sa(O(2)) = 88%), AI was 0.22 +/- 0.18 (P < 0.0005, compared with AI at the lower altitudes) and increased to 0.49 +/- 0.23 (P = 0.008, paired t-test) when oxygen was administered (Sa(O(2)) = 98%). In conclusion, high-altitude residents living at 4,243 m have almost total loss of cerebral autoregulation, which improved during oxygen administration. Those people living at 3,440 m and lower have still functioning cerebral autoregulation. This study showed that the altitude region between 3,440 and 4,243 m, marked by Sa(O(2)) in the high-altitude dwellers of 93% and 88%, is a transitional zone, above which cerebral autoregulation becomes critically impaired.

  9. Long-Term Intermittent Exposure to High Altitude Elevates Asymmetric Dimethylarginine in First Exposed Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Lüneburg, Nicole; Siques, Patricia; Brito, Julio; De La Cruz, Juan José; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Hannemann, Juliane; Ibanez, Cristian; Böger, Rainer H

    2017-09-01

    Lüneburg, Nicole, Patricia Siques, Julio Brito, Juan José De La Cruz, Fabiola León-Velarde, Juliane Hannemann, Cristian Ibanez, and Rainer Böger. Long-term intermittent exposure to high altitude elevates asymmetric dimethylarginine in first exposed young adults. High Alt Med Biol. 18:226-233, 2017.-Hypoxia-induced dysregulation of pulmonary and cerebral circulation may be related to an impaired nitric oxide (NO) pathway. We investigated the effect of chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIH) on metabolites of the NO pathway. We measured asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and SDMA) and monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and assessed their associations with acclimatization in male draftees (n = 72) undergoing CIH shifts at altitude (3550 m) during 3 months. Sixteen Andean natives living at altitude (3675 m) (chronic hypobaric hypoxia [CH]) were included for comparison. In CIH, ADMA and L-NMMA plasma concentrations increased from 1.14 ± 0.04 to 1.95 ± 0.09 μmol/L (mean ± SE) and from 0.22 ± 0.07 to 0.39 ± 0.03 μmol/L, respectively, (p < 0.001 for both) after 3 months, whereas SDMA did not change. The concentrations of ADMA and L-NMMA were higher in CH (3.48 ± 0.07, 0.53 ± 0.08 μmol/L; p < 0.001) as compared with CIH. In both CIH and CH, ADMA correlated with hematocrit (r(2) = 0.07, p < 0.05; r(2) = 0.26; p < 0.01). In CIH, an association of ADMA levels with poor acclimatization status was observed. We conclude that the endogenous NO synthase inhibitors, ADMA and L-NMMA, are elevated in hypoxia. This may contribute to impaired NO production at altitude and may also be predictive of altitude-associated health impairment.

  10. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafá, Miguel A.

    2014-10-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array.

  11. NASA/USRA high altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Michael; Gudino, Juan; Chen, Kenny; Luong, Tai; Wilkerson, Dave; Keyvani, Anoosh

    1990-01-01

    At the equator, the ozone layer ranges from approximately 80,000 to 130,000+ feet which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. This project is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum of a 6,000 mile range. The low Mach number, payload, and long cruising time are all constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. A pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements, a joined-wing, a bi-plane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The techniques used have been deemed reasonable within the limits of 1990 technology. The performance of each configuration is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project requirements. In the event that a requirement can not be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  12. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view detector based upon a water Cherenkov technology developed by the Milagro experiment. HAWC observes, at an elevation of 4100 m on Sierra Negra Mountain in Mexico, extensive air showers initiated by gamma and cosmic rays. The completed detector will consist of 300 closely spaced water tanks each instrumented with four photomultiplier tubes that provide timing and charge information used to reconstruct energy and arrival direction. HAWC has been optimized to observe transient and steady emission from point as well as diffuse sources of gamma rays in the energy range from several hundred GeV to several hundred TeV. Studies in solar physics as well as the properties of cosmic rays will also be performed. HAWC has been making observations at various stages of deployment since completion of 10% of the array in summer 2012. A discussion of the detector design, science capabilities, current construction/commissioning status, and first results will be presented...

  13. Morphological growth of Han boys and girls born and raised near sea level and at high altitude in western China.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Charles A.; Garruto, Ralph M.; Chin, Chen-Ting; Liu, Ji-Chuan; Liu, Rui-Ling; He, Xing

    2000-09-01

    This study compares the morphological characteristics of Han children, adolescents, and young adults who were born at 250 m near Beijing and at three high altitudes in Qinghai Province, Peoples Republic of China (3,200 m, 3,800 m, and 4,300 m). From ages 6 through 15, Han children growing up at high altitudes are significantly shorter, lighter, have less fat, and are less muscular than Han children growing up at low altitude. However, older adolescents and young adults show no such altitude differences. Younger adolescents and children in this study were all born after the government economic reforms of 1978. These reforms had a greater impact on the growth of children in and around large cities than on those in more remote areas. Therefore, the altitude differences in size among Han children ages 15 and younger may be a consequence of regional variation in health and nutrition, rather than due to the influence of hypoxia. There are no altitude-related differences in thorax dimensions among Han children, adolescents, or young adults. This suggests that hypoxia does not affect the thorax growth of Han children. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 12:665-681, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Lung volume, chest size, and hematological variation in low-, medium-, and high-altitude central Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Fiori, G; Facchini, F; Ismagulov, O; Ismagulova, A; Tarazona-Santos, E; Pettener, D

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate adaptive responses to high-altitude environment, we examined three groups of healthy adult males from Central Asia: 94 high-altitude (HA) Kirghiz subjects (3,200 m above sea level); 114 middle-altitude (MA) Kazakh subjects (2,100 m), and 90 low-altitude (LA) Kirghiz subjects (900 m). Data on chest size (chest perimeter and chest diameter), lung volume (forced expiratory volume (FEV) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1)), and hematological parameters (hemoglobin, erythrocytes, hematocrit, and SaO(2)) are discussed. The results show that 1) chest shape is less flat in the samples living at higher altitude. In the HA sample, chest perimeter is lower but chest excursion is high. 2) In the highlanders, forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1 are no higher than in the other samples, even when corrected for stature and body weight. The negative correlation between FVC-FEV1 and age decreases with increasing altitude. 3) The HA and MA samples have higher values of hemoglobin, erythrocytes, and hematocrit. The HA sample has lower SaO(2) and higher arterial oxygen content than the LA sample. No association between hematocrit and age was detected in the four samples. The results indicate that the high-altitude Kirghiz present features of developmental acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia which are also strongly influenced by other major high-altitude environmental stresses. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Ankle-brachial index on Kilimanjaro: lessons from high altitude.

    PubMed

    Nault, Patrice; Halman, Samantha; Paradis, Josée

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a high-sympathetic stimulus environment (high-altitude hypoxia) on limb-specific systolic blood pressure (sBP) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) in normal volunteers. We hypothesized that currently accepted normal values for ABI may in fact not reflect an actual normal vascular state in all patients. Twenty climbers (17 males, 3 females) from Gatineau-Hull (Québec, Canada) participated in this study and ascended Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa. Ankle-brachial index measurements were performed at sea level and on Mount Kilimanjaro at approximately 4100 m. The data were analyzed using predictive analytics software SPSS 14.0. Data obtained at sea level were compared to those obtained at approximately 4100 m, with participants serving as their own controls. Ankle-brachial indices measured at approximately 4100 m (mean = 1.20) were greater than those measured at sea level (mean = 0.97) (n = -6.23; 95% CI: -.32 to -.17; P < .001). There were no significant differences between the systolic brachial pressures at approximately 4100 m when compared to those at sea level (P = .814). Contrarily, systolic ankle pressures at sea level (mean = 132) were significantly greater than those measured at approximately 4100 m (mean = 152) (t = -3.5, 95% CI: -29 to -7.4; P = .002). This study is the first to physiologically demonstrate that in response to a high adrenergic stimulus in healthy volunteers there is a greater increase in sBP in the legs vs the arms.

  16. Effects of growth, diving history, and high altitude on blood oxygen capacity in harbor seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodama, A. M.; Elsner, R.; Pace, N.

    1977-01-01

    Blood volume and body composition for diving and nondiving harbor seals were measured at six-week intervals during a 10-month period of captitivity. Whole body hematocrit, red cell volume per kg of lean body mass, and total circulating hemoglobin per kg lean body mass were significantly higher in the diving group, but relatively large blood volumes expressed in terms of body weight (11-12%) were found in both groups. A pair of harbor seals exposed to high altitude for about three months registered significant increases in red cell volume, blood hemoglobin levels, and blood volume expressed in terms of body weight; results of alveolar gas analyses indicate that hyperventilation also occurred. These typical mammalian responses to hypoxia suggest that the harbor seal's large blood volume and high hemoglobin content are an expression of phylogenetic control, and that in spite of its adaptability to apnea during its diving life, the animal cannot be considered preacclimatized to high altitude.

  17. Physiological Adjustments and Circulating MicroRNA Reprogramming Are Involved in Early Acclimatization to High Altitude in Chinese Han Males.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao; Huang, He; Wang, Shou-Xian; Wu, Gang; Xu, Gang; Sun, Bing-Da; Zhang, Er-Long; Gao, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Altitude acclimatization is a physiological process that restores oxygen delivery to the tissues and promotes oxygen use under high altitude hypoxia. High altitude sickness occurs in individuals without acclimatization. Unraveling the molecular underpinnings of altitude acclimatization could help understand the beneficial body responses to high altitude hypoxia as well as the altered biological events in un-acclimatized individuals. This study assessed physiological adjustments and circulating microRNA (cmiRNA) profiles in individuals exposed to high altitude, aiming to explore altitude acclimatization in humans. Methods: Ninety volunteers were enrolled in this study. Among them, 22 individuals provided samples for microRNA arrays; 68 additional individuals constituted the validation set. Un-acclimatized individuals were identified by the Lake Louise Scoring System. Thirty-three phenotypes were recorded pre- and post-exposure to high altitude, including stress hormones, lipid profiles, hematological indices, myocardial enzyme spectrum, and liver and kidney function related enzymes. CmiRNA expression profiles were assessed using miRCURYTM LNA Array (v.18.0) screening, with data validated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Then, associations of plasma microRNA expression with physiological adjustments were evaluated. The biological relevance of the main differentially expressed cmiRNAs was explored by bioinformatics prediction. Results: Nineteen of the 33 phenotypes were significantly altered during early altitude acclimatization, including hematological indices, lipid profiles, and stress hormones; meanwhile, 86 cmiRNAs (79 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated) showed differential expression with statistical significance. Among them, 32 and 25 microRNAs were strongly correlated with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and total cholesterol elevations, respectively. In addition, 22 microRNAs were closely correlated

  18. Physiological Adjustments and Circulating MicroRNA Reprogramming Are Involved in Early Acclimatization to High Altitude in Chinese Han Males

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bao; Huang, He; Wang, Shou-Xian; Wu, Gang; Xu, Gang; Sun, Bing-Da; Zhang, Er-Long; Gao, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Altitude acclimatization is a physiological process that restores oxygen delivery to the tissues and promotes oxygen use under high altitude hypoxia. High altitude sickness occurs in individuals without acclimatization. Unraveling the molecular underpinnings of altitude acclimatization could help understand the beneficial body responses to high altitude hypoxia as well as the altered biological events in un-acclimatized individuals. This study assessed physiological adjustments and circulating microRNA (cmiRNA) profiles in individuals exposed to high altitude, aiming to explore altitude acclimatization in humans. Methods: Ninety volunteers were enrolled in this study. Among them, 22 individuals provided samples for microRNA arrays; 68 additional individuals constituted the validation set. Un-acclimatized individuals were identified by the Lake Louise Scoring System. Thirty-three phenotypes were recorded pre- and post-exposure to high altitude, including stress hormones, lipid profiles, hematological indices, myocardial enzyme spectrum, and liver and kidney function related enzymes. CmiRNA expression profiles were assessed using miRCURYTM LNA Array (v.18.0) screening, with data validated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Then, associations of plasma microRNA expression with physiological adjustments were evaluated. The biological relevance of the main differentially expressed cmiRNAs was explored by bioinformatics prediction. Results: Nineteen of the 33 phenotypes were significantly altered during early altitude acclimatization, including hematological indices, lipid profiles, and stress hormones; meanwhile, 86 cmiRNAs (79 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated) showed differential expression with statistical significance. Among them, 32 and 25 microRNAs were strongly correlated with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and total cholesterol elevations, respectively. In addition, 22 microRNAs were closely correlated

  19. Users guide to high altitude imagery of Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A guide to the high altitude imagery of Michigan outlines the areas of the state covered by selected recent high altitude aircraft and Earth Resources Technology Satellite flights. The types of remote sensing used are described. Maps of the flight coverage areas are included along with price lists of available imagery.

  20. Zephyr HALE UAS (High Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial System)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Zephyr HALE UAS (High Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial System ) European Command & African Command Science & Technology Conference 8th 12th...00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Zephyr HALE UAS (High Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial System ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  1. Introductory address: lessons to be learned from high altitude.

    PubMed

    Houston, C S

    1979-07-01

    A historical account of the important landmarks in man's experience with the high altitude environment is followed by comments on the important stages in the understanding of its physiological effects. The work of The Mount Logan High Altitude Physiology Study on acute mountain sickness is reviewed from its inception in 1967 until the present.

  2. Introductory address: lessons to be learned from high altitude.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    A historical account of the important landmarks in man's experience with the high altitude environment is followed by comments on the important stages in the understanding of its physiological effects. The work of The Mount Logan High Altitude Physiology Study on acute mountain sickness is reviewed from its inception in 1967 until the present. PMID:386292

  3. Effects of high altitude on sleep and respiratory system and theirs adaptations.

    PubMed

    San, Turhan; Polat, Senol; Cingi, Cemal; Eskiizmir, Gorkem; Oghan, Fatih; Cakir, Burak

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude (HA) environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ventilatory response of the peripheral chemoreceptors. Hyperventilation results in increase in arterial carbon-dioxide concentration. Altitude also affects sleep and cardiac output, which is the other determinant of oxygen delivery. Upon initial exposure to HA, the resting pulse rate increases rapidly, but with acclimatization, heart rate and cardiac output tend to fall. Another important component that leads to decrease in cardiac output is the reduction in the stroke volume with acclimatization. During sleep at HA, the levels of CO2 in the blood can drop very low and this can switch off the drive to breathe. Only after the body senses a further drop in O2 levels breathing is started again. Periodic breathing is thought to result from instability in the control system through the hypoxic drive or the response to CO2.

  4. Effects of High Altitude on Sleep and Respiratory System and Theirs Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    San, Turhan; Polat, Senol; Cingi, Cemal; Eskiizmir, Gorkem; Oghan, Fatih; Cakir, Burak

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude (HA) environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ventilatory response of the peripheral chemoreceptors. Hyperventilation results in increase in arterial carbondioxide concentration. Altitude also affects sleep and cardiac output, which is the other determinant of oxygen delivery. Upon initial exposure to HA, the resting pulse rate increases rapidly, but with acclimatization, heart rate and cardiac output tend to fall. Another important component that leads to decrease in cardiac output is the reduction in the stroke volume with acclimatization. During sleep at HA, the levels of CO2 in the blood can drop very low and this can switch off the drive to breathe. Only after the body senses a further drop in O2 levels breathing is started again. Periodic breathing is thought to result from instability in the control system through the hypoxic drive or the response to CO2. PMID:23690739

  5. Milk at altitude: Human milk macronutrient composition in a high-altitude adapted population of Tibetans.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Elizabeth A; Diki Bista, Kesang; Childs, Geoff

    2016-02-01

    The physiological challenges of high altitude have led to population-specific patterns of adaptation. These include alterations to child growth and reproduction, including lactation. However, while breastfeeding has been investigated, nothing is known about milk composition in high altitude adapted populations. Here, we investigate milk macronutrient composition, volume, and energy in a sample of 82 Tibetans living at high and low altitude in rural villages (Nubri Valley, Nepal) and at low altitude in Kathmandu, Nepal. Milk samples were collected in the morning using hand expression, frozen, and assayed for fat, protein, and total sugars. Reproductive histories and health recalls were also collected. Milk fat averaged 5.2 ±2.0 g/100 mL, milk sugar 7.37 ± 0.49 g/100 mL, and milk protein 1.26 ± 0.35 g/100 mL for a mean energy density of 81.4 ± 17.4 kcal/100 mL. There were no associations between altitude of residence and milk composition; however, overall milk fat was high compared to reference populations. Within the three groups, milk fat was positively associated with infant age (B = 0.103; p < 0.001) and maternal triceps skinfold thickness (B = 0.095; p < 0.01) while milk sugar was significantly and inversely associated with maternal parity and triceps skinfold thickness. Milk fat, and consequently milk energy, may be increased in high-altitude adapted Tibetans when compared to populations living at low altitude. The association between milk fat and maternal adiposity suggests that milk composition may be sensitive to maternal adiposity in this sample, likely reflecting increased metabolic costs of producing a high-fat milk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Maximal exercise and muscle oxygen extraction in acclimatizing lowlanders and high altitude natives

    PubMed Central

    Lundby, Carsten; Sander, Mikael; van Hall, Gerrit; Saltin, Bengt; Calbet, José A L

    2006-01-01

    The tight relation between arterial oxygen content and maximum oxygen uptake () within a given person at sea level is diminished with altitude acclimatization. An explanation often suggested for this mismatch is impairment of the muscle O2 extraction capacity with chronic hypoxia, and is the focus of the present study. We have studied six lowlanders during maximal exercise at sea level (SL) and with acute (AH) exposure to 4100 m altitude, and again after 2 (W2) and 8 weeks (W8) of altitude sojourn, where also eight high altitude native (Nat) Aymaras were studied. Fractional arterial muscle O2 extraction at maximal exercise was 90.0 ± 1.0% in the Danish lowlanders at sea level, and remained close to this value in all situations. In contrast to this, fractional arterial O2 extraction was 83.2 ± 2.8% in the high altitude natives, and did not change with the induction of normoxia. The capillary oxygen conductance of the lower extremity, a measure of oxygen diffusing capacity, was decreased in the Danish lowlanders after 8 weeks of acclimatization, but was still higher than the value obtained from the high altitude natives. The values were (in ml min−1 mmHg−1) 55.2 ± 3.7 (SL), 48.0 ± 1.7 (W2), 37.8 ± 0.4 (W8) and 27.7 ± 1.5 (Nat). However, when correcting oxygen conductance for the observed reduction in maximal leg blood flow with acclimatization the effect diminished. When calculating a hypothetical leg at altitude using either the leg blood flow or the O2 conductance values obtained at sea level, the former values were almost completely restored to sea level values. This would suggest that the major determinant for not to increase with acclimatization is the observed reduction in maximal leg blood flow and O2 conductance. PMID:16581864

  7. Effects of Ascent to High Altitude on Human Antimycobacterial Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Robert W.; Siedner, Mark J.; Necochea, Alejandro; Leybell, Inna; Valencia, Teresa; Herrera, Beatriz; Wiles, Siouxsie; Friedland, Jon S.; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis infection, disease and mortality are all less common at high than low altitude and ascent to high altitude was historically recommended for treatment. The immunological and mycobacterial mechanisms underlying the association between altitude and tuberculosis are unclear. We studied the effects of altitude on mycobacteria and antimycobacterial immunity. Methods Antimycobacterial immunity was assayed in 15 healthy adults residing at low altitude before and after they ascended to 3400 meters; and in 47 long-term high-altitude residents. Antimycobacterial immunity was assessed as the extent to which participants’ whole blood supported or restricted growth of genetically modified luminescent Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) mycobacteria during 96 hours incubation. We developed a simplified whole blood assay that could be used by a technician in a low-technology setting. We used this to compare mycobacterial growth in participants’ whole blood versus positive-control culture broth and versus negative-control plasma. Results Measurements of mycobacterial luminescence predicted the number of mycobacterial colonies cultured six weeks later. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood at similar rates to positive-control culture broth whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p≤0.002) of mycobacterial growth to be 4-times less than in culture broth. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood 25-times more than negative-control plasma whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p≤0.01) of mycobacterial growth to be only 6-times more than in plasma. There was no evidence of differences in antimycobacterial immunity at high altitude between people who had recently ascended to high altitude versus long-term high-altitude residents. Conclusions An assay of luminescent mycobacterial growth in whole blood was adapted and found to be feasible in low-resource settings. This demonstrated that ascent to or

  8. Prediction of physiological responses and performance at altitude using the 6-minute walk test in normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Oliver R; Richardson, Alan J; Hayes, Mark; Duncan, Ben; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-06-01

    The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is a reliable and valid tool for determining an individual's functional capacity, and has been used to predict summit success. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate whether a 6MWT in normobaric hypoxia could predict physiological responses and exercise performance at altitude. The secondary aim was to determine construct validity of the 6MWT for monitoring acclimatization to 3400 m (Cuzco, Peru). Twenty-nine participants performed six 6MWTs in four conditions: normoxic outdoor (NO), normoxic treadmill (NT), and hypoxic treadmill (HT) were each performed once; and hypoxic outdoor (HO) was performed three times, at 42 hours (HO1), 138 hours (HO2), and 210 hours (HO3) after arrival at Cuzco. One-way analysis of variance revealed no difference (P>.05) between NO and HO1 for 6MWT distance. HT and HO protocols were comparable for the measurement of delta heart rate (HR) and post-test peripheral oxygen saturation (%Spo2; P>.05). Acclimatization was evidenced by reductions (P<.05) in resting HR and respiratory rate (RR) between HO1, HO2, and HO3, and preservation of Spo2 between HO1 and HO2. Postexercise HR and RR were not different (P>.05) with acclimatization. The duration to ascend to 4215 m on a trek was moderately correlated (P<.05) to HR during the trek and the 6MWT distance during HT; no other physiological markers predicted performance. The 6MWT is a simple, time-efficient tool for predicting physiological responses to simulated and actual altitude, which are comparable. The 6MWT is effective at monitoring elements of acclimatization to moderate altitude. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbon Monoxide-Saturated Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers Attenuate High-Altitude-Induced Cardiac Injury by Amelioration of the Inflammation Response and Mitochondrial Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingshu; Hu, Ling; Hu, Yu; Gong, Gu; Tan, Hua; Deng, Li; Sun, Xiaoqin; Yi, Xiaobo; Sun, Yangyang; Wu, Wei; Li, Tao

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of carbon monoxide (CO) on high-altitude hypoxia-induced cardiac damage. Forty male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups. The mice were exposed to normoxia or simulated 5,500-meter high-altitude hypoxia in a hypobaric chamber for 7 days. During the first 3 days, the mice were pretreated with CO-saturated hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carrier (CO-HBOC), oxygen-saturated hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (O2-HBOC) at a dose of 0.3 g Hb/kg/day or an equivalent volume of saline. The in vivo left ventricle function, cardiac enzyme release, histopathological changes, apoptosis and inflammation were also measured. High-altitude hypoxia induced significant cardiac damage, as demonstrated by impaired cardiac function and increased proapoptotic, proinflammatory and pro-oxidant markers. Pretreatment with CO-HBOC significantly improved cardiac performance, reduced cardiac enzyme release and limited myocardial apoptosis. The increased inflammatory response was also suppressed. In addition to the preserved mitochondrial structure, hypobaric hypoxia-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage was remarkably attenuated. Moreover, these antiapoptotic and antioxidative effects were accompanied by an upregulated phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and STAT3. This study demonstrated that CO-HBOC provides a promising protective effect on high-altitude hypoxia-induced myocardial injury, which is mediated by the inhibition of inflammation and mitochondrial oxidative damage. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. The effect of high altitude on olfactory functions.

    PubMed

    Altundağ, Aytuğ; Salihoglu, Murat; Çayönü, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    It is known that high-altitude trips cause nasal congestion, impaired nasal mucociliary transport rate, and increased nasal resistance, due to decreased partial oxygen pressure and dry air. It is also known that olfactory perception is affected by barometric pressure and humidity. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether olfactory function changes in relation to high altitude in a natural setting. The present study included 41 volunteers with no history of chronic rhinosinusitis or nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 men (76 %) and 10 women (24 %); the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. Olfactory testing was conducted using "Sniffin' Sticks" at a high altitude (2,200 ms) and at sea level. Odor test scores for threshold and identification were significantly better at sea level than at high altitude (p < 0.001). The major finding of this investigation was that olfactory functions are decreased at high altitudes.

  11. Heart mechanics at high altitude: 6 days on the top of Europe.

    PubMed

    Maufrais, Claire; Rupp, Thomas; Bouzat, Pierre; Doucende, Gregory; Verges, Samuel; Nottin, Stéphane; Walther, Guillaume

    2016-12-22

    The aim of this study was to analyse the underlying mechanisms of left and right ventricular (LV and RV) functional alterations during several days in high-altitude hypoxia. Resting evaluations of LV and RV function and mechanics were assessed by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography on 11 subjects at sea level (SLPRE), 3 ± 2 h after helicopter transport to high altitude (D0), at day 2 (D2), day 4 (D4) and day 6 (D6) at 4350 m and 5 ± 2 h after return to sea level (SLPOST). Subjects experienced acute mountain sickness (AMS) during the first days at 4350 m. LV systolic function, RV systolic and diastolic function, LV and RV strains and LV synchrony were unchanged at high altitude. Peak twist was increased at D0, continued to increase until D6 (SLPRE: 9.0 ± 5.1deg; D6: 13.0 ± 4.0deg, P < 0.05), but was normalized at SLPOST. Early filling decreased at high altitude with a nadir at D2 (SLPRE: 78 ± 13 cm s-1; D2: 66 ± 11 cm s-1, P < 0.05). LV filling pressures index was decreased at high altitude with the minimum value obtained at D2 and remained reduced at SLPOST. Untwisting, an important factor of LV filling, was not decreased but was delayed at 4350 m. High-altitude exposure impaired LV diastolic function with the greatest effect observed at D2, concomitantly with the occurrence of AMS. The LV early filling impairments resulted from an increased RV afterload, a decrease in LV filling pressure and a delayed LV untwist. However, the increased LV twist probably acted as a compensatory mechanism to maintain cardiac performance during high-altitude hypoxia.

  12. Antioxidant and oxidative stress responses of sojourners at high altitude in different climatic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sanchari; Singh, Som Nath; Saha, Mantu; Kain, T. C.; Tyagi, A. K.; Ray, Uday Sankar

    2010-01-01

    High altitude (HA) is a multi-stressor environment comprising hypobaric hypoxia and cold. Climatic temperature varies with seasonal variation at HA. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ambient temperature on antioxidant profile among sojourners at HA. The study was conducted on sojourners exposed to an altitude of 4,560 m in two different seasons and categorized into two groups (SOJ 1, n = 63, ambient temp. at HA: -6º to +10ºC; SOJ 2, n = 81, ambient temp. at HA: 3º-22ºC). Blood was collected at sea level (SL) and after 4 weeks of HA exposure. Antioxidant enzymes showed significant upregulation in SOJ 2 at HA. In SOJ 1, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase showed significant upregulation but catalase and glutathione reductase showed significant decrease at HA. Non-enzymatic antioxidants showed significant reduction in SOJ 1 whereas a sustained antioxidant profile was observed in SOJ 2 at HA. Oxidative stress markers showed higher levels in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2 at HA. Differences observed between SOJ 1 and SOJ 2 at HA may be the consequence of different environmental temperatures. Cold stress was higher in SOJ 1 as evidenced from the significantly lower oral temperature in SOJ 1 as compared to SOJ 2. Cold- and hypoxia-induced increase in energy expenditure was significantly high in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2. To conclude, chronic exposure to hypoxia in moderate climatic temperature has a potential preconditioning effect on antioxidant system, but exposure to both cold and hypoxia causes greater oxidative stress due to altered metabolic rate.

  13. The physiology of extremes: Ancel Keys and the International High Altitude Expedition of 1935.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Sarah W

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the International High Altitude Expedition of 1935 and its significance in the life and science of Ancel Keys. Both the expedition and Keys's story afford excellent opportunities to explore the growing reach of interwar physiology into extreme climates-whether built or natural. As IHAE scientists assessed human performance and adaptation to hypoxia, low barometric pressure, and cold, they not only illuminated the physiological and psychological processes of high altitude acclimatization, but they also drew borderlines between the normal and the pathological, paved the way for the neocolonial exploitation of natural and human resources in Latin America, and pioneered field methods in physiology that were adapted and adopted by the Allied Forces during the Second World War. This case study in the physiology of place reveals the power and persistence of environmental determinism within biomedicine well into the twentieth century.

  14. EP300 contributes to high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans by regulating nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wang-Shan; He, Yao-Xi; Cui, Chao-Ying; Ouzhu, Luobu; Deji, Quzong; Peng, Yi; Bai, Cai-Juan; Duoji, Zhuoma; Gongga, Lanzi; Bian, Ba; Baima, Kangzhuo; Pan, Yong-Yue; Qu, la; Kang, Min; Ciren, Yangji; Baima, Yangji; Guo, Wei; Yang, la; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Guo, Yong-Bo; Xu, Shu-Hua; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Sheng-Guo; Cai, Yuan; Liu, Shi-Ming; Wu, Tian-Yi; Qi, Xue-Bin; Su, Bing

    2017-05-18

    The genetic adaptation of Tibetans to high altitude hypoxia likely involves a group of genes in the hypoxic pathway, as suggested by earlier studies. To test the adaptive role of the previously reported candidate gene EP300 (histone acetyltransferase p300), we conducted resequencing of a 108.9 kb gene region of EP300 in 80 unrelated Tibetans. The allele-frequency and haplotype-based neutrality tests detected signals of positive Darwinian selection on EP300 in Tibetans, with a group of variants showing allelic divergence between Tibetans and lowland reference populations, including Han Chinese, Europeans, and Africans. Functional prediction suggested the involvement of multiple EP300 variants in gene expression regulation. More importantly, genetic association tests in 226 Tibetans indicated significant correlation of the adaptive EP300 variants with blood nitric oxide (NO) concentration. Collectively, we propose that EP300 harbors adaptive variants in Tibetans, which might contribute to high-altitude adaptation through regulating NO production.

  15. Comparison of Live High: Train Low Altitude and Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Humberstone-Gough, Clare E.; Saunders, Philo U.; Bonetti, Darrell L.; Stephens, Shaun; Bullock, Nicola; Anson, Judith M.; Gore, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Live High:Train Low (LHTL) altitude training is a popular ergogenic aid amongst athletes. An alternative hypoxia protocol, acute (60-90 min daily) Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure (IHE), has shown potential for improving athletic performance. The aim of this study was to compare directly the effects of LHTL and IHE on the running and blood characteristics of elite triathletes. Changes in total haemoglobin mass (Hbmass), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), velocity at VO2max (vVO2max), time to exhaustion (TTE), running economy, maximal blood lactate concentration ([La]) and 3 mM [La] running speed were compared following 17 days of LHTL (240 h of hypoxia), IHE (10.2 h of hypoxia) or Placebo treatment in 24 Australian National Team triathletes (7 female, 17 male). There was a clear 3.2 ± 4.8% (mean ± 90% confidence limits) increase in Hbmass following LHTL compared with Placebo, whereas the corresponding change of -1.4 ± 4.5% in IHE was unclear. Following LHTL, running economy was 2.8 ± 4.4% improved compared to IHE and 3mM [La] running speed was 4.4 ± 4.5% improved compared to Placebo. After IHE, there were no beneficial changes in running economy or 3mM [La] running speed compared to Placebo. There were no clear changes in VO2max, vVO2max and TTE following either method of hypoxia. The clear difference in Hbmass response between LHTL and IHE indicated that the dose of hypoxia in IHE was insufficient to induce accelerated erythropoiesis. Improved running economy and 3mM [La] running speed following LHTL suggested that this method of hypoxic exposure may enhance performance at submaximal running speeds. Overall, there was no evidence to support the use of IHE in elite triathletes. Key Points Despite a clear 3.2% increase in haemoglobin mass following 17 days of Live High: Train Low altitude training, no change in maximal aerobic capacity was observed. There were positive changes in running economy and the lactate-speed relationship at submaximal running speeds

  16. Gene expression variations in high-altitude adaptation: a case study of the Asiatic toad (Bufo gargarizans).

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizhao; Qi, Yin; Lu, Bin; Qiao, Liang; Wu, Yayong; Fu, Jinzhong

    2017-07-03

    Genome-wide investigation of molecular mechanisms for high-altitude adaptation has attracted great attention in the last few years. In order to understand the contribution of gene expression level variations to high-altitude adaptation in Asiatic toads (Bufo gargarizans), we implemented a reciprocal transplant experiment between low- and high-altitude sites and sequenced 12 transcriptomes from brain, heart, and liver tissues. A large number of genes with expression differences (DEGs) between high- and low-altitude individuals (193 fixed and 844 plastic) were identified, and the majority of them were tissue specific. Heart displayed the largest number of DEGs, both plastic and fixed. Fixed DEGs were particularly concentrated in functions associated with muscle contraction, and the majority of them were down-regulated in high-altitude individuals. Plastic DEGs were highly concentrated in several energy metabolism related functional categories, and the majority of them were also down-regulated at high-altitude environments. In liver samples, genes associated with nutrient metabolism experienced a broad-scale expression down-regulation in high-altitude toads. These broadly suppressed expression patterns at high altitudes are in strong contrast to those of endothermic homeotherms, suggesting poikilothermic vertebrates may have adopted different strategies at high altitudes. Our results strongly support that both genotypic specialization and phenotypic plasticity play crucial role in adaptation to high altitude for Asiatic toads. Poikilothermic vertebrates are among the most hypoxia-tolerant animals known, and many molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We hope that our results will provide useful directions for future research.

  17. Intraocular pressure changes during high-altitude acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Pavlidis, Mitrofanis; Stupp, Tobias; Georgalas, Ilias; Georgiadou, Evi; Moschos, Michail; Thanos, Solon

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between hypobaric hypoxia acclimatization and intraocular pressure (IOP) during ascent, acclimatization, and descent between 2286 m and 5050 m. The following acclimatization-indicative physiological parameters were compared daily with IOP changes in eight healthy climbers of the 2003 Greek Karakorum expedition in altitude stages between 500 m and 5050 m: hemoglobin oxygen saturation (PO2), resting heart rate, blood pressure, retinal findings, and the Lake Louise score for acclimatization grading. IOP decreased significantly in the ascent phase (0.58 mmHg/100 m) and recovered (0.71 mmHg/100 m) during acclimatization and descent. A direct proportional correlation between decreases in PO2 and IOP was evaluated. Arterial blood pulse and pressure increased during acclimatization, while IOP decreased. No retinal hemorrhages were observed in well-acclimatized and incompletely acclimatized climbers. Every new active exposure to hypobaric hypoxia in the ascent phase induced a decrease in the IOP parallel to the PO2 decrease and to the level of acclimatization. The results from our study suggest that IOP changes are related to hypoxia-induced respiratory alkalosis and acclimatization stage, which could be used as a simple mobile screening test for acclimatization level to reveal acute mountain sickness and its severe consequences.

  18. Fertility of a high-altitude sheep model is compromised by deficiencies in both preovulatory follicle development and plasma LH availability.

    PubMed

    Parraguez, V H; Diaz, F; Cofré, E; Urquieta, B; De Los Reyes, M; Astiz, S; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2014-12-01

    At high altitude, hypoxia and/or oxidative stress may compromise fertility. This study tested the relative effect of short- or long-term exposure to high-altitude hypobaric hypoxia and oxidative stress in sheep on preovulatory follicle dynamics and gonadotrophin secretion. Thus, growth dynamics, stereidogenic function and competence to ovulate of preovulatory follicles, as well as FSH and LH availability throughout the entire oestrous cycle, were compared among sheep native from low and high altitude, and sheep newcomers to high altitude. The results indicates that short-term exposure in sheep newcomers to high altitude has a deleterious effect on both the ovarian function (affecting preovulatory follicular development) and the pituitary function (diminishing plasma LH availability). On the other hand, there were no detected differences in the preovulatory follicular development in sheep adapted to high altitude for generations and, conversely, LH secretion was increased, which suggests an adaptive mechanism. The treatment with antioxidant agents during a relative short period for the time of folliculogenesis (approximately 1 month and a half) changed substantially the development of preovulatory follicles in short-term exposed sheep to similar patterns than in sheep native and living to both high and low altitude. These results highlight the role of oxidative stress in the detriment of the reproductive function in individuals recently exposed to high-altitude hypoxic environment.

  19. Non-high altitude methods for rapid screening of susceptibility to acute mountain sickness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute mountain sickness (AMS) refers to the cerebral abnormalities typically triggered by exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude. Although AMS is not often life threatening, it can seriously impact health quality and decrease productivity. Thus, detection of potential susceptibility to AMS has become important for people arriving at high-altitude plateaus for the first time, including laborers and military staff. The aim of this review was to examine techniques which efficiently assess the susceptibility to AMS prior to exposure to high altitude. Methods By searching online databases, we retrieved studies with associations between AMS and methods to detect the susceptible people who were not exposed to high altitudes. Studies reporting significant correlation coefficients between screening methods and AMS scores were included. Results Several screening techniques of AMS susceptibility were found including cold pressor test, heart rate variability, and lung functions. Of these markers, heart rate variability was positively associated with AMS scores, while the rest were negatively associated with AMS scores. Conclusions We identified three physiological markers that were significantly associated with the risk of AMS. Although it is well known that simple sea level tests are not really helpful in predicting AMS currently, these markers, to some degree, may be employed as references in predicting susceptibility. PMID:24079477

  20. Oxygen enrichment and its application to life support systems for workers in high-altitude areas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongling; Liu, Yingshu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workers coming from lowland regions are at risk of developing acute mountain sickness (AMS) when working in low oxygen high-altitude areas. Objectives: The aim of this study was to improve the conditions that lead to hypoxia and ensure the safety of the high-altitude workers. We analyzed the influence of low atmospheric pressure on the oxygen enrichment process in high-altitude areas using an engineering method called low-pressure swing adsorption (LPSA). Methods: Fourteen male subjects were screened and divided into three groups by type of oxygen supply system used: (1) oxygen cylinder group; (2) LPSA oxygen dispersal group; and (3) control group. These tests included arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), pulse rate (PR), breaths per minute (BPM), and blood pressure (BP). Results: The results showed that after supplying oxygen using the LPSA method at the tunnel face, the SaO2 of workers increased; the incidence of acute mountain sickness, PR, and BPM significantly decreased. Conclusions: The LPSA life support system was found to be a simple, convenient, efficient, reliable, and applicable approach to ensure proper working conditions at construction sites in high-altitude areas. PMID:25000108

  1. Oxygen enrichment and its application to life support systems for workers in high-altitude areas.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongling; Liu, Yingshu

    2014-01-01

    Workers coming from lowland regions are at risk of developing acute mountain sickness (AMS) when working in low oxygen high-altitude areas. The aim of this study was to improve the conditions that lead to hypoxia and ensure the safety of the high-altitude workers. We analyzed the influence of low atmospheric pressure on the oxygen enrichment process in high-altitude areas using an engineering method called low-pressure swing adsorption (LPSA). Fourteen male subjects were screened and divided into three groups by type of oxygen supply system used: (1) oxygen cylinder group; (2) LPSA oxygen dispersal group; and (3) control group. These tests included arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), pulse rate (PR), breaths per minute (BPM), and blood pressure (BP). The results showed that after supplying oxygen using the LPSA method at the tunnel face, the SaO2 of workers increased; the incidence of acute mountain sickness, PR, and BPM significantly decreased. The LPSA life support system was found to be a simple, convenient, efficient, reliable, and applicable approach to ensure proper working conditions at construction sites in high-altitude areas.

  2. Autonomic responses of high-altitude natives during sojourn at plains and on return to altitude.

    PubMed

    Selvamurthy, W; Saxena, R K; Krishnamurthy, N; Nayar, H S

    1981-06-01

    The study was conducted on 20 high-altitude natives (HAN-I) 19-32 years old, to evaluate the changes in autonomic responses during their 2-months sojourn on the plains, and on return to high altitude (HA). The autonomic indices measured were heart rate HR), blood pressure (BP), oral temperature (Tor), mean skin temperature (Tsk), respiratory rate (RR), Cold pressor response (CPR), HR-response to tilt at 70 degree, and alpha index (AI) of EEG (occipital). These indices were recorded periodically during the 2 months of their stay on the plains, and thereafter on return to altitude for a period of 1 month. For comparison, the same responses were studied on 10 lowlanders (LL) on the plains and on induction to HA along with HAN-I. The study was repeated at altitude, once on 10 HAN who had never been to the plains (HAN-II) and on 10 acclimatised lowlanders. The results suggest that the relative parasympathetic dominance observed in natives at HA showed a gradual decrease during their sojourn on the plains, probably due to the elevation in sympathetic activity. On return to high altitude, they showed further increase in sympathetic excitation, as observed in LL on acute induction, but the magnitude of this response was less in natives. However, they showed a trend to faster return of autonomic responses to their initial level compared to LL.

  3. Does High Alveolar Fluid Reabsorption Prevent HAPE in Individuals with Exaggerated Pulmonary Hypertension in Hypoxia?

    PubMed

    Betz, Theresa; Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter; Schommer, Kai; Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2015-12-01

    An exaggerated increase in pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAsP) is a highlight of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). However, the incidence of HAPE at 4559 m was much lower in altitude-naïve individuals with exaggerated pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in normobaric hypoxia than in known HAPE-susceptibles, indicating that elevated PAsP alone is insufficient to induce HAPE. A decreased nasal potential difference (NPD) has been found in HAPE-susceptibles, where, based on animal models, NPD serves as surrogate of alveolar epithelial ion transport. We hypothesize that those HAPE-resistant individuals with high HPV may be protected by elevated alveolar Na and fluid reabsorption, which might be detected as increased NPD. To test this hypothesis, we measured NPD in normoxia of subjects who were phenotyped in previous studies as high altitude tolerant (controls), known HAPE-susceptibles with high HPV (HP+HAPE), as well as individuals with high HPV but without HAPE (HP-no-HAPE) at 4559 m. NPD and amiloride-sensitive NPD were lower in HP+HAPE than in controls, whereas HP-no-HAPE were not different from either group. There were no differences in Cl-transport between groups. Our results show low nasal ion transport in HAPE but higher transport in those individuals with the highest HPV but without HAPE. This indicates that in some individuals with high PAsP at high altitude high alveolar fluid reabsorption might protect them from HAPE.

  4. Aging, High Altitude, and Blood Pressure: A Complex Relationship.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Torlasco, Camilla; Salvi, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Bilo, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    Parati, Gianfranco, Juan Eugenio Ochoa, Camilla Torlasco, Paolo Salvi, Carolina Lombardi, and Grzegorz Bilo. Aging, high altitude, and blood pressure: A complex relationship. High Alt Biol Med 16:97-109, 2015.--Both aging and high altitude exposure may induce important changes in BP regulation, leading to significant increases in BP levels. By inducing atherosclerotic changes, stiffening of large arteries, renal dysfunction, and arterial baroreflex impairment, advancing age may induce progressive increases in systolic BP levels, promoting development and progression of arterial hypertension. It is also known, although mainly from studies in young or middle-aged subjects, that exposure to high altitude may influence different mechanisms involved in BP regulation (i.e., neural central and reflex control of sympathetic activity), leading to important increases in BP levels. The evidence is less clear, however, on whether and to what extent advancing age may influence the BP response to acute or chronic high altitude exposure. This is a question not only of scientific interest but also of practical relevance given the consistent number of elderly individuals who are exposed for short time periods (either for leisure or work) or live permanently at high altitude, in whom arterial hypertension is frequently observed. This article will review the evidence available on the relationship between aging and blood pressure levels at high altitude, the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this complex association, as well as some questions of practical interest regarding antihypertensive treatment in elderly subjects, and the effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure response during high altitude exposure.

  5. Travel to high altitude with pre-existing lung disease.

    PubMed

    Luks, A M; Swenson, E R

    2007-04-01

    The pathophysiology of high-altitude illnesses has been well studied in normal individuals, but little is known about the risks of high-altitude travel in patients with pre-existing lung disease. Although it would seem self-evident that any patient with lung disease might not do well at high altitude, the type and severity of disease will determine the likelihood of difficulty in a high-altitude environment. The present review examines whether these individuals are at risk of developing one of the main forms of acute or chronic high-altitude illness and whether the underlying lung disease itself will get worse at high elevations. Several groups of pulmonary disorders are considered, including obstructive, restrictive, vascular, control of ventilation, pleural and neuromuscular diseases. Attempts will be made to classify the risks faced by each of these groups at high altitude and to provide recommendations regarding evaluation prior to high-altitude travel, advice for or against taking such excursions, and effective prophylactic measures.

  6. Improving oxygenation at high altitude: acclimatization and O2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2003-01-01

    When lowlanders go to high altitude, the resulting oxygen deprivation impairs mental and physical performance, quality of sleep, and general well-being. This paper compares the effects of ventilatory acclimatization and oxygen enrichment of room air on the improvement of oxygenation as judged by the increase in the alveolar P(O2) and the reduction in equivalent altitude. The results show that, on the average, complete ventilatory acclimatization at an altitude of 5000 m increases the alveolar P(O2) by nearly 8 torr, which corresponds to a reduction in equivalent altitude of about 1000 m, although there is considerable individual variability. By comparison, oxygen enrichment to 27% at 5000 m can easily reduce the equivalent altitude to 3200 m, which is generally well tolerated. Because full ventilatory acclimatization at altitudes up to about 3600 m reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3000 m, oxygen enrichment is not justified for well-acclimatized persons. At an altitude of 4200 m, where several telescopes are located on the summit of Mauna Kea, full acclimatization reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3400 m, but the pattern of commuting probably would not allow this. Therefore, at this altitude, oxygen enrichment would be beneficial but is not essential. At higher altitudes such as 5050 m, where other telescopes are located or planned, the gain in oxygenation from acclimatization is insufficient to produce an adequate mental or physical performance for most work, and oxygen enrichment is highly desirable. Full ventilatory acclimatization requires at least a week of continuous exposure, although much of the improvement is seen in the first 2 days.

  7. Widespread Signals of Convergent Adaptation to High Altitude in Asia and America

    PubMed Central

    Foll, Matthieu; Gaggiotti, Oscar E.; Daub, Josephine T.; Vatsiou, Alexandra; Excoffier, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Living at high altitude is one of the most difficult challenges that humans had to cope with during their evolution. Whereas several genomic studies have revealed some of the genetic bases of adaptations in Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian populations, relatively little evidence of convergent evolution to altitude in different continents has accumulated. This lack of evidence can be due to truly different evolutionary responses, but it can also be due to the low power of former studies that have mainly focused on populations from a single geographical region or performed separate analyses on multiple pairs of populations to avoid problems linked to shared histories between some populations. We introduce here a hierarchical Bayesian method to detect local adaptation that can deal with complex demographic histories. Our method can identify selection occurring at different scales, as well as convergent adaptation in different regions. We apply our approach to the analysis of a large SNP data set from low- and high-altitude human populations from America and Asia. The simultaneous analysis of these two geographic areas allows us to identify several candidate genome regions for altitudinal selection, and we show that convergent evolution among continents has been quite common. In addition to identifying several genes and biological processes involved in high-altitude adaptation, we identify two specific biological pathways that could have evolved in both continents to counter toxic effects induced by hypoxia. PMID:25262650

  8. Effect of high altitude on sensitivity to the taste of phenylthiocarbamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. B.; Chatterjee, A.; Panjwani, U.; Yadav, D. K.; Selvamurthy, W.; Sharma, K. N.

    Sensitivity to the taste of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) was studied using the Harris-Kalmus method in healthy human volunteers at sea level and then subsequently at an altitude of 3500 m over a period of 3 weeks, after which they were brought back to sea level. Blood sugar, insulin and blood cortisol levels were estimated weekly. The results indicated that, out of 51 subjects studied, 26 (55%) were PTC tasters at sea level. Eight of those unable to taste PTC at sea level tested as tasters at high altitude, and 2 of them reverted to being non-tasters on return to sea level. In the blood, an increase in cortisol and blood insulin levels was seen without any significant change in sugar levels. All the changes recorded at high altitude tended to return to basal values after re-induction to sea level. The study suggests that high-altitude hypoxia in some way, possibly involving changes in hormonal profile among other factors, causes an alteration in sensitivity to the taste of PTC, resulting in some of the individuals shifting to lower PTC sensitivity.

  9. Peripheral blood lymphocytes: a model for monitoring physiological adaptation to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Mariggiò, Maria A; Falone, Stefano; Morabito, Caterina; Guarnieri, Simone; Mirabilio, Alessandro; Pilla, Raffaele; Bucciarelli, Tonino; Verratti, Vittore; Amicarelli, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    Depending on the absolute altitude and the duration of exposure, a high altitude environment induces various cellular effects that are strictly related to changes in oxidative balance. In this study, we used in vitro isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes as biosensors to test the effect of hypobaric hypoxia on seven climbers by measuring the functional activity of these cells. Our data revealed that a 21-day exposure to high altitude (5000 m) (1) increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, (2) caused a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and (3) despite possible transient increases in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, did not significantly change the antioxidant and/or oxidative damage-related status in lymphocytes and serum, assessed by measuring Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase activity, vitamin levels, and oxidatively modified proteins and lipids. Overall, these results suggest that high altitude might cause an impairment in adaptive antioxidant responses. This, in turn, could increase the risk of oxidative-stress-induced cellular damage. In addition, this study corroborates the use of peripheral blood lymphocytes as an easily handled model for monitoring adaptive response to environmental challenge.

  10. Widespread signals of convergent adaptation to high altitude in Asia and america.

    PubMed

    Foll, Matthieu; Gaggiotti, Oscar E; Daub, Josephine T; Vatsiou, Alexandra; Excoffier, Laurent

    2014-10-02

    Living at high altitude is one of the most difficult challenges that humans had to cope with during their evolution. Whereas several genomic studies have revealed some of the genetic bases of adaptations in Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian populations, relatively little evidence of convergent evolution to altitude in different continents has accumulated. This lack of evidence can be due to truly different evolutionary responses, but it can also be due to the low power of former studies that have mainly focused on populations from a single geographical region or performed separate analyses on multiple pairs of populations to avoid problems linked to shared histories between some populations. We introduce here a hierarchical Bayesian method to detect local adaptation that can deal with complex demographic histories. Our method can identify selection occurring at different scales, as well as convergent adaptation in different regions. We apply our approach to the analysis of a large SNP data set from low- and high-altitude human populations from America and Asia. The simultaneous analysis of these two geographic areas allows us to identify several candidate genome regions for altitudinal selection, and we show that convergent evolution among continents has been quite common. In addition to identifying several genes and biological processes involved in high-altitude adaptation, we identify two specific biological pathways that could have evolved in both continents to counter toxic effects induced by hypoxia.

  11. Effect of high altitude on sensitivity to the taste of phenylthiocarbamide.

    PubMed

    Singh, S B; Chatterjee, A; Panjwani, U; Yadav, D K; Selvamurthy, W; Sharma, K N

    2000-05-01

    Sensitivity to the taste of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) was studied using the Harris-Kalmus method in healthy human volunteers at sea level and then subsequently at an altitude of 3500 m over a period of 3 weeks, after which they were brought back to sea level. Blood sugar, insulin and blood cortisol levels were estimated weekly. The results indicated that, out of 51 subjects studied, 26 (55%) were PTC tasters at sea level. Eight of those unable to taste PTC at sea level tested as tasters at high altitude, and 2 of them reverted to being non-tasters on return to sea level. In the blood, an increase in cortisol and blood insulin levels was seen without any significant change in sugar levels. All the changes recorded at high altitude tended to return to basal values after re-induction to sea level. The study suggests that high-altitude hypoxia in some way, possibly involving changes in hormonal profile among other factors, causes an alteration in sensitivity to the taste of PTC, resulting in some of the individuals shifting to lower PTC sensitivity.

  12. Accuracy of Handheld Blood Glucose Meters at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Suzanna T.; Fokkert, Marion J.; Dikkeschei, Bert D.; Rienks, Rienk; Bilo, Karin M.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to increasing numbers of people with diabetes taking part in extreme sports (e.g., high-altitude trekking), reliable handheld blood glucose meters (BGMs) are necessary. Accurate blood glucose measurement under extreme conditions is paramount for safe recreation at altitude. Prior studies reported bias in blood glucose measurements using different BGMs at high altitude. We hypothesized that glucose-oxidase based BGMs are more influenced by the lower atmospheric oxygen pressure at altitude than glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs. Methodology/Principal Findings Glucose measurements at simulated altitude of nine BGMs (six glucose dehydrogenase and three glucose oxidase BGMs) were compared to glucose measurement on a similar BGM at sea level and to a laboratory glucose reference method. Venous blood samples of four different glucose levels were used. Moreover, two glucose oxidase and two glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs were evaluated at different altitudes on Mount Kilimanjaro. Accuracy criteria were set at a bias <15% from reference glucose (when >6.5 mmol/L) and <1 mmol/L from reference glucose (when <6.5 mmol/L). No significant difference was observed between measurements at simulated altitude and sea level for either glucose oxidase based BGMs or glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs as a group phenomenon. Two GDH based BGMs did not meet set performance criteria. Most BGMs are generally overestimating true glucose concentration at high altitude. Conclusion At simulated high altitude all tested BGMs, including glucose oxidase based BGMs, did not show influence of low atmospheric oxygen pressure. All BGMs, except for two GDH based BGMs, performed within predefined criteria. At true high altitude one GDH based BGM had best precision and accuracy. PMID:21103399

  13. Accuracy of handheld blood glucose meters at high altitude.

    PubMed

    de Mol, Pieter; Krabbe, Hans G; de Vries, Suzanna T; Fokkert, Marion J; Dikkeschei, Bert D; Rienks, Rienk; Bilo, Karin M; Bilo, Henk J G

    2010-11-12

    Due to increasing numbers of people with diabetes taking part in extreme sports (e.g., high-altitude trekking), reliable handheld blood glucose meters (BGMs) are necessary. Accurate blood glucose measurement under extreme conditions is paramount for safe recreation at altitude. Prior studies reported bias in blood glucose measurements using different BGMs at high altitude. We hypothesized that glucose-oxidase based BGMs are more influenced by the lower atmospheric oxygen pressure at altitude than glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs. Glucose measurements at simulated altitude of nine BGMs (six glucose dehydrogenase and three glucose oxidase BGMs) were compared to glucose measurement on a similar BGM at sea level and to a laboratory glucose reference method. Venous blood samples of four different glucose levels were used. Moreover, two glucose oxidase and two glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs were evaluated at different altitudes on Mount Kilimanjaro. Accuracy criteria were set at a bias <15% from reference glucose (when >6.5 mmol/L) and <1 mmol/L from reference glucose (when <6.5 mmol/L). No significant difference was observed between measurements at simulated altitude and sea level for either glucose oxidase based BGMs or glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs as a group phenomenon. Two GDH based BGMs did not meet set performance criteria. Most BGMs are generally overestimating true glucose concentration at high altitude. At simulated high altitude all tested BGMs, including glucose oxidase based BGMs, did not show influence of low atmospheric oxygen pressure. All BGMs, except for two GDH based BGMs, performed within predefined criteria. At true high altitude one GDH based BGM had best precision and accuracy.

  14. Optimal birthweights in Peruvian populations at high and low altitudes.

    PubMed

    Beall, C M

    1981-11-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that optimum birthweight for survival is lower among hospital-born infants in Puno, Peru (altitude 3860 m) than that among their counterparts at low altitude in Tacna, Peru (altitude 600 m). The data are derived from hospital birth records for 1971 and 1972 and municipal death records for 1971 through 1973. Linking these records permits analysis of the patterns of mortality in relation to birthweight. Stabilizing selection upon birthweight is operating in both populations. The high altitude population has a lower mean birthweight and a lower optimal birthweight. The Puno population is closer to its optimal birthweight distribution and, as a result of mortality during infancy, is approaching its optimum birthweight distribution for survival more rapidly than the Tacna population. It appears that the high altitude Puno population may well be adapted to its environment in the sense that there is less selective mortality on birthweight phenotypes.

  15. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  16. Autonomic cardiovascular responses in acclimatized lowlanders on prolonged stay at high altitude: a longitudinal follow up study.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Priyanka; Sharma, Vijay K; Hota, Kalpana B; Das, Saroj K; Hota, Sunil K; Srivastava, Ravi B; Singh, Shashi B

    2014-01-01

    Acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude is reported to cause sympathetic dominance that may contribute to the pathophysiology of high altitude illnesses. The effect of prolonged stay at high altitude on autonomic functions, however, remains to be explored. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating the effect of high altitude on autonomic neural control of cardiovascular responses by monitoring heart rate variability (HRV) during chronic hypobaric hypoxia. Baseline electrocardiography (ECG) data was acquired from the volunteers at mean sea level (MSL) (<250 m) in Rajasthan. Following induction of the study population to high altitude (4500-4800 m) in Ladakh region, ECG data was acquired from the volunteers after 6 months (ALL 6) and 18 months of induction (ALL 18). Out of 159 volunteers who underwent complete investigation during acquisition of baseline data, we have only included the data of 104 volunteers who constantly stayed at high altitude for 18 months to complete the final follow up after 18 months. HRV parameters, physiological indices and biochemical changes in serum were investigated. Our results show sympathetic hyperactivation along with compromise in parasympathetic activity in ALL 6 and ALL 18 when compared to baseline data. Reduction of sympathetic activity and increased parasympathetic response was however observed in ALL 18 when compared to ALL 6. Our findings suggest that autonomic response is regulated by two distinct mechanisms in the ALL 6 and ALL 18. While the autonomic alterations in the ALL 6 group could be attributed to increased sympathetic activity resulting from increased plasma catecholamine concentration, the sympathetic activity in ALL 18 group is associated with increased concentration of serum coronary risk factors and elevated homocysteine. These findings have important clinical implications in assessment of susceptibility to cardio-vascular risks in acclimatized lowlanders staying for prolonged duration at high

  17. Autonomic Cardiovascular Responses in Acclimatized Lowlanders on Prolonged Stay at High Altitude: A Longitudinal Follow Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Priyanka; Sharma, Vijay K.; Hota, Kalpana B.; Das, Saroj K.; Hota, Sunil K.; Srivastava, Ravi B.; Singh, Shashi B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude is reported to cause sympathetic dominance that may contribute to the pathophysiology of high altitude illnesses. The effect of prolonged stay at high altitude on autonomic functions, however, remains to be explored. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating the effect of high altitude on autonomic neural control of cardiovascular responses by monitoring heart rate variability (HRV) during chronic hypobaric hypoxia. Baseline electrocardiography (ECG) data was acquired from the volunteers at mean sea level (MSL) (<250 m) in Rajasthan. Following induction of the study population to high altitude (4500–4800 m) in Ladakh region, ECG data was acquired from the volunteers after 6 months (ALL 6) and 18 months of induction (ALL 18). Out of 159 volunteers who underwent complete investigation during acquisition of baseline data, we have only included the data of 104 volunteers who constantly stayed at high altitude for 18 months to complete the final follow up after 18 months. HRV parameters, physiological indices and biochemical changes in serum were investigated. Our results show sympathetic hyperactivation along with compromise in parasympathetic activity in ALL 6 and ALL 18 when compared to baseline data. Reduction of sympathetic activity and increased parasympathetic response was however observed in ALL 18 when compared to ALL 6. Our findings suggest that autonomic response is regulated by two distinct mechanisms in the ALL 6 and ALL 18. While the autonomic alterations in the ALL 6 group could be attributed to increased sympathetic activity resulting from increased plasma catecholamine concentration, the sympathetic activity in ALL 18 group is associated with increased concentration of serum coronary risk factors and elevated homocysteine. These findings have important clinical implications in assessment of susceptibility to cardio-vascular risks in acclimatized lowlanders staying for prolonged duration at high

  18. Effects of antioxidant vitamins on newborn and placental traits in gestations at high altitude: comparative study in high and low altitude native sheep.

    PubMed

    Parraguez, Víctor H; Atlagich, Miljenko; Araneda, Oscar; García, Carlos; Muñoz, Andrés; De Los Reyes, Mónica; Urquieta, Bessie

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the hypothesis that the effects of hypoxia on sheep pregnancies at high altitude (HA) are mediated by oxidative stress and that antioxidant vitamins may prevent these effects. Both HA native and newcomer ewes were maintained at an altitude of 3,589 m during mating and pregnancy. Control low altitude (LA) native ewes were maintained at sea level. Half of each group received daily oral supplements of vitamins C (500 mg) and E (350 IU) during mating and gestation. Near term, maternal plasma vitamin levels and oxidative stress biomarkers were measured. At delivery, lambs were weighed and measured, and placentas were recovered for macroscopic and microscopic evaluation. Vitamin concentrations in supplemented ewes were two- or threefold greater than in non-supplemented ewes. Plasma carbonyls and malondialdehyde in non-supplemented ewes were consistent with a state of oxidative stress, which was prevented by vitamin supplementation. Vitamin supplementation increased lamb birthweight and cotyledon number in both HA native and newcomer ewes, although placental weight and cotyledon surface were diminished. Placentas from vitamin-supplemented HA ewes were similar to those from ewes at sea level, making these placental traits (weight, number and diameter of cotyledons) similar to those from ewes at sea level. Vitamin supplementation had no effect on LA pregnancies. In conclusion, supplementation with vitamins C and E during pregnancy at HA prevents oxidative stress, improving pregnancy outcomes.

  19. Adaptive genetic changes related to haemoglobin concentration in native high-altitude Tibetans.

    PubMed

    Simonson, T S; Huff, C D; Witherspoon, D J; Prchal, J T; Jorde, L B

    2015-11-01

    What is the topic of this review? Tibetans have genetic adaptations that are hypothesized to underlie the distinct set of traits they exhibit at altitude. What advances does it highlight? Several adaptive signatures in the same genomic regions have been identified among Tibetan populations resident throughout the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Many highland Tibetans exhibit a haemoglobin concentration within the range expected at sea level, and this trait is associated with putatively adaptive regions harbouring the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway genes EGLN1, EPAS1 and PPARA. Precise functional variants at adaptive loci and relationships to physiological traits, beyond haemoglobin concentration, are currently being examined in this population. Some native Tibetan, Andean and Ethiopian populations have lived at altitudes ranging from 3000 to >4000 m above sea level for hundreds of generations and exhibit distinct combinations of traits at altitude. It was long hypothesized that genetic factors contribute to adaptive differences in these populations, and recent advances in genomics provide evidence that some of the strongest signatures of positive selection in humans are those identified in Tibetans. Many of the top adaptive genomic regions highlighted thus far harbour genes related to hypoxia sensing and response. Putatively adaptive copies of three hypoxia-inducible factor pathway genes, EPAS1, EGLN1 and PPARA, are associated with sea-level range, rather than elevated, haemoglobin concentration observed in many Tibetans at high altitude, and recent studies provide insight into some of the precise adaptive variants, timing of adaptive events and functional roles. While several studies in highland Tibetans have converged on a few hypoxia-inducible factor pathway genes, additional candidates have been reported in independent studies of Tibetans located throughout the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Various aspects of adaptive significance have yet to be identified, integrated

  20. Highly Resolved Aerosol Measurements from High Altitude Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1999-01-01

    The University of Denver agreed to develop and fabricate two instruments for the characterization of submicron aerosol. The instruments were to be light weight for use on remotely-piloted aircraft or balloons. The instruments were to provide accurate size measurements of size distributions in the size range from 0.07 to 2 micrometers in diameter and concentration measurements in the size range approximately 0.01 to 2 micrometers in diameter. The instruments constructed under this cooperative agreement respond quite nearly as expected and meet the objective of being light and compact. One has been used for ground based and low altitude studies and the other will be deployed in high altitude studies this winter.

  1. Sleep quality among elderly high-altitude dwellers in Ladakh.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Shinya; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Motonao; Nakajima, Shun; Wada, Taizo; Fujisawa, Michiko; Imai, Hissei; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Chen, Wenling; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2017-03-01

    It has been already known that people who temporarily stay at high altitude may develop insomnia as a symptom of acute mountain sickness. However, much less is known about people living at high altitude. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high altitude environment on sleep quality for the elderly who have been living at high altitude for their whole lives. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Domkhar valley at altitudes of 2800-4200m, Ladakh. Sleep quality was assessed using Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Measurement items include body mass index, blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, timed Up and Go test, oxygen saturation during wakefulness, respiratory function test, Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and so on. The participants were Ladakhi older adults aged 60 years or over (n=112) in Domkhar valley. The participation rate was 65.1% (male: female=47:65, mean age: 71.3 years and 67.9 years, respectively). The prevalence of the high score of ISI (8 or more) was 15.2% (17 out of 112). Altitude of residence was significantly correlated with ISI. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that OKS and altitude of residence were significantly related with ISI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High Resolution ECG for Evaluation of Heart Function During Exposure to Subacute Hypobaric Hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zupet, Petra; Finderle, Zarko; Schlegel, Todd T.; Princi, Tanja; Starc, Vito

    2010-01-01

    High altitude climbing presents a wide spectrum of health risks, including exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Risks are also typically exacerbated by the difficulty in appropriately monitoring for early signs of organ dysfunction in remote areas. We investigated whether high resolution advanced ECG analysis might be helpful as a non-invasive and easy-to-use tool (e.g., instead of Doppler echocardiography) for evaluating early signs of heart overload in hypobaric hypoxia. Nine non-acclimatized healthy trained alpine rescuers (age 43.7 plus or minus 7.3 years) climbed in four days to the altitude of 4,200 m on Mount Ararat. Five-minute high-resolution 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded (Cardiosoft) in each subject at rest in the supine position on different days but at the same time of day at four different altitudes: 400 m (reference altitude), 1,700 m, 3,200 m and 4,200 m. Changes in conventional and advanced resting ECG parameters, including in beat-to-beat QT and RR variability, waveform complexity, signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG was estimated by calculation of the regression coefficients in independent linear regression models. A p-value of less than 0.05 was adopted as statistically significant. As expected, the RR interval and its variability both decreased with increasing altitude, with trends k = -96 ms/1000 m with p = 0.000 and k = -9 ms/1000 m with p = 0.001, respectively. Significant changes were found in P-wave amplitude, which nearly doubled from the lowest to the highest altitude (k = 41.6 microvolt/1000 m with p = 0.000), and nearly significant changes in P-wave duration (k = 2.9 ms/1000 m with p = 0.059). Changes were less significant or non-significant in other studied parameters including those of waveform complexity, signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG. High resolution ECG analysis, particularly of the P wave, shows promise as a tool for monitoring early changes in heart function

  3. Chronic stress of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at high altitude: a field study.

    PubMed

    Hunt von Herbing, I; Pan, T-C F; Méndez-Sánchez, F; Garduño-Paz, M; Hernández-Gallegos, O; Ruiz-Gómez, M L; Rodríguez-Vargas, G

    2015-07-01

    The stress response of Oncorhynchus mykiss in high-altitude farms in central Mexico was investigated over two seasons: the cool (9·1-13·7° C) dry winter season, and the warmer (14·7-15·9° C), wetter summer season. Fish were subjected to an acute stress test followed by sampling of six physiological variables: blood cortisol, glucose, lactate, total antioxidant capacity, haemoglobin concentration and per cent packed cell volume (VPC %). Multivariate analyses revealed that lactate and total antioxidant capacity were significantly higher in the summer, when water temperatures were warmer and moderate hypoxia (4·9-5·3 mg l(-1) ) prevailed. In contrast, plasma cortisol was significantly higher in the winter (mean ± s.e.: 76·7 ± 4·0 ng ml(-1) ) when temperatures were cooler and dissolved oxygen levels higher (6·05-7·9 mg l(-1) ), than in the summer (22·7 ± 3·8 ng ml(-1) ). Haemoglobin concentrations (mg dl(-1) ) were not significantly different between seasons, but VPC % was significantly higher in the summer (50%) than in the winter (35%). These results suggest that in summer, effects of high altitude on farmed fish are exacerbated by stresses of high temperatures and hypoxia, resulting in higher blood lactate, increased total antioxidant capacity and elevated VPC % levels. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  4. The effect of high altitude on nasal nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Altundag, Aytug; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether nasal nitric oxide (nNO) levels change in relation to high altitude in a natural setting where the weather conditions were favorable. The present study included 41 healthy volunteers without a history of acute rhinosinusitis within 3 weeks and nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 males (76 %) and 10 females (24 %) and the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. The volunteers encamped for 2 days in a mountain village at an altitude of 1,500 m above sea level (masl) and proceeded to highlands at an altitude of 2,200 masl throughout the day. The measurements of nNO were done randomly, either first at the mountain village or at sea level. Each participant had nNO values both at sea level and at high altitude at the end of the study. The nNO values of sea level and high altitude were compared to investigate the effect of high altitude on nNO levels. The mean of average nNO measurements at the high altitude was 74.2 ± 41 parts-per-billion (ppb) and the mean of the measurements at sea level was 93.4 ± 45 ppb. The change in nNO depending on the altitude level was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The current investigation showed that nNO levels were decreased at high altitude even if the weather conditions were favorable, such as temperature, humidity, and wind.

  5. Altitude and endurance training.

    PubMed

    Rusko, Heikki K; Tikkanen, Heikki O; Peltonen, Juha E

    2004-10-01

    The benefits of living and training at altitude (HiHi) for an improved altitude performance of athletes are clear, but controlled studies for an improved sea-level performance are controversial. The reasons for not having a positive effect of HiHi include: (1) the acclimatization effect may have been insufficient for elite athletes to stimulate an increase in red cell mass/haemoglobin mass because of too low an altitude (< 2000-2200 m) and/or too short an altitude training period (<3-4 weeks); (2) the training effect at altitude may have been compromised due to insufficient training stimuli for enhancing the function of the neuromuscular and cardiovascular systems; and (3) enhanced stress with possible overtraining symptoms and an increased frequency of infections. Moreover, the effects of hypoxia in the brain may influence both training intensity and physiological responses during training at altitude. Thus, interrupting hypoxic exposure by training in normoxia may be a key factor in avoiding or minimizing the noxious effects that are known to occur in chronic hypoxia. When comparing HiHi and HiLo (living high and training low), it is obvious that both can induce a positive acclimatization effect and increase the oxygen transport capacity of blood, at least in 'responders', if certain prerequisites are met. The minimum dose to attain a haematological acclimatization effect is > 12 h a day for at least 3 weeks at an altitude or simulated altitude of 2100-2500 m. Exposure to hypoxia appears to have some positive transfer effects on subsequent training in normoxia during and after HiLo. The increased oxygen transport capacity of blood allows training at higher intensity during and after HiLo in subsequent normoxia, thereby increasing the potential to improve some neuromuscular and cardiovascular determinants of endurance performance. The effects of hypoxic training and intermittent short-term severe hypoxia at rest are not yet clear and they require further study.

  6. High altitude retinopathy in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Shults, W T; Swan, K C

    1975-06-01

    Retinal hemorrhages appear to be a frequent, though often unappreciated, occurrence in unacclimated climbers experiencing prolonged exposure to altitudes above approximately 3,658 meters (12,000 ft), heights frequently attained by American moutaineers. This condition has not received attention in the ophthalmologic literature, though several reports of retinal and vitreous hemorrhages have appeared in nonophthalmologic journals. Of six surviving members of a climbing expedition of Mt. Aconcagua, four had retinal hemorrhages. Two had permanently disturbed vision with paracentral scotomas plotted on a tangent screen.

  7. Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis Unraveling Transcriptional Regulation of High-Altitude Adaptation of Tibetan Pig

    PubMed Central

    Koltes, James E.; Gou, Xiao; Yang, Shuli; Yan, Dawei; Lu, Shaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan pigs have survived at high altitude for millennia and they have a suite of adaptive features to tolerate the hypoxic environment. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of hypoxia-adaptive phenotypes have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we analyzed differentially expressed genes (DEGs), biological pathways and constructed co-expression regulation networks using whole-transcriptome microarrays from lung tissues of Tibetan and Duroc pigs both at high and low altitude. A total of 3,066 DEGs were identified and this list was over-represented for the ontology terms including metabolic process, catalytic activity, and KEGG pathway including metabolic pathway and PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. The regulatory (RIF) and phenotypic (PIF) impact factor analysis identified several known and several potentially novel regulators of hypoxia adaption, including: IKBKG, KLF6 and RBPJ (RIF1), SF3B1, EFEMP1, HOXB6 and ATF6 (RIF2). These findings provide new details of the regulatory architecture of hypoxia-adaptive genes and also insight into which genes may undergo epigenetic modification for further study in the high-altitude adaptation. PMID:27936142

  8. The lactate paradox revisited in lowlanders during acclimatization to 4100 m and in high-altitude natives

    PubMed Central

    van Hall, G; Lundby, C; Araoz, M; Calbet, J A L; Sander, M; Saltin, B

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia has been proposed to induce a closer coupling in human skeletal muscle between ATP utilization and production in both lowlanders (LN) acclimatizing to high altitude and high-altitude natives (HAN), linked with an improved match between pyruvate availability and its use in mitochondrial respiration. This should result in less lactate being formed during exercise in spite of the hypoxaemia. To test this hypothesis six LN (22–31 years old) were studied during 15 min warm up followed by an incremental bicycle exercise to exhaustion at sea level, during acute hypoxia and after 2 and 8 weeks at 4100 m above sea level (El Alto, Bolivia). In addition, eight HAN (26–37 years old) were studied with a similar exercise protocol at altitude. The leg net lactate release, and the arterial and muscle lactate concentrations were elevated during the exercise in LN in acute hypoxia and remained at this higher level during the acclimatization period. HAN had similar high values; however, at the moment of exhaustion their muscle lactate, ADP and IMP content and Cr/PCr ratio were higher than in LN. In conclusion, sea-level residents in the course of acclimatization to high altitude did not exhibit a reduced capacity for the active muscle to produce lactate. Thus, the lactate paradox concept could not be demonstrated. High-altitude natives from the Andes actually exhibit a higher anaerobic energy production than lowlanders after 8 weeks of acclimatization reflected by an increased muscle lactate accumulation and enhanced adenine nucleotide breakdown. PMID:19139048

  9. Effects of short-term normobaric hypoxia on haematology, muscle phenotypes and physical performance in highly trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Basset, Fabien A; Joanisse, Denis R; Boivin, Frédéric; St-Onge, Josée; Billaut, François; Doré, Jean; Chouinard, Richard; Falgairette, Guy; Richard, Denis; Boulay, Marcel R

    2006-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of short-term normobaric hypoxia on physiology and performance in highly trained athletes. Twelve (7 male and 5 female) athletes were randomly assigned into two groups and spent 8 h per night for two consecutive nights a week over 3 weeks under either short-term normobaric hypoxia (simulating 3636 m altitude, inspired O2=13%) or in normobaric normoxia in a single-blind study. Following a 3 week washout period, athletes were then exposed to the other condition. Athletes were tested for maximal oxygen consumption and time to exhaustion on an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer before and after each treatment in addition to being tested for anaerobic performance (Wingate test) on a modified Monark cycle ergometer. Blood samples were taken throughout the experiment and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were taken before and after each treatment. Increases in red blood cell count, haematocrit, haemoglobin, platelet number and erythropoietin concentration were observed following short-term normobaric hypoxia. Except for a modest decrease in phosphofructokinase activity following short-term normobaric hypoxia, no changes were observed in muscle enzyme activities, buffer capacity, capillary density or morphology. No performance measures were changed following short-term normobaric hypoxia or normobaric normoxia. Although short-term normobaric hypoxia exposure increased levels of a number of haematological parameters, this was not associated with improved aerobic or anaerobic performance in highly trained athletes.

  10. Different gene expressions between cattle and yak provide insights into high-altitude adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Yang, Y; Wang, L; Ma, T; Shang, H; Ding, L; Han, J; Qiu, Q

    2016-02-01

    DNA sequence variation has been widely reported as the genetic basis for adaptation, in both humans and other animals, to the hypoxic environment experienced at high altitudes. However, little is known about the patterns of gene expression underlying such hypoxic adaptations. In this study, we examined the differences in the transcriptomes of four organs (heart, kidney, liver and lung) between yak and cattle, a pair of closely related species distributed at high and low altitudes respectively. Of the four organs examined, heart shows the greatest differentiation between the two species in terms of gene expression profiles. Detailed analyses demonstrated that some genes associated with the oxygen supply system and the defense systems that respond to threats of hypoxia are differentially expressed. In addition, genes with significantly differentiated patterns of expression in all organs exhibited an unexpected uniformity of regulation along with an elevated frequency of nonsynonymous substitutions. This co-evolution of protein sequences and gene expression patterns is likely to be correlated with the optimization of the yak metabolic system to resist hypoxia.

  11. MRI evidence: acute mountain sickness is not associated with cerebral edema formation during simulated high altitude.

    PubMed

    Mairer, Klemens; Göbel, Markus; Defrancesco, Michaela; Wille, Maria; Messner, Hubert; Loizides, Alexander; Schocke, Michael; Burtscher, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common condition among non-acclimatized individuals ascending to high altitude. However, the underlying mechanisms causing the symptoms of AMS are still unknown. It has been suggested that AMS is a mild form of high-altitude cerebral edema both sharing a common pathophysiological mechanism. We hypothesized that brain swelling and consequently AMS development is more pronounced when subjects exercise in hypoxia compared to resting conditions. Twenty males were studied before and after an eight hour passive (PHE) and active (plus exercise) hypoxic exposure (AHE) (F(i)O(2) = 11.0%, P(i)O(2)∼80 mmHg). Cerebral edema formation was investigated with a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner and analyzed by voxel based morphometry (VBM), AMS was assessed using the Lake Louise Score. During PHE and AHE AMS was diagnosed in 50% and 70% of participants, respectively (p>0.05). While PHE slightly increased gray and white matter volume and the apparent diffusion coefficient, these changes were clearly more pronounced during AHE but were unrelated to AMS. In conclusion, our findings indicate that rest and especially exercise in normobaric hypoxia are associated with accumulation of water in the extracellular space, however independent of AMS development. Thus, it is suggested that AMS and HACE do not share a common pathophysiological mechanism.

  12. Defective Tibetan PHD2 binding to p23 links high altitude adaption to altered oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Song, Daisheng; Li, Lin-sheng; Arsenault, Patrick R; Tan, Qiulin; Bigham, Abigail W; Heaton-Johnson, Katherine J; Master, Stephen R; Lee, Frank S

    2014-05-23

    The Tibetan population has adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude. Tibetans bear a genetic signature in the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2/EGLN1) gene, which encodes for the central oxygen sensor of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. Recent studies have focused attention on two nonsynonymous coding region substitutions, D4E and C127S, both of which are markedly enriched in the Tibetan population. These amino acids reside in a region of PHD2 that harbors a zinc finger, which we have previously discovered binds to a Pro-Xaa-Leu-Glu (PXLE) motif in the HSP90 cochaperone p23, thereby recruiting PHD2 to the HSP90 pathway to facilitate HIF-α hydroxylation. We herein report that the Tibetan PHD2 haplotype (D4E/C127S) strikingly diminishes the interaction of PHD2 with p23, resulting in impaired PHD2 down-regulation of the HIF pathway. The defective binding to p23 depends on both the D4E and C127S substitutions. We also identify a PXLE motif in HSP90 itself that can mediate binding to PHD2 but find that this interaction is maintained with the D4E/C127S PHD2 haplotype. We propose that the Tibetan PHD2 variant is a loss of function (hypomorphic) allele, leading to augmented HIF activation to facilitate adaptation to high altitude. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Do British commercial mountaineering expeditions carry drugs to treat high altitude illnesses?

    PubMed

    Pattenden, Holly A; Shah, Neeraj M; Hillebrandt, David; Rodger, Mike; Windsor, Jeremy S

    2012-07-01

    High altitude commercial expeditions are increasingly popular. As high altitude illnesses are common on ascent to altitude, this study aimed to ascertain whether medications for these conditions were carried by commercial operators who run high altitude expeditions. Despite recommendations, it appears that drugs to treat high altitude illnesses are not routinely carried by commercial operators. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  14. HOUSTON - EARTH VIEWS - LOW-ALTITUDE - HIGH-ANGLE - TX

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-01-01

    Low-altitude, high-angle view of Houston downtown area. This view was photographed to show convention central part of downtown to promote facilities here for hosting large conventions, etc. 1. JSC PROTOCOL - CONVENTIONS HOUSTON, TX

  15. 33. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL SETTING. October 1982 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 15, Upper Mississipi River (Arsenal Island), Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  16. 13. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL SETTING. October 1982 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 17, Upper Mississippi River, New Boston, Mercer County, IL

  17. 16. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL SETTING - Upper Mississippi River Nine-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam Complex No. 22, Upper Mississippi River, Saverton, Ralls County, MO

  18. A genome wide study of genetic adaptation to high altitude in feral Andean Horses of the páramo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Life at high altitude results in physiological and metabolic challenges that put strong evolutionary pressure on performance due to oxidative stress, UV radiation and other factors dependent on the natural history of the species. To look for genes involved in altitude adaptation in a large herbivore, this study explored genome differentiation between a feral population of Andean horses introduced by the Spanish in the 1500s to the high Andes and their Iberian breed relatives. Results Using allelic genetic models and Fst analyses of ~50 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the horse genome, 131 candidate genes for altitude adaptation were revealed (Bonferoni of p ≤ 2 × 10–7). Significant signals included the EPAS1 in the hypoxia-induction-pathway (HIF) that was previously discovered in human studies (p = 9.27 × 10-8); validating the approach and emphasizing the importance of this gene to hypoxia adaptation. Strong signals in the cytochrome P450 3A gene family (p = 1.5 ×10-8) indicate that other factors, such as highly endemic vegetation in altitude environments are also important in adaptation. Signals in tenuerin 2 (TENM2, p = 7.9 × 10-14) along with several other genes in the nervous system (gene categories representation p = 5.1 × 10-5) indicate the nervous system is important in altitude adaptation. Conclusions In this study of a large introduced herbivore, it becomes apparent that some gene pathways, such as the HIF pathway are universally important for high altitude adaptation in mammals, but several others may be selected upon based on the natural history of a species and the unique ecology of the altitude environment. PMID:24344830

  19. Effects of High Terrestrial Altitude on Military Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-18

    Title Effects of High Terrestrial Altitude on Military Performance Author( s ) Louis E. Banderet and Richard L. Burse Intended for publication in Handbook...34’- <-𔃾 DA UJ 2496 PRIVOUS EDITIONS WILL II USED C . S fnt Effects of High Terrestrial Altitude on Military Performance 1 2 Louis E. Banderet...inadequate oxygen which can ad- versely affect military performance ( Disease threat, 1979; U.S. Army, 1975). Much information of military importance about

  20. Association between MT-CO3 haplotypes and high-altitude adaptation in Tibetan chicken.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Zhong, Hang; Chen, Shi-Yi; Yao, Yong-Gang; Liu, Yi-Ping

    2013-10-15

    Genetic mutation in cytochrome c oxidase subunit III gene (MT-CO3) could influence the kinetics of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), which catalyzes oxygen transport capacity in oxidative phosphorylation. However, the potential relationship between MT-CO3 variants and high-altitude adaptation remains poorly understood in Tibetan chicken. Here, we sequenced MT-CO3 gene of 125 Tibetan chickens and 144 Chinese domestic chickens in areas at a low elevation (below 1,000 m). Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected; and five of them (m.10081A>G, m.10115G>A, m.10270G>A, m.10336A>G and m.10447C>T) shared by Tibetan chicken and lowland chicken with the significant difference in their respective allele frequencies. Nine haplotypes (H1-H9) were finally defined. Among them, haplotype H4 was positively associated with high-altitude adaptation whereas haplotypes H6, H7 and H8 had negative association with high-altitude adaptation. The Median-joining profile suggested that haplotype H5 had the ancestral position to the other haplotypes but had no significant relationship with high-altitude adaptation. However, there was only m.10081A>G mutation differed from haplotype H4 and H5. Results also suggested that chickens with A allele at m.10081A>G, had over 2.6 times than those with G allele in the probability of the ability to adapt hypoxia. It suggests that the synonymous mutation m.10081A>G may be a prerequisite for shaping high-altitude adaptation-specific haplotypes.

  1. Cognitive and neuroimaging changes in healthy immigrants upon relocation to a high altitude: A panel study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jiye; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Wenbin; Qi, Shun; Xu, Hui; Li, Chen; Zhang, Jinsong; Zhao, Haitao; Meng, Shanshan; Li, Dan; Lu, Huanyu; Aschner, Michael; Li, Bin; Yin, Hong; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2017-08-01

    Cognitive and neuroimaging changes under chronic high-altitude exposure have never been followed up and dynamically assessed. To investigate the cognitive and brain structural/functional alterations associated with chronic high-altitude exposure. Sixty-nine college freshmen that were immigrating to Tibet were enrolled and followed up for two years. Neuropsychological tests, including verbal/visual memory and simple/recognition reaction time, were utilized to determine whether the subjects' cognitive function had changed in response to chronic high-altitude exposure. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) were used to quantify brain gray matter (GM) volumes, regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) alterations before and after exposure. Areas with changes in both GM and ReHo were used as seeds in the inter-regional FC analysis. The subjects showed significantly lower accuracy in memory tests and longer reaction times after exposure, and neuroimaging analysis showed markedly decreased GM volumes and ReHo in the left putamen. FC analysis seeding of the left putamen showed significantly weakened FC with the superior temporal gyrus, anterior/middle cingulate gyrus and other brain regions. In addition, decreased ReHo was found in the superior temporal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, anterior cingulate gyrus and medial frontal gyrus, while increased ReHo was found in the hippocampus. Differences in ReHo/FC before and after high-altitude exposure in multiple regions were significantly correlated with the cognitive changes. Cognitive functions such as working memory and psychomotor function are impaired during chronic high-altitude exposure. The putamen may play an important role in chronic hypoxia-induced cognitive impairment. Hum Brain Mapp 38:3865-3877, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Global assessment of high-altitude wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C. L.; Caldeira, K.

    2008-12-01

    Wind speed generally increases with altitude to the tropopause; hence, the power available in high-altitude winds is enormous, especially near the jet streams. We assess for the first time the available wind power resource worldwide at altitudes between 500 and 12,000 m. The highest wind power densities are found near 10,000 m over Japan and eastern China, the eastern coast of the United States, southern Australia, and north-eastern Africa. Below 1000 m, the best locations are the southern tip of South America, the coasts along the northern Pacific and Atlantic oceans, the central-eastern coast of Africa, and the north-eastern coast of South America. Because jet streams vary locally and seasonally, however, the high-altitude wind power resource is less steady than needed for baseload power. However, dynamically reaching the height with the highest winds, increasing the area covered with high-altitude devices, and using batteries for storage can effectively reduce intermittency. When high-altitude wind power devices are distributed uniformly throughout the entire atmosphere, numerical simulations show negligible effects on the global climate for low densities, but surface cooling, decreased precipitation, and greater sea ice cover for high densities.

  3. Effects of high altitude and exercise on marksmanship.

    PubMed

    Tharion, W J; Hoyt, R W; Marlowe, B E; Cymerman, A

    1992-02-01

    The effects of exercise and high altitude (3,700 m to 4,300 m) on marksmanship accuracy and sighting time were quantified in 16 experienced marksmen. Subjects dry-fired a disabled rifle equipped with a laser-based system from a free-standing position. The 2.3-cm circular target was at a distance of 5 m. Marksmanship was assessed under the following conditions: 1) at rest at sea level; 2) immediately after a 21-km run/walk ascent from 1,800 m to 4,300 m elevation; 3) at rest during days 1 to 3 at altitude; 4) at rest during days 14 to 16 at altitude; and 5) immediately after a second ascent after 17 d at altitude. Exercise reduced marksmanship accuracy (p less than 0.05) but did not affect sighting time. Acute altitude exposure reduced marksmanship accuracy, and decreased sighting time (p less than 0.05). However, after residence at altitude, accuracy and sighting time at rest returned to sea level values. Exercise and acute altitude exposure had similar but independent detrimental effects on marksmanship.

  4. Letter to the Editor Reply to commentary by G. Sikri and S. Dua on the article "Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms in hypoxia-related genes and susceptibility to acute high-altitude pulmonary edema" published in Genetics and Molecular Research 14 (3): 11562-11572 to the letter published in Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 15904-15905.

    PubMed

    Wu, L J

    2016-03-24

    The object in this study was a Han Chinese population in Lhasa, with 3658 m in altitude from Chengdu, which has 505 m in altitude by air. Within 24 to 48 h before the subjects arrived in the plateau, they completed a basic situation questionnaire, under the guidance of medical staff. Within 24 to 48 h after they reached the plateau, the subjects completed an acute plateau disease questionnaire. The diagnostic standard of HAPE and the diagnosis of acute plateau disease were adopted by the Lake Louise diagnostic standards in 1991 and the Chinese Medical Association promulgated the domestic diagnostic criteria on the Third National Plateau Medical Academic Seminar. Other diseases that cause acute symptoms of altitude sickness, such as plateau pulmonary edema, plateau cerebral edema, acute respiratory infections and neurosis, were excluded. According to the Lake Louise standard, questionnaire and symptom score values >3 points were diagnosed as HAPE. According to the national standard, the questionnaire and symptom score values >5 points were diagnosed as HAPE. At the present, morbidity of HAPE remains relatively high in China. The research shows that usually in the case of not taking preventive measures, according to the factors such as altitude, speed, and time of arrival, the incidence of HAPE is 30% to 90%. Epidemiological survey shows that HAPE happens at an altitude of 2500 m above the plateau. And an altitude of 3000 m above the plateau of China is occupied 1/6 of the total land area, the population of permanent residents is more than sixty million. We detected the 200 cases who adapted to plateau and the 106 cases of patients with HAPE susceptibility genes SNP locus, and got the key SNP loci of HAPE susceptibility genes. We maked the corresponding gene chip diagnostic kits.

  5. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-04-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  6. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  7. [High altitude retinal hemorrhages in the expeditions to 8,000 meter peaks. A study of 10 cases].

    PubMed

    Botella de Maglia, J; Martínez-Costa, R

    1998-04-04

    Retinal haemorrhages are common at high altitude. Their pathogenesis is unknown. It has been suggested that they are less frequent in sherpas, and that possible predisposing factors might be the abscence of previous high-altitude experience, the extent of the high-altitude hypoxic exposure, polycythemia (because of hyperviscosity), history of cough and Valsalva manoeuvres during the expedition, existence of severe forms of mountain sickness (high-altitude pulmonary oedema and high-altitude cerebral oedema) and use of antiinflammatory drugs. The aim of this study is to know the incidence of retinal haemorrhages in the expeditions to mountains higher than 8.000 m and their relationship to the previously referred possible predisposing factors. Funduscopy was performed on 17 healthy subjects taking part in expeditions to Cho-Oyu (8.201 m) and to Shisha Pangma (8.046 m) and on six of their Nepali coworkers. Retinal haemorrhages were found in 10 of the European (59%) and in none of the Nepali mountaineers (p = 0.019). Other 2 Spanish climbers had tortuosity and engorgment of the retinal veins. No statistical association was found between retinal haemorrhages and maximal altitude attained prior to the expedition, maximal altitude reached during the present expedition, number of nights spent at extreme altitude, weight loss as an expression of chronic exposure to hypoxia, haemoglobin, history of cough or Valsalva manoeuvres during the expedition, existence of severe forms of mountain sickness or use of drugs. These results do not allow us to state that the mentioned factors predispose to high-altitude retinal haemorrhages.

  8. Description of SHARC: The Strategic High-Altitude Radiance Code.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-16

    for Paths from 60 to 300 km altitude in he 2-40 _.m spectral region. It models r-adiation due to NLTE (Non-Local Thermodynamic quilibrium) molecular...2 HIGH-ALTITUDE INFRARED RADIATION CONCEPTS ... ....... 4 2.1 Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium .... ........ 4 2.2 Vibrational Temperature...Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) populations of higher vibrational states are included in the calculation. The equivalent-width, line-by-line LBL

  9. Poor ventilatory response to mild hypoxia may inhibit acclimatization at moderate altitude in elderly patients after carotid surgery.

    PubMed

    Roeggla, G; Roeggla, M; Wagner, A; Laggner, A N

    1995-06-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptors (carotid bodies) are the main sensing organs for hypoxaemia. During carotid surgery, the carotic body in the bifurcation of the common carotid artery is often involved and damaged or destroyed. Animals lose their ability to adapt to high altitude after experimental denervation of the carotid bodies. The objective of our study was to evaluate the ability of human patients to adapt to moderate altitude after single side carotid surgery. Blood gas analysis at rest at 171 m and after car and cable car transport to 1600 m before and after carotid surgery was performed. Mean(s.d.) paO2 decreased insignificantly from 74.8(3.56) at 171 m altitude to 71.6(2.07) at 1600 m (P = n.s.), means(s.d.) paCO2 decreased significantly from 36.2(2.86) to 31.4(2.7) mmHg (P < 0.05) before carotid surgery. Months after surgery, a significant drop in paO2 occurred after identical passive exposure to moderate altitude: mean(s.d.) paCO2 at 171 m 74.4(3.65) mmHg, at 1600 m 65.8(3.70) mmHg (P < 0.01), paCO2 did not change significantly. Mean(s.d.) paCO2 at 171 m: 36.0(2.35), at 1600 m 36.2(2.86) mmHg (P = n.s.). Although the sample investigated was small, after single side carotid surgery patients seem to lose their ability for satisfactory ventilatory response to acute exposure to moderate altitude. This is of possible alpine medical importance.

  10. Extensive Microhemorrhages of the Cerebellar Peduncles After High-Altitude Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline; Hoigné-Perret, Philipp; Kottke, Raimund

    2017-06-01

    Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline, Philipp Hoigné-Perret, and Raimund Kottke. Extensive microhemorrhages of the cerebellar peduncles after high-altitude cerebral edema. High Alt Med Biol. 18:182-184, 2017.-Neuromagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of subjects who suffered from high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) typically shows cerebral microhemorrhages (MH) of the corpus callosum, in particular the splenium, and supratentorial white matter. This is a case report of a 43-year-old male, who suffered from unusually prolonged severe ataxia and amnesia after having been rescued during the ascent to Mount Everest at 6400 m. MRI of the brain 63 days after the incident showed the typical MH in the corpus callosum, but, in addition, extensive MH were found in the middle cerebellar peduncles. These infratentorial MH might reflect the pronounced atactic gait disorder. This case describes the first HACE-associated MH in the cerebellar peduncles in a high-altitude mountaineer indicating a potential vulnerability of infratentorial brain areas to hypobaric hypoxia.

  11. [Effects of exposure to altitude on neuropsychology aspects: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Lemos, Valdir de Aquino; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli Dos; Prado, Juliana Martuscelli da Silva; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Marco Túlio De

    2010-03-01

    Discuss the effects of altitude exposure on neuropsychological functions. We have conducted a literature review using as source indexed articles at Pubmed in the period from 1921 to 2008, using the following key words: 'cognition and hypoxia', 'hypoxia and neuropsychology', 'acute hypoxia', 'chronic hypoxia', and 'acclimatization and hypoxia', as well as specific books on the subject. Acute and chronic effects of Hypoxia can alter many of the neuropsychological functions in different altitudes due to physiological changes resulted by the oxygen (O2) partial decrease that can lead to neuropsychological alterations in individuals exposed to high altitudes. Individuals exposed to high altitudes must use an O2 supplementation and the practice of acclimatization, among other strategy ways that can be used in order to minimize the negative effects of hypoxia on neuropsychological aspects.

  12. Human autonomic activity and its response to acute oxygen supplement after high altitude acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuping; Kennedy, Brian P; Hopkins, Susan R; Bogaard, Harm J; Wagner, Peter D; Ziegler, Michael G

    2002-11-29

    It is well established that after acclimatization at high altitude, many sympathetic pathways are hyperactive yet heart rate (HR) remains unchanged. In this study, we attempted to determine if this unchanged heart rate is due to compensatory mechanisms such as changes in parasympathetic activity or levels of receptors for autonomic neurotransmitters. We also examined the role played by hypoxia in these autonomic adaptations to high altitude. Three experiments were carried out on five healthy lowlanders both at sea level (SL) and after 2 weeks of acclimatization at 3800 m (Post-Ac) with: (a) placebo (control); (b) acute beta-adrenergic receptor blockade by propranolol (PRO), or (c) acute parasympathetic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate (GLY). Compared with SL control values, post-Ac venous norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine increased by 96% (p < 0.001) and 55% (p < 0.05), but epinephrine and HR did not change. PRO resulted in a smaller decrease in HR (bpm) Post-Ac than at SL (15 +/- 6 vs. 21 +/- 6, p < 0.05), while GLY caused a greater increase in HR Post-Ac than at SL (59 +/- 8 vs. 45 +/- 6, p < 0.05). Breathing oxygen at SL concentration while at altitude did not decrease NE, or alter the effect of PRO on HR, but reduced the chronotropic effect of GLY by 14% (p < 0.05). These results suggest that after acclimatization to altitude, increased parasympathetic neurotransmitter release and decreased beta-adenoreceptor activity account for the unchanged HR despite enhanced sympathetic activity. Acute oxygen replacement rapidly counteracted the parasympathetic, but not sympathetic hyperactivity that occurs at high altitude.

  13. Effect of high altitude on protein metabolism in Bolivian children.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, Jose L; Spielvogel, Hilde; Berger, Jacques; Araoz, Mauricio; Lujan, Carmen; Tellez, Wilma; Caceres, Esperanza; Gachon, Pierre; Coudert, Jean; Beaufrere, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    In Bolivia, malnutrition in children is a major health problem that may be caused by inadequate protein, energy, and micronutrient intake; exposure to bacterial and parasitic infections; and life in a multistress environment (high altitude, cold, cosmic radiation, low ambient humidity). However, no data on protein absorption and utilization at high altitude were available. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of altitude on protein metabolism in Bolivian children. We measured protein utilization using leucine labeled with a stable isotope ((13)C) in two groups of healthy prepubertal children matched for age. Group 1 (n = 10) was examined at high altitude (HA) in La Paz (3600 m), and group 2 (n = 10) at low altitude (LA) in Santa Cruz (420 m). The nutritional status did not differ between groups but, as was to be expected, the HA group had higher hemoglobin concentration than the LA group. The children consumed casein that was intrinsically labeled with L-(1-(13)C) leucine and expired (13)CO(2) was analyzed. Samples of expired air were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometer in Clermont-Ferrand. It was found that cumulative leucine oxidation ((13)CO(2)) at 300 min after ingestion was 19.7 +/- 4.9% at HA and 25.2 +/- 3.2% at LA. These results showed that protein absorption and/or utilization is significantly affected by altitude.

  14. SHARP: Subsonic High Altitude Research Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, Todd; Burton, Craig; Cabatan, Aileen; Hermano, Christine; Jones, Tom; Lee, Susan; Radloff, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. Mission one is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.mi. at 100,000 ft with a 2500 lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission, with an altitude of 70,000 ft and an increased payload of 4000 lbs. For the third mission, the aircraft will takeoff at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft carrying a 2500 lb payload, and land at Puerto Montt, Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft with a 1000 lb payload, make an excursion to 120,000 ft, and land at Howard AFB, Panama. Three missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained due to constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. The aircraft need not be manned for all four missions. Three aircraft configurations have been determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements. In the event that a requirement cannot be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  15. Effect of hypoxia by intermittent altitude exposure on semen characteristics and testicular morphology of male rhesus monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, D. K.

    1995-09-01

    Semen characteristics and testicular morphology of rhesus monkeys were studied on exposure to a simulated high altitude of 4411 m for 21 days. There was a partially reversible decrease in the semen volume, sperm count and sperm motility, as well as an elevation of pH and fructose concentration. These changes were associated with degeneration of the germinal epithelium and spermatogenic arrest at the end of third week of exposure which had not recovered even 3 weeks after the exposure.

  16. Periodic breathing and oxygen supplementation in Chilean miners at high altitude (4200m).

    PubMed

    Moraga, Fernando A; Jiménez, Daniel; Richalet, Jean Paul; Vargas, Manuel; Osorio, Jorge

    2014-11-01

    Our objective was to determine the nocturnal ventilatory pattern and characterize the effect of oxygen enrichment on nocturnal ventilatory pattern and sleep quality in miners exposed to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia at 4200m. A total of 16 acclimatized miners were studied. Nocturnal ventilatory pattern (plethysmographic inductance), arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate (pulse oximetry) were performed in 9/16 subjects. Sleep quality at high altitude was assessed by self-questionnaires in 16/16 subjects. All measurements were performed during at least 7h of sleep. Subjects were studied while sleeping at high altitude without (control, C) and with oxygen supplementation (FiO2=0.25, treated, T). Periodic breathing (%) C: 25±18 vs T: 6.6±5.6 (p<0.05), apneas index (no./h) C: 34.9±24.1 vs T: 8.5±6.8 (p<0.05); and sleep quality C: 17.8±3.4 vs T: 12.1±2.2 (p<0.0001) were evaluated. In conclusion, periodic breathing with apneas was present in miners exposed to high altitude for 1 to 4 years and was reduced by treatment with supplementary oxygen.

  17. Dopaminergic metabolism in carotid bodies and high-altitude acclimatization in female rats.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Vincent; Soliz, Jorge; Soria, Ruddy; Pequignot, Jacqueline; Favier, Roland; Spielvogel, Hilde; Pequignot, Jean Marc

    2002-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ovarian steroids stimulate breathing through a dopaminergic mechanism in the carotid bodies. In ovariectomized female rats raised at sea level, domperidone, a peripheral D2-receptor antagonist, increased ventilation in normoxia (minute ventilation = +55%) and acute hypoxia (+32%). This effect disappeared after 10 daily injections of ovarian steroids (progesterone + estradiol). At high altitude (3,600 m, Bolivian Institute for High-Altitude Biology-IBBA, La Paz, Bolivia), neutered females had higher carotid body tyrosine hydroxylase activity (the rate-limiting enzyme for catecholamine synthesis: +129%) and dopamine utilization (+150%), lower minute ventilation (-30%) and hypoxic ventilatory response (-57%), and higher hematocrit (+18%) and Hb concentration (+21%) than intact female rats. Consistent signs of arterial pulmonary hypertension (right ventricular hypertrophy) also appeared in ovariectomized females. None of these parameters was affected by gonadectomy in males. Our results show that ovarian steroids stimulate breathing by lowering a peripheral dopaminergic inhibitory drive. This process may partially explain the deacclimatization of postmenopausal women at high altitude.

  18. Effects of high altitude and cold air exposure on airway inflammation in patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Seys, Sven F; Daenen, Marc; Dilissen, Ellen; Van Thienen, Ruud; Bullens, Dominique M A; Hespel, Peter; Dupont, Lieven J

    2013-10-01

    Eighteen patients with asthma were evaluated during preparation to climb to extreme altitude in order to study the effects of low fractional inspired oxygen (FiO(2)), prolonged exposure to cold air and high altitude on lung function, asthma control and airway inflammation. Spirometry and airway inflammation (fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and induced sputum) were studied under different test conditions: hypoxic (FiO(2)=11%) exercise test, 24-hour cold exposure (-5°C) and before, during and after an expedition that involved climbing the Aconcagua mountain (6965 m). Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and FeNO values were slightly lower (p<0.04) after 1 h of normobaric hypoxia. FEV(1) decreased (p=0.009) after 24-hour cold exposure, accompanied by increased sputum neutrophilia (p<0.01). During the expedition FEV(1) and forced vital capacity decreased (maximum FEV(1) decrease of 12.3% at 4300 m) and asthma symptoms slightly increased. After the expedition the Asthma Control Test score and prebronchodilator FEV(1) were reduced (p<0.02), sputum neutrophil count was increased (p=0.04) and sputum myeloperoxidase levels, sputum interleukin 17 mRNA, serum and sputum vascular endothelial growth factor A levels were significantly higher compared with baseline. Patients with asthma with the lowest oxygen saturation during the hypoxic exercise test were more prone to develop acute mountain sickness. Exposure to environmental conditions at high altitude (hypoxia, exercise, cold) was associated with a moderate loss of asthma control, increased airway obstruction and neutrophilic airway inflammation. The cold temperature is probably the most important contributing factor as 24-hour cold exposure by itself induced similar effects.

  19. Pulmonary vascular responsiveness in rats following neonatal exposure to high altitude or carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, A.; Penney, D.G. Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI )

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of adult and neonatal rats to high altitude increases pulmonary vascular responsiveness during the exposure. A study was undertaken to determine if a short exposure of neonatal rats to either high-altitude or carbon monoxide (CO) hypoxia would cause persistent alterations in pulmonary vascular responsiveness postexposure. One-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were obtained as 16 litters of 10-12 pups each. At 2 days of age, 4 litters were exposed to CO (500 ppm) for 32 days, and 4 litters were exposed to ambient air (AIR) in Detroit (200 m). Another 4 litters were exposed to 3500 m altitude (ALT) in a chamber for 32 days, and 3 litters were exposed to ambient conditions in Fort Collins (CON, 1524 m). After the exposures, all rats were maintained at 1524 m. At 2, 40, 76 and 112 days postexposure, lungs were isolated and perfused with Earle's salt solution (+Ficoll, 4 g%). Pulmonary vascular responsiveness was assessed by dose responses to angiotensin II (AII, 0.025-0.40 [mu]g) and acute hypoxia (3% O[sub 2] for 3 min). AII responses were higher in ALT vs CON rats at 2 and 40 days postexposure, but no differences were noted between CO and AIR rats. Baseline pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure (in isolated lungs) were higher in ALT rats at all four ages compared to the other three groups. Both the ALT and CO rats displayed hypertrophy of the right ventricle (RV) and the left ventricle (LV) at the termination of treatment and elevated hematocrit. LV hypertrophy and polycythemia regressed with time, but RV hypertrophy remained significant in the ALT rats through 112 days postexposure. The results indicate that neonatal exposure to ALT, but no CO, causes a persistent increase in pulmonary vascular responsiveness and RV hypertrophy for at least 112 days after termination of the exposure. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Sleep Disordered Breathing During Live High-Train Low in Normobaric Versus Hypobaric Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Saugy, Jonas J; Schmitt, Laurent; Fallet, Sibylle; Faiss, Raphael; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Bertschi, Mattia; Heinzer, Raphaël; Millet, Grégoire P

    2016-09-01

    Saugy, Jonas J., Laurent Schmitt, Sibylle Fallet, Raphael Faiss, Jean-Marc Vesin, Mattia Bertschi, Raphaël Heinzer, and Grégoire P. Millet. Sleep disordered breathing during live high-train low in normobaric versus hypobaric hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 17:233-238, 2016.-The present study aimed to compare sleep disordered breathing during live high-train low (LHTL) altitude camp using normobaric hypoxia (NH) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH). Sixteen highly trained triathletes completed two 18-day LHTL camps in a crossover designed study. They trained at 1100-1200 m while they slept either in NH at a simulated altitude of 2250 m or in HH. Breathing frequency and oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded continuously during all nights and oxygen desaturation index (ODI 3%) calculated. Breathing frequency was lower for NH than HH during the camps (14.6 ± 3.1 breath × min(-1) vs. 17.2 ± 3.4 breath × min(-1), p < 0.001). SpO2 was lower for HH than NH (90.8 ± 0.3 vs. 91.9 ± 0.2, p < 0.001) and ODI 3% was higher for HH than NH (15.1 ± 3.5 vs. 9.9 ± 1.6, p < 0.001). Sleep in moderate HH is more altered than in NH during a LHTL camp.

  1. Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeraj M; Hussain, Sidra; Cooke, Mark; O’Hara, John P; Mellor, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Travel to high altitude is increasingly popular. With this comes an increased incidence of high-altitude illness and therefore an increased need to improve our strategies to prevent and accurately diagnose these. In this review, we provide a summary of recent advances of relevance to practitioners who may be advising travelers to altitude. Although the Lake Louise Score is now widely used as a diagnostic tool for acute mountain sickness (AMS), increasing evidence questions the validity of doing so, and of considering AMS as a single condition. Biomarkers, such as brain natriuretic peptide, are likely correlating with pulmonary artery systolic pressure, thus potential markers of the development of altitude illness. Established drug treatments include acetazolamide, nifedipine, and dexamethasone. Drugs with a potential to reduce the risk of developing AMS include nitrate supplements, propagators of nitric oxide, and supplemental iron. The role of exercise in the development of altitude illness remains hotly debated, and it appears that the intensity of exercise is more important than the exercise itself. Finally, despite copious studies demonstrating the value of preacclimatization in reducing the risk of altitude illness and improving performance, an optimal protocol to preacclimatize an individual remains elusive. PMID:26445563

  2. Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neeraj M; Hussain, Sidra; Cooke, Mark; O'Hara, John P; Mellor, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Travel to high altitude is increasingly popular. With this comes an increased incidence of high-altitude illness and therefore an increased need to improve our strategies to prevent and accurately diagnose these. In this review, we provide a summary of recent advances of relevance to practitioners who may be advising travelers to altitude. Although the Lake Louise Score is now widely used as a diagnostic tool for acute mountain sickness (AMS), increasing evidence questions the validity of doing so, and of considering AMS as a single condition. Biomarkers, such as brain natriuretic peptide, are likely correlating with pulmonary artery systolic pressure, thus potential markers of the development of altitude illness. Established drug treatments include acetazolamide, nifedipine, and dexamethasone. Drugs with a potential to reduce the risk of developing AMS include nitrate supplements, propagators of nitric oxide, and supplemental iron. The role of exercise in the development of altitude illness remains hotly debated, and it appears that the intensity of exercise is more important than the exercise itself. Finally, despite copious studies demonstrating the value of preacclimatization in reducing the risk of altitude illness and improving performance, an optimal protocol to preacclimatize an individual remains elusive.

  3. SpO2 and Heart Rate During a Real Hike at Altitude Are Significantly Different than at Its Simulation in Normobaric Hypoxia.