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Sample records for high carbon content

  1. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  2. High anthropogenic carbon content in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A.; Tanhua, T.; KöRtzinger, A.; Wallace, D. W. R.

    2010-12-01

    This work presents data of dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity from a cruise to the Mediterranean Sea during October-November 2001, with the main focus on the CFC-12 data and on the eastern basin. Using the transit time distribution method, the anthropogenic carbon concentrations in the basin were estimated. Results were cross-checked with a back-calculation technique. The entire water column of the Mediterranean Sea contains anthropogenic CO2, with minimum concentrations of 20.5 μmol kg-1 (error range: 16.9-27.1 μmol kg-1) in the most eastern part of the basin at intermediate depths, where the waters' mean age is >130 yr. Column inventories of up to 154 mol m-2 (132-179 mol m-2) are found and a total inventory of 1.7 Pg (1.3-2.1 Pg) of anthropogenic carbon in the Mediterranean Sea was estimated. There is a net flux of 38 Tg yr-1 (30-47 Tg yr-1) of dissolved inorganic carbon through the Strait of Gibraltar into the Atlantic Ocean and an opposite net flux of 3.5 Tg yr-1 (-1.8-9.2 Tg yr-1) of anthropogenic carbon into the Mediterranean Sea.

  3. Sodium flux-assisted low-temperature high-pressure synthesis of carbon nitride with high nitrogen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, Alexey; Akaishi, Minoru; Golberg, Dmitri

    2003-05-01

    Carbon nitride powders with high nitrogen content have been synthesized via a new, high-pressure (7.7 GPa) and relatively low-temperature (400-500 °C) procedure that involves a chemical reaction of hexachlorobenzene (C 6Cl 6) and sodium azide (NaN 3) in an enclosed system for 50-70 h in the presence of a sodium flux. The obtained powder product was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nitrogen-carbon atomic ratio of the material was 1.24 ± 0.15, which is consistent with C 3N 4 stoichiometry and represents the most nitrogen-rich carbon nitride yet prepared under high-pressure. Scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the material obtained was predominantly amorphous with some fraction of nanocrystallites with the reticular distance between the lattice planes approximately 0.326 nm.

  4. Highly Doped Carbon Nanobelts with Ultrahigh Nitrogen Content as High-Performance Supercapacitor Materials.

    PubMed

    Su, Congcong; Pei, Chengjie; Wu, Bingxia; Qian, Junfeng; Tan, Yiwei

    2017-08-01

    Nitrogen-doped and nitrogen and oxygen codoped carbon nanobelts (CNBs) (denoted as N-CNBs and N-O-CNBs, respectively) are respectively obtained by pyrolyzing the self-aligned polypyrrole (PPy) NBs and Se@poly(2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline) core@shell nanowires. Particularly, the uniform size, unique nanostructure, and well-defined edges of the PPy NBs result in the uniform size of the doped CNBs with an extraordinarily high N doping level (≈16 at%), especially the very large concentrations of the redox active pyridinic (9 at%) and pyrrolic N (3.5 at%) species. Furthermore, the precursors in highly self-aligned, dense arrays give rise to a very high packing density for the N-CNBs and N-O-CNBs. These incomparable features provide not only appropriate pathways for the introduction of pseudocapacitance via rapid Faradaic reactions and enhancement of volumetric capacitance but also structural design and synthesis approach to new types of nanostructured carbon. Notably, the N-CNBs obtained at the pyrolysis temperature of 800 °C (N-CNB8) in symmetric electrochemical cells deliver a specific capacitance of 458 F g(-1) and ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of 645 F cm(-3) in aqueous solution, which are among the best performance ever reported for carbon-based supercapacitive materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Towards the bulk carbon content of Earth; new metal carbide geobarometer in high pressure diamond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.; Dobson, D.; Milledge, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Formation of the metallic core in Earth (and other terrestrial planets) is not thought to have completely removed metallic iron from the lower mantle, where metallic iron might therefore be expected to occur as a widespread minor component [1]. We provide a new interpretation of metallic carbide inclusions in some diamond, which support a very high pressure origin from the lower mantle. Unlike rare carbides reported from diamonds previously without silicon [2], some diamonds from Jagersfontein coexist with iron-rich carbides which do contain significant silicon and oxygen, including in some cases their partial exsolution products. Based on an experimental calibration for liquid iron coexisting with lower mantle perovskite [3], we are able to show that some carbides were likely derived from pressures of approximately 45 GPa, or depths of >1100 km. This potential geobarometer has not been corrected for the behaviour of carbon in the liquid iron system, which might be an important experimental goal. The recognition of this independent carbide geobarometer offers an important new tool to confirm the superdeep origin of some diamond. The carbide-bearing diamonds are from a group whose charcteristics have recently been described [5]. Their distinctive light carbon isotopic signature (13^C ~ 17 ) coupled with evidence for very low contents nitrogen which is nonetheless highly aggregated, might be interpreted as indicative of subducted carbon. However, we are also open to the possibility that the bulk carbon isotopic composition of the Earth might also be different from the normal mantle value (13^C ~ 6 ), in which case the potential 0.4 wt% C in the Earth's core could also be isotopically very light, as suggested by Grady et al [6]. References [1] Frost D et al, Nature 428, 409-412 (2004) [2] Jacob D E et al, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol., 146, 566-576 (2004) [3] Lin et al, Science, 295, 313-315 (2002) [4] Dubrovinsky L. et al, Nature 422, 58-61 (2003) [5] Jones A P et al, 9

  6. Carbon content in the Earth's inner core from the elasticity of iron carbide at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle-Neumann, G.; Mookherjee, M.

    2009-12-01

    Discrepancy between sound wave velocity of Fe-Ni alloys and seismological models indicate that Earth’s core is likely to contain lighter elements such as H, C, O, Si and S. Carbon is a plausible candidate because of its cosmic abundance and chemical affinity to iron at low pressures. Earlier it was thought that carbon, being volatile might have been lost during the accretionary stages of the planet. However, it is now known, that core formation likely took place from the deep magma ocean surrounded by solar-nebula type proto-atmosphere enriched in volatiles thus enabling incorporation of volatiles in to the molten core. Experimental studies conducted to study the phase diagram of Fe-C system revealed that volatility of carbon is only significant at pressures lower than 10-5 GPa. (Wood, 1993, EPSL, 117, 593) suggested that solid inner core might be composed of Fe3C. Recent experimental studies have extended the Fe-C phase diagram to considerably higher pressures (~70 GPa) and have found that Fe7C3 is the likely phase at the inner core conditions (Lord et al., 2009, EPSL, 284, 157). In this study we determine the elasticity of Fe7C3 using first principle methods. Results of compression for the ferromagnetic Fe7C3 is well represented by a third order Birch Murnaghan finite strain expression with K0~ 275 GPa, K‧~2.5 and V0~ 182 Å3. Under compression magnetic moment gradually decreases and at ~69 GPa magnetic moment is instantaneously lost. Similar behavior has been reported for Fe3C at 60 GPa (Vocadlo et al., 2002, EPSL, 203, 567). The high-pressure non-magnetic phase has distinct elastic parameters with K0~ 228 GPa, K‧~4.9 and V0~ 181 Å3. Calculated elastic constants also exhibit softening associated with the loss of magnetization. Similar anomalous behavior in thermoelastic parameter owing to loss of magnetization has been observed for Fe3C (Fiquet et al. 2009, PEPI, 172, 125) at 68 GPa. We will present full elastic tensor and sound wave velocity results for

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Nitrogen Content and Its Role on the Carbon Dioxide Adsorption Capacity of Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Lakhi, Kripal S; Park, Dae-Hwan; Joseph, Stalin; Talapaneni, Siddulu N; Ravon, Ugo; Al-Bahily, Khalid; Vinu, Ajayan

    2017-03-02

    Mesoporous carbon nitrides (MCNs) with rod-shaped morphology and tunable nitrogen contents have been synthesized through a calcination-free method by using ethanol-washed mesoporous SBA-15 as templates at different carbonization temperatures. Carbon tetrachloride and ethylenediamine were used as the sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The resulting MCN materials were characterized with low- and high-angle powder XRD, nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution (HR) SEM, HR-TEM, elemental analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure techniques. The carbonization temperature plays a critical role in controlling not only the crystallinity, but also the nitrogen content and textural parameters of the samples, including specific surface area and specific pore volume. The nitrogen content of MCN decreases with a concomitant increase in specific surface area and specific pore volume, as well as the crystallinity of the samples, as the carbonization temperature is increased. The results also reveal that the structural order of the materials is retained, even after heat treatment at temperatures up to 900 °C with a significant reduction of the nitrogen content, but the structure is partially damaged at 1000 °C. The carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of these materials is not only dependent on the textural parameters, but also on the nitrogen content. The MCN prepared at 900 °C, which has an optimum BET surface area and nitrogen content, registers a carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of 20.1 mmol g(-1) at 273 K and 30 bar, which is much higher than that of mesoporous silica, MCN-1, activated carbon, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Three-dimensional porous carbon composites containing high sulfur nanoparticle content for high-performance lithium–sulfur batteries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoxing; Sun, Jinhua; Hou, Wenpeng; Jiang, Shidong; Huang, Yong; Geng, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur is a promising cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries because of its high theoretical capacity (1,675 mA h g−1); however, its low electrical conductivity and the instability of sulfur-based electrodes limit its practical application. Here we report a facile in situ method for preparing three-dimensional porous graphitic carbon composites containing sulfur nanoparticles (3D S@PGC). With this strategy, the sulfur content of the composites can be tuned to a high level (up to 90 wt%). Because of the high sulfur content, the nanoscale distribution of the sulfur particles, and the covalent bonding between the sulfur and the PGC, the developed 3D S@PGC cathodes exhibit excellent performance, with a high sulfur utilization, high specific capacity (1,382, 1,242 and 1,115 mA h g−1 at 0.5, 1 and 2 C, respectively), long cycling life (small capacity decay of 0.039% per cycle over 1,000 cycles at 2 C) and excellent rate capability at a high charge/discharge current. PMID:26830732

  9. High temperature ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water foam stabilized with viscoelastic zwitterionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Alzobaidi, Shehab; Da, Chang; Tran, Vu; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2017-02-15

    Ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) foams with gas phase volume fractions (ϕ) above 0.95 (that is <0.05 water) tend to be inherently unstable given that the large capillary pressures that cause the lamellar films to thin. Herein, we demonstrate that these C/W foams may be stabilized with viscoelastic aqueous phases formed with a single zwitterionic surfactant at a concentration of only 1% (w/v) in DI water and over a wide range of salinity. Moreover, they are stable with a foam quality ϕ up to 0.98 even for temperatures up to 120°C. The properties of aqueous viscoelastic solutions and foams containing these solutions are examined for a series of zwitterionic amidopropylcarbobetaines, R-ONHC3H6N(CH3)2CH2CO2, where R is varied from C12-14 (coco) to C18 (oleyl) to C22 (erucyl). For the surfactants with long C18 and C22 tails, the relaxation times from complex rheology indicate the presence of viscoelastic wormlike micelles over a wide range in salinity and pH, given the high surfactant packing fraction. The apparent viscosities of these ultralow water content foams reached more than 120cP with stabilities more than 30-fold over those for foams formed with the non-viscoelastic C12-14 surfactant. At 90°C, the foam morphology was composed of ∼35μm diameter bubbles with a polyhedral texture. The apparent foam viscosity typically increased with ϕ and then dropped at ϕ values higher than 0.95-0.98. The Ostwald ripening rate was slower for foams with viscoelastic versus non-viscoelastic lamellae as shown by optical microscopy, as a consequence of slower lamellar drainage rates. The ability to achieve high stabilities for ultralow water content C/W foams over a wide temperature range is of interest in various technologies including polymer and materials science, CO2 enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration (by greater control of the CO2 flow patterns), and possibly even hydraulic fracturing with minimal use of water to reduce the requirements for

  10. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-01-01

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties. PMID:27431281

  11. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-07-19

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties.

  12. Fabrication of High Content Carbon Nanotube-Polyurethane Sheets with Tailorable Properties.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B; Zou, Shan; Laqua, Kurtis; Barnes, Michael; Simard, Benoit

    2017-09-13

    We have fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT)-polyurethane (TPU) sheets via a one-step filtration method that uses a TPU solvent/nonsolvent combination. This solution method allows for control of the composition and processing conditions, significantly reducing both the filtration time and the need for large volumes of solvent to debundle the CNTs. Through an appropriate selection of the solvents and tuning the solvent/nonsolvent ratio, it is possible to enhance the interaction between the CNTs and the polymer chains in solution and improve the CNT exfoliation in the nanocomposites. The composition of the nanocomposites, which defines the characteristics of the material and its mechanical properties, can be precisely controlled. The highest improvements in tensile properties were achieved at a CNT:TPU weight ratio around 35:65 with a Young's modulus of 1270 MPa, stress at 50% strain of 35 MPa, and strength of 41 MPa, corresponding to ∼10-fold improvement in modulus and ∼7-fold improvement in stress at 50% strain, while maintaining a high failure strain. At the same composition, CNTs with higher aspect ratio produce nanocomposites with greater improvements (e.g., strength of 99 MPa). Electrical conductivity also shows a maximum near the same composition, where it can exceed the values achieved for the pristine nanotube buckypaper. The trend in mechanical and electrical properties was understood in terms of the CNT-TPU interfacial interactions and morphological changes occurring in the nanocomposite sheets as a function of increasing the TPU content. The availability of such a simple method and the understanding of the structure-property relationships are expected to be broadly applicable in the nanocomposites field.

  13. Carbon content of sediments of small reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Carbon content was measured in sediments deposited in 58 small reservoirs across the US. Reservoirs varied from 0.2 to 4,000 km{sup 2} in surface area. The carbon content of sediment ranged from 0.3 to 5.6 percent, with a mean of 1.9 {plus minus} 1.1 percent. No significant differences between the soil and sediment carbon content were found using a paired t-test or ANOVA. The carbon content of sediments in reservoirs was similar to the carbon content of surface soils in the watershed, except in watersheds with shrub or steppe (desert) vegetation. Based on the sediment accumulation rates measured in each reservoir, the calculated organic carbon accumulation rates among reservoirs ranged from 26 to 3,700 gC m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}, with a mean of 675 {plus minus} 739 gC m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}. The carbon content and accumulation rates were highest in sediments from grassland watersheds. High variability was found in carbon content, carbon accumulation, and sediment accumulation rates due to individual watershed and reservoir characteristics rather than to any broad physiographic patterns. The carbon accumulation rates in these reservoir sediments indicate that reservoir sediments could be a significant sink of organic carbon.

  14. A Sustainable Route from Biomass Byproduct Okara to High Content Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Sheets for Efficient Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingzhou; Qian, Tao; Wang, Mengfan; Shen, Xiaowei; Xu, Na; Sun, Zhouzhou; Yan, Chenglin

    2016-01-20

    A sustainable route from the biomass byproduct okara as a natural nitrogen fertilizer to high-content N-doped carbon sheets is demonstrated. The as-prepared unique structure exhibits high specific capacity (292 mAh g(-1) ) and extremely long cycle life (exceeding 2000 cycles). A full battery is devised for the practical use of materials with a flexible/wearable LED screen. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. [Accelerated carbonation of high Ca content municipal solid waste incineration fly ash and impact on leaching of heavy metal].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Jin, Yi-Ying; Nie, Yong-Feng

    2009-11-01

    The accelerated carbonation of high Ca content Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ash was investigated with an L:S ratio of 0.25:1 to study the effect of accelerated carbonation on the leaching of critical heavy metals (As, Cd, Cu, Zn, Sb, Pb) in the fly ash. The results of XRD analysis showed after carbonation the peaks of Ca(OH)2 and CaClOH disappeared, while the peaks of CaCO3 became intense. After carbonation, the mineral phase of Pb was changed and Cu compound (CuTi2.05S4) was identified. The TG/DTA analysis showed the weight gain of the fly ash before 440 degrees C reached 5.70%. Furthermore, the SEM-EDS analysis confirmed the occurrence of the reaction of Ca(OH)2 (s) + CO2 (g) --> CaCO3 (s). The TCLP test of carbonated fly ash revealed that the leaching concentration of the critical heavy metals, except Cd, decreased within the carbonation time of 2 h. When the carbonation time was longer than 50 h, the leaching concentration of critical heavy metals, except Ph were higher than that of un-carbonated fly ash.

  16. Investigation of accelerated and natural carbonation of MSWI fly ash with a high content of Ca.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Jin, Yiying; Nie, Yongfeng

    2010-02-15

    The application of accelerated carbonation and natural carbonation to treat municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash was presented. The influence of reaction time and the liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, which both affect the reactivity of CO(2), was evaluated to determine their impact on the quality of carbonation. The optimum carbonation reaction of fly ash was found to occur when an L/S of 0.25 was used. Carbonation decreased the leaching of Pb, Cu, Zn and As, but increased the leaching of Cd and Sb. Based on the leaching of these six heavy metals, the optimum pH of the carbonated fly ash was 9.5-10.5. The release of soluble salts such as SO(4), Cl and F changed little following carbonation, and their release occurred independently of pH. The release potential and leaching behavior of carbonated fly ash were further evaluated using the three-step sequential extraction procedure proposed by the commission of the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR). The results of the BCR analyses revealed that carbonation exerted a significant effect on the heavy metal fractions in steps 1 and 2, but little effect on the distribution of heavy metals in step 3 and residue fraction. Physical and chemical changes induced by carbonation were presented and discussed.

  17. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-08-04

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications.

  18. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-01-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications. PMID:27488268

  19. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-08-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications.

  20. Reduction in the earthworm metabolomic response after phenanthrene exposure in soils with high soil organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    McKelvie, Jennifer R; Whitfield Åslund, Melissa; Celejewski, Magda A; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated the correlation between soil organic carbon (OC) content and metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to phenanthrene (58 ± 3 mg/kg) spiked into seven artificial soils with OC contents ranging from 1 to 27% OC. Principal component analysis of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of aqueous extracts identified statistically significant differences in the metabolic profiles of control and phenanthrene-exposed E. fetida in the 1% OC soil only. Partial least squares analysis identified a metabolic response in the four soils with OC values ≤11% which was well correlated to estimated phenanthrene porewater concentrations. The results suggest that the higher sorption capability of high OC soils decreased the bioavailability of phenanthrene and the subsequent metabolic response of E. fetida.

  1. Chromium Extraction via Chemical Processing of Fe-Cr Alloys Fine Powder with High Carbon Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. M.; Navarro, R. C. S.; Souza, R. F. M.; Brocchi, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    Ferrous alloys are important raw materials for special steel production. In this context, alloys from the Fe-Cr system, with typical Cr weight fraction ranging from 0.45 to 0.95, are prominent, particularly for the stainless steel industry. During the process in which these alloys are obtained, there is considerable production of fine powder, which could be reused after suitable chemical treatment, for example, through coupling pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical processes. In the present study, the extraction of chromium from fine powder generated during the production of a Fe-Cr alloy with high C content was investigated. Roasting reactions were performed at 1073 K, 1173 K, and 1273 K (800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C) with 300 pct (w/w) excess NaOH in an oxidizing atmosphere (air), followed by solubilization in deionized water, selective precipitation, and subsequent calcination at 1173 K (900 °C) in order to convert the obtained chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3. The maximum achieved Cr recovery was around 86 pct, suggesting that the proposed chemical route was satisfactory regarding the extraction of the chromium initially present. Moreover, after X-ray diffraction analysis, the final produced oxide has proven to be pure Cr2O3 with a mean crystallite size of 200 nm.

  2. Chromium Extraction via Chemical Processing of Fe-Cr Alloys Fine Powder with High Carbon Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. M.; Navarro, R. C. S.; Souza, R. F. M.; Brocchi, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Ferrous alloys are important raw materials for special steel production. In this context, alloys from the Fe-Cr system, with typical Cr weight fraction ranging from 0.45 to 0.95, are prominent, particularly for the stainless steel industry. During the process in which these alloys are obtained, there is considerable production of fine powder, which could be reused after suitable chemical treatment, for example, through coupling pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical processes. In the present study, the extraction of chromium from fine powder generated during the production of a Fe-Cr alloy with high C content was investigated. Roasting reactions were performed at 1073 K, 1173 K, and 1273 K (800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C) with 300 pct (w/w) excess NaOH in an oxidizing atmosphere (air), followed by solubilization in deionized water, selective precipitation, and subsequent calcination at 1173 K (900 °C) in order to convert the obtained chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3. The maximum achieved Cr recovery was around 86 pct, suggesting that the proposed chemical route was satisfactory regarding the extraction of the chromium initially present. Moreover, after X-ray diffraction analysis, the final produced oxide has proven to be pure Cr2O3 with a mean crystallite size of 200 nm.

  3. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  4. Gel spinning of PVA composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yizhe; Lai, Dengpan; Zou, Liming; Ling, Xinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Xu, Yongjing

    2015-07-01

    In this report, poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide (MWCNTs-GO) hybrids were prepared by gel spinning, and were characterized by TGA, DSC, SEM, XL-2 yarn strength tester and electrical conductivity measurement. The total content of MWCNTs-GO hybrids in the PVA composite fibers, which is up to 25 wt%, was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DSC measurement shows that the melting and crystallization peaks decreased after the addition of nano-fillers. This is due to the reason that the motion of PVA chains is completely confined by strong hydrogen bonding interaction between PVA and nano-fillers. After the addtion of GO, the dispersibility of MWCNTs in composite fibers improved slightly. And the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased by 38% and 67%, respectively. This is caused by the increased hydrogen bonding interaction and synergistic effect through hybridization of MWCNTs and GO. More significantly, the electrical conductivity of PVA/MWCNTs/GO composite fibers enhanced by three orders of magnitude with the addition of GO.

  5. Zinc oxide nanorod assisted rapid single-step process for the conversion of electrospun poly(acrylonitrile) nanofibers to carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nain, Ratyakshi; Singh, Dhirendra; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for immobilization of polymer chains and assisted in uniform heat distribution. This facilitated rapid and efficient conversion of the polymer structure to the ladder, and subsequently, the graphitized structure. At the end of the process, the ZnO nanorods were found to completely separate from the carbonized fibers yielding pure carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content and surface area. The approach could be used to eliminate the slow, energy intensive stabilization step and achieve fast conversion of randomly laid carbon nanofiber webs in a single step to carbon nanofibers without the application of external tension or internal templates usually employed to achieve a high graphitic content in such systems.The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for

  6. Influence factor research on deacidification process for high carbon content gas field by numerical simulation-a case study of the Oudeh gas field.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yitang; Huang, Kun; Huang, Cheng; Lu, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of CO2 in natural gas affect its calorific value and corrode the equipment and pipelines related to its transportation and usage. Therefore, strict control over the H2S and CO2 contents in natural gas is essential. CO2 is an important industrial gas that can bring a great deal of economic profit when it is fully utilized. The natural gas produced at the Oudeh gas field in Syria contains high carbon content natural gas, in which the CO2 content is in the range of 17.5-18.8 %, while the H2S content is in the range of 2.8-3.2 %. However, there have been few studies conducted on treatment solutions for natural gas with high carbon contents. In this paper, several commonly used methods for deacidification of natural gas were introduced. Among these methods, the most suitable one was chosen for desulfurization and decarbonization of the natural gas produced at the Oudeh gas field based on its gas quality. Optimization and analysis of the primary operating parameters for the desulfurization and decarbonization processes were conducted to obtain the optimized values for the input temperature of the lean solution (42 °C), reflux ratio (0.8), number of trays in the absorber unit (17) , and circulation rate of the lean solution (330 m(3)/h), etc. Additionally, the influence of the operating pressure of the regenerator unit on the regeneration system was also investigated. The energy consumption of the apparatus and the corrosion level of sour gas to the apparatus were reduced after optimization. Based on the investigation of the natural gas treatment for this gas field, it can serve as a reference for the purification of high carbon contents natural gas.

  7. Undegassed Carbon Content from a Highly Depleted Segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (1-5°S): Evidence from Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voyer, M.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    As carbon solubility is low in basalts, MORB contain little dissolved CO2 (189±61 ppm, 1σ, n=600 [1]). A global negative correlation between CO2/Nb (proxy for amount of CO2 lost by degassing) and Ba/La (proxy for source enrichment) indicates that depleted MORB are less affected by degassing than enriched MORB: CO2/Nb ratios range from 0-100 for samples with Ba/La>4, while CO2/Nb range from 50 to 400 for samples with Ba/La<4 [1]. To assess the CO2 content of undegassed MORB, we analyzed the volatile content of 70 olivine-hosted, glassy melt inclusions (MIs) from four basalts dredged along MAR 1-5°S, a ridge segment that produces highly depleted MORB in terms of trace element enrichment and radiogenic isotopes [2, 3]. MIs contain CO2 contents (180-1420 ppm) that are higher than their respective matrix glasses (130-220 ppm, typical for vapor-saturated melts erupted at 3-5 km b.s.l.). One of the four dredges (EN061 5D-3Ag) contains MIs that do not exhibit shrinkage bubbles. For this sample only, we find a positive correlation between the CO2 content (240-770 ppm) and the Cl content (6-20 ppm) of the MIs that is not found in the matrix glasses (see Fig.). We infer that the correlation between CO2 and Cl, both highly incompatible in silicate minerals during fractional crystallization, is strong evidence for vapor-undersaturation, as any CO2 degassing would have erased the correlation. Together with MIs from the Siqueiros Fracture Zone [4] and from northern Iceland [5], the MIs from EN061 5D-3Ag may represent another occurrence of carbon-undersaturated MORB. Our results will be used to model the primary carbon content of MORB and of the depleted upper mantle. Note that the average Cl content of the matrix glasses (20±1 ppm) is higher than those of the MIs (12±3 ppm, see Fig.). This indicates either that the matrix glasses assimilated a small amount of seawater Cl, or that the MIs are all more depleted than the matrix glass. We will acquire major and trace element

  8. High H2S contents and other effects of thermochemical sulfate reduction in deeply buried carbonate reservoirs: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nöth, S.

    The accumulation of high H2S concentrations in oil and gas fields is usually associated with deeply buried high-temperature carbonate reservoirs and is attributed to the abiological oxidation of hydrocarbons by sulfate - thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). This review aims at providing an overview of the literature and assessing existing uncertainties in the current understanding of TSR processes and their geological significance. Reaction pathways, various reaction products, the autocatalytic nature of TSR, and reaction kinetics are discussed. Furthermore, various criteria for recognizing TSR effects, such as petrographic/diagenetic alterations and stable isotope geochemistry of the inorganic as well as the organic reactants, are summarized and evaluated. There is overwhelming geological evidence of TSR taking place at a minimum temperature of 110-140°C, but the temperature discrepancy between experimental data and nature still exists. However, the exact nature and mechanisms of catalysts which influence TSR are not known. Local H2S variations may reflect steady-state conditions dominated by H2S buildups and flux out of the system. The latter is controlled by lithological and geological factors.

  9. Aerosol and graphitic carbon content of snow

    SciTech Connect

    Chy-acute-accentlek, P.; Srivastava, V.; Cahenzli, L.; Pinnick, R.G.; Dod, R.L.; Novakov, T.; Cook, T.L.; Hinds, B.D.

    1987-08-20

    Snow samples from southern New Mexico, west Texas, Antarctica, and Greenland were analyzed for aerosol and graphitic carbon. Graphitic carbon contents were found to be between 2.2 and 25 ..mu..g L/sup -1/ of snow meltwater; water-insoluble aerosol content varied between 0.62 and 8.5 mg L/sup -1/. For comparison, two samples of Camp Century, Greenland, ice core, having approximate ages of 4,000 and 6,000 years, were also analyzed. Ice core graphitic carbon contents were found to be 2.5 and 1.1 ..mu..g L/sup -1/. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

  10. Jellyfish body plans provide allometric advantages beyond low carbon content.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Kylie A; Duarte, Carlos M; Lucas, Cathy H; Sutherland, Kelly R; Condon, Robert H; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E; Robinson, Kelly L; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world's oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  11. Jellyfish Body Plans Provide Allometric Advantages beyond Low Carbon Content

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kylie A.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Lucas, Cathy H.; Sutherland, Kelly R.; Condon, Robert H.; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Robinson, Kelly L.; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world’s oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  12. Carbon content and degassing history of the lunar volcanic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Diane T.; Hauri, Erik H.; Saal, Alberto E.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Volcanic glasses observed on the lunar surface have been interpreted as the products of volatile-rich, fire-fountain eruptions. Revised estimates of the water content of primitive lunar magmas have overturned the notion of a volatile-poor Moon, but degassing of water-rich vapour during volcanic eruptions is inconsistent with geochemical and petrological observations. Although degassing of carbon is compatible with observations, the amount of indigenous carbon in lunar volcanic materials is not well constrained. Here we present high-precision measurements of indigenous carbon contents in primitive lunar volcanic glasses and melt inclusions. From our measurements, in combination with solubility and degassing model calculations, we suggest that carbon degassed before water in lunar magmas, and that the amount of carbon in the lunar lavas was sufficient to trigger fire-fountain eruptions at the lunar surface. We estimate--after correcting for bubble formation in the melt inclusions--that the primitive carbon contents and hydrogen/carbon ratios of lunar magmas fall within the range found in melts from Earth’s depleted upper mantle. Our findings are also consistent with measurements of hydrogen, fluorine, sulphur and chlorine contents, as well as carbon and hydrogen isotopes, in primitive lunar magmas, suggesting a common origin for the volatile elements in the interiors of the Earth and Moon.

  13. Metal-Organic Coordination Polymer to Prepare Density Controllable and High Nitrogen-Doped Content Carbon/Graphene for High Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinwei; Zhong, Wenbin; Zou, Yubo; Xiong, Changlun; Yang, Wantai

    2017-01-11

    Design and preparation of carbon-based electrode material with high nitrogen-doping ratio and appropriate density attract much interest for supercapacitors in practical application. Herein, three porous carbon/graphene (NCGCu, NCGFe, and NCGZn) with high doping ratio of nitrogen have been prepared via directly pyrolysis of graphene oxide (GO)/metal-organic coordination polymer (MOCP) composites, which were formed by reacting 4,4'-bipyridine (BPD) with CuCl2, FeCl3, and ZnCl2, respectively. As-prepared NCGCu, NCGFe and NCGZn showed high nitrogen doping ratio of 10.68, 12.99, and 11.21 at. %; and high density of 1.52, 0.84, and 1.15 g cm(-3), respectively. When as-prepared samples were used as supercapacitor electrodes, NCGCu, NCGFe and NCGZn exhibited high gravimetric specific capacitances of 369, 298.5, 309.5 F g(-1), corresponding to high volumetric specific capacitances of 560.9, 250.7, 355.9 F cm(-3) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), as well as good cycling stability, nearly 100% of the capacitance retained after 1000 cycles even at a large current density of 10 A g(-1). It is expected that the provided novel strategy can be used to develop electrode materials in high performance energy conversion/storage devices.

  14. Limitations of using Raman microscopy for the analysis of high-content-carbon-filled ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari-Siahkali, Afshin; Almdal, Kristoffer; Kingshott, Peter

    2003-12-01

    The effects of laser irradiation on changes to the surface chemistry and structure of a commercially available ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber sample after Raman microscopy analysis was investigated. The Raman measurements were carried out with different levels of laser power on the sample, ranging from 4.55 mW to 0.09 mW. The surface of the EPDM was analyzed before and after laser exposure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The techniques have surface probe depths of approximately < or = 10 nm and 1 microm, respectively. Both sets of analysis show that ingredients of the blended EPDM rubber "bloom" to the surface as a result of local heating that takes place due to the absorption of laser by carbon black during the Raman analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was also performed on the Raman analyzed areas to visually illustrate the effects created due to laser light exposure (i.e., burning marks). The change in surface chemistry also occurs in regions a few millimeters from the exposed sites, indicating that the effect is quite long range. However, this phenomenon has no major influence, as far as XPS or ATR-FTIR results disclose, on the backbone structure of the rubber sample. The results indicate that precautions should be taken when analyzing complex blended polymer samples using Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Carbon content on perturbed wetlands of Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Ojeda, S. M.; Orellana, R.; Herrera Silveira, J.

    2013-05-01

    The north coast of Yucatan Peninsula is a karstic scenario where the water flows mainly underground through the so called "cenotes"-ring system ("sink holes") toward the coast. This underground water system enhances the connection between watershed condition and coastal ecosystem health. Inland activities such as livestock, agriculture and urban development produce changes in the landscape, hydrological connectivity and in the water quality that can decrease wetland coverage specially mangroves and seagrasses. We conducted studies on the description of structure, biomass and carbon content of the soil, above and below ground of four different types of wetland in a perturbed region. The wetland ecological types were freshwater (Typha domingensis), dwarf mangroves (Avicenia germinans), grassland (Cyperacea) and Seagrasses. Due to the area is mainly covered by mangroves, they represent the most important carbon storage nevertheless the condition of the structure determine the carbon content in soil. Through GIS tools we explore the relationships between land use and costal condition in order to determine priority areas for conservation within the watershed that could be efficient to preserve the carbon storage of this area.

  16. Size controlled synthesis of Li2MnSiO4 nanoparticles: effect of calcination temperature and carbon content for high performance lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, V; Ravi, S; Kim, W S; Lee, S Y; Lee, Y S

    2011-03-15

    Size controlled, nanoparticulate Li(2)MnSiO(4) cathodes were successfully prepared by sol-gel route. Effects of calcination temperature and carbon content (adipic acid) were studied during synthesis process. EPR study was conducted to ensure the formation of phase through oxidation state of manganese. Microscopic pictures indicate spherical shape morphology of the synthesized Li(2)MnSiO(4) nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopic pictures confirmed the presence of carbon coating on the surface of the particles. Further, the optimization has been performed based on phase purity and its battery performance. From the optimization, 700°C and 0.2 mol adipic acid (against total metal ion present in the compound) were found better conditions to achieve high performance material. The Li(2)MnSiO(4) nanoparticles prepared in the aforementioned conditions exhibited an initial discharge capacity of ~113 mAh g(-1) at room temperature in Li/1M LiPF(6) in EC:DMC/Li(2)MnSiO(4) cell configuration. All the Li(2)MnSiO(4) nanoparticles prepared at various conditions experienced the capacity fade during cycling. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Coaxial Three-Layered Carbon/Sulfur/Polymer Nanofibers with High Sulfur Content and High Utilization for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Ye, Jian; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Lifen; Yang, Hanxi; Ai, Xinping

    2017-03-27

    Great progress has been made on the cyclability and material utilization in recent development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries; however, most of the sulfur electrodes reported so far have a considerable low loading of sulfur (60%), which causes a substantial decrease in energy density and is therefore difficult for application in batteries. To deal with this issue, we fabricate a novel sulfur composite with a coaxial three-layered structure, in which sulfur is deposited on carbon fibers and coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS), thus enabling a high sulfur loading of 70.8 wt % without the expense of its electrochemical performance. Benefiting from the rigid conductive framework of carbon fibers and flexible buffering matrix of the polymer for blocking the diffusion loss of discharge intermediates, the as-fabricated composite electrode exhibits a high initial reversible capacity of 1272 mA h g(-1) (based on the total mass of the composite), a stable cyclability with a retained capacity of 807 mA h g(-1) after 200 cycles, and a high Coulombic efficiency of ∼99% upon extended cycling, offering a new selection for practical application in Li-S batteries.

  18. Heterogeneity in mantle carbon content from CO2-undersaturated basalts.

    PubMed

    Le Voyer, M; Kelley, K A; Cottrell, E; Hauri, E H

    2017-01-13

    The amount of carbon present in Earth's mantle affects the dynamics of melting, volcanic eruption style and the evolution of Earth's atmosphere via planetary outgassing. Mantle carbon concentrations are difficult to quantify because most magmas are strongly degassed upon eruption. Here we report undegassed carbon concentrations from a new set of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We use the correlations of CO2 with trace elements to define an average carbon abundance for the upper mantle. Our results indicate that the upper mantle carbon content is highly heterogeneous, varying by almost two orders of magnitude globally, with the potential to produce large geographic variations in melt fraction below the volatile-free solidus. Such heterogeneity will manifest as variations in the depths at which melt becomes interconnected and detectable, the CO2 fluxes at mid-ocean ridges, the depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and mantle conductivity.

  19. Heterogeneity in mantle carbon content from CO2-undersaturated basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voyer, M.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Hauri, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    The amount of carbon present in Earth's mantle affects the dynamics of melting, volcanic eruption style and the evolution of Earth's atmosphere via planetary outgassing. Mantle carbon concentrations are difficult to quantify because most magmas are strongly degassed upon eruption. Here we report undegassed carbon concentrations from a new set of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We use the correlations of CO2 with trace elements to define an average carbon abundance for the upper mantle. Our results indicate that the upper mantle carbon content is highly heterogeneous, varying by almost two orders of magnitude globally, with the potential to produce large geographic variations in melt fraction below the volatile-free solidus. Such heterogeneity will manifest as variations in the depths at which melt becomes interconnected and detectable, the CO2 fluxes at mid-ocean ridges, the depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and mantle conductivity.

  20. Heterogeneity in mantle carbon content from CO2-undersaturated basalts

    PubMed Central

    Le Voyer, M.; Kelley, K.A.; Cottrell, E.; Hauri, E.H.

    2017-01-01

    The amount of carbon present in Earth's mantle affects the dynamics of melting, volcanic eruption style and the evolution of Earth's atmosphere via planetary outgassing. Mantle carbon concentrations are difficult to quantify because most magmas are strongly degassed upon eruption. Here we report undegassed carbon concentrations from a new set of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We use the correlations of CO2 with trace elements to define an average carbon abundance for the upper mantle. Our results indicate that the upper mantle carbon content is highly heterogeneous, varying by almost two orders of magnitude globally, with the potential to produce large geographic variations in melt fraction below the volatile-free solidus. Such heterogeneity will manifest as variations in the depths at which melt becomes interconnected and detectable, the CO2 fluxes at mid-ocean ridges, the depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and mantle conductivity. PMID:28082738

  1. Chromium and cobalt ion release following the Durom high carbon content, forged metal-on-metal surface replacement of the hip.

    PubMed

    Vendittoli, P-A; Mottard, S; Roy, A G; Dupont, C; Lavigne, M

    2007-04-01

    We evaluated the concentrations of chromium and cobalt ions in blood after metal-on-metal surface replacement arthroplasty using a wrought-forged, high carbon content chromium-cobalt alloy implant in 64 patients. At one year, mean whole blood ion levels were 1.61 microg/L (0.4 to 5.5) for chromium and 0.67 microg/L (0.23 to 2.09) for cobalt. The pre-operative ion levels, component size, female gender and the inclination of the acetabular component were inversely proportional to the values of chromium and/or cobalt ions at one year postoperatively. Other factors, such as age and level of activity, did not correlate with the levels of metal ions. We found that the levels of the ions in the serum were 1.39 and 1.37 times higher for chromium and cobalt respectively than those in the whole blood. The levels of metal ions obtained may be specific to the hip resurfacing implant and reflect its manufacturing process.

  2. Relationships between C3 Plant Foliar Carbon Isotope Composition and Element Contents of Grassland Species at High Altitudes on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong-Chun; Fan, Jiang-Wen; Harris, Warwick; Zhong, Hua-Ping; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Cheng, Xi-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Relationships of foliar carbon isotope composition (δ13C) with foliar C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg contents and their ratios of 219 C3 species leaf samples, obtained in August in 2004 to 2007 from 82 high altitude grassland sites on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau China, were examined. This was done with reference to the proposition that foliar δ13C increases with altitude and separately for the life-form groups of graminoids, forbs and shrubs and for the genera Stipa and Kobresia. For all samples, foliar δ13C was negatively related to foliar K, P and ∑K+ Ca+ Mg, and positively correlated to foliar C, C/N and C/P. The significance of these correlations differed for the taxonomic and life-form groups. Lack of a relationship of foliar δ13C with foliar N was inconsistent with the majority of studies that have shown foliar δ13C to be positively related to foliar N due to a decrease of Ci/Ca (the ratio between intercellular and atmospheric concentration of CO2) and explained as a result of greater photosynthetic capacity at higher foliar N concentration. However this inconsistency relates to other high altitude studies that have found that photosynthetic capacity remains constant as foliar N increases. After accounting for the altitudinal relationship with foliar δ13C, of the elements only the K effect was significant and was most strongly expressed for Kobresia. It is concluded that factors critical to plant survival and growth at very high altitudes, such as low atmospheric pressure and low temperatures, may preclude expression of relationships between foliar δ13C and foliar elements that have been observed at lower altitudes. PMID:23565275

  3. Relationships between C3 plant foliar carbon isotope composition and element contents of grassland species at high altitudes on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong-Chun; Fan, Jiang-Wen; Harris, Warwick; Zhong, Hua-Ping; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Cheng, Xi-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Relationships of foliar carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) with foliar C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg contents and their ratios of 219 C3 species leaf samples, obtained in August in 2004 to 2007 from 82 high altitude grassland sites on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau China, were examined. This was done with reference to the proposition that foliar δ(13)C increases with altitude and separately for the life-form groups of graminoids, forbs and shrubs and for the genera Stipa and Kobresia. For all samples, foliar δ(13)C was negatively related to foliar K, P and ∑K+ Ca+ Mg, and positively correlated to foliar C, C/N and C/P. The significance of these correlations differed for the taxonomic and life-form groups. Lack of a relationship of foliar δ(13)C with foliar N was inconsistent with the majority of studies that have shown foliar δ(13)C to be positively related to foliar N due to a decrease of Ci/Ca (the ratio between intercellular and atmospheric concentration of CO2) and explained as a result of greater photosynthetic capacity at higher foliar N concentration. However this inconsistency relates to other high altitude studies that have found that photosynthetic capacity remains constant as foliar N increases. After accounting for the altitudinal relationship with foliar δ(13)C, of the elements only the K effect was significant and was most strongly expressed for Kobresia. It is concluded that factors critical to plant survival and growth at very high altitudes, such as low atmospheric pressure and low temperatures, may preclude expression of relationships between foliar δ(13)C and foliar elements that have been observed at lower altitudes.

  4. The Effects of Earth Science Textbook Contents on High School Students' Knowledge of, Attitude toward, and Behavior of Energy Saving and Carbon Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Yu-Long; Chou, Ying-Chyi; Yen, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Shr-Jya

    2017-01-01

    As science textbooks are considered as one of the major source of climate change information of students, this study aims to examine the differences in energy saving and carbon reduction knowledge, attitude, and behavior between two groups of Taiwan's high school students using earth science textbooks of two different publishers. Some items of…

  5. High Thermal Conductivity Carbon/Carbon Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop a lowcost, high thermal conductivity carbon/carbon composite with a mesophase pitch -based matrix. A low...carbonization technique and heat treatment of the mesophase pitch was utilized to enhance composite properties by increasing the composite density...Three different fibers, T300 PAN-based, P55 pitch -based, and an experimental high thermal conductivity mesophase pitch -based, were incorporated as the

  6. Programmable high crystallinity carbon patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Hong; Gu, Yang; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Lu; Liu, Guowei; He, Yongmin; Long, Yi; Zhao, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube and graphene are promising candidates for next-generation flexible electronics. However, the practical application of carbon electronics requires controlled fabrication of those materials with micro-patterned structures on flexible substrate at wafer-scale and low cost. Inspiring from the conventional photolithography process and pyrolysis of photoresist, herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of high-quality micro-patterned high crystallinity carbon. The method employed pre-patterned pyrolyzed photoresist as carbon precursors, in order to minimize the mobility of carbon during the high temperature growth, which results into high quality carbon patterns with a lateral resolution up to ~2 µm. The flexible carbon electronics are demonstrated by transferring the as-patterned high crystallinity carbon patterns to the flexible substrate, and showing asymmetric tensile-compressive response with high output resolution. These results will pave the way to the next-generation carbon-based flexible electronics and mechanical sensors.

  7. Osteoblast response to nanocrystalline calcium hydroxyapatite depends on carbonate content.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brandy R; Mostafa, Amany; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2014-09-01

    Normal bone mineral is a carbonated-apatite, but there are limited data on the effect of mineral containing carbonate on cell response. We characterized surface chemical compositions of three experimental carbonated hydroxyapatite (CO3(2-) HA) substrates and investigated their effect on osteoblast differentiation. Carbonate was incorporated into the hydroxyapatite powders while phosphate and hydroxyl groups were shown to be reduced by analyzing the chemical composition of the substrate surfaces. CO3(2-) HA powders with increasing carbonate concentrations designated as C1 (3.88%), C2 (4.85%), and C3 (5.82%) were molded, pressed, and fired into 14 mm discs. We observed that calcium phosphate ratios increased monotonically with increasing carbonate content, whereas differentiation of MG63 cells decreased. CO3(2-) HA surfaces also affected factor production. Addition of carbonate caused a 70% reduction in osteoprotegerin (OPG) compared to cultures on pure HA, but the effect of carbonate was not dose-dependent. Low carbonate content reduced VEGF-A by 80%, but higher levels of carbonate reversed this effect in a concentration dependent manner, with the C3 VEFG-A levels approximately twice that of C1 levels. These observations collectively indicate that bone cells are sensitive to carbonate content in bone mineral and the effects of carbonate substitution vary with the outcome being measured. Overall, this study provides a preliminary understanding of how carbonate substitution within hydroxyapatite modulates cellular behavior. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A study of surface swelling caused by graphitisation during pulsed laser ablation of carbon allotrope with high content of sp3 bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadot, G. B. J.; Billingham, J.; Axinte, D. A.

    2017-06-01

    Experiments and theory are employed to investigate the laser ablation of boron doped diamond and tetrahedral amorphous carbon using nanosecond laser pulses. For a single laser pulse at low values of fluence, the laser induces a swelling of the surface due to graphitisation, whilst a high level of fluence leads to recession of the surface due to vaporization. To understand and investigate the underlying phenomena during the diamond-laser interaction, a model has been developed to reliably and quickly predict the behaviour of the surface and the thickness of the heat affected zone. The model is based on conservation of heat and mass during the laser-workpiece interaction. It consists of a one-dimensional system of non-linear equations that models the material heating, evaporation, graphitisation and plasma shielding. There is excellent agreement between numerical and experimental results for the position of the interfaces up to a high laser fluence. This model is the first to investigate the ablation of diamond that is able to capture surface swelling due to the graphitisation of the diamond layer, the graphite thickness and the amount of ablated material within a single framework. Furthermore, the model provides a novel methodology to investigate the thermal stability of diamond-like carbon films. The activation energy for tetrahedral amorphous carbon is obtained using the model with an accuracy of 3.15-0.22+1.0 eV.

  9. Mössbauer spectroscopic investigation of retained-austenite content of high-carbon tool steel during isothermal tempering of as-quenched samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bała, Piotr; Krawczyk, Janusz; Hanc, Aneta

    2009-04-01

    This work presents the results of investigations using Mössbauer spectroscopy technique and their interpretation concerning retained austenite (RA) and its transformation during tempering in relation to previously conducted dilatometric, microscopic and mechanical investigations. This research was conducted on a new high-carbon alloy steel 120 MnCrMoV8-6-4-2, which was designed in 1998, in Phase Transformations Research Group at the AGH UST. The influence of the tempering time on the mechanical and chemical stability of retained austenite and on the products of its transformation, nucleation and solubility of ɛ carbides and cementite nucleation and growth, was determined.

  10. A Reassessment of Carbon Content in Tropical Trees

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam R.; Thomas, Sean C.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of carbon (C) content in live wood is essential for quantifying tropical forest C stocks, yet generic assumptions (such as biomass consisting of 50% carbon on a weight/weight basis) remain widely used despite being supported by little chemical analysis. Empirical data from stem cores of 59 Panamanian rainforest tree species demonstrate that wood C content is highly variable among co-occurring species, with an average (47.4±2.51% S.D.) significantly lower than widely assumed values. Prior published values have neglected to account for volatile C content of tropical woods. By comparing freeze- and oven-dried wood samples, we show that volatile C is non-negligible, and excluding the volatile fraction underestimates wood C content by 2.48±1.28% (S.D.) on average. Wood C content varied substantially among species (from 41.9–51.6%), but was neither strongly phylogenetically conserved, nor correlated to ecological (i.e. wood density, maximum tree height) or demographic traits (i.e. relative growth rate, mortality rate). Overall, assuming generic C fractions in tropical wood overestimates forest C stocks by ∼3.3–5.3%, a non-trivial margin of error leading to overestimates of 4.1–6.8 Mg C ha−1 in a 50-ha forest dynamics plot on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. In addition to addressing other sources of error in tropical forest C accounting, such as uncertainties in allometric models and belowground biomass, compilation and use of species-specific C fractions for tropical tree species would substantially improve both local and global estimates of terrestrial C stocks and fluxes. PMID:21858157

  11. Automotive high color carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ducote, R.E.; Dees, R.G.; Musick, V.L.

    1988-06-14

    A method of making a low porosity carbon black is described comprising: (1) feeding into a carbon black reactor a carbonaceous feed; (2) contacting the feed in the reactor with combustion gases containing oxygen thereby cracking the feed to produce carbon black; and (3) contacting the produced carbon black in the reactor with vaporizable hydrocarbon oil injected into the reaction at a point where the carbon black forming reaction is substantially complete to at least partially quench the carbon black producing reaction, the vaporizable hydrocarbon oil being cracked and serving to plate the carbon black to reduce the porosity thereof.

  12. Modelling and mapping the topsoil organic carbon content for Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempen, Bas; Kaaya, Abel; Ngonyani Mhaiki, Consolatha; Kiluvia, Shani; Ruiperez-Gonzalez, Maria; Batjes, Niels; Dalsgaard, Soren

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC), held in soil organic matter, is a key indicator of soil health and plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. The soil can act as a net source or sink of carbon depending on land use and management. Deforestation and forest degradation lead to the release of vast amounts of carbon from the soil in the form of greenhouse gasses, especially in tropical countries. Tanzania has a high deforestation rate: it is estimated that the country loses 1.1% of its total forested area annually. During 2010-2013 Tanzania has been a pilot country under the UN-REDD programme. This programme has supported Tanzania in its initial efforts towards reducing greenhouse gas emission from forest degradation and deforestation and towards preserving soil carbon stocks. Formulation and implementation of the national REDD strategy requires detailed information on the five carbon pools among these the SOC pool. The spatial distribution of SOC contents and stocks was not available for Tanzania. The initial aim of this research, was therefore to develop high-resolution maps of the SOC content for the country. The mapping exercise was carried out in a collaborative effort with four Tanzanian institutes and data from the Africa Soil Information Service initiative (AfSIS). The mapping exercise was provided with over 3200 field observations on SOC from four sources; this is the most comprehensive soil dataset collected in Tanzania so far. The main source of soil samples was the National Forest Monitoring and Assessment (NAFORMA). The carbon maps were generated by means of digital soil mapping using regression-kriging. Maps at 250 m spatial resolution were developed for four depth layers: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm, and 0-30 cm. A total of 37 environmental GIS data layers were prepared for use as covariates in the regression model. These included vegetation indices, terrain parameters, surface temperature, spectral reflectances, a land cover map and a small

  13. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S.; Morono, Y.; Littmann, S.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Into the seafloor, a radical decline in nutrient and energy availability poses strong metabolic demands to any residing life. However, a sedimentary microbial ecosystem seems to maintain itself close to what we understand to be the energetic limit of life. Since a complex sediment matrix is interfering with the analysis of whole cells and sub-cellular compounds such as cell wall and membrane molecules, little is known about the physiological properties of cells in the deep biosphere. Here we focus on the size and carbon content of cells from a 90-m sediment drill core retrieved in October 2013 at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea, in 437 meters water depth. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via fluorescence microscopy (FM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography after cells had additionally been purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Cell-carbon turnover times were estimated using an amino acid racemization model that is based on the built-in molecular clock of aspartic acid, which due to racemization alternates between the D- and L-isomeric configurations over timescales of thousands of years at low in-situ temperatures (≈4˚C). We find that the majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or rod-shaped morphology, and that absolute values for cell volume are strongly dependent on the method used, spanning three orders of magnitude from approximately 0.001 to 1 µm3 for both coccoid and rod-shaped cells. From the surface to the deepest sample measured (≈60 mbsf), cell volume decreases by an order of magnitude, and carbon content is in the lower range (<20 fg C cell-1) of what has been reported in the literature as conversion factors. Cell-carbon is turned over approximately

  14. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  15. Soil carbon content and CO2 flux along a hydrologic gradient in a High-Arctic tundra lake basin, Northwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, J.; Klein, E. S.; Welker, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Franklin, M.

    2015-12-01

    High Arctic landscapes are composed of watershed basins that vary in size and ecohydrology, but typically have a plant community complex that ranges from dry tundra to moist tundra to wet sedge systems along water body shorelines. The spatial extent of these plant communities reflects mean annual soil moisture and temperature, and is vulnerable to changes in climate conditions. Soil moisture and temperature significantly influence organic matter microbial activity and decomposition, and can affect the fate of soil carbon in tundra soils. Consequently, due to the unique soil carbon differences between tundra plant communities, shifts in their spatial extent may drive future High Arctic biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Understanding this terrestrial-atmosphere trace gas feedback, however, requires quantification of the rates and patterns of CO2 exchange along soil moisture gradients and the associated soil properties. In summer of 2015, soil CO2 flux rate, soil moisture and temperature were measured along a soil moisture gradient spanning three vegetation zones (dry tundra, wet tundra, and wet grassland) in a snow melt-fed lake basin near Thule Greenland. Mean soil temperature during the 2015 growing season was greater in dry tundra than in wet tundra and wet grassland (13.0 ± 1.2, 7.8 ± 0.8, and 5.5 ± 0.9°C, respectively). Mean volumetric soil moisture differed among all three vegetation zones where the soil moisture gradient ranged from 9 % (dry tundra) to 34 % (wet tundra) to 51 % (wet grassland). Mean soil CO2 flux was significantly greater in the wet grassland (1.7 ± 0.1 μmol m-2 s-1) compared to wet tundra (0.9 ± 0.2 μmol m-2 s-1) and dry tundra (1.2 ± 0.2 μmol m-2 s-1). Soil CO2 flux increased and decreased with seasonal warming and cooling of soil temperature. Although soil temperature was an important seasonal driver of soil CO2 flux rates, differences in mean seasonal soil CO2 flux rates among vegetation zones appeared to be a function of the

  16. Building soil carbon content of Texas Vertisols

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soils in central Texas, USA (Udic and Entic Pellusterts) have been degraded by intensive agricultural practices. This was typified by loss of soil organic carbon from about 1880 to 1949 from a concentration of about 6.5 percent in the surface to about 1 percent. Agriculture practices since 1949 are...

  17. Age, carbon content and climatic stability of West Siberian peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, G.; Frey, K. E.; Sheng, Y.; Peugh, S.; Velichko, A.; Kremenetski, K.; Borisova, O.; Forster, R. R.

    2001-12-01

    The West Siberian Lowland (WSL) is the world's largest high-latitude wetland, with a 1.8 X 106 km2 forest-palustrine zone covering nearly 2/3 of western Siberia. Over half of this area consists of peatlands, which since the early Holocene have sequestered atmospheric carbon in the form of undecomposed plant matter. The total carbon pool of the WSL has been roughly estimated at ~215 Pg C, suggesting that nearly one-tenth of the world's soil carbon pool lies stored in these peatlands. The region has recently attracted attention from the global change community, owing to recent studies elsewhere that suggest CO2 and methane exchange from peatlands may change dramatically under a warming climate. Since 1999 an international team of scientists from UCLA, The Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk State University and the University of Utah, has conducted a major field and satellite remote sensing study of the role of WSL peatlands in the global carbon cycle. Central to the study is the extraction of peat cores throughout the region, from which peatland age and carbon content are determined from thermal analysis and radiocarbon dating. After successful summer field campaigns in 1999, 2000 and 2001 we have collected nearly 100 cores, as well as thousands of other measurements and samples of peat depth, surface moisture, botany, water geochemistry, river sediment load and land surface cover. The scope and scale of these data are unprecedented in the region. Numerous satellite images of the area have also been compiled, including 150 m MSU-SK visible/near-infrared imagery from the Russian RESURS-01 platform since 1994, ERS synthetic aperture radar and scatterometer products since 1991, DMSP SSM/I passive microwave data since 1987, and 52 Landsat MSS scenes acquired in 1973. These satellite datasets are now being combined with point field observations to determine the Holocene evolution, total carbon content, desiccation susceptibility and contemporary wetness variability of the

  18. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  19. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  20. Increasing the Content of High-Content Screening

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shantanu; Genovesio, Auguste

    2014-01-01

    Target-based high-throughput screening (HTS) has recently been critiqued for its relatively poor yield compared to phenotypic screening approaches. One type of phenotypic screening, image-based high-content screening (HCS), has been seen as particularly promising. In this article, we assess whether HCS is as high content as it can be. We analyze HCS publications and find that although the number of HCS experiments published each year continues to grow steadily, the information content lags behind. We find that a majority of high-content screens published so far (60−80%) made use of only one or two image-based features measured from each sample and disregarded the distribution of those features among each cell population. We discuss several potential explanations, focusing on the hypothesis that data analysis traditions are to blame. This includes practical problems related to managing large and multidimensional HCS data sets as well as the adoption of assay quality statistics from HTS to HCS. Both may have led to the simplification or systematic rejection of assays carrying complex and valuable phenotypic information. We predict that advanced data analysis methods that enable full multiparametric data to be harvested for entire cell populations will enable HCS to finally reach its potential. PMID:24710339

  1. Caffeine content of energy drinks, carbonated sodas, and other beverages.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Rachel R; Goldberger, Bruce A; Cone, Edward J

    2006-03-01

    The caffeine content of 10 energy drinks, 19 carbonated sodas, and 7 other beverages was determined. In addition, the variability of the caffeine content of Coca-Cola fountain soda was evaluated. Caffeine was isolated from the samples by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. The caffeine concentration of the caffeinated energy drinks ranged from none detected to 141.1 mg/serving. The caffeine content of the carbonated sodas ranged from none detected to 48.2 mg/serving, and the content of the other beverages ranged from < 2.7 to 105.7 mg/serving. The intra-assay mean, standard deviation, and % coefficient of variation for the Coca-Cola fountain samples were 44.5, 2.95, and 6.64 mg/serving, respectively.

  2. Carbonated apatites obtained by the hydrolysis of monetite: influence of carbonate content on adhesion and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Ilse Y; Van den Vreken, Natasja M F; Declercq, Heidi A; Cornelissen, Maria J; Verbeeck, Ronald M H

    2010-04-01

    The influence of the carbonate content in apatites on the adhesion and the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells was investigated. B-type carbonated apatites (DCAps) were prepared by the hydrolysis of monetite (CaHPO(4), DCP) in solutions with a carbonate concentration ranging from 0.001 to 0.075 mol l(-1). Stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (DCAp0) was synthesized in carbonate-free solution. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on the compacted DCAps and cell adhesion and proliferation were analysed after 24h and 7 days, respectively, using a MTS assay and fluorescence microscopy. Cell adhesion tends to increase with increasing carbonate content for carbonate contents between 0 and 6.9 wt.% and levels out to an acceptable value (+ or - 50% compared to the control) for carbonate contents between 6.9 and 16.1 wt.%. Only DCAps with a carbonate content equal to or higher than 11% support high cell proliferation comparable to the control. On the latter DCAps, the cells have a spread morphology and form a near-confluent layer. A decrease in charge density and crystallinity at the apatite surface, as well as the formation of more spheroidal crystals with increasing carbonate content, might attribute to changes in composition and three-dimensional structure of the protein adsorption layer and hence to the observed cell behaviour. Consequently, only DCAps with a high carbonate content, mimicking early in vivo mineralization, are possible candidates for bone regeneration.

  3. Protein carbon content evolves in response to carbon availability and may influence the fate of duplicated genes

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, Jason G; Wagner, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Natural selection can influence even the lowest level of biological organization, the atomic composition of biological macromolecules. In analysing genome-scale gene expression data, we find that ancestral yeast strains preferentially express proteins with low carbon content during carbon limitation, relative to strains selected in the laboratory under carbon limitation. The likely reason is that the artificially selected strains acquire adaptations that refine their response to the limitation or partly circumvent the limiting condition. This finding extends previous work which shows that natural selection can act on the atomic costs of proteins. We also show that genes with high carbon and nitrogen content are less likely to have duplicates, indicating that atomic composition also plays a role in evolution by gene duplication. Taken together, our results contribute to the emerging view that protein atomic composition influences genome and transcriptome evolution. PMID:17264057

  4. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  5. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  6. Electric-arc synthesis of soot with high content of higher fullerenes in parallel arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutlov, A. E.; Nekrasov, V. M.; Sergeev, A. G.; Bubnov, V. P.; Kareev, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Soot with a relatively high content of higher fullerenes (C76, C78, C80, C82, C84, C86, etc.) is synthesized in a parallel arc upon evaporation of pure carbon electrodes. The content of higher fullerenes in soot extract amounts to 13.8 wt % when two electrodes are simultaneously burnt in electric-arc reactor. Such a content is comparable with the content obtained upon evaporation of composite graphite electrodes with potassium carbonate impurity.

  7. Estimation of black carbon content for biomass burning aerosols from multi-channel Raman lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Marmureanu, Luminita; Nicolae, Doina

    2015-04-01

    Biomass burning due to natural processes (forest fires) or anthropical activities (agriculture, thermal power stations, domestic heating) is an important source of aerosols with a high content of carbon components (black carbon and organic carbon). Multi-channel Raman lidars provide information on the spectral dependence of the backscatter and extinction coefficients, embedding information on the black carbon content. Aerosols with a high content of black carbon have large extinction coefficients and small backscatter coefficients (strong absorption), while aerosols with high content of organic carbon have large backscatter coefficients (weak absorption). This paper presents a method based on radiative calculations to estimate the black carbon content of biomass burning aerosols from 3b+2a+1d lidar signals. Data is collected at Magurele, Romania, at the cross-road of air masses coming from Ukraine, Russia and Greece, where burning events are frequent during both cold and hot seasons. Aerosols are transported in the free troposphere, generally in the 2-4 km altitude range, and reaches the lidar location after 2-3 days. Optical data are collected between 2011-2012 by a multi-channel Raman lidar and follows the quality assurance program of EARLINET. Radiative calculations are made with libRadTran, an open source radiative model developed by ESA. Validation of the retrievals is made by comparison to a co-located C-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, biomass burning, radiative model, black carbon Acknowledgment: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project no. 39/2012 - SIAFIM, and by Romanian Partnerships in priority areas PNII implemented with MEN-UEFISCDI support, project no. 309/2014 - MOBBE

  8. Influence of solid content and maximum temperature on the performance of a hydrothermal carbonization reactor.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Imanol; Marchetti, Paola; Lohri, Christian Riuji; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2017-01-23

    Hydrothermal carbonization is a thermochemical process that converts wet organic matter into a sterile, high-calorific solid material called hydrochar. This technology is considered an interesting option for low- and middle-income urban settings, often lacking adequate services and high fraction of wet organic waste. The aim of this study was to study the influence of the loading rate (total solid content) and the maximum temperature reached on the resulting energy ratio (ER) of the process and the fuel properties of the obtained hydrochar. Ten experiments were carried out with a standardized biowaste-feedstock. Different solid contents (2.54%, 4.93%, 7.44%, 9.45%, 12.83%, 15.2% by weight) and different targeted maximum temperatures (170°C, 180°C, 190°C, 200°C) were tested. Compared to the feedstock, all resulting hydrochars had an increased higher heating value (HHV) (average of 29.2 MJ/kgdb) and carbon content (average of 66.9%db) than the original biowaste (19.3 MJ/kgdb and 46.2%db, respectively). The HHV obtained were similar to those of charcoal (29.6 MJ/kg). Higher solid contents resulted in higher hydrochar yields and carbon efficiencies, whereas higher temperatures resulted in higher carbon content and HHV of the hydrochar. The experiment with the highest solid content (15.2%wt) achieved an ER > 1.

  9. Carbon and Nitrogen Content of Natural Planktonic Bacteria †

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Toshi

    1986-01-01

    A method of estimating carbon and nitrogen content per unit of natural bacterial cell volume was developed. This method is based on the difference in the retentiveness of bacteria between two kinds of glass fiber filter, GF/C and GF/F (Whatman, Inc., Clifton, N.J.). Biovolume and biomass (carbon and nitrogen content) of bacteria which passed through the GF/C but not the GF/F filter were estimated with an epifluorescence microscopy and a CHN analyzer, respectively. From seasonal determinations of natural planktonic bacteria in epilimnetic waters of a mesotrophic lake, the conversion factors of 106 fg of C/μm3 and 25 fg of N/μm3 were derived as average values. By using these values, the contribution of bacteria to the biomass of lake plankton is discussed. PMID:16347114

  10. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziglo, M. J.; Nelson, A. E.; Heo, G.; Major, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm -2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation ( p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  11. Carbon cycling in high-latitude ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alan; Frolking, Stephen; Holland, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    The carbon-rich soils and peatlands of high-latitude ecosystems could substantially influence atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and CH4 in a changing climate. Currently, cold, often waterlogged conditions retard decomposition, and release of carbon back to the atmosphere may be further slowed by physical protection of organic matter in permafrost. As a result, many northern ecosystems accumulate carbon over time (Billings et al., 1982; Poole and Miller, 1982), and although such rates of accumulation are low, thousands of years of development have left Arctic ecosystems with an extremely high soil carbon content; Schlesinger's (1984) average value of 20.4 kg C/m(sup 2) leads to a global estimate of 163 x 10(exp 15) g C. All GCM simulations of a doubled CO2 climate predict the greatest warming to occur in the polar regions (Dickinson, 1986; Mitchell, 1989). Given the extensive northern carbon pools and the strong sensitivity of decomposition processes to temperature, even a slight warming of the soil could dramatically alter the carbon balance of Arctic ecosystems. If warming accelerates rates of decomposition more than rates of primary production, a sizeable additional accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere could occur. Furthermore, CH4 produced in anaerobic soils and peatlands of the Arctic already composes a good percentage of the global efflux (Cicerone and Oremlund, 1988); if northern soils become warmer and wetter as a whole, CH4 emissions could dramatically rise. A robust understanding of the primary controls of carbon fluxes in Arctic ecosystems is critical. As a framework for a systematic examination of these controls, we discussed a conceptual model of regional-scale Arctic carbon turnover, including CH4 production, and based upon the Century soil organic matter model.

  12. Soil Water Cycling Links to Carbon Content between Ecosystems in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, K. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Stannard, D. I.; Mladinich, C. S.; Thienelt, T. S.; Blanken, P.

    2011-12-01

    Near surface soil-water content is crucial to the sustainability of an ecosystem. Additionally, the feedbacks between soil water and soil carbon improve the ability to predict carbon sequestration rates. Organic-carbon content in surface soils influences soil texture and, subsequently, water holding capacity. Preliminary research for two growing seasons (2010 and 2011) compares soil water, temperature, heat flux, and evapotranspiration (ET) with soil organic carbon content at several sites in the Colorado Front Range. Continuous measurements of precipitation, soil moisture and temperature, and energy fluxes were conducted from eddy covariance flux towers at three sites around metropolitan Denver: one urban site and two adjacent sites, a montane forest (Flying J Ranch Open Space), and a native tallgrass prairie (Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge (NWR)). Irrigation data were obtained for the Denver urban site and added to its precipitation to obtain total water inputs. Soil samples (0-5cm) were collected at each tower site and analyzed for bulk density, volumetric water content, and organic carbon content. Soil water inputs and losses (as ET) were analyzed for each site and compared to soil organic carbon content. Rocky Flats NWR soils contained the highest organic carbon content (20-30 percent), while the urban site and Flying J Ranch soils contained between 10-15 percent. Comparing grassland sites, the urban soil received 5 times higher water input (600mm, more than half from irrigation) in 2010 than those of Rocky Flats. Despite less water input, the Rocky Flats site developed more soil organic carbon, possibly due to large amounts of grassland biomass mineralization and moderate soil moisture conditions through the season. The Denver urban site demonstrated less soil moisture variability in response to surface-water inputs from precipitation compared to soils at the native grassland and montane sites, perhaps limiting the conditions under which soil carbon

  13. The influence of carbon content on cyclic fatigue of NiTi SMA wires.

    PubMed

    Matheus, T C U; Menezes, W M M; Rigo, O D; Kabayama, L K; Viana, C S C; Otubo, J

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate two NiTi wires with different carbon and oxygen contents in terms of mechanical resistance to rotary bending fatigue (RBF) under varied parameters of strain amplitude and rotational speed. The wires produced from two vacuum induction melting (VIM) processed NiTi ingots were tested, Ti-49.81 at%Ni and Ti-50.33 at%Ni, named VIM 1 and VIM 2. A brief analysis related to wire fabrication is also presented, as well as chemical and microstructural analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and optical microscope, respectively. A computer controlled RBF machine was specially constructed for the tests. Three radii of curvature were used: 50.0, 62.5 and 75.0 mm, respectively, R(1), R(2) and R(3), resulting in three strain amplitudes ε(a) : 1.00%, 0.80% and 0.67%. The selected rotational speeds were 250 and 455 rpm. The VIM 1 wire had a high carbon content of 0.188 wt% and a low oxygen content of 0.036 wt%. The oxygen and carbon contents of wire VIM 2 did not exceed their maximum, of 0.070 and 0.050 wt%, according to ASTM standard (ASTM F-2063-00 2001). The wire with lower carbon content performed better when compared to the one with higher carbon content, withstanding 29,441 and 12,895 cycles, respectively, to fracture. The surface quality of the wire was associated with resistance to cyclic fatigue. Surface defects acted as stress concentrators points. Overall, the number of cycles to failure was higher for VIM 2 wires with lower carbon content. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  14. Measurement of carbon storage in landfills from the biogenic carbon content of excavated waste samples.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Barlaz, Morton A

    2013-10-01

    Landfills are an anaerobic ecosystem and represent the major disposal alternative for municipal solid waste (MSW) in the U.S. While some fraction of the biogenic carbon, primarily cellulose (Cel) and hemicellulose (H), is converted to carbon dioxide and methane, lignin (L) is essentially recalcitrant. The biogenic carbon that is not mineralized is stored within the landfill. This carbon storage represents a significant component of a landfill carbon balance. The fraction of biogenic carbon that is not reactive in the landfill environment and therefore stored was derived for samples of excavated waste by measurement of the total organic carbon, its biogenic fraction, and the remaining methane potential. The average biogenic carbon content of the excavated samples was 64.6±18.0% (average±standard deviation), while the average carbon storage factor was 0.09±0.06g biogenic-C stored per g dry sample or 0.66±0.16g biogenic-C stored per g biogenic C. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gajewski, K. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Viau, A. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Sawada, M. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Atkinson, D. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Wilson, S. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of Sphagnum spores in North America and Eurasia are mapped for the past 21ka, as described in Gajewski et al. (2002). In summary, spore data were taken from existing pollen data bases, as were radiocarbon chronologies. The abundance of Sphagnum spores was mapped at 2000-year intervals beginning 21000 years BP (before present). The present-day distribution of abundant Sphagnum spores corresponds closely to areas with peatland development, with maximum Sphagnum abundance between 630 and 1300 mm annual precipitation and between -2° and 60°C mean annual air temperature. Carbon content of peatlands was generated from estimated peatland area, calculated values of peat thickness, and specified values of bulk density (112 × 103 g m-3) and fraction of carbon (51.7%).

  16. Carbon content of common airborne fungal species and fungal contribution to aerosol organic carbon in a subtropical city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jessica Y. W.; Chan, Chak K.; Lee, C.-T.; Lau, Arthur P. S.

    Interest in the role and contribution of fungi to atmospheric aerosols and processes grows in the past decade. Substantial data or information such as fungal mass or carbon loading to ambient aerosols is however still lacking. This study aimed to quantify the specific organic carbon content (OC per spore) of eleven fungal species commonly found airborne in the subtropics, and estimated their contribution to organic carbon in aerosols. The specific OC contents showed a size-dependent relationship ( r = 0.64, p < 0.05) and ranged from 3.6 to 201.0 pg carbon per spore or yeast cell, giving an average of 6.0 pg carbon per spore (RSD 51%) for spore or cell size less than 10 μm. In accounting for natural variations in the composition and abundance of fungal population, weighted-average carbon content for field samples was adopted using the laboratory determined specific OC values. An average of 5.97 pg carbon per spore (RSD 3.8%) was enumerated from 28 field samples collected at the university campus. The mean fungal OC concentration was 3.7, 6.0 and 9.7 ng m -3 in PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM 10, respectively. These corresponded to 0.1%, 1.2% and 0.2% of the total OC in PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM 10, respectively. In the study period, rain provided periods with low total OC but high fungal prevalence and fungi contributed 7-32% OC in PM 2.5-10 or 2.4-7.1% OC in PM 10. More extensive studies are deserved to better understand the spatial-, temporal- and episodic dependency on the fungal OC contribution to the atmospheric aerosols.

  17. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  18. Snapshot prediction of carbon productivity, carbon and protein content in a Southern Ocean diatom using FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sackett, Olivia; Petrou, Katherina; Reedy, Brian; Hill, Ross; Doblin, Martina; Beardall, John; Ralph, Peter; Heraud, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Diatoms, an important group of phytoplankton, bloom annually in the Southern Ocean, covering thousands of square kilometers and dominating the region's phytoplankton communities. In their role as the major food source to marine grazers, diatoms supply carbon, nutrients and energy to the Southern Ocean food web. Prevailing environmental conditions influence diatom phenotypic traits (for example, photophysiology, macromolecular composition and morphology), which in turn affect the transfer of energy, carbon and nutrients to grazers and higher trophic levels, as well as oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The paucity of phenotypic data on Southern Ocean phytoplankton limits our understanding of the ecosystem and how it may respond to future environmental change. Here we used a novel approach to create a 'snapshot' of cell phenotype. Using mass spectrometry, we measured nitrogen (a proxy for protein), total carbon and carbon-13 enrichment (carbon productivity), then used this data to build spectroscopy-based predictive models. The models were used to provide phenotypic data for samples from a third sample set. Importantly, this approach enabled the first ever rate determination of carbon productivity from a single time point, circumventing the need for time-series measurements. This study showed that Chaetoceros simplex was less productive and had lower protein and carbon content during short-term periods of high salinity. Applying this new phenomics approach to natural phytoplankton samples could provide valuable insight into understanding phytoplankton productivity and function in the marine system.

  19. Snapshot prediction of carbon productivity, carbon and protein content in a Southern Ocean diatom using FTIR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sackett, Olivia; Petrou, Katherina; Reedy, Brian; Hill, Ross; Doblin, Martina; Beardall, John; Ralph, Peter; Heraud, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms, an important group of phytoplankton, bloom annually in the Southern Ocean, covering thousands of square kilometers and dominating the region's phytoplankton communities. In their role as the major food source to marine grazers, diatoms supply carbon, nutrients and energy to the Southern Ocean food web. Prevailing environmental conditions influence diatom phenotypic traits (for example, photophysiology, macromolecular composition and morphology), which in turn affect the transfer of energy, carbon and nutrients to grazers and higher trophic levels, as well as oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The paucity of phenotypic data on Southern Ocean phytoplankton limits our understanding of the ecosystem and how it may respond to future environmental change. Here we used a novel approach to create a ‘snapshot' of cell phenotype. Using mass spectrometry, we measured nitrogen (a proxy for protein), total carbon and carbon-13 enrichment (carbon productivity), then used this data to build spectroscopy-based predictive models. The models were used to provide phenotypic data for samples from a third sample set. Importantly, this approach enabled the first ever rate determination of carbon productivity from a single time point, circumventing the need for time-series measurements. This study showed that Chaetoceros simplex was less productive and had lower protein and carbon content during short-term periods of high salinity. Applying this new phenomics approach to natural phytoplankton samples could provide valuable insight into understanding phytoplankton productivity and function in the marine system. PMID:26230047

  20. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM

  1. Microstructural characterization of high-carbon ferrochromium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, A.; Navara, E.

    1996-04-01

    Light optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for high-carbon ferrochromium microstructural analysis. Different microstructures were observed for industrially and laboratory-produced ferroalloys. Primary carbides of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} with chromium ferrite were found in the industrially produced, slowly solidified, and cooled ferroalloy, while primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides accompanied a eutectic mixture of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides and chromium ferrite in the laboratory-melted and in the water-solidified and water-cooled materials. Different microstructural arrangements are directly related to the friability properties of this material, which characterizes its resistance to abrasion on handling and impact. In ferrochromium upgraded by carbon content reduction, the eutectic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} hexagonal carbides are partly replaced by M{sub 23}C{sub 6} dendritic carbides. The presence of dendritic carbides in the ferrochromium eutectic microstructure can be interpreted as a proof of a lower carbon content, raising the commercial value of the ferroalloy. The hexagonal M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides exhibited a central hollow along the longitudinal axis, and on metallographic samples they looked like screw nuts. A model of the solidification mechanism for such crystals is proposed.

  2. Investigating the Role of Carbonate Ion Concentration on the Magnesium Content of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, C.; Dove, P. M.; Han, N.

    2011-12-01

    The fields of biomineralization and carbonate geochemistry are undergoing a paradigm shift with the realization that the formation of calcite with diverse compositions and textures can be understood within the framework of multiple pathways to mineralization. Many organisms do not form their skeletons via the classical step-growth process, but instead mineralization occurs through a mesocrystal pathway that begins with the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which subsequently transforms to calcite. Little is known about factors that regulate this type of calcification because the last 50 years of research have focused almost entirely on step-growth processes. In particular, new findings indicate that the chemical signatures and properties of calcites that form via an amorphous pathway are significantly different. Variable temperature has been shown to influence the amount of magnesium that is incorporated into ACC, but the effect of alkalinity has not been constrained. Here, a flow-through method was developed to produce ACC within a geochemically relevant pH range and with a constant supersaturation, and to determine the effect of carbonate ion concentration on magnesium uptake. The experimental approach uses a high precision syringe pump to prepare ACC under specified and constant chemical conditions. This study used two syringes that contained: 1) 100 ml of MgCl2?6H2O and CaCl2?2H2O such that the Mg/Ca ratio is fixed at 5:1 (modern seawater), and 2) 100 ml of 60mM - 400mM NaHCO3. The initial sodium bicarbonate solutions were buffered to a pH of 9.75 using NaOH, and upon mixing with the 5:1 Mg/Ca solution the resulting pH range was 9.2 - 9.7. All experiments were performed at temperatures between 21.5 and 23 degrees Celsius. Solution and solids were collected on 0.20 micron filter paper with a vacuum pump running continuously. Experiments were typically conducted for an hour and a half and all samples were rinsed with distilled deionized water before

  3. High dielectric permittivity and improved mechanical and thermal properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride) composites with low carbon nanotube content: effect of composite processing on phase behavior and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer Kumar, G.; Vishnupriya, D.; Chary, K. Suresh; Umasankar Patro, T.

    2016-09-01

    The composite processing technique and nanofiller concentration and its functionalization significantly alter the properties of polymer nanocomposites. To realize this, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) were dispersed in a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) matrix at carefully selected CNT concentrations by two illustrious methods, such as solution-cast and melt-mixing. Notwithstanding the processing method, CNTs induced predominantly the γ-phase in PVDF, instead of the commonly obtained β-phase upon nanofiller incorporation, and imparted significant improvements in dielectric properties. Acid-treatment of CNT improved its dispersion and interfacial adhesion significantly with PVDF, and induced a higher γ-phase content and better dielectric properties in PVDF as compared to pristine CNT. Further, the γ-phase content was found to be higher in solution-cast composites than that in melt-mixed counterparts, most likely due to solvent-induced crystallization in a controlled environment and slow solvent evaporation in the former case. However, interestingly, the melt-mixed composites showed a significantly higher dielectric constant at the onset of the CNT networked-structure as compared to the solution-cast composites. This suggests the possible role of CNT breakage during melt-mixing, which might lead to higher space-charge polarization at the polymer-CNT interface, and in turn an increased number of pseudo-microcapacitors in these composites than the solution-cast counterparts. Notably, PVDF with 0.13 vol% (volume fraction, f c = 0.0013) of acid-treated CNTs, prepared by melt-mixing, displayed the relative permittivity of ˜217 and capacitance of ˜5430 pF, loss tangent of ˜0.4 at 1 kHz and an unprecedented figure of merit of ˜105. We suggest a simple hypothesis for the γ-phase formation and evolution of the high dielectric constant in these composites. Further, the high-dielectric composite film showed marked improvements in mechanical and thermal properties

  4. Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L.

    2009-07-01

    Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

  5. Caffeine content of prepackaged national-brand and private-label carbonated beverages.

    PubMed

    Chou, K-H; Bell, L N

    2007-08-01

    Caffeine is a well-known stimulant that is added as an ingredient to various carbonated soft drinks. Due to its stimulatory and other physiological effects, individuals desire to know the exact amount of caffeine consumed from these beverages. This study analyzed the caffeine contents of 56 national-brand and 75 private-label store-brand carbonated beverages using high-performance liquid chromatography. Caffeine contents ranged from 4.9 mg/12 oz (IGA Cola) to 74 mg/12 oz (Vault Zero). Some of the more common national-brand carbonated beverages analyzed in this study with their caffeine contents were Coca-Cola (33.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Coke (46.3 mg/12 oz), Pepsi (38.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Pepsi (36.7 mg/12 oz), Dr Pepper (42.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Pepper (44.1 mg/12 oz), Mountain Dew (54.8 mg/12 oz), and Diet Mountain Dew (55.2 mg/12 oz). The Wal-Mart store-brand beverages with their caffeine contents were Sam's Cola (12.7 mg/12 oz), Sam's Diet Cola (13.3 mg/12 oz), Dr Thunder (30.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Thunder (29.9 mg/12 oz), and Mountain Lightning (46.5 mg/12 oz). Beverages from 14 other stores were also analyzed. Most store-brand carbonated beverages were found to contain less caffeine than their national-brand counterparts. The wide range of caffeine contents in carbonated beverages indicates that consumers would benefit from the placement of caffeine values on food labels.

  6. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.; Gleason, J.D.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a ??D from -580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a ??D of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO2 is 290 to 418 ppm with S 13C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and ??18O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO2 carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, ??18C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H2O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon (??13C = -17.6 per mil). The 18O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100?? to 1300??C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  7. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  8. Computer vision for high content screening.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Oren Z; Frey, Brendan J

    2016-01-01

    High Content Screening (HCS) technologies that combine automated fluorescence microscopy with high throughput biotechnology have become powerful systems for studying cell biology and drug screening. These systems can produce more than 100 000 images per day, making their success dependent on automated image analysis. In this review, we describe the steps involved in quantifying microscopy images and different approaches for each step. Typically, individual cells are segmented from the background using a segmentation algorithm. Each cell is then quantified by extracting numerical features, such as area and intensity measurements. As these feature representations are typically high dimensional (>500), modern machine learning algorithms are used to classify, cluster and visualize cells in HCS experiments. Machine learning algorithms that learn feature representations, in addition to the classification or clustering task, have recently advanced the state of the art on several benchmarking tasks in the computer vision community. These techniques have also recently been applied to HCS image analysis.

  9. High chloride content calcium silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojing; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2017-03-08

    Chloride is known to volatilize from silicate glass melts and until now, only a limited number of studies on oxychloride silicate glasses have been reported. In this paper we have synthesized silicate glasses that retain large amounts of CaCl2. The CaCl2 has been added to the calcium metasilicate composition (CaO·SiO2). Glasses were produced via a melt quench route and an average of 70% of the chloride was retained after melting. Up to 31.6 mol% CaCl2 has been successfully incorporated into these silicate glasses without the occurrence of crystallization. (29)Si MAS-NMR spectra showed the silicon being present mainly as a Q(2) silicate species. This suggests that chloride formed Cl-Ca(n) species, rather than Si-Cl bonds. Upon increasing the CaCl2 content, the Tg reduced markedly from 782 °C to 370 °C. Glass density and glass crystallization temperature decreased linearly with an increase in the CaCl2 content. However, both linear regressions revealed a breakpoint at a CaCl2 content just below 20 mol%. This might be attributed to a significant change in the structure and is also correlated with the nature of the crystallizing phases formed upon heat treatment. The glasses with less than 19.2 mol% CaCl2 crystallized to wollastonite, whilst the compositions with CaCl2 content equal to or greater than 19.2 mol% are thought to crystallize to CaCl2. In practice, the crystallization of CaCl2 could not occur until the crystallization temperature fell below the melting point of CaCl2. The implications of the results along with the high chloride retention are discussed.

  10. High tocopherol and triacylglycerol contents in Pinus pinea L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Nizar; Tlili, Nizar; Ben Ammar, Kamel; Khaldi, Abdelhamid; Fady, Bruno; Triki, Saida

    2009-01-01

    Oleaginous seeds are among the functional foods most recognized for their tocopherols and triacylglycerols because of their role in lipid metabolism. In this paper, the tocopherol and triacylglycerol contents in seeds of several Pinus pinea L. populations around the Mediterranean Basin were investigated. Lipids were extracted from fully ripen seeds with petroleum ether. The tocopherol (alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, and delta-tocopherol) contents were, respectively, 15.34+/-3.75 ppm, 1,681.75+/-404.03 ppm and 41.87+/-9.79 ppm. Lipids (mainly triacylglycerols) in P. pinea seeds averaged 48% on a dry weight basis. Triacylglycerols with an equivalent carbon number of 44 (32.27%) and of 46 (30.91%) were dominant. The major triacylglycerol was LLO (24.06%). Tocopherols and triacylglycerols were present at remarkably high levels, thus making P. pinea oil a valuable source of antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids with varying levels across the geographical range of P. pinea.

  11. Lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide based low ethylene carbonate content electrolyte with unusual solvation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masashi

    2017-08-01

    We prepared a lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI)-based low ethylene carbonate (EC) content electrolyte as a new electrolyte. LiFSI enough dissociates in mixed solvents containing only a small amount of EC and the LiFSI-based low EC content electrolyte shows a high ionic conductivity comparable to that of a conventional LiPF6-based high EC content electrolyte. In addition, the LiFSI-based low EC content electrolyte has an unusual solvation state of Li ion and we consider that the desolvation process from Li ion in our new electrolyte system is different from that in the conventional high EC content systems. A graphite half-cell assembled with our new electrolyte shows a quite low Li ion transfer resistance and outstanding charge and discharge rate performance compared to the conventional high EC content systems. A graphite/LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cell assembled with our new electrolyte also shows superior charge and discharge rate performance and excellent long cycle stability.

  12. Effect of carbon content on friction and wear of cast irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with cast irons and wrought steels containing various amounts of carbon in the alloy structure in contact with 52100 steel. Gray cast irons were found to exhibit lower friction and wear characteristics than white cast irons. Further, gray cast iron wear was more sensitive to carbon content than was white. Wear with gray cast iron was linearly related to load, and friction was found to be sensitive to relative humidity and carbon content. The form, in which the carbon is present in the alloy, is more important, as the carbon content and no strong relationship seems to exist between hardness of these ferrous alloys and wear.

  13. Effect of Carbon Contents and ti Addition on the Microstructure of Ultra-Low Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yinsheng; Dong, Jiling; Lee, Changyu; Shin, Keesam; Yoon, Jeongbong; Lee, Byungho

    2011-06-01

    The microstructures of a series of ultra-low carbon (ULC) steels with various carbon contents (50-200ppm) and Ti addition (>500ppm) were studied by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The specimens were fabricated under the process of hot rolling, cold rolling and a two-step continuous annealing. The experimental results showed that the increase of carbon content decreased grain size, whereas the addition of Ti resulted in a larger grain size compared to those without Ti addition. Dislocation (cell) structures were introduced by cold rolling, but it was removed by the two-step annealing. Only MnS precipitated from the Ti-free specimens. However, a larger amount of fine TiN, a few coarse TiS and the extremely low number of much coarser Ti3AlC were observed in the Ti-added specimens. Besides, the reduction of MnS inclusion was obtained by the addition of the Ti.

  14. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on fatty acid contents and composition in the green microalga, Chlorella sp. 227.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunja; Lee, Dukhaeng; Luong, Thao Thanh; Park, Sora; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Taeho

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate and generalize the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on the growth of and lipid production in Chlorella sp. 227, several nutritional combinations consisting of different carbon and nitrogen sources and concentrations were given to the media for cultivation of Chlorella sp. 227, respectively. The growth rate and lipid content were affected largely by concentration rather than by sources. The maximum specific growth was negatively affected by low concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. There is a maximum allowable inorganic carbon concentration (less than 500~1,000 mM bicarbonate) in autotrophic culture, but the maximum lipid content per gram dry cell weight (g DCW) was little affected by the concentration of inorganic carbon within the concentration. The lipid content per g DCW was increased when the microalga was cultured with the addition of glucose and bicarbonate (mixotrophic) at a fixed nitrogen concentration and with the lowest nitrogen concentration (0.2 mM), relatively. Considering that lipid contents per g DCW increased in those conditions, it suggests that a high ratio of carbon to nitrogen in culture media promotes lipid accumulation in the cells. Interestingly, a significant increase of the oleic acid amount to total fatty acids was observed in those conditions. These results showed the possibility to induce lipid production of high quality and content per g DCW by modifying the cultivation conditions.

  15. Influence of moisture content and temperature on degree of carbonation and the effect on Cu and Cr leaching from incineration bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenlin Yvonne; Heng, Kim Soon; Sun, Xiaolong; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the influence of moisture content and temperature on the degree of carbonation of municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration bottom ash (IBA) from two different incineration plants in Singapore. The initial rate of carbonation was affected by the nominal moisture content used. Carbonation temperature seemed to play a part in changing the actual moisture content of IBA during carbonation, which in turn affected the degree of carbonation. Results showed that 2h of carbonation was sufficient for the samples to reach a relatively high degree of carbonation that was close to the degree of carbonation observed after 1week of carbonation. Both Cu and Cr leaching also showed significant reduction after only 2h of carbonation. Therefore, the optimum moisture content and temperature were selected based on 2h of carbonation. The optimum moisture content was 15% for both incineration plants while the optimum temperature was different for the two incineration plants, at 35°C and 50°C. The effect on Cu and Cr leaching from IBA after accelerated carbonation was evaluated as a function of carbonation time. Correlation coefficient, Pearson's R, was used to determine the dominant leaching mechanism. The reduction in Cu leaching was found to be contributed by both formation of carbonate mineral and reduction of DOC leaching. On the other hand, Cr leaching seemed to be dominantly controlled by pH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests

    PubMed Central

    Talhelm, Alan F; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Kubiske, Mark E; Zak, Donald R; Campany, Courtney E; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F

    2014-01-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C content across communities and no meaningful interactions between CO2 and O3. Treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted primarily from changes in the near-surface mineral soil and tree C, particularly differences in woody tissues. Excluding the mineral soil, cumulative NPP was a strong predictor of ecosystem C content (r2 = 0.96). Elevated CO2 enhanced cumulative NPP by 39%, a consequence of a 28% increase in canopy nitrogen (N) content (g N m−2) and a 28% increase in N productivity (NPP/canopy N). In contrast, elevated O3 lowered NPP by 10% because of a 21% decrease in canopy N, but did not impact N productivity. Consequently, as the marginal impact of canopy N on NPP (ΔNPP/ΔN) decreased through time with further canopy development, the O3 effect on NPP dissipated. Within the mineral soil, there was less C in the top 0.1 m of soil under elevated O3 and less soil C from 0.1 to 0.2 m in depth under elevated CO2. Overall, these results suggest that elevated CO2 may create a sustained increase in NPP, whereas the long-term effect of elevated O3 on NPP will be smaller than expected. However, changes in soil C are not well-understood and limit our ability to predict changes in ecosystem C content. PMID:24604779

  17. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Talhelm, Alan F; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Kubiske, Mark E; Zak, Donald R; Campany, Courtney E; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F

    2014-08-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and tropospheric ozone (O3 ) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C content across communities and no meaningful interactions between CO2 and O3 . Treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted primarily from changes in the near-surface mineral soil and tree C, particularly differences in woody tissues. Excluding the mineral soil, cumulative NPP was a strong predictor of ecosystem C content (r(2) = 0.96). Elevated CO2 enhanced cumulative NPP by 39%, a consequence of a 28% increase in canopy nitrogen (N) content (g N m(-2) ) and a 28% increase in N productivity (NPP/canopy N). In contrast, elevated O3 lowered NPP by 10% because of a 21% decrease in canopy N, but did not impact N productivity. Consequently, as the marginal impact of canopy N on NPP (∆NPP/∆N) decreased through time with further canopy development, the O3 effect on NPP dissipated. Within the mineral soil, there was less C in the top 0.1 m of soil under elevated O3 and less soil C from 0.1 to 0.2 m in depth under elevated CO2 . Overall, these results suggest that elevated CO2 may create a sustained increase in NPP, whereas the long-term effect of elevated O3 on NPP will be smaller than expected. However, changes in soil C are not well-understood and limit our ability to predict changes in ecosystem C content. © 2014 The Authors Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Fructose content and composition of commercial HFCS-sweetened carbonated beverages

    PubMed Central

    White, J S; Hobbs, L J; Fernandez, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The obesigenic and related health effects of caloric sweeteners are subjects of much current research. Consumers can properly adjust their diets to conform to nutritional recommendations only if the sugars composition of foods and beverages is accurately measured and reported, a matter of recent concern. We tested the hypothesis that high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) used in commercial carbonated beverages conforms to commonly assumed fructose percentages and industry technical specifications, and fulfills beverage product label regulations and Food Chemicals Codex-stipulated standards. Design: A high-pressure liquid chromatography method was developed and verified for analysis of sugars in carbonated beverages sweetened with HFCS-55. The method was used to measure percent fructose in three carbonated beverage categories. Method verification was demonstrated by acceptable linearity (R2>0.99), accuracy (94–104% recovery) and precision (RSD<2%). Result: Fructose comprised 55.58% of total sugars (95% confidence interval 55.51–55.65%), based on 160 total measurements by 2 independent laboratories of 80 randomly selected carbonated beverages sweetened with HFCS-55. The difference in fructose measurements between laboratories was significant but small (0.1%), and lacked relevance. Differences in fructose by product category or by product age were not statistically significant. Total sugars content of carbonated beverages showed close agreement within product categories (95% confidence interval=0.01–0.54%). Conclusions: Using verified analytical methodology for HFCS-sweetened carbonated beverages, this study confirmed the hypothesis that fructose as a percentage of total sugars is in close agreement with published specifications in industry technical data sheets, published literature values and governmental standards and requirements. Furthermore, total sugars content of commercial beverages is consistent with common industry practices for canned and

  19. Fructose content and composition of commercial HFCS-sweetened carbonated beverages.

    PubMed

    White, J S; Hobbs, L J; Fernandez, S

    2015-01-01

    The obesigenic and related health effects of caloric sweeteners are subjects of much current research. Consumers can properly adjust their diets to conform to nutritional recommendations only if the sugars composition of foods and beverages is accurately measured and reported, a matter of recent concern. We tested the hypothesis that high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) used in commercial carbonated beverages conforms to commonly assumed fructose percentages and industry technical specifications, and fulfills beverage product label regulations and Food Chemicals Codex-stipulated standards. A high-pressure liquid chromatography method was developed and verified for analysis of sugars in carbonated beverages sweetened with HFCS-55. The method was used to measure percent fructose in three carbonated beverage categories. Method verification was demonstrated by acceptable linearity (R(2)>0.99), accuracy (94-104% recovery) and precision (RSD < 2%). Fructose comprised 55.58% of total sugars (95% confidence interval 55.51-55.65%), based on 160 total measurements by 2 independent laboratories of 80 randomly selected carbonated beverages sweetened with HFCS-55. The difference in fructose measurements between laboratories was significant but small (0.1%), and lacked relevance. Differences in fructose by product category or by product age were not statistically significant. Total sugars content of carbonated beverages showed close agreement within product categories (95% confidence interval = 0.01-0.54%). Using verified analytical methodology for HFCS-sweetened carbonated beverages, this study confirmed the hypothesis that fructose as a percentage of total sugars is in close agreement with published specifications in industry technical data sheets, published literature values and governmental standards and requirements. Furthermore, total sugars content of commercial beverages is consistent with common industry practices for canned and bottled products and met the US Federal

  20. Facile synthesis of cellulose-based carbon with tunable N content for potential supercapacitor application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zehong; Peng, Xinwen; Zhang, Xiaoting; Jing, Shuangshuang; Zhong, Linxin; Sun, Runcang

    2017-08-15

    Producing hierarchical porous N-doped carbon from renewable biomass is an essential and sustainable way for future electrochemical energy storage. Herein we cost-efficiently synthesized N-doped porous carbon from renewable cellulose by using urea as a low-cost N source, without any activation process. The as-prepared N-doped porous carbon (N-doped PC) had a hierarchical porous structure with abundant macropores, mesopores and micropores. The doping N resulted in more disordered structure, and the doping N content in N-doped PC could be easily tunable (0.68-7.64%). The doping N functionalities could significantly improve the supercapacitance of porous carbon, and even a little amount of doping N (e.g. 0.68%) could remarkably improve the supercapacitance. The as-prepared N-doped PC with a specific surface area of 471.7m(2)g(-1) exhibited a high specific capacitance of 193Fg(-1) and a better rate capability, as well as an outstanding cycling stability with a capacitance retention of 107% after 5000 cycles. Moreover, the N-doped porous carbon had a high energy density of 17.1Whkg(-1) at a power density of 400Wkg(-1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Contemporary carbon content of bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in butter.

    PubMed

    Tong, T; Ondov, J M; Buchholz, B A; VanDerveer, M C

    2016-01-01

    The fraction of naturally produced bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a ubiquitous plasticizer known to contaminate packaged foods, was determined for each of five 1.10 kg samples of unsalted market butter by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After extraction and concentration enrichment with liquid-liquid extraction, flash column chromatography, and preparative-scale high performance liquid chromatography, each sample provided ≈ 250 μg extracts of DEHP with carbon purity ranging from 92.5 ± 1.2% (n = 3, 1σ) to 97.1 ± 0.8% (n = 3, 1σ) as measured with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). After corrections for method blank DEHP, co-eluting compounds, and unidentified carbon, the mean fraction of naturally produced DEHP in butter was determined to be 0.16 ± 0.12 (n = 5, 1σ). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the contemporary fraction of DEHP isolated from market butter in the U.S.

  2. Contemporary Carbon Content of Bis (2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Butter

    PubMed Central

    Tong, T.; Ondov, J. M.; Buchholz, B. A.; VanDerveer, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    The fraction of naturally produced Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a ubiquitous plasticizer known to contaminate packaged foods, was determined for each of five 1.10 kg samples of unsalted market butter by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After extraction and concentration enrichment with liquid-liquid extraction, flash column chromatography, and preparative-scale high performance liquid chromatography, each sample provided ≈250 µg extracts of DEHP with carbon purity ranging from 92.5±1.2% (n=3, 1σ) to 97.1±0.8% (n=3, 1σ) as measured with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). After corrections for method blank DEHP, co-eluting compounds, and unidentified carbon, the mean fraction of naturally produced DEHP in butter was determined to be 0.16±0.12 (n=5, 1σ). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the contemporary fraction of DEHP isolated from market butter in the U.S. PMID:26213077

  3. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  4. Digital mapping of soil organic carbon contents and stocks in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Hartemink, Alfred E; Minasny, Budiman; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette B; Greve, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60 and 60-100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, wetness index, and multi-resolution index of valley bottom flatness. The highest average SOC content of 20 g kg(-1) was reported for 0-5 cm soil, whereas there was on average 2.2 g SOC kg(-1) at 60-100 cm depth. For SOC and bulk density prediction precision decreased with soil depth, and a standard error of 2.8 g kg(-1) was found at 60-100 cm soil depth. Average SOC stock for 0-30 cm was 72 t ha(-1) and in the top 1 m there was 120 t SOC ha(-1). In total, the soils stored approximately 570 Tg C within the top 1 m. The soils under agriculture had the highest amount of carbon (444 Tg) followed by forest and semi-natural vegetation that contributed 11% of the total SOC stock. More than 60% of the total SOC stock was present in Podzols and Luvisols. Compared to previous estimates, our approach is more reliable as we adopted a robust quantification technique and mapped the spatial distribution of SOC stock and prediction uncertainty. The estimation was validated using common statistical indices and the data and high-resolution maps could be used for future soil carbon assessment and inventories.

  5. Digital Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon Contents and Stocks in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Hartemink, Alfred E.; Minasny, Budiman; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette B.; Greve, Mogens H.

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0−5, 5−15, 15−30, 30−60 and 60−100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, wetness index, and multi-resolution index of valley bottom flatness. The highest average SOC content of 20 g kg−1 was reported for 0−5 cm soil, whereas there was on average 2.2 g SOC kg−1 at 60−100 cm depth. For SOC and bulk density prediction precision decreased with soil depth, and a standard error of 2.8 g kg−1 was found at 60−100 cm soil depth. Average SOC stock for 0−30 cm was 72 t ha−1 and in the top 1 m there was 120 t SOC ha−1. In total, the soils stored approximately 570 Tg C within the top 1 m. The soils under agriculture had the highest amount of carbon (444 Tg) followed by forest and semi-natural vegetation that contributed 11% of the total SOC stock. More than 60% of the total SOC stock was present in Podzols and Luvisols. Compared to previous estimates, our approach is more reliable as we adopted a robust quantification technique and mapped the spatial distribution of SOC stock and prediction uncertainty. The estimation was validated using common statistical indices and the data and high-resolution maps could be used for future soil carbon assessment and inventories. PMID:25137066

  6. Relating black carbon content to reduction of snow albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, R. E.; Warren, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    In remote snow of the Northern Hemisphere, the levels of soot pollution are in the parts-per-billion (ppb) range, where the effect on albedo is at the level of a few percent. A reduction of albedo by 1-2% is significant for climate but is difficult to detect experimentally, because snow albedo depends on several other variables. In our work to quantify the climatic effect of black carbon (BC) in snow, we therefore do not directly measure the albedo reduction. Instead, we use a two-step procedure: (1) We collect snow samples, melt and filter them, and analyze the filters spectrophotometrically for BC concentration. (2) We use the BC amount from the filter measurement, together with snow grain size, in a radiative transfer model to compute the albedo reduction. Our radiative transfer model uses the discrete ordinates algorithm DISORT 2.0. We have chosen a representative BC size distribution and optical constants, and have incorporated those of mineral dust as well. While a given mass of BC causes over an order of magnitude more snow albedo reduction compared to dust, a snowpack containing dust mutes the albedo-reducing effect of BC. Because the computed reduction of snow albedo is model-based, it requires experimental verification. We doubt that direct measurement of albedo-reduction will be feasible in nature, because of the vertical variation of both snow grain size and soot content, and because the natural soot content is small. We conclude that what is needed is an artificial snowpack, with uniform grain size and large uniform soot content (ppm not ppb), to produce a large signal on albedo. We have chosen to pursue this experiment outdoors rather than in the laboratory, for the following reasons: (1) The snowpack in the field of view is uniformly illuminated if the source of radiation is the Sun. (2) Visible radiation penetrates into the snow, so photons emerge horizontally distant from where they entered. In the limited width of a laboratory snowpack, radiation

  7. High performance carbon nanocomposites for ultracapacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to composite electrodes for electrochemical devices, particularly to carbon nanotube composite electrodes for high performance electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors.

  8. The Effects of Simulated Wildfire on Particle Size and Carbon Content in Piedmont Soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynes, A.; Werts, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Soils are a known carbon sink, holding twice as much carbon as the atmosphere (Schlesinger, 1995). However, little is known about how much soil organic carbon (SOC) is released from the soil during fire events. Surface fires can heat mineral soils to up to 500°C at depths of several centimeters and maintain that temperature for hours (Werts and Jahren, 2007). This has been known to affect the size of particles in soils, carbon content in the soils, and the clay mineralogy (Hungerford et al, 1993). This study looks at relationships between soil clay content and clay chemistry in relation to carbon emissions during surface fires, to determine temperature effects on several piedmont soil types from South Carolina. Soil samples were taken from three different sites varying in clay content, clay type, parent material, and development. Temperature increases were applied in increments of 50°C, with a range from 100°C to 500°C, to determine fire effects on SOC, particle size, and clay mineralogy of the soils. We found a decrease in SOC (up to 98%) from the original amount in all soil horizons with temperature applications up to 500°C. At a temperature range between 100°C and 300°C, most soil horizons showed an increase in clay of a range between 0.1 and 34%. At temperatures ranging from 300°C to 500°C, there was a decrease in clay ranging from 2.5-42%. While previous research suggests that a positive correlation between the percentage of clay and SOC in soils is common (Feller and Beare, 1997), in this study, a negative correlation was found between the percentage of clay and SOC in all three soil types (R2=0.87, 0.76, and 0.59) at 100°C. There appears to be an increasingly positive relationship between clay and carbon as temperature increases, although a consistent high correlation was not present at all temperatures. This is counter to what was found initially in our soils prior to heating. While research into surface fires is important to the understanding of

  9. Optimization of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of Piper Betel Linn leaves oil and total phenolic content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, A. H. A.; Yunus, M. A. C.; Arsad, N. H.; Lee, N. Y.; Idham, Z.; Razak, A. Q. A.

    2016-11-01

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (SC-CO2) Extraction was applied to extract piper betel linn leaves. The piper betel leaves oil was used antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anticancer and antistroke. The aim of this study was to optimize the conditions of pressure, temperature and flowrate for oil yield and total phenolic content. The operational conditions of SC-CO2 studied were pressure (10, 20, 30 MPa), temperature (40, 60, 80 °C) and flowrate carbon dioxide (4, 6, 8 mL/min). The constant parameters were average particle size and extraction regime, 355pm and 3.5 hours respectively. First order polynomial expression was used to express the extracted oil while second order polynomial expression was used to express the total phenolic content and the both results were satisfactory. The best conditions to maximize the total extraction oil yields and total phenolic content were 30 MPa, 80 °C and 4.42 mL/min leading to 7.32% of oil and 29.72 MPa, 67.53 °C and 7.98 mL/min leading to 845.085 mg GAE/g sample. In terms of optimum condition with high extraction yield and high total phenolic content in the extracts, the best operating conditions were 30 MPa, 78 °C and 8 mL/min with 7.05% yield and 791.709 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g sample. The most dominant condition for extraction of oil yield and phenolic content were pressure and CO2 flowrate. The results show a good fit to the proposed model and the optimal conditions obtained were within the experimental range with the value of R2 was 96.13% for percentage yield and 98.52% for total phenolic content.

  10. High Content Screening in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shushant; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Heutink, Peter

    2012-01-01

    neurodegenerative diseases such as axonal transport deficits or alterations in morphology properties13, 14. This approach could not be used to investigate the dynamic nature of cellular processes or pathogenic events that occur in a subset of cells. To quantify such features one has to move to multi-dimensional phenotypes termed high-content screening (HCS)4, 15-17. HCS is the cell-based quantification of several processes simultaneously, which provides a more detailed representation of the cellular response to various perturbations compared to HTS. HCS has many advantages over HTS18, 19, but conducting a high-throughput (HT)-high-content (HC) screen in neuronal models is problematic due to high cost, environmental variation and human error. In order to detect cellular responses on a 'phenomics' scale using HC imaging one has to reduce variation and error, while increasing sensitivity and reproducibility. Herein we describe a method to accurately and reliably conduct shRNA screens using automated cell culturing20 and HC imaging in neuronal cellular models. We describe how we have used this methodology to identify modulators for one particular protein, DJ1, which when mutated causes autosomal recessive parkinsonism21. Combining the versatility of HC imaging with HT methods, it is possible to accurately quantify a plethora of phenotypes. This could subsequently be utilized to advance our understanding of the genome, the pathways involved in disease pathogenesis as well as identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22257990

  11. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; O'neil, J R; Adami, L H; Gleason, J D; Hardcastle, K

    1970-01-30

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a deltaD from-580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a deltaD of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO(2) is 290 to 418 ppm with delta (13)C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and delta(18)O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO(2) carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, delta(13)C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H(2)O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon(delta(13)C = -17.6 per mil). The (18)O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100 degrees to 1300 degrees C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  12. Spatial distribution of carbon dust in the early solar nebula and the carbon content of planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Trieloff, Mario

    2017-09-01

    Context. A high fraction of carbon bound in solid carbonaceous material is observed to exist in bodies formed in the cold outskirts of the solar nebula, while bodies in the region of terrestrial planets contain only very small mass fractions of carbon. Most of the solid carbon component is lost and converted into CO during the spiral-in of matter as the Sun accretes matter from the solar nebula. Aims: We study the fate of the carbonaceous material that entered the proto-solar disc by comparing the initial carbon abundance in primitive solar system material and the abundance of residual carbon in planetesimals and planets in the asteroid belt and the terrestrial planet region. Methods: We constructed a model for the composition of the pristine carbonaceous material from observational data on the composition of the dust component in comets and of interplanetary dust particles and from published data on pyrolysis experiments. This material entered the inner parts of the solar nebula during the course of the build-up of the proto-sun by accreting matter from the proto-stellar disc. Based on a one-zone evolution model of the solar nebula, we studied the pyrolysis of the refractory and volatile organic component and the concomitant release of hydrocarbons of high molecular weight under quiescent conditions of disc evolution, while matter migrates into the central parts of the solar nebula. We also studied the decomposition and oxidation of the carbonaceous material during violent flash heating events, which are thought to be responsible for the formation of chondrules. To do this, we calculated pyrolysis and oxidation of the carbonaceous material in temperature spikes that were modeled according to cosmochemical models for the temperature history of chondrules. Results: We find that the complex hydrocarbon components of the carbonaceous material are removed from the disc matter in the temperature range between 250 and 400 K, but the amorphous carbon component survives to

  13. A review of volatile compounds in tektites, and carbon content and isotopic composition of moldavite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žák, Karel; SkáLA, Roman; Šanda, Zdeněk.; Mizera, Jiří.

    2012-06-01

    Tektites, natural silica-rich glasses produced during impact events, commonly contain bubbles. The paper reviews published data on pressure and composition of a gas phase contained in the tektite bubbles and data on other volatile compounds which can be released from tektites by either high-temperature melting or by crushing or milling under vacuum. Gas extraction from tektites using high-temperature melting generally produced higher gas yield and different gas composition than the low-temperature extraction using crushing or milling under vacuum. The high-temperature extraction obviously releases volatiles not only from the bubbles, but also volatile compounds contained directly in the glass. Moreover, the gas composition can be modified by reactions between the released gases and the glass melt. Published data indicate that besides CO2 and/or CO in the bubbles, another carbon reservoir is present directly in the tektite glass. To clarify the problem of carbon content and carbon isotopic composition of the tektite glass, three samples from the Central European tektite strewn field—moldavites—were analyzed. The samples contained only 35-41 ppm C with δ13C values in the range from -28.5 to -29.9‰ VPDB. This indicates that terrestrial organic matter was a dominant carbon source during moldavite formation.

  14. An Investigation into Techniques for the Determination of Moisture Content on Activated Carbon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Activated carbon (or charcoal ) is a universal adsorbent for the removal of a variety of organic/inorganic contaminants, in both gaseous and aqueous phase...AD-A245 938 i * *~fl Nadoni Waren AN INVESTIGATION INTO TECHNIQUES FOR THE DETERMNATION OF MOISTURE CONTENT ON ACTIVATED CARBON (U) by L.E. Cameron...INVESTIGATION INTO TECHNIQUES FOR THE DETERMINATION OF MOISTURE CONTENT ON ACTIVATED CARBON (U) by L.E. Cameron and S.H.C. Liang Chemical Protecti

  15. Total content of carbon monoxide in the atmosphere over Russian regions according to satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, S. A.; Mokhov, I. I.; Dzhola, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) total columns over European Russia (ER) and western Siberia (WS) have been analyzed using MOPITT (V5, TIR/NIR, L3) IR-radiometer data obtained in 2000-2014. High CO contents are revealed over large urban and industrial agglomerations and over regions of oil-and-gas production. A stable local CO maximum is observed over the Moscow agglomeration. Statistical characteristics of CO total columns observed in the atmosphere over ER and WS in 2000-2014 are presented. An analysis of long-term changes in CO content reveals nonlinear changes in the CO total column over northern Eurasia in 2000-2014. Results of a comparative analysis of annual variations in atmospheric CO contents over ER and WS are given. Based on Fourier analysis, empirical models of annual variations in total CO contents over ER and WS are proposed. Relations between regional CO contents and fire characteristics and between spatial CO distributions and features of large-scale atmospheric dynamics under conditions of weather and climate anomalies in the summers of 2010 in ER and 2012 in WS are analyzed. Data on total CO contents measured with a MOPITT satellite radiometer and a ground-based spectrometer operating at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics are compared.

  16. Foraminiferal indicators of high OC content in marine sediments; a question of OC source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Giudice Cappelli, Elena; Austin, William; Smith, Laura; Ward, Hannah; Clarke, Jess; Green, Jade; Smeaton, Craig

    2017-04-01

    West Shetland voes (sea inlets), on Scotland northern maritime periphery, represent a range of environmental and depositional settings in an area of coastal ocean which is characterised by a generally high organic carbon content in marine sediments. Possible sources of organic carbon are fish farms, as this region is experiencing a large expansion in marine aquaculture, and/or erosion of peatland. Twenty-one sites in six voes were sampled in August 2015 following an organic carbon gradient. The aims of this study are: 1) to establish the modern biogeography of benthic foraminifera in west Shetland voes, 2) to explore the use of these organisms as bio-indicators of high organic carbon content in marine sediments, and 3) to trace the source of organic carbon and its transportation between different habitats and pools (e.g.: terrestrial to marine; marine aquaculture to sediments). To achieve this, we paired together spatial variations in the composition of benthic foraminiferal assemblages (species abundance and diversity) with changes in the physical properties of marine sediments determined by carbon stable isotope measurements and loss on ignition analysis. Preliminary results show a positive relationship between high abundance of the agglutinated benthic foraminifera Eggerelloides scaber, high organic carbon content in the sediments and proximity to fish farms. Although aquaculture farming in these areas may be a contributing factor, radiocarbon dates demonstrate that organic enrichment in the sediments pre-dates the introduction of aquaculture, while carbon stable isotope measurements point to peat erosion as a more likely source of organic carbon in west Shetland voes. Therefore, peatland erosion is a significant source of organic carbon in marine sediments and may be an important contributor to the store of blue carbon in west Shetland voes and, more in general, in the coastal ocean.

  17. Molecular indicators for palaeoenvironmental change in a Messinian evaporitic sequence (Vena del Gesso, Italy). II: High-resolution variations in abundances and 13C contents of free and sulphur-bound carbon skeletons in a single marl bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, F.; Damste, J. S.; Frewin, N. L.; Hayes, J. M.; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The extractable organic matter of 10 immature samples from a marl bed of one evaporitic cycle of the Vena del Gesso sediments (Gessoso-solfifera Fm., Messinian, Italy) was analyzed quantitatively for free hydrocarbons and organic sulphur compounds. Nickel boride was used as a desulphurizing agent to recover sulphur-bound lipids from the polar and asphaltene fractions. Carbon isotopic compositions (delta vs PDB) of free hydrocarbons and of S-bound hydrocarbons were also measured. Relationships between these carbon skeletons, precursor biolipids, and the organisms producing them could then be examined. Concentrations of S-bound lipids and free hydrocarbons and their delta values were plotted vs depth in the marl bed and the profiles were interpreted in terms of variations in source organisms, 13 C contents of the carbon source, and environmentally induced changes in isotopic fractionation. The overall range of delta values measured was 24.7%, from -11.6% for a component derived from green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) to -36.3% for a lipid derived from purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae). Deconvolution of mixtures of components deriving from multiple sources (green and purple sulphur bacteria, coccolithophorids, microalgae and higher plants) was sometimes possible because both quantitative and isotopic data were available and because either the free or S-bound pool sometimes appeared to contain material from a single source. Several free n-alkanes and S-bound lipids appeared to be specific products of upper-water-column primary producers (i.e. algae and cyanobacteria). Others derived from anaerobic photoautotrophs and from heterotrophic protozoa (ciliates), which apparently fed partly on Chlorobiaceae. Four groups of n-alkanes produced by algae or cyanobacteria were also recognized based on systematic variations of abundance and isotopic composition with depth. For hydrocarbons probably derived from microalgae, isotopic variations are well correlated with

  18. Molecular indicators for palaeoenvironmental change in a Messinian evaporitic sequence (Vena del Gesso, Italy). II: High-resolution variations in abundances and 13C contents of free and sulphur-bound carbon skeletons in a single marl bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, F.; Damste, J. S.; Frewin, N. L.; Hayes, J. M.; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The extractable organic matter of 10 immature samples from a marl bed of one evaporitic cycle of the Vena del Gesso sediments (Gessoso-solfifera Fm., Messinian, Italy) was analyzed quantitatively for free hydrocarbons and organic sulphur compounds. Nickel boride was used as a desulphurizing agent to recover sulphur-bound lipids from the polar and asphaltene fractions. Carbon isotopic compositions (delta vs PDB) of free hydrocarbons and of S-bound hydrocarbons were also measured. Relationships between these carbon skeletons, precursor biolipids, and the organisms producing them could then be examined. Concentrations of S-bound lipids and free hydrocarbons and their delta values were plotted vs depth in the marl bed and the profiles were interpreted in terms of variations in source organisms, 13 C contents of the carbon source, and environmentally induced changes in isotopic fractionation. The overall range of delta values measured was 24.7%, from -11.6% for a component derived from green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) to -36.3% for a lipid derived from purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae). Deconvolution of mixtures of components deriving from multiple sources (green and purple sulphur bacteria, coccolithophorids, microalgae and higher plants) was sometimes possible because both quantitative and isotopic data were available and because either the free or S-bound pool sometimes appeared to contain material from a single source. Several free n-alkanes and S-bound lipids appeared to be specific products of upper-water-column primary producers (i.e. algae and cyanobacteria). Others derived from anaerobic photoautotrophs and from heterotrophic protozoa (ciliates), which apparently fed partly on Chlorobiaceae. Four groups of n-alkanes produced by algae or cyanobacteria were also recognized based on systematic variations of abundance and isotopic composition with depth. For hydrocarbons probably derived from microalgae, isotopic variations are well correlated with

  19. High Performance Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Bolometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-21

    REPORT High performance multiwall carbon nanotube bolometers 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: High infrared bolometric photoresponse has...been observed in multiwall carbon nanotube MWCNT films at room temperature. The observed detectivity D in exceeding 3.3 106 cm Hz1/2 /W on MWCNT film...U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS carbon nanotube, infrared detector, bolometer

  20. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel; Aslan, Hüsnü; Dong, Mingdong; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a microbial ecosystem in ocean sediments has evoked interest in life under extreme energy limitation and its role in global element cycling. However, fundamental parameters such as the size and the amount of biomass of sub-seafloor microbial cells are poorly constrained. Here we determined the volume and the carbon content of microbial cells from a marine sediment drill core retrieved by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Expedition 347, at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via epifluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after cells had been purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or slightly elongated morphology. From the sediment surface to the deepest investigated sample (~60 m below the seafloor), the cell volume of both coccoid and elongated cells decreased by an order of magnitude from ~0.05 to 0.005 μm3. The cell-specific carbon content was 19–31 fg C cell−1, which is at the lower end of previous estimates that were used for global estimates of microbial biomass. The cell-specific carbon density increased with sediment depth from about 200 to 1000 fg C μm−3, suggesting that cells decrease their water content and grow small cell sizes as adaptation to the long-term subsistence at very low energy availability in the deep biosphere. We present for the first time depth-related data on the cell volume and carbon content of sedimentary microbial cells buried down to 60 m below the seafloor. Our data enable estimates of volume- and biomass-specific cellular rates of energy metabolism in the deep biosphere and will improve global estimates of microbial biomass. PMID:27630628

  1. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel; Aslan, Hüsnü; Dong, Mingdong; Jørgensen, Bo B; Lomstein, Bente Aa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a microbial ecosystem in ocean sediments has evoked interest in life under extreme energy limitation and its role in global element cycling. However, fundamental parameters such as the size and the amount of biomass of sub-seafloor microbial cells are poorly constrained. Here we determined the volume and the carbon content of microbial cells from a marine sediment drill core retrieved by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Expedition 347, at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via epifluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after cells had been purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or slightly elongated morphology. From the sediment surface to the deepest investigated sample (~60 m below the seafloor), the cell volume of both coccoid and elongated cells decreased by an order of magnitude from ~0.05 to 0.005 μm(3). The cell-specific carbon content was 19-31 fg C cell(-1), which is at the lower end of previous estimates that were used for global estimates of microbial biomass. The cell-specific carbon density increased with sediment depth from about 200 to 1000 fg C μm(-3), suggesting that cells decrease their water content and grow small cell sizes as adaptation to the long-term subsistence at very low energy availability in the deep biosphere. We present for the first time depth-related data on the cell volume and carbon content of sedimentary microbial cells buried down to 60 m below the seafloor. Our data enable estimates of volume- and biomass-specific cellular rates of energy metabolism in the deep biosphere and will improve global estimates of microbial biomass.

  2. High content analysis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Federica; Motti, Dario; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kaspar, Brian K

    2017-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. Neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglial cells all undergo pathological modifications in the onset and progression of ALS. A number of genes involved in the etiopathology of the disease have been identified, but a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ALS has yet to be determined. Currently, people affected by ALS have a life expectancy of only two to five years from diagnosis. The search for a treatment has been slow and mostly unsuccessful, leaving patients in desperate need of better therapies. Until recently, most pre-clinical studies utilized the available ALS animal models. In the past years, the development of new protocols for isolation of patient cells and differentiation into relevant cell types has provided new tools to model ALS, potentially more relevant to the disease itself as they directly come from patients. The use of stem cells is showing promise to facilitate ALS research by expanding our understanding of the disease and help to identify potential new therapeutic targets and therapies to help patients. Advancements in high content analysis (HCA) have the power to contribute to move ALS research forward by combining automated image acquisition along with digital image analysis. With modern HCA machines it is possible, in a period of just a few hours, to observe changes in morphology and survival of cells, under the stimulation of hundreds, if not thousands of drugs and compounds. In this article, we will summarize the major molecular and cellular hallmarks of ALS, describe the advancements provided by the in vitro models developed in the last few years, and review the studies that have applied HCA to the ALS field to date. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of water content and organic carbon on remote sensing of crop residue cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbin, G.; Hunt, E. R., Jr.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; McCarty, G. W.; Brown, D. J.; Doraiswamy, P. C.

    2009-04-01

    Crop residue cover is an important indicator of tillage method. Remote sensing of crop residue cover is an attractive and efficient method when compared with traditional ground-based methods, e.g., the line-point transect or windshield survey. A number of spectral indices have been devised for residue cover estimation. Of these, the most effective are those in the shortwave infrared portion of the spectrum, situated between 1950 and 2500 nm. These indices include the hyperspectral Cellulose Absorption Index (CAI), and advanced multispectral indices, i.e., the Lignin-Cellulose Absorption (LCA) index and the Shortwave Infrared Normalized Difference Residue Index (SINDRI), which were devised for the NASA Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor. Spectra of numerous soils from U.S. Corn Belt (Indiana and Iowa) were acquired under wetness conditions varying from saturation to oven-dry conditions. The behavior of soil reflectance with water content was also dependent on the soil organic carbon content (SOC) of the soils, and the location of the spectral bands relative to significant water absorptions. High-SOC soils showed the least change in spectral index values with increase in soil water content. Low-SOC soils, on the other hand, showed measurable difference. For CAI, low-SOC soils show an initial decrease in index value followed by an increase, due to the way that water content affects CAI spectral bands. Crop residue CAI values decrease with water content. For LCA, water content increases decrease crop residue index values and increase them for soils, resulting in decreased contrast. SINDRI is also affected by SOC and water content. As such, spatial information on the distribution of surface soil water content and SOC, when used in a geographic information system (GIS), will improve the accuracy of remotely-sensed crop residue cover estimates.

  4. Carbon content of atmospheric aerosols in a residential area during the wood combustion season in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krecl, Patricia; Ström, Johan; Johansson, Christer

    Carbonaceous aerosol particles were observed in a residential area with wood combustion during wintertime in Northern Sweden. Filter samples were analyzed for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) content by using a thermo-optical transmittance method. The light-absorbing carbon (LAC) content was determined by employing a commercial Aethalometer and a custom-built particle soot absorption photometer. Filter samples were used to convert the optical signals to LAC mass concentrations. Additional total PM 10 mass concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured. The mean and standard deviation mass concentrations were 4.4±3.6 μg m -3 for OC, and 1.4±1.2 μg m -3 for EC. On average, EC accounted for 10.7% of the total PM 10 and the contribution of OC to the total PM 10 was 35.4%. Aethalometer and custom-built PSAP measurements were highly correlated ( R2=0.92). The hourly mean value of LAC mass concentration was 1.76 μg m -3 (median 0.88 μg m -3) for the winter 2005-2006. This study shows that the custom-built PSAP is a reliable alternative for the commercial Aethalometer with the advantage of being a low-cost instrument.

  5. Bicarbonate content of groundwater in carbonate rock in eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trainer, F.W.; Heath, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    In carbonate-rock terrane the most effective solution occurs where soil and vegetative cover facilitate biogenic production and storage of CO2 in the soil until part of it is carried downward in percolating water. Bicarbonate data for groundwater in eastern North America are examined in the light of these conditions, of the CO2 content of soil gas, and of the timing of groundwater recharge relative to seasonal changes in soil temperature. There appears to be no well-marked relation between latitude and bicarbonate content of groundwater in this region. Interplay of all the factors listed above, and of lithology and soil types, is evidently such that under optimum conditions the amount of solution of carbonate rock is roughly comparable, per unit of groundwater recharge, over the region from Ohio to Florida (and, perhaps, to Puerto Rico and Yucatan). Relatively low HCO3 concentrations observed in much of the southern United States are attributed to low production and storage of CO2 in sandy soil that is poor in organic matter. On the other hand, concentrations observed in Ontario, New York and Michigan are markedly higher than is to be expected from interrelations of the factors considered. These high values, apparently anomalous, are attributed in part to solution of granular glacial drift derived largely from carbonate rock. ?? 1976.

  6. Carbon/Carbon Fasteners For Use At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlmann, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Fasteners made of advanced carbon/carbon material perform well at ambient and high temperatures. Exhibit shear strengths of more than 10 kpsi at room temperature and 13 kpsi at temperature of 2,700 degrees F. However, fasteners exhibited poor tensile strength at room temperature. Best suited to applications in which exposed to shear loads with minimal tension loads. Parts reused after thermal cycling.

  7. Effect of Charcoal Volatile Matter Content and Feedstock on Soil Microbe-Carbon-Nitrogen Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, T.; Deenik, J. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Campbell, S.; Antal, M. J., Jr.

    2010-12-01

    Charcoal has important biogeochemical implications in soil—first as a means to sequester carbon, and second as a soil conditioner to potentially enhance soil quality and fertility. Volatile matter (VM) content is a property of charcoal which describes its degree of thermal alteration, or carbonization. Results from greenhouse experiments have shown that plant growth can be negatively affected by charcoals with high VM content (20-35%), with and without fertilizer supplements, whereas low VM charcoal (6-9%) increased plant growth when combined with fertilizer. We conducted two laboratory studies to characterize the VM content of charcoals derived from two feedstocks (corncob and kiawe) and relate observed differences to key aspects of soil fertility. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), total phenol content (using a Prussian blue colorimetric assay), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we found that the VM content of charcoal primarily consisted of alkanes, oxygen-substituted alkanes, and phenolic compounds. However, the GC-MS data indicated that charcoals can differ vastly in their extractable fraction, depending upon both VM content and feedstock. In a second set of experiments, we examined the effect of VM content and feedstock on soil microbial activity, available nitrogen (N), and soluble carbon (C). High VM corncob charcoals significantly enhanced microbial activity, coupled with net reduction in available N and soluble C. For a given feedstock, the extent of this effect was dependent upon VM content. However, the overall effect of VM content on microbial dynamics was apparently related to the composition of the acetone-extractable fraction, which was particularly important when comparing two charcoals derived from different feedstocks but with the equivalent VM contents. Removing the acetone-extractable fraction from the 23% VM corncob charcoal significantly reduced the enhancement of

  8. High Calcium (~80mol%) Late Stage Carbonate in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, K. J.; Holland, G.; Lyon, I. C.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Burgess, R.

    2006-03-01

    Brief petrological, chemical and textural description of previously undescribed high Ca late stage carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001. This carbonate surrounds Mg rich carbonates and rosette fragments.

  9. Effect of carbon content on structure and magnetic properties for (Fe, Ni) 1-xC x by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyue; Zhong, Minjian; Yu, Liming; Chen, Hangde; He, Zhengming; Zhang, Jincang

    2006-08-01

    FCC (Fe 55Ni 45) 1-xC x supersaturated solid solution was prepared in a wide concentration range (0⩽x⩽0.9) by mechanical alloying of nanocrystalline Fe 55Ni 45 with graphite. The lattice constant of Fe 55Ni 45 increases linearly with increasing carbon content up to x=0.25. At the same time, it is found that the magnetic moment per metal atom (Fe, Ni) decreases linearly with increasing carbon content for 0⩽x⩽0.25 with a slope of 1.2 μB/at. For high carbon content, x⩾0.5, it is observed that the decrease of lattice constant and increase of moment per metal atom (Fe, Ni) with increasing C content, indicates that the dissolution of carbon is hindered by the high-volume fraction of graphite in the initial powder mixture. The complete amorphization of x=0.5 does not occur after the extended ball milling. The alloying effect of carbon on the magnetization is compared with other metalloid B, P, and Si in Fe- and Ni-based binary system.

  10. Optimization of calcium carbonate content on synthesis of aluminum foam and its compressive strength characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno, Nugraha, Bagja; Kusharjanto

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important characteristic of aluminum foam is compressive strength, which is reflected by its impact energy and Young's modulus. In the present research, optimization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) content in the synthesized aluminum foam in order to obtain the highest compressive strength was carried out. The results of this study will be used to determine the CaCO3 content synthesis process parameter in pilot plant scale production of an aluminum foam. The experiment was performed by varying the concentration of calcium carbonate content, which was used as foaming agent, at constant alumina concentration (1.5 wt%), which was added as stabilizer, and temperature (725°C). It was found that 4 wt% CaCO3 gave the lowest relative density, which was 0.15, and the highest porosity, which was 85.29%, and compressive strength of as high as 0.26 Mpa. The pore morphology of the obtained aluminum foam at such condition was as follow: the average pore diameter was 4.42 mm, the wall thickness minimum of the pore was 83.24 µm, roundness of the pore was 0.91. Based on the fractal porosity, the compressive strength was inversely proportional to the porosity and huddled on a power law value of 2.91.

  11. High aluminium content of infant milk formulas.

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, R; Hams, G; Meerkin, M; Rosenberg, A R

    1986-01-01

    The aluminium content of several commercially available infant milk formulas was measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Results were compared with those for fresh breast milk, cow's milk, and local tap water. Differences in aluminium concentration of greater than 150-fold were found, with the lowest concentrations in breast milk. PMID:3767424

  12. Impact of carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of microscale zerovalent iron particles on its reactivity towards chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Larsson, Per-Olof; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2013-11-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) abiotically degrades several chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) via reductive dechlorination, which offers perspectives for in situ groundwater remediation applications. The difference in reactivity between ZVI particles is often linked with their specific surface area. However, other parameters may influence the reactivity as well. Earlier, we reported for a set of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles the disappearance kinetic of different CAHs which were collected under consistent experimental conditions. In the present study, these kinetic data were correlated with the carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of mZVI particles. It was confirmed that not only the specific surface area affects the disappearance kinetic of CAHs, but also the chemical composition of the mZVI particles. The chemical composition, in addition, influences CAHs removal mechanism inducing sorption onto mZVI particles instead of dechlorination. Generally, high disappearance kinetic of CAHs was observed for particles containing less oxygen. A high carbon content, on the other hand, induced nonreactive sorption of the contaminants on the mZVI particles. To obtain efficient remediation of CAHs by mZVI particles, this study suggested that the carbon and oxygen content should not exceed 0.5% and 1% respectively. Finally, the efficiency of the mZVI particles may be improved to some extent by enriching them with sulfur. However, the impact of sulfur content on the reactivity of mZVI particles is less pronounced than that of the carbon and oxygen content.

  13. Facile synthesis of carbon supported copper nanoparticles from alginate precursor with controlled metal content and catalytic NO reduction properties.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Sergios K; Favvas, Evangelos P; Sapalidis, Andreas A; Romanos, George E; Katsaros, Fotios K

    2011-05-15

    A copper-nanoparticle-doped carbon was prepared from an alginate based precursor in a one step carbonisation-reduction procedure based on the modified polyol process. The ion exchange capacity of the precursor as well as the porosity, metal content, thermal properties, of the final product, were investigated. The preparation route leads to a porous carbon/copper composite with predefined metal loading reaching up to over 30% (w/w) of finely dispersed Cu nanoparticles of fairly uniform size. NO catalytic abatement evaluation showed high efficiency even at low temperatures compared to other recently reported carbon supported catalysts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  15. Topsoil organic carbon content of Europe, a new map based on a generalised additive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brogniez, Delphine; Ballabio, Cristiano; Stevens, Antoine; Jones, Robert J. A.; Montanarella, Luca; van Wesemael, Bas

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for up-to-date spatially continuous organic carbon (OC) data for global environment and climatic modeling. Whilst the current map of topsoil organic carbon content for Europe (Jones et al., 2005) was produced by applying expert-knowledge based pedo-transfer rules on large soil mapping units, the aim of this study was to replace it by applying digital soil mapping techniques on the first European harmonised geo-referenced topsoil (0-20 cm) database, which arises from the LUCAS (land use/cover area frame statistical survey) survey. A generalized additive model (GAM) was calibrated on 85% of the dataset (ca. 17 000 soil samples) and a backward stepwise approach selected slope, land cover, temperature, net primary productivity, latitude and longitude as environmental covariates (500 m resolution). The validation of the model (applied on 15% of the dataset), gave an R2 of 0.27. We observed that most organic soils were under-predicted by the model and that soils of Scandinavia were also poorly predicted. The model showed an RMSE of 42 g kg-1 for mineral soils and of 287 g kg-1 for organic soils. The map of predicted OC content showed the lowest values in Mediterranean countries and in croplands across Europe, whereas highest OC content were predicted in wetlands, woodlands and in mountainous areas. The map of standard error of the OC model predictions showed high values in northern latitudes, wetlands, moors and heathlands, whereas low uncertainty was mostly found in croplands. A comparison of our results with the map of Jones et al. (2005) showed a general agreement on the prediction of mineral soils' OC content, most probably because the models use some common covariates, namely land cover and temperature. Our model however failed to predict values of OC content greater than 200 g kg-1, which we explain by the imposed unimodal distribution of our model, whose mean is tilted towards the majority of soils, which are mineral. Finally, average

  16. Research on carbon content in fly ash from circulating fluidized bed boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Xianbin Xiao; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Junfu Lu; Guangxi Yue

    2005-08-01

    The carbon content in the fly ash from most Chinese circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers is much higher than expected, which directly influences the combustion efficiency. In the present paper, carbon burnout was investigated in both field tests and laboratory experiments. The effect of coal property, operation condition, gas-solid mixing, char deactivation, residence time, and cyclone performance are analyzed seriatim based on a large amount of experimental results. A coal index is proposed to describe the coal rank, having a strong effect on the char burnout. Bad gas-solid mixing in the furnace is another important reason of the higher carbon content in the fly ash. Some chars in the fly ash are deactivated during combustion of large coal particles and have very low carbon reactivity. Several suggestions are made about design, operation, and modification to reduce the carbon content in the fly ash. 14 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A New Route for Unburned Carbon Concentration Measurements Eliminating Mineral Content and Coal Rank Effects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Zhen; Yu, Hai-Tong

    2014-01-01

    500 million tons of coal fly ash are produced worldwide every year with only 16% of the total amount utilized. Therefore, potential applications using fly ash have both environmental and industrial interests. Unburned carbon concentration measurements are fundamental to effective fly ash applications. Current on-line measurement accuracies are strongly affected by the mineral content and coal rank. This paper describes a char/ash particle cluster spectral emittance method for unburned carbon concentration measurements. The char/ash particle cluster spectral emittance is predicted theoretically here for various unburned carbon concentrations to show that the measurements are sensitive to unburned carbon concentration but insensitive to the mineral content and coal rank at short wavelengths. The results show that the char/ash particle cluster spectral emittance method is a novel and promising route for unburned carbon concentration on-line measurements without being influenced by mineral content or coal rank effects. PMID:24691496

  18. Carbonate formation in Wyoming montmorillonite under high pressure carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Tae-Bong; Baltrus, John P.; Howard, Bret H.; Harbert, William P.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.

    2013-03-01

    Carbonation reaction with silicate minerals that are common components of the host rock and cap rock within geological storage reservoirs and the associated structural deformation were investigated for better understanding of the geochemical reactions associated with geologic CO2 storage. Exposure of a model expanding clay, Wyoming montmorillonite, SWy-2, to high-pressure CO2 resulted in the formation of a mineral carbonate phase via dry CO2–clay mineral interactions at two different temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that the properties of CO2 fluid at 70 °C provide more favorable conditions for carbonate formation at the clay surface less accessible to CO2 at 22 °C. The carbonation reaction occurred predominantly within the first couple of days of exposure to the fluid and then proceeded slower with continuing exposure. As compared to the as-received clay under the same ambient conditions, the (0 0 1) basal spacing of the clay bearing carbonates (after the CO2 exposure) was slightly expanded at a relative humidity (RH) level of 12% but it was slightly collapsed at the RH level of 40%. Finally, experimental observations suggest that the carbonation reaction occurs at the external surface as well as internal surface (interlayer) of the clay particles.

  19. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  20. High performance hydrophobic solvent, carbon dioxide capture

    DOEpatents

    Nulwala, Hunaid; Luebke, David

    2017-05-09

    Methods and compositions useful, for example, for physical solvent carbon capture. A method comprising: contacting at least one first composition comprising carbon dioxide with at least one second composition to at least partially dissolve the carbon dioxide of the first composition in the second composition, wherein the second composition comprises at least one siloxane compound which is covalently modified with at least one non-siloxane group comprising at least one heteroatom. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials and ethylene-glycol based materials have high carbon dioxide solubility but suffer from various problems. PDMS is hydrophobic but suffers from low selectivity. Ethylene-glycol based systems have good solubility and selectivity, but suffer from high affinity to water. Solvents were developed which keep the desired combinations of properties, and result in a simplified, overall process for carbon dioxide removal from a mixed gas stream.

  1. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul S.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Calafat, Antoni; York, Paul H.; Steven, Andy; Macreadie, Peter I.

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes < 63 µm), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between Corg and mud contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil Corg content. We also combined these data with the δ13C signatures of the soil Corg to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil Corg content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast-growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil Corg content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool in these meadows. The relatively high soil Corg contents with relatively low mud contents (e.g., mud-Corg saturation) in bare sediments and Zostera, Halodule and Halophila meadows was related to significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter, while higher contribution of seagrass detritus in Amphibolis and Posidonia meadows disrupted the correlation expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil Corg content for scaling up purposes when

  2. Nonionic Organic Solute Sorption to two Organobentonites as a Function of Organic-Carbon Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt-Hunt, S. L.; Burns, S. E.; Smith, J. A.

    2002-05-01

    Sorption of three nonionic organic solutes (benzene, trichloroethene, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene) to hexadecyltrimethylammonium-bentonite (HDTMA-bentonite) and benzyltrimethylammonium-bentonite (BTEA-bentonite) was measured as a function of organic-carbon content at quaternary ammonium cation loadings ranging from 30 to 130% of the clay's cation-exchange capacity. Sorption of all three solutes to HDTMA-bentonite was linear and sorptive capacity of the HDTMA-bentonite increased as the organic-carbon content of the clay increased. 1,2-Dichlorobenzene sorbed most strongly to HDTMA-bentonite, followed by benzene and TCE. The stronger sorption of benzene to HDTMA-bentonite compared to TCE was unexpected based on a partition mechanism of sorption and consideration of solute solubility. This result may be caused by interactions between the pi electrons of benzene and the negatively charged surface of the clay. Log Koc values for all three solutes increased with organic-carbon content. This suggests that the increased organic-carbon content alone may not explain the observed increase in sorption capacity. Sorption of the three solutes to BTEA-bentonite was nonlinear and solute sorption decreased with increasing organic-carbon content. Surface area measurements indicate that the surface area of both organobentonites generally decreased with increasing organic-carbon content. Since nonionic organic solute sorption to BTEA-bentonite occurs by adsorption, the reduced sorption is likely caused by the reduction in surface area corresponding to increased organic cation loading.

  3. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  4. Carbon in iron phases under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Skorodumova, N. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Johansson, B.; Ahuja, R.

    2005-11-01

    The influence of carbon impurities on the properties of iron phases (bcc, hcp, dhcp, fcc) has been studied using the first-principles projector augmented-wave (PAW) method for a wide pressure range. It is shown that the presence of ~6 at. % of interstitial carbon has a little effect on the calculated structural sequence of the iron phases under high pressure. The bcc -> hcp transition both for pure iron and iron containing carbon takes place around 9 GPa. According to the enthalpies comparison, the solubility of carbon into the iron solid is decreased by high pressure. The coexistence of iron carbide (Fe3C) + pure hcp Fe is most stable phase at high pressure compared with other phases. Based on the analysis of the pressure-density dependences for Fe3C and hcp Fe, we suggest that there might be some fraction of iron carbide present in the core.

  5. High value carbon materials from PET recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, J. B.; Ania, C. O.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J. J.

    2004-11-01

    Poly(ethylene) terephthalate (PET), has become one of the major post-consumer plastic waste. In this work special attention was paid to minimising PET residues and to obtain a high value carbon material. Pyrolysis and subsequent activation of PET from post-consumer soft-drink bottles was performed. Activation was carried out at 925 °C under CO2 atmosphere to different burn-off degrees. Textural characterisation of the samples was carried out by performing N2 adsorption isotherms at -196 °C. The obtained carbons materials were mainly microporous, presenting low meso and macroporosity, and apparent BET surface areas of upto 2500 m2 g-1. The capacity of these materials for phenol adsorption and PAHs removal from aqueous solutions was measured and compared with that attained with commercial active carbons. Preliminary tests also showed high hydrogen uptake values, as good as the results obtained with high-tech carbon materials.

  6. Content Delivery for a Virtual High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, W. Joy

    2003-01-01

    In the fall of 2002, Visions In Education, a charter school for home-schooled and independent-study children, opened Visions High School Academy (www.visions academy.org), a virtual project-based high school. The five educators who started the program--Mark Jackson, Fred Lamora, Celine Darby, Jennifer Russell and the author--identified three…

  7. Content Delivery for a Virtual High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, W. Joy

    2003-01-01

    In the fall of 2002, Visions In Education, a charter school for home-schooled and independent-study children, opened Visions High School Academy (www.visions academy.org), a virtual project-based high school. The five educators who started the program--Mark Jackson, Fred Lamora, Celine Darby, Jennifer Russell and the author--identified three…

  8. Carbon, sulfur and nitrogen contents in the Pavel and Goumoshnik meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Ch. P.; Stoianova, R. Zh.; Veselinova, R.

    Measurements of the carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen contents in two series of samples from the Pavel and Goumoshnik meteorites are presented. The measurements were performed with two different infrared detectors connected to a microprocessor. Each series of samples included samples from the interior of the meteorite and from the surface layer, together with the black crust. The measurements yielded abundances of carbon which were two times higher in samples from the outer layer than in samples from the meteorite interior. It is suggested that these higher concentrations in the outer layers are due to a process of ablation occurring when the temperature drops in the interior layers of the meteorite as it passes through the earth atmosphere. No significant differences were found in the concentrations of sulfur in the two series of samples. The total content of nitrogen in both meteorites was high. The average values in the first series were within the range from 0.493 to 0.590 percent, and 0.586 to 0.673 percent in the second series. It is shown that nitrogen concentrations in carbonaceous meteorites decrease in relation to depth, suggesting that the Pavel and Goumoshnik meteorites represent an anomalous case.

  9. Soil total carbon content, aggregation, bulk density, and penetration resistance of croplands and nearby grasslands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Converting native grassland (NGL) to cropland (CL) decreases soil organic matter contents (components of soil total carbon contents, STCCs), which often leads to soil degradation. Reestablishing grass on CL generally increases soil organic matter, which improves soil conditions. This study was condu...

  10. Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Kunioka, Masao; Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi

    2014-01-01

    An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 ((14)C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. After cooling of extraction solutions, the resin was recovered as a fine semi-crystalline precipitate, which was easily filtered. Recovery rates were almost identical (99%), even for low-density polyethylene and linear low-density polyethylene, which may have lower crystallinity. This procedure could provide a suitable approach for estimation of biobased carbon content by AMS on the basis of the standard ASTM D 6866. The biobased carbon content for resin extracted from polyethylene composites allow for the calculation of biosynthetic polymer content, which is an indicator of mass percentage of the biobased plastic resin in the composite.

  11. Effects of taste solutions, carbonation, and cold stimulus on the power frequency content of swallowing submental surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yutaka; Morita, Yuji; Koizumi, Hideki; Shingai, Tomio

    2009-05-01

    This study explored the effects of 5 taste solutions (citric acid, sucrose, sodium chloride, caffeine, and sodium glutamate) versus water on the power frequency content of swallowing submental surface electromyography (sEMG). Healthy subjects were presented with 5 ml of each of 5 tastants and water. Data were collected in 3 trials of the 5 tastants and water by using submental sEMG, which was then subjected to spectral analysis. Sour and salt taste solutions increased the spectrum-integrated values of the total power components. The spectrum-integrated values of low-frequency power (below 10 Hz) in the salt taste trial significantly increased, whereas those of high-frequency power (above 10 Hz) in the sour taste trial tended to increase. Neither pleasantness nor intensity of taste was related to these changes. This study also explored the effects of carbonation and cold stimulus on the power frequency content of continuous swallowing sEMG for 60-ml solutions. Carbonation significantly increased the spectrum-integrated value of the total power components by significantly increasing the high-frequency content. Cold stimulus significantly decreased the low-frequency content. In summary, this study reveals that taste, carbonation, and cold stimulus have qualitatively different influences on the power frequency content of swallowing sEMG.

  12. Dual-shale-content method for total organic carbon content evaluation from wireline logs in organic shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xin; Wan, Yu; Bie, Fan

    2017-05-01

    Organic shale is one of the most important unconventional resources all around the world. Total organic carbon (TOC) content is an important evaluation parameter of reservoir hydrocarbon source quality. The regular evaluation methods have higher requirements of well logs and core experiment data for statistical regression. Through analyzing the resistivity and gamma ray logging response characteristics of shale content and organic matters, combined with digital rock physics experiment simulation, we put forward and improve the dual-shale-content method for TOC content logging evaluation. The accuracy of this method is verified by actual data processing. The result shows the dual-shale-content method is simple to use and the error is small. And by comparing with the calculation results by using the ΔLogR method, it is revealed that the trend of the TOC content calculated by our method agrees with the core results better. This new method is suitable for the evaluation of TOC content in the area or interval where there is only conventional logs.

  13. Influence of carbon content on cold rolling and recrystallization texture in polycrystalline 3% Si-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, M.; Shingaki, Y.; Imamura, T.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of carbon content on cold rolling and recrystallization texture in polycrystalline 3%Si-Fe under the relatively high rolling reduction condition has been investigated. The main component of recrystallization texture was {554}<225> orientation in ultra low carbon (ULC) 3%Si-Fe and {411}<148> orientation in low carbon (LC) 3%Si-Fe. The origin of {411}<148> recrystallization texture development in LC 3%Si-Fe is discussed in terms of the rotation of deformation twin from {100}<011> to {411}<148> orientation with the generation of the slip bands inside the neighboring matrix grain {111}<011>. The rotation axis of this crystal rotation was estimated <112> axis. Assuming the single slip system activation in BCC metal, crystal rotation around <112> axis indicates an activation of {110}<111> slip system. In terms of Schmid factor, {112}<111> slip system must be activated in {100}<011> matrix. This is not in agreement with the estimation of {110}<111> slip system activation. Detailed observation on the cold rolled sample revealed that common slip plane passed through the deformation twin and surrounding deformed matrix grains. It is considered that slip plane matching (SPM) with neighboring grains activates the lower Schmid factor slip system in deformation twin. These results suggest that not only Schmid factor but also SPM with neighboring grains should be considered to decide the active slip systems in polycrystalline metals.

  14. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Nitrogen Content for Spatially Explicit Carbon and Water Cycle Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Miller, J. R.; Chen, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Foliage nitrogen concentration is a determinant of photosynthetic capacity of leaves, thereby an important input to ecological models for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. Recently, spectrally continuous airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery has proven to be useful for retrieving an important related parameter, total chlorophyll content at both leaf and canopy scales. Thus remote sensing of vegetation biochemical parameters has promising potential for improving the prediction of global carbon and water balance patterns. In this research, we explored the feasibility of estimating leaf nitrogen content using hyperspectral remote sensing data for spatially explicit estimation of carbon and water budgets. Multi-year measurements of leaf biochemical contents of seven major boreal forest species were carried out in northeastern Ontario, Canada. The variation of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content in response to various growth conditions, and the relationship between them,were investigated. Despite differences in plant type (deciduous and evergreen), leaf age, stand growth conditions and developmental stages, leaf nitrogen content was strongly correlated with leaf chlorophyll content on a mass basis during the active growing season (r2=0.78). With this general correlation, leaf nitrogen content was estimated from leaf chlorophyll content at an accuracy of RMSE=2.2 mg/g, equivalent to 20.5% of the average measured leaf nitrogen content. Based on this correlation and a hyperspectral remote sensing algorithm for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval, the spatial variation of leaf nitrogen content was inferred from the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery acquired by Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). A process-based ecological model Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) was used for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. In contrast to the scenario with leaf nitrogen content assigned as a constant value without

  15. High-resolution spatial patterns of Soil Organic Carbon content derived from low-altitude aerial multi-band imagery on the Broadbalk Wheat Experiment at Rothamsted,UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana Jague, Emilien; Goulding, Keith; Heckrath, Goswin; Macdonald, Andy; Poulton, Paul; Stevens, Antoine; Van Wesemael, Bas; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    patterns of SOC at a very high spatial resolution (< 10cm) (ii) to quantify the uncertainties on the predictions and potential of the method for monitoring SOC changes in experimental plots. This study used multi-band images with wavelengths between 450-1000nm taken at low altitude and at the landscape scale with a Tetracam Mini-MCA6. Images were taken of plots on section 9 on Broadbalk (continuous wheat) in November 2013 using a UAV-platform (Octocopter) at an altitude of 120m. The different images obtained were corrected for vignetting, noise and geometric deformation then stitched and georeferenced; the radiance was converted for reflectance with white calibration panels. Also, the vegetation effect (a cover mean of 10%) was removed by linear spectral unmixing. Finally, the spectra was calibrated and validated with SOC (0-5cm) measurements from 57 soil samples (37 calibration samples and 20 for the validation) taken along transect. The resulting map of SOC contents has a resolution of 10cm and an associated error of about the same magnitude as that for routine laboratory analyses (i.e. 0.2%). The map shows clear differences between plots relating to the different long-term fertilizer and organic manure inputs.

  16. Metallurgical Mechanism and Niobium Effects on Improved Mechanical Properties in High Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansto, Steven G.

    The technological development of value-added applications for niobium (Nb) microalloyed structural steels has expanded into the high carbon long products sector. Micro additions of 0.005 to 0.020%Nb in various high carbon steel compositions have exhibited improved processing, such as wire drawability or formability during manufacturing, higher productivity at reduced operational cost as well as improved mechanical properties compared to traditional non-Nb bearing high carbon steels. Although the Nb solubility is limited in high carbon steels compared to low carbon steels, the optimized Nb content has been defined based on experimental results and now transferred into industrial operations. The Nb delays the pearlite transformation, hence resulting in a finer interlammelar spacing compared to traditional high carbon pearlitic steels. Consequently, the optimized Nb content leads to improved mechanical properties due to this finer interlamellar pearlite spacing. Opportunities exist to transfer this new Nb-technology into wire rods, bolts, rails and tire cord.

  17. Magneto-carbonization method for production of carbon fiber, and high performance carbon fibers made thereby

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit K.; Ozcan, Soydan; Eberle, Claude C.; Abdallah, Mohamed Gabr; Mackiewicz, Ludtka Gail; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Rivard, John Daniel Kennedy

    2017-08-08

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from fiber precursor, wherein the fiber precursor is subjected to a magnetic field of at least 3 Tesla during a carbonization process. The carbonization process is generally conducted at a temperature of at least 400.degree. C. and less than 2200.degree. C., wherein, in particular embodiments, the carbonization process includes a low temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 400.degree. C. or 500.degree. C. and less than or up to 1000.degree. C., 1100.degree. C., or 1200.degree. C., followed by a high temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 1200.degree. C. In particular embodiments, particularly in the case of a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber precursor, the resulting carbon fiber may possess a minimum tensile strength of at least 600 ksi, a tensile modulus of at least 30 Msi, and an ultimate elongation of at least 1.5%.

  18. Using High-Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presentation at International Conference on Toxicological Alternatives & Translational Toxicology (ICTATT) held in China and Discussing the possibility of using High Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping Points Slide Presentation at International Conference on Toxicological Alternatives & Translational Toxicology (ICTATT) held in China and Discussing the possibility of using High Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping Points

  19. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  20. Joining Carbon-Carbon Composites and High-Temperature Materials with High Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Daniel; Singler, Robert

    1998-01-01

    1. Program goals addressed during this period. Experimental work was directed at formation of a low-stress bond between carbon- carbon and aluminum, with the objective of minimizing the heating of the aluminum substrate, thereby minimizing stresses resulting from the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) difference between the aluminum and carbon-carbon. A second objective was to form a bond between carbon-carbon and aluminum with good thermal conductivity for electronic thermal management (SEM-E) application. 2. Substrates and joining materials selected during this period. Carbon-Carbon Composite (CCC) to Aluminum. CCC (Cu coated) to Aluminum. Soldering compounds based on Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu/Bi compositions. 3. Soldering experiments performed. Conventional techniques. High Energy Electron Beam (HEEB) process.

  1. Low content of Pt supported on Ni-MoCx/carbon black as a highly durable and active electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation, oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions in acidic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zang, Jianbing; Jia, Shaopei; Tian, Pengfei; Han, Chan; Wang, Yanhui

    2017-08-01

    Nickel and molybdenum carbide modified carbon black (Ni-MoCx/C) was synthesized by a two-step microwave-assisted deposition/carbonthermal reduction method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The as-prepared Ni-MoCx/C supported Pt (10 wt%) electrocatalyst (10Pt/Ni-MoCx/C) was synthesized through a microwave-assisted reduction method and 10Pt/Ni-MoCx/C exhibited high electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation, oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions. Results showed that 10Pt/Ni-MoCx/C electrocatalyst had better electrocatalytic activity and stability performance than 20 wt% Pt/C (20Pt/C) electrocatalyst. Among them, the electrochemical surface area of 10Pt/Ni-MoCx/C reached 68.4 m2 g-1, which was higher than that of 20Pt/C (63.2 m2 g-1). The enhanced stability and activity of 10Pt/Ni-MoCx/C electrocatalyst were attributed to: (1) an anchoring effect of Ni and MoCx formed during carbonthermal reduction process; (2) a synergistic effect among Pt, Ni, MoOx and MoCx. These findings indicated that 10Pt/Ni-MoCx/C was a promising electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

  2. High voltage spark carbon fiber detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pulse discharge technique was used to determine the length and density of carbon fibers released from fiber composite materials during a fire or aircraft accident. Specifications are given for the system which uses the ability of a carbon fiber to initiate spark discharge across a high voltage biased grid to achieve accurate counting and sizing of fibers. The design of the system was optimized, and prototype hardware proved satisfactory in laboratory and field tests.

  3. Case hardenability at high carbon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, H.W.

    1995-02-01

    Loss of hardenability in the case was thought to be responsible for a lower than specified hardness found on a large carburized bushing. Pseudo Jominy testing on several high hardenability carburizing grades confirmed that hardenability fade was present at carbon levels above 0.65% and particularly for those steels containing molybdenum. Analysis of previous work provided a formula for calculating Jominy hardenability at various carbon levels. Again the results confirmed that the loss of hardenability was more severe in steels containing molybdenum.

  4. Buckling of carbon nanotubes at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Y; Wang, C M; Tan, V B C

    2009-05-27

    Presented herein is an investigation into the buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) subjected to axial compression and torsion at high temperatures. This study is carried out by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at both room temperature and extremely high temperatures. It is observed that the SWCNT becomes more susceptible to buckling in a higher temperature environment, especially when the SWCNT is subject to axial compression. The high thermal energy enhances the vibration of carbon atoms in the SWCNT significantly, which leads to bond breaking and the formation of sp(3) bonds as well as Stone-Wales (SW) defects in the postbuckling stage.

  5. Determination by near infrared microscopy of the nitrogen and carbon content of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) leaf powder

    PubMed Central

    Lequeue, Gauthier; Draye, Xavier; Baeten, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Near infrared microscopy (NIRM) has been developed as a rapid technique to predict the chemical composition of foods, reduce analytical costs and time and ease sample preparation. In this study, NIRM has been evaluated as an alternative to classical chemical analysis to determine the nitrogen and carbon content of small samples of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) leaf powder. Near infrared spectra were obtained by NIRM for independent leaf samples collected on 216 plants grown under six different levels of nitrogen. From these, 30 calibration and 30 validation samples covering the spectral range of the whole set were selected and their nitrogen and carbon contents were determined by a reference method. The calibration model obtained for nitrogen content proved to be excellent, with a coefficient of determination in calibration (R2c) higher than 0.9 and a ratio of performance to deviation (RPDc) higher than 3. Statistical indicators of prediction using the validation set were also very high (R2p values > 0.90). However, the calibration model obtained for carbon content was much less satisfactory (R2c < 0.50). NIRM appears as a promising and suitable tool for a rapid, non-destructive and reliable determination of nitrogen content of tiny samples of tomato leaf powder. PMID:27634485

  6. Deviations of inorganic and organic carbon content in hypomineralised enamel.

    PubMed

    Taube, F; Marczewski, M; Norén, J G

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to discriminate hypomineralised enamel of permanent first molars from normal enamel by means of spectroscopic methods. The present study was conducted using Multi spot Raman Fourier Transform Spectroscopy, Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Raman spectroscopy indicated significantly more B-type carbonate and hydrocarbons in hypomineralised enamel diagnosed as MIH (Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation). From XRD analysis, no changes in crystallinity of the enamel apatite could be found. Using multi spot Raman-spectroscopy, a significant molecular discrimination between normal and hypomineralised enamel could be made. Detailed surface studies are needed in order to achieve better restorative materials, specifically designed for restoration of hypomineralised enamel, and are also needed in order to understand and predict the clinical consequences of hypomineralised enamel with the condition MIH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Abukari, S. S. Mensah, S. Y.; Twum, A.; Mensah, N. G.; Adu, K. A.; Rabiu, M.

    2012-12-15

    We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ω{sub B} for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ω{sub B} for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  8. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  9. High-resolution electron microscopy study of synthetic carbonate and aluminum containing apatites.

    PubMed

    Layani, J D; Cuisinier, F J; Steuer, P; Cohen, H; Voegel, J C; Mayer, I

    2000-05-01

    Aluminum (Al)-containing calcium-deficient carbonated hydroxyapatites were produced by a precipitation method from aqueous solution with carbonate (0-6.1%) and aluminum (0.1-0.5%) concentrations close to those found in biological materials. Two series of apatites were prepared: one at pH 7.0 and another at pH 9. 0. High-resolution electron microscopy has shown that many of them possess structural defects such as screw dislocations, grain boundaries, and central defects. Samples with high carbonate content and high water and high Al(3+) content had a high amount of structural defects. Accordingly, a sample (7Al1) with a relatively high carbonate content (6.1%) and a sample (7Al6) without carbonate but with a relatively high water (2.0 mol) and Al(3+) content (0. 39%) presented the highest amount of structural defects, 54% and 47%, respectively. A sample (7Al13) with a low level of crystalline water (1 mol) and low carbonate (2.5%) showed a small amount of defects. The presence of water associated with Al(3+) induced a high number of crystals having a central defect with a great similarity to the so-called water layer of octacalcium phosphate (OCP). Observed images of all these crystals have shown good correspondence with the computer-simulated image based on the crystal structure of hydroxyapatite, indicating that the addition of Al(3+) and carbonate does not perturb the apatitic structure.

  10. Creep of carbon-yarn and carbon-carbon composites at high temperatures and high stresses. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sines, G.; Yang, Z.; Vickers, B.D.

    1988-05-01

    To better understand the creep-behavior of carbon yarn and carbon-carbon composites, creep experiments were developed that permitted testing at high temperatures (up to 2500 C) and at high stresses (up to 850 MPa) on specially prepared, uniaxial specimens that had a known gage length. Using a Dorn-type power-law relation to model steady-state creep, the apparent activation energy for the carbon-yarn and carbon-composite specimens was determined to be 1082 kj/mol. This value represents a single thermally activated process, vacancy diffusion, that compares favorably with the various types of graphitizable carbon. The value determined for the stress exponent was 7.5. It too was found to be independent of the carbon-matrix's presence and independent of the specimens' loading history. Values of the pre-exponential constant for the carbon yarn and carbon composites were also calculated. The carbon matrix greatly improves the creep resistance of the carbon composite. This improvement was attributed to the matrix's microstructure. It distributes applied loads more evenly and it may also impose a triaxial stress state in the yarns's filaments. It is proposed that such a stress state may inhibit the flux of vacancies, thus accounting in part for this increase in creep resistance.

  11. Pyrogenic Carbon in soils: a literature-based inventory and a global estimation of its content in soil organic carbon and stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisser, Moritz; Purves, Ross; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Abiven, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC) is considered one of the most stable components in soil and can represent more than 30% of total soil organic carbon (SOC). However, few estimates of global PyC stock or distribution exist and thus PyC is not included in any global carbon cycle models, despite its potential major relevance for the soil pool. To obtain a global picture, we reviewed the literature for published PyC content in SOC data. We generated the first PyC database including more than 560 measurements from 55 studies. Despite limitations due to heterogeneous distribution of the studied locations and gaps in the database, we were able to produce a worldwide PyC inventory. We found that global PyC represent on average 13.7% of the SOC and can be even up to 60%, making it one of the largest groups of identifiable compounds in soil, together with polysaccharides. We observed a consistent range of PyC content in SOC, despite the diverse methods of quantification. We tested the PyC content against different environmental explanatory variables: fire and land use (fire characteristics, land use, net primary productivity), climate (temperature, precipitation, climatic zones, altitude) and pedogenic properties (clay content, pH, SOC content). Surprisingly, soil properties explain PyC content the most. Soils with clay content higher than 50% contain significantly more PyC (> 30% of the SOC) than with clay content lower than 5% (< 6% of the SOC). Alkaline soils contain at least 50% more PyC than acidic soils. Furthermore, climatic conditions, represented by climatic zone or mean temperature or precipitation, correlate significantly with the PyC content. By contrast, fire characteristics could only explain PyC content, if site-specific information was available. Datasets derived from remote sensing did not explain the PyC content. To show the potential of this database, we used it in combination with other global datasets to create a global worldwide PyC content and a stock estimation

  12. Enhancing Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Potentials of Antidesma thwaitesianum by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction.

    PubMed

    Poontawee, Warut; Natakankitkul, Surapol; Wongmekiat, Orawan

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has increasingly gained attention as an alternative technique for extraction of natural products without leaving toxic residues in extracts. Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg. (Phyllanthaceae), or ma mao, has been reported to exhibit antioxidant health benefits due to its phenolic constituents. To determine whether SFE technique could impact on phenolic contents and associated antioxidant potentials, ripe fruits of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae) were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and conventional solvents (ethanol, water). The results showed that the SC-CO2 extract contained significantly higher yield, total phenolic, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents than those obtained from ethanol and water. It also demonstrated the greatest antioxidant activities as assessed by ABTS radical cation decolorization, DPPH radical scavenging, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Further analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD/MSD) revealed the presence of catechin as a major phenolic compound of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae), with the maximum amount detected in the SC-CO2 extract. These data indicate that SFE technology improves both quantity and quality of Antidesma thwaitesianum fruit extract. The findings added more reliability of using this technique to produce high added value products from this medicinal plant.

  13. Enhancing Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Potentials of Antidesma thwaitesianum by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Poontawee, Warut; Natakankitkul, Surapol; Wongmekiat, Orawan

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has increasingly gained attention as an alternative technique for extraction of natural products without leaving toxic residues in extracts. Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg. (Phyllanthaceae), or ma mao, has been reported to exhibit antioxidant health benefits due to its phenolic constituents. To determine whether SFE technique could impact on phenolic contents and associated antioxidant potentials, ripe fruits of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae) were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and conventional solvents (ethanol, water). The results showed that the SC-CO2 extract contained significantly higher yield, total phenolic, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents than those obtained from ethanol and water. It also demonstrated the greatest antioxidant activities as assessed by ABTS radical cation decolorization, DPPH radical scavenging, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Further analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD/MSD) revealed the presence of catechin as a major phenolic compound of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae), with the maximum amount detected in the SC-CO2 extract. These data indicate that SFE technology improves both quantity and quality of Antidesma thwaitesianum fruit extract. The findings added more reliability of using this technique to produce high added value products from this medicinal plant. PMID:25977832

  14. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  15. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  16. High Ice Water Content: DC-8 Aeronautics Campaign

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-10

    During the month of August, NASA’s DC-8 completed flights in Florida aimed at collecting data on high-altitude crystals for the High Ice Water Content (HIWC) mission. High ice water content can be found within large convective storms and can result in aircraft engines losing power or not functioning properly. Researchers will use the data to develop technology that can be used onboard commercial aircraft to avoid high ice water content conditions and provide a safer flight for passengers. This video gives an inside look at the HIWC mission, including research done in and around Hurricane Danny, as well as a look at the instruments being used onboard the research aircraft. Researchers and pilots onboard worked with satellite information from the ground to find regions of high ice water content within the convective systems.

  17. Effects of tantalum content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low-carbon RAFM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Yongchang; Yan, Biyu; Li, Huijun

    2016-10-01

    In order to explore the influence of tantalum content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon RAFM (reduced activation ferritic/martensitic) steels, three low carbon RAFM steels with different tantalum contents (0%, 0.027%, 0.073%) were designed. The precipitation behavior and effect of precipitates on the mechanical properties of the Low-C RAFM steel were investigated. The results indicate that increase of tantalum content causes decrease of the prior austenite grain size and the amount of M23C6 carbides precipitated along prior austenite grain boundaries and packet boundaries as well as increase of the amount of MX nano-sized particles within intragranular regions. The impact properties of low carbon RAFM steels are excellent regardless of the tantalum content. The impact properties and hardness are obviously improved by increasing tantalum content, which may be related to increase of the number of MX and decrease of M23C6. Furthermore, the tensile properties at elevated temperature below 600 °C are hardly changed with increase of tantalum content, yet those at 800 °C are improved with increasing tantalum content. This implies that MX carbides would be more important for tensile properties at higher temperature.

  18. Black carbon content in a ponderosa pine forest of eastern Oregon with varying seasons and intervals of prescribed burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matosziuk, L.; Hatten, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil carbon represents a significant component of the global carbon cycle. While fire-based disturbance of forest ecosystems acts as a carbon source, the increased temperatures can initiate molecular changes to forest biomass that convert fast cycling organic carbon into more stable forms such as black carbon (BC), a product of incomplete combustion that contains highly-condensed aromatic structures and very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Such forms of carbon can remain in the soil for hundred to thousands of years, effectively creating a long-term carbon sink. The goal of this project is to understand how specific characteristics of prescribed burns, specifically the season of burn and the interval between burns, affect the formation, structure, and retention of these slowly degrading forms of carbon in the soil. Both O-horizon (forest floor) and mineral soil (0-15 cm cores) samples were collected from a season and interval of burn study in Malheur National Forest. The study area is divided into six replicate units, each of which is sub-divided into four treatment areas and a control. Beginning in 1997, each treatment area was subjected to: i) spring burns at five-year intervals, ii) fall burns at five-year intervals, iii) spring burns at 15-year intervals, or iv) fall burns at 15-year intervals. The bulk density, pH, and C/N content of each soil were measured to assess the effect of the burn treatments on the soil. Additionally, the amount and molecular structure of BC in each sample was quantified using the distribution of specific molecular markers (benzene polycarboxylic acids or BPCAs) that are present in the soil following acid digestion.

  19. [Relationship between organic carbon and water content in four type wetland sediments in Sanjiang Plain].

    PubMed

    Tong, Cheng-li; Zhang, Wen-ju; Wang, Hong-qing; Tang, Guo-yong; Yang, Gai-ren; Wu, Jin-shui

    2005-11-01

    Characteristic and relationship were analyzed between organic carbon and water content in four types of wetlands (one cultivated wetland and three typical natural wetlands including fen, marsh and marshy meadow) in Sanjiang Plain of Northeastern China. Results show that there are distinct differences in the depths of organic carbon deposition, the organic carbon and water content in sediment profiles of these four type wetlands. There are significant positive correlations between organic carbon and water content in sediment profiles of the same type wetland (p < 0.01; R2 = 0.8276, 0.9917, 0.9916 and 0.9782 for cultivated wetland, fen, marsh and marshy meadow, respectively). The trend for evolution of ecological and environmental functions of wetland ecosystems is discussed based on the analysis of the relationship between soil organic carbon and water content. The results further illustrate the viewpoint that the protection and restoration of wetlands could lessen the global climate change caused by the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  20. Effect of silicon on the spheroidization of cementite in hypereutectoid high carbon chromium bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwan-Ho; Lee, Jae-Seung; Lee, Duk-Lak

    2010-12-01

    The effect of silicon on the spheroidization of cementite in hypereutectoid high carbon chromium bearing steels has been investigated on the basis of microstructural analysis and thermodynamic calculations. The results showed that an increase of silicon content in high carbon chromium bearing steels retards the spheoridization of cementite. The thermodynamic calculations revealed that the shrinkage of the austenite phase field in bearing steels with increasing silicon content gave rise to an increase of volume fraction of cementite at an annealing temperature, possibly resulting in incomplete spheroidization. Furthermore, due to the low solubility of silicon in cementite, an increase of silicon content can raise the activity or chemical potential of carbon atoms in austenite at the austenite/cementite interfaces. Consequently, the difference in chemical potential of carbon atoms at the interfaces would be reduced with increasing silicon content, causing a decrease of the driving force for their diffusion from cementite to austenite.

  1. Calcium content of different compositions of gallstones and pathogenesis of calcium carbonate gallstones.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Kuen; Pan, Huichin; Huang, Shing-Moo; Huang, Nan-Lan; Yao, Chung-Chin; Hsiao, Kuang-Ming; Wu, Chew-Wun

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the calcium content of different gallstone compositions and the pathogenic mechanisms of calcium carbonate gallstones. Between August 2001 and July 2007, gallstones from 481 patients, including 68 calcium carbonate gallstones, were analyzed for total calcium content. Gallbladder bile samples from 33 cases and six controls were analyzed for pH, carbonate anion level, free-ionized calcium concentration and saturation index for calcium carbonate. Total calcium content averaged 75.6 %, 11.8 %, and 4.2 % for calcium carbonate, calcium bilirubinate and cholesterol gallstones. In 29.4 % of patients, chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions were caused by polypoid lesions in the neck region and 70.6 % were caused by stones. A total of 82 % of patients had chronic low-grade inflammation of the gallbladder wall and 18.0 % had acute inflammatory exacerbations. In the bile, we found the mean pH, mean carbonate anion, free-ionized calcium concentrations, and mean saturation index for calcium carbonate to be elevated in comparison to controls. From our study, we found chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions and low-grade GB wall inflammation lead to GB epithelium hydrogen secretion dysfunction. Increased calcium ion efflux into the GB lumen combined with increased carbonate anion presence increases SI_CaCO(3) from 1 to 22.4. Thus, in an alkaline milieu with pH 7.8, calcium carbonate begins to aggregate and precipitate. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Microbial community signature of high-solid content methanogenic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Abbassi-Guendouz, Amel; Trably, Eric; Hamelin, Jérôme; Dumas, Claire; Steyer, Jean Philippe; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Escudié, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    In this study, changes in bacterial and archaeal communities involved in anaerobic digestion processes operated with high solid contents were investigated. Batch tests were performed within a range of total solids (TS) of 10-35%. Between 10% and 25% TS, high methanogenic activity was observed and no overall specific structure of active bacterial communities was found. At 30% and 35%, methanogenesis was inhibited as a consequence of volatile fatty acids accumulation. Here, a specific bacterial signature was observed with three main dominant bacteria related to Clostridium sp., known for their ability to grow at low pH. Additionally, archaeal community was gradually impacted by TS content. Three archaeal community structures were observed with a gradual shift from Methanobacterium sp. to Methanosarcina sp., according to the TS content. Overall, several species were identified as biomarkers of methanogenesis inhibition, since bacterial and archaeal communities were highly specific at high TS contents.

  3. Electrical properties of multiphase composites based on carbon nanotubes and an optimized clay content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiziano, Luigi; Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo; Guadagno, Liberata; Vertuccio, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The experimental results concerning the characterization of a multiphase nanocomposite systems based on epoxy matrix, loaded with different amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an optimized Hydrotalcite (HT) clay content (i.e. 0.6 wt%), duly identified by an our previous theoretical study based on Design of Experiment (DoE), are presented. Dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMA) reveal that even the introduction of higher HT loading (up to 1%wt) don't affect significantly the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites while morphological investigations show an effective synergy between clay and carbon nanotubes that leads to peculiar micro/nanostructures that favor the creation of the electrical conductive network inside the insulating resin. An electrical characterization is carried out in terms of DC electrical conductivity, percolation threshold (EPT) and frequency response in the range 10Hz-1MHz. In particular, the measurements of the DC conductivity allow to obtain the typical "percolation" curve also found for classical CNT-polymer mixtures and a value of about 2 S/m for the electrical conductivity is achieved at the highest considered CNTs concentration (i.e. 1 wt%). The results suggest that multiphase nanocomposites obtained incorporating dispersive nanofillers, in addition to the conductive one, may be a valid alternative to the polymer blends, to improve the properties of the polymeric materials thus able to meet high demands, particularly concerning their mechanical and thermal stability and electrical features required in the aircraft engineering.

  4. A pressure-affected headspace-gas chromatography method for determining calcium carbonate content in paper sample.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yi; Yu, Zhen-Hua; Zhan, Jian-Bo; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Zhang, Shu-Xin; Xie, Wei-Qi; He, Liang

    2017-07-21

    The present work reports on the development of a pressure-affected based headspace (HS) analytical technique for the determination of calcium carbonate content in paper samples. By the acidification, the carbonate in the sample was converted to CO2 and released into the headspace of a closed vial and then measured by gas chromatography (GC). When the amount of carbonate in the sample is significant, the pressure created by the CO2 affects the accuracy of the method. However, the pressure also causes a change in the O2 signal in the HS-GC measurement, which is a change that can be used as an indirect measure of the carbonate in the sample. The results show that the present method has a good precision (the relative standard deviation<2.32%), and good accuracy (the relative differences compared to a reference method was<5.76%). Coupled with the fact that the method is simple, rapid, and accurate, it is suitable for a variety of applications that call for the analysis of high carbonate content in paper samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Carboxylated molecules regulate magnesium content of amorphous calcium carbonates during calcification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongbo; Wallace, Adam F.; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    With the realization that many calcified skeletons form by processes involving a precursor phase of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), a new paradigm for mineralization is emerging. There is evidence the Mg content in biogenic ACC is regulated by carboxylated (acidic) proteins and other macromolecules, but the physical basis for such a process is unknown. We test the hypothesis that ACC compositions express a systematic relationship to the chemistry of carboxyl-rich biomolecules. A series of inorganic control experiments were conducted to establish the dependence of Mg/Ca ratios in ACC on solution composition. We then determined the influence of a suite of simple carboxylated organic acids on Mg content. Molecules with a strong affinity for binding Ca compared with Mg promote the formation of Mg-enriched ACC that is compositionally equivalent to high-magnesium calcites and dolomite. Measurements show Mg/Ca ratios are controlled by a predictable dependence upon the binding properties of the organic molecules. The trend appears rooted in the conformation and electrostatic potential topology of each molecule, but dynamic factors also may be involved. The dependence suggests a physical basis for reports that specific sequences of calcifying proteins are critical to modulating mineralization. Insights from this study may provide a plausible explanation for why some biogenic carbonates and carbonaceous cements often contain higher Mg signatures than those that are possible by classical crystal growth processes. The findings reiterate the controls of microenvironment on mineralization and suggest an origin of compositional offsets, or vital effects, long recognized by the paleoclimate community. PMID:19955417

  6. Wood carbon content of tree species in Eastern China: interspecific variability and the importance of the volatile fraction.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S C; Malczewski, G

    2007-11-01

    Data on the mass density and carbon content of tree organs, and in particular stem wood, are essential for accurate assessments of forest carbon sequestration. However most available data, including that for East Asia, has neglected the volatile C fraction. Wood samples were collected and assayed for C content from 14 native tree species in Jilin Province, NE China. C content showed statistically significant variation among species, ranging from 48.4% to 51.0%. The volatile C fraction was non-negligible, averaging 2.2%, and showed high variation among species. As found in prior studies, wood C content was appreciably higher in conifer than hardwood (angiosperm) species (50.8+/-0.1% vs. 49.5+/-0.2%, respectively). Wood carbon density (gC/cm(3)) showed very high inter-specific variation, due mainly to differences in wood specific gravity. Our analyses, in conjunction with recently published data from North America, indicate a global mean value of 47.5+/-0.5% wood C content exclusive of volatile C; the widely used 50% figure corresponds more closely to total wood C inclusive of the volatile fraction. Failure to include volatile C or to use species- or higher-taxon-specific C content values in forest C assessments is likely to introduce biases on the order approximately 4-6%. In addition, the stocks and flows of the volatile C fraction in wood are in themselves an important and sorely neglected aspect of forest C processes likely to be strongly impacted by harvests and other management practices.

  7. Equilibrated moisture content of several carbon phenolics and their relationship to resin, fiber, and interface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between relative humidity and the equilibrated moisture content of several variants of two distinctly different carbon phenolic composites. One of the materials gives a typical exponential relationship between RH and equilibrated moisture content while the second gives an inverse sigmoidal relationship with the largest increase in moisture between 45-60 percent relative humidity. The possible relationship between the shape of the curves and the nature of the material constituents is discussed.

  8. Synthesis of high luminescent carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdyuk, Alina A.; Petrova, Polina S.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.

    2017-03-01

    In this article we report an effective and simple method for synthesis of high luminescent carbon nanodots (CDs). In our work as a carbon source sodium dextran sulfate (DS) was used because it is harmless, its analogs are used in medicine as antithrombotic compounds and blood substitutes after hemorrhage. was used as a substrate We investigated the influence of temperature parameters of hydrothermal synthesis on the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and position of emission maxima. We discovered that the PL intensity can be tuned by changing of synthesis temperature and CD concentration.

  9. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ranga P; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-07-16

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ~6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity.

  10. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-10-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique. Fe ions in solution form red-orange complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline, producing an absorption peak at λ=510 nm, the intensity of which is proportional to the solution Fe concentration. A series of standard Fe solutions were formulated to establish the relationship between optical absorbance and Fe concentration. Many Fe catalysts were microscopically observed to be encased by graphitic layers, thus preventing their extraction. Fe catalyst dissolution from CNTs was investigated with various single and mixed acids, and Fe concentration was found to be highest with CNTs being held at reflux in HClO4/HNO3 and H2SO4/HNO3 mixtures. This novel colorimetric method to measure Fe concentrations by UV/Vis spectroscopy was validated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, indicating its reliability and applicability to asses Fe content in CNTs.

  11. Reduction of the nitrogen and carbon content in swine waste with algae and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, E; Nagel, M; Tischner, R

    1999-08-01

    Animal waste causes environmental problems like eutrophication of ground and surface water or the pollution of the atmosphere because of its high NH4+ content. The aim of our study was to fix the nitrogen of swine waste as biomass. Therefore, an isolated alga, Chlorella sp., and bacteria naturally living in liquid manure were grown in batch cultures (containing diluted swine waste supplied with a nutrient solution) and continuous cultures (undiluted liquid manure) to achieve reduction of NH4+ and total organic carbon (TOC) contents. For continuous cultivation, a photobioreactor of our own design was used. The batch cultivation of Chlorella sp. and bacteria in swine waste resulted in good growth of both groups of organisms and in a reduction of 25% NH4+ and 80% TOC. In the continuous cultivation a steady state was not achieved owing to a change in the composition of the bacterial population. NH4+ was totally removed, but NO2- (up to 100 mM) was transiently released. NO3- was not detected. These effects might be explained by the presence of heterotrophic nitrifiers, which are able to oxidize NH4+ to NO2- and to reduce NO2- to gaseous compounds.

  12. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-01-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique. Fe ions in solution form red–orange complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline, producing an absorption peak at λ=510 nm, the intensity of which is proportional to the solution Fe concentration. A series of standard Fe solutions were formulated to establish the relationship between optical absorbance and Fe concentration. Many Fe catalysts were microscopically observed to be encased by graphitic layers, thus preventing their extraction. Fe catalyst dissolution from CNTs was investigated with various single and mixed acids, and Fe concentration was found to be highest with CNTs being held at reflux in HClO4/HNO3 and H2SO4/HNO3 mixtures. This novel colorimetric method to measure Fe concentrations by UV/Vis spectroscopy was validated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, indicating its reliability and applicability to asses Fe content in CNTs. PMID:26491641

  13. Enhanced ethanol fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with high spermidine contents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ki; Jo, Jung-Hyun; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2017-05-01

    Construction of robust and efficient yeast strains is a prerequisite for commercializing a biofuel production process. We have demonstrated that high intracellular spermidine (SPD) contents in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can lead to improved tolerance against various fermentation inhibitors, including furan derivatives and acetic acid. In this study, we examined the potential applicability of the S. cerevisiae strains with high SPD contents under two cases of ethanol fermentation: glucose fermentation in repeated-batch fermentations and xylose fermentation in the presence of fermentation inhibitors. During the sixteen times of repeated-batch fermentations using glucose as a sole carbon source, the S. cerevisiae strains with high SPD contents maintained higher cell viability and ethanol productivities than a control strain with lower SPD contents. Specifically, at the sixteenth fermentation, the ethanol productivity of a S. cerevisiae strain with twofold higher SPD content was 31% higher than that of the control strain. When the SPD content was elevated in an engineered S. cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose, the resulting S. cerevisiae strain exhibited much 40-50% higher ethanol productivities than the control strain during the fermentations of synthetic hydrolysate containing high concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. These results suggest that the strain engineering strategy to increase SPD content is broadly applicable for engineering yeast strains for robust and efficient production of ethanol.

  14. The development of high precision carbon fiber composite mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Ding, Jiao-teng; Wang, Yong-jie; Xie, Yong-jie; Ma, Zhen; Fan, Xue-wu

    2016-10-01

    Due to low density, high stiffness, low thermal expansion coefficient, duplicate molding, etc., carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is one of the potential materials of the optical mirror. The process developed for Φ300mm high precision CFRP mirror described in this paper. A placement tool used to improve laying accuracy up to ± 0.1°.A special reinforced cell structure designed to increase rigidity and thermal stability. Optical replication process adopted for surface modification of the carbon fiber composite mirror blank. Finally, surface accuracy RMS of Φ300mm CFRP mirror is 0.22μm, surface roughness Ra is about 2nm, and the thermal stability can achieve 13nm /°C from the test result. The research content is of some reference value in the infrared as well as visible light applications.

  15. Sorbents for CO2 capture from high carbon fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Maroto-Valer, M Mercedes; Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Yinzhi; Tang, Zhong

    2008-11-01

    Fly ashes with high-unburned-carbon content, referred to as fly ash carbons, are an increasing problem for the utility industry, since they cannot be marketed as a cement extender and, therefore, have to be disposed. Previous work has explored the potential development of amine-enriched fly ash carbons for CO2 capture. However, their performance was lower than that of commercially available sorbents, probably because the samples investigated were not activated prior to impregnation and, therefore, had a very low surface area. Accordingly, the work described here focuses on the development of activated fly ash derived sorbents for CO2 capture. The samples were steam activated at 850 degrees C, resulting in a significant increase of the surface area (1075 m2/g). The activated samples were impregnated with different amine compounds, and the resultant samples were tested for CO2 capture at different temperatures. The CO2 adsorption of the parent and activated samples is typical of a physical adsorption process. The impregnation process results in a decrease of the surface areas, indicating a blocking of the porosity. The highest adsorption capacity at 30 and 70 degrees C for the amine impregnated activated carbons was probably due to a combination of physical adsorption inherent from the parent sample and chemical adsorption of the loaded amine groups. The CO2 adsorption capacities for the activated amine impregnated samples are higher than those previously published for fly ash carbons without activation (68.6 vs. 45 mg CO2/g sorbent).

  16. Denitrification of high nitrate concentration wastewater using alternative carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Nava, Y; Marañón, E; Soons, J; Castrillón, L

    2010-01-15

    The use of different organic carbon sources in the denitrification of wastewater containing 2500 mg nitrates/L in a SBR was studied. Three alternative sources of carbon were tested: wastewater from a sweet factory, a residue from a soft drinks factory and a residue from a dairy plant. The first two are sugar-rich, whereas the third presents a high content in lactic acid. Maximum specific denitrification rates of between 42 and 48 mg NO(3)-N/g VSS h were obtained. The effluents were nitrate-free and very low COD concentrations were obtained in 4-6h reaction time, especially with the sugar-rich carbon sources. The values of the denitrifier net yield coefficient were higher than when using methanol (0.93-1.75 g VSS(formed)/g NO(x)-N(reduced)). The lowest value was obtained using the lactic acid-rich residue. The optimum COD/N ratios varied between 4.6 for the lactic acid-rich carbon source and 5.5-6.5 for the sugar-rich carbon sources.

  17. Carbon: A New View of its High-Temperature Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-20

    REP00T SAMSOJR-71-1’O6 Carbon :, A New View of its High-Temperature Behavior MaterialsSciences.1Labpratory The Ivan A. Getting Lbabozitories, The...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on revere. aide If necessary and Identify by block number) New Concept of Carbon Behavior Carbon Triple...Points Carbon Phase Diagram Carbon Vapor Pressure Linear Carbon Forms High Temperature Structure 0ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If neceesary end

  18. [Effects of different fertilization modes on paddy field topsoil organic carbon content and carbon sequestration duration in South China].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Qun; Yang, Min-Fang; Xu, Min-Lun; Zhang, Wu-Yi; Bian, Xin-Min

    2012-01-01

    Based on the organic carbon data of 222 topsoil samples taken from 38 paddy field experiment sites in South China, calculations were made on the relative annual change of topsoil organic carbon content (RAC) and carbon sequestration duration in the paddy fields in South China under five fertilization modes (inorganic nitrogen fertilization, N; inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization, NP; inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilization, NPK; organic fertilization, O; and inorganic plus organic fertilization, OF). The RAC under the fertilizations was 0-0.4 g x kg(-1) x a(-1), with an increment of 0.20 and 0.26 g x kg(-1) x a(-1) in double and triple cropping systems, respectively. The RAC was higher in treatments O and OF than in treatments N, NP, and NPK, being the highest (0.32 g x kg(-1) x a(-1)) in treatment OF. The topsoil organic carbon accumulation rate decreased with increasing time, and the carbon sequestration duration in treatments N, NP, NPK, O, and OF was about 22, 28, 38, 57, and 54 years, respectively. Inorganic plus organic fertilization was the most effective practice for soil carbon sequestration in the paddy fields in South China.

  19. Soil carbon dioxide emission and carbon content under dryland crops. I. Effects of tillage and crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil CO2 emission and C content can be influenced by types of tillage and crops. The CO2 flux at the soil surface, soil total C at 0- to 120-cm depth, and soil temperature and water content at 0- to 15-cm were measured under dryland no-tilled malt barley (NTB), no-tilled pea (NTP), no-tilled fallow ...

  20. Effects of Carbon Content on the Electrochemical Performances of MoS2-C Nanocomposites for Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weiyi; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Caiyun; Tao, Zhanliang; Chou, Shu-Lei; Kang, Yong-Mook; Liu, Hua-Kun

    2016-08-31

    Molybdenum disulfide is popular for rechargeable batteries, especially in Li-ion batteries, because of its layered structure and relatively high specific capacity. In this paper, we report MoS2-C nanocomposites that are synthesized by a hydrothermal process, and their use as anode material for Li-ion batteries. Ascorbic acid is used as the carbon source, and the carbon contents can be tuned from 2.5 wt % to 16.2 wt %. With increasing of carbon content, the morphology of MoS2-C nanocomposites changes from nanoflowers to nanospheres, and the particle size is decreased from 200 to 60 nm. This change is caused by the chemical complex interaction of ascorbic acid. The MoS2-C nanocomposite with 8.4 wt % C features a high capacity of 970 mAh g(-1) and sustains a capacity retention ratio of nearly 100% after 100 cycles. When the current increases to 1000 mA g(-1), the capacity still reaches 730 mAh g(-1). The above manifests that the carbon coating layer does not only accelerate the charge transfer kinetics to supply quick discharging and charging, but also hold the integrity of the electrode materials as evidenced by the long cycling stability. Therefore, MoS2-based nanocomposites could be used as commercial anode materials in Li-ion batteries.

  1. Effects of long-term compost application on carbon content and soil physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Marie; Houot, Sabine

    2013-04-01

    Biological treatment through composting of organic wastes fulfils multiple purposes: it not only reduces the amount of waste stored in landfills but can also provide agricultural soils with organic amendments, which affect physicochemical soil properties and reduce the use of mineral fertilizers. However, the impacts of different types of amendments are not yet fully understood, as quantity and quality of the exogenous organic matter (EOM) applied vary greatly and numerous other parameters are affected as well, such as pH, heavy metal content, or nutrient availability. The objective of this project was to investigate the effect of different organic amendments - via simulations - on water holding capacity (WHC) and particularly plant available water (PAW), in regard to irrigation needs. The long-term field experiment "Qualiagro" (INRA - Veolia Environment collaboration) was established in Feucherolles, France in 1998, where five treatments were designed, each with two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal and optimal. Farmyard manure (FYM) and three types of compost - all applied every other year at a rate of 4 t carbon ha-1 - gave rise to varying organic carbon (OC) contents and were compared to a control treatment. The treatments changed the soil's OC content from initially ~10.5 g kg-1 to a range of 9.35 to 15.58 g kg-1. An increased OC content can enhance WHC by increasing total porosity/ reducing bulk density. The PAW - the difference between field capacity (FC) and permanent wilting point (WP); predicted with pedotransfer functions related to OC - increases, if the increase at FC is larger than that at WP. With a higher amount of PAW, the need to irrigate fields - to ensure sufficient water availability for plant growth - decreases. At the same time, soil bulk density (ρd) affects root growth; denser soils can lead to reduced rooting depth. Both of these effects were considered when employing a simple soil water balance model (BUDGET; http

  2. High Density Methane Storage in Nanoporous Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Soo, Yuchoong; Maland, Brett; Doynov, Plamen; Lin, Yuyi; Pfeifer, Peter; Mriglobal Collaboration; All-Craft Team

    2014-03-01

    Development of low-pressure, high-capacity adsorbent based storage technology for natural gas (NG) as fuel for advanced transportation (flat-panel tank for NG vehicles) is necessary in order to address the temperature, pressure, weight, and volume constraints present in conventional storage methods (CNG & LNG.) Subcritical nitrogen adsorption experiments show that our nanoporous carbon hosts extended narrow channels which generate a high surface area and strong Van der Waals forces capable of increasing the density of NG into a high-density fluid. This improvement in storage density over compressed natural gas without an adsorbent occurs at ambient temperature and pressures ranging from 0-260 bar (3600 psi.) The temperature, pressure, and storage capacity of a 40 L flat-panel adsorbed NG tank filled with 20 kg of nanoporous carbon will be featured.

  3. Dynamic powder compaction of rapidly solidified Path A alloy with increased carbon and titanium content

    SciTech Connect

    Megusar, J.; Imeson, D.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study is to show the potential of the dynamic powder compaction technique to consolidate rapidly solidified Path A alloys and to develop microstructures with improved irradiation performance in the fusion environment. Samples of rapidly solidified and dynamically compacted Path A alloy with increased carbon and titanium content have been included in alloy development irradiation experiments.

  4. Reduction of adsorption capacity of coconut shell activated carbon for organic vapors due to moisture contents.

    PubMed

    Abiko, Hironobu; Furuse, Mitsuya; Takano, Tsuguo

    2010-01-01

    In occupational hygiene, activated carbon produced from coconut shell is a common adsorbent material for harmful substances including organic vapors due to its outstanding adsorption capacity and cost advantage. However, moisture adsorption of the carbon generally decreases the adsorption capacity for organic vapors. In a previous report, we prepared several coconut shell activated carbons which had been preconditioned by equilibration with moisture at different relative humidities and measured the breakthrough times for 6 kinds of organic vapor, in order to clarify the effect of preliminary moisture content in activated carbon on the adsorption capacity in detail. We found that the relative percent weight increase due to moisture adsorption of the carbon specimen had a quantitative effect, reducing the breakthrough time. In this report, we carried out further measurements of the effect of moisture content on the adsorption of 13 kinds of organic vapor, and investigated the relationship between moisture adsorption and the reduction of the breakthrough time of activated carbon specimens. We also applied the data to the Wood's breakthrough time estimation model which is an extension of the Wheeler-Jonas equation.

  5. Estimating the soil organic carbon content for European NUTS2 regions based on LUCAS data collection.

    PubMed

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Yigini, Yusuf; Dunbar, Martha B

    2013-01-01

    Under the European Union Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, the European Commission Directorate-General for the Environment and the European Environmental Agency (EEA) identified a decline in soil organic carbon and soil losses by erosion as priorities for the collection of policy relevant soil data at European scale. Moreover, the estimation of soil organic carbon content is of crucial importance for soil protection and for climate change mitigation strategies. Soil organic carbon is one of the attributes of the recently developed LUCAS soil database. The request for data on soil organic carbon and other soil attributes arose from an on-going debate about efforts to establish harmonized datasets for all EU countries with data on soil threats in order to support modeling activities and display variations in these soil conditions across Europe. In 2009, the European Commission's Joint Research Centre conducted the LUCAS soil survey, sampling ca. 20,000 points across 23 EU member states. This article describes the results obtained from analyzing the soil organic carbon data in the LUCAS soil database. The collected data were compared with the modeled European topsoil organic carbon content data developed at the JRC. The best fitted comparison was performed at NUTS2 level and showed underestimation of modeled data in southern Europe and overestimation in the new central eastern member states. There is a good correlation in certain regions for countries such as the United Kingdom, Slovenia, Italy, Ireland, and France. Here we assess the feasibility of producing comparable estimates of the soil organic carbon content at NUTS2 regional level for the European Union (EU27) and draw a comparison with existing modeled data. In addition to the data analysis, we suggest how the modeled data can be improved in future updates with better calibration of the model.

  6. Modelling global change impacts on soil carbon contents of agro-silvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2016-04-01

    total of 38 sampling points were selected under two management practices and six different land uses: (1) MEOW-dehesa (D); (2) MEOW-dehesa + some pine trees (D+P); (3) MEOW-dehesa + some cork oaks (D+C); (4) MEOW-dehesa + some gall oaks (D + G); (5) MEOW-dehesa after a clarified process and transformed to olive grove but maintaining isolated oaks (OG) and (6) MEOW-dehesa after a clarified process and transformed to cereal pasture with isolated oaks (C). Preliminary results showed a high heterogeneity of SOC contents along the soil profile for different climate and land use scenarios. The methods used here can be easily implemented in other Mediterranean areas with available information on climate, site, soil and land use. Keywords: CarboSOIL model, land use change, climate change, soil depth, dehesa References: Abd-Elmabod, S.K., Muñoz-Rojas, M., Jordán, A., Anaya-Romero, M., De la Rosa, D., 2014. Modelling soil organic carbon stocks along topographic transects under climate change scenarios using CarboSOIL. Geophys. Res. Abstr. vol. 16 EGU2014-295-1, EGU General Assembly.) Álvaro-Fuentes, J., Easter, M., Paustian, K., 2012. Climate change effects on organic carbon storage in agricultural soils of northeastern Spain. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 155, 87-94. Corral-Fernández, R., Parras-Alcántara, L., Lozano-García, B. 2013. Stratification ratio of soil organic C, N and C:N in Mediterranean evergreen oak woodland with conventional and organic tillage. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 164, 252-259. Francaviglia, R., Coleman, K., Whitmore, A.P., Doro, L., Urracci, G., Rubino, M., Ledda, L., 2012. Changes in soil organic carbon and climate change - application of the RothC model in agrosilvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems. Agric. Syst. 112, 48- 54. IPCC, 2007. Technical summary. In: Climate Change 2007. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change http://www.ipcc.ch/. Lozano-García, B., Parras-Alcántara, L

  7. Carbon and nitrogen contents in Desert Plants and Soil in the Yanqi basin of Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen are two main elements in plant-soil systems. Here, we present a study of carbon and nitrogen contents in several typical desert plants and underlying soil, which was conducted in Yanqi basin, Xinjiang province of China. Our results show that carbon (C) content is around 30% in both aboveground tissues and belowground roots. Nitrogen (N) content in desert plants has a range of 0.5%-3.5%, and the aboveground tissue has higher nitrogen content (~2%) than the belowground root (~1%). As a result, the belowground root has higher C/N ratio (~35) than the aboveground tissue (~25). Especially, the C/N values in belowground roots are twice as much as their aboveground tissues in Acroption repens, Tamarix ramosissima Ledeb. and Halostachys caspica. In desert soils, the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) with depth 0-50cm are range of 12.5-4.6 and 3.2-1.4 g/kg, respectively, different . As expected, the SOC and TN contents are declined with the depth increase. Meanwhile, our result indicated the soil TN is followed the SOC dynamic, as both elements are bond into the organic compounds. However, unlike the C/N ratios in aboveground tissue and roots, there is no significant difference of C/N ratios (2.95-3.46) in the soils within the 0-50 cm depth. The results inferred that in the desert plant C mainly storage in roots, but the C, N allocation between desert plant and soil has no significantly related.

  8. Highly selective and stable carbon dioxide uptake in polyindole-derived microporous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muhammad; Tiwari, Jitendra N; Kemp, K Christain; Yousuf, Muhammad; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-05-21

    Adsorption with solid sorbents is considered to be one of the most promising methods for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO₂) from power plant flue gases. In this study, microporous carbon materials used for CO₂ capture were synthesized by the chemical activation of polyindole nanofibers (PIF) at temperatures from 500 to 800 °C using KOH, which resulted in nitrogen (N)-doped carbon materials. The N-doped carbon materials were found to be microporous with an optimal adsorption pore size for CO₂ of 0.6 nm and a maximum (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) BET surface area of 1185 m(2) g(-1). The PIF activated at 600 °C (PIF6) has a surface area of 527 m(2) g(-1) and a maximum CO₂ storage capacity of 3.2 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C and 1 bar. This high CO₂ uptake is attributed to its highly microporous character and optimum N content. Additionally, PIF6 material displays a high CO₂ uptake at low pressure (1.81 mmol g(-1) at 0.2 bar and 25 °C), which is the best low pressure CO₂ uptake reported for carbon-based materials. The adsorption capacity of this material remained remarkably stable even after 10 cycles. The isosteric heat of adsorption was calculated to be in the range of 42.7-24.1 kJ mol(-1). Besides the excellent CO₂ uptake and stability, PIF6 also exhibits high selectivity values for CO₂ over N₂, CH₄, and H₂ of 58.9, 12.3, and 101.1 at 25 °C, respectively, and these values are significantly higher than reported values.

  9. Carbon coated nickel nanoparticles produced in high-frequency arc plasma at ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vnukova, Natalia; Dudnik, Alexander; Komogortsev, Sergey; Velikanov, Dmitry; Nemtsev, Ivan; Volochaev, Michael; Osipova, Irina; Churilov, Grigory

    2017-10-01

    The nickel particles with the mean size about 10-20 nm coated with carbon were extracted by the treatment of the carbon condensate with nitric and hydrochloric acids. The initial carbon condensate containing nickel nanoparticles with a graphite conversion was synthesized in the high-frequency carbon-helium arc plasma at ambient pressure with the nickel nanoparticles as a catalyst. The nickel content in the nanoparticles was 84.6 wt%. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are characterized by the high hysteresis and thermal stability. The sample of compacted nanoparticles is characterized by electrical resistance much higher than it in of compacted initial condensate.

  10. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests

    Treesearch

    Alan F. Talhelm; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Mark E. Kubiske; Donald R. Zak; Courtney E. Campany; Andrew J. Burton; Richard E. Dickson; George R. Hendrey; J. G. Isebrands; Keith F. Lewin; John Nagy; David F. Karnosky

    2014-01-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment...

  11. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m2 g−1 present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g−1 in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g−1, respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g−1 at 0.1 A g−1 and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry. PMID:26472144

  12. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-10-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m2 g-1 present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g-1 in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g-1, respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry.

  13. WEAR BEHAVIOR OF CARBON NANOTUBE/HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian B.; Novotny, John E.; Advani, Suresh G.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Nanotube/High Density Polyethylene (CNT/HDPE) composites were manufactured and tested to determine their wear behavior. The nanocomposites were made from untreated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and HDPE pellets. Thin films of the precursor materials were created with varying weight percentages of nanotubes (1%, 3%, and 5%), through a process of mixing and extruding. The precursor composites were then molded and machined to create test specimens for mechanical and wear tests. These included small punch testing to compare stiffness, maximum load and work-to-failure and block-on-ring testing to determine wear behavior. Each of the tests was conducted for the different weight percentages of composite as well as pure HDPE as the baseline. The measured mechanical properties and wear resistance of the composite materials increased with increasing nanotube content in the range studied. PMID:20161101

  14. Electric double-layer capacitors based on highly graphitized nanoporous carbons derived from ZIF-67.

    PubMed

    Torad, Nagy L; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Li, Yunqi; Hamoudi, Hicham; Imura, Masataka; Sakka, Yoshio; Hu, Chi-Chang; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-06-23

    Nanoporous carbons (NPCs) have large specific surface areas, good electrical and thermal conductivity, and both chemical and mechanical stability, which facilitate their use in energy storage device applications. In the present study, highly graphitized NPCs are synthesized by one-step direct carbonization of cobalt-containing zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 (ZIF-67). After chemical etching, the deposited Co content can be completely removed to prepare pure NPCs with high specific surface area, large pore volume, and intrinsic electrical conductivity (high content of sp(2) -bonded carbons). A detailed electrochemical study is performed using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. Our NPC is very promising for efficient electrodes for high-performance supercapacitor applications. A maximum specific capacitance of 238 F g(-1) is observed at a scan rate of 20 mV s(-1) . This value is very high compared to previous works on carbon-based electric double layer capacitors.

  15. Faint High-Latitude Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.

    1992-10-01

    Since carbon giants are ideal for study of the structure and kinematics of the outer galactic halo, we have undertaken a wide-area survey to search for faint high-latitude carbon (FHLC) stars. We use two-color photometric selection with large format CCDs to cover 52 deg^2 of sky to a depth of about V=18. Below this limit, we find good (< 20%) agreement between our object counts as a function of magnitude and the galactic models of Bahcall and Coneira (1984) at a variety of latitudes and longitudes. Our spectroscopic followup began with low-resolution spectra of 19 unconfirmed C-star candidates from the Case objective-prism photographic survey of Sanduleak and Pesch (1988). Four of these we find to be M stars. The 15 C stars we classify on the two-parameter Keenan-Morgan (1941) system as warm (color class < 4), with moderate to weak carbon band strengths (C class < 3). Of 94 faint C-star candidates from our own CCD survey, one highly ranked V=17 candidate was found to have strong carbon and CN bands. We estimate that to a depth of V=18, the surface density of FHLC stars is 0.019^0.044_-0.016 deg^-2. We identify two FHLC stars with previously cataloged high-proper-motion objects. These objects are thus inferred to be dwarf carbon (dC) stars, supplementing the one previously known case, G 77-61. Not all dC stars will have detectable proper motions, so other luminosity/distance indicators are needed: we find that C dwarfs all have similar JHK colors, and possibly an unusually strong lambda-6191 bandhead of carbon. By comparing positions of the HST Guide Star Catalog and the original Palomar Observatory Sky Survey, we detect proper motions in two additional FHLC stars. Our proper-motion survey, spanning a 30-yr base line, thus identifies four new dC's, and provides proper-motion upper limits for another 44 FHLC stars. Kinematic simulations suggest that virtually all Population II dCs will have detectable proper motions in a survey as sensitive as our own, and that to a

  16. [XPS and Raman spectral analysis of nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films with different nitrogen content].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang-Shou; Zhu, Jia-Qi; Han, Jie-Cai; Tian, Gui; Tan, Man-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films were prepared on the polished C--Si substrates by introducing highly pure nitrogen gas into the cathode region and the depositing chamber synchronously using filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology. The nitrogen content in the films was controlled by changing the flow rate of nitrogen gas. The configuration of ta-C : N films was investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and visible Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the nitrogen content in the films increased from 0.84 at% to 5.37 at% monotonously when the nitrogen flow rate was varied from 2 seem to 20 sccm. The peak position of C (1s) core level moved towards higher binding energy with the increase in nitrogen content. The shift of C (1s) peak position could be ascribed to the chemical bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms even though more three-fold coordinated sp2 configuration as in graphite was formed when the films were doped with more nitrogen atoms. Additionally, the half width of C(1s) peak gradually was also broadened with increasing nitrogen content. In order to discover clearly the changing regularities of the microstructure of the films, the XPS C(1s) spectra and Raman spectra were deconvoluted using a Gaussian-Lorentzian mixed lineshape. It was shown that the tetrahedral hybridization component was still dominant even though the ratio of sp2/sp3 obtained from C(1s) spectra rose with the increase in nitrogen content. The Raman measurements demonstrated that the G peak position shifted towards higher frequency from 1,561 to 1,578 cm(-1) and the ratio of ID/IG also rose with the increase in nitrogen content. Both results indicated that the graphitizing tendency could occur with the increase in nitrogen content in the films.

  17. Determination of fossil carbon content in Swedish waste fuel by four different methods.

    PubMed

    Jones, Frida C; Blomqvist, Evalena W; Bisaillon, Mattias; Lindberg, Daniel K; Hupa, Mikko

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the content of fossil carbon in waste combusted in Sweden by using four different methods at seven geographically spread combustion plants. In total, the measurement campaign included 42 solid samples, 21 flue gas samples, 3 sorting analyses and 2 investigations using the balance method. The fossil carbon content in the solid samples and in the flue gas samples was determined using (14)C-analysis. From the analyses it was concluded that about a third of the carbon in mixed Swedish waste (municipal solid waste and industrial waste collected at Swedish industry sites) is fossil. The two other methods (the balance method and calculations from sorting analyses), based on assumptions and calculations, gave similar results in the plants in which they were used. Furthermore, the results indicate that the difference between samples containing as much as 80% industrial waste and samples consisting of solely municipal solid waste was not as large as expected. Besides investigating the fossil content of the waste, the project was also established to investigate the usability of various methods. However, it is difficult to directly compare the different methods used in this project because besides the estimation of emitted fossil carbon the methods provide other information, which is valuable to the plant owner. Therefore, the choice of method can also be controlled by factors other than direct determination of the fossil fuel emissions when considering implementation in the combustion plants.

  18. Leaf carbon contents vary with the plant life forms and biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; He, F.; Tian, D.; Fang, J.

    2016-12-01

    Leaf carbon content per dry mass (LCC) is an important plant trait and also a very key factor influencing our estimations of regional and global carbon sequestration in plants. Compared with the nitrogen and phosphorus, Carbon content of plants change slight, and most studies have accepted the value of 50%, however, the variations of LCC among different biomes and life forms remain unclear. By a meta-analysis, we collected 18,338 data of plants LCC from literatures and TRY database. Our result showed that the geometric mean for plant LCC was 46.82%, but varied greatly among plant life forms. Specifically, higher LCC appeared in trees and shrubs with average values of 47.64% and 46.32%, respectively. Herbaceous plants showed a lower LCC of 44.88%, while crops and aquatic plants both exhibited the lowest LCC values of 41.93% and 41.20%, respectively. Moreover, deciduous and evergreen trees had similar LCC, while coniferous trees showed higher LCC than broadleaved trees. Remarkably, the LCC of perennial herbs demonstrated the highest with an average of 45.11% among all the herbaceous plants. In summary, the LCC showed an increase with the following order of biomes: cropland, grassland, shrubland and forest. Our results indicated that the LCC of plants was lower that 50%, and could be a perfect factor to distinguish the plant life forms and biomes. Key words: leaf carbon content, plant traits, biome, life form.

  19. Effect of sulfur content in a sulfur-activated carbon composite on the electrochemical properties of a lithium/sulfur battery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Changhyeon; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Wang, Guoxiu; Ahn, Jae-Pyeung; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The content of sulfur in activated carbon was controlled by solution process. • The sulfur electrode with low sulfur content shows the best performance. • The Li/S battery has capacity of 1360 mAh/g at 1 C and 702 mAh/g at 10 C. - Abstract: The content of sulfur in sulfur/activated carbon composite is controlled from 32.37 wt.% to 55.33 wt.% by a one-step solution-based process. When the sulfur content is limited to 41.21 wt.%, it can be loaded into the pores of an activated carbon matrix in a highly dispersed state. On the contrary, when the sulfur content is 55.33 wt.%, crystalline sulfur can be detected on the surface of the activated carbon matrix. The best electrochemical performance can be obtained for a sulfur electrode with the lowest sulfur content. The sulfur/activated carbon composite with 32.37 wt.% sulfur afforded the highest first discharge capacity of 1360 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C rate and a large reversible capacity of 702 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C (16.75 A/g)

  20. Adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in porous carbons: effect of surface chemistry, water content, and pore disorder.

    PubMed

    Billemont, Pierre; Coasne, Benoit; De Weireld, Guy

    2013-03-12

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in nanoporous carbons in the presence of water is studied using experiments and molecular simulations. Both the experimental and numerical samples contain polar groups that account for their partially hydrophilicity. For small amounts of adsorbed water, although the shape of the adsorption isotherms remain similar, both the molecular simulations and experiments show a slight decrease in the CO2 and CH4 adsorption amounts. For large amounts of adsorbed water, the experimental data suggest the formation of methane or carbon dioxide clathrates in agreement with previous work. In contrast, the molecular simulations do not account for the formation of such clathrates. Another important difference between the simulated and experimental data concerns the number of water molecules that desorb upon increasing the pressure of carbon dioxide and methane. Although the experimental data indicate that water remains adsorbed upon carbon dioxide and methane adsorption, the molecular simulations suggest that 40 to 75% of the initial amount of adsorbed water desorbs with carbon dioxide or methane pressure. Such discrepancies show that differences between the simulated and experimental samples are crucial to account for the rich phase behavior of confined water-gas systems. Our simulations for carbon dioxide-methane coadsorption in the presence of water suggest that the pore filling is not affected by the presence of water and that adsorbed solution theory can be applied for pressures as high as 15 MPa.

  1. High electrical resistivity carbon/graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, F. L.; Forsman, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon/graphite fibers were chemically oxidized in the liquid phase to fibers of graphite oxide. Resistivity increases as high as 10,000 times were obtained, the oxidized fiber decomposed on exposure to atmosphere. A factor of 1,000 remained as a stable increment. The largest change observed was 1,000,000 times. Best results were obtained on the most highly graphitized fibers. Electrochemical oxidation yielded a lower increase--about 10 times, but provided a controllable method of synthesis and insight to the mechanism of reaction. Tensile tests indicated that the strength of the fiber on oxidation was decreased by no more than 25 percent.

  2. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  3. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-05-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB.

  4. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-05-04

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>10(5) km(3)) within short time span (<1-3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB.

  5. Impact of organosulfur content on diesel fuel stability and implications for carbon steel corrosion.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Christopher N; Aktas, Deniz F; Duncan, Kathleen E; Callaghan, Amy V; Stevenson, Bradley S; Suflita, Joseph M

    2013-06-04

    Ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel has been integrated into the worldwide fuel infrastructure to help meet a variety of environmental regulations. However, desulfurization alters the properties of diesel fuel in ways that could potentially impact its biological stability. Fuel desulfurization might predispose ULSD to biodeterioration relative to sulfur-rich fuels and in marine systems accelerate rates of sulfate reduction, sulfide production, and carbon steel biocorrosion. To test such prospects, an inoculum from a seawater-compensated ballast tank was amended with fuel from the same ship or with refinery fractions of ULSD, low- (LSD), and high sulfur diesel (HSD) and monitored for sulfate depletion. The rates of sulfate removal in incubations amended with the refinery fuels were elevated relative to the fuel-unamended controls but statistically indistinguishable (∼50 μM SO4/day), but they were found to be roughly twice as fast (∼100 μM SO4/day) when the ship's own diesel was used as a source of carbon and energy. Thus, anaerobic hydrocarbon metabolism likely occurred in these incubations regardless of fuel sulfur content. Microbial community structure from each incubation was also largely independent of the fuel amendment type, based on molecular analysis of 16S rRNA sequences. Two other inocula known to catalyze anaerobic hydrocarbon metabolism showed no differences in fuel-associated sulfate reduction or methanogenesis rates between ULSD, LSD, and HSD. These findings suggest that the stability of diesel is independent of the fuel organosulfur compound status and reasons for the accelerated biocorrosion associated with the use of ULSD should be sought elsewhere.

  6. Soil organic carbon covariance with soil water content; a geostatistical analysis in cropland fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, H. R.; Berg, A. A.; von Bertoldi, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil texture has traditionally represented the rate of soil water drainage influencing soil water content (WC) in the soil characteristic curves, hydrological models and remote sensing field studies. Although soil organic carbon (OC) has been shown to significantly increase the water holding capacity of soil in individual field studies, evidence is required to consider soil OC as a significant factor in soil WC variability at the scale of a remote sensing footprint (25 km2). The relationship of soil OC to soil WC was evaluated over 50 fields during the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil WC field sampling campaign over southern Manitoba, Canada. On each field, soil WC was measured at 16 sample points, at 100 m spacing to 5 cm depth with Stevens hydra probe sensors on 16 sampling dates from June 7 to July 19, 2012. Soil cores were also taken at sampling sites on each field, each sampling day, to determine gravimetric moisture, bulk density and particle size distribution. On 4 of the sampling dates, soil OC was also determined by loss on ignition on the dried soil samples from all fields. Semivariograms were created from the field mean soil OC and field mean surface soil WC sampled at midrow, over all cropland fields and averaged over all sampling dates. The semivariogram models explained a distinct relationship of both soil OC and WC within the soil over a range of 5 km with a Gaussian curve. The variance in soil that soil OC and WC have in common was a similar Gaussian curve in the cross variogram. Following spatial interpolation with Kriging, the spatial maps of soil OC and WC were also very similar with high covariance over the majority of the sampling area. The close correlation between soil OC and WC suggests they are structurally related in the soil. Soil carbon could thus assist in improving downscaling methods for remotely sensed soil WC and act as a surrogate for interpolation of soil WC.

  7. Tillage, Cropping Sequence, and Nitrogen Fertilization Effects on Dryland Soil Carbon Dioxide Emission and Carbon Content

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management practices are needed to reduce dryland soil CO2 emission and increase C sequestration that can influence global warming. We evaluated the effects of tillage and cropping sequence combination and N fertilization on dryland soil surface CO2 flux, temperature and water content at the 0- to 1...

  8. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  9. Graphitization in high carbon commercial steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, M. A.; Colás, R.; Valtierra, S.

    1998-08-01

    Graphitization kinetics in two commercial high carbon steels, AISI types 1075 and 1095, are studied by conducting a series of isothermal annealing treatments in the temperature range of 560 to 680‡ C for periods of time ranging from 20 to 500 h. The samples selected were collected along the processing route in a commercial production line dedicated to the fabrication of thin strip. The structures studied were those of hot rolling (consisting of fine pearlite), cold rolling (spheroidized carbides within a deformed ferritic matrix), and subcritical annealing (spheroidized carbides in undeformed ferrite). The samples obtained from hot rolled coils do not graphitize, whereas those cold rolled graphitize at a rate that depends on the type of steel and degree of deformation. No graphite was found in samples from the lower carbon steel, which were subcritically annealed, although they were observed in specimens from the other steel, which were cold rolled to a reduction of 50% prior to the subcritical annealing.

  10. Thermophysical property measurements on low alloy high strength carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Brooks, J.A.; Atteridge, D.G.; Porter, W.D.

    1997-06-15

    The alloys of interest in this study were AISI Type 4230 and Type 4320 low alloy high strength carbon steels. They are heat-treatable steels and are usually used in the quenched and tempered condition. The Type 4130 has about 0.3% (wt.)C, 0.95%Cr, and 0.2% Mo. The Type 4320 has about 0.2%C, 1.7%Ni, 0.7%Cr, and 0.3% Mo. They are among the most popular alloy steels because of their excellent combination of mechanical properties and are used in both cast and wrought forms for many applications requiring high strength and toughness. However, during the casting operation, carbon segregation to the part surface forms a high carbon content surface layer in the part, which will induce surface cracking in the subsequent quenching process. And, during the welding operation, the critical cooling rate in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) will determine if the weldment is crack-free or not. Thus, the numerical effort to study the thermal history, microstructure evolution and residual stress development during welding and casting is critical to the application of these steels. This modeling effect requires the accurate knowledge of thermophysical properties, such as thermal expansion, solidus and liquidus temperatures, specific heat capacity, and heat of fusion. Unfortunately, these thermophysical properties are unavailable for temperatures over 1,000 C (1,2), thus the need for this study.

  11. [Study on the content and carbon isotopic composition of water dissolved inorganic carbon from rivers around Xi'an City].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Li, Xiang-Zhong; Liu, Wei-Guo

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the content and isotopic compositions of water dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from four typical rivers (Chanhe, Bahe, Laohe and Heihe) around Xi'an City were studied to trace the possible sources of DIC. The results of this study showed that the content of DIC in the four rivers varied from 0.34 to 5.66 mmol x L(-1) with an average value of 1.23 mmol x L(-1). In general, the content of DIC increased from the headstream to the river mouth. The delta13C(DIC) of four rivers ranged from -13.3 per thousand to -7.2 per thousand, with an average value of -10.1 per thousand. The delta13C(DIC) values of river water were all negative (average value of -12.6 per thousand) at the headstream of four rivers, but the delta13C(DIC) values of downstream water were more positive (with an average value of -9.4 per thousand). In addition, delta13C(DIC) of river water showed relatively negative values (the average value of delta13C(DIC) was -10.5 per thousand) near the estuary of the rivers. The variation of the DIC content and its carbon isotope suggested that the DIC sources of the rivers varied from the headstream to the river mouth. The negative delta13C(DIC) value indicated that the DIC may originate from the soil CO2 at the headstream of the rivers. On the other hand, the delta13C(DIC) values of river water at the middle and lower reaches of rivers were more positive, and it showed that soil CO2 produced by respiration of the C4 plants (like corn) and soil carbonates with positive delta13C values may be imported into river water. Meanwhile, the input of pollutants with low delta13C(DIC) values may result in a decrease of delta13C(DIC) values in the rivers. The study indicated that the DIC content and carbon isotope may be used to trace the sources of DIC in rivers around Xi'an City. Our study may provide some basic information for tracing the sources of DIC of rivers in the small watershed area in the Loess Plateau of China.

  12. Kirishites, a new type of natural high-carbon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Yu. B.; Skublov, G. T.; Yushkin, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    On the right-hand bank of the Volkhov River, in the natural area of tektite-like glasses (Volkhovites), fragments of shungites and slags with bunches of hairlike dark brownish enclosures were found. The filament thickness ranged from 20 to 100 μm, and separate “hairlines” were 3 cm in length. The composition of shungites and “hairlines” was found to be identical, which allowed us to consider the latter as aposhungite carbon formations. The high-carbon hairline structures associated with volkhovites are called kirishites. Kirishites are a new type of high-carbon structures that formed simultaneously with volkhovites in the case of explosion-type delivery of carbon slag and shungite fragments to the daylight surface during Holocene explosive activity. Under sharply reductive conditions, the slags partially melted, the melts were segregated, and carbonaceous-silicate and carbonaceous-ferriferous glasses formed with subsequent decompression-explosive liberation of carbon-supersaturated structures, which were extruded from shungite and slag fragments in the form of a resinoid mass. The “hairlines” were found to be zonal in structure: the central axial zones are composed of high-nitrogen hydrocarbon compounds, and peripheral regions are essentially carbonaceous with a high content of organic-mineral compounds and numerous microanomalies of petrogenic, volatile, rare, and ore elements. Infrared spectroscopy identified in kirishites proteinlike compounds, diagnosed in absorption bands (in cm-1) 600-720 (Amid V), 1200-1300 (Amid III), 1480-1590 (Amid II), 1600-1700 (Amid I), 3000-3800 (vibrations in NH2 and II groups). Gas chromatography, with the possibility of differentiation of left- and right-handed forms, revealed a broad spectrum of amino acids in kirishites, with their total content found to be the absolutely highest record for natural bitumens, an order of magnitude higher than the largest amino acid concentrations ever revealed in fibrous high

  13. Faint high-latitude carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul Jonathan

    We have undertaken a wide area survey to search for faint high latitude carbon (FHLC) stars. Carbon giants are ideal for study of the structure and kinematics of the outer galactic halo. We use two color photometric selection with large format charge-coupled devices (CCD's) to cover 52 deg2 of sky to a depth of about V = 18. Below this limit, we find good (approximately less than 20 percent) agreement between our object counts as a function of magnitude and the galactic models of Bahcall and Soneira at a variety of latitudes and longitudes. Our spectroscopic followup began with low-resolution spectra of 19 unconfirmed C star candidates from the Case objective-prism photographic survey of Sanduleak and Pesch. Four of these we find to be M stars. The 15 C stars we classify on the two-parameter Keenan-Morgan system as warm (color class less than 3). Of 94 faint C star candidates from our own CCD survey, one highly ranked V = 17 candidate was found to have strong carbon and CN bands. We estimate that to a depth of V = 18, the surface density FHLC stars is 0.019+0.044-.016 deg-2. We identify two FHLC stars with previously catalogued high proper motion objects. These objects are thus inferred to be dwarf carbon (dC) stars, supplementing the one previously known case, G77-61. Not all dC stars will have detectable proper motions, so other luminosity/distance indicators are needed: we find that C dwarfs all have similar JHK colors, and possibly an unusually strong lambda-6191 bandhead of carbon. By comparing positions in the HST Guide Star Catalog and the original Palomar Observatory Sky Survey, we detect proper motions in two additional FHLC stars. Our proper motion survey, spanning a 30 year baseline, thus identifies two new dC's, and provides proper motion upper limits for another 44 FHLC stars. Kinematic simulations suggest that virtually all Population 2 dC's will have detectable proper motions in a survey as sensitive as our own, and that to a limit of V approximately

  14. [Soluble organic carbon in plant litters on Loess Plateau: content and biodegradability].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-yang; Zhou, Jian-bin; Xia, Zhi-min; Chen, Xing-li

    2010-12-01

    The litters of eight plant species from the Loess Plateau were cut into pieces with 2 mm and 1 cm in size, and extracted with distilled water and 0.01 mol x L(-1) CaCl2 to determine the soluble organic carbon (SOC) content. In the meantime, a 7-day indoor incubation test was conducted at (25 +/- 3) degrees C to investigate their biodegradability. The SOC content and the ratio of SOC to total carbon (SOC/TC) in the litters were 18.20-156.82 g x kg(-1) and 4.21%-32.84%, respectively. Shrub litter had a slightly higher SOC content than tree litter, while grass litter had the lowest SOC content. After 7-day incubation, the biodegradation rate of SOC in the plant litters ranged from 44.5% to 80.6% (62.9% on average), and decreased in the order of shrub > tree > grass. By the end of the incubation, the proportion of soluble organic matter in solution had a significant increasing trend, which was related to the rapid biodegradation of labile composition in the litters. The higher content and higher biodegradation rate of SOC in plant litters might play important roles in nutrient cycling and energy flow during the vegetation restoration on Loess Plateau.

  15. Carbon content variation in boles of mature sugar maple and giant sequoia.

    PubMed

    Lamlom, Sabah H; Savidge, Rodney A

    2006-04-01

    At present, a carbon (C) content of 50% (w/w) in dry wood is widely accepted as a generic value; however, few wood C measurements have been reported. We used elemental analysis to investigate C content per unit of dry matter and observed that it varied both radially and vertically in boles of two old-growth tree species: sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Bucholz). In sugar maple there was considerable variation in tree ring widths among four radii for particular annual layers of xylem, revealing that the annual rate of C assimilation differs around the circumference and from the base of each tree to its top, but the observed variation in C content was unrelated to diameter growth rate and strongly related to the calendar year when the wood was formed. Carbon content in sugar maple wood increased in an approximately linear fashion, from < 50 to 51% from pith to cambium, at both the base and top of the boles. In giant sequoia, C was essentially constant at > 55% across many hundreds of years of heartwood, but it declined abruptly at the sapwood-heartwood boundary and remained lower in all sapwood samples, an indication that heartwood formation involves anabolic metabolism. Factors that may be responsible for the different C contents and trends with age between sugar maple and sequoia trees are considered. Tree-ring data from this study do not support some of the key assumptions made by dendrochronology.

  16. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  17. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  18. Bonding and hardness in nonhydrogenated carbon films with moderate sp{sup 3} content

    SciTech Connect

    Gago, R.; Jimenez, I.; Albella, J. M.; Climent-Font, A.; Caceres, D.; Vergara, I.; Banks, J. C.; Doyle, B. L.; Terminello, L. J.

    2000-06-01

    Amorphous carbon films with an sp{sup 3} content up to 25% and a negligible amount of hydrogen have been grown by evaporation of graphite with concurrent Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. The sp{sup 3} content is maximized for Ar{sup +} energies between 200 and 300 eV following a subplantation mechanism. Higher ion energies deteriorate the film due to sputtering and heating processes. The hardness of the films increases in the optimal assisting range from 8 to 18 GPa, and is explained by crosslinking of graphitic planes through sp{sup 3} connecting sites. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. The method of soft sensor modeling for fly ash carbon content based on ARMA deviation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu; Yang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The carbon content of fly ash is an important parameter in the process of boiler combustion. Aiming at the existing problems of fly ash detection, the soft measurement model was established based on PSO-SVM, and the method of deviation correction based on ARMA model was put forward on this basis, the soft sensing model was calibrated by the values which were obtained by off-line analysis at intervals. The 600 MW supercritical sliding pressure boiler was taken for research objects, the auxiliary variables were selected and the data which collected by DCS were simulated. The result shows that the prediction model for the carbon content of fly ash based on PSO-SVM is good in effect of fitting, and introducing the correction module is helpful to improve the prediction accuracy.

  20. Quenching of cast iron with a high copper content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Natalia; Bataev, Anatoly; Razumakov, Aleksey

    2015-10-01

    The structure, hardness, and microhardness of hypoeutectic white cast iron alloyed with copper after quenching at 1000 and 1120°C is studied. Features of cupric inclusion separation are detected and its size distribution is shown. After quenching the structure consists of martensite, residual austenite, and vermicular graphite. A decrease in the size and volume fraction of globular cupric inclusions is detected, along with the complete dissolution of nanoscale cupric inclusions, which are located in the ferrite of pearlite colonies. The result of these structural changes is a 30% increase in iron hardness. Cast iron quenching at 1120° C is followed by an increase in the austenite volume fraction to 69%. This effect is due to a decrease in the volume fraction of graphite and a corresponding increase in the carbon content in γ-Fe. Cupric inclusions are located mainly along boundaries of austenitic grains.

  1. Experimental determination of CO2 content at graphite saturation along a natural basalt-peridotite melt join: Implications for the fate of carbon in terrestrial magma oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Megan S.; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of the carbon carrying capacity of peridotite melt at reducing conditions is critical to constrain the mantle budget and planet-scale distribution of carbon set at early stage of differentiation. Yet, neither measurements of CO2 content in reduced peridotite melt nor a reliable model to extrapolate the known solubility of CO2 in basaltic (mafic) melt to solubility in peridotitic (ultramafic) melt exist. There are several reasons for this gap; one reason is due to the unknown relative contributions of individual network modifying cations, such as Ca2+ versus Mg2+, on carbonate dissolution particularly at reducing conditions. Here we conducted high pressure, temperature experiments to estimate the CO2 contents in silicate melts at graphite saturation over a compositional range from natural basalts toward peridotite at a fixed pressure (P) of 1.0 GPa, temperature (T) of 1600 °C, and oxygen fugacity (log ⁡ fO2 ∼ IW + 1.6). We also conducted experiments to determine the relative effects of variable Ca and Mg contents in mafic compositions on the dissolution of carbonate. Carbon in quenched glasses was measured and characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy and was found to be dissolved as carbonate (CO32-). The FTIR spectra showed CO32- doublets that shifted systematically with the MgO and CaO content of silicate melts. Using our data and previous work we constructed a new composition-based model to determine the CO2 content of ultramafic (peridotitic) melt representative of an early Earth, magma ocean composition at graphite saturation. Our data and model suggest that the dissolved CO2 content of reduced, peridotite melt is significantly higher than that of basaltic melt at shallow magma ocean conditions; however, the difference in C content between the basaltic and peridotitic melts may diminish with depth as the more depolymerized peridotite melt is more compressible. Using our model of CO2 content at

  2. Shedding Light on Filovirus Infection with High-Content Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G.

    2012-01-01

    Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI) has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection. PMID:23012631

  3. Shedding light on filovirus infection with high-content imaging.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G

    2012-08-01

    Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI) has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  4. Rheological properties of polyolefin composites highly filled with calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Jakubowska, Paulina; Sterzynski, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the rheological properties of highly filled polyolefin composites (HFPCs) have been investigated. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3), with stearic acid modified surface, was used as filler. Ternary compounds have been obtained by the inclusion of a CaCO3/polypropylene master batch into the high density polyethylene matrix. The highly filled polyolefin composites with CaCO3 content in the range between 40 and 64 wt% have been prepared in the molten state using a single-screw extruder, the temperature of the extrusion die was set at 230°C. The melt rheological properties of the HFPCs have been extensively investigated both in oscillatory and steady shear flow.

  5. Fluoride content in bottled drinking waters, carbonated soft drinks and fruit juices in Davangere city, India.

    PubMed

    Thippeswamy, H M; Kumar, Nanditha; Anand, S R; Prashant, G M; Chandu, G N

    2010-01-01

    The regular ingestion of fluoride lowers the prevalence of dental caries. The total daily intake of fluoride for optimal dental health should be 0.05-0.07 mg fluoride/kg body weight and to avoid the risk of dental fluorosis, the daily intake should not exceed a daily level of 0.10 mg fluoride/kg body weight. The main source of fluoride is from drinking water and other beverages. As in other countries, consumption of bottled water, juices and carbonated beverages has increased in our country. To analyze the fluoride content in bottled water, juices and carbonated soft drinks that were commonly available in Davangere city. Three samples of 10 commercially available brands of bottled drinking water, 12 fruit juices and 12 carbonated soft drinks were purchased. Bottled water and carbonated soft drinks were stored at a cold place until fluoride analysis was performed and a clear juice was prepared using different fruits without the addition of water. Then, the fluoride analysis was performed. The mean and standard deviation of fluoride content of bottled water, fruit juices and carbonated soft drinks were measured, which were found to be 0.20 mg (±0.19) F/L, 0.29 mg (±0.06) F/L and 0.22 mg (±0.05) F/L, respectively. In viewing the results of the present study, it can be concluded that regulation of the optimal range of fluoride in bottled drinking water, carbonated soft drinks and fruit juices should be drawn for the Indian scenario.

  6. Fluid replacement after dehydration: influence of beverage carbonation and carbohydrate content.

    PubMed

    Lambert, C P; Costill, D L; McConell, G K; Benedict, M A; Lambert, G P; Robergs, R A; Fink, W J

    1992-05-01

    This investigation evaluated the effects of beverage carbonation and carbohydrate (CHO) content on fluid replacement following exercise/thermal dehydration. On four occasions separated by at least 7 days, eight healthy men cycled at 50% of VO2max in a hot environmental chamber (40 degrees C, 40% relative humidity) until a weight loss of 4.12 +/- 0.22% was attained. In the subsequent four hours, subjects ingested one of four solutions at 15-min intervals. The total volume ingested equalled that lost during dehydration. The solutions were administered in randomized order and varied in their carbonation and carbohydrate (CHO) content: 1. CK: carbonated 10% glucose-fructose solution, 2. NCK: non-carbonated 10% glucose-fructose solution, 3. CNK: carbonated non-caloric solution, and 4. NCNK: non-carbonated non-caloric solution. Plasma volume changes, total plasma protein concentration, plasma osmolality, and the plasma glucose concentration were determined at rest before and after dehydration, and at 30, 90, 150, and 240 min of recovery. Plasma volume changes and the plasma protein concentration were not different (p greater than 0.05) between treatments. Values for the plasma glucose concentration and the change in plasma osmolality were significantly elevated when CHO beverages were ingested when compared with non-CHO beverage ingestion. Five-min cycling bouts were performed at 70% of VO2max before and after dehydration and at 60, 120, 180, and 240 min of rehydration. The respiratory exchange ratio was elevated in both of the CHO treatments when compared with both of the non-CHO treatments at 60, 120, 180 and 240 min of rehydration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Effect of Carbon Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Tian, Li-Qian; Xue, Bing; Jiang, Xue-Bo; Zhou, Li

    2012-07-01

    Two heats of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels were prepared. One has an ultralow carbon content of 0.01 wt pct, whereas another heat has a normal carbon content of 0.09 wt pct. The effect of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels was studied. The results show that the ultralow-carbon steel contains bimodal, nanosized MX precipitates with high density in the matrix but few M23C6 carbide particles in the normalized-and-tempered state. The smaller nanosized MX precipitates have two kinds of typical morphology: One is cubic and another is rectangular. The cubic MX precipitate contains Nb, Ti, and V, whereas the rectangular one only contains Nb and V. The normal carbon steel has abundant M23C6 carbide particles along the grain and lath boundaries and much less density of nanosized MX precipitates after the same heat treatments. After long-term aging at 923 K (650 °C) for 10,000 hours, the stress rupture properties of the ultralow carbon content steel degrades more significantly. The strength degradation mechanism of the 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels is discussed in this article.

  8. Method for manufacturing high quality carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A non-catalytic process for the production of carbon nanotubes includes supplying an electric current to a carbon anode and a carbon cathode which have been securely positioned in the open atmosphere with a gap between them. The electric current creates an electric arc between the carbon anode and the carbon cathode, which causes carbon to be vaporized from the carbon anode and a carbonaceous residue to be deposited on the carbon cathode. Inert gas is pumped into the gap to flush out oxygen, thereby preventing interference with the vaporization of carbon from the anode and preventing oxidation of the carbonaceous residue being deposited on the cathode. The anode and cathode are cooled while electric current is being supplied thereto. When the supply of electric current is terminated, the carbonaceous residue is removed from the cathode and is purified to yield carbon nanotubes.

  9. Lightweight Carbon-Carbon High-Temperature Space Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W.O.; Shih, Wei

    2008-01-01

    A document summarizes the development of a carbon-carbon composite radiator for dissipating waste heat from a spacecraft nuclear reactor. The radiator is to be bonded to metal heat pipes and to operate in conjunction with them at a temperature approximately between 500 and 1,000 K. A goal of this development is to reduce the average areal mass density of a radiator to about 2 kg/m(exp 2) from the current value of approximately 10 kg/m(exp 2) characteristic of spacecraft radiators made largely of metals. Accomplishments thus far include: (1) bonding of metal tubes to carbon-carbon material by a carbonization process that includes heating to a temperature of 620 C; (2) verification of the thermal and mechanical integrity of the bonds through pressure-cycling, axial-shear, and bending tests; and (3) construction and testing of two prototype heat-pipe/carbon-carbon-radiator units having different radiator areas, numbers of heat pipes, and areal mass densities. On the basis of the results achieved thus far, it is estimated that optimization of design could yield an areal mass density of 2.2 kg/m (exp 2) close to the goal of 2 kg/m(exp 2).

  10. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of carbon onions and nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. J.; Liu, G. H.; Wang, X. M.; Fujita, T.; Xu, B. S.; Chen, M. W.

    2009-08-01

    We report high-pressure Raman spectra of carbon onions and nanocapsules investigated by diamond anvil cell experiments. The pressure coefficient and elastic behavior of carbon onions and nanocapsules are found to be very similar to those of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Additionally, detectable structure changes, particularly the collapse of the concentric graphite structure, cannot been seen at pressures as high as ˜20 GPa, demonstrating that carbon onions and nanocapsules have significant hardness and can sustain very high pressures.

  11. High nitrogen availability reduces polyphenol content in Sphagnum peat.

    PubMed

    Bragazza, Luca; Freeman, Chris

    2007-05-15

    Peat mosses of the genus Sphagnum constitute the bulk of living and dead biomass in bogs. These plants contain peculiar polyphenols which hamper litter peat decomposition through their inhibitory activity on microbial breakdown. In the light of the increasing availability of biologically active nitrogen in natural ecosystems, litter derived from Sphagnum mosses is an ideal substrate to test the potential effects of increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition on polyphenol content in litter peat. To this aim, we measured total nitrogen and soluble polyphenol concentration in Sphagnum litter peat collected in 11 European bogs under a chronic gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results demonstrate that increasing nitrogen concentration in Sphagnum litter, as a consequence of increased exogenous nitrogen availability, is accompanied by a decreasing concentration of polyphenols. This inverse relationship is consistent with reports that in Sphagnum mosses, polyphenol and protein biosynthesis compete for the same precursor. Our observation of modified Sphagnum litter chemistry under chronic nitrogen eutrophication has implications in the context of the global carbon balance, because a lower content of decay-inhibiting polyphenols would accelerate litter peat decomposition.

  12. Carbon concentration measurements by atom probe tomography in the ferritic phase of high-silicon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rementeria, Rosalia; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Aranda, Maria M.; Guo, Wei; Jimenez, Jose A.; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Caballero, Francisca G.

    2016-12-19

    Current studies using atom probe tomography (APT) show that bainitic ferrite formed at low temperature contains more carbon than what is consistent with the paraequilibrium phase diagram. However, nanocrystalline bainitic ferrite exhibits a non-homogeneous distribution of carbon atoms in arrangements with specific compositions, i.e. Cottrell atmospheres, carbon clusters, and carbides, in most cases with a size of a few nanometers. The ferrite volume within a single platelet that is free of these carbon-enriched regions is extremely small. Proximity histograms can be compromised on the ferrite side, and a great deal of care should be taken to estimate the carbon content in regions of bainitic ferrite free from carbon agglomeration. For this purpose, APT measurements were first validated for the ferritic phase in a pearlitic sample and further performed for the bainitic ferrite matrix in high-silicon steels isothermally transformed between 200 °C and 350 °C. Additionally, results were compared with the carbon concentration values derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses considering a tetragonal lattice and previous APT studies. In conclusion, the present results reveal a strong disagreement between the carbon content values in the bainitic ferrite matrix as obtained by APT and those derived from XRD measurements. Those differences have been attributed to the development of carbon-clustered regions with an increased tetragonality in a carbon-depleted matrix.

  13. Effects of oxygen and carbon content on nitrogen removal capacities in landfill bioreactors and response of microbial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiqing; Wu, Dong; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xinghua; Xie, Bing

    2016-07-01

    In this study, landfill bioreactors were tested to treat the recalcitrant leachate-nitrogen and the impacts of relevant operational parameters on its conversion were comprehensively investigated. We found that the highly diverse microbial community in landfill bioreactors could be substantially affected by increasing biodegradable carbon and oxygen content, which led to the whole system's intrinsic nitrogen removal capacity increasing from 50 to 70 %, and meanwhile, the contribution of anammox was detected less than 20 %. The sequencing and q-PCR results showed that microbial community in bioreactor was dominated by Proteobacteria (∼35 %) and Acidobacteria (~20 %) during the whole experiment. The abundance of anammox functioning bacteria (Amx) kept at a stable level (-2.5 to -2.2 log (copies/16S rRNA)) and was not statistically correlated to the abundance of anammox bacteria. However, significant linear correlation (p < 0.05) was determined between the abundance of nirS and Proteobacteria; amoA and AOB. Redundancy analysis (RDA) suggested that although oxygen and biodegradable carbon can both impose effects on microbial community structure, only biodegradable carbon content is the determinant in the total nitrogen removal.

  14. High surface area carbon and process for its production

    DOEpatents

    Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter; Rash, Tyler; Shah, Parag; Suppes, Galen

    2016-12-13

    Activated carbon materials and methods of producing and using activated carbon materials are provided. In particular, biomass-derived activated carbon materials and processes of producing the activated carbon materials with prespecified surface areas and pore size distributions are provided. Activated carbon materials with preselected high specific surface areas, porosities, sub-nm (<1 nm) pore volumes, and supra-nm (1-5 nm) pore volumes may be achieved by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process.

  15. Influence of Carbon Content and Rolling Temperature on Rolling Texture in 3 Pct Si Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingaki, Y.; Takashima, M.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Effects of carbon and rolling temperature up to 453 K (180 °C) on rolling texture of 3 pct Si steel at a reduction of 66 pct were investigated using a single crystal with an initial orientation of {110}<001>. With residual-level carbon, uniform slip deformation was observed in the specimen cold rolled at room temperature and most of initial orientation {110}<001> rotated to {111}<112> during the rolling. With carbon addition, the formation of the deformation twins and the shear bands were promoted in the specimen cold rolled at room temperature. Regions with {110}<001> were observed inside the shear bands. Warm-rolled specimen with residual-level carbon had microbands containing tiny {110}<001> regions. Warm-rolled specimen with carbon addition had both the shear bands and the microbands but no deformation twin. Additionally, there were unique band structures with rotated crystal orientation around the rolling direction from initial orientation {110}<001>. These experimental results suggest that the carbon addition inhibits dislocation migration by the increase of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and that the high deformation temperature activates multiple slip systems by the reduction of CRSS and further that the carbon addition and high deformation temperature superimposed bring about the activation of symmetrical {110} slip systems additionally.

  16. Electrochemical Determination of Caffeine Content in Ethiopian Coffee Samples Using Lignin Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode.

    PubMed

    Amare, Meareg; Aklog, Senait

    2017-01-01

    Lignin film was deposited at the surface of glassy carbon electrode potentiostatically. In contrast to the unmodified glassy carbon electrode, an oxidative peak with an improved current and overpotential for caffeine at modified electrode showed catalytic activity of the modifier towards oxidation of caffeine. Linear dependence of peak current on caffeine concentration in the range 6 × 10(-6) to 100 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) with determination coefficient and method detection limit (LoD = 3 s/slope) of 0.99925 and 8.37 × 10(-7) mol L(-1), respectively, supplemented by recovery results of 93.79-102.17% validated the developed method. An attempt was made to determine the caffeine content of aqueous coffee extracts of Ethiopian coffees grown in four coffee cultivating localities (Wonbera, Wolega, Finoteselam, and Zegie) and hence to evaluate the correlation between users preference and caffeine content. In agreement with reported works, caffeine contents (w/w%) of 0.164 in Wonbera coffee; 0.134 in Wolega coffee; 0.097 in Finoteselam coffee; and 0.089 in Zegie coffee were detected confirming the applicability of the developed method for determination of caffeine in a complex matrix environment. The result indicated that users' highest preference for Wonbera and least preference for Zegie cultivated coffees are in agreement with the caffeine content.

  17. Organic carbon and nitrogen content associated with colloids and suspended particulates from the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; Daniel, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    Suspended material samples were collected at 16 sites along the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries during July-August 1991, October-November 1991, and April-May 1992, and separated into colloid and particulate fractions to determine the organic carbon content of these two fractions of suspended material. Sample collection involved centrifugation to isolate the suspended particulate fraction and ultrafiltration to isolate the colloid fraction. For the first time, particulate and colloid concentrations and organic carbon and nitrogen content were investigated along the entire reach of the Mississippi River from above Minneapolis, Minnesota, to below New Orleans, Louisiana. Organic carbon content of the colloid (15.2 percent) was much higher than organic carbon content of the particulate material (4.8 percent). Carbon/nitrogen ratios of colloid and particulate phases were more similar to ratios for microorganisms than to ratios for soils, humic materials, or plants.Suspended material samples were collected at 16 sites along the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries during July-August 1991, October-November 1991, and April-May 1992, and separated into colloid and particulate fractions to determine the organic carbon content of these two fractions of suspended material. Sample collection involved centrifugation to isolate the suspended particulate fraction and ultrafiltration to isolate the colloid fraction. For the first time, particulate and colloid concentrations and organic carbon and nitrogen content were investigated along the entire reach of the Mississippi River from above Minneapolis, Minnesota, to below New Orleans, Louisiana. Organic carbon content of the colloid (15.2 percent) was much higher than organic carbon content of the particulate material (4.8 percent). Carbon/nitrogen ratios of colloid and particulate phases were more similar to ratios for microorganisms than to ratios for soils, humic materials, or plants.

  18. The Content and Stable Isotopic Composition of Carbon in Individual Micrometeorites from Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Yates, P. D.; Hutchison, R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1997-01-01

    The carbon contents and d13C values of eleven individual micrometeorites have been determined using a combination of stepped combustion and static mass spectrometry. A new low-blank procedure, involving pre-treatment of the samples with a solvent to remove surficial contaminants, has enabled samples of 6-84 microgram to be analysed successfully. The eleven samples (seven separated from Greenland cryoconite and four from Antarctic ice) were each split prior to carbon determination and a fragment taken for study using analytical electron microscopy. In this way, the chemical compositions were obtained thereby allowing comparison with other investigations. As with previous studies of micrometeorites collected at the Earth's surface, the major difficulty with interpreting the results involves distinguishing indigenous components from terrestrial contaminants. Overall carbon contents were typically less than 0.2 wt%, although one of the Greenland samples contained 1.5 wt% carbon, considered to arise mainly from algal contamination. For the other samples, around 0.05-0.15 wt% of the total carbon in each micrometeorite was considered to be organic in nature with at least some of this (if not all) being terrestrial in origin; the remainder was probably indigenous, being analogous to the macromolecular organic material found in primitive carbonaceous chondrites. The generally low content of this indigenous organic material, compared to conventional meteorites, is presumably a reflection of carbon loss from the micrometeorites either during atmospheric heating, or subsequent weathering. For that carbon combusting between 500 and 600_C, ten of the samples appeared to show a simple two-component system, i.e. a mixture of blank and an isotopically light component (d13C^2 -32). It is possible that the light component is Cd, a fine-grained form of pre-solar diamond which is known to be prevalent in primitive chondritic meteorites. If so then it is present in the micrometeorites

  19. Carbon and nutrient contents in soils from the Kings River Experimental Watersheds, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California

    Treesearch

    D.W. Johnson; C.T. Hunsaker; D.W. Glass; B.M. Rau; B.A. Roath

    2011-01-01

    Soil C and nutrient contents were estimated for eight watersheds in two sites (one high elevation, Bull, and one low elevation, Providence) in the Kings River Experimental Watersheds in the western Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Eighty-seven quantitative pits were dug to measure soil bulk density and total rock content, while three replicate surface samples...

  20. Perspectives on Proterozoic surface ocean redox from iodine contents in ancient and recent carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Lu, Zunli; Bekker, Andrey; Diamond, Charles W.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Jiang, Ganqing; Kah, Linda C.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Loyd, Sean J.; Osburn, Magdalena R.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Wang, Chunjiang; Zhou, Xiaoli; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-04-01

    The Proterozoic Eon hosted the emergence and initial recorded diversification of eukaryotes. Oxygen levels in the shallow marine settings critical to these events were lower than today's, although how much lower is debated. Here, we use concentrations of iodate (the oxidized iodine species) in shallow-marine limestones and dolostones to generate the first comprehensive record of Proterozoic near-surface marine redox conditions. The iodine proxy is sensitive to both local oxygen availability and the relative proximity to anoxic waters. To assess the validity of our approach, Neogene-Quaternary carbonates are used to demonstrate that diagenesis most often decreases and is unlikely to increase carbonate-iodine contents. Despite the potential for diagenetic loss, maximum Proterozoic carbonate iodine levels are elevated relative to those of the Archean, particularly during the Lomagundi and Shuram carbon isotope excursions of the Paleo- and Neoproterozoic, respectively. For the Shuram anomaly, comparisons to Neogene-Quaternary carbonates suggest that diagenesis is not responsible for the observed iodine trends. The baseline low iodine levels in Proterozoic carbonates, relative to the Phanerozoic, are linked to a shallow oxic-anoxic interface. Oxygen concentrations in surface waters would have at least intermittently been above the threshold required to support eukaryotes. However, the diagnostically low iodine data from mid-Proterozoic shallow-water carbonates, relative to those of the bracketing time intervals, are consistent with a dynamic chemocline and anoxic waters that would have episodically mixed upward and laterally into the shallow oceans. This redox instability may have challenged early eukaryotic diversification and expansion, creating an evolutionary landscape unfavorable for the emergence of animals.

  1. Exploring the multiplicity of soil-human interactions: organic carbon content, agro-forest landscapes and the Italian local communities.

    PubMed

    Salvati, Luca; Barone, Pier Matteo; Ferrara, Carlotta

    2015-05-01

    Topsoil organic carbon (TOC) and soil organic carbon (SOC) are fundamental in the carbon cycle influencing soil functions and attributes. Many factors have effects on soil carbon content such as climate, parent material, land topography and the human action including agriculture, which sometimes caused a severe loss in soil carbon content. This has resulted in a significant differentiation in TOC or SOC at the continental scale due to the different territorial and socioeconomic conditions. The present study proposes an exploratory data analysis assessing the relationship between the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and selected socioeconomic attributes at the local scale in Italy with the aim to provide differentiated responses for a more sustainable use of land. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis contributed to understand the effectiveness of local communities responses for an adequate comprehension of the role of soil as carbon sink.

  2. Recent transient tracer distributions in the Fram Strait: estimation of anthropogenic carbon content and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöven, T.; Tanhua, T.; Hoppema, M.; von Appen, W.-J.

    2015-09-01

    The storage of anthropogenic carbon in the ocean's interior is an important process which modulates the increasing carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. The polar regions are expected to be net sinks for anthropogenic carbon. Transport estimates of dissolved inorganic carbon and the anthropogenic offset can thus provide information about the magnitude of the corresponding storage processes. Here we present a transient tracer, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) data set along 78°50' N sampled in the Fram Strait in 2012. A theory on tracer relationships is introduced which allows for an application of the Inverse Gaussian - Transit Time Distribution (IG-TTD) at high latitudes and the estimation of anthropogenic carbon concentrations. Current velocity measurements along the same section were used to estimate the net flux of DIC and anthropogenic carbon through the Fram Strait. The new theory explains the differences between the theoretical (IG-TTD based) tracer age relationship and the specific tracer age relationship of the field data by saturation effects during water mass formation and/or the deliberate release experiment of SF6 in the Greenland Sea in 1996 rather than by different mixing or ventilation processes. Based on this assumption, a maximum SF6 excess of 0.5-0.8 fmol kg-1 was determined in the Fram Strait at intermediate depths (500-1600 m). The anthropogenic carbon concentrations are 50-55 μmol kg-1 in the Atlantic Water/Recirculating Atlantic Water, 40-45 μmol kg-1 in the Polar Surface Water/warm Polar Surface Water and between 10-35 μmol kg-1 in the deeper water layers, with lowest concentrations in the bottom layer. The net DIC and anthropogenic carbon fluxes through the Fram Strait indicate a balanced exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic, although with high uncertainties.

  3. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high.

    PubMed

    Chuchu, Nancy; Patel, Bhavini; Sebastian, Blaise; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium.

  4. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Methods Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Results Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. Conclusions All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium. PMID:24103160

  5. High hydrogen storage capacity of porous carbons prepared by using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanlei; Gao, Qiuming; Hu, Juan

    2009-05-27

    A kind of activated carbon with further carbon dioxide and potassium hydroxide activations for hydrogen storage was investigated. The carbon dioxide and potassium hydroxide activations have apparently different effects on the pore structures and textures of the activated carbon which closely associated with the hydrogen storage properties. The potassium hydroxide activation can remarkably donate microporosity to the frameworks of the activated carbon. One of the resultant porous carbons exhibited a high surface area of up to 3190 m(2) g(-1) and large gravimetric hydrogen uptake capacity of 7.08 wt % at 77 K and 20 bar, which is one of the largest data reported for the porous carbon materials. This result suggests that the porous carbon with large amounts of active sites, high surface area, and high micropore volume related to optimum pore size could achieve high gravimetric hydrogen storage.

  6. Tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on dryland soil carbon dioxide emission and carbon content.

    PubMed

    Sainju, Upendra M; Jabro, Jalal D; Caesar-Tonthat, Thecan

    2010-01-01

    Management practices are needed to reduce dryland soil CO(2) emissions and to increase C sequestration. We evaluated the effects of tillage and cropping sequence combinations and N fertilization on dryland crop biomass (stems + leaves) and soil surface CO(2) flux and C content (0- to 120-cm depth) in a Williams loam from May to October, 2006 to 2008, in eastern Montana. Treatments were no-tilled continuous malt barley (Hordeum vulgaris L.) (NTCB), no-tilled malt barley-pea (Pisum sativum L.) (NTB-P), no-tilled malt barley-fallow (NTB-F), and conventional-tilled malt barley-fallow (CTB-F), each with 0 and 80 kg N ha(-1). Measurements were made both in Phase I (malt barley in NTCB, pea in NTB-P, and fallow in NTB-F and CTB-F) and Phase II (malt barley in all sequences) of each cropping sequence in every year. Crop biomass varied among years, was greater in the barley than in the pea phase of the NTB-P treatment, and greater in NTCB and NTB-P than in NTB-F and CTB-F in 2 out of 3 yr. Similarly, biomass was greater with 80 than with 0 kg N ha(-1) in 1 out of 3 yr. Soil CO(2) flux increased from 8 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in early May to 239 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in mid-June as temperature increased and then declined to 3 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in September-October. Fluxes peaked immediately following substantial precipitation (>10 mm), especially in NTCB and NTB-P. Cumulative CO(2) flux from May to October was greater in 2006 and 2007 than in 2008, greater in cropping than in fallow phases, and greater in NTCB than in NTB-F. Tillage did not influence crop biomass and CO(2) flux but N fertilization had a variable effect on the flux in 2008. Similarly, soil total C content was not influenced by treatments. Annual cropping increased CO(2) flux compared with crop-fallow probably by increasing crop residue returns to soils and root and rhizosphere respiration. Inclusion of peas in the rotation with malt barley in the no-till system, which have been known to reduce N fertilization rates and

  7. The beautiful cell: high-content screening in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bickle, Marc

    2010-09-01

    The term "high-content screening" has become synonymous with imaging screens using automated microscopes and automated image analysis. The term was coined a little over 10 years ago. Since then the technology has evolved considerably and has established itself firmly in the drug discovery and development industry. Both the instruments and the software controlling the instruments and analyzing the data have come to maturity, so the full benefits of high-content screening can now be realized. Those benefits are the capability of carrying out phenotypic multiparametric cellular assays in an unbiased, fully automated, and quantitative fashion. Automated microscopes and automated image analysis are being applied at all stages of the drug discovery and development pipeline. All major pharmaceutical companies have adopted the technology and it is in the process of being embraced broadly by the academic community. This review aims at describing the current capabilities and limits of the technology as well as highlighting necessary developments that are required to exploit fully the potential of high-content screening and analysis.

  8. A key parameter on the adsorption of diluted aniline solutions with activated carbons: The surface oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Beatrice; Ferrer, Nabí; Sempere, Julià; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    A total of 11 different commercial activated carbons (AC) with well characterized textural properties and oxygen surface content were tested as adsorbents for the removal of aniline as a target water pollutant. The maximum adsorption capacity of aniline for the studied AC was from 138.9 to 257.9 mg g(-1) at 296.15 K and it was observed to be strongly related to the textural properties of the AC, mainly with the BET surface area and the micropore volume. It was not observed any influence of the oxygen surface content of the AC on the maximum adsorption capacity. However, it was found that at low aniline aqueous concentration, the presence of oxygen surface groups plays a dominant role during the adsorption. A high concentration of oxygen surface groups, mainly carboxylic and phenolic groups, decreases the aniline adsorption regardless of the surface area of the AC.

  9. Carbon monoxide studies at high altitude.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J J

    1988-01-01

    In high altitude areas, ambient carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations are rising because of the increasing number of new residents and tourists, and their concomitant use of motor vehicles and heating appliances. There are, however, comparatively few studies of the acute or chronic physiological effects that may be caused by inhaling CO at high altitude. There are data supporting the concept that the effects of breathing CO at high altitude are additive, and data suggesting that the effects may be more than additive. Visual sensitivity and flicker fusion frequency are reduced in humans inhaling CO at high altitude. One provocative study suggests that the increase in coronary capillarity seen with chronic altitude exposure may be blocked by CO. We exposed male, laboratory rats for 6 weeks to 100 ppm CO, 4676 m (15,000 ft) simulated high altitude (SHA), and CO at SHA. SHA increase hematocrit ratio (Hct) and right ventricle weight, but decreased body weight. CO increased Hct and left ventricle weight. Our results indicate that 100 ppm CO does not exacerbate the effects produced by exposure to 4676 m altitude.

  10. Anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction in coastal marine sediments controlled by organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Byrne, James M; Glombitza, Clemens; Schmidt, Caroline; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Coastal marine sediments contain varying concentrations of iron, oxygen, nitrate and organic carbon. It is unknown how organic carbon content influences the activity of nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers and microbial Fe-redox cycling in such sediments. Therefore, microcosms were prepared with two coastal marine sediments (Kalø Vig and Norsminde Fjord at Aarhus Bay, Denmark) varying in TOC from 0.4 to 3.0 wt%. The microcosms were incubated under light/dark conditions with/without addition of nitrate and/or Fe(II). Although most probable number (MPN) counts of phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers were five times lower in the low-TOC sediment, phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation rates were higher compared with the high-TOC sediment. Fe(III)-amended microcosms showed that this lower net Fe(II) oxidation in the high-TOC sediment is caused by concurrent bacterial Fe(III) reduction. In contrast, MPN counts of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and net rates of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation were comparable in low- and high-TOC sediments. However, the ratio of nitratereduced :iron(II)oxidized was higher in the high-TOC sediment, suggesting that a part of the nitrate was reduced by mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and chemoorganoheterotrophic nitrate-reducers. Our results demonstrate that dynamic microbial Fe cycling occurs in these sediments and that the extent of Fe cycling is dependent on organic carbon content.

  11. Land abandonment, fire recurrence and soil carbon content in the Macizo del Caroig, Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá, A.; González Peñaloza, F.; Santín, C.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    During the last 50 years two main forces have driven the fate of Mediterranean landscapes: land abandonment and forest fires (MacDonald et al., 2000; Moreira et al., 2001). Due to the economical changes suffered by the of the Mediterranean countries after the Second World War, the population migrated from the rural to the urban areas, and from South to North Europe. The land abandonment allowed the vegetation to recover and, as a consequence, an increase in forest fire took place. The soils of the abandoned land recovered the vegetation and litter layers, and consequently changes in soil properties have being found. One of these changes is the increase of soil carbon content, which is due both to vegetation recovery and to fire occurrence that increases the ash and pyrogenic carbon content in soils. Twenty plots were selected in the Macizo del Caroig in Eastern Spain on soils developed on limestone. The period of abandonment and the forest fires that had affected each plot were determined by interviews with the owners, farmers and shepherds. In addition, six (three + three) plots were selected as forest (no plough) and cultivated control plots. Each plot was sampled (10 random samples) and the organic carbon content determined. The results show that the cultivated plots have organic matter contents of 1.02 %, and the forest (Quercus ilex sp.) plots reach the highest value: 14.98 %. Within those we found values that range from 2.34 %, in the recently abandoned plots (10 year abandonment), to values of 8.23 % in the 50 year old abandoned fields.The results demonstrate that there is a recovery of the organic carbon in abandoned soils and that the forest fires do no affect this trend. The increase of soil organic matter after abandonment is a result of the recovery of vegetation(Debussche et al., 2001), which is the consequence of the end of the disturbance of forest that have affected the Mediterranean for millennia (Barbero et al., 1990). The colonization of the

  12. Influence of carbon content on the copper-telluride phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior of carbon alloyed Cu-Te conductive bridge random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devulder, Wouter De Schutter, Bob; Detavernier, Christophe; Opsomer, Karl; Franquet, Alexis; Meersschaut, Johan; Muller, Robert; Van Elshocht, Sven; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Goux, Ludovic; Belmonte, Attilio

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the carbon content on the Cu-Te phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior in carbon alloyed Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4} based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) cells. Carbon alloying of copper-tellurium inhibits the crystallization, while attractive switching behavior is preserved when using the material as Cu-supply layer in CBRAM cells. The phase formation is first investigated in a combinatorial way. With increasing carbon content, an enlargement of the temperature window in which the material stays amorphous was observed. Moreover, if crystalline phases are formed, subsequent phase transformations are inhibited. The electrical switching behavior of memory cells with different carbon contents is then investigated by implementing them in 580 μm diameter dot TiN/Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4}-C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si memory cells. Reliable switching behavior is observed for carbon contents up to 40 at. %, with a resistive window of more than 2 orders of magnitude, whereas for 50 at. % carbon, a higher current in the off state and only a small resistive window are present after repeated cycling. This degradation can be ascribed to the higher thermal and lower drift contribution to the reset operation due to a lower Cu affinity towards the supply layer, leading cycle-after-cycle to an increasing amount of Cu in the switching layer, which contributes to the current. The thermal diffusion of Cu into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under annealing also gives an indication of the Cu affinity of the source layer. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to investigate this migration depth in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} before and after annealing, showing a higher Cu, Te, and C migration for high carbon contents.

  13. [Effects of water content on redox potential and carbon mineralization of wetland sediments].

    PubMed

    Yang, Gai-ren; Tong, Cheng-li; Xiao, He-ai; Wu, Jin-shui

    2009-08-15

    To better understand the effect of soil water contents on redox potential (Eh), and their impacts on C mineralization in natural wetland, sediment samples from 3 types of wetlands (fen, humus marsh and marshy meadow) in the San-jiang Plate region of North China were incubated (25 degrees C) for 155 d under a range of reducing and oxidizing conditions by controlling water contents (varied from 24% to 232% of water holding capacity) (WHC). CO2-C evolved during incubation was measured at different time intervals. Results showed that Eh of sediments decreased significantly as water content increased from 24% WHC (lighted moisturized) to about 100% WHC, then decreased slightly as water content increased further to a level of submersed (about 2 cm water-depths). The accumulative amount of CO2-C evolved from the sediments indicated that the optimum water contents for mineralization of organic C are 32%, 48% and 76%-100% WHC for sediments of fen, humus marsh, and marshy meadow, respectively. The relationship between mineralization rates and redox potentials (Eh) were well fitted with second order parabola equations (p < 0.05). Mineralization rates and accumulative amount of organic C displayed a positive correlation with Eh up to 300 mV. However, a significant negative correlation was observed when Eh increased above 300 mV. Results demonstrated that low redox potential is the controlling factor of carbon accumulation of wetland in San-jiang Plate region.

  14. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers.

  15. Carbide Formation and Dissolution in Biomedical Co-Cr-Mo Alloys with Different Carbon Contents during Solution Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineta, Shingo; Namba, Shigenobu; Yoneda, Takashi; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki

    2010-08-01

    The microstructures of as-cast and heat-treated biomedical Co-Cr-Mo (ASTM F75) alloys with four different carbon contents were investigated. The as-cast alloys were solution treated at 1473 to 1548 K for 0 to 43.2 ks. The precipitates in the matrix were electrolytically extracted from the as-cast and heat-treated alloys. An M23C6 type carbide and an intermetallic σ phase (Co(Cr,Mo)) were detected as precipitates in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.12C alloy; an M23C6 type carbide, a σ phase, an η phase (M6C-M12C type carbide), and a π phase (M2T3X type carbide with a β-manganese structure) were detected in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.15C alloy; and an M23C6 type carbide and an η phase were detected in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.25C and Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.35C alloys. After solution treatment, complete precipitate dissolution occurred in all four alloys. Under incomplete precipitate dissolution conditions, the phase and shape of precipitates depended on the heat-treatment conditions and the carbon content in the alloys. The π phase was detected in the alloys with carbon contents of 0.15, 0.25, and 0.35 mass pct after heat treatment at high temperature such as 1548 K for a short holding time of less than 1.8 ks. The presence of the π phase in the Co-Cr-Mo alloys has been revealed in this study for the first time.

  16. Effect of low water content in protic ionic liquid on ions electrosorption in porous carbon: application to electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Gorska, B; Timperman, L; Anouti, M; Béguin, F

    2017-05-10

    The effect of low water content (<20, 150, 1000, 10 000 ppm) in triethylammonium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide - [(C2H5)3N(+)H][TFSI(-)] - protic ionic liquid (PIL) on the performance of activated carbon (AC) electrodes as well as AC/AC electrochemical capacitors (ECs) is reported. Under negative polarization, hydrogen electrosorption onto carbon is enhanced along with the increase of water content in PIL, whereas the resulting desorption peaks are shifted to lower potential values, evidencing lower sorption energy when hydrogen is stored from moisture containing PIL. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) investigations on PIL-based ECs demonstrated that the evolution of the Stern layer nanostructure at positive and negative potentials is asymmetrical. The results revealed comparable electrochemical performance for PIL containing 150 and 1000 ppm of H2O, due to similar operation of the positive electrode, where [TFSI(-)] anions are adsorbed in the outer Helmholtz plane, and the negative one, where hydrogen is stored through the reduction of the intermediate hydronium cation. By contrast, a cell with "dry" PIL (<20 ppm of water) displayed a distinctive operation due to hydrogen electrosorption directly through reduction of the protonated cation, and selective adsorption of [TFSI(-)] anions, which occurs thanks to the high polarizability and image force (IF) created by their induced charge. Galvanostatic cycling with potential limitation (GCPL) showed comparable capacitance values whatever the water content in PILs up to 1000 ppm, yet electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) revealed higher capacitance as well as better retention at higher frequencies with the PIL containing 150 ppm of water. Hence, 150 ppm is reasoned to be an optimal value for diffusion and adsorption of ions. The nature of current collectors (aluminum or stainless steel) has a determining role in their polarization behavior, and consequently the potential range of electrodes as well as ion diffusion

  17. Effects of treated wastewater irrigation on contents and dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jüschke, E.; Marschner, B.; Chen, Y.; Tarchitzky, J.

    2009-04-01

    In many arid and semi-arid regions, the demand for freshwater as drinking water and other domestic uses is constantly growing due to demographic growth and increasing standard of living. Therefore, less freshwater is available for agricultural irrigation and new water sources are needed. Treated wastewater (TWW) already serves as an important water source in Jordan, the Palestinian Territories and Israel. Related to its high loads with nutrients, salts and organic materials within its use as irrigation water major effects on the soil physical and chemical properties can occur, in the worst case leading to soil degradation. In an ongoing study we are investigated in the effects of TWW irrigation on agricultural soils in the region. Here we present results from analyses of total soil carbon contents and qualities in soils irrigated with freshwater and TWW. Furthermore microbiological parameters were investigated as microbial biomass, microbial activities and enzyme activities. In several sites, subsoils (50-160 cm) from TWW irrigated plots were depleted in soil organic matter with the largest differences occurring in sites with the longest TWW irrigation history. Laboratory incubation experiments with additions of 14C-labelled compounds to the soils showed that microbial activity in freshwater irrigated soils was much more stimulated by sugars or amino acids than in TWW irrigated soils. The lack of such "priming effects" (Hamer & Marschner 2005) in the TWW irrigated soils indicates that here the microorganisms are already operating at their optimal metabolic activity due to the continuous substrate inputs with soluble organic compounds from the TWW. Apparently, this higher microbial activity is causing an increased depletion of soil organic matter, which may have negative long-term effects on soil quality.

  18. Influence of dissolved organic carbon content on modelling natural organic matter acid-base properties.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Cédric; Mounier, Stéphane; Benaïm, Jean Yves

    2004-10-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) behaviour towards proton is an important parameter to understand NOM fate in the environment. Moreover, it is necessary to determine NOM acid-base properties before investigating trace metals complexation by natural organic matter. This work focuses on the possibility to determine these acid-base properties by accurate and simple titrations, even at low organic matter concentrations. So, the experiments were conducted on concentrated and diluted solutions of extracted humic and fulvic acid from Laurentian River, on concentrated and diluted model solutions of well-known simple molecules (acetic and phenolic acids), and on natural samples from the Seine river (France) which are not pre-concentrated. Titration experiments were modelled by a 6 acidic-sites discrete model, except for the model solutions. The modelling software used, called PROSECE (Programme d'Optimisation et de SpEciation Chimique dans l'Environnement), has been developed in our laboratory, is based on the mass balance equilibrium resolution. The results obtained on extracted organic matter and model solutions point out a threshold value for a confident determination of the studied organic matter acid-base properties. They also show an aberrant decreasing carboxylic/phenolic ratio with increasing sample dilution. This shift is neither due to any conformational effect, since it is also observed on model solutions, nor to ionic strength variations which is controlled during all experiments. On the other hand, it could be the result of an electrode troubleshooting occurring at basic pH values, which effect is amplified at low total concentration of acidic sites. So, in our conditions, the limit for a correct modelling of NOM acid-base properties is defined as 0.04 meq of total analysed acidic sites concentration. As for the analysed natural samples, due to their high acidic sites content, it is possible to model their behaviour despite the low organic carbon concentration.

  19. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  20. [Impact of laser energy on measurement of fly ash carbon content].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shun-Chun; Lu, Ji-Dong; Xie, Cheng-Li; Li, Jie; Pan, Sheng-Hua; He, Ze-Xiong

    2009-08-01

    A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy-based apparatus for the analysis of element, employing a 532 nm laser and a multi-channel optical spectrometer with a non-intensified CCD array, has been built and tested. It was applied to analyze the carbon content of coal fly ash. Seven groups of pulse laser in the range of 35 to 98 mJ were used to ablate the fly ash samples. The electron densities and plasma temperatures with different laser energy were determined, and the influence of laser energy on the intensity of analysis carbon lines was also analyzed. The results show that carbon line intensity increases slowly with the increase in laser energy in the range of 35 to 46 mJ, and increases fast in the range of 46 to 78 mJ, then trends to saturation and has a little drop. At the same time, air breakdown has increased significantly, and has an obvious effect on sample plasma. Furthermore, the electron density and plasma temperature increase with the laser energy until 78 mJ and then begin to decrease. It indicates that a proper laser energy can enhance the plasma emission signal, and avoid the negative impact of air breakdown that prevent the pulse laser from reaching the surface of sample and ablating it. In this experiment situation, the measurement accuracy of the carbon line can be improved.

  1. Boriding of high carbon high chromium cold work tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, W.

    2014-06-01

    High-carbon high-chromium cold work tool steels are widely used for blanking and cold forming of punches and dies. It is always advantageous to obtain an increased wear resistant surface to improve life and performance of these steels. In this connection boriding of a high-carbon high-chromium cold work die steel, D3, was conducted in a mixture of 30% B4C, 70% borax at 950 °C for two, four and six hours. Case depth of the borided layer obtained was between 40 to 80 μm. After boriding, the surface hardness achieved was between 1430 to 1544 HV depending upon the process time. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the formation of a duplex compound layer consisting of FeB and Fe2B. It is generally considered that FeB is undesirable because of its inherent brittleness. Post boriding treatment (homogenization) transformed the compound layer into single-phase layer of Fe2B, while surface hardness decreased to 1345-1430 HV. Pin-on-disc wer test showed that wear resistance of the borided samples was superior as compared to non-borided material and increased with boriding time.

  2. High-strength porous carbon and its multifunctional applications

    DOEpatents

    Wojtowicz, Marek A; Rubenstein, Eric P; Serio, Michael A; Cosgrove, Joseph E

    2013-12-31

    High-strength porous carbon and a method of its manufacture are described for multifunctional applications, such as ballistic protection, structural components, ultracapacitor electrodes, gas storage, and radiation shielding. The carbon is produced from a polymer precursor via carbonization, and optionally by surface activation and post-treatment.

  3. PAH desorption from sediments with different contents of organic carbon from wastewater receiving rivers.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weixiao; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Ren, Huimin; Xu, Wei

    2011-03-01

    Many rivers have to receive treated or untreated wastewater as the main water sources in the world, especially in the countries facing with water shortage. For instance, the Haihe and Huaihe River Basin, which are among areas facing crises for water resources in China, receive 33,400 million tons of wastewater per year. As the sediment has large capacity for sorbing hydrophobic organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), it can act as a natural repository for the contaminants. This means pollutants can release into water phase again under some conditions, such as resuspension, sediment dredging, etc. The objective of this research was to study the trends of PAH release from sediments in rivers receiving much wastewater, such as Yongding New River (YD), Northsewer (NS), and Southsewer (SS) from Haihe River Basin. These rivers received most of the wastewater from Tianjin, China and merge into Bohai Bay finally. Sediments (namely YD, NS, and SS) were collected from Yongding New River, Northsewer, and Southsewer, respectively. The physical and chemical properties of the sediments, including particle size distribution, total organic carbon (TOC) and black carbon (BC) contents, elemental compositions, organic functional groups analyzed from Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra, were characterized. PAH desorption from the sediments was measured with the Tenax shaken slurry desorption method. The NS sediment had a greatly higher TOC and BC contents, while lower BC-to-TOC ratio than YD and SS sediments. NMR and FTIR analysis showed that aliphatic carbons were more abundant in NS sediment than SS sediment. The desorption experiments showed that PAHs desorbed more rapidly from YD and NS sediments than from SS sediment. PAH fraction desorbed after each interval during the experiment except 0.8 day was significantly correlated with PAH properties among all the three sediments. The higher BC-to-TOC ratio in SS

  4. The carbon isotopes ratio and trace metals content determinations in some Transylvanian fruit juices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehelean, A.; Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.

    2012-02-01

    This work presents a preliminary study on the carbon isotope signature and trace metal content investigated on the soil-plant-fruit pulp chain. The samples were collected from two Transylvanian areas namely Alba and Salaj. The average value of the δ13C at the soil surface was around δ13C ≈ -27%° and important differences of the δ13C values between the two studied areas were not observed. Meanwhile, differences between fruit pulp of grape juice and the pulp of pear juice relived a difference of about 1.5%° for δ13C values.

  5. Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons for high performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Liu, Qiming

    2016-08-01

    The mesoporous carbons have been synthesized by using α-D(+)-Glucose, D-Glucosamine hydrochloride or their mixture as carbon precursors and mesoporous silicas (SBA-15 or MCF) as hard templates. The as-prepared products show a large pore volume (0.59-0.97 cm3 g-1), high surface areas (352.72-1152.67 m2 g-1) and rational nitrogen content (ca. 2.5-3.9 wt.%). The results of electrochemical tests demonstrate that both heteroatom doping and suitable pore structure play a decisive role in the performance of supercapacitors. The representative sample of SBA-15 replica obtained using D-Glucosamine hydrochloride only exhibits high specific capacitance (212.8 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1) and good cycle durability (86.1% of the initial capacitance after 2000 cycles) in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, which is attributed to the contribution of double layer capacitance and pseudo-capacitance. The excellent electrochemical performance makes it a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  6. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization for high-content screening.

    PubMed

    Querido, Emmanuelle; Dekakra-Bellili, Lynda; Chartrand, Pascal

    2017-08-15

    Single molecule RNA imaging using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can provide quantitative information on mRNA abundance and localization in a single cell. There is now a growing interest in screening for modifiers of RNA abundance and/or localization. For instance, microsatellite expansion within RNA can lead to toxic gain-of-function via mislocalization of these transcripts into RNA aggregate and sequestration of RNA-binding proteins. Screening for inhibitors of these RNA aggregate can be performed by high-throughput RNA FISH. Here we describe detailed methods to perform single molecule RNA FISH in multiwell plates for high-content screening (HCS) microscopy. We include protocols adapted for HCS with either standard RNA FISH with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes or the recent single molecule inexpensive FISH (smiFISH). Recommendations for success in HCS microscopy with high magnification objectives are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D.; Ali, Syed F.; Paule, Merle G.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:24871937

  8. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D; Ali, Syed F; Paule, Merle G; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2015-03-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Cohesion of wet grains at high liquid content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raux, Pascal; Bocquet, Lyderic; Biance, Anne-Laure

    2015-11-01

    Adding liquid to a granular medium highly increases its cohesion, due to the creation of capillary bridges between grains. From the paste obtained by mixing a large amount of water to spherical glass beads (~ 100 μm), we cast a compact beam. We study its rupture under its own weight, then deduce the cohesive strength, which increases with water content. This behavior diverges from what is expected from individual capillary bridges, suggesting a role of the liquid repartition in the granular medium. Curently at the Universidad Adolfo Ibañez (Chile).

  10. Multidimensional fluorescence studies of the phenolic content of dissolved organic carbon in humic substances.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Todd; Ross, Annemarie D; Chiarelli, Joseph; Kenny, Jonathan E

    2012-03-01

    Indicators suggest that the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in natural waters may be increasing. Climate change has been proposed as a potential contributor to the trend, and under such a mechanism, the phenolic content of DOC may also be increasing. This study explores the assessment of the phenolic character of DOC using multidimensional fluorescence spectroscopy as a more convenient alternative to traditional wet chemistry methods. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) is applied to fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) of humic samples to analyze inherent phenolic content. The PARAFAC results are correlated with phenol concentrations derived from the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent-based method. The reagent-based method reveals that the phenolic content of five International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) samples varies from approximately 5.2 to 22 ppm Tannic Acid Equivalents (TAE). A four-component PARAFAC fit is applied to the EEMs of the IHSS sample dataset and it is determined by PARAFAC score correlations with phenol concentrations from the reagent-based method that components C2, C3, and C4 have the highest probability of containing phenolic groups. The results show the potential for PARAFAC analysis of multidimensional fluorescence data for monitoring the phenolic content of DOC. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  11. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens

    PubMed Central

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J. S.; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen’s sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  12. Mapping soil organic carbon content and composition across Australia to assess vulnerability to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscarra Rossel, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    We can effectively monitor soil condition—and develop sound policies to offset the emissions of greenhouse gases—only with accurate data from which to define baselines. Currently, estimates of soil organic C for countries or continents are either unavailable or largely uncertain because they are derived from sparse data, with large gaps over many areas of the Earth. Here, we derive spatially explicit estimates, and their uncertainty, of the distribution and stock of organic C content and composition in the soil of Australia. The composition of soil organic C may be characterized by chemical separation or physical fractionation based on either particle size or particle density (Skjemstad et al., 2004; Gregorich et al., 2006; Kelleher&Simpson, 2006; Zimmermann et al., 2007). In Australia, for example, Skjemstad et al. (2004) used physical separation of soil samples into 50-2000 and <50-μm particle-size fractions followed by the measurement of char-carbon using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, giving the three OC pools, particulate organic carbon (POC), humic organic carbon (HOC) and resistant organic carbon (ROC; charcoal or char-carbon). We assembled and harmonized data from several sources to produce the most comprehensive set of data on the current stock of organic C in soil of the continent. Using them, we have produced a fine spatial resolution baseline map of organic C, POC, HOC and ROC at the continental scale. In this presentation I will describe how we made the maps and how we use them to assess the vulnerability of soil organic C to for instance climate change.

  13. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens.

    PubMed

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J S; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J P; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen's sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration.

  14. Structure and Crystallization Behavior of Nylong 66/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites at Low Carbon Nanotube Contents

    SciTech Connect

    Li,L.; Li, C.; Ni, C.; Rong, L.; Hsiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were modified with poly(hexamethylene adipamide) (also known as Nylon 66) via a controlled polymer solution crystallization method. A 'nanohybrid shish kebab' (NHSK) structure was found wherein the MWNT resembled the shish while Nylon 66 lamellar crystals formed the kebabs. These Nylon 66-functionalized MWNTs were used as precursors to prepare polymer/MWNT nanocomposites. Excellent dispersion was revealed by optical and electron microscopies. Nitric acid etching of the nanocomposites showed that MWNT formed a robust network in Nylon 66. Non-isothermal DSC results showed multiple melting peaks, which can be attributed to lamellar thickness changes upon heating. The crystallite sizes L{sub 100} and L{sup 010} of Nylon 66, determined by WAXD, decreased with increasing MWNT contents. Isothermal DSC results showed that crystallization kinetics increased first and then decreased with increasing MWNT contents in Nylon 66. This study showed that the effect of MWNTs on Nylon 66 crystallization is twofold: MWNTs provide heterogeneous nucleation sites for Nylon 66 crystallization while the tube network structure hinders large crystal growth.

  15. Nitrogen enriched mesoporous carbon as a high capacity cathode in lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hongjiao; Zhang, Huamin; Zhang, Yining; Liu, Tao; Li, Jing; Lai, Qinzhi

    2013-09-21

    Nitrogen enriched mesoporous carbon (N-MCS) with extremely high mesopore volume and nitrogen content is prepared through a one-step hard template method. The N-MCS cathode shows excellent discharge performance in lithium-oxygen batteries. The pore space is better utilized due to its optimized pore structure and uniformly incorporated N.

  16. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  17. [Soil labile organic carbon contents and their allocation characteristics under different land uses at dry-hot valley].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guo-yong; Li, Kun; Sun, Yong-yu; Zhang, Chun-hua

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC), readily oxidation organic carbon (ROC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC)and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents and their allocation ratios were comparatively investigated under Leucaena leucocephala woodland, Acacia auriculiformis woodland, dry cropland and wasteland in dry-hot valley. Results showed that SOC contents were not significant differences among the four land uses with the range of 4.22-5.19 g x kg(-1). ROC contents under L. leucocephala (2.14 g x kg(-1)) and A. auriculiformis woodland (2.03 g x kg(-1)) were both significantly higher than those under dry cropland (1.38 g x kg(-1)) and wasteland (1.34 g x kg(-1)). The highest MBC and DOC contents both presented under dry cropland among the four land uses, whereas the lowest occurred under wasteland. ROC allocation ratios under woodlands were 1.3 to 1.6 times to those under dry cropland and wasteland. MBC and DOC allocation ratios under cropland were higher than those under other three land uses, and the ratios were closely among woodlands and wasteland. Plant residue amounts and management were primarily determined ROC contents, and soil water content and plant residue quantity were mainly affected the variation of MBC and DOC contents under the four land uses. The change of ROC contents could sensitively indicate SOC dynamics in dry-hot valley, but the change of MBC or DOC could not.

  18. Effect of chloride content of molten nitrate salt on corrosion of A516 carbon steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Clift, W. Miles

    2010-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of A516 carbon steel was evaluated to determine the effect of the dissolved chloride content in molten binary Solar Salt. Corrosion tests were conducted in a molten salt consisting of a 60-40 weight ratio of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} at 400{sup o}C and 450{sup o}C for up to 800 hours. Chloride concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% were investigated to determine the effect on corrosion of this impurity, which can be present in comparable amounts in commercial grades of the constituent salts. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses, corrosion morphology was examined by metallographic sectioning, and the types of corrosion products were determined by x-ray diffraction. Corrosion proceeded by uniform surface scaling and no pitting or intergranular corrosion was observed. Corrosion rates increased significantly as the concentration of dissolved chloride in the molten salt increased. The adherence of surface scales, and thus their protective properties, was degraded by dissolved chloride, fostering more rapid corrosion. Magnetite was the only corrosion product formed on the carbon steel specimens, regardless of chloride content or temperature.

  19. The Gray Institute 'open' high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barber, P R; Tullis, I D C; Pierce, G P; Newman, R G; Prentice, J; Rowley, M I; Matthews, D R; Ameer-Beg, S M; Vojnovic, B

    2013-08-01

    We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this 'open' design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam 'end-stations' at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach.

  20. Carbon concentration measurements by atom probe tomography in the ferritic phase of high-silicon steels

    DOE PAGES

    Rementeria, Rosalia; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Aranda, Maria M.; ...

    2016-12-19

    Current studies using atom probe tomography (APT) show that bainitic ferrite formed at low temperature contains more carbon than what is consistent with the paraequilibrium phase diagram. However, nanocrystalline bainitic ferrite exhibits a non-homogeneous distribution of carbon atoms in arrangements with specific compositions, i.e. Cottrell atmospheres, carbon clusters, and carbides, in most cases with a size of a few nanometers. The ferrite volume within a single platelet that is free of these carbon-enriched regions is extremely small. Proximity histograms can be compromised on the ferrite side, and a great deal of care should be taken to estimate the carbon contentmore » in regions of bainitic ferrite free from carbon agglomeration. For this purpose, APT measurements were first validated for the ferritic phase in a pearlitic sample and further performed for the bainitic ferrite matrix in high-silicon steels isothermally transformed between 200 °C and 350 °C. Additionally, results were compared with the carbon concentration values derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses considering a tetragonal lattice and previous APT studies. In conclusion, the present results reveal a strong disagreement between the carbon content values in the bainitic ferrite matrix as obtained by APT and those derived from XRD measurements. Those differences have been attributed to the development of carbon-clustered regions with an increased tetragonality in a carbon-depleted matrix.« less

  1. Effect of carbon, manganese, nickel, and nitrogen concentrations on the phase composition and properties of wrought high-manganese steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarin, N. Ya.; Kats, R. Z.; Startsev, V. A.; Petrova, I. A.

    1981-01-01

    Strain hardening of high-manganese steel is characterized not only by the formation of dislocations but also by precipitation of second phase (primarily α martensite with a carbon concentration <1.0% and carbides with a carbon content >1.2%), lowering the ductility of the cold worked metal, which induces the formation on the working surfaces of defects due to contact fatigue.

  2. Transient tracer distributions in the Fram Strait in 2012 and inferred anthropogenic carbon content and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöven, Tim; Tanhua, Toste; Hoppema, Mario; von Appen, Wilken-Jon

    2016-02-01

    The storage of anthropogenic carbon in the ocean's interior is an important process which modulates the increasing carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. The polar regions are expected to be net sinks for anthropogenic carbon. Transport estimates of dissolved inorganic carbon and the anthropogenic offset can thus provide information about the magnitude of the corresponding storage processes. Here we present a transient tracer, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) data set along 78°50' N sampled in the Fram Strait in 2012. A theory on tracer relationships is introduced, which allows for an application of the inverse-Gaussian-transit-time distribution (IG-TTD) at high latitudes and the estimation of anthropogenic carbon concentrations. Mean current velocity measurements along the same section from 2002-2010 were used to estimate the net flux of DIC and anthropogenic carbon by the boundary currents above 840 m through the Fram Strait. The new theory explains the differences between the theoretical (IG-TTD-based) tracer age relationship and the specific tracer age relationship of the field data, by saturation effects during water mass formation and/or the deliberate release experiment of SF6 in the Greenland Sea in 1996, rather than by different mixing or ventilation processes. Based on this assumption, a maximum SF6 excess of 0.5-0.8 fmol kg-1 was determined in the Fram Strait at intermediate depths (500-1600 m). The anthropogenic carbon concentrations are 50-55 µmol kg-1 in the Atlantic Water/Recirculating Atlantic Water, 40-45 µmol kg-1 in the Polar Surface Water/warm Polar Surface Water and between 10 and 35 µmol kg-1 in the deeper water layers, with lowest concentrations in the bottom layer. The net fluxes through the Fram Strait indicate a net outflow of ˜ 0.4 DIC and ˜ 0.01 PgC yr-1 anthropogenic carbon from the Arctic Ocean into the North Atlantic, albeit with high uncertainties.

  3. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  4. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-15

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  5. Roles of bulk carbon content on grain size, carbide reactions and intergranular rupture life in 2.25cr martensitic heat resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyun Je; Heo, Nam Hoe; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2016-11-01

    The steel of a higher bulk carbon content shows the denser precipitation distribution of carbides after the solution treatment followed by tempering. Such a carbide distribution produces the smaller prior austenite grain size after the welding simulation at a high temperature. Because the equilibrium segregation concentration of phosphorus decreases with decreasing prior austenite grain size, the specimen of the higher bulk carbon content shows therefore the longer intergranular rupture life. The rupture life is also increased by the partitioning of phosphorus pre-segregated at prior austenite grain boundary/carbide interfaces onto the fresh surface of precipitates formed on the surface of pre-formed carbides. The intergranular rupture life is additionally increased by the repulsive segregation between carbon and phosphorus which decreases the overall phosphorus segregation concentration at the prior austenite grain boundaries.

  6. High-Flux Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes for Gas Separation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hannes; Voss, Hartwig; Kaltenborn, Nadine; Kämnitz, Susanne; Wollbrink, Alexander; Feldhoff, Armin; Caro, Jürgen; Roitsch, Stefan; Voigt, Ingolf

    2017-06-26

    Carbon membranes have great potential for highly selective and cost-efficient gas separation. Carbon is chemically stable and it is relative cheap. The controlled carbonization of a polymer coating on a porous ceramic support provides a 3D carbon material with molecular sieving permeation performance. The carbonization of the polymer blend gives turbostratic carbon domains of randomly stacked together sp(2) hybridized carbon sheets as well as sp(3) hybridized amorphous carbon. In the evaluation of the carbon molecular sieve membrane, hydrogen could be separated from propane with a selectivity of 10 000 with a hydrogen permeance of 5 m(3) (STP)/(m(2) hbar). Furthermore, by a post-synthesis oxidative treatment, the permeation fluxes are increased by widening the pores, and the molecular sieve carbon membrane is transformed from a molecular sieve carbon into a selective surface flow carbon membrane with adsorption controlled performance and becomes selective for carbon dioxide. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. High efficient preparation of carbon nanotube-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenxin; Wang, Yanxiang; Wang, Chengguo; Chen, Jiqiang; Wang, Qifen; Yuan, Yan; Niu, Fangxu

    2016-02-01

    An innovative technique has been developed to obtain the uniform catalyst coating on continuously moving carbon fibers. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted carbon fibers with significantly improved tensile strength have been succeeded to produce by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) when compared to the tensile strength of untreated carbon fibers. The critical requirements for preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with high tensile strength have been found, mainly including (i) the obtainment of uniform coating of catalyst particles with small particle size, (ii) the low catalyst-induced and mechano-chemical degradation of carbon fibers, and (iii) the high catalyst activity which could facilitate the healing and strengthening of carbon fibers during the growth of CNTs. The optimum growth temperature was found to be about 500 °C, and the optimum catalyst is Ni due to its highest activity, there is a pronounced increase of 10% in tensile strength of carbon fibers after CNT growth at 500 °C by using Ni catalyst. Based on the observation from HRTEM images, a healing and crosslink model of neighboring carbon crystals by CNTs has been formulated to reveal the main reason that causes an increase in tensile strength of carbon fibers after the growth of CNTs. Such results have provided the theoretical and experimental foundation for the large-scale preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength, significantly promoting the development of CNT-grafted carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  8. The role of clay content during earthquake propagation in carbonate-hosted faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paola, N.; Bullock, R. J.; Holdsworth, R.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate faults often contain small amounts of phyllosilicate in their slip zone. To assess the effect of phyllosilicate content on earthquake propagation in carbonate faults, we performed friction experiments at seismic slip rate (v = 1.3 m/s) on gouges of calcite, phyllosilicate (montmorillonite and illite-smectite) and mixed calcite/phyllosilicate compositions. Experiments were carried out at 9 MPa normal load and under both room-humidity (dry) and water-saturated (wet) conditions. All dry gouges, regardless of clay content, plus the wet calcite, produce a friction evolution curve, comprising an initial slip-hardening phase, during which friction evolves to peak values f = 0.60-0.76, followed by a dramatic slip-weakening phase, during which f decreases to a constant steady-state value of 0.19-0.33 over a distance which ranges from 0.2 m for clay-bearing gouges up to 0.6 m for pure calcite. Conversely, wet gouges with phyllosilicate content ≥ 10 wt.% show negligible slip-hardening, and the attainment of steady-state sliding almost immediately at the onset of slip, with f = 0.05-0.26. Dry gouges show slip localization and grain size reduction within a narrow (<65 microns) principal slip zone, accompanied by microstructural evidence for thermal decomposition of calcite (although only when clay content is ≤ 50 wt.%). Wet gouges are characterized by distributed deformation and grain size reduction, with no microstructural evidence for thermal decomposition of calcite. We interpret that slip initiates within the wet gouges along interconnected networks of weak phyllosilicates, formed during axial loading compaction prior to shear. This can explain the: 1) measured lack of slip-hardening and peak friction; 2) observed distributed nature of deformation and grain size reduction; 3) lack of evidence for thermally activated processes, due to low frictional heating in accord with small values of friction and lack of slip localization. Our findings imply that small

  9. [Soil organic carbon content and its distribution pattern in Hangzhou Bay coastal wetlands].

    PubMed

    Shao, Xue-xin; Yang, Wen-ying; Wu, Ming; Jiang, Ke-yi

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content and its distribution pattern in the natural intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands of Hangzhou Bay were studied, aimed to explore the effects of vegetation succession, exotic species invasion, and reclamation on the SOC in costal wetlands of the Bay. In intertidal zones, the surface SOC content ranged from 4.41 to 8.58 g x kg(-1), with an average of 6.45 g x kg(-1), and differed significantly under different vegetations, with a tendency of under Phragmites australis (8.56 +/- 0.04 g x kg(-1)) > Spartina alterniflora (7.31 +/- 0.08 g x kg(-1)) > Scirpus mariqueter (5.48 +/- 0.29 g x kg(-1)) > mudflats (4.47 +/- 0.09 g x kg(-1)); in reclaimed wetlands, the surface SOC content was 7.46 +/- 0.25 g x kg(-1) in the 1960s, 1.96 +/- 0.46 g x kg(-1) in the 1980s, and 5.12 +/- 0.16 g x kg(-1) in 2003, showing a trend of increased after an initial decrease with increasing reclamation year. The SOC in the profiles all showed a decreasing trend from the surface to the bottom. The SOC in intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, and positively correlated with soil total nitrogen (TN), suggesting a large reserve of organic nitrogen in TN. The correlation between SOC and soil C/N ratio was not obvious in intertidal zones, but significantly positive in reclaimed wetlands, indicating that reclamation affected soil C/N ratio to a certain extent. This study showed that in the intertidal zones, soil carbon sequestration capacity increased gradually with plant community succession. However, the invasion of exotic species Spartina alternflora might decrease the capacity of carbon sequestration in intertidal zones. It was also found that the changes of soil moisture content, particle composition, vegetation coverage, and reclamation history were the main factors affecting the SOC distribution in reclaimed wetlands.

  10. Diel changes in the near-surface biomass of zooplankton and the carbon content of vertical migrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Graeme C.; Harris, Roger P.; Head, Robert N.

    Zooplankton biomass and the carbon content of vertical migrants were measured in the NE Atlantic (36.5°N, 19.2°W) between 11 and 18 July 1996 as part of the Plankton Reactivity in the Marine Environment (PRIME) programme. The increase in zooplankton biomass near the surface (0-100 m) at night compared to during the day suggested that diel vertical migration was an important feature at this site. For three species of vertically migrant copepods, Pleuromamma pisekii, P. gracilis and P. abdominalis, the carbon content of individuals collected at dusk was significantly less than for individuals collected at dawn, with this reduction being 6.2, 7.3 and 14.8%, respectively. This dawn-dusk reduction in carbon content is consistent with the diel pattern of feeding and fasting exhibited by vertical migrants and supports the suggestion that migrating zooplankton will cause an active export of carbon from the surface layers.

  11. Seasonal controls of canopy chlorophyll content on forest carbon uptake: Implications for GPP modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Chen, J. M.; Froelich, N. J.; Chen, B.; Staebler, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    Forested ecosystems represent an important part of the global carbon cycle, with accurate estimates of gross primary productivity (GPP) crucial for understanding ecosystem response to environmental controls and improving global carbon models. This research investigated the relationships between leaf area index (LAI) and leaf chlorophyll content (ChlLeaf) with forest carbon uptake. Ground measurements of LAI and ChlLeaf were taken approximately every 9 days across the 2013 growing season from day of year (DOY) 130 to 290 at Borden Forest, Ontario. These biophysical measurements were supported by on-site eddy covariance flux measurements. Differences in the temporal development of LAI and ChlLeaf were considerable, with LAI reaching maximum values within approximately 10 days of bud burst at DOY 141. In contrast, ChlLeaf accumulation only reached maximum values at DOY 182. This divergence has important implications for GPP models which use LAI to represent the fraction of light absorbed by a canopy (fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (fAPAR)). Daily GPP values showed the strongest relationship with canopy chlorophyll content (ChlCanopy; R2 = 0.69, p < 0.001), with the LAI and GPP relationship displaying nonlinearity at the start and end of the growing season (R2 = 0.55, p < 0.001). Modeled GPP derived from LAI × PAR and ChlCanopy × PAR was tested against measured GPP, giving R2 = 0.63, p < 0.001 and R2 = 0.82, p < 0.001, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of considering canopy pigment status in deciduous forests, with models that use fAPARLAI rather than fAPARChl neglecting to account for the importance of leaf photosynthetic potential.

  12. Characterization of the Carbon and Retained Austenite Distributions in Martensitic Medium Carbon, High Silicon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Donald H.; Cross, Steven M.; Kim, Sangho; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2007-08-01

    The retained austenite content and carbon distribution in martensite were determined as a function of cooling rate and temper temperature in steel that contained 1.31 at. pct C, 3.2 at. pct Si, and 3.2 at. pct noniron metallic elements. Mössbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), transmission synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atom probe tomography were used for the microstructural analyses. The retained austenite content was an inverse, linear function of cooling rate between 25 and 560 K/s. The elevated Si content of 3.2 at. pct did not shift the start of austenite decomposition to higher tempering temperatures relative to SAE 4130 steel. The minimum tempering temperature for complete austenite decomposition was significantly higher (>650 °C) than for SAE 4130 steel (˜300 °C). The tempering temperatures for the precipitation of transition carbides and cementite were significantly higher (>400 °C) than for carbon steels (100 °C to 200 °C and 200 °C to 350 °C), respectively. Approximately 90 pct of the carbon atoms were trapped in Cottrell atmospheres in the vicinity of the dislocation cores in dislocation tangles in the martensite matrix after cooling at 560 K/s and aging at 22 °C. The 3.2 at. pct Si content increased the upper temperature limit for stable carbon clusters to above 215 °C. Significant autotempering occurred during cooling at 25 K/s. The proportion of total carbon that segregated to the interlath austenite films decreased from 34 to 8 pct as the cooling rate increased from 25 to 560 K/s. Developing a model for the transfer of carbon from martensite to austenite during quenching should provide a means for calculating the retained austenite. The maximum carbon content in the austenite films was 6 to 7 at. pct, both in specimens cooled at 560 K/s and at 25 K/s. Approximately 6 to 7 at. pct carbon was sufficient to arrest the transformation of austenite to martensite. The chemical potential of carbon is the same in

  13. Pheophytinase Knockdown Impacts Carbon Metabolism and Nutraceutical Content Under Normal Growth Conditions in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Lira, Bruno Silvestre; Rosado, Daniele; Almeida, Juliana; de Souza, Amanda Pereira; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Purgatto, Eduardo; Guyer, Luzia; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Freschi, Luciano; Rossi, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Although chlorophyll (Chl) degradation is an essential biochemical pathway for plant physiology, our knowledge regarding this process still has unfilled gaps. Pheophytinase (PPH) was shown to be essential for Chl breakdown in dark-induced senescent leaves. However, the catalyzing enzymes involved in pigment turnover and fruit ripening-associated degreening are still controversial. Chl metabolism is closely linked to the biosynthesis of other isoprenoid-derived compounds, such as carotenoids and tocopherols, which are also components of the photosynthetic machinery. Chls, carotenoids and tocopherols share a common precursor, geranylgeranyl diphosphate, produced by the plastidial methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Additionally, the Chl degradation-derived phytol can be incorporated into tocopherol biosynthesis. In this context, tomato turns out to be an interesting model to address isoprenoid-metabolic cross-talk since fruit ripening combines degreening and an intensely active MEP leading to carotenoid accumulation. Here, we investigate the impact of PPH deficiency beyond senescence by the comprehensive phenotyping of SlPPH-knockdown tomato plants. In leaves, photosynthetic parameters indicate altered energy usage of excited Chl. As a mitigatory effect, photosynthesis-associated carotenoids increased while tocopherol content remained constant. Additionally, starch and soluble sugar profiles revealed a distinct pattern of carbon allocation in leaves that suggests enhanced sucrose exportation. The higher levels of carbohydrates in sink organs down-regulated carotenoid biosynthesis. Additionally, the reduction in Chl-derived phytol recycling resulted in decreased tocopherol content in transgenic ripe fruits. Summing up, tocopherol and carotenoid metabolism, together with the antioxidant capacity of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions, were differentially affected in leaves and fruits of the transgenic plants. Thus, in tomato, PPH plays a role beyond

  14. Methane and carbon dioxide content in eroding permafrost soils along the Beaufort Sea coast, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelson, G. J.; Ping, C. L.; Jorgenson, M. T.

    2011-03-01

    Soil CH4 and CO2 gas contents were determined at 39 sites located along the 1957 km coastline of the Beaufort Sea of northern Alaska. Average soil CH4 concentrations increased with depth into the upper frozen layers, while the CO2 decreased with depth. Over 80% of the CH4 and 46% of the total CO2 were contained in the permafrost portion of the profiles. Overall, average concentrations of CH4 within the soil profiles were correlated to water content (R2 = 0.66, p ≤ 0.01). Concentrations of CO2 were correlated to total organic carbon (R2 = 0.76, p ≤ 0.001) and negatively correlated to water content (R2 = 0.61, p ≤ 0.01). The highest total bank gas concentrations for both gases were found in ice-rich permafrost (average volumetric H2O ≥ 70%). Soils eroded across the coast annually were estimated to contain 3.61 ± 1.35 t CH4 (average 1.86 ± 0.70 g m-2) and 469 ± 128 t CO2 (average 240 ± 65 g m-2). Gas amounts present in annually eroding banks were on the same order of magnitude as amounts emitted per year on an area basis from undisturbed tundra and lakes reported by others for the Arctic and smaller than previous estimates for local coastal anthropogenic sources. Soil stocks of gases, water and total organic carbon indicate that with coastal permafrost degradation gas release is minor in magnitude and importance to C-dynamics when compared to the TOC stocks of the coastline.

  15. Development of highly porous carbon and ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasuyuki

    The objectives of this thesis were to develop new methods for manufacturing highly porous and low-density carbon and ceramic materials by simple methods using low-cost precursors, which can exhibit high corrosion resistance and high-temperature performance with advantageous porous microstructure. Various types of porous carbon materials were manufactured using different techniques. These materials included porous carbons fabricated by paper making technology, foamed resin based carbons, resin powder based porous carbons and carbon bonded carbon fibre composites. Then, these different forms of porous carbon preforms were converted into lightweight and low-density ceramics by two main fabrication routes. In the first route, porous carbon-ceramic composites were manufactured by infiltration of a mixture of silica sol-gels and a resin carbon source into porous carbon preforms. The silica was subsequently converted into SiC or Si3N4 by carbothermal reduction or nitridation, respectively. Furthermore, boron oxide glass was impregnated in addition to SiC. However, the porous carbon-ceramic composites from this fabrication method exhibited poor high-temperature performance due to low oxidation resistance.In the second route, porous carbon preforms were directly converted into porous SiC materials by a reaction bonding technique with silicon vapour infiltration. The ceramics produced by this route were proved to have high potentiality as lightweight and low-density materials at elevated temperatures and corrosive atmospheres, with modified mechanical properties. Structural and morphological characterizations of the porous materials were carried out using optical and electron microscopy, diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. Mechanical properties were also measured including flexural, tensile and compressive strength, and elastic modulus at room and elevated temperatures, and the results of mechanical properties were analyzed in relation to density/porosity values

  16. Detailed consideration of physicochemical properties of CO3apatites as biomaterials in relation to carbonate content using ICP, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, SEM, and HR-TEM.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Rie; Hayashi, Hidetaka; Hirata, Isao; Miake, Yasuo; Yanagisawa, Takaaki; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2006-09-01

    CO3apatites with different carbonate contents were synthesized at 60 +/- 1 degrees C and pH 7.4 +/- 0.2 under different carbonate concentrations (0-0.3 mol/L) in the supplied solutions. Their physicochemical properties were analyzed using various methods. Inductively coupled plasma gave accurate chemical analysis data for calcium and phosphate contents. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a clear chemical shift at high carbonate content. A CO3(2-) absorption peak area approximately proportional to carbonate content was observed through Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed a dramatic change of the crystal shape. Osteoblast proliferation at the surface of each CO3apatite-collagen sponge indicated that osteoblasts deformed to expand and cover the surface of the sponge, and appeared to adhere well to the sponge.

  17. High-strength carbon nanotube fibre-like ribbon with high ductility and high electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, J N; Luo, X G; Wu, T; Chen, Y

    2014-06-25

    Macroscopic fibres made up of carbon nanotubes exhibit properties far below theoretical predictions and even much lower than those for conventional carbon fibres. Here we report improvements of mechanical and electrical properties by more than one order of magnitude by pressurized rolling. Our carbon nanotubes self-assemble to a hollow macroscopic cylinder in a tube reactor operated at high temperature and then condense in water or ethanol to form a fibre, which is continually spooled in an open-air environment. This initial fibre is densified by rolling under pressure, leading to a combination of high tensile strength (3.76-5.53 GPa), high tensile ductility (8-13%) and high electrical conductivity ((1.82-2.24) × 10(4) S cm(-1)). Our study therefore demonstrates strategies for future performance maximization and the very considerable potential of carbon nanotube assemblies for high-end uses.

  18. Dissolved organic carbon content and characteristics in relation to carbon dioxide partial pressure across Poyang Lake wetlands and adjacent aquatic systems in the Changjiang basin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaxin; Jiao, Ruyuan; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Lu; Yan, Weijin

    2016-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays diverse roles in carbon biogeochemical cycles. Here, we explored the link between DOC and pCO2 using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with UV254 detection and excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy to determine the molecular weight distribution (MW) and the spectral characteristics of DOC, respectively. The relationship between DOC and pCO2 was investigated in the Poyang Lake wetlands and their adjacent aquatic systems. The results indicated significant spatial variation in the DOC concentrations, MW distributions, and pCO2. The DOC concentration was higher in the wetlands than in the rivers and lakes. pCO2 was high in wetlands in which the dominant vegetation was Phragmites australis, whereas it was low in wetlands in which Carex tristachya was the dominant species. DOC was divided into five fractions according to MW, as follows: super-low MW (SLMW, <1 kDa); low MW (LMW, 1-2.5 kDa); intermediate MW (IMW, 2.5-3.5 kDa); high MW (HMW, 3.5-6 kDa); and super-high MW (SMW, > 40 kDa). Rivers contained high proportions of HMW and extremely low amounts of SLMW, whereas wetlands had relatively high proportions of SLMW. The proportion of SMW (SMWp) was particularly high in wetlands. We found that pCO2 significantly positively correlated with the proportion of IMW, and significantly negatively correlated with SMWp. These data improve our understanding of the MW of bioavailable DOC and its conversion to CO2. The present results demonstrate that both the content and characteristics of DOC significantly affect pCO2. pCO2 and DOC must be studied further to help understanding the role of the wetland on the regional CO2 budget.

  19. Engineering of High-Toughness Carbon Nanotubes Hierarchically Laminated Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-27

    REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jul-10 - Jul-11 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Program Title: ENGINEERING OF HIGH-TOUGHNESS CARBON NANOTUBES ...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Program Title: ENGINEERING OF HIGH-TOUGHNESS CARBON NANOTUBES ...Ashby plots can be attained (Fig. 2B). 5. New doping method of carbon nanotubes was developed. Funding Profile: (Give the fiscal year funding

  20. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  1. Towards high-siderophore-content foods: optimisation of coprogen production in submerged cultures of Penicillium nalgiovense.

    PubMed

    Emri, Tamás; Tóth, Viktória; Nagy, Csilla Terézia; Nagy, Gábor; Pócsi, Imre; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Antal, Károly; Balla, József; Balla, György; Román, Gyula; Kovács, István; Pócsi, István

    2013-07-01

    Fungal siderophores are likely to possess atheroprotective effects in humans, and therefore studies are needed to develop siderophore-rich food additives or functional foods to increase the siderophore uptake in people prone to cardiovascular diseases. In this study the siderophore contents of mould-ripened cheeses and meat products were analysed and the coprogen production by Penicillium nalgiovense was characterised. High concentrations of hexadentate fungal siderophores were detected in penicillia-ripened Camembert- and Roquefort-type cheeses and also in some sausages. In one sausage fermented by P. nalgiovense, the siderophore content was comparable to those found in cheeses. Penicillium nalgiovense produced high concentrations of coprogen in submerged cultures, which were affected predominantly by the available carbon and nitrogen sources under iron starvation. Considerable coprogen yields were still detectable in the presence of iron when the fermentation medium was supplemented with the iron chelator Na₂-EDTA or when P. nalgiovense was co-cultivated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These data may be exploitable in the future development of high-siderophore-content foods and/or food additives. Nevertheless, the use of P. nalgiovense fermentation broths for these purposes may be limited by the instability of coprogen in fermentation media and by the β-lactam production by the fungus. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Kinetics of carbon precipitation and re-solution in low Si-content silicon iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walz, F.; Wakisaka, T.; Kronmüller, H.

    2005-11-01

    In low Si-charged silicon iron (Fe + 0.1%Si) the kinetics of carbon diffusion, precipitation and redissolution have been carefully studied by means of the magnetic after-effect (MAE) within the temperature range 200 K < Ta < 1100 K. The activation parameters of respective processes have been determined by means of least squares fitting the experimental data. In the presence of substitutionally alloyed Si, the C-Richter MAE gives rise to two Debye-type relaxation peaks - resulting from elementary steps of carbon diffusion combined with reorientation in the (i) unperturbed and (ii) Si-modified Fe matrix - situated near 265 K and 320 K, with activation enthalpies, Qi, of 0.84 eV and 1.08 eV. Two-stage carbon precipitation, obeying first order kinetics, occurs, intensively, near 390 K with the elementary C diffusion enthalpy of 0.84 eV and, rather weakly, near 540 K with an enthalpy of 1.18 eV. The resulting precipitates are discussed in terms of partly intra-grain deposited iron carbide phases (Fe3C) and, mainly, grain-boundary determined C trapping. Decomposition of these precipitates occurring, again, in two stages - situated near 740 K and 950 K, with activation enthalpies of 1.72 and 2.02 eV - leads to a restitution of the state of maximum interstitially dissolved C in the matrix. Of practical importance for silicon steel fabrication is the observation that, after complete C precipitation (Ta . 580 K), the material can be kept in a state of minimum dissolved carbon content - and hence of minimum ac-losses - by not allowing it to warm up above Ta 650 K.

  3. Negative-ion production on carbon materials in hydrogen plasma: influence of the carbon hybridization state and the hydrogen content on H- yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Pardanaud, Cédric; Carrère, Marcel; Layet, Jean-Marc; Gicquel, Alix; Kumar, Pravin; Eon, David; Jaoul, Cédric; Engeln, Richard; Cartry, Gilles

    2014-02-01

    Highly oriented polycrystalline graphite (HOPG), boron-doped diamond (BDD), nanocrystalline diamond, ultra-nanocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon surfaces are exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma in a 13.56 MHz plasma reactor. Relative yields of surface-produced H- ions due to bombardment of positive ions from the plasma are measured by an energy analyser cum quadrupole mass spectrometer. Irrespective of plasma conditions (0.2 and 2 Pa), HOPG surfaces show the highest yield at room temperature (RT), while at high temperature (HT), the highest yield (˜3-5 times compared to HOPG surface at RT) is observed on BDD surfaces. The shapes of ion distribution functions are compared at RT and HT to demonstrate the mechanism of ion generation at the surface. Raman spectroscopy analyses of the plasma-exposed samples reveal surface modifications influencing H- production yields, while further analyses strongly suggest that the hydrogen content of the material and the sp3/sp2 ratio are the key parameters in driving the surface ionization efficiency of carbon materials under the chosen plasma conditions.

  4. High GC content causes orphan proteins to be intrinsically disordered.

    PubMed

    Basile, Walter; Sachenkova, Oxana; Light, Sara; Elofsson, Arne

    2017-03-01

    De novo creation of protein coding genes involves the formation of short ORFs from noncoding regions; some of these ORFs might then become fixed in the population. These orphan proteins need to, at the bare minimum, not cause serious harm to the organism, meaning that they should for instance not aggregate. Therefore, although the creation of short ORFs could be truly random, the fixation should be subjected to some selective pressure. The selective forces acting on orphan proteins have been elusive, and contradictory results have been reported. In Drosophila young proteins are more disordered than ancient ones, while the opposite trend is present in yeast. To the best of our knowledge no valid explanation for this difference has been proposed. To solve this riddle we studied structural properties and age of proteins in 187 eukaryotic organisms. We find that, with the exception of length, there are only small differences in the properties between proteins of different ages. However, when we take the GC content into account we noted that it could explain the opposite trends observed for orphans in yeast (low GC) and Drosophila (high GC). GC content is correlated with codons coding for disorder promoting amino acids. This leads us to propose that intrinsic disorder is not a strong determining factor for fixation of orphan proteins. Instead these proteins largely resemble random proteins given a particular GC level. During evolution the properties of a protein change faster than the GC level causing the relationship between disorder and GC to gradually weaken.

  5. Soil carbon isotopic composition and soil carbon content in an agroecosystem during six years of Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE).

    PubMed

    Giesemann, Anette; Weigel, Hans-Joachim

    2008-12-01

    The Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment conducted at the Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL) in Braunschweig in an arable crop rotation (total duration six years) allowed us to trace carbon (C) input in the soil C pool, as the CO(2), used in the experiment to increase the atmospheric CO(2) concentration, was depleted in (13)C. Accurate assessment of the C input by means of stable C isotope analysis requires detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of both the C isotopic composition and the C content in the soil C. Assumed changes in these parameters were examined. CO(2) enrichment treatment over a six year period resulted in a clear trend towards an increase of soil C content in the uppermost 10 cm of soil. About 4.9% of the soil C present under ambient air conditions, and 10.7% present under elevated CO(2) conditions were determined as new input. However, the results are not statistically significant yet.

  6. Indirect voltammetric determination of caffeine content in coffee using 1,4-benzoquinone modified carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Aklilu, Muluken; Tessema, Merid; Redi-Abshiro, Mesfin

    2008-08-15

    In this paper a simple and highly sensitive electroanalytical method for the determination of caffeine content using 1,4-benzoquinone modified carbon paste electrode is presented. The method is based on suppression of 1,4-benzoquinone peak current on addition of caffeine. Square-wave and cyclic voltammetric techniques were utilised for the investigation. The 1,4-benzoquinone modified electrode exhibited a well-defined peak with reproducible peak current values for repetitive measurements; and showed a decrease in peak current value with an increase in caffeine content. The result revealed two linear range regions between 0 mmol L(-1) and 0.5 mmol L(-1) and 0.5 mmol L(-1) and 8.0 mmol L(-1), with detection limits of 0.3 micromol L(-1) and 5.1 micromol L(-1), respectively. The method was then successfully applied to the determination of caffeine content in coffee samples. The effects of pH, electrode composition, step potential, pulse amplitude and square-wave frequency on the voltammetric responses were also investigated.

  7. High-content analysis for drug delivery and nanoparticle applications.

    PubMed

    Brayden, David J; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Dawson, Kenneth A; O'Brien, Peter J; Simpson, Jeremy C

    2015-08-01

    High-content analysis (HCA) provides quantitative multiparametric cellular fluorescence data. From its origins in discovery toxicology, it is now addressing fundamental questions in drug delivery. Nanoparticles (NPs), polymers, and intestinal permeation enhancers are being harnessed in drug delivery systems to modulate plasma membrane properties and the intracellular environment. Identifying comparative mechanistic cytotoxicity on sublethal events is crucial to expedite the development of such systems. NP uptake and intracellular routing pathways are also being dissected using chemical and genetic perturbations, with the potential to assess the intracellular fate of targeted and untargeted particles in vitro. As we discuss here, HCA is set to make a major impact in preclinical delivery research by elucidating the intracellular pathways of NPs and the in vitro mechanistic-based toxicology of formulation constituents.

  8. REMOTE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-TRITIUM-CONTENT WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; Raymond Sigg, R; Leah Arrigo, L; Donald Pak, D

    2007-08-07

    Systems to safely analyze for tritium in moisture collected from glovebox atmospheres are being developed for use at Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities. Analysis results will guide whether the material contains sufficient tritium for economical recovery, or whether it should be stabilized for disposal as waste. In order to minimize potential radiation exposures that could occur in handling and diluting high-tritium-content water, SRS sought alternatives to the process laboratory's routine analysis by liquid-scintillation counting. The newer systems determine tritium concentrations by measuring bremsstrahlung radiation induced by low-energy beta interactions. One of the systems determines tritium activity in liquid streams, the other determines tritium activity in water vapor. Topics discussed include counting results obtained by modeling and laboratory testing and corrections that are made for low-energy photon attenuation.

  9. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOEpatents

    Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.

    1989-10-03

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]-Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4] oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm[sup [minus]1] cm[sup [minus]1]. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  10. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOEpatents

    Marschman, Steven C.; Davis, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  11. Variations in pore characteristics in high volatile bituminous coals: Implications for coal bed gas content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Drobniak, A.; Strapoc, D.; Solano-Acosta, W.; Rupp, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Seelyville Coal Member of the Linton Formation (Pennsylvanian) in Indiana was studied to: 1) understand variations in pore characteristics within a coal seam at a single location and compare these variations with changes occurring between the same coal at different locations, 2) elaborate on the influence of mineral-matter and maceral composition on mesopore and micropore characteristics, and 3) discuss implications of these variations for coal bed gas content. The coal is high volatile bituminous rank with R0 ranging from 0.57% to 0.60%. BET specific surface areas (determined by nitrogen adsorption) of the coals samples studied range from 1.8 to 22.9??m2/g, BJH adsorption mesopore volumes from 0.0041 to 0.0339??cm3/g, and micropore volumes (determined by carbon dioxide adsorption) from 0.0315 to 0.0540??cm3/g. The coals that had the largest specific surface areas and largest mesopore volumes occur at the shallowest depths, whereas the smallest values for these two parameters occur in the deepest coals. Micropore volumes, in contrast, are not depth-dependent. In the coal samples examined for this study, mineral-matter content influenced both specific surface area as well as mesopore and micropore volumes. It is especially clear in the case of micropores, where an increase in mineral-matter content parallels the decrease of micropore volume of the coal. No obvious relationships were observed between the total vitrinite content and pore characteristics but, after splitting vitrinite into individual macerals, we see that collotelinite influences both meso- and micropore volume positively, whereas collodetrinite contributes to the reduction of mesopore and micropore volumes. There are large variations in gas content within a single coal at a single location. Because of this variability, the entire thickness of the coal must be desorbed in order to determine gas content reliably and to accurately calculate the level of gas saturation. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All

  12. High mitochondria content is associated with prostate cancer disease progression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are suggested to be important organelles for cancer initiation and promotion. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic value of MTC02, a marker for mitochondrial content, in prostate cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry of using an antibody against MTC02 was performed on a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 11,152 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared to histological phenotype, biochemical recurrence, ERG status and other genomic deletions by using our TMA attached molecular information. Results Tumor cells showed stronger MTC02 expression than normal prostate epithelium. MTC02 immunostaining was found in 96.5% of 8,412 analyzable prostate cancers, including 15.4% tumors with weak, 34.6% with moderate, and 46.5% with strong expression. MTC02 expression was associated with advanced pathological tumor stage, high Gleason score, nodal metastases (p < 0.0001 each), positive surgical margins (p = 0.0005), and early PSA recurrence (p < 0.0001) if all cancers were jointly analyzed. Tumors harboring ERG fusion showed higher expression levels than those without (p < 0.0001). In ERG negative prostate cancers, strong MTC02 immunostaining was linked to deletions of PTEN, 6q15, 5q21, and early biochemical recurrence (p < 0.0001 each). Moreover, multiple scenarios of multivariate analyses suggested an independent association of MTC02 with prognosis in preoperative settings. Conclusions Our study demonstrates high-level MTC02 expression in ERG negative prostate cancers harboring deletions of PTEN, 6q15, and 5q21. Additionally, increased MTC02 expression is a strong predictor of poor clinical outcome in ERG negative cancers, highlighting a potentially important role of elevated mitochondrial content for prostate cancer cell biology. PMID:24261794

  13. Strong linkage of polar cod (Boreogadus saida) to sea ice algae-produced carbon: Evidence from stomach content, fatty acid and stable isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlbach, Doreen; Schaafsma, Fokje L.; Graeve, Martin; Lebreton, Benoit; Lange, Benjamin Allen; David, Carmen; Vortkamp, Martina; Flores, Hauke

    2017-03-01

    The polar cod (Boreogadus saida) is considered an ecological key species, because it reaches high stock biomasses and constitutes an important carbon source for seabirds and marine mammals in high-Arctic ecosystems. Young polar cod (1-2 years) are often associated with the underside of sea ice. To evaluate the impact of changing Arctic sea ice habitats on polar cod, we examined the diet composition and quantified the contribution of ice algae-produced carbon (αIce) to the carbon budget of polar cod. Young polar cod were sampled in the ice-water interface layer in the central Arctic Ocean during late summer 2012. Diets and carbon sources of these fish were examined using 4 approaches: (1) stomach content analysis, (2) fatty acid (FA) analysis, (3) bulk nitrogen and carbon stable isotope analysis (BSIA) and (4) compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of FAs. The ice-associated (sympagic) amphipod Apherusa glacialis dominated the stomach contents by mass, indicating a high importance of sympagic fauna in young polar cod diets. The biomass of food measured in stomachs implied constant feeding at daily rates of ∼1.2% body mass per fish, indicating the potential for positive growth. FA profiles of polar cod indicated that diatoms were the primary carbon source, indirectly obtained via amphipods and copepods. The αIce using bulk isotope data from muscle was estimated to be >90%. In comparison, αIce based on CSIA ranged from 34 to 65%, with the highest estimates from muscle and the lowest from liver tissue. Overall, our results indicate a strong dependency of polar cod on ice-algae produced carbon. This suggests that young polar cod may be particularly vulnerable to changes in the distribution and structure of sea ice habitats. Due to the ecological key role of polar cod, changes at the base of the sea ice-associated food web are likely to affect the higher trophic levels of high-Arctic ecosystems.

  14. Physiological Conditions Conducive to High Cyanophycin Content in Biomass of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Elbahloul, Yasser; Krehenbrink, Martin; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the inorganic medium components, the initial pH, the incubation temperature, the oxygen supply, the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, and chloramphenicol on the synthesis of cyanophycin (CGP) by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain ADP1 were studied in a mineral salts medium containing sodium glutamate and ammonium sulfate as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Variation of all these factors resulted in maximum CGP contents of only about 3.5% (wt/wt) of the cell dry matter (CDM), and phosphate depletion triggered CGP accumulation most substantially. However, addition of arginine to the medium as the sole carbon source for growth promoted CGP accumulation most strikingly. This effect was systematically studied, and an optimized phosphate-limited medium containing 75 mM arginine and 10 mM ammonium sulfate yielded a CGP content of 41.4% (wt/wt) of the CDM at 30°C. The CGP content of the cells was further increased to 46.0% (wt/wt) of the CDM by adding 2.5 μg of chloramphenicol per ml of medium in the accumulation phase. These contents are by far the highest CGP contents of bacterial cells ever reported. CGP was easily isolated from the cells by using an acid extraction method, and this CGP contained about equimolar amounts of aspartic acid and arginine and no detectable lysine; the molecular masses ranged from 21 to 29 kDa, and the average molecular mass was about 25 kDa. Transmission electron micrographs of thin sections of cells revealed large CGP granules that frequently had an irregular shape with protuberances at the surface and often severely deformed the cells. A cphI::ΩKm mutant of strain ADP1 with a disrupted putative cyanophycinase gene accumulated significantly less CGP than the wild type accumulated, although the cells expressed cyanophycin synthetase at about the same high level. It is possible that the intact CphI protein is involved in the release of CGP primer molecules from initially synthesized CGP. The resulting lower concentration of

  15. Effect of variation in argon content of calibration gases on determination of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Min, Deullae; Kang, Namgoo; Moon, Dong Min; Lee, Jin Bok; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Jin Seog

    2009-12-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is a greenhouse gas that makes by far the largest contribution to the global warming of the Earth's atmosphere. For the measurements of atmospheric CO(2) a non-dispersive infrared analyzer (NDIR) and gas chromatography are conventionally being used. We explored whether and to what degree argon content can influence the determination of atmospheric CO(2) using the comparison of CO(2) concentrations between the sample gas mixtures with varying Ar amounts at 0 and 18.6 mmol mol(-1) and the calibration gas mixtures with Ar at 8.4, 9.1, and 9.3 mmol mol(-1). We newly discovered that variation of Ar content in calibration gas mixtures could undermine accuracy for precise and accurate determination of atmospheric CO(2) in background air. The differences in CO(2) concentration due to the variation of Ar content in the calibration gas mixtures were negligible (<+/-0.03 micromol mol(-1)) for NDIR systems whereas they noticeably increased (<+/-1.09 micromol mol(-1)) especially for the modified GC systems to enhance instrumental sensitivity. We found that the thermal mass flow controller is the main source of the differences although such differences appeared only in the presence of a flow restrictor in GC systems. For reliable monitoring of real atmospheric CO(2) samples, one should use calibration gas mixtures that contain Ar content close to the level (9.332 mmol mol(-1)) in the ambient air as possible. Practical guidelines were highlighted relating to selection of appropriate analytical approaches for the accurate and precise measurements of atmospheric CO(2). In addition, theoretical implications from the findings were addressed.

  16. Calculations of Gas-liquid Equilibrium in Wellbore with High Carbon dioxide Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaming; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Gao, Yue

    2014-05-01

    Carbon dioxide injection not only enhances the oil recovery dramatically, but also it will reduce the greenhouse effect, therefore, Carbon dioxide injection technique is applied extensively. During the process of carbon dioxide displacement, when carbon dioxide breaks though into oil production wells, carbon dioxide content will impacts the phase state and physical properties of the mixed liquor in the wellbore, as a result, it will affect the calculation of temperature and pressure in oil production wells. Applying the conventional black-oil model to calculate the phase state of the miscible fluids is unacceptable. To tackle the problem, this paper uses the gas-liquid flash theory and component model to program software, so that the phase state (gas, liquid or gas-liquid) and physical properties of the mixed liquor (including hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon) under initial conditions is calculated, moreover, the impact of carbon dioxide content on the physical properties(mainly including density, viscosity, specific heat at const pressure, surface tension, etc) of mixed liquor in oil production wells is analyzed in this paper. The comparison of the results shows that this model can meet the engineering needs with high accuracy.

  17. Amorphous diamond: a high-pressure superhard carbon allotrope.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu; Zhang, Li; Mao, Ho-kwang; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Baldini, Maria; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Wendy L

    2011-10-21

    Compressing glassy carbon above 40 GPa, we have observed a new carbon allotrope with a fully sp(3)-bonded amorphous structure and diamondlike strength. Synchrotron x-ray Raman spectroscopy revealed a continuous pressure-induced sp(2)-to-sp(3) bonding change, while x-ray diffraction confirmed the perseverance of noncrystallinity. The transition was reversible upon releasing pressure. Used as an indenter, the glassy carbon ball demonstrated exceptional strength by reaching 130 GPa with a confining pressure of 60 GPa. Such an extremely large stress difference of >70 GPa has never been observed in any material besides diamond, indicating the high hardness of this high-pressure carbon allotrope.

  18. Amorphous diamond: A high-pressure superhard carbon allotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu; Zhang, Li; Mao, Ho Kwang; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Baldini, Maria; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Wendy L.

    2011-01-01

    Compressing glassy carbon above 40 GPa, we have observed a new carbon allotrope with a fully sp³-bonded amorphous structure and diamondlike strength. Synchrotron x-ray Raman spectroscopy revealed a continuous pressure-induced sp²-to-sp³ bonding change, while x-ray diffraction confirmed the perseverance of noncrystallinity. The transition was reversible upon releasing pressure. Used as an indenter, the glassy carbon ball demonstrated exceptional strength by reaching 130 GPa with a confining pressure of 60 GPa. Such an extremely large stress difference of >70 GPa has never been observed in any material besides diamond, indicating the high hardness of this high-pressure carbon allotrope.

  19. Using LUCAS topsoil database to estimate soil organic carbon content in local spectral libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldi, Fabio; van Wesemael, Bas; Chabrillat, Sabine; Chartin, Caroline

    2017-04-01

    The quantification of the soil organic carbon (SOC) content over large areas is mandatory to obtain accurate soil characterization and classification, which can improve site specific management at local or regional scale exploiting the strong relationship between SOC and crop growth. The estimation of the SOC is not only important for agricultural purposes: in recent years, the increasing attention towards global warming highlighted the crucial role of the soil in the global carbon cycle. In this context, soil spectroscopy is a well consolidated and widespread method to estimate soil variables exploiting the interaction between chromophores and electromagnetic radiation. The importance of spectroscopy in soil science is reflected by the increasing number of large soil spectral libraries collected in the world. These large libraries contain soil samples derived from a consistent number of pedological regions and thus from different parent material and soil types; this heterogeneity entails, in turn, a large variability in terms of mineralogical and organic composition. In the light of the huge variability of the spectral responses to SOC content and composition, a rigorous classification process is necessary to subset large spectral libraries and to avoid the calibration of global models failing to predict local variation in SOC content. In this regard, this study proposes a method to subset the European LUCAS topsoil database into soil classes using a clustering analysis based on a large number of soil properties. The LUCAS database was chosen to apply a standardized multivariate calibration approach valid for large areas without the need for extensive field and laboratory work for calibration of local models. Seven soil classes were detected by the clustering analyses and the samples belonging to each class were used to calibrate specific partial least square regression (PLSR) models to estimate SOC content of three local libraries collected in Belgium (Loam belt

  20. Discrepancy between Measured Serum Total Carbon Dioxide Content and Bicarbonate Concentration Calculated from Arterial Blood Gases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngho; Massie, Larry; Murata, Glen H

    2015-01-01

    Large differences between the concentrations of serum total carbon dioxide (TCO2) and blood gas bicarbonate (HCO3-) were observed in two consecutive simultaneously drawn sets of samples of serum and arterial blood gases in a patient who presented with severe carbon dioxide retention and profound acidemia. These differences could not be explained by the effect of the high partial pressure of carbon dioxide on TCO2, by variations in the dissociation constant of the carbonic acid/bicarbonate system or by faults caused by the algorithms of the blood gas apparatus that calculate HCO3-. A recalculation using the Henderson-Hasselbach equation revealed arterial blood gas HCO3- values close to the corresponding serum TCO2 values and clarified the diagnosis of the acid-base disorder, which had been placed in doubt by the large differences between the reported TCO2 and HCO3- values. Human error in the calculation of HCO3- was identified as the source of these differences. Recalculation of blood gas HCO3- should be the first step in identifying the source of large differences between serum TCO2 and blood gas HCO3-. PMID:26824002

  1. Discrepancy between Measured Serum Total Carbon Dioxide Content and Bicarbonate Concentration Calculated from Arterial Blood Gases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngho; Massie, Larry; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-12-07

    Large differences between the concentrations of serum total carbon dioxide (TCO2) and blood gas bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) were observed in two consecutive simultaneously drawn sets of samples of serum and arterial blood gases in a patient who presented with severe carbon dioxide retention and profound acidemia. These differences could not be explained by the effect of the high partial pressure of carbon dioxide on TCO2, by variations in the dissociation constant of the carbonic acid/bicarbonate system or by faults caused by the algorithms of the blood gas apparatus that calculate HCO3 (-). A recalculation using the Henderson-Hasselbach equation revealed arterial blood gas HCO3 (-) values close to the corresponding serum TCO2 values and clarified the diagnosis of the acid-base disorder, which had been placed in doubt by the large differences between the reported TCO2 and HCO3 (-) values. Human error in the calculation of HCO3 (-) was identified as the source of these differences. Recalculation of blood gas HCO3 (-) should be the first step in identifying the source of large differences between serum TCO2 and blood gas HCO3 (-).

  2. Structure of carbonate melts at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, J.; Sanloup, C.; Cochain, B.; Konopkova, Z.; Afonina, V.; Morgenroth, W.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate melts are rare magmas with only a single active volcano (Oldoinyo Lengai,Tanzania [1]). They are of fundamental interest for their role in the Earth's deep carbon cycle and are of immense economic importance due to their affinity for REE strategic metals (niobium, uranium, tantalum, etc). They have remarkable physical properties such as very low viscosity [2] and magmatic temperatures for alkaline carbonate lavas [3] and it has been predicted that their compressibility could be significantly higher than that of silicate melts [4,5]. Despite the atomic structure of carbonate melts being fundamental for controlling their physical and chemical behavior in natural systems, very few structural studies have been reported and these have been largely computational. Here we present initial structural investigations of carbonate melts at mantle pressures using in situ x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells. The structure factor S(Q) is transformed to obtain the real space pair distribution function G(R) which describes the local and intermediate range atomic ordering allowing bond length and coordination number changes with pressure to be determined. [1] Krafft and Keller, Science 245:168-170, 1989 [2] Yono et al., Nat. Commun. 5:5091, 2014 [3] Dobson et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 143:207-215, 1996 [4] Genge et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 131:225-238, 1995 [5] Jones et al., Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 75:289-322, 2013

  3. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2–53 μm) and sand (53–2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg−1 soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg−1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  4. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed

    Yang, X M; Drury, C F; Reynolds, W D; Yang, J Y

    2016-06-02

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and sand (53-2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg(-1) soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg(-1), but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation.

  5. The Impact of Buried Horizons and Deep Soil Pedogenesis on Soil Carbon Content and Vertical Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. N.; Dietzen, C.; Harrison, R. B.; Gross, C.; Kirpach, A.

    2015-12-01

    The lower boundary of soil has been a point of contention among soil scientists for decades. Recent evidence suggests that soil is much deeper than is measured by many ecological studies and that arbitrary definitions of maximum soil depth unnecessarily exclude important regions of the soil profile. This paper provides illustrated examples of soil profiles that have important deep soil characteristics or buried horizons. Soil pits were excavated with a backhoe to at least 2.5 m depth at 35 sites throughout the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) ecoregion of the Pacific Northwest. These soils cover four orders - Andisol, Inceptisol, Alfisol, and Ultisol - and highlight the hidden diversity of subsoil characteristics throughout the region. The roots of trees and understory species often extended deep into the C horizons of soil. Despite experiencing less pedogenic development than surface horizons, C horizons are important as the frontier of soil formation, as an important resource for plant growth, and as a repository of diffuse but significant carbon storage. On average, there was 188.1 Mg C ha-1 total across all 35 sites, of which 76.3 Mg ha-1 (40.5%) was found below 0.5 m and 44.4 Mg ha-1 (23.6%) was found below 1 m. There was substantial variability in the vertical distribution of C with as little as 8.0% and as much as 58.0% of total C below 1 m. In some cases, B horizons are far deeper than the 1 or 2 m depth arbitrarily assumed to represent the whole soil. In other cases, subsoil hides buried profiles that can significantly impact total soil carbon stocks as well as aboveground plant growth. These buried horizons are important repositories of nutrients and carbon that are poorly understood and rarely sampled. Ignoring subsoil precludes incorporating soil burial or deep soil processes into biogeochemical and global carbon cycle models, and limits mechanistic understanding of carbon sequestration and mobilization in soil.

  6. The system ilmenite-carbonatite-carbon in the origin of diamond: Correlation between the titanium content and diamond potential of kimberlite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yu. A.; Bovkun, A. V.; Androsova, N. A.; Garanin, V. K.

    2017-03-01

    Experimental studies of melting relations in the system ilmenite-K-Na-Mg-Fe-Ca carbonatite-carbon at 8 GPa and 1600°C provide evidence for the effect of liquid immiscibility between ilmenite and carbonatite melts. It is shown that the solubility of ilmenite in carbonatitic melts is negligible and does not depend on its concentration in experimental samples within 25-75 wt %. However, carbonatite-carbon melts are characterized by a high diamond-forming efficiency. This means that the correlation between the concentration of TiO2 and diamond content is problematic for mantle chambers and requires further, more complex, experimental studies.

  7. High Performance Shape Memory Epoxy/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yayun; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Lingyu; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-13

    A series of shape memory nanocomposites based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) E51/methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA)/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with various stoichiometric ratios (rs) of DGEBA/MHHPA from 0.5 to 1.2 and filler contents of 0.25 and 0.75 wt % are fabricated. Their morphology, curing kinetics, phase transition, mechanical properties, thermal conduction, and shape memory behaviors are systematically investigated. The prepared materials show a wide range of glass transition temperatures (Tg) of ca. 65-140 °C, high flexural modulus (E) at room temperature up to ca. 3.0 GPa, high maximum stress (σm) up to ca. 30 MPa, high strain at break (εb) above 10%, and a fast recovery of 32 s. The results indicate that a small amount of MWCNT fillers (0.75 wt %) can significantly increase all three key mechanical properties (E, σm, and εb) at temperatures close to Tg, the recovery rate, and the repetition stability of the shape memory cycles. All of these remarkable advantages make the materials good candidates for the applications in aerospace and other important fields.

  8. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Charles David; Das, Sujit; Jeon, Dr. Saeil

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  9. Sulfur Encapsulated in Graphitic Carbon Nanocages for High-Rate and Long-Cycle Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Yang, Chun-Peng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid sp(2) carbon with a graphene backbone and graphitic carbon nanocages (G-GCNs) is demonstrated as an ideal host for sulfur in Li-S batteries, because it serves as highly efficient electrochemical nanoreactors as well as polysulfides reservoirs. The as-obtained S/(G-GCNs) with high S content exhibits superior high-rate capability (765 mA h g(-1) at 5 C) and long-cycle life over 1000 cycles.

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of sludge with high hydrocarbon content generated by a Mexican natural gas processing facility.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Carrillo, T; Castorena-Cortés, G; Zapata-Peñasco, I; Reyes-Avila, J; Olguín-Lora, P

    2012-03-01

    The biodegradation of oil sludge from Mexican sour gas and petrochemical facilities contaminated with a high content of hydrocarbons, 334.7 ± 7.0 g kg(-1) dry matter (dm), was evaluated. Studies in microcosm systems were carried out in order to determine the capacity of the native microbiota in the sludge to reduce hydrocarbon levels under aerobic conditions. Different carbon/nitrogen/phosphorous (C/N/P) nutrient ratios were tested. The systems were incubated at 30 °C and shaken at 100 rpm. Hydrocarbon removals from 32 to 51% were achieved in the assays after 30 days of incubation. The best assay had C/N/P ratio of 100/1.74/0.5. The results of the Microtox(®) and Ames tests indicated that the original sludge was highly toxic and mutagenic, whereas the best assay gave a final product that did not show toxicity or mutagenicity.

  11. An oral multispecies biofilm model for high content screening applications

    PubMed Central

    Kommerein, Nadine; Stumpp, Sascha N.; Müsken, Mathias; Ehlert, Nina; Winkel, Andreas; Häussler, Susanne; Behrens, Peter; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Stiesch, Meike

    2017-01-01

    Peri-implantitis caused by multispecies biofilms is a major complication in dental implant treatment. The bacterial infection surrounding dental implants can lead to bone loss and, in turn, to implant failure. A promising strategy to prevent these common complications is the development of implant surfaces that inhibit biofilm development. A reproducible and easy-to-use biofilm model as a test system for large scale screening of new implant surfaces with putative antibacterial potency is therefore of major importance. In the present study, we developed a highly reproducible in vitro four-species biofilm model consisting of the highly relevant oral bacterial species Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Veillonella dispar and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The application of live/dead staining, quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and urea-NaCl fluorescence in situ hybridization (urea-NaCl-FISH) revealed that the four-species biofilm community is robust in terms of biovolume, live/dead distribution and individual species distribution over time. The biofilm community is dominated by S. oralis, followed by V. dispar, A. naeslundii and P. gingivalis. The percentage distribution in this model closely reflects the situation in early native plaques and is therefore well suited as an in vitro model test system. Furthermore, despite its nearly native composition, the multispecies model does not depend on nutrient additives, such as native human saliva or serum, and is an inexpensive, easy to handle and highly reproducible alternative to the available model systems. The 96-well plate format enables high content screening for optimized implant surfaces impeding biofilm formation or the testing of multiple antimicrobial treatment strategies to fight multispecies biofilm infections, both exemplary proven in the manuscript. PMID:28296966

  12. High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials in ToxCast

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  13. High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials in ToxCast

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  14. pH-responsive delivery of doxorubicin from citrate-apatite nanocrystals with tailored carbonate content.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Isaac; Delgado-López, José Manuel; Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A; Iafisco, Michele; Tampieri, Anna; Colangelo, Donato; Prat, Maria; Gómez-Morales, Jaime

    2013-07-02

    In this work, the efficiency of bioinspired citrate-functionalized nanocrystalline apatites as nanocarriers for delivery of doxorubicin (DOXO) has been assessed. The nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomplexing of metastable calcium/citrate/phosphate solutions both in the absence (Ap) and in the presence (cAp) of carbonate ions. The presence of citrate and carbonate ions in the solution allowed us to tailor the size, shape, carbonate content, and surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. The drug-loading efficiency of the two types of apatite was evaluated by means of the adsorption isotherms, which were found to fit a Langmuir-Freundlich behavior. A model describing the interaction between apatite surface and DOXO is proposed from adsorption isotherms and ζ-potential measurements. DOXO is adsorbed as a dimer by means of a positively charged amino group that electrostatically interacts with negatively charged surface groups of nanoparticles. The drug-release profiles were explored at pHs 7.4 and 5.0, mimicking the physiological pH in the blood circulation and the more acidic pH in the endosome-lysosome intracellular compartment, respectively. After 7 days at pH 7.4, cAp-DOXO released around 42% less drug than Ap-DOXO. However, at acidic pH, both nanoassemblies released similar amounts of DOXO. In vitro assays analyzed by confocal microscopy showed that both drug-loaded apatites were internalized within GTL-16 human carcinoma cells and could release DOXO, which accumulated in the nucleus in short times and exerted cytotoxic activity with the same efficiency. cAp are thus expected to be a more promising nanocarrier for experiments in vivo, in situations where intravenous injection of nanoparticles are required to reach the targeted tumor, after circulating in the bloodstream.

  15. Unusually high stable carbon isotopic values of methane from low organic carbon Mars analog hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Tazaz, A.; Chanton, J.; Bebout, B.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the Mars rovers’ findings of past hypersaline environments and the discovery of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur and in the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge in northern California. Methane-rich bubbles were observed to be released from below gypsum/halite crusts in these environments. The stable carbon isotopic composition of these bubbles ranged from about -30 to -40 ‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered non-biogenic, however incubations of crust and sediments samples over time resulted in the production of methane. We therefore undertook a series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in these environments. The concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC) in these environments were measured. POC content was low (relative to most methane-producing sedimentary environments), generally less than 1%, and always less than 2% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -13 to -22 ‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled trimethylamine (TMA), monomethylamine, methanol, acetate and bicarbonate were added to incubation vials and the methane produced was monitored for 13C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens in these hypersaline environments were the non-competitive substrates, the methylamines and methanol. When unlabeled, but isotopically known, TMA was added to incubation vials in varying concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced also varied. Little, if any, difference in the isotopic composition between the TMA and methane occurred at the lowest TMA concentration (10 µM final concentration). The lowest methane δ13C values (and so greatest fractionation between methane and TMA) occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 µM final concentration). This change in the

  16. Evaluation of microwave acid digestion for determination of fiber-volume contents in carbon-epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.C.; McLaughlin, V.N.; El-Amin, L.; Ilias, S.

    1995-06-01

    The analysis of carbon-epoxy composites for fiber-volume contents is significant in determining the quality and strength of a given composite. The method commonly being used is acid digestion in a hot water bath, which takes about 2.5 hours for digestion alone. A study has been done using a new technique, what is known as Microwave Acid Digestion (MAD) for quick determination of fiber-volume contents of carbon-epoxy composites. This technique uses a specially designed teflon bomb for digestion. The bomb allows for temperatures up to 250 C and pressures up to 1,200 psi. Under such operating conditions, the MAD technique reduces digestion time to about 70 seconds. The study demonstrated that the microwave acid digestion (MAD) is an efficient means for determination of fiber-volume contents of carbon-epoxy composites.

  17. High-temperature carbon-furnace thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    A thermometer for monitoring temperatures between 1500 and 2600/sup 0/K in industrial carbon furnaces is described. The instrument uses a calibrated broadband radiation sensor and incorporates features to minimize optical path attenuations which limit temperature measurement accuracy in practice. Errors can be substantially reduced to near instrument calibration uncertainty (+-1%) with an enclosed windowless optical path to a blackbody target.

  18. Adsorption of tetracycline from aqueous solutions onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes with different oxygen contents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Ma, Jie; Han, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different oxygen contents were investigated for the adsorption of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solutions. As the surface oxygen content of the MWCNTs increased, the maximum adsorption capacity and adsorption coefficient of TC increased to the largest values and then decreased. The relation can be attributed to the interplay between the nanotubes' dispersibility and the water cluster formation upon TC adsorption. The overall adsorption kinetics of TC onto CNTs-3.2%O might be dependent on both intra-particle diffusion and boundary layer diffusion. The maximum adsorption capacity of TC on CNTs-3.2%O was achieved in the pH range of 3.3–8.0 due to formation of water clusters or H-bonds. Furthermore, the presence of Cu2+ could significantly enhanced TC adsorption at pH of 5.0. However, the solution ionic strength did not exhibit remarkable effect on TC adsorption. In addition, when pH is beyond the range (3.3–8.0), the electrostatic interactions caused the decrease of TC adsorption capacity. Our results indicate that surface properties and aqueous solution chemistry play important roles in TC adsorption on MWCNTs. PMID:24937315

  19. Carbon tetrachloride degradation: Effect of microbial growth substrate and vitamin B{sub 12} content

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, S.; Stensel, H.D.; Ferguson, J.F.

    2000-05-01

    Microbial degradation kinetics of carbon tetrachloride (CT) under reducing conditions were investigated for different cultures, fed with 1,2-propanediol, dextrose, propionalde-hyde, or acetate and nitrate, in the anaerobic step of an anaerobic/aerobic operation sequence. Methanogenesis was inhibited due to the aerobic step. CT biodegradation rates followed first-order kinetics with respect to CT concentration and biomass and were not affected by the presence of growth substrate. CT degradation rates increased linearly with higher intracellular vitamin B{sub 12} content. The culture fed 1,2-propanediol had the highest vitamin B{sub 12} content, which was 3.8, 4.7, and 16 times that of the propionaldehyde-,dextrose-, and acetate-fed cultures, respectively, and its first-order degradation rate constant was 2.8, 4.5, 6.0 times that for those cultures, respectively. No CT degradation occurred with culture liquid, suggesting that intracellular factors were responsible for CT degradation. The propanediol culture was able to sustain a constant CT degradation rate for a 16-day test period without substrate addition. Compared to a propanediol-fed culture grown only under anaerobic conditions, the propanediol culture grown under the sequential anaerobic/aerobic condition resulted in more biomass growth and a greater CT degradation rate per unit of propanediol fed, although its CT degradation rate per unit of biomass was lower.

  20. Closeout of Advanced Boron and Metal Loaded High Porosity Carbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Eklund; T. C. Mike Chung; Henry C. Foley; Vincent H. Crespi

    2011-05-01

    The Penn State effort explored the development of new high-surface-area materials for hydrogen storage, materials that could offer enhancement in the hydrogen binding energy through a direct chemical modification of the framework in high specific-surface-area platforms. The team chemically substituted boron into the hexagonal sp2 carbon framework, dispersed metal atoms bound to the boro-carbon structure, and generated the theory of novel nanoscale geometries that can enhance storage through chemical frustration, sheet curvature, electron deficiency, large local fields and mixed hybridization states. New boro-carbon materials were synthesized by high temperature plasma, pyrolysis of boron-carbon precursor molecules, and post-synthesis modification of carbons. Hydrogen uptake has been assessed, and several promising leads have been identified, with the requirement to simultaneously optimize total surface area while maintaining the enhanced hydrogen binding energies already demonstrated.

  1. Regional prediction of soil organic carbon content over croplands using airborne hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Bel, Liliane; Lefebvre, Josias; Chehdi, Kacem

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the Prostock-Gessol3 and the BASC-SOCSENSIT projects, dedicated to the spatial monitoring of the effects of exogenous organic matter land application on soil organic carbon storage. It aims at identifying the potential of airborne hyperspectral AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soils comprise hortic or glossic luvisols, calcaric, rendzic cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle data (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks which were georeferenced. Tracks were atmospherically corrected using a set of 22 synchronous field spectra of both bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. Atmospherically corrected track tiles were mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution resulting in a 66 Gb image. A SPOT4 satellite image was acquired the same day in the framework of the SPOT4-Take Five program of the French Space Agency (CNES) which provided it with atmospheric correction. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then NDVI calculation and thresholding enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. All 18 sampled sites known to be bare at this very date were correctly included in this map. A total of 85 sites sampled in 2013 or in the 3 previous years were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic spectra which were related to topsoil SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples. The use of the total sample including 27 sites under cloud shadows led to non-significant results. Considering 43 sites outside cloud shadows only, median

  2. The Effects of Tree Species on Soil Organic Carbon Content and Distribution in South Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, N. H.; Cha, J. Y.; Cha, Y. K.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) content of forests is controlled by the dynamic balance between photosynthesis and respiration. Changes of tree species can affect the SOC content both directly by alteration in quantity and quality of newly photosynthesized inputs, and indirectly by changes in soil conditions such as root distribution and soil microbial communities. Although many studies have been conducted on the effects of tree species on SOC, the results are mixed possibly due to the locality and the scales of the studies. This can be overcome by systematic analysis on extensively collected samples of forest floors and soils. We investigated the impacts of tree species, dominantly pines (Pinus) and oaks (Quercus), on SOC stock and distribution in South Korea by conducting ANOVA and GLM analyses using the Korean National Forest Inventory data collected from 640 plots during 2007-2010. The trees used in the data were relatively young with 67% of them being less than 40 years old because of a nation-wide reforestation program started in the 1970s. The results demonstrated a clear contrast between Pinus and Quercus, depending on soil horizons. Forest floor SOC under Pinus was 6.98 ton C/ha, significantly higher than 5.30 ton C/ha under Quercus. In contrast, SOC in mineral soils was 51.31 ton C/ha under Pinus, significantly lower than 64.76 ton C/ha under Quercus. The total SOC content including both forest floor and mineral soils was significantly higher under Quercus than Pinus, suggesting that Quercus has a potential to sequester more atmospheric CO2 in the forests in Korea.

  3. Temporal trends in organic carbon content in the main Swiss rivers, 1974-2010.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Murillo, J C; Zobrist, J; Filella, M

    2015-01-01

    Increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations have often been reported in rivers and lakes of the Northern Hemisphere over the last few decades. High-quality organic carbon (OC) concentration data have been used to study the change in DOC and total (TOC) organic carbon concentrations in the main rivers of Switzerland (Rhône, Rhine, Thur and Aar) between 1974 and 2010. These rivers are characterized by high discharge regimes (due to their Alpine origin) and by running in populated areas. Small long term trends (a general statistically significant decrease in TOC and a less clear increase in DOC concentrations), on the order of 1% of mean OC concentration per year, have been observed. An upward trend before 1999 reversed direction to a more marked downward trend from 1999 to 2010. Of the potential causes of OC temporal variation analysed (water temperature, dissolved reactive phosphorus and river discharge), only discharge explains a significant, albeit still small, part of TOC variability (8-31%), while accounting for barely 2.5% of DOC variability. Estimated anthropogenic TOC and DOC loads (treated sewage) to the rivers could account for a maximum of 4-20% of the temporal trends. Such low predictability is a good example of the limitations faced when studying causality and drivers behind small variations in complex systems. River export of OC from Switzerland has decreased significantly over the period. Since about 5.5% of estimated NEP of Switzerland is exported by the rivers, riverine OC fluxes should be taken into account in a detailed carbon budget of the country.

  4. Infiltrating sulfur into a highly porous carbon sphere as cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A highly porous carbon (HPC) with regular spherical morphology was synthesized. • Sulfur/HPC composites were prepared by melt–diffusion method. • Sulfur/HPC composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life. - Abstract: Sulfur composite material with a highly porous carbon sphere as the conducting container was prepared. The highly porous carbon sphere was easily synthesized with resorcinol–formaldehyde precursor as the carbon source. The morphology of the carbon was observed with field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, which showed a well-defined spherical shape. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis indicated that it possesses a high specific surface area of 1563 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and a total pore volume of 2.66 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} with a bimodal pore size distribution, which allow high sulfur loading and easy transportation of lithium ions. Sulfur carbon composites with varied sulfur contents were prepared by melt–diffusion method and lithium sulfur cells with the sulfur composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life.

  5. The soil organic carbon content of anthropogenically altered organic soils effects the dissolved organic matter quality, but not the dissolved organic carbon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bechtold, Michel; Lücke, Andreas; Bol, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This is especially true for peatlands which usually show high concentrations of DOC due to the high stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC). Most previous studies found that DOC concentrations in the soil solution depend on the SOC content. Thus, one would expect low DOC concentrations in peatlands which have anthropogenically been altered by mixing with sand. Here, we want to show the effect of SOC and groundwater level on the quantity and quality of the dissolved organic matter (DOM). Three sampling sites were installed in a strongly disturbed bog. Two sites differ in SOC (Site A: 48%, Site B: 9%) but show the same mean annual groundwater level of 15 and 18 cm below ground, respectively. The SOC content of site C (11%) is similar to Site B, but the groundwater level is much lower (-31 cm) than at the other two sites. All sites have a similar depth of the organic horizon (30 cm) and the same land-use (low-intensity sheep grazing). Over two years, the soil solution was sampled bi-weekly in three depths (15, 30 and 60 cm) and three replicates. All samples were analyzed for DOC and selected samples for dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and delta-13C and delta-15N. Despite differences in SOC and groundwater level, DOC concentrations did not differ significantly (A: 192 ± 62 mg/L, B: 163 ± 55 mg/L and C: 191 ± 97 mg/L). At all sites, DOC concentrations exceed typical values for peatlands by far and emphasize the relevance even of strongly disturbed organic soils for DOC losses. Individual DOC concentrations were controlled by the temperature and the groundwater level over the preceding weeks. Differences in DOM quality were clearer. At site B with a low SOC content, the DOC:DON ratio of the soil solution equals the soil's C:N ratio, but the DOC:DON ratio is much higher than the C:N ratio at site A. In all cases, the DOC:DON ratio strongly correlates with delta-13C. There is no

  6. Respiratory Effects of Inhaled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Role of Particle Morphology and Iron Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madl, Amy Kathleen

    Nanotechnology provides promise for significant advancements in a number of different fields including imaging, electronics, and therapeutics. With worldwide production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exceeding over 500 metric tons annually and industry growth expecting to double over the next 5 yr, there are concerns our understanding of the hazards of these nanomaterials may not be keeping pace with market demand. The physicochemical properties of CNTs may delineate the key features that determine either toxicity or biocompatibility and assist in evaluating the potential health risks posed in industrial and consumer product settings. We hypothesized that the iron content and morphology of inhaled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) influences the extent of cellular injury and alters homeostasis in the lung. To address this hypothesis, (1) an aerosol system was developed to deliver carbon-based nanomaterials in a manner of exposure that is physiologically and environmentally relevant (e.g., inhalation), (2) acute (1 d) and subacute (10 d) nose-only inhalation studies to a well-characterized aerosol of iron-containing (FeSWCNT) versus cleaned (iron removed, cSWCNTs) SWCNTs were conducted to evaluate the time-course patterns of possible injury through measurement of markers of cytotoxicity, inflammation, and cellular remodeling/homeostasis, and (3) the effects of SWCNTs were compared to other well-studied materials (e.g. non-fibrous, low-iron content ultrafine carbon black and fibrous, high-iron content, highly persistent, durable and potent carcinogen crocidolite) to offer insights into the relative toxicity of these nanomaterials as well as the possible mechanisms by which the effects occur. Rats (SD) were exposed to either aerosolized SWCNTs (raw FeSWCNT or purified cSWCNT), carbon black (CB), crocidolite, or fresh air via nose-only inhalation. Markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity in lung lavage, mucin in different airway generations, and collagen in the

  7. Junior High Business Education. Arkansas Public School Course Content Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This course content guide was developed in accordance with the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools adopted by the Arkansas State Board of Education. The guide is offered as a framework upon which a curriculum can be built. Within the subject area and at each grade level, the content guide identifies skills at three instructional levels:…

  8. Junior High Business Education. Arkansas Public School Course Content Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This course content guide was developed in accordance with the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools adopted by the Arkansas State Board of Education. The guide is offered as a framework upon which a curriculum can be built. Within the subject area and at each grade level, the content guide identifies skills at three instructional levels:…

  9. Preparation of carbon nanoparticles and carbon nitride from high nitrogen compound

    DOEpatents

    Huynh, My Hang V [Los Alamos, NM; Hiskey, Michael A [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-01

    The high-nitrogen compound 3,6-di(azido)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DiAT) was synthesized by a relatively simple method and used as a precursor for the preparation of carbon nanospheres and nanopolygons, and nitrogen-rich carbon nitrides.

  10. An Ultra-Lightweight, High Performance Carbon-Carbon Space Radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. O.; Wang, Mike; Shih, Wei; Ramirez, Rogelio; Beach, Duane; Youchison, Dennis; Lenard, Roger; Liguori, Justin; Liguori, Ed

    2007-01-01

    Propulsion systems for deep space exploration that rely on nuclear energy require innovative advancements in radiator technology, both materials and construction technique, to meet the demands associated with high rejection temperatures. A five fold reduction in radiator specific mass is achievable and will be needed to meet the demanding challenge of space exploration. Our development of a carbon-carbon (C-C) based radiator design unaffected by long term exposure to high temperature and radiation has wide ranging application, for both small and large power conversion systems. Our results stem from a NASA SBIR program focused on demonstrating thermal performance in a high temperature carbon-carbon (C-C) radiator configured with titanium water- heat pipes, using approximately 500 K water for the working fluid. However, joining strategy and material choices employed are appropriate for very high temperature alkali fluids. Distinct design advantages of carbon-carbon material are its low density, unlimited life, and ability to tailor its physical properties through fiber selection, fiber orientation, and special processing. We will report on our experience in joining of titanium to carbonized materials through direct carbonization and brazing. Results of thermal tests at Sandia National Laboratories on a 1 kW thermal radiator will be presented, along with construction progress and testing of a 2.6 m2 sandwich radiator for NASA Glenn.

  11. Disinfection associated spoilage of high water content ionic matrix hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sack, R A; Harvey, H; Nunes, I

    1989-01-01

    Chemical analysis was carried out on clinically obtained hazy white hydrogel lenses that had been exposed to hydrogen peroxide disinfection. Analysis revealed that hazing was a surface phenomenon limited to high water content ionic matrix hydrogels (type IV), the type associated with the deposition of large amounts of lysozyme. We subjected unworn lenses to cycling studies involving doping in a variable artificial tear solution followed by exposure to disinfectant; this allowed us to duplicate the clinical situation and to derive a mechanism for this phenomenon. Hazing proved independent of the presence of hydrogen peroxide but dependent on the interaction of lens-bound lysozyme and stannate anion, the latter derived from sodium stannate present in the disinfectant as a stabilizing agent. Hazing is restricted to the type IV hydrogels because only these polymers have a sufficient number of anionic binding sites and are of sufficient porosity to allow the penetration and binding of a thick layer of lysozyme. Lysozyme is essential to hazing. No other tear protein is small enough to penetrate the hydrogel matrix or basic enough to have a marked affinity for the lens and to provide binding sites for stannate anion. These findings highlight the unique vulnerability of the type IV hydrogel to interaction with trace or transient ionic constituents in tears and lens care solutions.

  12. Pupil responses to high-level image content.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Nakayama, Ken

    2013-05-17

    The link between arousal and pupil dilation is well studied, but it is less known that other cognitive processes can trigger pupil responses. Here we present evidence that pupil responses can be induced by high-level scene processing, independent of changes in low-level features or arousal. In Experiment 1, we recorded changes in pupil diameter of observers while they viewed a variety of natural scenes with or without a sun that were presented either upright or inverted. Image inversion had the strongest effect on the pupil responses. The pupil constricted more to the onset of upright images as compared to inverted images. Furthermore, the amplitudes of pupil constrictions to viewing images containing a sun were larger relative to control images. In Experiment 2, we presented cartoon versions of upright and inverted pictures that included either a sun or a moon. The image backgrounds were kept identical across conditions. Similar to Experiment 1, upright images triggered pupil constrictions with larger amplitudes than inverted images and images of the sun evoked greater pupil contraction than images of the moon. We suggest that the modulations of pupil responses were due to higher-level interpretations of image content.

  13. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO.

    PubMed

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R

    2016-03-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge-multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of "final" results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K.; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J.; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge—multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of “final” results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. PMID:26476368

  15. High Performance Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Alan; Collins, Steve; Munoz, Edgar; Razal, Joselito; Ebron, Von; Ferraris, John; Baughman, Ray

    2003-03-01

    Exploiting the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes has remained somewhat elusive due to the inability to process the as produced insoluble soot into functional macroscopic assemblies. To this end we have developed a simple but effective method to produce continuous, homogeneous fibers containing carbon nanotubes having as-spun mechanical properties that compare very favorably to recognized synthetic and natural "super fibers" such as Kevlar and spider silk. By using novel spinning apparatus, spinning solutions, and spinning coagulants, we have spun nanotube fibers having record lengths, record tensile strengths, and having an energy-to-break (toughness) higher than any material that we have found. As an example of the potential multi-functionalities of our fibers, we have fabricated fiber supercapacitors, which we weave into textiles.

  16. Nutritional and Phytochemical Content of High-Protein Crops.

    PubMed

    Multari, Salvatore; Neacsu, Madalina; Scobbie, Lorraine; Cantlay, Louise; Duncan, Gary; Vaughan, Nicholas; Stewart, Derek; Russell, Wendy R

    2016-10-11

    Sustainable sources of high-protein plants could help meet future protein requirements. Buckwheat, green pea, fava bean, hemp, and lupin were analyzed by proximate analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine their macro- and micronutrient contents, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to elucidate the phytochemical profiles. The protein contents ranged from 20 to 43% (w/w), and all samples were found to be rich in insoluble fiber: 9-25% (w/w). The selected crops had a favorable micronutrient profile, with phosphorus levels ranging from 2.22 ± 0.05 to 9.72 ± 0.41 g kg(-1), while iron levels ranged from 20.23 ± 0.86 to 69.57 ± 7.43 mg kg(-1). The crops contained substantial amounts of phytophenolic compounds. In particular, buckwheat was a rich source of pelargonidin (748.17 ± 75.55 mg kg(-1)), epicatechin (184.1 ± 33.2 mg kg(-1)), quercetin (35.66 ± 2.22 mg kg(-1)), caffeic acid (41.74 ± 22.54 mg kg(-1)), and 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (63.64 ± 36.16 mg kg(-1)); hemp contained p-coumaric acid (84.02 ± 8.10 mg kg(-1)), cyanidin (58.43 ± 21.01 mg kg(-1)), protocatechualdehyde (34.77 ± 5.15 mg kg(-1)), and gentisic acid (31.20 ± 1.67 mg kg(-1)); and fava bean was the richest source of ferulic acid (229.51 ± 36.58 mg kg(-1)) and its 5-5' (39.99 ± 1.10 mg kg(-1)) and 8-5 dimers (58.17 ± 6.68 mg kg(-1)). Demonstrating that these crops are rich sources of protein, fiber, and phytochemicals could encourage higher consumption and utilization of them as healthy and sustainable ingredients in the food and drink industry.

  17. How to map soil carbon stocks in highly urbanized regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, V. I.; Stoorvogel, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest carbon stock in terrestrial ecosystems and the capacity for carbon sequestration is a widely accepted soil function. For land-use planning and decision making the regional analysis of SOC stocks and their spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention. Quite a few studies focus on mapping the carbon stocks in natural and agricultural areas using digital soil mapping (DSM) techniques. Although urban areas remain almost neglected. The urban environment provides a number of specific features and processes that influence soil formation and functioning: soil sealing, functional zoning and settlement history. This not only results in a considerable urban SOC (especially in the subsoil), but also results in a unique spatial variability of SOC stocks at short distance. In contrast to the often gradual changes in natural areas, urban soils may exhibit abrupt changes due to the anthropogenic influence. Thus implementation of standard DSM methodology will result in extremely high nuggets and correspondingly low prediction accuracy. Besides, traditional regression kriging, widely-used for the case when legacy data is lacking, is often based on the correlation between SOC and dominating soil forming factors (climate, relief, parent material and vegetation). Although in urban conditions, anthropogenic influence itself turns out to be a predominant soil-forming factor. The spatial heterogeneity of urban soil carbon stocks is further complicated by a specific profile distribution with possible second SOC maximum, referred to cultural layer. Importance of urban SOC as well as specifics of urban environment requires for a specific approach to map urban SOC as part of regional analysis. Moscow region with its variability of bioclimatic conditions and high urbanization level (10 % from the total area) was chosen as an interesting case study. Random soil sampling in different soil zones (4) and land

  18. High-performance membrane-electrode assembly with an optimal polytetrafluoroethylene content for high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gisu; Kim, MinJoong; Han, Junyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Shul, Yong-Gun; Cho, EunAe

    2016-08-01

    Although high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) have a high carbon monoxide tolerance and allow for efficient water management, their practical applications are limited due to their lower performance than conventional low-temperature PEMFCs. Herein, we present a high-performance membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) with an optimal polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) content for HT-PEMFCs. Low or excess PTFE content in the electrode leads to an inefficient electrolyte distribution or severe catalyst agglomeration, respectively, which hinder the formation of triple phase boundaries in the electrodes and result in low performance. MEAs with PTFE content of 20 wt% have an optimal pore structure for the efficient formation of electrolyte/catalyst interfaces and gas channels, which leads to high cell performance of approximately 0.5 A cm-2 at 0.6 V.

  19. Pyrolytic and oxidative syntheses of high-yield carbons from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiangfeng

    A pressurized chemical reactor was designed and built per ASME code, which is capable of conducting pyrolysis, activation and gasification processes with an available volume of 7.2 L. It can operate at a pressure up to 3.5 MPa and the system provides a maximum saturated steam flow rate of 2.4 kg/hr at 5.4 MPa. With this reactor, the effects of moisture content, pressure and pretreatment of feedstock on synthesizing charcoal and its yields and properties were examined. Higher moisture content favors charcoal formation and leads to uniform properties of charcoal throughout the bed. However, it demands more external energy. Increase in operation pressure also favors higher yield of charcoal with reduced cook time, but not significantly for pressure above 1 MPa. Woods sorbed with CuSOsb4 and FeSOsb4 result in higher yield and/or better quality as well as short cook time. Charcoals from woods and nutshells have yields around 40% to 65% with a gross calorific value over 30 MJ/kg. A novel process for synthesizing high-yield activated carbon from Macshells was discovered, which involves air activation. Together with equations derived from energy balance, a model describing mass transport and reaction was developed for evaluating roles of diffusion in oxygenating biomass charcoal. Carbonization step is found necessary for subsequent oxygenation and activation in obtaining high-yield activated carbon. Both modeled and experimental results show no influence of mass transport in oxygenation at a temperature below 560 K, and good agreement in temperature rise due to reaction. Results from the kinetics model and the experiments indicate first-order reaction kinetics in oxygenation with respect to oxygen partial pressure. Evaluation on the values of increase in surface area (or iodine number) per carbon loss for activated carbon obtained by this process shows more effective use of carbon compared to the conventional method. Ultimate analyses show high carbon content and low ash

  20. The preparation and characterization of CN x film with high nitrogen content by cathode electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Tao; Cao, Chuan-Bao; Lv, Qiang; Li, Chao; Zhu, He-Sun

    2003-05-01

    CN x thin film with high nitrogen content was prepared on ITO conductive glass substrates by cathode electrodeposition, using dicyandiamide (C 2H 4N 4) in acetone as precursors. The surface morphologies, atomic bonding state, and chemical composition were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The CN x particles got nanometer level with the average size of 80 nm. The maximum value of the N/C atomic ratio was more than 1. Carbon and nitrogen existed mainly in the form of tetrahedral CN bonds, with a few CN bonds. From UV-Vis absorption spectrum, we found that during near-ultraviolet area the deposited CN x films appeared nonlinear optical absorption phenomena, and the ultraviolet light (200-280 nm) could be transmitted. The electrical resistivities of the films were in the range of 10 12-10 16 Ω cm.

  1. 6. INTERIOR VIEW, HIGH CARBON HOT ROLLED SHEET STEEL FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW, HIGH CARBON HOT ROLLED SHEET STEEL FOR NAIL PLATE BEING LOADED ON THE CRADLE USED DURING THE PICKLING PROCESS - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  2. 5. INTERIOR VIEW, HIGH CARBON HOT ROLLED SHEET STEEL FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW, HIGH CARBON HOT ROLLED SHEET STEEL FOR NAIL PLATE BEING REMOVED FROM THE CRADLE USED DURING THE PICKLING PROCESS - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  3. A unique carbon with a high specific surface area produced by the carbonization of agar in the presence of graphene.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tingting; Lv, Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Zhengjie; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2013-11-14

    A unique carbon with a high specific surface area was prepared by carbonization of a polymer-based precursor, agar, in the presence of graphene. Graphene prevents the shrinkage and aggregation of the carbonized particles, resulting in extraordinarily large external surface area (∼1200 m(2) g(-1)) of the carbon, which shows a high rate performance as a supercapacitor electrode.

  4. [Effects of land use type on soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen contents in Karst region of South China].

    PubMed

    Li, Xinai; Xiao, Heai; Wu, Jinshui; Su, Yirong; Huang, Daoyou; Huang, Min; Liu, Shoulong; Peng, Hongcui

    2006-10-01

    A total of 721 surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from the paddy field, upland, and woodland in the Karst region of Dacai, Huanjiang County, Guangxi Province, and the contents of their organic carbon (Oc ), total nitrogen (TN), microbial biomass carbon (Bc) , and microbial biomass nitrogen (BN) were determined. The results showed that the Oc and BN contents and soil pH value showed the trend of paddy field = woodland > upland, while TN and Bc contents had the trend of woodland > paddy field > upland. There was a significant positive correlation between Bc and Oc, and between B5 and TN. Soil microbial biomass C and N had rapid responses to the changes of land use type, which could be used as the sensitive biological indicators in evaluating soil quality and fertility in Karst region.

  5. Enzyme inactivation and quality preservation of sake by high-pressure carbonation at a moderate temperature.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Shota; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Fujii, Kazuyoshi; Ohdoi, Ritsushi; Sakamoto, Koji; Yamane, Yuichi; Miyake, Masaki; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Osajima, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a high-pressure carbonation treatment on the change in quality of sake during storage was investigated. Measurements of the amino acidity and isovaleraldehyde content of carbonated sake (20 MPa pressure at 40, 45 and 50 degrees C for 7, 21 and 33 min, respectively) as well as of heat-treated sake (reaching temperature of 65 degrees C and immediately cooled) were almost unchanged during storage at 3 and 20 degrees C. Glucose in the sake subjected to these treatments was retained at an almost constant under the same storage conditions, except for the sake carbonated at 40 degrees C and stored at 20 degrees C. In contrast, the amino acidity, and glucose and isovaleraldehyde contents of non-pasteurized (fresh) sake increased during storage at both temperatures. The sake samples subjected to the carbonation treatment and heat treatment both gave better sensory scores than the fresh sake sample after 6 month of storage at 3 and 20 degrees C, especially at 3 degrees C for the flavor. These results suggest that the high-pressure carbonation treatment is an effective new technique for preserving the quality of sake.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes as High-Pressure Cylinders and Nanoextruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Banhart, F.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Rodríguez-Manzo, J. A.; Terrones, M.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2006-05-01

    Closed-shell carbon nanostructures, such as carbon onions, have been shown to act as self-contracting high-pressure cells under electron irradiation. We report that controlled irradiation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes can cause large pressure buildup within the nanotube cores that can plastically deform, extrude, and break solid materials that are encapsulated inside the core. We further showed by atomistic simulations that the internal pressure inside nanotubes can reach values higher than 40 gigapascals. Nanotubes can thus be used as robust nanoscale jigs for extruding and deforming hard nanomaterials and for modifying their properties, as well as templates for the study of individual nanometer-sized crystals under high pressure.

  7. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Biocompatibility Study of Highly Crystalline Carbonated Hydroxyapatite Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Caibao; Chen, Yingzhi; Huang, Yongzhuo; Zhu, Peizhi

    2015-08-01

    Highly crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanorods with different carbonate contents were synthesized by a novel hydrothermal method. The crystallinity and chemical structure of synthesized nanorods were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photo-electronic spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The biocompatibility of synthesized CHA nanorods was evaluated by cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MG-63 cell line. The biocompatibility evaluation results show that these CHA nanorods are biologically active apatites and potentially promising bone-substitute biomaterials for orthopedic application.

  8. Effect of electrolyte water content on the anodic passivation of lithium in IM LiC104-propylene carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. D.; Nagao, A. R.

    1982-06-01

    This work deals with the effect of aqueous contamination on the anode passivation of Li in 1M LiC10 4-propylene carbonate. Passivation occurs more readily with increasing electrolyte water content. Preliminary evidence suggests that anodic passivation may be due to anodic enrichment and eventual precipitation of LiC10 4 in the superficial anolyte layer.

  9. Effect of electrolyte water content on the anodic passivation of lithium in 1m lic104-propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.D.; Nagao, A.R.

    1982-06-01

    This work deals with the effect of aqueous contamination on the anode passivation of Li in 1M LiC10/sup 4/-propylene carbonate. Passivation occurs more readily with increasing electrolyte water content. Preliminary evidence suggests that anodic passivation may be due to anodic enrichment and eventual precipitation of LiC10/sup 4/ in the superficial anolyte layer.

  10. Arabidopsis Seed Content QTL Mapping Using High-Throughput Phenotyping: The Assets of Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jasinski, Sophie; Lécureuil, Alain; Durandet, Monique; Bernard-Moulin, Patrick; Guerche, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Seed storage compounds are of crucial importance for human diet, feed and industrial uses. In oleo-proteaginous species like rapeseed, seed oil and protein are the qualitative determinants that conferred economic value to the harvested seed. To date, although the biosynthesis pathways of oil and storage protein are rather well-known, the factors that determine how these types of reserves are partitioned in seeds have to be identified. With the aim of implementing a quantitative genetics approach, requiring phenotyping of 100s of plants, our first objective was to establish near-infrared reflectance spectroscopic (NIRS) predictive equations in order to estimate oil, protein, carbon, and nitrogen content in Arabidopsis seed with high-throughput level. Our results demonstrated that NIRS is a powerful non-destructive, high-throughput method to assess the content of these four major components studied in Arabidopsis seed. With this tool in hand, we analyzed Arabidopsis natural variation for these four components and illustrated that they all displayed a wide range of variation. Finally, NIRS was used in order to map QTL for these four traits using seeds from the Arabidopsis thaliana Ct-1 × Col-0 recombinant inbred line population. Some QTL co-localized with QTL previously identified, but others mapped to chromosomal regions never identified so far for such traits. This paper illustrates the usefulness of NIRS predictive equations to perform accurate high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis seed content, opening new perspectives in gene identification following QTL mapping and genome wide association studies. PMID:27891138

  11. Hierarchically porous carbon derived from banana peel for lithium sulfur battery with high areal and gravimetric sulfur loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fanqun; Qin, Furong; Zhang, Kai; Fang, Jing; Lai, Yanqing; Li, Jie

    2017-09-01

    Facile and sustainable route is developed to convert biomass into hierarchically porous carbon matrix cooperating with highly conductive graphene. By tailoring the porosity of the carbon matrix to promote fast mass transfer and cooperating highly conductive interconnected graphene frameworks to accelerate the electron transport, the carbon sulfur cathodes simultaneously achieve high areal and gravimetric sulfur loading/content (6 mg cm-2/67 wt%) and deliver outstanding electrochemical performance. After 100 cyclic discharge-charge test at the current density of 0.2 C, the reversible capacity maintains at 707 mA h g-1.

  12. High performance carbon fibers from very high molecular weight polyacrylonitrile precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E. Ashley; Weisenberger, Matthew C.; Abdallah, Mohamed G.; Vautard, Frederic; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Ozcan, Soydan; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Eberle, Cliff; Jackson, David C.; Mecham, Sue J.; Naskar, Amit K.

    2016-02-02

    In this study, carbon fibers are unique reinforcing agents for lightweight composite materials due to their outstanding mechanical properties and low density. Current technologies are capable of producing carbon fibers with 90-95% of the modulus of perfect graphite (~1025 GPa). However, these same carbon fibers possess less than 10% of the theoretical carbon fiber strength, estimated to be about 100 GPa.[1] Indeed, attempts to increase carbon fiber rigidity results in lower breaking strength. To develop advanced carbon fibers with both very high strength and modulus demands a new manufacturing methodology. Here, we report a method of manufacturing high strength, very high modulus carbon fibers from a very high molecular weight (VHMW) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor without the use of nanomaterial additives such as nucleating or structure-templating agents, as have been used by others.[2,3

  13. High performance carbon fibers from very high molecular weight polyacrylonitrile precursors

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, E. Ashley; Weisenberger, Matthew C.; Abdallah, Mohamed G.; ...

    2016-02-02

    In this study, carbon fibers are unique reinforcing agents for lightweight composite materials due to their outstanding mechanical properties and low density. Current technologies are capable of producing carbon fibers with 90-95% of the modulus of perfect graphite (~1025 GPa). However, these same carbon fibers possess less than 10% of the theoretical carbon fiber strength, estimated to be about 100 GPa.[1] Indeed, attempts to increase carbon fiber rigidity results in lower breaking strength. To develop advanced carbon fibers with both very high strength and modulus demands a new manufacturing methodology. Here, we report a method of manufacturing high strength, verymore » high modulus carbon fibers from a very high molecular weight (VHMW) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor without the use of nanomaterial additives such as nucleating or structure-templating agents, as have been used by others.[2,3]« less

  14. Respiratory carbon metabolism in the high mountain plant species Ranunculus glacialis.

    PubMed

    Nogués, Salvador; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Streb, Peter; Pardo, Antoni; Baptist, Florence; Bligny, Richard; Ghashghaie, Jaleh; Cornic, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Very little is known about the primary carbon metabolism of the high mountain plant Ranunculus glacialis. It is a species with C3 photosynthesis, but with exceptionally high malate content in its leaves, the biological significance of which remains unclear. 13C/12C-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) labelling were used to study the carbon metabolism of R. glacialis, paying special attention to respiration. Although leaf dark respiration was high, the temperature response had a Q10 of 2, and the respiratory quotient (CO2 produced divided by O2 consumed) was nearly 1, indicating that the respiratory pool is comprised of carbohydrates. Malate, which may be a large carbon substrate, was not respired. However, when CO2 fixed by photosynthesis was labelled, little labelling of the CO2 subsequently respired in the dark was detected, indicating that: (i) most of the carbon recently assimilated during photosynthesis is not respired in the dark; and (ii) the carbon used for respiration originates from (unlabelled) reserves. This is the first demonstration of such a low metabolic coupling of assimilated and respired carbon in leaves. The biological significance of the uncoupling between assimilation and respiration is discussed.

  15. A genetic strategy generating wheat with very high amylose content.

    PubMed

    Regina, Ahmed; Berbezy, Pierre; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Li, Suzhi; Cmiel, Mark; Larroque, Oscar; Bird, Anthony R; Swain, Steve M; Cavanagh, Colin; Jobling, Stephen A; Li, Zhongyi; Morell, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Resistant starch (RS), a type of dietary fibre, plays an important role in human health; however, the content of RS in most modern processed starchy foods is low. Cereal starch, when structurally manipulated through a modified starch biosynthetic pathway to greatly increase the amylose content, could be an important food source of RS. Transgenic studies have previously revealed the requirement of simultaneous down-regulation of two starch branching enzyme (SBE) II isoforms both located on the long arm of chromosome 2, namely SBEIIa and SBEIIb, to elevate the amylose content in wheat from ~25% to ~75%. The current study revealed close proximity of genes encoding SBEIIa and SBEIIb isoforms in wheat with a genetic distance of 0.5 cM on chromosome 2B. A series of deletion and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loss of function alleles in SBEIIa, SBEIIb or both was isolated from two different wheat populations. A breeding strategy to combine deletions and SNPs generated wheat genotypes with altered expression levels of SBEIIa and SBEIIb, elevating the amylose content to an unprecedented ~85%, with a marked concomitant increase in RS content. Biochemical assays were used to confirm the complete absence in the grain of expression of SBEIIa from all three genomes in combination with the absence of SBEIIb from one of the genomes. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Short-range vertical variation in organic carbon, carbonate carbon, total sulfur contents and Munsell color values in a core from the Upper Pennsylvanian Stark Shale Member of the Dennis Limestone, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, M.R.; Leventhal, Joel S.; Hatch, Joseph R.

    1983-01-01

    Organic carbon, total sulfur, carbonate carbon and Munsell color value were determined for 21 successive samples from a 53-cm-thick section of drill core. These samples are from the Stark Shale Member of the Dennis Limestone of Upper Pennsylvanian age, Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The data confirm previous results (Hosterman and Whitlow, 1981) which showed that a limited relationship of color value to organic carbon exists for shales containing about 7 percent or less organic carbon. For samples with 7 percent or more organic carbon, color values are nearly all the same. The color value is useful in screening samples before trace element analysis and in estimating the organic carbon content and metal potential of the shale (Leventhal and others, 1982).

  17. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  18. Clay Chemistry's Influence on the Average Carbon Content and Particle Size at the Ninety-Six Historical Site, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, L.; Werts, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Ninety-Six National Historic Site is located in Greenwood County, SC. Recent geologic mapping of this area has revealed differences in soil properties over short distances within the park. We studied the chemistry of the clay minerals found within the soils to see if there was a correlation between the amounts of soil organic carbon contained in the soil and particle size in individual soil horizons. Three different vegetation areas, including an old field, a deciduous forest, and a pine forest were selected to see what influence vegetation type had on the clay chemistry and carbon levels as well. Four samples containing the O, A, and B horizons were taken from each location and we studied the carbon and nitrogen content using an elemental analyzer, particle size using a Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyzer, and clay mineralogy with powder X-ray diffraction of each soil sample. Samples from the old field and pine forest gave an overall negative correlation between carbon content and clay percentage, which is against the normal trend for Southern Piedmont Ultisols. The deciduous forest samples gave no correlation at all between its carbon content and clay percentage. Together, all three locations show the same negative relationship, while once separated into vegetation type and A and B horizons it shows even more abnormal relationships of negative while several show no correlation (R2= 0.007403- 0.56268). Using powder XRD, we ran clay samples from each A and B horizon for the clay mineralogy. All three vegetation areas had the same results of containing quartz, kaolinite, and Fe oxides, therefore, clay chemistry is not a reason behind the abnormal trend of a negative correlation between average carbon content and clay percentage. Considering that all three locations have the same climate, topography, and parent material of metagranite, it could be reasonable to assume these results are a factor of environmental and biological influences rather than clay type.

  19. [Effects of nitrogen application on soil greenhouse gas fluxes in Eucalyptus plantations with different soil organic carbon content].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Da; Zhang, Kai; Su, Dan; Lu, Fei; Wan, Wu-Xing; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Zheng, Hua

    2014-10-01

    The effects of nitrogen fertilization or nitrogen deposition on soil greenhouse gases fluxes has been well studied, while little has been piloted about the effects of nitrogen application on soil greenhouse gas fluxes and its discrepancy with different soil organic carbon content. In our study, we conducted field control experiment in a young Eucalyptus plantation in Southeast China. We compared the effects of 4 levels of nitrogen fertilization (Control: 0 kg · hm(-2); Low N: 84.2 kg · hm(-2); Medium N: 166.8 kg · hm(-2); High N: 333.7 kg · hm(-2)) on soil GHGs fluxes from 2 sites (LC and HC) with significantly different soil organic carbon (SOC) content (P < 0.05). The results showed: (1) Fertilization had significant priming effect on CO2 and N2O emission fluxes. One month after fertilization, both CO2 and N2O had the flux peak and decreased gradually, and the difference among the treatments disappeared at the end of the growing season. However, fertilization had no significant effect on CH4 oxidation between the 2 sites. (2) Fertilization and SOC were two crucial factors that had significant effects on CO2 and N2O emission. Fertilization had a significant positive effect on CO2 and N2O emission fluxes (P < 0.001). CH4 oxidation rates decreased with the increasing N addition, but there was no statistical difference (P > 0.05). The CO2 and N2O emission fluxes were significantly higher in HC than those in LC (P < 0.01). (3) Fertilization and SOC had great interactive effect on CO2 and N2O emission (P < 0.05). Compared with fluxes in LC, the fluxes in HC were much more sensitive to N input: low N could remarkably stimulate the CO2 and N2O emission. In conclusion, the effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil GHGs fluxes were not only in connection with the intensify of nitrogen, but also closely tied to the SOC content. When we assess the effects of nitrogen on soil GHGs fluxes, the difference induced by SOC should not be ignored.

  20. Accumulation of soil carbon and phosphorus contents of a rehabilitated forest.

    PubMed

    Haruna Ahmed, Osumanu; Aainaa Hasbullah, Nur; Ab Majid, Nik Muhamad

    2010-10-12

    The world's tropical rainforests are decreasing at an alarming rate as they are converted to agricultural land, pasture, and plantations. Decreasing tropical forests affect global warming. As a result, afforestation progams have been suggested to mitigate this problem. The objective of this study was to determine the carbon and phosphorus accumulation of a rehabilitated forest of different ages. The size of the study area was 47.5 ha. Soil samples were collected from the 0-, 6-, 12-, and 17-year-old rehabilitated forest. Twenty samples were taken randomly with a soil auger at depths of 0-20 and 20-40 cm. The procedures outlined in the Materials and Methods section were used to analyze the soil samples for pH, total C, organic matter, total P, C/P ratio, yield of humic acid (HA), and cation exchange capacity (CEC). The soil pH decreased significantly with increasing age of forest rehabilitation regardless of depth. Age did not affect CEC of the rehabilitated forest. Soil organic matter (SOM), total C, and total P contents increased with age. However, C/P ratio decreased with time at 0-20 cm. Accumulation of HA with time and soil depth was not consistent. The rehabilitated forest has shown signs of being a C and P sink.

  1. Environmental forcing does not lead to variation in carbon isotope content of forest soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, David; Egan, Jocelyn; Hall, Steven; Risk, David

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have highlighted fluctuations in the carbon isotope content (δ13C) of CO2 produced by soil respiration. These have been correlated with diel cycles of environmental forcing (e.g., soil temperature), or with synoptic weather events (e.g., rain events and pressure-induced ventilation). We used an extensive suite of observations to examine these phenomena over two months in a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site). Measurements included automated soil respiration chambers and automated measurements of the soil gas profile. We found 1) no diel change in the δ13C of the soil surface flux or the CO2 produced in the soil (despite strong diel change in surface flux rate), 2) no change in δ13C following wetting (despite a significant increase in soil flux rate), and 3) no evidence of pressure-induced ventilation of the soil. Measurements of the δ13C of surface CO2 flux agreed closely with the isotopic composition of soil CO2 production calculated using soil profile measurements. Temporal variation in the δ13C of surface flux was relatively minor and unrelated to measured environmental variables. Deep in the soil profile, results conform to established theory regarding diffusive soil gas transport and isotopic fractionation, and suggest that sampling soil gas at a depth of several tens of centimeters is a simple and effective way to assess the mean δ13C of the surface flux.

  2. Transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress alfalfa NADH-glutamate synthase have higher carbon and nitrogen content.

    PubMed

    Chichkova, S; Arellano, J; Vance, C P; Hernández, G

    2001-11-01

    This work reports the characterization of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that constitutively overexpress NADH-GOGAT. Three independent transformants, designated GOS10, GOS13 and GOS19 (for GOGAT sense), with stable integration of the chimeric alfalfa NADH-GOGAT gene fused to the CaMV 35S promoter were studied. The transgene was stably integrated and inherited by the progeny. In these GOS lines, the expression of NADH-GOGAT mRNA and protein was detected at low levels in roots and leaves, while the expression of the host tobacco NADH-GOGAT gene was nearly undetectable. The roots of GOS lines showed an elevated (15-40%) enzyme activity as compared to control plants. When GOS plants were grown under greenhouse conditions and fed with either nitrate or ammonium as the sole nitrogen source, they showed higher total carbon and nitrogen content in shoots and increased shoot dry weight when plants were entering into the flowering stage, as compared to control plants. The observed phenotype of GOS plants was interpreted as reflecting a higher capacity to assimilate nitrogen due to a higher NADH-GOGAT activity.

  3. Correlations of carbon isotope discrimination with element and ash contents in two Sabina evergreen trees in northwest China: patterns and implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youfu; Chen, Tuo; Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao; An, Lizhe; Chen, Yingwu

    2011-06-30

    Foliar carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) is widely used as an integrator of physiological plant responses to environmental change. However, the relationship between foliar Δ and mineral nutrient accumulation is still not well-known. The foliar Δ, K, Ca, Mg, Si and ash contents of S. przewalskii Kom. (SP) and S. chinensis (Lin.) Ant. (SC), two over-winter trees distributed on high altitude plateaux and lower altitude plains, respectively, were measured at monthly intervals over two years under the same growing conditions to examine the genetic and seasonal variation in foliar nutrient concentrations in relation to foliar Δ. The foliar Δ, Mg, K and ash contents were markedly lower in SP than in SC, and the foliar Si content was significantly higher in SP than SC, while the differences in Ca contents between the two Sabina trees were not significant. There was higher foliar Δ in winter than in summer for both Sabina trees. Close negative correlations of foliar Δ with K and Mg content, and significant positive correlations between foliar Δ and Si contents, were observed in SP but not in SC. Thus, higher water-use efficiency of SP than of SC is related to higher Si and lower Mg and K contents that have positive effects on the reduction of transpiration rates or stomatal conductances. The results obtained by the present study will advance the understanding of the adaptive strategies of mineral nutrition and water use in harsh environments.

  4. Soil organic carbon stocks are systematically overestimated by misuse of the parameters bulk density and rock fragment content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeplau, Christopher; Vos, Cora; Don, Axel

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks requires estimates of the carbon content, bulk density, rock fragment content and depth of a respective soil layer. However, different application of these parameters could introduce a considerable bias. Here, we explain why three out of four frequently applied methods overestimate SOC stocks. In soils rich in rock fragments (> 30 vol. %), SOC stocks could be overestimated by more than 100 %, as revealed by using German Agricultural Soil Inventory data. Due to relatively low rock fragments content, the mean systematic overestimation for German agricultural soils was 2.1-10.1 % for three different commonly used equations. The equation ensemble as re-formulated here might help to unify SOC stock determination and avoid overestimation in future studies.

  5. Highly stable linear carbonate-containing electrolytes with fluoroethylene carbonate for high-performance cathodes in sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongwon; Lee, Jaegi; Kim, Hyungsub; Kang, Kisuk; Choi, Nam-Soon

    2016-07-01

    Employing linear carbonates such as dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and diethyl carbonate (DEC) as electrolyte solvents provides an opportunity to design appropriate electrolyte systems for high-performance sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). However, in practice, the use of linear carbonate-containing electrolytes is quite challenging because linear carbonates readily decompose at Na metal electrodes or sodiated anodes. One of the promising approaches is using an electrolyte additive to resolve the critical problems related to linear carbonates. Our investigation reveals that remarkable enhancement in electrochemical performance of Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7) cathodes with linear carbonate-containing electrolytes is achieved by using a fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive. Importantly, the initial Coulombic efficiency of the Na deposition/stripping on a stainless steel (SS) electrode is drastically improved from 16% to 90% by introducing the FEC additive into ethylene carbonate (EC)/propylene carbonate (PC)/DEC (5/3/2, v/v/v)/0.5 M NaClO4. The underlying mechanism of FEC at the electrode-electrolyte interface is clearly demonstrated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In addition, the Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7) cathode in EC/PC/DEC (5/3/2, v/v/v)/0.5 M sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) with FEC delivers a discharge capacity of 90.5 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/2 and exhibits excellent capacity retention of 97.5% with high Coulombic efficiency of 99.6% after 300 cycles at 30 °C.

  6. The effects of land abandonment and long-term afforestation practices on the organic carbon and lignin content of a Mediteranean soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stijsiger, Romy; Nadal-Romero, Estela; Campo, Julian; Cammeraat, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Afforestation is an important strategy that can decrease atmospheric carbon in sequestering it in biomass and soils (Pérez-Crusado et al., 2014). In Spain an active afforestation program was adopted in the 1950s, when after wide spread land abandonment the soils were severely eroded (FAO, 2015). In this research the organic carbon and lignin content of the soils in the Araguás catchment area in the Spanish Pyrenees were examined. This research is part of a larger research examining the effect of afforestation over time (Med Afforest Project, PIEF-GA-2013-624974). The research area was afforested with both the P. sylvestris (Scotts Pine) and the P.nigra (Black Pine). Both sites were compared to bare soil (representing severely eroded soil), natural secondary succession (re-vegetation) and meadows. The method used to assess the lignin content is Curie-point pyrolysis with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). The results showed a reducing trend for the soil organic carbon (SOC) content with depth. The highest SOC and lignin contents in the topsoil were found under P.nigra and secondary succession. This decline in lignin content corresponds with a high degradation rate (Ad/Al) in the top soil and lower degradation rates in depths of >20 cm. Meadows showed an increased SOC content in deeper horizons, which corresponds to high lignin content as well. In which the meadows showed an increase in lignin content for the soil depths of >20 cm that was unusual and could not be explained by the S/G and P/G ratios and the degradation ratio (Ad/Al). According to the results, P. nigra was the best afforestation practice for increasing the SOC and lignin contents in the soil. The P. sylvestris was considered but proved to be less successful than natural secondary succession. Acknowledgements This research was supported by a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship in the project "MED-AFFOREST" (PIEF-GA-2013-624974). JC also acknowledges the VALi+d postdoctoral contract (APOSTD/2014

  7. Mineral bioavailability and bone mineral contents in pigs given calcium carbonate postprandially.

    PubMed

    Pointillart, A; Colin, C; Lacroix, H C; Guéguen, L

    1995-10-01

    We have further investigated the "meal effect" on mineral bioavailability in pigs by mineral balance studies and measurements of bone ash contents and bending moment. A group of seven pigs (CAA) was given all its dietary Ca as CaCO3 5 h after the first daily meal for 8 weeks. The control group of seven pigs received CaCO3 in the meal. Both groups were given normal P within the meals. Ca and P absorption and retention were evaluated by a 10-day balance trial. Several bones were collected at slaughter to determine bone ash, Ca, and P contents and bending moment (three-point bending test). Ingesting Ca after the meal did not affect Ca bioavailability or phosphorus absorption, but did reduce P retention, which in turn decreased the bone scores. Osteopenia, indicated by decreased total mineral contents of bones (and decreased ash:bone volume ratio), was associated with elevated plasma osteocalcin in the CAA group. Thus, CaCO3 need not be incorporated into a meal for high Ca absorption, provided that Ca is given after a meal, but simultaneous intakes of Ca and P are required for the best mineral retention.

  8. Microscopic Study of Carbon Surfaces Interacting with High Carbon Ferromanganese Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Kolbeinsen, Leiv

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of carbon materials with molten slags occurs in many pyro-metallurgical processes. In the production of high carbon ferromanganese in submerged arc furnace, the carbothermic reduction of MnO-containing silicate slags yields the metal product. In order to study the interaction of carbon with MnO-containing slags, sessile drop wettability technique is employed in this study to reduce MnO from a molten slag drop by carbon substrates. The interfacial area on the carbon substrate before and after reaction with slag is studied by scanning electron microscope. It is indicated that no Mn metal particles are found at the interface through the reduction of the MnO slag. Moreover, the reduction of MnO occurs through the contribution of Boudouard reaction and it causes carbon consumption in particular active sites at the interface, which generate carbon degradation and open pore growth at the interface. It is shown that the slag is fragmented to many micro-droplets at the reaction interface, potentially due to the effect on the interfacial energies of a provisional liquid Mn thin film. The rapid reduction of these slag micro-droplets affects the carbon surface with making deep micro-pores. A mechanism for the formation of slag micro-droplets is proposed, which is based on the formation of provisional micro thin films of liquid Mn at the interface.

  9. Microscopic Study of Carbon Surfaces Interacting with High Carbon Ferromanganese Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Kolbeinsen, Leiv

    2014-09-01

    The interaction of carbon materials with molten slags occurs in many pyro-metallurgical processes. In the production of high carbon ferromanganese in submerged arc furnace, the carbothermic reduction of MnO-containing silicate slags yields the metal product. In order to study the interaction of carbon with MnO-containing slags, sessile drop wettability technique is employed in this study to reduce MnO from a molten slag drop by carbon substrates. The interfacial area on the carbon substrate before and after reaction with slag is studied by scanning electron microscope. It is indicated that no Mn metal particles are found at the interface through the reduction of the MnO slag. Moreover, the reduction of MnO occurs through the contribution of Boudouard reaction and it causes carbon consumption in particular active sites at the interface, which generate carbon degradation and open pore growth at the interface. It is shown that the slag is fragmented to many micro-droplets at the reaction interface, potentially due to the effect on the interfacial energies of a provisional liquid Mn thin film. The rapid reduction of these slag micro-droplets affects the carbon surface with making deep micro-pores. A mechanism for the formation of slag micro-droplets is proposed, which is based on the formation of provisional micro thin films of liquid Mn at the interface.

  10. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  11. The Content of Literature in the High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Dwight L.

    The content of a literature program defined in terms of the structure of literature is proposed. A three-layer definition of structure is suggested which considers (1) the substance of literature, including man and his gods, man and the natural world, man and other men, and man and himself; (2) mode in literature, including the romantic, comic,…

  12. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Preparation of High School Physics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge--PCK). The program has been in place…

  13. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Preparation of High School Physics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge--PCK). The program has been in place…

  14. The influence of climate change on the soil organic carbon content in Italy from 1961 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantappiè, M.; L'Abate, G.; Costantini, E. A. C.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are the biggest carbon store in the world (1500 Gt, e.g. 1.5 × 10 21 g). The European Commission indicates the accounting of soil organic carbon (SOC) variations in space and time as the first step in the strategy for soil protection. It is indeed necessary in evaluating the risk of soil organic matter decline and soil biodiversity decline, and when evaluating the role played by soils in global CO 2 accounting. Previous maps of SOC variations in Italy did not consider the direct effect of climate. There is a marked inter-dependence between SOC and climate. SOC increases with the increase in precipitations and decreases with a rise in temperatures. It is also known that land use and management have a bigger impact on SOC than climate. The aim of this work is to understand to what extent the SOC variations occurring in Italy from 1961 to 2008 could be explained by climate change. The soil database of Italy was the source of information for SOC content: 17,817 observations (3082 before and 14,735 after 31 Dec 1990). SOC content was referred to the first 50 cm of soil depth, one single data obtained by weighted horizon thickness. SOC content was expressed as percentage by weight (dag kg - 1 ) analyzed by the Walkley-Black procedure and converted to ISO standard. The CRA-CMA (Research Unit for Climatology and Meteorology Applied to Agriculture) database was the source of information for climatic data. We considered the mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean value of total annual precipitation (MAP) of the two periods 1961-1990 and 1991-2006, and we mapped them by regression kriging with elevation and latitude as predictors. The climate change between the two periods was characterized by a general MAT increase, which was greater at lower altitudes and higher latitudes. The precipitation generally decreased, with some local exceptions. Some linear regression analyses were used to investigate the relationship between SOC content and climate/land use. Temperatures

  15. High power and high energy electrodes using carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Fabrizio; Brambilla, Nicolo Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo

    2015-04-07

    An electrode useful in an energy storage system, such as a capacitor, includes an electrode that includes at least one to a plurality of layers of compressed carbon nanotube aggregate. Methods of fabrication are provided. The resulting electrode exhibits superior electrical performance in terms of gravimetric and volumetric power density.

  16. Hierarchically structured nanoporous carbon tubes for high pressure carbon dioxide adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Patzsch, Julia; Babu, Deepu J

    2017-01-01

    Mesoscopic, nanoporous carbon tubes were synthesized by a combination of the Stoeber process and the use of electrospun macrosized polystyrene fibres as structure directing templates. The obtained carbon tubes have a macroporous nature characterized by a thick wall structure and a high specific surface area of approximately 500 m²/g resulting from their micro- and mesopores. The micropore regime of the carbon tubes is composed of turbostratic graphitic areas observed in the microstructure. The employed templating process was also used for the synthesis of silicon carbide tubes. The characterization of all porous materials was performed by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption of carbon dioxide on the carbon tubes at 25 °C at pressures of up to 30 bar was studied using a volumetric method. At 26 bar, an adsorption capacity of 4.9 mmol/g was observed. This is comparable to the adsorption capacity of molecular sieves and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. The high pressure adsorption process of CO2 was found to irreversibly change the microporous structure of the carbon tubes. PMID:28685114

  17. Thermodynamically Controlled High-Pressure High-Temperature Synthesis of Crystalline Fluorinated sp 3 -Carbon Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, Kamil; Landskron, Kai

    2015-11-19

    We report the feasibility of the thermodynamically controlled synthesis of crystalline sp3-carbon networks. We show that there is a critical pressure below which decomposition of the carbon network is favored and above which the carbon network is stable. Based on advanced, highly accurate quantum mechanical calculations using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method (FP-LAPW) and the Birch–Murnaghan equation of state, this critical pressure is 26.5 GPa (viz. table of contents graphic). Such pressures are experimentally readily accessible and afford thermodynamic control for suppression of decomposition reactions. The present results further suggest that a general pattern of pressure-directed control exists for many isolobal conversions of sp2 to sp3 allotropes, relating not only to fluorocarbon chemistry but also extending to inorganic and solid-state materials science.

  18. Facile One-Step Synthesis of Hybrid Graphitic Carbon Nitride and Carbon Composites as High-Performance Catalysts for CO2 Photocatalytic Conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangang; Bai, Xia; Qin, Hengfei; Wang, Fei; Li, Yaguang; Li, Xi; Kang, Shifei; Zuo, Yuanhui; Cui, Lifeng

    2016-07-13

    Utilizing and reducing carbon dioxide is a key target in the fight against global warming. The photocatalytic performance of bulk graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is usually limited by its low surface area and rapid charge carrier recombination. To develop g-C3N4 more suitable for photocatalysis, researchers have to enlarge its surface area and accelerate the charge carrier separation. In this work, novel hybrid graphitic carbon nitride and carbon (H-g-C3N4/C) composites with various carbon contents have been developed for the first time by a facile one-step pyrolysis method using melamine and natural soybean oil as precursors. The effect of carbon content on the structure of H-g-C3N4/C composites and the catalytic activity for the photoreduction of CO2 with H2O were investigated. The results indicated that the introduction of carbon component can effectively improve the textural properties and electronic conductivity of the composites, which exhibited imporved photocatalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 with H2O in comparison with bulk g-C3N4. The highest CO and CH4 yield of 22.60 μmol/g-cat. and 12.5 μmol/g-cat., respectively, were acquired on the H-g-C3N4/C-6 catalyst with the carbon content of 3.77 wt % under 9 h simulated solar irradiation, which were more than twice as high as that of bulk g-C3N4. The remarkably increased photocatalytic performance arises from the synergistic effect of hybrid carbon and g-C3N4.

  19. Amorphous Diamond: A High-Pressure Superhard Carbon Allotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu; Zhang, Li; Mao, Ho-kwang; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Baldini, Maria; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Wendy L.

    2011-12-09

    Compressing glassy carbon above 40 GPa, we have observed a new carbon allotrope with a fully sp{sup 3}-bonded amorphous structure and diamondlike strength. Synchrotron x-ray Raman spectroscopy revealed a continuous pressure-induced sp{sup 2}-to-sp{sup 3} bonding change, while x-ray diffraction confirmed the perseverance of noncrystallinity. The transition was reversible upon releasing pressure. Used as an indenter, the glassy carbon ball demonstrated exceptional strength by reaching 130 GPa with a confining pressure of 60 GPa. Such an extremely large stress difference of >70 GPa has never been observed in any material besides diamond, indicating the high hardness of this high-pressure carbon allotrope.

  20. The temperature and carbonate ion influence on Pleistocene high latitude planktonic foraminiferal carbon isotopic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C.; Foreman, A. D.; Munson, J.; Slowey, N. C.; Hodell, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing a credible record of the carbon isotopic composition of high latitude surface ocean DIC over ice ages has been an enormous challenge, because the possible archives of this important variable in deep sea sediments all incorporate complex effects of the biomineralization process. For example, culture experiments (by Spero and colleagues) demonstrate a strong temperature and carbonate ion effect on the carbon isotopic composition of G. bulloides--the taxon of planktonic foraminifera that is most abundant in the majority of subpolar sediment sequences. Here we capitalize on the fortuitous observation of exceptionally strong covariation between the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of G. bulloides in multiple sediment sequences from the Benguela upwelling region. The covariation is most clear during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (an interval when the isotopic composition of the seawater was least variable) and undoubtedly results from the precipitation of tests under variable conditions of temperature and carbonate ion. The unusually clear isotopic relationship in planktonic foraminifera observed off Namibia constitutes a field calibration of the biomineralization effects observed in culture, and we apply it to previously published high latitude carbon isotopic records throughout the Southern Ocean. We find that many of the excursions toward lower planktonic foraminiferal δ13C that have been interpreted previously as the upwelling of nutrient rich water during deglaciations are better explained as increases in upper ocean temperature and carbonate ion. Conversely, the excursions toward high δ13C during ice age intervals that have been interpreted previously as increased export production (purportedly stimulated by dust) are also better explained by temperature and carbonate ion variability. After removal of the inferred temperature and carbonate ion signal from the planktonic foraminiferal time series, the residual is essentially (but not exactly) the same

  1. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive.

  2. Experimental carbon dioxide laser brain lesions and intracranial dynamics. Part 2. Effect on brain water content and its response to acute therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tiznado, E.G.; James, H.E.; Moore, S.

    1985-04-01

    Experimental brain lesions were created over the left parietooccipital cortex of the albino rabbit through the intact dura mater with high radiating carbon dioxide laser energy. The brain water content was studied 2, 6, and 24 hours after the insult. Another two groups of animals received acute therapy with either dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) or furosemide (1 mg/kg). In all groups, Evans blue extravasation uniformly extended from the impact crater into the surrounding white matter. The brain water content in the gray matter was elevated from the control value by 2 hours after impact and remained elevated at 6 and 24 hours. The white matter brain water content did not increase until 6 hours after impact and remained elevated in the 24-hour group. After dexamethasone treatment, there was a significant decrease of water in the gray matter, but not in the white matter. With furosemide therapy, there was no reduction of gray or white matter brain water.

  3. The Spatial Distribution of Carbon Dust in the Early Solar Nebula and the Carbon Content of Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, H.-P.; Trieloff, M.

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation and pyrolysis processes in the chemically active regions of the Solar Nebula are considered that are responsible for the destruction of the pristine carbon inherited from the ISM and its conversion to hydrocarbons and ultimately to CO.

  4. Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-10

    energy lithium ion batteries . The use of CNT additives with commercial high capacity lithium rich cathodes was shown to increase areal loadings and...collectors can result in battery energy density increases up to 15% (vs. mesocarbon microbead (MCMB)). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Carbon Nanotubes, CNT...a) Carbon nanotube paper coated with NCA cathode composite for testing as positive electrode in Li-ion battery (b) Comparison of NCA specific

  5. Microscale characterisation of stochastically reconstructed carbon fiber-based Gas Diffusion Layers; effects of anisotropy and resin content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiotis, Andreas G.; Kainourgiakis, Michael E.; Charalambopoulou, Georgia C.; Stubos, Athanassios K.

    2016-07-01

    A novel process-based methodology is proposed for the stochastic reconstruction and accurate characterisation of Carbon fiber-based matrices, which are commonly used as Gas Diffusion Layers in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. The modeling approach is efficiently complementing standard methods used for the description of the anisotropic deposition of carbon fibers, with a rigorous model simulating the spatial distribution of the graphitized resin that is typically used to enhance the structural properties and thermal/electrical conductivities of the composite Gas Diffusion Layer materials. The model uses as input typical pore and continuum scale properties (average porosity, fiber diameter, resin content and anisotropy) of such composites, which are obtained from X-ray computed microtomography measurements on commercially available carbon papers. This information is then used for the digital reconstruction of realistic composite fibrous matrices. By solving the corresponding conservation equations at the microscale in the obtained digital domains, their effective transport properties, such as Darcy permeabilities, effective diffusivities, thermal/electrical conductivities and void tortuosity, are determined focusing primarily on the effects of medium anisotropy and resin content. The calculated properties are matching very well with those of Toray carbon papers for reasonable values of the model parameters that control the anisotropy of the fibrous skeleton and the materials resin content.

  6. Fast Compression of Imagery with High Frequency Content

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    lessons that can’t be learned in a classroom. D. Scott Anderson iii Table of Contents Page Acknowledgements... media . Much research has been focused on image quality ver- sus bit rate and/or algorithm speed. Here, we seek an effective image coder with a weighted...this reason, compression performance is quantified by a plot of image quality versus bit rate. Bit rate is usually measured in bits per pixel ( bpp ). It

  7. A High Performance Content Based Recommender System Using Hypernym Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Potok, Thomas E; Patton, Robert M

    2015-10-20

    There are two major limitations in content-based recommender systems, the first is accurately measuring the similarity of preferred documents to a large set of general documents, and the second is over-specialization which limits the "interesting" documents recommended from a general document set. To address these issues, we propose combining linguistic methods and term frequency methods to improve overall performance and recommendation.

  8. High Temperature Carbonized Grass as a High Performance Sodium Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Yao, Yonggang; Wan, Jiayu; Henderson, Doug; Zhang, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-01-11

    Hard carbon is currently considered the most promising anode candidate for room temperature sodium ion batteries because of its relatively high capacity, low cost, and good scalability. In this work, switchgrass as a biomass example was carbonized under an ultrahigh temperature, 2050 °C, induced by Joule heating to create hard carbon anodes for sodium ion batteries. Switchgrass derived carbon materials intrinsically inherit its three-dimensional porous hierarchical architecture, with an average interlayer spacing of 0.376 nm. The larger interlayer spacing than that of graphite allows for the significant Na ion storage performance. Compared to the sample carbonized under 1000 °C, switchgrass derived carbon at 2050 °C induced an improved initial Coulombic efficiency. Additionally, excellent rate capability and superior cycling performance are demonstrated for the switchgrass derived carbon due to the unique high temperature treatment.

  9. Effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen fertilization on phenolic content in Poa annua L.

    PubMed

    Martijn Bezemer T; Hefin Jones T; E Newington J

    2000-11-01

    Different but partially overlapping hypotheses have been developed to predict the allocation of phenolics in elevated atmospheric CO(2). The carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis predicts increased allocation to phenolics due to reduced relative availability of nitrogen. The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis states that allocation will depend on source and sink strength, while the protein competition model predicts that allocation will remain unchanged. We grew Poa annua at two CO(2) concentrations in soils of three different nutrient levels. Although plant-tissue nitrogen levels were reduced in high CO(2) and photosynthetic rate increased, phenolic concentration and biomass allocation remained unchanged. We discuss these data in the context of the three models' predictions of phenolic allocation in conditions of elevated CO(2).

  10. The effect of HWVP feed nitrate and carbonate content on glass redox adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemers, K.D.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Department of Energy to immobilize pretreated radioactive high-level waste (HLW) as glass for geological disposal. In the HWVP formic acid will be added to the pretreated HLW prior to vitrification. The formic acid is added to adjust the feed rheology and to provide a reductant which maintains the feed in the melter within an acceptable redox range. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of nitrate and carbonate concentrations in the pretreated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) feed on the amount of formic acid required to obtain an acceptable glass redox state in the melter. The glass redox state was measured by the Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sup +3} ratio in the vitrified product.

  11. [Effects of conservation tillage and weed control on soil water and organic carbon contents in winter wheat field].

    PubMed

    Han, Hui-Fang; Ning, Tang-Yuan; Li, Zeng-Jia; Tian, Shen-Zhong; Wang, Yu; Zhong, Wei-Lei; Tian, Xin-Xin

    2011-05-01

    Taking a long-term (since 2004) straw-returning winter wheat field as the object, an investigation was made in the wheat growth seasons of 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 to study the effects of different tillage methods (rotary tillage, harrow tillage, no-tillage, subsoil tillage, and conventional tillage) and weed management on the soil water and organic carbon contents. No matter retaining or removing weeds, the weed density under subsoil tillage and no-tillage was much higher than that under rotary tillage, harrow tillage, and conventional tillage. From the jointing to the milking stage of winter wheat, retaining definite amounts of weeds, no matter which tillage method was adopted, could significantly increase the 0-20 cm soil water content, suggesting the soil water conservation effect of retaining weeds. Retaining weeds only increased the soil organic carbon content in 0-20 cm layer at jointing stage. At heading and milking stages, the soil organic carbon contents in 0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm layers were lower under weed retaining than under weed removal. Under the conditions of weed removal, the grain yield under subsoil tillage increased significantly, compared with that under the other four tillage methods. Under the conditions of weed retaining, the grain yield was the highest under rotary tillage, and the lowest under conventional tillage.

  12. Spatial and temporal changes of soil organic carbon content since time of reclamation of mine soils in a semi-arid environment of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartl, Thomas; Glenn, Vanessa; Erskine, Peter; Chan, Jaclyn

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying carbon fluxes in reclaimed mining environments informs about the success of rehabilitation. Increasing soil organic matter (SOM) improves crucial functional properties of soil; thus, it is highly desirable to promote SOM accumulation in rehabilitated mine soils. The carbon content is often used as a surrogate to describe the status of soil health. Organic carbon in soils contributes to nutrient storage and exchange for plant growth, but also improves water storage capacity and microbial activity. Particularly for poor quality soil substrates with low clay contents, like many spoils from open-cut mining, elevating the carbon concentration is an ideal means to improve the soil quality. The objective of the study was to investigate the change of SOC of re-established soils in mining dependent on the length of time since reclamation under different types of vegetation communities in a semi-arid environment of Central Queensland, Australia. Deviating from standard sampling programs, the SOC of the soil profile was determined in small depth sampling increments from the surface following the assumption, that fresh (green) organic matter will be highest close to the surface and that in semi-arid environments, the dislocation of organic matter to depth by precipitation and microbial activity will be limited. The investigations showed that the most recently rehabilitated sites (>3 years post rehabilitation) show a high organic carbon (OC) gradient decreasing from the surface downwards into the soil. The highest concentration of OC was generally found in the first cm from the surface. Below a depth of 5cm no increase of OC with time since reclamation (max. 25 years) could be determined. An increase of OC with time could be determined, although it appears that even after more than 20 years since reclamation the concentration and depth distribution of OC of an unmined soil could not be rebuilt. Thus, it may be inferred that introducing support practices of

  13. [Effects of wheat-straw returning into paddy soil on dissolved organic carbon contents and rice grain yield].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Liu, Meng; Chen, Jing-du; Gu, Hai-yan; Dai, Qi-gen; Ma, Ke-qiang; Jiang, Feng; He, Li

    2015-02-01

    A tank experiment using conventional rice cultivar Nanjing 44 as experimental material was conducted at the Experimental Farm of Yangzhou University to investigate the dynamics of wheat straw decomposition rate and the amount of carbon release in clay and sandy soils, as well as its effects on the content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and rice yield. The two rates of wheat straw returning were 0 and 6000 kg · hm(-2), and three N application levels were 0, 225, 300 kg · hm(-2). The results showed that, the rate of wheat straw decomposition and the amount of carbon release in clay and sandy soils were highest during the initial 30 days after wheat straw returning, and then slowed down after, which could be promoted by a higher level of nitrogen application. The rate of wheat straw decomposition and the amount of carbon release in clay soil were higher than that in sandy soil. The DOC content in soil increased gradually with wheat straw returning into paddy soil and at the twenty-fifth day, and then decreased gradually to a stable value. The DOC content at the soil depth of 15 cm was significantly increased by wheat straw returning, but not at the soil depth of 30 cm and 45 cm. It was concluded that wheat straw returning increased the DOC content in the soil depth of 0-15 cm mainly. N application decreased the DOC content and there was no difference between the two N application levels. Straw returning decreased the number of tillers in the early growth period, resulted in significantly reduced panicles per unit area, but increased spikelets per panicle, filled-grain percentages, 1000-grain mass, and then enhanced grain yield.

  14. Unusual High Oxygen Reduction Performance in All-Carbon Electrocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Tao, Ying; Lv, Wei; Su, Fang-Yuan; Ke, Lei; Li, Jia; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-based electrocatalysts are more durable and cost-effective than noble materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is an important process in energy conversion technologies. Heteroatoms are considered responsible for the excellent ORR performance in many carbon-based electrocatalysts. But whether an all-carbon electrocatalyst can effectively reduce oxygen is unknown. We subtly engineered the interfaces between planar graphene sheets and curved carbon nanotubes (G-CNT) and gained a remarkable activity/selectivity for ORR (larger current, and n = 3.86, ~93% hydroxide + ~7% peroxide). This performance is close to that of Pt; and the durability is much better than Pt. We further demonstrate the application of this G-CNT hybrid as an all-carbon cathode catalyst for lithium oxygen batteries.We speculate that the high ORR activity of this G-CNT hybrid stems from the localized charge separation at the interface of the graphene and carbon nanotube, which results from the tunneling electron transfer due to the Fermi level mismatch on the planar and curved sp2 surfaces. Our result represents a conceptual breakthrough and pioneers the new avenues towards practical all-carbon electrocatalysis. PMID:25189141

  15. Unusual High Oxygen Reduction Performance in All-Carbon Electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Tao, Ying; Lv, Wei; Su, Fang-Yuan; Ke, Lei; Li, Jia; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-based electrocatalysts are more durable and cost-effective than noble materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is an important process in energy conversion technologies. Heteroatoms are considered responsible for the excellent ORR performance in many carbon-based electrocatalysts. But whether an all-carbon electrocatalyst can effectively reduce oxygen is unknown. We subtly engineered the interfaces between planar graphene sheets and curved carbon nanotubes (G-CNT) and gained a remarkable activity/selectivity for ORR (larger current, and n = 3.86, ~93% hydroxide + ~7% peroxide). This performance is close to that of Pt; and the durability is much better than Pt. We further demonstrate the application of this G-CNT hybrid as an all-carbon cathode catalyst for lithium oxygen batteries.We speculate that the high ORR activity of this G-CNT hybrid stems from the localized charge separation at the interface of the graphene and carbon nanotube, which results from the tunneling electron transfer due to the Fermi level mismatch on the planar and curved sp2 surfaces. Our result represents a conceptual breakthrough and pioneers the new avenues towards practical all-carbon electrocatalysis.

  16. Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Yauscheva, E.P.

    2005-03-18

    Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of a large amount of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts climate. (Jacobson 2001; Rozenberg 1982). In this paper, we analyze the results of laboratory and field investigations that focused on the relative content of BC in aerosol particles. Main attention is given to the study of possibility using this parameter as an informative sign for estimating the effect of remote forest fire smokes on the near-ground aerosol composition.

  17. Freestanding highly defect nitrogen-enriched carbon nanofibers for lithium ion battery thin-film anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Guoqiang; Bao, Wurigumula; Yuan, Yifei; Liu, Zhun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Wu, Feng; Amine, Khalil; Wang, Jing; Lu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To spread lithium ion batteries into large-scale energy storage technologies, high ener-gy/power densities and long cycling life of carbon-based anodes must be achieved. This re-quires revolutionary design of the anode’s architectures that can facilitate the fast electronic and ionic transport, as well as accommodate the electrode structural instability. Here we re-port a thin-film electrode design and demonstrate its use in flexible, and large-area carbon-based anode assemblies. The fabrication of electrodes is realized by sputtering a graphite tar-get in the high-purity nitrogen atmosphere, then highly-defect nitrogen-doped carbon nano-fibers are deposited vertically onto copper substrates with a thin film configuration. The high-ly-defect nitrogen-doping enhances the lithium storage and transport, the orientation grown mechanism improves the charge transfer, and the compact configuration makes the high tap density possible. As a result, the thin films exhibit high specific capacities of ~ 500 mAh g−1, namely a volume capacity of ~ 100 mAh cm−3. They also exhibit stable cycle performance (400 mAh g−1 after 200 cycles) and good rate capability (450 mAh g−1 at 1 A g−1 rate). This work opens up a new carbon-based anode design by using sputtering technology for effec-tively incorporating high content nitrogen into carbon matrices. Such electrode architecture significantly improves the electrochemical performance of carbon-based materials.

  18. High performance all-carbon thin film supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhang; Mirri, Francesca; Notarianni, Marco; Pasquali, Matteo; Motta, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated high performance supercapacitors by using all carbon electrodes, with volume energy in the order of 10-3 Whcm-3, comparable to Li-ion batteries, and power densities in the range of 10 Wcm-3, better than laser-scribed-graphene supercapacitors. All-carbon supercapacitor electrodes are made by solution processing and filtering electrochemically-exfoliated graphene sheets mixed with clusters of spontaneously entangled multiwall carbon nanotubes. We maximize the capacitance by using a 1:1 weight ratio of graphene to multi-wall carbon nanotubes and by controlling their packing in the electrode film so as to maximize accessible surface and further enhance the charge collection. This electrode is transferred onto a plastic-paper-supported double-wall carbon nanotube film used as current collector. These all-carbon thin films are combined with plastic paper and gelled electrolyte to produce solid-state bendable thin film supercapacitors. We assembled supercapacitor cells in series in a planar configuration to increase the operating voltage and find that the shape of our supercapacitor film strongly affects its capacitance. An in-line superposition of rectangular sheets is superior to a cross superposition in maintaining high capacitance when subject to fast charge/discharge cycles. The effect is explained by addressing the mechanism of ion diffusion into stacked graphene sheets.

  19. Insulator-metal transition of highly compressed carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Ranga P.; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Kim, Minseob; Tse, John S.

    2011-10-01

    We present integrated spectral, structural, resistance, and theoretical evidences for simple molecular CS2 transformations to an insulating black polymer with threefold carbon atoms at 9 GPa, then to a semiconducting polymer above 30 GPa, and finally to a metallic solid above 50 GPa. The metallic phase is a highly disordered three-dimensional network structure with fourfold carbon atoms at the carbon-sulfur distance of ˜1.70 Å. Based on first-principles calculations, we present two plausible structures for the metallic phase: α-chalcopyrite and tridymite, both of which exhibit metallic ground states and disordered diffraction features similar to that measured. We also present the phase and chemical transformation diagram for carbon disulfide, showing a large stability field of the metallic phase to 100 GPa and 800 K.

  20. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Lassila, David H [Aptos, CA; Bonner, Brian P [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  1. Highly Efficient Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts based on Winged Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yingwen; Zhang, Hongbo; Varanasi, Chakrapani V.; Liu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Developing electrocatalysts with both high selectivity and efficiency for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is critical for several applications including fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this work we developed high performance electrocatalysts based on unique winged carbon nanotubes. We found that the outer-walls of a special type of carbon nanotubes/nanofibers, when selectively oxidized, unzipped and exfoliated, form graphene wings strongly attached to the inner tubes. After doping with nitrogen, the winged nanotubes exhibited outstanding activity toward catalyzing the ORR through the four-electron pathway with excellent stability and methanol/carbon monoxide tolerance. While the doped graphene wings with high active site density bring remarkable catalytic activity, the inner tubes remain intact and conductive to facilitate electron transport during electrocatalysis. PMID:24217312

  2. High School Journalism Textbooks, 1980-1985: An Overview of Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Barbara; Nunamaker, Anne

    To determine how high school journalism textbooks published from 1980 to 1985 deal with mass media and to what extent they deal with journalistic skills versus historical and theoretical content, a content analysis was made of nine comprehensive textbooks published during that period. Specific content areas that were analyzed in the historical and…

  3. Heats of immersion of active carbon and carbon black in water and benzene as a function of the moisture content of the adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinin, M.M.; Isirikyan, A.A.; Nikolaev, K.M.; Polyakov, N.S.; Tatarinova, L.I.

    1987-07-10

    Rehydration of the active sites of carbon and carbon black formed after vacuum heat treatment of the samples at high temperatures is reflected in the heats of their immersion in benzene and water: for carbon, the heat of immersion in benzene does not change, but the heat of immersion in water increases markedly, while the heat of immersion of carbon black in benzene decreases markedly and the heat of immersion in water almost does not change. All four basic stages of adsorption of water vapors on active carbon: (1) the formation of water clusters, (2) formation of a random monolayer, (3) volume filling of micropores, and (4) saturation with capillary condensation phenomena in the mesopores, are reflected in the curve of the dependence of the heats of immersion of carbon in benzene on the relative vapor pressure of the preadsorbed water. Based on the study of the heats of immersion of AC-47 active carbon in benzene as a function of the amount of preadsorbed water, the reality of the existence of a statistical monolayer or similarity of the monolayer of water in the micropores of nongraphitized active carbon not made chemically hydrophobic, formed in the narrow region of relative water vapor pressures from 0.45 to 0.6, was demonstrated.

  4. Estimating total lipid content of Camelina sativa via pyrolysis assisted in-situ transesterification with dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Min; Lee, Jechan; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2017-02-01

    Direct derivatization of C. sativa seed into FAMEs without lipid extraction was conducted for the quantification of lipid analysis via in-situ thermal methylation with dimethyl carbonate as an acyl acceptor on silica (SiO2). The introduced method had an extraordinarily high tolerance against impurities such as pyrolytic products and moisture. To ensure the technical completeness of in-situ methylation, thermal cracking of FAMEs transformed from C. sativa seed was also explored. Thermal cracking of unsaturated FAMEs such as C18:1, C18:2, C18:3 and C20:1 occurred at temperatures higher than 365°C due to their thermal instability. Thus, experimental findings in this study suggests not only that qualitative analysis of fatty acid profile in C. sativa seed via in-situ methylation using SiO2 could be achieve, but also that the total lipid content (42.65wt.%) in C. sativa seed could be accurately estimated.

  5. Optimization of solid content, carbon/nitrogen ratio and food/inoculum ratio for biogas production from food waste.

    PubMed

    Dadaser-Celik, Filiz; Azgin, Sukru Taner; Yildiz, Yalcin Sevki

    2016-12-01

    Biogas production from food waste has been used as an efficient waste treatment option for years. The methane yields from decomposition of waste are, however, highly variable under different operating conditions. In this study, a statistical experimental design method (Taguchi OA9) was implemented to investigate the effects of simultaneous variations of three parameters on methane production. The parameters investigated were solid content (SC), carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N) and food/inoculum ratio (F/I). Two sets of experiments were conducted with nine anaerobic reactors operating under different conditions. Optimum conditions were determined using statistical analysis, such as analysis of variance (ANOVA). A confirmation experiment was carried out at optimum conditions to investigate the validity of the results. Statistical analysis showed that SC was the most important parameter for methane production with a 45% contribution, followed by F/I ratio with a 35% contribution. The optimum methane yield of 151 l kg(-1) volatile solids (VS) was achieved after 24 days of digestion when SC was 4%, C/N was 28 and F/I were 0.3. The confirmation experiment provided a methane yield of 167 l kg(-1) VS after 24 days. The analysis showed biogas production from food waste may be increased by optimization of operating conditions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Anodic stripping voltammetry at in situ bismuth-plated carbon and gold microdisc electrodes in variable electrolyte content unstirred solutions.

    PubMed

    Baldrianova, L; Svancara, I; Economou, A; Sotiropoulos, S

    2006-10-27

    Carbon and gold microdisc electrodes (30 and 10 microm, respectively) have been tested as substrates for in situ bismuth film plating from unstirred solutions of variable acetate buffer content and were subsequently used in the anodic stripping voltammetry determination of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions. The effects of Bi(III) concentration, analyte accumulation time, stirring as well as supporting electrolyte content have been studied. Under optimal conditions good voltammetric responses were obtained by means of square wave anodic stripping voltammetry in unstirred analyte solutions of 5 x 10(-8) to 10(-6)M, even in the absence of added buffer. In an indicative application, Pb(II) ion levels were determined in tap water using bismuth-plated carbon microdisc electrodes.

  7. Effect of Different Casting Parameters on the Cleanliness of High Manganese Steel Ingots Compared to High Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schweinichen, Petrico; Chen, Zhiye; Senk, Dieter; Lob, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    The increasing demand for excellent steel properties has led to the creation of new steel grades such as high manganese TWIP and TRIP steels which are scientifically examined in Germany within the international research framework of the SFB 761 "Steel-ab initio." The production of these high-technology products, utilizing mainly the ingot-casting method, leads to new challenges in the prevention of cast defects. At RWTH Aachen University, a systematic investigation of the solidification process as it relates to shrinkage cavity, macrosegregation, cleanliness, and surface imperfections in as-cast ingots is being conducted. A particular attention was devoted to the effects of such casting parameters as superheat, pouring rate, hot top, and stirring conditions on the solidification and cleanliness of low carbon alloyed and high manganese alloyed steels. The experimental results show that rising manganese content leads to a higher amount and larger size of inclusions while rising carbon content enhances the inclusion generation in the same way. It was found that a bottom teeming system combined with an inert gas atmosphere produces the best quality and that if casting is performed with a runner-system, it is important to use a SiO2-free refractory to avoid oxidizing the Mn content of the melt to MnO inclusions by redox-reactions.

  8. Variability in magnesium, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, and trace element contents of brachiopod shells: implications for paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Saulnier, Ségolène; Vigier, Nathalie; Schumacher, Aimryc; Chaussidon, Marc; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium content in the ocean is ≈ 1290 ppm and is one of the most abundant elements. It is involved in the carbon cycle via the dissolution and precipitation of carbonates, especially Mg-rich carbonates as dolomites. The Mg/Ca ratio of the ocean is believed to have changed through time. The causes of these variations, i.e. hydrothermal activity change or enhanced precipitation of dolomite, could be constrained using the magnesium isotope composition (δ26Mg) of carbonates. Brachiopods, as marine environmental proxies, have the advantage to occur worldwide in a depth range from intertidal to abyssal, and have been found in the geological record since the Cambrian. Moreover, as their shell is in low-Mg calcite, they are quite resistant to diagenetic processes. Here we report δ26Mg, δ18O, δ13C values along with trace element contents of one modern brachiopod specimen (Terebratalia transversa) and one fossil specimen (Terebratula scillae, 2.3 Ma). We combined δ26Mg values with oxygen and carbon isotope compositions and trace element contents to look for possible shell geochemical heterogeneities in order to investigate the processes that control the Mg isotope composition of brachiopod shells. We also evaluate the potential of brachiopods as a proxy of past seawater δ26Mg values. The two investigated brachiopod shells present the same range of δ26Mg variation (up to 2 ‰)). This variation cannot be ascribed to changes in environmental parameters, i.e. temperature or pH. As previously observed, the primary layer of calcite shows the largest degree of oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibrium relative to seawater. In contrast, the δ26Mg value of this layer is comparable to that of the secondary calcite layer value. In both T. scillae and T. transversa, negative trends are observable between magnesium isotopic compositions and oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions. These trends, combined to linear relationships between δ26Mg values and REE contents, are best

  9. Determination of Stabiliser Contents in Advanced Gun Propellants by Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY N"m A.R. TURNER AND A. WHITE...TO biEPROOU.; AND SELL THIS REPORT Determination of Stabiliser Contents in Advanced Gun Propellants by Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography A.R...8217/......... .. Availability Cooes Dist Avaiardlo A-i Determination of Stabiliser Contents in Advanced Gun Propellants by Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography

  10. A density-independent method for high moisture content measurement using a microstrip transmission line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangjun; Okamura, Seichi

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure high moisture content in materials from 190% to 350% on a dry weight basis. The method uses a microstrip transmission line, on which the material under test is overlaid. A parameter calculated from the attenuation and phase shift of the microwave signal is proposed to measure the moisture content. The experiments were performed on samples of sawdust, and the results show that the method is able to determine high moisture content independent of density. The standard error of calibration for the moisture content determination was 12.4% in the moisture content range from 190% to 350%.

  11. High Content Screening as High Quality Assay for Biological Evaluation of Photosensitizers In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Gisela M. F.; Paszko, Edyta; Davies, Anthony M.; Senge, Mathias O.

    2013-01-01

    A novel single step assay approach to screen a library of photdynamic therapy (PDT) compounds was developed. Utilizing high content analysis (HCA) technologies several robust cellular parameters were identified, which can be used to determine the phototoxic effects of porphyrin compounds which have been developed as potential anticancer agents directed against esophageal carcinoma. To demonstrate the proof of principle of this approach a small detailed study on five porphyrin based compounds was performed utilizing two relevant esophageal cancer cell lines (OE21 and SKGT-4). The measurable outputs from these early studies were then evaluated by performing a pilot screen using a set of 22 compounds. These data were evaluated and validated by performing comparative studies using a traditional colorimetric assay (MTT). The studies demonstrated that the HCS assay offers significant advantages over and above the currently used methods (directly related to the intracellular presence of the compounds by analysis of their integrated intensity and area within the cells). A high correlation was found between the high content screening (HCS) and MTT data. However, the HCS approach provides additional information that allows a better understanding of the behavior of these compounds when interacting at the cellular level. This is the first step towards an automated high-throughput screening of photosensitizer drug candidates and the beginnings of an integrated and comprehensive quantitative structure action relationship (QSAR) study for photosensitizer libraries. PMID:23923014

  12. Improved Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymers at High Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Xuan; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2012-01-01

    The polymer nanocomposite used in this work comprises elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a polymer matrix and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a conductive nanofiller. To achieve uniform distribution of carbon nanotubes within the polymer, an optimized dispersion process was developed, featuring a strong organic solvent—chloroform, which dissolved PDMS base polymer easily and allowed high quality dispersion of MWCNTs. At concentrations as high as 9 wt.%, MWCNTs were dispersed uniformly through the polymer matrix, which presented a major improvement over prior techniques. The dispersion procedure was optimized via extended experimentation, which is discussed in detail.

  13. Compressibility of highly porous network of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawal, Amit; Kumar, Vijay

    2013-10-01

    A simple analytical model for predicting the compressibility of highly porous network of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been proposed based on the theory of compression behavior of textile materials. The compression model of CNT network has accounted for their physical, geometrical, and mechanical properties. The compression behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been predicted and compared with the experimental data pertaining to the compressibility of highly porous nanotube sponges. It has been demonstrated that the compressibility of network of MWCNTs can be tailored depending upon the material parameters and the level of compressive stresses.

  14. Using High-Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping Points (ICTATT meeting China)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation at International Conference on Toxicological Alternatives & Translational Toxicology (ICTATT) held in China and Discussing the possibility of using High Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping Points

  15. Pedagogical content knowledge and preparation of high school physics teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2010-07-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge—PCK). The program has been in place for 7 years and has a steady production rate of an average of six teachers per year who remain in the profession. The main purpose of the paper is to provide information about a possible structure, organization, and individual elements of a program that prepares physics teachers. The philosophy of the program and the coursework can be implemented either in a physics department or in a school of education. The paper provides details about the program course work and teaching experiences and suggests ways to adapt it to other local conditions.

  16. Automated microscopy for high-content RNAi screening

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is one of the most powerful tools to investigate complex cellular processes such as cell division, cell motility, or intracellular trafficking. The availability of RNA interference (RNAi) technology and automated microscopy has opened the possibility to perform cellular imaging in functional genomics and other large-scale applications. Although imaging often dramatically increases the content of a screening assay, it poses new challenges to achieve accurate quantitative annotation and therefore needs to be carefully adjusted to the specific needs of individual screening applications. In this review, we discuss principles of assay design, large-scale RNAi, microscope automation, and computational data analysis. We highlight strategies for imaging-based RNAi screening adapted to different library and assay designs. PMID:20176920

  17. Revision of Fontes & Garnier's model for the initial 14C content of dissolved inorganic carbon used in groundwater dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, Liang-Feng; Plummer, L. Niel

    2013-01-01

    The widely applied model for groundwater dating using 14C proposed by Fontes and Garnier (F&G) (Fontes and Garnier, 1979) estimates the initial 14C content in waters from carbonate-rock aquifers affected by isotopic exchange. Usually, the model of F&G is applied in one of two ways: (1) using a single 13C fractionation factor of gaseous CO2 with respect to a solid carbonate mineral, εg/s, regardless of whether the carbon isotopic exchange is controlled by soil CO2 in the unsaturated zone, or by solid carbonate mineral in the saturated zone; or (2) using different fractionation factors if the exchange process is dominated by soil CO2 gas as opposed to solid carbonate mineral (typically calcite). An analysis of the F&G model shows an inadequate conceptualization, resulting in underestimation of the initial 14C values (14C0) for groundwater systems that have undergone isotopic exchange. The degree to which the 14C0 is underestimated increases with the extent of isotopic exchange. Examples show that in extreme cases, the error in calculated adjusted initial 14C values can be more than 20% modern carbon (pmc). A model is derived that revises the mass balance method of F&G by using a modified model conceptualization. The derivation yields a “global” model both for carbon isotopic exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 in the unsaturated zone, and for carbon isotopic exchange dominated by solid carbonate mineral in the saturated zone. However, the revised model requires different parameters for exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 as opposed to exchange dominated by solid carbonate minerals. The revised model for exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 is shown to be identical to the model of Mook (Mook, 1976). For groundwater systems where exchange occurs both in the unsaturated zone and saturated zone, the revised model can still be used; however, 14C0 will be slightly underestimated. Finally, in carbonate systems undergoing complex geochemical reactions, such as oxidation of

  18. Coupled Carbonization Strategy toward Advanced Hard Carbon for High-Energy Sodium-Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Ming, Hai; Zhang, Wenfeng; Cao, Gaoping; Yang, Yusheng

    2017-07-19

    Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) are expected to be a promising commercial alternative to lithium-ion batteries for grid electricity storage due to their potential low cost in the near future. Up to the present, the anode material still remains a great challenge for the application of SIBs, especially at room temperature. Graphite has an obvious limitation to store larger radius sodium ions (Na(+)) in comparison with lithium ions (Li(+)), while the hard carbon with large interlayer distance can demonstrate a relatively high storage capability and durable cycle life. However, the disadvantages of low initial Coulombic efficiency (ICE) mainly caused by large surface area and high cost synthetic approach hinder its practical applications. Herein, a new coupled carbonization strategy is presented to prepare a cost-effective hard carbon material by pyrolyzing and carbonizing the mixture of abundant sucrose and phenolic resin. Benefiting from the specialized pyrolysis reaction process and optimized conditions as studied in detail, the hard carbon has an extremely low surface area of 1.54 m(2) g(-1) and high initial Coulombic efficiency of 87%, which have been rarely reported before and enhance the utilization efficiency of Na(+) consumption within the cathode in the future. More importantly, the hard carbon, with a high interlayer distance 3.95 Å, can deliver a higher capacity of 319 mAh g(-1) and maintain a finer capacity retention of 90% over 150 cycles. Besides, a full cell with the configuration of as-prepared hard carbon anode versus an air-stable O3-Na0.9[Cu0.22Fe0.30Mn0.48]O2 cathode is further presented, and it has a high ICE of 80% and energy density of 256 Wh kganode(-1) (vs hard carbon) with reliable cycle performance. The results demonstrate that our synthetic strategy is feasible and extendable, while the tunable carbon-based materials should have wider applications in addition to the attractive properties in Na-ion batteries.

  19. Sulfur contents of peats at the confluence of carbonate and peat-forming depositional systems, southeastern Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.D. ); Davies, T.D. ); Spackman, W. )

    1993-08-01

    Complex stratigraphic and compositional relationships have been reported by others at sites where coal beds are laterally in contact with marine carbonates (such as in the southern portion of the Illinois basin). These basin edges are important in that they may (1) represent sites of active coal mining, (2) contain important clues as to the development of the basin, and (3) be sources of the dispersed terrestrial organics encountered in nearby marine rocks. This study was undertaken to investigate peat/carbonate relationships in a modern setting, with initial research on sulfur contents relative to stratigraphic/petrographic conditions. Thirty-eight cores were taken along northwest-southeast transects from the mainland to Florida Bay. The most inland cores consist entirely of peat, representing transgression of marine types (mangrove) over freshwater types. Toward the carbonate-rich bay, a more complex stratigraphy exists. Marine carbonates and peats interfinger, with erosional contacts indicating that parts of the peat sequence are missing. At the coastline, most of the peat is replaced by marine carbonate except for thin (1-10 cm) basal (usually overlain by marine carbonates), with the best preserved ranges from 0.6 to 5.0% (dry) at the most inland sites, 2.4 to 7.8% near the coastline, and 1.5 to 5.9% in bay sediments. Total sulfur is higher in marine than freshwater peats, but freshwater peats overlain by marine peats are enriched in sulfur. Freshwater peats beneath marine carbonates are relatively low in sulfur, but are higher if the peat is overlain by a marine peat before being overlain by the carbonate.

  20. Effect of decarburization annealing temperature and time on the carbon content, microstructure, and texture of grain-oriented pure iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-jun; Rong, Zhe; Xiang, Li; Qiu, Sheng-tao; Li, Jian-xin; Dong, Ting-liang

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the effect of decarburization annealing temperature and time on the carbon content, microstructure, and texture of grain-oriented pure iron was investigated by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron-backscatter diffraction. The results showed that the efficiency of decarburization dramatically increased with increasing decarburization temperature. However, when the annealing temperature was increased to 825°C and 850°C, the steel's carbon content remained essentially unchanged at 0.002%. With increasing decarburization time, the steel's carbon content generally decreased. When both the decarburization temperature and time were increased further, the average grain size dramatically increased and the number of fine grains decreased; meanwhile, some relatively larger grains developed. The main texture types of the decarburized sheets were approximately the same: {001}<110> and {112 115}<110>, with a γ-fiber texture. Furthermore, little change was observed in the texture. Compared with the experimental sheets, the texture of the cold-rolled sheet was very scattered. The best average magnetic induction ( B 800) among the final products was 1.946 T.

  1. Higher peroxidase activity, leaf nutrient contents and carbon isotope composition changes in Arabidopsis thaliana are related to rutin stress.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2014-09-15

    Rutin, a plant secondary metabolite that is used in cosmetics and food additive and has known medicinal properties, protects plants from UV-B radiation and diseases. Rutin has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its mode of action at physiological level is unknown. Here, we report the biochemical, physiological and oxidative response of Arabidopsis thaliana to rutin at micromolar concentrations. It was found that fresh weight; leaf mineral contents (nitrogen, sodium, potassium, copper and aluminum) were decreased following 1 week exposure to rutin. Arabidopsis roots generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species after rutin treatment, consequently increasing membrane lipid peroxidation, decreasing leaf Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) contents and losing root viability. Carbon isotope composition in A. thaliana leaves was less negative after rutin application than the control. Carbon isotope discrimination values were decreased following rutin treatment, with the highest reduction compared to the control at 750μM rutin. Rutin also inhibited the ratio of CO2 from leaf to air (ci/ca) at all concentrations. Total protein contents in A. thaliana leaves were decreased following rutin treatment. It was concluded carbon isotope discrimination coincided with protein degradation, increase lipid peroxidation and a decrease in ci/ca values may be the primary action site of rutin. The present results suggest that rutin possesses allelopathic potential and could be used as a candidate to develop environment friendly natural herbicide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Content in Bituminous Coal by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using UV Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiongwei; Mao, Xianglei; Wang, Zhe; Richard, E. Russo

    2015-11-01

    The carbon content of bituminous coal samples was analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The 266 nm laser radiation was utilized for laser ablation and plasma generation in air. The partial least square method and the dominant factor based PLS method were used to improve the measurement accuracy of the carbon content of coal. The results showed that the PLS model could achieve good measurement accuracy, and the dominant factor based PLS model could further improve the measurement accuracy. The coefficient of determination and the root-mean-square error of prediction of the PLS model were 0.97 and 2.19%, respectively; and those values for the dominant factor based PLS model were 0.99 and 1.51%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the 266 nm wavelength could accurately measure the carbon content of bituminous coal. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51276100) and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2013CB228501). The authors also thank the financial funding from the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Science Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (No. 2013CB228501)

  3. Application of Identification Techniques to Determine Effect of Carbon Content in Steels on Rheological Parameters During Hot Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, L.; Hodgson, P. D.; Pietrzyk, M.

    2004-06-01

    The objective of the present work is searching for the correlation between the carbon content in steels and the parameters of the rheological models, which are used to describe the materials behavior during hot plastic deformation. This correlation can be expected in the internal variable models, which are based on physical phenomena occurring in the material. Such a model, based on the dislocation density as the internal variable, is investigated in this work. The experiments including hot torsion tests are used for the analysis. The procedure is composed of three parts. Plastometric tests were performed for steels with various carbon content. Optimization techniques were applied next to determine the coefficients in the internal variable rheological model for these steels. Two versions of the model are considered. One is based on the average dislocation density and the second accounts for the distribution of dislocation densities. Evaluation of correlation between carbon content and such coefficients in the models as activation energy for self diffusion, activation energy for recrystallization, grain boundary mobility, recovery coefficient etc. was the main objective of the work. In consequence, the model which may be used for simulation of hot forming processes for steels with various chemical compositions, is proposed.

  4. Effects of Retained Austenite Volume Fraction, Morphology, and Carbon Content on Strength and Ductility of Nanostructured TRIP-assisted Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Qiu, LN; Sun, Xin; Zuo, Liang; Liaw, Peter K.; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-06-01

    With a suite of multi-modal and multi-scale characterization techniques, the present study unambiguously proves that a substantially-improved combination of ultrahigh strength and good ductility can be achieved by tailoring the volume fraction, morphology, and carbon content of the retained austenite (RA) in a transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steel with the nominal chemical composition of 0.19C-0.30Si-1.76Mn-1.52Al (weight percent, wt.%). After intercritical annealing and bainitic holding, a combination ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 1,100 MPa and true strain of 50% has been obtained, as a result of the ultrafine RA lamellae, which are alternately arranged in the bainitic ferrite around junction regions of ferrite grains. For reference, specimens with a blocky RA, prepared without the bainitic holding, yield a low ductility (35%) and a low UTS (800 MPa). The volume fraction, morphology, and carbon content of RA have been characterized using various techniques, including magnetic probing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-backscatter-diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Interrupted tensile tests, mapped using EBSD in conjunction with the kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis, reveal that the lamellar RA is the governingmicrostructure component responsible for the higher mechanical stability, compared to the blocky one. By coupling these various techniques, we quantitatively demonstrate that in addition to the RA volume fraction, its morphology and carbon content are equally important in optimizing the strength and ductility of TRIP-assisted steels.

  5. Ultralow viscosity of carbonate melts at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yoshio; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Hummer, Daniel; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Park, Changyong; Shen, Guoyin; Wang, Yanbin; Kavner, Abby; Manning, Craig E

    2014-10-14

    Knowledge of the occurrence and mobility of carbonate-rich melts in the Earth's mantle is important for understanding the deep carbon cycle and related geochemical and geophysical processes. However, our understanding of the mobility of carbonate-rich melts remains poor. Here we report viscosities of carbonate melts up to 6.2 GPa using a newly developed technique of ultrafast synchrotron X-ray imaging. These carbonate melts display ultralow viscosities, much lower than previously thought, in the range of 0.006-0.010 Pa s, which are ~2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than those of basaltic melts in the upper mantle. As a result, the mobility of carbonate melts (defined as the ratio of melt-solid density contrast to melt viscosity) is ~2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of basaltic melts. Such high mobility has significant influence on several magmatic processes, such as fast melt migration and effective melt extraction beneath mid-ocean ridges.

  6. New crude oils from the Checheno-Ingush ASSR with high contents of hydrogen sulfide in the associated gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dorogochinskaya, V.A.; Shul'zhenko, E.D.; Varshaver, V.P.; Khabibulina, R.K.

    1987-07-01

    The crude oils that the authors have investigated differ from those obtained in previously discovered fields of the Checheno-Ingush ASSR in having lower contents of wax, higher contents of mercaptan sulfur and aromatic hydrocarbons in the light kerosene cuts, high acidity of all distillates, low carbon residue of the residual stocks, and higher viscosity index of the lube stocks. The general direction in processing these crudes should be the fuel/oil version, obtaining the following products: a wide-cut diesel fuel either winter-grade low-sulfur fuel or a low-pour component of summer-grade diesel fuel, and also feedstocks for the production of liquid paraffins; a wide cut (350-490/sup 0/C) as cat cracker feed; and a residue above 350/sup 0/C for the production of high-V.I. distillate and residual lubes.

  7. Enhanced biological carbon consumption in a high CO2 ocean.

    PubMed

    Riebesell, U; Schulz, K G; Bellerby, R G J; Botros, M; Fritsche, P; Meyerhöfer, M; Neill, C; Nondal, G; Oschlies, A; Wohlers, J; Zöllner, E

    2007-11-22

    The oceans have absorbed nearly half of the fossil-fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted into the atmosphere since pre-industrial times, causing a measurable reduction in seawater pH and carbonate saturation. If CO2 emissions continue to rise at current rates, upper-ocean pH will decrease to levels lower than have existed for tens of millions of years and, critically, at a rate of change 100 times greater than at any time over this period. Recent studies have shown effects of ocean acidification on a variety of marine life forms, in particular calcifying organisms. Consequences at the community to ecosystem level, in contrast, are largely unknown. Here we show that dissolved inorganic carbon consumption of a natural plankton community maintained in mesocosm enclosures at initial CO2 partial pressures of 350, 700 and 1,050 microatm increases with rising CO2. The community consumed up to 39% more dissolved inorganic carbon at increased CO2 partial pressures compared to present levels, whereas nutrient uptake remained the same. The stoichiometry of carbon to nitrogen drawdown increased from 6.0 at low CO2 to 8.0 at high CO2, thus exceeding the Redfield carbon:nitrogen ratio of 6.6 in today's ocean. This excess carbon consumption was associated with higher loss of organic carbon from the upper layer of the stratified mesocosms. If applicable to the natural environment, the observed responses have implications for a variety of marine biological and biogeochemical processes, and underscore the importance of biologically driven feedbacks in the ocean to global change.

  8. Advanced in-situ measurement of soil carbon content using inelastic neutron scattering

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measurement and mapping of natural and anthropogenic variations in soil carbon stores is a critical component of any soil resource evaluation process. Emerging modalities for soil carbon analysis in the field is the registration of gamma rays from soil under neutron irradiation. The inelastic neutro...

  9. An estimate of anthropogenic CO2 inventory from decadal changes in oceanic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Tanhua, Toste; Körtzinger, Arne; Friis, Karsten; Waugh, Darryn W; Wallace, Douglas W R

    2007-02-27

    Increased knowledge of the present global carbon cycle is important for our ability to understand and to predict the future carbon cycle and global climate. Approximately half of the anthropogenic carbon released to the atmosphere from fossil fuel burning is stored in the ocean, although distribution and regional fluxes of the ocean sink are debated. Estimates of anthropogenic carbon (C(ant)) in the oceans remain prone to error arising from (i) a need to estimate preindustrial reference concentrations of carbon for different oceanic regions, and (ii) differing behavior of transient ocean tracers used to infer C(ant). We introduce an empirical approach to estimate C(ant) that circumvents both problems by using measurement of the decadal change of ocean carbon concentrations and the exponential nature of the atmospheric C(ant) increase. In contrast to prior approaches, the results are independent of tracer data but are shown to be qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with tracer-derived estimates. The approach reveals more C(ant) in the deep ocean than prior studies; with possible implications for future carbon uptake and deep ocean carbonate dissolution. Our results suggest that this approachs applied on the unprecedented global data archive provides a means of estimating the C(ant) for large parts of the world's ocean.

  10. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; ...

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films withmore » up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.« less

  11. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  12. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  13. Directed evolution of an ultrastable carbonic anhydrase for highly efficient carbon capture from flue gas

    PubMed Central

    Alvizo, Oscar; Nguyen, Luan J.; Savile, Christopher K.; Bresson, Jamie A.; Lakhapatri, Satish L.; Solis, Earl O. P.; Fox, Richard J.; Broering, James M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Zimmerman, Sabrina A.; Novick, Scott J.; Liang, Jack; Lalonde, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is one of nature’s fastest enzymes and can dramatically improve the economics of carbon capture under demanding environments such as coal-fired power plants. The use of CA to accelerate carbon capture is limited by the enzyme’s sensitivity to the harsh process conditions. Using directed evolution, the properties of a β-class CA from Desulfovibrio vulgaris were dramatically enhanced. Iterative rounds of library design, library generation, and high-throughput screening identified highly stable CA variant