Science.gov

Sample records for high cholesterolfructose-fed rats

  1. A high-resolution anatomical rat atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xueling; Yu, Li; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jie; Li, Anan; Han, Dao; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the availability of a high-resolution atlas of the adult rat. The atlas is composed of 9475 cryosectional images captured in 4600 × 2580 × 24-bit TIFF format, constructed using serial cryosection-milling techniques. Cryosection images were segmented, labelled and reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) computerized models. These images, 3D models, technical details, relevant software and further information are available at our website, http://vchibp.vicp.net/vch/mice/. PMID:17062027

  2. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  3. Amphetamine Conditioned Place Preference in High and Low Impulsive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Justin R.; Marusich, Julie A.; Gipson, Cassandra D.; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulants such as d-amphetamine (AMPH) are used commonly to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but concerns have been raised regarding the use of AMPH due to its reinforcing and potentially addictive properties. The current study examined if individual differences in impulsive choice predict AMPH-induced hyperactivity and conditioned place preference (CPP). Rats were first tested in delay discounting using an adjusting delay procedure to measure impulsive choice and then were subsequently tested for AMPH CPP. High impulsive (HiI) and low impulsive (LoI) rats were conditioned across four sessions with 0.1, 0.5, or 1.5 mg/kg of AMPH. AMPH increased locomotor activity for HiI and LoI rats following 0.5 mg/kg but failed to increase activity following 0.1 and 1.5 mg/kg. CPP was established for HiI rats with both 0.5 and 1.5 mg/kg of AMPH, whereas LoI rats did not develop CPP following any dose of AMPH; HiI and LoI groups differed significantly following 0.5 mg/kg of AMPH. These results indicate that HiI rats are more sensitive to the rewarding effects of AMPH compared to LoI rats, which is consistent with research showing that high impulsive individuals may be more vulnerable to stimulant abuse. PMID:21807020

  4. High prevalence of rat hepatitis E virus in wild rats in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Guan, Dawei; Su, Juan; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji; Li, Tian-Cheng; Ke, Chang Wen

    2013-08-30

    Serum samples from a total of 713 wild rats captured in Zhanjiang city in China from December 2011 to September 2012 were investigated for the prevalence of rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) by exploring rat HEV-specific antibodies and RNA. By an ELISA based on recombinant rat HEV-like particles (HEV-LPs), 23.3% (166/713) of the rats were positive for anti-HEV IgG, and 8.3% (59/713) were positive for anti-HEV IgM. The IgG-positive rates in Rattus norvegicus, Bandicota indica, Rattus flavipectus, Rattus rattoides losea, and Rattus rattus hainanus, were 27.8% (64/230), 23.0% (40/174), 19.9% (34/171), 21.5% (26/121), and 11.8% (2/17), while the IgM-positive rates were 8.3% (19/230), 6.9% (12/174), 8.2% (14/171), 10.7% (13/121), and 5.9% (1/17), respectively. The IgG-positive rate of the rats captured in rural areas, 24.1% (84/348), was higher than that in the central area of Zhanjiang city, 15.1% (32/212). The highest IgG-positive rates, as high as 45.3% (39/86), were detected in wild rats trapped in the garbage dump. Twelve of the 59 IgM-positive serum samples were positive for HEV RNA, which was detected in all of the wild rat species except R. rattus hainanus. A phylogenetic analysis of the partial genome of rat HEV ORF1 indicated that all of the 12 HEV strains belong to rat HEV, and no other genotype HEV were detected. The rat HEV from Zhangjiang city could be classified into three separated clusters, suggesting that the infection due to rat HEV with a variety of genome entities occurs extensively among wild rats in China.

  5. Reduction of dimethylarsinic acid to the highly toxic dimethylarsinous acid by rats and rat liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Németi, Balázs; Gregus, Zoltán

    2013-03-18

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)), the major urinary metabolite of inorganic arsenic, is weakly cytotoxic, whereas its reduced form, dimethylarsinous acid (DMAs(III)), is highly toxic. Although glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and arsenic methyltransferase have been shown or thought to catalyze DMAs(V) reduction, their role in DMAs(V) reduction in vivo, or in cell extracts is uncertain. Therefore, the reduction of DMAs(V) to DMAs(III) in rats and in rat liver cytosol was studied to better understand its mechanism. To assess DMAs(V) reduction in rats, a novel procedure was devised based on following the accumulation of red blood cell (RBC)-bound dimethylarsenic (DMAs), which represents DMAs(III), in the blood of DMAs(V)-injected anesthetized rats. These studies indicated that rats reduced DMAs(V) to DMAs(III) to a significant extent, as in 90 min 31% of the injected 50 μmol/kg DMAs(V) dose was converted to DMAs(III) that was sequestered by the circulating erythrocytes. Pretreatment of rats with glutathione (GSH) depletors (phorone or BSO) delayed the elimination of DMAs(V) and the accumulation of RBC-bound DMAs, whereas the indirect methyltransferase inhibitor periodate-oxidized adenosine was without effect. Assessment of DMAs(V)-reducing activity of rat liver cytosol revealed that reduction of DMAs(V) required cytosolic protein and GSH and was inhibited by thiol reagents, GSSG and dehydroascorbate. Although thioredoxin reductase (TRR) inhibitors (aurothioglucose and Sb(III)) inhibited cytosolic DMAs(V) reduction, recombinant rat TRR plus NADPH, alone or when added to the cytosol, failed to support DMAs(V) reduction. On ultrafiltration of the cytosol through a 3 kDa filter, the reducing activity in the retentate was lost but was largely restored by NADPH. Such experiments also suggested that the reducing enzyme was larger than 100 kDa and was not GSTO1. In summary, reduction of DMAs(V) to the highly toxic DMAs(III) in rats and rat liver cytosol is a GSH

  6. A high fructose diet impairs spatial memory in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ross, A P; Bartness, T J; Mielke, J G; Parent, M B

    2009-10-01

    Over the past three decades there has been a substantial increase in the amount of fructose consumed by North Americans. Recent evidence from rodents indicates that hippocampal insulin signaling facilitates memory and excessive fructose consumption produces hippocampal insulin resistance. Based on this evidence, the present study tested the hypothesis that a high fructose diet would impair hippocampal-dependent memory. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (postnatal day 61) were fed either a control (0% fructose) or high fructose diet (60% of calories). Food intake and body mass were measured regularly. After 19 weeks, the rats were given 3 days of training (8 trials/day) in a spatial version of the water maze task, and retention performance was probed 48 h later. The high fructose diet did not affect acquisition of the task, but did impair performance on the retention test. Specifically, rats fed a high fructose diet displayed significantly longer latencies to reach the area where the platform had been located, made significantly fewer approaches to that area, and spent significantly less time in the target quadrant than did control diet rats. There was no difference in swim speed between the two groups. The retention deficits correlated significantly with fructose-induced elevations of plasma triglyceride concentrations. Consequently, the impaired spatial water maze retention performance seen with the high fructose diet may have been attributable, at least in part, to fructose-induced increases in plasma triglycerides.

  7. Pancreatic functions in high salt fed female rats

    PubMed Central

    Lasheen, Noha N

    2015-01-01

    Salt consumption has been increased worldwide and the association of high salt diets with enhanced inflammation and target organ damage was reported. Little data were available about the effect of high salt diet on exocrine function of pancreas, while the relation between high salt intake and insulin sensitivity was controversial. This study was designed to investigate the effect of high salt diet on exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions, and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanism(s). Twenty adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups; control group; fed standard rodent diet containing 0.3% NaCl, and high salt fed group; fed 8% NaCl for 8 weeks. On the day of sacrifice, rats were anesthized by i.p. pentobarbitone (40 μg/kg B.W.). Nasoanal length was measured and fasting blood glucose was determined from rat tail. Blood samples were obtained from abdominal aorta for determination of plasma sodium, potassium, amylase, lipase, aldosterone, insulin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1), and interleukin 6 (IL6). Pancreata of both groups were histologically studied. Compared to control group, 8-week high salt fed group showed: significant elevation in body weight, body mass index, Lee index, plasma sodium, TGF-β1 and IL6, however, plasma aldosterone, amylase, lipase, and insulin levels were significantly decreased. A nonsignificant increase in plasma potassium and nonsignificant changes in fasting blood glucose and HOMA-IR were detected between groups. Pancreatic fibrosis was observed in test group. High salt diet for 8 weeks caused pancreatic fibrosis evidenced by decline of both exocrine and endocrine functions of pancreas in Wistar rats. PMID:26216433

  8. High-fat diet-induced obesity Rat model: a comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley Rat

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia; Meireles, Manuela; Norberto, Sónia; Leite, Joana; Freitas, Joana; Pestana, Diogo; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the past decades, obesity and associated metabolic complications have reached epidemic proportions. For the study of these pathologies, a number of animal models have been developed. However, a direct comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley (SD) Rat as models of high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity has not been adequately evaluated so far. Wistar and SD rats were assigned for 2 experimental groups for 17 weeks: standard (St) and high-fat (HF) diet groups. To assess some of the features of the metabolic syndrome, oral glucose tolerance tests, systolic blood pressure measurements and blood biochemical analysis were performed throughout the study. The gut microbiota composition of the animals of each group was evaluated at the end of the study by real-time PCR. HF diet increased weight gain, body fat mass, mesenteric adipocyte's size, adiponectin and leptin plasma levels and decreased oral glucose tolerance in both Wistar and SD rats. However, the majority of these effects were more pronounced or earlier detected in Wistar rats. The gut microbiota of SD rats was less abundant in Bacteroides and Prevotella but richer in Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus comparatively to the gut microbiota of Wistar rats. Nevertheless, the modulation of the gut microbiota by HF diet was similar in both strains, except for Clostridium leptum that was only reduced in Wistar rats fed with HF diet. In conclusion, both Wistar and SD Rat can be used as models of HF diet-induced obesity although the metabolic effects caused by HF diet seemed to be more pronounced in Wistar Rat. Differences in the gut microbial ecology may account for the worsened metabolic scenario observed in Wistar Rat. PMID:27144092

  9. Identification of rat mammary tumor-1 gene (RMT-1), which is highly expressed in rat mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Chiou, S; Yoo, J; Loh, K C; Guzman, R C; Gopinath, G R; Rajkumar, L; Chou, Y C; Yang, J; Popescu, N C; Nandi, S

    2001-12-10

    Full-term pregnancy early in life results in a permanent reduction in lifetime breast cancer risk in women. Parous rats and mice are also refractory to chemical carcinogenesis. Therefore, investigation of the differences between mammary glands from virgin and parous rats would provide valuable information regarding the protective effects of early full-term pregnancy. In this report, we examined the gene expression patterns in mammary glands from virgin and parous Lewis rats. Using differential display technology, a novel 4.2 kb cDNA, designated rat mammary tumor-1 (RMT-1) was isolated. Northern blot analysis of RMT-1 showed that RMT-1 expression was higher in the pre-pubertal and pubertal stages during rat mammary gland development while it was down-regulated in mammary glands from mature virgin and parous rats. RMT-1 expression was highest in rat mammary cancers compared with either the mammary glands of virgin or parous rats. At the Northern blot sensitivity level, RMT-1 expression was found only in the mammary gland. Northern blot analysis also showed that the expression of this gene was found in 74% of N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary cancers while it was not found in MNU-induced cancers from other organs. The examination of the RMT-1 gene structure revealed that it consists of five exons spanning 5.9 kb. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the gene was localized on rat chromosome 1 band q 43-51. The present data show that there is a correlation between high RMT-1 expression and rat mammary carcinogenesis or decreased RMT-1 expression and parity associated refractoriness to chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis. However, whether or not RMT-1 gene has a functional role in these processes remains to be investigated.

  10. Voluntary Running Aids to Maintain High Body Temperature in Rats Bred for High Aerobic Capacity.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Sira M; Silvennoinen, Mika; Ma, Hongqiang; Törmäkangas, Timo; Rantalainen, Timo; Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Rita; Lensu, Sanna; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    The production of heat, i.e., thermogenesis, is a significant component of the metabolic rate, which in turn affects weight gain and health. Thermogenesis is linked to physical activity (PA) level. However, it is not known whether intrinsic exercise capacity, aging, and long-term voluntary running affect core body temperature. Here we use rat models selectively bred to differ in maximal treadmill endurance running capacity (Low capacity runners, LCR and High capacity Runners, HCR), that as adults are divergent for aerobic exercise capacity, aging, and metabolic disease risk to study the connection between PA and body temperature. Ten high capacity runner (HCR) and ten low capacity runner (LCR) female rats were studied between 9 and 21 months of age. Rectal body temperature of HCR and LCR rats was measured before and after 1-year voluntary running/control intervention to explore the effects of aging and PA. Also, we determined whether injected glucose and spontaneous activity affect the body temperature differently between LCR and HCR rats at 9 vs. 21 months of age. HCRs had on average 1.3°C higher body temperature than LCRs (p < 0.001). Aging decreased the body temperature level of HCRs to similar levels with LCRs. The opportunity to run voluntarily had a significant impact on the body temperature of HCRs (p < 0.001) allowing them to maintain body temperature at a similar level as when at younger age. Compared to LCRs, HCRs were spontaneously more active, had higher relative gastrocnemius muscle mass and higher UCP2, PGC-1α, cyt c, and OXPHOS levels in the skeletal muscle (p < 0.050). These results suggest that higher PA level together with greater relative muscle mass and higher mitochondrial content/function contribute to the accumulation of heat in the HCRs. Interestingly, neither aging nor voluntary training had a significant impact on core body temperature of LCRs. However, glucose injection resulted in a lowering of the body temperature of LCRs (p < 0

  11. Voluntary Running Aids to Maintain High Body Temperature in Rats Bred for High Aerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Karvinen, Sira M.; Silvennoinen, Mika; Ma, Hongqiang; Törmäkangas, Timo; Rantalainen, Timo; Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Rita; Lensu, Sanna; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    The production of heat, i.e., thermogenesis, is a significant component of the metabolic rate, which in turn affects weight gain and health. Thermogenesis is linked to physical activity (PA) level. However, it is not known whether intrinsic exercise capacity, aging, and long-term voluntary running affect core body temperature. Here we use rat models selectively bred to differ in maximal treadmill endurance running capacity (Low capacity runners, LCR and High capacity Runners, HCR), that as adults are divergent for aerobic exercise capacity, aging, and metabolic disease risk to study the connection between PA and body temperature. Ten high capacity runner (HCR) and ten low capacity runner (LCR) female rats were studied between 9 and 21 months of age. Rectal body temperature of HCR and LCR rats was measured before and after 1-year voluntary running/control intervention to explore the effects of aging and PA. Also, we determined whether injected glucose and spontaneous activity affect the body temperature differently between LCR and HCR rats at 9 vs. 21 months of age. HCRs had on average 1.3°C higher body temperature than LCRs (p < 0.001). Aging decreased the body temperature level of HCRs to similar levels with LCRs. The opportunity to run voluntarily had a significant impact on the body temperature of HCRs (p < 0.001) allowing them to maintain body temperature at a similar level as when at younger age. Compared to LCRs, HCRs were spontaneously more active, had higher relative gastrocnemius muscle mass and higher UCP2, PGC-1α, cyt c, and OXPHOS levels in the skeletal muscle (p < 0.050). These results suggest that higher PA level together with greater relative muscle mass and higher mitochondrial content/function contribute to the accumulation of heat in the HCRs. Interestingly, neither aging nor voluntary training had a significant impact on core body temperature of LCRs. However, glucose injection resulted in a lowering of the body temperature of LCRs (p < 0

  12. Isolation of high density lipoproteins from rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Magun, A M; Brasitus, T A; Glickman, R M

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have defined forms of high density lipoproteins (HDL) in rat mesenteric lymph, suggesting that they have a secretory origin. This study describes the isolation and characterization of intestinal intracellular HDL. Two preparations were made as follows: (a) Rat enterocytes were isolated and a Golgi organelle fraction was prepared. (b) Cell homogenates were subjected to nitrogen cavitation and a cytoplasmic fraction was prepared. Lipoproteins were isolated from both preparations by sequential ultracentrifugation. When the HDL fraction (1.07-1.21 g/ml) was subjected to isopyknic density gradient ultracentrifugation, a peak of apoproteins A-I and B (apoA-I and apoB, respectively) was found at a density of 1.11-1.14 g/ml. Electron microscopy of the fraction showed spherical particles ranging in size from 6 to 13 nm. Immunoelectrophoresis revealed a precipitin arc in the alpha region against apoA-I which extended into the pre-beta region where a precipitin arc against apoB was also seen. ApoB antisera depleted the pre-beta particles whereas the alpha migrating particles remained. Lipid analysis of the whole HDL fraction revealed phospholipid, cholesteryl ester, and triglyceride as the major lipids. [3H]leucine was then administered into the duodenum and a radiolabeled intracellular HDL fraction was isolated. The newly synthesized apoproteins of the HDL fraction, as determined by gel electrophoresis, were apoB, apoA-I, and apolipoprotein A-IV (ApoA-IV). Immunoprecipitation of the apoB particles revealed apoA-I and apoA-IV in the supernatant. These data demonstrate that there are at least two intracellular intestinal forms of HDL particles, one of which contains apoB. The other particle contains apoA-I and apoA-IV, has alpha mobility, is spherical, and resembles a particle found in the lymph. Images PMID:3965504

  13. Effect of high fat, fiber and caloric restriction on rat mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, D.; Van Sant, J.; Butler, B.

    1986-03-05

    Female rats given 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were placed on diets of control fat (CF-4.5%) or high fat (HF-20%) with either control fiber (6%) or high fiber (FB-12%). A 60% reduction in the CF diet was used to study the effects of caloric restriction on tumorigenesis. Results showed that HF diets had a shorter latency period than CF rats. The respective average number of tumors per rat and tumor volume were 7.3 +/- 1.3 and 23694 mm/sup 2/ for rats on a HF diet and 5.1+/-1.1 and 9144 mm/sup 3/ for CF rats. Addition of high fiber to the diets reduced the tumor incidence from 95% to 70% in the CF group but did not reduce the incidence in HF group. Although tumor number was reduced to 3.7+/-1.5 in CF+FB rats, the tumor volumes were not reduced (8950 mm/sup 3/). Rats fed HF+FB did not have fewer tumors (7.0+/-1.1), but did show a 53% reduction in tumor load. The estrogen dependent enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was not affected by dietary levels of fat, which suggests that the promotional effects of fat may not be through estrogen stimulation. None of the caloric restricted rats had tumors 12 weeks post-DMBA. These restricted rats all had significantly elevated levels of serum corticosterone.

  14. Chronic psychological stress enhances nociceptive processing in the urinary bladder in high-anxiety rats.

    PubMed

    Robbins, M T; DeBerry, J; Ness, T J

    2007-08-15

    This study sought to determine whether acute and/or chronic psychological stress produce changes in urinary bladder nociception. Female Sprague-Dawley (SD; low/moderate anxiety) or Wistar-Kyoto (WK; high-anxiety) rats were exposed to either an acute (1 day) or a chronic (10 days) water avoidance stress paradigm or a sham stress paradigm. Paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli and fecal pellet output, were quantified at baseline and after the final stress or sham stress exposure. Rats were then sedated, and visceromotor responses (VMRs) to urinary bladder distension (UBD) were recorded. While acute stress exposure did not significantly alter bladder nociceptive responses in either strain of rats, WK rats exposed to a chronic stress paradigm exhibited enhanced responses to UBD. These high-anxiety rats also exhibited somatic analgesia following acute, but not chronic, stress. Furthermore, WK rats had greater fecal pellet output than SD rats when stressed. Significant stress-induced changes in nociceptive responses to mechanical stimuli were observed in SD rats. That chronic psychological stress significantly enhanced bladder nociceptive responses only in high-anxiety rats provides further support for a critical role of genetics, stress and anxiety as exacerbating factors in painful urogenital disorders such as interstitial cystitis (IC).

  15. High fat diet-fed obese rats are highly sensitive to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Mayurranjan S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; White, Brent; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-09-15

    Often, chemotherapy by doxorubicin (Adriamycin) is limited due to life threatening cardiotoxicity in patients during and posttherapy. Recently, we have shown that moderate diet restriction remarkably protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. This cardioprotection is accompanied by decreased cardiac oxidative stress and triglycerides and increased cardiac fatty-acid oxidation, ATP synthesis, and upregulated JAK/STAT3 pathway. In the current study, we investigated whether a physiological intervention by feeding 40% high fat diet (HFD), which induces obesity in male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-275 g), sensitizes to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. A LD{sub 10} dose (8 mg doxorubicin/kg, ip) administered on day 43 of the HFD feeding regimen led to higher cardiotoxicity, cardiac dysfunction, lipid peroxidation, and 80% mortality in the obese (OB) rats in the absence of any significant renal or hepatic toxicity. Doxorubicin toxicokinetics studies revealed no change in accumulation of doxorubicin and doxorubicinol (toxic metabolite) in the normal diet-fed (ND) and OB hearts. Mechanistic studies revealed that OB rats are sensitized due to: (1) higher oxyradical stress leading to upregulation of uncoupling proteins 2 and 3, (2) downregulation of cardiac peroxisome proliferators activated receptor-{alpha}, (3) decreased plasma adiponectin levels, (4) decreased cardiac fatty-acid oxidation (666.9 {+-} 14.0 nmol/min/g heart in ND versus 400.2 {+-} 11.8 nmol/min/g heart in OB), (5) decreased mitochondrial AMP-{alpha}2 protein kinase, and (6) 86% drop in cardiac ATP levels accompanied by decreased ATP/ADP ratio after doxorubicin administration. Decreased cardiac erythropoietin and increased SOCS3 further downregulated the cardioprotective JAK/STAT3 pathway. In conclusion, HFD-induced obese rats are highly sensitized to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by substantially downregulating cardiac mitochondrial ATP generation, increasing oxidative stress and downregulating

  16. Inulin oligofructose attenuates metabolic syndrome in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil A; Ward, Leigh C; Brown, Lindsay

    2016-11-01

    Prebiotics alter bacterial content in the colon, and therefore could be useful for obesity management. We investigated the changes following addition of inulin oligofructose (IO) in the food of rats fed either a corn starch (C) diet or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (H) diet as a model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. IO did not affect food intake, but reduced body weight gain by 5·3 and 12·3 % in corn starch+inulin oligofructose (CIO) and high-carbohydrate, high-fat with inulin oligofructose (HIO) rats, respectively. IO reduced plasma concentrations of free fatty acids by 26·2 % and TAG by 75·8 % in HIO rats. IO increased faecal output by 93·2 %, faecal lipid excretion by 37·9 % and weight of caecum by 23·4 % and colon by 41·5 % in HIO rats. IO improved ileal morphology by reducing inflammation and improving the density of crypt cells in HIO rats. IO attenuated H diet-induced increases in abdominal fat pads (C 275 (sem 19), CIO 264 (sem 40), H 688 (sem 55), HIO 419 (sem 32) mg/mm tibial length), fasting blood glucose concentrations (C 4·5 (sem 0·1), CIO 4·2 (sem 0·1), H 5·2 (sem 0·1), HIO 4·3 (sem 0·1) mmol/l), systolic blood pressure (C 124 (sem 2), CIO 118 (sem 2), H 152 (sem 2), HIO 123 (sem 3) mmHg), left ventricular diastolic stiffness (C 22·9 (sem 0·6), CIO 22·9 (sem 0·5), H 27·8 (sem 0·5), HIO 22·6 (sem 1·2)) and plasma alanine transaminase (C 29·6 (sem 2·8), CIO 32·1 (sem 3·0), H 43·9 (sem 2·6), HIO 33·6 (sem 2·0) U/l). IO attenuated H-induced increases in inflammatory cell infiltration in the heart and liver, lipid droplets in the liver and plasma lipids as well as impaired glucose and insulin tolerance. These results suggest that increasing soluble fibre intake with IO improves signs of the metabolic syndrome by decreasing gastrointestinal carbohydrate and lipid uptake.

  17. Acute toxicity of high concentrations of carbon dioxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Muijser, H; van Triel, J J; Duistermaat, E; Bos, P M J

    2014-07-01

    Subterranean storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been proposed to diminish atmospheric increases of this greenhouse gas. To contribute to risk assessment of accidental release associated with handling, transport and storage, rats were exposed to high concentrations (targets 40, 43 and 50 volume %) of CO2. The oxygen concentrations dropped as a result, but were not supplemented. For each concentration, pairs of animals were exposed for different exposure durations to derive an exposure concentration-duration relation in which mortality is described as a function of C(n)×t (probit relation). A very high "n" value for the probit function could be derived from the data obtained at 40% and 43% CO2, which indicates that for exposure durations longer than 30 min the LC50 decreases hardly with increasing exposure duration. Below 30 min the LC50 seemed to increase with decreasing exposure durations. The variability in the data of 43% and 50% CO2, however, did not allow to derive a meaningful value of "n".

  18. Food dependence in rats selectively bred for low versus high saccharin intake. Implications for "food addiction".

    PubMed

    Yakovenko, Veronica; Speidel, Elizabeth R; Chapman, Clinton D; Dess, Nancy K

    2011-10-01

    The "food addiction" concept implies that proneness to drug dependence and to food dependence should covary. The latter was studied in low- (LoS) and high- (HiS) saccharin-consuming rats, who differ in drug self-administration (HiS>LoS) and withdrawal (LoS>HiS). Sugary food intake in the first 1-2 h was higher in HiS than LoS rats. Sugar intake predicted startle during abstinence only among LoS rats. These results may suggest bingeing-proneness in HiS rats and withdrawal-proneness among LoS rats. However, intake escalation and somatic withdrawal did not differ between lines. Further study with selectively bred rats, with attention to definitions and measures, is warranted.

  19. High mortality rates occur in copper deficient rats exposed to a normally nonlethal endotoxin treatment

    SciTech Connect

    DiSilvestro, R.; Joseph, E.; Yang, F.L. )

    1991-03-15

    Endotoxin hepatotoxicity is proposed to occur by processes which could be retarded by 3 copper enzymes: ceruloplasmin, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), and extracellular (EC) SOD. Weanling rats fed low copper for 40 days showed low activity levels of these enzymes, and a very high mortality rate 20 h after endotoxin injection. No rats fed adequate copper died from this treatment. In addition, serum transaminase activities, indicators of liver damage, were elevated by 3 h to a greater extent in the deficient rats than in the adequates. The high susceptibility to endotoxemia in the deficient rats was not associated with low hepatic glutathione, high liver malondialedhyde, nor restricted metallothionein induction 3 h after endotoxin injection. Endotoxin reduced serum EC SOD activities in adequate and deficient rats, but final values were lower in the latter. Studies on roles of specific copper enzymes in resistance to endotoxemia are currently underway.

  20. Reproductive parameters and oxidative stress status of male rats fed with low and high salt diet

    PubMed Central

    Iranloye, Bolanle O.; Oludare, Gabriel O.; Morakinyo, Ayodele O.; Esume, Naomi A.; Ekeh, Lucy C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deficiency of minerals and micronutrients has been reported to impair the process of spermatogenesis. Historically, salt has been used by women on their husbands to increase their libido, however, the role of salt diet on sperm parameters are yet to be ascertained. AIM: The present study was designed to determine the effect of low and high salt diet on sperm parameters, oxidative status and reproductive hormone levels of male rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 18 rats were divided into three groups: Group I: (control) received 0.3% salt diet, Group II: low salt (received 0.14% salt diet) and Group III: high salt (received 8% salt diet). All animals were treated for 6 weeks; after which epididymal sperm parameters; oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) in the testes and epididymal tissues, as well as follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone levels were determined. RESULTS: The results showed decreased sperm count in the low salt diet rats while increased sperm count was observed in the high salt diet treated rats. Both low salt and high salt diet fed rats exhibited increased abnormal sperm cells and increased epididymal oxidative stress when compared with their respective control. FSH and testosterone levels were increased in the high salt fed rats while LH level was decreased when compared with the control values. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that both low and high salt diet play a negative role in the fertility of male rats. PMID:24672168

  1. High-molecular-mass hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole rat.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-07-18

    The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years. In addition to their longevity, naked mole rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole rat's cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high-molecular-mass hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high-molecular-mass HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole-rat tissues owing to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signalling, as they have a higher affinity to HA compared with mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signalling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high-molecular-mass HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, HYAL2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumours in mice. We speculate that naked mole rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species.

  2. Rats of hypertensive ISIAH strain are resistant to the development of metabolic syndrome induced by high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Dushkin, M I; Khrapova, M V; Kovshik, G G; Chasovskikh, M I; Selyatitskaya, V G; Palchikova, N A

    2014-03-01

    We studied the influence of high-fat diet on the development of metabolic syndrome in rats of hypertensive ISIAH strain and normotensive WAG strain. In contrast to ISIAH rats, high-fat diet in WAG rats led visceral obesity, glucose tolerance, and dyslipidemia. DNA-binding activity of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) decreased in the liver of WAG rats and increased in ISIAH rats. Blood levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and corticosterone increased more significantly in WAG rats. Corticosterone content in the adrenal glands was more markedly reduced in WAG rats. High-fat diet had no effect on BP in ISIAH and WAG rats. It was concluded that ISIAH rats can be used as a genetic model in studies of the mechanism of resistance to the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Increased metallothionein content in rat liver induced by x irradiation and exposure to high oxygen tension

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, N.; Aono, K.; Utsumi, K.

    1983-08-01

    X irradiation and exposure to high oxygen tension are known to induce lipid peroxidation. The effects of these stresses on hepatic content of metallothionein, which may be involved in the regulation of zinc and copper metabolism, have been studied. The amount of metallothionein in rat liver was increased 11-fold by a high dose of X irradiation (1000 R). Increased metallothionein content (about 15 times) was also observed in liver of rats exposed to high oxygen tension for 3 days.

  4. Renoprotective and antioxidant effects of Saururus chinensis Baill in rats fed a high-fructose diet

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ha-Neul; Park, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kang, Min-Jung; Jeong, Soo-Mi; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the preventive effect of Saururus chinensis Baill against renal damage induced by a high-fructose diet in rats. The rats (n = 30) were fed either a cornstarch-based (65%), high-fructose (65%), or high-fructose (64.5%) diet with 0.5% S. chinensis Baill extract for 10 weeks. Twenty-four hour urine collections were obtained and the animals were sacrificed after an overnight fast. Serum urea and creatinine and urine albumin were measured using colorimetric methods, and creatinine clearance was determined. In addition, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH), and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the kidney were determined. Kidney samples were also examined histologically. The fructose-fed rats showed renal dysfunction, indicated by decreased creatinine clearance, increased albumin in the urine, and increased urea and creatinine in the serum. These renal function parameters were comparable to control levels in rats that consumed S. chinensis Baill. Fructose consumption increased renal TBARS and reduced GSH and SOD activity, whereas these levels were near-normal in the rats consuming S. chinensis Baill. The kidneys of fructose-fed rats showed glomerular basement membrane thickening, mesangial matrix expansion, and tubule dilation. These pathological changes were not seen in the rats that consumed S. chinensis Baill. Therefore, S. chinensis Baill effectively alleviated fructose-induced renal damage in these rats, at least partially due to antioxidant activity. PMID:21994532

  5. Development of a rat biomagnetic measurement system using a high-TC SQUID magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-Seon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2010-08-01

    We have developed a rat magnetocardiograph (MCG) system employing a high-TC SQUID magnetometer and a tabletop magnetic shield. We obtained clear MCG signals from a healthy Wistar Kyoto rat with a relatively high peak amplitude of 50 pT by virtue of the small gap cryostat developed in this study. Well defined P-, QRS- and T-waves were observed on the MCG of the healthy rat. In the case of a spontaneously hypertensive rat measurement, the MCG showed quite a disturbed wave pattern thought to be caused by the hypertensive heart abnormality. The results suggest that the rat biomagnetic measurement system has a strong potential for monitoring the progress of the heart disease model.

  6. High-alcohol-drinking rats exhibit persistent freezing responses to discrete cues following Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Linda M; Finn, Peter R; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2003-09-01

    We previously reported that high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats exhibited selective deficits in active avoidance learning and that those deficits were partially reversed by moderate doses of ethanol under certain training conditions [Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. 75 (2003) 89]. In that study, we hypothesized that HAD deficits resulted from exaggerated fear in the conditioning context and that the anxiolytic properties of ethanol, along with prior exposure to the conditioning apparatus, were responsible for the facilitated avoidance learning that was observed in HAD rats following moderate doses of ethanol. The current study was designed to test whether HAD rats exhibit behaviors consistent with increased fear in aversive learning contexts. We used a standard Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm to assess behavioral freezing in HAD (HAD-1 and HAD-2) and low-alcohol-drinking (LAD; LAD-1 and LAD-2) rats. No significant differences were observed between HAD-1 and HAD-2 or between LAD-1 and LAD-2 rats, indicating that the replicate lines performed similarly in this study. Both HAD and LAD rats exhibited robust fear conditioning during training. Although no differences were observed between HAD and LAD rats during fear training, HAD rats failed to extinguish freezing behavior in response to the discrete tone conditional stimulus during subsequent fear retention tests. Thus, HAD rats demonstrated prolonged cue-elicited fear that was resistant to extinction.

  7. The pineal complex in Roman high avoidance and Roman low avoidance rats.

    PubMed

    Seidel, A; Sousa Neto, J A; Huesgen, A; Vollrath, L; Manz, B; Gentsch, C; Lichtsteiner, M

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the pineal gland of Roman high avoidance (RHA/Verh) rats is larger than that of Roman low avoidance rats (RLA/Verh). In the present study measurement of enzyme activities (serotonin-N-acetyl-transferase, hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase) revealed that pineals of RHA/Verh rats are twice as active in melatonin production than pineals of RLA/Verh rats. Indoleamine content was also higher in RHA/Verh rats, whereas noradrenaline content was the same in both lines. When values were expressed per mg protein, these differences disappeared except for N-acetyl-serotonin and noradrenaline which were higher or lower in RHA/Verh rats, respectively. Both lines had higher serum levels of melatonin during the dark phase than during the light phase. However, RHA/Verh rats had increased serum levels as compared to RLA/Verh rats during both day and night. Morphometric analysis of the deep and superficial part of the pineal complex revealed, that the volumes of both parts are enlarged in RHA/Verh rats. Electron microscopic studies of pineals collected during day- and nighttime showed higher numbers of synaptic ribbons per unit area in pineals of RHA/Verh rats. In pineals collected during June synaptic ribbons displayed a day/night rhythm in RHA/Verh rats only, whereas in glands of both lines collected during November no daily changes were found. These results show that closely related but divergently selected rat lines may differ in pineal ultrastructure and pineal function.

  8. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Rice, William L; Van Hoek, Alfred N; Păunescu, Teodor G; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  9. Moderately shielded high-Tc SQUID system for rat MCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstein, S.; Kim, I.-S.; Drung, D.; Novikov, I.; Schurig, Th

    2010-06-01

    Recently, we have developed a 5-channel high-Tc SQUID system with one signal channel intended for rat magnetocardiography (MCG) in moderately shielded or "quiet" real environment. This system is an adapted version of a human MCG system which has been improved with respect to user-friendliness and stability. A dewar with a cold-warm distance of 7 mm and a refill cycle time of up to one week is utilized. The implemented high-Tc SQUIDs are single-layer devices with grain boundary junctions fabricated at KRISS with laser ablation on 10 mm × 10 mm STO substrates. In order to cancel environmental magnetic noise, three of the five SQUIDs are arranged to build an axial software first-order or second-order gradiometer with a base line of 35 mm. The other two SQUIDs are used for balancing. To overcome previous system instabilities, we have implemented an Earth field compensation for each SQUID. For this, the SQUIDs were mounted in capsules containing integrated field compensation coils. The three Earth field components are measured with an additional triaxial fluxgate, and compensated at the SQUID locations using the low-noise current source of the SQUID readout electronics. This way, the SQUIDs can be cooled and operated in a low residual field that improves system stability and reduces low-frequency SQUID noise. It is even possible to slowly move the dewar in the Earth field (dynamic field compensation). Different noise cancellation procedures were optimized and compared employing a periodic signal source.

  10. Effect of low-intensity extremely high frequency radiation on reproductive function in wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Subbotina, T I; Tereshkina, O V; Khadartsev, A A; Yashin, A A

    2006-08-01

    The exposure to low-intensity extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation during spermatogenesis was accompanied by pathological changes, which resulted in degeneration and polymorphism of spermatozoa. The number of newborn rats increased in the progeny of irradiated animals.

  11. Enhanced flavor-nutrient conditioning in obese rats on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate choice diet.

    PubMed

    Wald, Hallie S; Myers, Kevin P

    2015-11-01

    Through flavor-nutrient conditioning rats learn to prefer and increase their intake of flavors paired with rewarding, postingestive nutritional consequences. Since obesity is linked to altered experience of food reward and to perturbations of nutrient sensing, we investigated flavor-nutrient learning in rats made obese using a high fat/high carbohydrate (HFHC) choice model of diet-induced obesity (ad libitum lard and maltodextrin solution plus standard rodent chow). Forty rats were maintained on HFHC to induce substantial weight gain, and 20 were maintained on chow only (CON). Among HFHC rats, individual differences in propensity to weight gain were studied by comparing those with the highest proportional weight gain (obesity prone, OP) to those with the lowest (obesity resistant, OR). Sensitivity to postingestive food reward was tested in a flavor-nutrient conditioning protocol. To measure initial, within-meal stimulation of flavor acceptance by post-oral nutrient sensing, first, in sessions 1-3, baseline licking was measured while rats consumed grape- or cherry-flavored saccharin accompanied by intragastric (IG) water infusion. Then, in the next three test sessions they received the opposite flavor paired with 5 ml of IG 12% glucose. Finally, after additional sessions alternating between the two flavor-infusion contingencies, preference was measured in a two-bottle choice between the flavors without IG infusions. HFHC-OP rats showed stronger initial enhancement of intake in the first glucose infusion sessions than CON or HFHC-OR rats. OP rats also most strongly preferred the glucose-paired flavor in the two-bottle choice. These differences between OP versus OR and CON rats suggest that obesity is linked to responsiveness to postoral nutrient reward, consistent with the view that flavor-nutrient learning perpetuates overeating in obesity.

  12. Promoting Effect of a High-Fat/High-Protein Diet in DMBA-Induced Ductal Pancreatic Cancer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Z’graggen, Kaspar; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Werner, Jens; Graeme-Cook, Fiona; Jimenez, Ramon E.; Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a high-fat/high-protein diet (HFPD) acts as a promoter of the natural course of cancer growth in the 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced ductal pancreatic cancer model in rats. Summary Background Data DMBA implantation to the rat pancreas induces ductal adenocarcinoma. Information regarding the effects of diet and the presence of K-ras mutation in this model is not available. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to regular rat chow or a diet with a 30% content in fat and protein (HFPD). The presentation of cancer, the histologic spectrum of neoplasia at 1 and 9 months, and the prevalence of cancer in relation to diet were assessed. Histologic specimens comprising normal ducts, hyperplasia, dysplasia/carcinoma in situ, or carcinoma were designated by a pathologist and microdissected. Genomic DNA was extracted, and K-ras and H-ras gene mutations were determined by a mutant-enriched polymerase chain reaction assay and direct sequencing. Results Rats fed HFPD increased their weight significantly compared with controls. DMBA induced characteristic stages of neoplasia at the implant site but not elsewhere. Macroscopic cancers of the pancreatic head presented regularly with common bile duct and gastric outlet obstruction. The prevalence of K-ras mutations was proportional to the degree of epithelial abnormality. K-ras mutations were significantly more frequent in cancer than in normal and hyperplastic ducts. H-ras mutations were not found. At 1 month in the HFPD-fed rats, the prevalence of cancer (16%) and dysplasia (16%) was not significantly different from the prevalence of cancer (29%) and dysplasia (8%) in the chow-fed rats. At 9 months the prevalence of cancer in the HFPD-fed rats increased to 29%, whereas that in the chow-fed rats decreased to 17%. The combined prevalence of cancer and dysplasia at 9 months in the HFPD-fed rats (34%) significantly exceeded that in the chow-fed rats. Conclusions DMBA induces characteristic

  13. High-sodium intake prevents pregnancy-induced decrease of blood pressure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Beauséjour, Annie; Auger, Karine; St-Louis, Jean; Brochu, Michéle

    2003-07-01

    Despite an increase of circulatory volume and of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activity, pregnancy is paradoxically accompanied by a decrease in blood pressure. We have reported that the decrease in blood pressure was maintained in pregnant rats despite overactivation of RAAS following reduction in sodium intake. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the opposite condition, e.g., decreased activation of RAAS during pregnancy in the rat. To do so, 0.9% or 1.8% NaCl in drinking water was given to nonpregnant and pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days (last week of gestation). Increased sodium intakes (between 10- and 20-fold) produced reduction of plasma renin activity and aldosterone in both nonpregnant and pregnant rats. Systolic blood pressure was not affected in nonpregnant rats. However, in pregnant rats, 0.9% sodium supplement prevented the decreased blood pressure. Moreover, an increase of systolic blood pressure was obtained in pregnant rats receiving 1.8% NaCl. The 0.9% sodium supplement did not affect plasma and fetal parameters. However, 1.8% NaCl supplement has larger effects during gestation as shown by increased plasma sodium concentration, hematocrit level, negative water balance, proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction. With both sodium supplements, decreased AT1 mRNA levels in the kidney and in the placenta were observed. Our results showed that a high-sodium intake prevents the pregnancy-induced decrease of blood pressure in rats. Nonpregnant rats were able to maintain homeostasis but not the pregnant ones in response to sodium load. Furthermore, pregnant rats on a high-sodium intake (1.8% NaCl) showed some physiological responses that resemble manifestations observed in preeclampsia.

  14. Involvement of Nuclear Related Factor 2 Signaling Pathway in the Brain of Obese Rats and Obesity-Resistant Rats Induced by High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-Wei; Ding, Bing-Jie; Wang, Li-Jing; Shao, Yi; Xiao, Rong

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the mechanism of brain damage in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and diet-resistant (DR) rats from the viewpoint of redox state and nuclear related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a high-fat diet for 10 weeks to obtain the DIO and DR rats. d-Galactose was injected subcutaneously through the back of the neck for 10 weeks to establish oxidative stress model rats. Then, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and the level of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in serum and brain tissue were measured by using enzymatic assay kits. The levels of cholecystokinin and peptide YY in the brain tissue were detected by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. In addition, the protein expression of Nrf2 and its downstream factors such as heme oxygenase 1, manganese superoxide dismutase, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in the brain tissue were measured by Western blotting. In the brain of DIO rats, the level of GSH and ratio of GSH/GSSG were lower, whereas the GSH-Px concentration was higher compared with DR rats significantly. On the other hand, the GSSG level was higher in the serum of DIO rats compared with the DR rats. The oxidative stress state in the brain of DIO rats, but not in DR rats, were observed. In addition, the protein expressions of Nrf2 and NQO1 were downregulated in the brain of DR rats compared with that in DIO rats. Our data suggest that the Nrf2/NQO1 signaling pathway and redox state were involved in the pathogenesis of the rats prone to obesity, but not the DR rats resistant to obesity.

  15. Alteration of Loperamide-Induced Prostate Relaxation in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Sheng-Lung; Chung, Hsien-Hui; Chen, I-Hung; Tong, Yat-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the change of loperamide-induced prostate relaxation in rats fed with high-fat diet (HFD). Materials and Methods. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: (1) control rats fed with normal chow and (2) rats fed with HFD for 6 months. The prostate was removed for histology study. Isolated prostate strips were hung in organ bath and precontracted with 1 μmol/L phenylephrine or 50 mmol/L KCl. The relaxation responses to loperamide 0.1 to 10 μmol/L were recorded. Western blotting analyses were performed for prostate μ-opioid receptors (MOR) and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel proteins: sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) and inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir) 6.2 subunits. Results. Body weight, prostate weight, plasma levels of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and cholesterol, as well as systolic blood pressure, were significantly increased in the HFD rats. Histology showed prostatic hyperplasia in the HFD rat prostate. Prostatic relaxation induced by loperamide was markedly reduced in HFD when compared to the control. Protein expressions of MOR, SUR, and Kir 6.2 were decreased in HFD-fed rats. Conclusion. Loperamide-induced prostate relaxation is decreased in HFD rats due to reduced MOR and KATP channel expressions. PMID:25506071

  16. Beer promotes high levels of alcohol intake in adolescent and adult alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Garth A; Wang, Emyo Y J; Lawrence, Andrew J; McGregor, Iain S

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that high levels of alcohol consumption can be obtained in laboratory rats by using beer as a test solution. The present study extended these observations to examine the intake of beer and equivalent dilute ethanol solutions with an inbred line of alcohol-preferring P rats. In Experiment 1, male adolescent P rats and age-matched Wistar rats had access to either beer or equivalent ethanol solutions for 1h daily in a custom-built lickometer apparatus. In subsequent experiments, adolescent (Experiment 2) and adult (Experiment 3) male P rats were given continuous 24-h home cage access to beer or dilute ethanol solutions, with concomitant access to lab chow and water. In each experiment, the alcohol content of the beer and dilute ethanol solutions was gradually increased from 0.4, 1.4, 2.4, 3.4, 4.4, 5 to 10% EtOH (vol/vol). All three experiments showed a major augmentation of alcohol intake when rats were given beer compared with equivalent ethanol solutions. In Experiment 1, the overall intake of beer was higher in P rats compared with Wistar rats, but no strain difference was found during the 1-h sessions with plain ethanol consumption. Experiment 1 also showed that an alcohol deprivation effect was more readily obtained in rats with a history of consuming beer rather than plain ethanol solutions. In Experiments 2 and 3, voluntary beer intake in P rats represented ethanol intake of 10-15 g/kg/day, among the highest reported in any study with rats. This excessive consumption was most apparent in adolescent rats. Beer consumption markedly exceeded plain ethanol intake in these experiments except at the highest alcohol concentration (10%) tested. The advantage of using beer rather than dilute ethanol solutions in both selected and nonselected rat strains is therefore confirmed. Our findings encourage the use of beer with alcohol-preferring rats in future research that seeks to obtain high levels of alcohol self-administration.

  17. Blueberry intervention improves vascular reactivity and lowers blood pressure in high-fat-, high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Ishisaka, Akari; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Terao, Junji

    2013-05-28

    Growing evidence suggests that intake of flavonoid-containing foods may exert cardiovascular benefits in human subjects. We have investigated the effects of a 10-week blueberry (BB) supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and vascular reactivity in rats fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, known to induce endothelial dysfunction. Rats were randomly assigned to follow a control chow diet, a chow diet supplemented with 2 % (w/w) BB, a high-fat diet (10 % lard; 0·5 % cholesterol) or the high fat plus BB for 10 weeks. Rats supplemented with BB showed significant reductions in systolic BP (SBP) of 11 and 14 %, at weeks 8 and 10, respectively, relative to rats fed the control chow diet (week 8 SBP: 107·5 (SEM 4·7) v. 122·2 (SEM 2·1) mmHg, P= 0·018; week 10 SBP: 115·0 (SEM 3·1) v. 132·7 (SEM 1·5) mmHg, P< 0·0001). Furthermore, SBP was reduced by 14 % in rats fed with the high fat plus 2 % BB diet at week 10, compared to those on the high-fat diet only (SBP: 118·2 (SEM 3·6) v. 139·5 (SEM 4·5) mmHg, P< 0·0001). Aortas harvested from BB-fed animals exhibited significantly reduced contractile responses (to L-phenylephrine) compared to those fed the control chow or high-fat diets. Furthermore, in rats fed with high fat supplemented with BB, aorta relaxation was significantly greater in response to acetylcholine compared to animals fed with the fat diet. These data suggest that BB consumption can lower BP and improve endothelial dysfunction induced by a high fat, high cholesterol containing diet.

  18. A high frequency of induction of chromosome aberrations in the fibroblasts of LEC strain rats by X-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Okui, T; Endoh, D; Arai, S; Hayashi, M

    1996-08-01

    The LEC strain of rats (LEC rats), originally developed as a model for hereditary fulminant hepatitis, is highly sensitive to whole-body X-irradiation when compared to WKAH strain of rats (WKAH rats). The present results showed that frequencies of certain types of chromosome aberrations induced by in vitro X-irradiation in the fibroblasts of LEC rats were higher than those of WKAH rats. In particular, frequencies of chromatid gaps and chromosome exchanges in LEC cells were higher approximately 4- to 5-fold and 6- to 8-fold, respectively, than those of WKAH cells.

  19. Obesity in MENX Rats Is Accompanied by High Circulating Levels of Ghrelin and Improved Insulin Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Tobias; Bielohuby, Maximilian; Müller, Timo D; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Pellegata, Natalia S

    2016-02-01

    Ghrelin, the natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), is mainly secreted from the stomach and regulates food intake and energy homeostasis. p27 regulates cell cycle progression in many cell types. Here, we report that rats affected by the multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome MENX, caused by a p27 mutation, develop pancreatic islet hyperplasia containing elevated numbers of ghrelin-producing ε-cells. The metabolic phenotype of MENX-affected rats featured high endogenous acylated and unacylated plasma ghrelin levels. Supporting increased ghrelin action, MENX rats show increased food intake, enhanced body fat mass, and elevated plasma levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. Ghrelin effect on food intake was confirmed by treating MENX rats with a GHS-R1a antagonist. At 7.5 months, MENX-affected rats show decreased mRNA levels of hypothalamic GHS-R1a, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and agouti-related protein (AgRP), suggesting that prolonged hyperghrelinemia may lead to decreased ghrelin efficacy. In line with ghrelin's proposed role in glucose metabolism, we find decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in MENX rats, while insulin sensitivity is improved. In summary, we provide a novel nontransgenic rat model with high endogenous ghrelin plasma levels and, interestingly, improved glucose tolerance. This model might aid in identifying new therapeutic approaches for obesity and obesity-related diseases, including type 2 diabetes.

  20. Activity/inactivity circadian rhythm shows high similarities between young obesity-induced rats and old rats.

    PubMed

    Bravo Santos, R; Delgado, J; Cubero, J; Franco, L; Ruiz-Moyano, S; Mesa, M; Rodríguez, A B; Uguz, C; Barriga, C

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare differences between elderly rats and young obesity-induced rats in their activity/inactivity circadian rhythm. The investigation was motivated by the differences reported previously for the circadian rhythms of both obese and elderly humans (and other animals), and those of healthy, young or mature individuals. Three groups of rats were formed: a young control group which was fed a standard chow for rodents; a young obesity-induced group which was fed a high-fat diet for four months; and an elderly control group with rats aged 2.5 years that was fed a standard chow for rodents. Activity/inactivity data were registered through actimetry using infrared actimeter systems in each cage to detect activity. Data were logged on a computer and chronobiological analysis were performed. The results showed diurnal activity (sleep time), nocturnal activity (awake time), amplitude, acrophase, and interdaily stability to be similar between the young obesity-induced group and the elderly control group, but different in the young control group. We have concluded that obesity leads to a chronodisruption status in the body similar to the circadian rhythm degradation observed in the elderly.

  1. High glucose uptake in growing rats adapted to a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet determines low fasting glycemia even with high hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mayara P; Buzelle, Samyra L; Batistela, Emanuele; Doneda, Diego L; França, Suélem A de; Santos, Maísa P dos; Andrade, Cláudia M B; Garófalo, Maria A R; Kettelhut, Isis do C; Navegantes, Luiz C C; Chaves, Valéria E; Bertolini, Gisele L; Kawashita, Nair H

    2014-06-01

    The our objective was to investigate the adaptations induced by a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet in growing rats, which by comparison with the rats fed a control (C) diet at displayed lower fasting glycemia and similar fasting insulinemia, despite impairment in insulin signaling in adipose tissues. In the insulin tolerance test the LPHC rats showed higher rates of glucose disappearance (30%) and higher tolerance to overload of glucose than C rats. The glucose uptake by the soleus muscle, evaluated in vivo by administration of 2-deoxy-[(14)C]glucose, increased by 81%. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase content and the incorporation of [1-(14)C]pyruvate into glucose was also higher in the slices of liver from the LPHC rats than in those from C rats. The LPHC rats showed increases in l-lactate as well as in other gluconeogenic precursors in the blood. These rats also had a higher hepatic production of glucose, evaluated by in situ perfusion. The data obtained indicate that the main substrates for gluconeogenesis in the LPHC rats are l-lactate and glycerol. Thus, we concluded that the fasting glycemia in the LPHC animals was maintained mainly by increases in the hepatic gluconeogenesis from glycerol and l-lactate, compensating, at least in part, for the higher glucose uptake by the tissues.

  2. Effects of berberine on diabetes induced by alloxan and a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Qin; Wei, Wei; Chen, Li-Ming; Liu, Sheng

    2006-11-03

    Berberine is the major active constituent of Rhizoma coptidis. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of berberine on diabetes in rats and its possible mechanisms. Diabetes was induced by tail vein injection with alloxan in Wistar rats. The amount of alloxan administered was 55 mg/kg. Diabetic rats were fed with a high-cholesterol diet. The fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), nitric oxide (NO) levels in serum and malondialdehyde (MDA),superoxide dismutase (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) contents in heart tissue were assayed by spectrophotometry. Pancreas samples collected after 3 weeks of alloxan treatment were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and examined under a light microscope, and scored. Intragastric administration of berberine (100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly decreased fasting blood glucose levels, serum content of TC, TG, LDL-c, and effectively increased HDL-c, NO level in diabetic rats. Furthermore, berberine treatment significantly blocked the increase of MDA, increased SOD and GSH-px levels in diabetic rats. Histopathological scores showed that berberine had restored the damage of pancreas tissues in rats with diabetes mellitus. The results showed berberine significantly inhibited the progression of diabetes induced by alloxan, and the inhibitory effect of berberine on diabetes might be associated with its hypoglycemic effect, modulating lipids metabolic effects and its ability to scavenge free radical.

  3. Cardiovascular function in male and female JCR:LA-cp rats: Effect of high fat/high sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Ian; Soler, Amanda; Joseph, Gregory; Hutcheson, Brenda; Bradford, Chastity; Zhang, Frank; Potter, Barry J; Proctor, Spencer D; Rocic, Petra

    2017-01-13

    30% of the world population is diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. High fat/high sucrose diet (HF/HS, Western diet) correlates with metabolic syndrome prevalence. We characterized effects of the HF/HS diet on vascular (arterial stiffness, vasoreactivity, coronary collateral development) and cardiac (echocardiography) function, oxidative stress and inflammation in a rat model of metabolic syndrome (JCR). Furthermore, we determined whether male vs. female animals were affected differentially by the Western diet. Cardiovascular function in JCR male rats was impaired vs. normal rats (SD). HF/HS diet compromised cardiovascular (dys)function in JCR but not in SD male rats. In contrast, cardiovascular function was minimally impaired in JCR females on normal chow. However, cardiovascular function in JCR females on the HF/HS diet deteriorated to levels comparable to JCR males on the HF/HS diet. Similarly, oxidative stress was markedly increased in male but not female JCR rats on normal chow, but was equally exacerbated by the HF/HS diet in male and female JCR rats. These results indicate that the Western diet enhances oxidative stress and cardiovascular dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and eliminates the protective effect of female sex on cardiovascular function, implying that both males and females with metabolic syndrome are at equal risk for cardiovascular disease.

  4. Effect of magnesium deficiency on lipid metabolism in rats fed a high carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Rayssiguier, Y; Gueux, E; Weiser, D

    1981-11-01

    The effects of acute magnesium deficiency on lipid metabolism were examined in weaning rats fed a high carbohydrate diet containing starch or sucrose for 8 days. Rats were killed after the feeding period. In plasma, magnesium deficiency increased triglyceride and free cholesterol levels and decreased esterified cholesterol levels. Rats fed a magnesium-deficient diet containing sucrose showed particularly high triglyceride plasma levels. In liver, magnesium-deficient rats fed sucrose showed a significant increase in triglycerides, lactate and alpha-glycerophosphate and a significant decrease in glycogen. Changes in triglycerides and glycogen in the liver of magnesium-deficient rats fed starch were not significant. In sucrose-fed rats, serum lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation. With magnesium deficiency, triglycerides were significantly increased in the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions and cholesterol levels were increased in the VLDL and LDL and significantly lower in the high density lipoprotein (HDL) fractions. The detrimental effect of severe magnesium deficiency associated particularly with a high carbohydrate diet content and more especially with a sucrose diet is discussed.

  5. High-frequency electroacupuncture evidently reinforces hippocampal synaptic transmission in Alzheimer's disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Kong, Li-hong; Wang, Hui; Shen, Feng; Wang, Ya-wen; Zhou, Hua; Sun, Guo-jie

    2016-01-01

    The frequency range of electroacupuncture in treatment of Alzheimer's disease in rats is commonly 2–5 Hz (low frequency) and 50–100 Hz (high frequency). We established a rat model of Alzheimer's disease by injecting β-amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42) into the bilateral hippocampal dentate gyrus to verify which frequency may be better suited in treatment. Electroacupuncture at 2 Hz or 50 Hz was used to stimulate Baihui (DU20) and Shenshu (BL23) acupoints. The water maze test and electrophysiological studies demonstrated that spatial memory ability was apparently improved, and the ranges of long-term potentiation and long-term depression were increased in Alzheimer's disease rats after electroacupuncture treatment. Moreover, the effects of electroacupuncture at 50 Hz were better than that at 2 Hz. These findings suggest that high-frequency electroacupuncture may enhance hippocampal synaptic transmission and potentially improve memory disorders in Alzheimer's disease rats. PMID:27335565

  6. Homozygous and Heterozygous p53 Knockout Rats Develop Metastasizing Sarcomas with High Frequency

    PubMed Central

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Toonen, Pim W.; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Hermsen, Roel; de Bruin, Alain; Cuppen, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    The TP53 tumor suppressor gene is mutated in the majority of human cancers. Inactivation of p53 in a variety of animal models results in early-onset tumorigenesis, reflecting the importance of p53 as a gatekeeper tumor suppressor. We generated a mutant Tp53 allele in the rat using a target-selected mutagenesis approach. Here, we report that homozygosity for this allele results in complete loss of p53 function. Homozygous mutant rats predominantly develop sarcomas with an onset of 4 months of age with a high occurrence of pulmonary metastases. Heterozygous rats develop sarcomas starting at 8 months of age. Molecular analysis revealed that these tumors exhibit a loss-of-heterozygosity of the wild-type Tp53 allele. These unique features make this rat highly complementary to other rodent p53 knockout models and a versatile tool for investigating tumorigenesis processes as well as genotoxic studies. PMID:21854749

  7. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity in Wistar and August rats with low and high motor activity (a cytochemical study).

    PubMed

    Sergutina, A V; Rakhmanova, V I

    2014-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase activity was quantitatively evaluated by cytochemical method in brain structures (layers III and V of the sensorimotor cortex, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus CA3 field) of August and Wistar rats demonstrating high and low motor activity in the open field test. In August rats, acetylcholinesterase activity in the analyzed brain structures prevailed in animals with high motor activity in comparison with rats with low motor activity. In Wistar rats, the differences between the animals demonstrating high and low motor activity were less pronounced, but varied depending on the experimental series of studies. Comparisons of August rats with low motor activity and Wistar rats with high motor activity (maximum difference of motor function in these animals) revealed significant excess of acetylcholinesterase activity in layer III of the sensorimotor cortex in August rats and no differences in other brain structures of the examined animals.

  8. Pulmonary vascular responsiveness in rats following neonatal exposure to high altitude or carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, A.; Penney, D.G. Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI )

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of adult and neonatal rats to high altitude increases pulmonary vascular responsiveness during the exposure. A study was undertaken to determine if a short exposure of neonatal rats to either high-altitude or carbon monoxide (CO) hypoxia would cause persistent alterations in pulmonary vascular responsiveness postexposure. One-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were obtained as 16 litters of 10-12 pups each. At 2 days of age, 4 litters were exposed to CO (500 ppm) for 32 days, and 4 litters were exposed to ambient air (AIR) in Detroit (200 m). Another 4 litters were exposed to 3500 m altitude (ALT) in a chamber for 32 days, and 3 litters were exposed to ambient conditions in Fort Collins (CON, 1524 m). After the exposures, all rats were maintained at 1524 m. At 2, 40, 76 and 112 days postexposure, lungs were isolated and perfused with Earle's salt solution (+Ficoll, 4 g%). Pulmonary vascular responsiveness was assessed by dose responses to angiotensin II (AII, 0.025-0.40 [mu]g) and acute hypoxia (3% O[sub 2] for 3 min). AII responses were higher in ALT vs CON rats at 2 and 40 days postexposure, but no differences were noted between CO and AIR rats. Baseline pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure (in isolated lungs) were higher in ALT rats at all four ages compared to the other three groups. Both the ALT and CO rats displayed hypertrophy of the right ventricle (RV) and the left ventricle (LV) at the termination of treatment and elevated hematocrit. LV hypertrophy and polycythemia regressed with time, but RV hypertrophy remained significant in the ALT rats through 112 days postexposure. The results indicate that neonatal exposure to ALT, but no CO, causes a persistent increase in pulmonary vascular responsiveness and RV hypertrophy for at least 112 days after termination of the exposure. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Protective effect of Caralluma fimbriata against high-fat diet induced testicular oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Gujjala, Sudhakara; Putakala, Mallaiah; Gangarapu, Venkatanarayana; Nukala, Srinivasulu; Bellamkonda, Ramesh; Ramaswamy, Rajendran; Desireddy, Saralakumari

    2016-10-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) promotes the oxidative stress formation, which in turn has hazardous effects on reproductive system and fertility. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Caralluma fimbriata on high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress in the testis of rat. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: Control (C), Control treated with CFE (C+ CFE), High fat diet fed (HFD), High fat diet fed treated with CFE (HFD+CFE) and High fat diet fed treated with Metformin (HFD+Met). CFE was orally administered (200mg/kg body weight) for 90days to groups-C+CFE and HFD+CFE rats. The effects of HF-diet on the reproductive organs were determined by measuring relative and absolute testes and epididymal fat pads weights. Regarding testes antioxidant status, high-fat fed rats showed higher levels of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, polyol pathway enzymes and lower GSH levels and lower activities of antioxidants, while CFE treatment prevented all these observed abnormalities. The present study clearly indicates that CFE offers a significant protection against HF-diet induced testicular oxidative stress in rats.

  10. Nucleus accumbens neuronal maturation differences in young rats bred for low versus high voluntary running behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael D; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Wells, Kevin D; Company, Joseph M; Brown, Jacob D; Cruthirds, Clayton L; Heese, Alexander J; Zhu, Conan; Rottinghaus, George E; Childs, Thomas E; Booth, Frank W

    2014-01-01

    We compared the nucleus accumbens (NAc) transcriptomes of generation 8 (G8), 34-day-old rats selectively bred for low (LVR) versus high voluntary running (HVR) behaviours in rats that never ran (LVRnon-run and HVRnon-run), as well as in rats after 6 days of voluntary wheel running (LVRrun and HVRrun). In addition, the NAc transcriptome of wild-type Wistar rats was compared. The purpose of this transcriptomics approach was to generate testable hypotheses as to possible NAc features that may be contributing to running motivation differences between lines. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and Gene Ontology analyses suggested that ‘cell cycle’-related transcripts and the running-induced plasticity of dopamine-related transcripts were lower in LVR versus HVR rats. From these data, a hypothesis was generated that LVR rats might have less NAc neuron maturation than HVR rats. Follow-up immunohistochemistry in G9–10 LVRnon-run rats suggested that the LVR line inherently possessed fewer mature medium spiny (Darpp-32-positive) neurons (P < 0.001) and fewer immature (Dcx-positive) neurons (P < 0.001) than their G9–10 HVR counterparts. However, voluntary running wheel access in our G9–10 LVRs uniquely increased their Darpp-32-positive and Dcx-positive neuron densities. In summary, NAc cellularity differences and/or the lack of running-induced plasticity in dopamine signalling-related transcripts may contribute to low voluntary running motivation in LVR rats. PMID:24665095

  11. Effect of a high-fat diet on diabetic mother rats and their offspring through three generations.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Ritsuko; Seki, Koji; Nara, Misa; Murakami, Masami; Kohama, Tomoko

    2007-08-01

    Pregnant diabetic Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet starting at the first gestational day. The effect of the high-fat diet on the growth of the female, her offspring, and the offspring's offspring was studied. Pregnant rats (first generation) were divided into the Diabetic streptozotocin-induced group and the control group. Diabetic streptozotocin-induced rats and control rats were fed either a control diet (5% fat in diet) or high-fat diet (32% fat in diet), and observed up to the third generation. In each generation, after weaning, the pups were fed the respective diet. The fat content was mainly animal lard. Diabetic rats fed the high-fat diet were infertile, and the pregnant first-generation and diabetic rats fed the control diet had a stillbirth rate of 27.5 +/- 22.0% (mean +/- SE). In the first generation, the diabetic rats fed the control diet had a significantly lower body weight increase during the pregnancy than the control rats fed the control diet. The second-generation diabetic rats fed the control diet had a high blood glucose level at birth, and their triglyceride level was higher than that in the other two groups. The third-generation diabetic rats fed the control diet had a triglyceride level higher than that of control rats. Delivery was most difficult in diabetic rats fed the high-fat diet. Pups of diabetic rats fed the control diet had growth retardation and increased blood glucose levels. We conclude that when the mother rat had diabetes, the next generation was also affected.

  12. Lipid Lowering Effect of Punica granatum L. Peel in High Lipid Diet Fed Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghipour, Alireza; Ilchizadeh Kavgani, Ali; Ghahramani, Reza; Shahabzadeh, Saleh; Anissian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Many herbal medicines have been recommended for the treatment of dyslipidemia. The antilipidemic effect of hydroethanolic extract of pomegranate peel (Punica granatum L.) was investigated in high lipid diet fed male rats. Intraperitoneally administration of pomegranate peel extract (50, 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg body weight) for 23 days on the levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, HDL, alkaline phosphatase (AP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in high lipid diet fed male rats was evaluated. Treatment of pomegranate extract decreased body weight in treated rats, significantly. Administration of the plant extract significantly decreased serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, alkaline phosphatise, AST, and ALT levels, whereas it increased serum HDL-C in high lipid diet fed rats in comparison to saline control group. Also, histopathological study showed that treatment of pomegranate peel extract attenuates liver damage in high lipid diet fed rats in comparison to saline group. It is concluded that the plant should be considered as an excellent candidate for future studies on dyslipidemia. PMID:25295067

  13. Establishment and evaluation of an experimental rat model for high-altitude intestinal barrier injury

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Han; Zhou, Dai-Jun; Chen, Zhang; Zhou, Qi-Quan; Wu, Kui; Tian, Kun; Li, Zhi-Wei; Xiao, Zhen-Liang

    2017-01-01

    In the present study an experimental high-altitude intestinal barrier injury rat model was established by simulating an acute hypoxia environment, to provide an experimental basis to assess the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of altitude sickness. A total of 70 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: Control group (group C) and a high-altitude hypoxia group (group H). Following 2 days adaptation, the rats in group H were exposed to a simulated 4,000-m, high-altitude hypoxia environment for 3 days to establish the experimental model. To evaluate the model, bacterial translocation, serum lipopolysaccharide level, pathomorphology, ultrastructure and protein expression in rats were assessed. The results indicate that, compared with group C, the rate of bacterial translocation and the apoptotic index of intestinal epithelial cells were significantly higher in group H (P<0.01). Using a light microscope it was determined that the intestinal mucosa was thinner in group H, there were fewer epithelial cells present and the morphology was irregular. Observations with an electron microscope indicated that the intestinal epithelial cells in group H were injured, the spaces among intestinal villi were wider, the tight junctions among cells were open and lanthanum nitrate granules (from the fixing solution) had diffused into the intestinal mesenchyme. The expression of the tight junction protein occludin was also decreased in group H. Therefore, the methods applied in the present study enabled the establishment of a stable, high-altitude intestinal barrier injury model in rats. PMID:28352318

  14. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis induced by a high-fat diet promotes diethylnitrosamine initiated early hepatocarcinogenesis in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been suggested that patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are at a high risk for liver cancer. However, it is unknown whether high-fat diet induced NASH promotes hepatocarcinogenesis. In the present study, Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with a low dose of hepatic carcinogen die...

  15. Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Induced by a High-Fat Diet Promotes Diethylnitrosamine Initiated Early Hepatocarcinogenesis in Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been suggested that patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have a high risk for liver cancer. However, it is unknown whether high-fat diet induced NASH promotes chemical carcinogen-initiated hepatocarcinogenesis. In the present study, Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with a low d...

  16. Des-acyl ghrelin prevents heatstroke-like symptoms in rats exposed to high temperature and high humidity.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Yujiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Noboru; Nakahara, Keiko

    2016-02-26

    We have shown previously that des-acyl ghrelin decreases body temperature in rats through activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. Here we investigated whether des-acyl ghrelin ameliorates heatstroke in rats exposed to high temperature. Peripheral administration of des-acyl ghrelin significantly attenuated hyperthermia induced by exposure to high-temperature (35°C) together with high humidity (70-80%). Although biochemical analysis revealed that exposure to high temperature significantly increased hematocrit and the serum levels of aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine and electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)), most of these heatstroke-associated reactions were significantly reduced by treatment with des-acyl ghrelin. The level of des-acyl ghrelin in plasma was also found to be significantly increased under high-temperature conditions. These results suggest that des-acyl ghrelin could be useful for preventing heatstroke under high temperature condition.

  17. Highly sensitive LC-MS/MS method for determination of galantamine in rat plasma: application to pharmacokinetic studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Suresh, P S; Mullangi, Ramesh; Sukumaran, Sathesh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive assay method has been developed and validated for the estimation of galantamine (GLM) in rat plasma using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive-ion mode. The assay procedure involves a simple liquid-liquid extraction of GLM and phenacetin (internal standard, IS) from rat plasma using acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was achieved with 0.2% formic acid:acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.60 mL/min on an Atlantis dC18 column with a total run time 2.5 min. The MS/MS ion transitions monitored were 288.10 → 213.10 for GLM and 180.10 → 110.10 for IS. Method validation was performed as per United States Food and Drug Administration guidelines and the results met the acceptance criteria. The lower limit of quantitation achieved was 0.12 ng/mL and linearity was observed from 0.12 to 525 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision were in the ranges of 4.73-11.7 and 5.83-8.64%, respectively. This novel method has been applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats.

  18. Impact of chromium histidinate on high fat diet induced obesity in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chromium (Cr) is an essential trace element that has garnered interest for use as a weight loss aid, but its molecular mechanism in obesity is not clear. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate the effects of chromium histidinate (CrHis) on glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65) and the oxidative stress marker 4-hydroxynonenal adducts (HNE) expressions in liver of rats fed high fat diet (HFD). Methods Male Wistar rats (n = 40, 8 wk-old) were divided into four groups. Group I was fed a standard diet (12% of calories as fat); Group II was fed a standard diet and supplemented with 110 μg CrHis/kg BW/d; Group III was fed a HFD (40% of calories as fat); Group IV was fed HFD and supplemented with 110 μg CrHis/kg BW/d. Results Rats fed HFD possessed greater serum insulin (40 vs.33 pmol/L) and glucose (158 vs. 143 mg/dL) concentration and less liver Cr (44 vs.82 μg/g) concentration than rats fed the control diet. However, rats supplemented with CrHis had greater liver Cr and serum insulin and lower glucose concentration in rats fed HFD (P < 0.05). The hepatic nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65) and HNE were increased in high fat group compared to control group, but reduced by the CrHis administration (P < 0.05). The levels of hepatic Nrf2 and HO-1 were increased by supplementation of CrHis (P < 0.05). Conclusion These findings demonstrate that supplementation of CrHis is protective against obesity, at least in part, through Nrf2-mediated induction of HO-1 in rats fed high fat diet. PMID:21539728

  19. High-Moisture Diet for Laboratory Rats: Nutrient Analysis, Growth, and Organ Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battles, August H.; Knapka, Joseph T.; Lewis, Laura; Lang, Marie T.; Gruendel, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    A diet (KSC-25) to be sterilized by irradiation was formulated to contain 66% moisture and to provide the required nutrients for growing rats. Analyses of the irradiated dry diet provided data to evaluate its nutrient content. The diet was evaluated for its ability to supply all nutrients, including water, required by immature rats. Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the high-moisture diet with or without access to a water bottle. Rats (n = 16) fed an irradiated purified diet in a meal form with access to a water bottle were the control animals. Feed efficiency, food and water consumption, and growth rate data were collected during the 28-day study. Organ weights were collected on day 28. The test diet met or exceeded the National Research Council (NRC) estimated nutritional requirements for immature laboratory rats. The 66% moisture KSC-25 diet provided all nutrients, including water, required by weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats for growth equivalent to the established purified diet.

  20. Rats acquire stronger preference for flavors consumed towards the end of a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kevin P

    2013-02-17

    Rats learn to prefer flavors associated with postingestive effects of nutrients. The physiological signals underlying this postingestive reward are unknown. We have previously shown that rats readily learn to prefer a flavor that was consumed early in a multi-flavored meal when glucose is infused intragastrically (IG), suggesting rapid postingestive reward onset. The present experiments investigate the timing of postingestive fat reward, by providing distinctive flavors in the first and second halves of meals accompanied by IG fat infusion. Learning stronger preference for the earlier or later flavor would indicate when the rewarding postingestive effects are sensed. Rats consumed sweetened, calorically-dilute flavored solutions accompanied by IG high-fat infusion (+ sessions) or water (- sessions). Each session included an "Early" flavor for 8min followed by a "Late" flavor for 8min. Learned preferences were then assessed in two-bottle tests (no IG infusion) between Early(+) vs. Early(-), Late(+) vs. Late(-), Early(+) vs. Late(+), and Early(-) vs. Late(-). Rats only preferred Late(+), not Early(+), relative to their respective (-) flavors. In a second experiment rats trained with a higher fat concentration learned to prefer Early(+) but more strongly preferred Late(+). Learned preferences were evident when rats were tested deprived or recently satiated. Unlike with glucose, ingested fat appears to produce a slower-onset rewarding signal, detected later in a meal or after its termination, becoming more strongly associated with flavors towards the end of the meal. This potentially contributes to enhanced liking for dessert foods, which persists even when satiated.

  1. Behavioral responses of high and low active male rats to the chronic ingestion of desipramine.

    PubMed

    Echandía, E L; Broitman, S T; Fóscolo, M R

    1985-06-01

    Male rats arbitrarily selected for high and low motor activity (HA and LA-rats) were submitted to the chronic ingestion (30 days) of desipramine (DSP) in doses of about 1.5, 3 and 6 mg/kg/24 hr. Their motor activity was assessed in an animal activity monitor providing a measure of total horizontal movements and vertical movements and in a hole-board providing a measure of locomotion, head-dipping and grooming. There were significant differences between HA and LA-rats in their behavioral response to DSP treatment. At the doses used DSP did not affect horizontal and vertical movements and hole-board locomotion or exploration in HA-rats (Experiment 1). In LA-rats, however (Experiment 2), these motor activities were significantly stimulated by DSP. Such effect was dose dependent; 1.5 mg/kg/24 hr was ineffective while 6 mg/kg/24 hr produced a clear cut reversion of hypoactivity. It is speculated that DSP treatment increased resistance of LA-rats to the mild stress caused by testing.

  2. Antihyperlipidemic effect of Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Valcheva-Kuzmanova, S; Kuzmanov, K; Mihova, V; Krasnaliev, I; Borisova, P; Belcheva, A

    2007-03-01

    Aronia melanocrpa fruit juice (AMFJ) used in our experiment was very rich in phenolic substances (709.3 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 ml juice). Anthocyanins (106.8 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents/100 ml juice) were the main flavonoid group. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of AMFJ on plasma lipids and lipoprotein profile, and histopathology of liver and aorta in rats with dietary-induced hyperlipidemia. AMFJ was administered by gavage for 30 days at doses of 5, 10 and 20 ml/kg body weight to rats fed a standard diet (SD) or a 4% cholesterol-containing diet (4% ChD). The 4% ChD caused a significant elevation of plasma total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides (TG). AMFJ did not significantly influence plasma lipids in rats fed the SD and significantly hindered the elevation of plasma TC, LDL-C and TG in rats fed the 4% ChD. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were not significantly influenced either by the 4% ChD or by AMFJ. Neither the cholesterol feeding, nor AMFJ treatment induced any histopathological changes in rat liver and aorta. In conclusion, AMFJ showed an antihyperlipidemic effect in rats with hyperlipidemia and could be valuable in reducing this factor of cardiovascular risk.

  3. Ferulic Acid Alleviates Changes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome Induced by High-Carbohydrate, High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Senaphan, Ketmanee; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Sangartit, Weerapon; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Prachaney, Parichat; Greenwald, Stephen E; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2015-08-04

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ferulic acid (FA) is the major phenolic compound found in rice oil and various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of FA in minimizing insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and remodeling in a rat model of high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic changes, which is regarded as an analogue of metabolic syndrome (MS) in man. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high carbohydrate, high fat (HCHF) diet and 15% fructose in drinking water for 16 weeks, where control rats were fed with standard chow diet and tap water. FA (30 or 60 mg/kg) was orally administered to the HCHF and control rats during the last six weeks of the study. We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, FA also improved vascular function and prevented vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries. The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms.

  4. Operant responding for sucrose by rats bred for high or low saccharin consumption.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, Blake A; Mitra, Anaya; Avant, Ross A; Anker, Justin J; Carroll, Marilyn E; Levine, Allen S

    2010-03-30

    The use of rats differing in the intake of sweet substances has highlighted some interesting parallels between taste preferences and drug self-administration. For example, rats selectively bred to consume high (HiS) or low (LoS) amounts of a 0.1% saccharin solution (when compared to water consumption), show corresponding differences across several measures of cocaine self-administration (HiS>LoS). In this study, we measured whether the two strains also differ when response requirements are imposed for obtaining a sucrose reinforcer. Male HiS and LoS rats were measured for operant responding for sucrose pellets under fixed-ratio (FR) schedules of 1, 3, 5 and 10 and under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule, during which the response requirement for each successive pellet increased exponentially. The effect of systemic naltrexone (0.3, 1 and 3mg/kg) on PR responding for sucrose pellets was also tested. Under all FR and PR schedules, the number of pellets obtained by the LoS rats were significantly lower than those obtained by the HiS rats. Although the LoS weighed more than the HiS rats, this difference does not appear to explain differences in operant behavior. No strain differences in the effect of naltrexone were observed; the 3mg/kg dose reduced the number of pellets obtained in both strains. Measures of locomotor activity taken prior to operant trials suggest that the differences in responding were not due to differences in general activity levels. These studies provide further characterization of the HiS and LoS rat lines by demonstrating that motivation to consume sucrose is greater in HiS than in LoS rats.

  5. Repeated exposure attenuates the behavioral response of rats to static high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Houpt, Thomas A.; Cassell, Jennifer A.; Hood, Alison; DenBleyker, Megan; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Kathleen; Ortega, Breyda; Smith, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of rats to high strength static magnetic fields of 7 T or above has behavioral effects such as the induction of locomotor circling, the suppression of rearing, and the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). To determine if habituation occurs across magnetic field exposures, rats were pre-exposed two times to a 14 T static magnetic field for 30 min on two consecutive days; on the third day, rats were given access to a novel 0.125% saccharin prior to a third 30-min exposure to the 14 T magnetic field. Compared to sham-exposed rats, pre-exposed rats showed less locomotor circling and an attenuated CTA. Rearing was suppressed in all magnet-exposed groups regardless of pre-exposure, suggesting that the suppression of rearing is more sensitive than other behavioral responses to magnet exposure. Habituation was also observed when rats under went pre-exposures at 2–3 hour intervals on a single day. Components of the habituation were also long lasting; a diminished circling response was observed when rats were exposed to magnetic field 36 days after 2 pre-exposures. To control for possible effects of unconditioned stimulus pre-exposure, rats were also tested in a similar experimental design with two injections of LiCl prior to the pairing of saccharin with a third injection of LiCl. Pre-exposure to LiCl did not attenuate the LiCl-induced CTA, suggesting that 2 pre-exposures to an unconditioned stimulus are not sufficient to explain the habituation to magnet exposure. Because the effects of magnetic field exposure are dependent on an intact vestibular apparatus, and because the vestibular system can habituate to many forms of perturbation, habituation to magnetic field exposure is consistent with mediation of magnetic field effects by the vestibular system. PMID:20045422

  6. Fibrinogen-thrombin collagen patch reinforcement of high-risk colonic anastomoses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Grau, Juan Manuel; Bernardos García, Carlos; Cepeda Franco, Carmen; Mendez García, Cristina; García Ruiz, Salud; Docobo Durantez, Fernando; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Padillo Ruiz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effectiveness of human fibrinogen-thrombin collagen patch (TachoSil®) in the reinforcement of high-risk colon anastomoses. METHODS A quasi-experimental study was conducted in Wistar rats (n = 56) that all underwent high-risk anastomoses (anastomosis with only two sutures) after colectomies. The rats were divided into two randomized groups: Control group (24 rats) and treatment group (24 rats). In the treatment group, high-risk anastomosis was reinforced with TachoSil® (a piece of TachoSil® was applied over this high-risk anastomosis, covering the gap). Leak incidence, overall survival, intra-abdominal adhesions, and histologic healing of anastomoses were analyzed. Survivors were divided into two subgroups and euthanized at 15 and 30 d after intervention in order to analyze the adhesions and histologic changes. RESULTS Overall survival was 71.4% and 57.14% in the TachoSil® group and control group, respectively (P = 0.29); four rats died from other causes and six rats in the treatment group and 10 in the control group experienced colonic leakage (P > 0.05). The intra-abdominal adhesion score was similar in both groups, with no differences between subgroups. We found non-significant differences in the healing process according to the histologic score used in both groups (P = 0.066). CONCLUSION In our study, the use of TachoSil® was associated with a non-statistically significant reduction in the rate of leakage in high-risk anastomoses. TachoSil® has been shown to be a safe product because it does not affect the histologic healing process or increase intra-abdominal adhesions. PMID:27721926

  7. Influence of age on reactivity to diverse emotional challenges in low- and high-anxiety rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciana C; Gomes, Margareth Z; Brandão, Marcus L

    2011-02-01

    Studies have revealed that the extent of reactivity of high-anxiety rats to diverse challenges is different than low-anxiety rats and have provided important insights into the psychopathology of anxiety. Various factors intervene to allow defensive mechanisms to react to diverse threatening challenges, including ontogeny and the nature of the emotional challenge (e.g., conditioned vs. unconditioned). The present study investigated the extent to which a particular type of fear extrapolates to other emotional responses to diverse threatening challenges. Groups of 30- and 60-day-old rats were assigned to low freezing behavior (LFB) and high freezing behavior (HFB) groups using the contextual fear conditioning paradigm and subjected to either the fear-potentiated startle (FPS) test, novelty-induced ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) or elevated plus-maze (EPM) tests. At 30 days of age, HFB rats exhibited greater FPS than LFB rats. In contrast, prior selection of HFB and LFB did not affect the performance of 30-day-old animals in the EPM and novelty-induced USVs. Sixty-day-old animals exhibited a performance deficit in all three tests. These data suggest that the performance of young rats in animal models of anxiety parallels their selection as LFB and HFB in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm. However, the increased fear-like behavior exhibited by the 60-day-old HFB rats may elicit performance deficits in conditioned and unconditioned fear tests. These results suggest that the interaction between hyperanxiety and age may cause a performance deficit despite the animals' increased fear-like behavior when facing emotional challenges, thus resembling psychiatric patients in many respects.

  8. Effect of prolonged use of high dose of tibolone on the vagina of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Helene Nara; de Carvalho, Ana Carolina Bergmann; Filho, Porphirio José Soares; Pantaleão, José Augusto Soares; Guzmán-Silva, Maria Angélica

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluate the effect of prolonged use of high dose of tibolone on the vagina of ovariectomized rats. Bilateral ovariectomy was performed on 14 rats weighing 250 g. Thirty days later, vaginal smears were collected verifying the menopause status by anoestrus cytology. Rats were divided randomly into groups: experimental rats (n = 9) received 1 mg tibolone/day orally and control rats (n = 6) received placebo (carboxymethylcellulose). After 150 days, all rats were sedated and euthanized by cervical displacement. The vagina was removed, fixed in 10% buffered formalin, sampled and processed for paraffin embedding. Histological sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, picrosirius red, periodic acid Schiff (PAS) and PAS-diastase, and Weigert's resorcin–fuchsin. Cell proliferation was analysed by immunohistochemistry to detect Ki67. Histomorphometric analyses were performed for epithelial thickness, per cent area of collagen fibres and blood vessels, mast cells and Ki67-positive nuclei per mm of basal membrane. Means and standard error of means were calculated, and data were compared using the Mann–Whitney test, with significance level at P < 0.05. In the vagina, epithelial thickness, number of Ki67-positive nuclei per mm of basal membrane, number of vessels and number of mast cells were significantly higher in the tibolone group when compared with the control group. Furthermore, the content of glycogen and glycoproteins in the vaginal epithelium was modified by tibolone. Tibolone administered in high dose and for a long period has a trophic effect, reversing vaginal atrophy, and has no dysplastic or neoplastic effect in the vagina of ovariectomized rats. PMID:21518049

  9. Berberine inhibits aldose reductase and oxidative stress in rat mesangial cells cultured under high glucose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Liu, Peiqinq; Tao, Sha; Deng, Yanhui; Li, Xuejuan; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Fenfen; Huang, Wenge; Chen, Fengying; Huang, Heqing; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2008-07-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), one of the most serious microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus, is a major cause of end-stage renal disease. Berberine is one of the main constituents of Coptidis rhizoma and Cortex phellodendri. In the present study, we examined effects of berberine (BBR) on renal injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and on the changes of aldose reductase (AR) and oxidative stress in cultured rat mesangial cells exposed to high glucose. Fasting blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and urine protein over 24 h were detected by using the commercially available kits. Cell proliferation, collagen synthesis, aldose reductase (AR), superoxide anion, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected, respectively, by different methods. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, fasting blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and urine protein over 24 h were significantly decreased in rats treated with 200 mg/kg berberine for 12 weeks compared with diabetic control rats (P < 0.05). This was accompanied by a reduced AR activity and gene expression at both mRNA and protein levels. In cultured rat mesangial cells exposed to high glucose, incubation of BBR significantly decreased cell proliferation, collagen synthesis and AR activity as well as its mRNA and protein levels compared with control cells (P < 0.05). In vitro, BBR also significantly increased SOD activity and decreased superoxide anion and MDA compared with control cells (P < 0.05). These results suggested that BBR could ameliorate renal dysfunction in DN rats, which may be ascribed to inhibition of AR in mesangium, reduction of oxidative stress, and amelioration of extracellular matrix synthesis and cell proliferation. Further studies are warranted to explore the role of AR in DN and the therapeutic implications by AR inhibitors such as BBR.

  10. Protective effect of berberine on beta cells in streptozotocin- and high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiyin; Zhou, Shiwen; Tang, Jianlin; Zhang, Kebin; Guang, Lixia; Huang, Yongping; Xu, Ying; Ying, Yi; Zhang, Le; Li, Dandan

    2009-03-15

    Oxidative stress in diabetes coexists with a reduction in the antioxidant status, which can further increase the deleterious effects of free radicals. Berberine is one of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma coptidis which has been used to treat diabetes for more than 1400 years in China. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of berberine against beta cell damage and antioxidant of pancreas in diabetic rats. Diabetic rats with hyperlipidemia were induced by intraperitoneally injection 35 mg/kg streptozotocin and a high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet. Rats were divided into 7 groups at the end of week 16: untreated control, untreated diabetic, 75, 150, 300 mg/kg berberine-treated diabetic, 100 mg/kg fenofibrate-treated, and 4 mg/kg rosiglitazone-treated. After 16 weeks treatment, serum insulin level, insulin expression in pancreas, and malonaldehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity in pancreatic homogenate were assayed. Pancreas was examined by hematoxylin/eosin staining and transmission electron microscope. Pancreas to body weight ratio, insulin level, insulin sensitivity index, malonaldehyde content and superoxide dismutase activity were altered in diabetic rats, and were near control levels treated with 150, 300 mg/kg berberine. Mitochondrial vacuolization and swelling, dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum were observed in beta cells of diabetic rats. The pancreatic islet area atrophied and secretory granules of beta cells decreased in diabetic rats. Slight pathological changes existed in beta cells of 150, 300 mg/kg berberine-treated diabetic pancreas. These findings suggest that berberine has protective effect for diabetes through increasing insulin expression, beta cell regeneration, antioxidant enzyme activity and decreasing lipid peroxidation.

  11. A three generation reproduction study with Sprague-Dawley rats consuming high-amylose transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing Hua; Dong, Ying; Zhao, Yan Sheng; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Yun; He, Yuan Qing; Liu, Qiao Quan

    2014-12-01

    The transgenic rice line (TRS) enriched with amylose and resistant starch (RS) was developed by antisense RNA inhibition of starch-branching enzymes. Cereal starch with high amylose has a great benefit on human health through its resistant starch. In order to evaluate the effect of transgenic rice on rats, the rats were fed diets containing 70% TRS rice flour, its near-isogenic rice flour or the standard diet as the control through three generations. In the present study, clinical performance, reproductive capacity and pathological responses including body weight, food consumption, reproductive data, hematological parameters, serum chemistry components, organ relative weights and histopathology were examined. Some statistically significant differences were observed in rats consuming the high amylose rice diet when compared to rats fed the near-isogenic control rice diet or the conventional (non-rice) standard diet. These differences were generally of small magnitude, appeared to be random in nature, and were within normal limits for the strain of rat used, and were therefore not considered to be biologically meaningful or treatment related.

  12. Pressor recovery after acute stress is impaired in high fructose-fed Lean Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer A; D'Angelo, Gerard; Mintz, James D; Fulton, David J; Stepp, David W

    2016-06-01

    Insulin resistance is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular disease; however, the mechanistic link remains unclear. This study aims to determine if early cardiovascular changes associated with short-term fructose feeding in the absence of obesity manifest as abnormal blood pressure control. Metabolic dysfunction was induced in Lean Zucker rats by short-term high-fructose feeding. Rats were implanted with telemetry devices for the measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and subjected to air jet stress at 5 and 8 weeks after feeding. Additional animals were catheterized under anesthesia for the determination of MAP and blood flow responses in the hind limb and mesenteric vascular beds to intravenous injection of isoproterenol (0.001-0.5 μm), a β-adrenergic agonist. Metabolic dysfunction in high-fructose rats was not accompanied by changes in 24-h MAP Yet, animals fed a high-fructose diet for 8 weeks exhibited a marked impairment in blood pressure recovery after air-jet stress. Dose-dependent decreases in MAP and peripheral blood flow in response to isoproterenol treatment were significantly attenuated in high-fructose rats. These data suggest that impaired blood pressure recovery to acute mental stress precedes the onset of hypertension in the early stages of insulin resistance. Further, blunted responses to isoproterenol implicate β2-adrenergic sensitivity as a possible mechanism responsible for altered blood pressure control after short-term high-fructose feeding.

  13. High dietary salt decreases antioxidant defenses in the liver of fructose-fed insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Dornas, Waleska Claudia; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; dos Santos, Rinaldo Cardoso; Guerra, Joyce Ferreira da Costa; de Souza, Melina Oliveira; Silva, Maísa; Souza e Silva, Lorena; Diniz, Mirla Fiuza; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio

    2013-12-01

    In this study we investigated the hypothesis that a high-salt diet to hyperinsulinemic rats might impair antioxidant defense owing to its involvement in the activation of sodium reabsorption to lead to higher oxidative stress. Rats were fed a standard (CON), a high-salt (HS), or a high-fructose (HF) diet for 10 weeks after which, 50% of the animals belonging to the HF group were switched to a regimen of high-fructose and high-salt diet (HFS) for 10 more weeks, while the other groups were fed with their respective diets. Animals were then euthanized and their blood and liver were examined. Fasting plasma glucose was found to be significantly higher (approximately 50%) in fructose-fed rats than in the control and HS rats, whereas fat liver also differed in these animals, producing steatosis. Feeding fructose-fed rats with the high-salt diet triggered hyperinsulinemia and lowered insulin sensitivity, which led to increased levels of serum sodium compared to the HS group. This resulted in membrane perturbation, which in the presence of steatosis potentially enhanced hepatic lipid peroxidation, thereby decreasing the level of antioxidant defenses, as shown by GSH/GSSG ratio (HFS rats, 7.098±2.1 versus CON rats, 13.2±6.1) and superoxide dismutase (HFS rats, 2.1±0.05 versus CON rats, 2.3±0.1%), and catalase (HFS rats, 526.6±88.6 versus CON rats, 745.8±228.7 U/mg ptn) activities. Our results indicate that consumption of a salt-rich diet by insulin-resistant rats may lead to regulation of sodium reabsorption, worsening hepatic lipid peroxidation associated with impaired antioxidant defenses.

  14. High trait impulsivity predicts food addiction-like behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Ferragud, Antonio; Moore, Catherine F; Everitt, Barry J; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2014-09-01

    Impulsivity is a behavioral trait frequently seen not only in drug-addicted individuals but also in individuals who pathologically overeat. However, whether impulsivity predates the development of uncontrollable feeding is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that a high impulsivity trait precedes and confers vulnerability for food addiction-like behavior. For this purpose, we trained ad libitum-fed male Wistar rats in a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL) task to select Low- and High-impulsive rats. Then, we allowed Low- and High-impulsive rats to self-administer a highly palatable diet (Palatable group) or a regular chow diet (Chow group) in 1-h daily sessions, under fixed ratio (FR) 1, FR3, FR5, and under a progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In addition, we tested the compulsiveness for food in Low- and High-impulsive rats by measuring the food eaten in the aversive, open compartment of a light/dark conflict test. Finally, we measured the expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the shell and the core of the nucleus accumbens, which is a marker for neuroadaptive changes following addictive drug exposure. The data we obtained demonstrate that impulsivity is a trait that predicts the development of food addiction-like behaviors, including: (i) excessive intake, (ii) heightened motivation for food, and (iii) compulsive-like eating, when rats are given access to highly palatable food. In addition, we show that the food addiction phenotype in high impulsive subjects is characterized by an increased expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens shell. These results reveal that impulsivity confers an increased propensity to develop uncontrollable overeating of palatable food.

  15. High Sucrose Intake Ameliorates the Accumulation of Hepatic Triacylglycerol Promoted by Restraint Stress in Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Corona-Pérez, Adriana; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Rodríguez, Ida Soto; Cuevas, Estela; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco; Rodríguez-Antolín, Jorge; Nicolás-Toledo, Leticia

    2015-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder. Stress promotes the onset of the NAFLD with a concomitant increment in the activity of the hepatic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD-1). However, the interaction between the stress and a carbohydrate-enriched diet for the development of NAFLD in young animals is unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of chronic stress on the hepatic triacylglycerol level of young rats fed or not with a high sucrose-diet. For doing this, 21-day old male Wistar rats were allocated into 4 groups: control (C), chronic restraint stress (St), high-sucrose diet (S30), and chronic restraint stress plus a 30 % sucrose diet (St + S30). Chronic restraint stress consisted of 1-hour daily session, 5 days per week and for 4 weeks. Rats were fed with a standard chow and tap water (C group) or 30 % sucrose diluted in water (S30 group). The St + S30 groups consumed less solid food but had an elevated visceral fat accumulation in comparison with the St group. The St group showed a high level of serum corticosterone and a high activity of the hepatic 11β-HSD-1 concomitantly to the augmentation of hepatic steatosis signs, a high hepatic triacylglycerol content, and hepatic oxidative stress. Conversely, the high-sucrose intake in stressed rats (St + S30 group) reduced the hepatic 11β-HSD-1 activity, the level of serum corticosterone, and the hepatic triacylglycerol content. Present findings show that a high-sucrose diet ameliorates the triacylglycerol accumulation in liver promoted by the restraint stress in young male rats.

  16. Differential expression of apolipoprotein D in male reproductive system of rats by high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lim, W; Bae, H; Song, G

    2016-11-01

    Apolipoprotein D, a 29-kDa secreted glycoprotein that belongs to the lipocalin superfamily, is widely expressed in various tissues and associated with lipid metabolism as a component of high-density lipoproteins. Although Apolipoprotein D binds to small hydrophobic ligands including cholesterol, little is known about effects of high-fat diet with cholesterol on expression of Apolipoprotein D in the male reproductive tract. Therefore, we investigated Apod expression in penises, prostate glands, and testes from rats fed a high-fat diet including a high amount of cholesterol. Our previous research indicated that a high-fat diet induces dyslipidemia leading to histological changes and dysfunction of male reproduction in rats. Consistent with these results, Apod mRNA expression was significantly (p < 0.001) decreased in penises and prostate glands (p < 0.01) and testes (p < 0.01) from rats fed a high-fat diet as compared with normal diet. In addition, Apod mRNA and protein were detected predominantly in urethral epithelium and penile follicle from rats. Moreover, changes in expression of specific microRNAs (miR-229b-3p, miR-423-3p, and miR-490-3p) regulating Apod in the penises and prostate glands were negatively associated with Apod expression. Collectively, results of this study suggest that Apod is a novel regulatory gene in the male reproductive system, especially in penises of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet, and that expression of Apod is regulated at the posttranscriptional level by target microRNAs.

  17. NEONATAL LOW- AND HIGH-DOSE EXPOSURE TO ESTRADIOL BENZOATE IN THE MALE RAT: I. EFFECTS ON THE PROSTATE GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neonatal Low- And High-Dose Exposure To Estradiol Benzoate In The Male Rat: 1. Effects On The Prostate Gland. Oliver Putz, Christian B. Schwartz, Steve Kim, Gerald A. LeBlanc Ralph L. Cooper, Gail S. Prins

    ABSTRACT
    Brief exposure of rats to high doses of natural estro...

  18. High intrinsic aerobic capacity and pomegranate juice are protective against macrophage atherogenecity: studies in high- vs. low-capacity runner (HCR vs. LCR) rats.

    PubMed

    Rosenblat, Mira; Volkova, Nina; Abassi, Zaid; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Aviram, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We studied the rat model system of high- vs. low-capacity runner (HCR vs. LCR) rats to question the atherogenic properties (oxidative stress, triglycerides and cholesterol metabolism) in the rat macrophages, serum, liver and heart. Half of the LCR or HCR rats consumed pomegranate juice (PJ; 15 μmol of gallic acid equivalents/rat/day) for 3 weeks and were compared to placebo-treated rats. At the end of the study blood samples, peritoneal macrophages (RPM), livers, and hearts were harvested from the rats. RPM harvested from HCR vs. LCR demonstrated reduced cellular oxidation (21%), increased paraoxonase 2 activity (28%) and decreased triglycerides mass (44%). Macrophage uptake rates of fluorescein-isothiocyanate-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or oxidized LDL were significantly lower, by 37% or by 18%, respectively, in HCR vs. LCR RPM. PJ consumption significantly decreased all the above atherogenic parameters with more substantial beneficial effects observed in the LCR vs. the HCR rats (~80% vs. ~40% improvement, respectively). Similar hypo-triglyceridemic pattern was noted in serum from HCR vs. LCR. In contrast to the above results, liver oxidation and triglycerides mass were both minimally increased in HCR vs. LCR rats by 31% and 28%, respectively. In the heart, lipid content was very low, and interestingly, an absence of any significant oxidative stress, along with modest triglyceride accumulation, was observed. We conclude that HCR vs. LCR rats demonstrate reduced atherogenicity, mostly in their macrophages. PJ exerts a further improvement, mostly in macrophages from LCR rats.

  19. Impulsivity Characterization in the Roman High- and Low-Avoidance Rat Strains: Behavioral and Neurochemical Differences

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Margarita; Cardona, Diana; Gómez, Maria José; Sánchez-Santed, Fernando; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Campa, Leticia; Suñol, Cristina; Escarabajal, Maria Dolores; Torres, Carmen; Flores, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    The selective breeding of Roman high- (RHA) and low-avoidance (RLA) rats for rapid vs extremely poor acquisition of active avoidance behavior in a shuttle-box has generated two phenotypes with different emotional and motivational profiles. The phenotypic traits of the Roman rat lines/strains (outbred or inbred, respectively) include differences in sensation/novelty seeking, anxiety/fearfulness, stress responsivity, and susceptibility to addictive substances. We designed this study to characterize differences between the inbred RHA-I and RLA-I strains in the impulsivity trait by evaluating different aspects of the multifaceted nature of impulsive behaviors using two different models of impulsivity, the delay-discounting task and five-choice serial reaction time (5-CSRT) task. Previously, rats were evaluated on a schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) task that has been suggested as a model of obsessive-compulsive disorder. RHA-I rats showed an increased acquisition of the SIP task, higher choice impulsivity in the delay-discounting task, and poor inhibitory control as shown by increased premature responses in the 5-CSRT task. Therefore, RHA-I rats manifested an increased impulsivity phenotype compared with RLA-I rats. Moreover, these differences in impulsivity were associated with basal neurochemical differences in striatum and nucleus accumbens monoamines found between the two strains. These findings characterize the Roman rat strains as a valid model for studying the different aspects of impulsive behavior and for analyzing the mechanisms involved in individual predisposition to impulsivity and its related psychopathologies. PMID:20090672

  20. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult rats were maintained on a chlorpyrifos-containing diet to p...

  1. Maternal obesity and post-natal high fat diet disrupt hepatic circadian rhythm in rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Offspring of obese (Ob) rat dams gain greater body wt and fat mass when fed high-fat diet (HFD) as compared to controls. Alterations of diurnal circadian rhythm are known to detrimentally impact metabolically active tissues such as liver. We sought to determine if maternal obesity (MOb) leads to p...

  2. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350g body weight by...

  3. Stability of Rat Brain Glutamine Synthetase to Oxygen Toxicity (Oxygen at High Pressure).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    Enzyme assays using the gamma-glutamyl transferase method provided estimates of glutamine synthetase activity in rat brain homogenates subjected to a...supports the lack of any connection between convulsions caused by in vivo inhibition of glutamine synthetase and convulsions caused by oxygen toxicity (oxygen at high pressure). (Author)

  4. Betaine supplementation protects against high-fructose-induced renal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen-Yu; Wang, Ming-Xing; Ge, Chen-Xu; Wang, Xing; Li, Jian-Mei; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2014-03-01

    High fructose intake causes metabolic syndrome, being an increased risk of chronic kidney disease development in humans and animals. In this study, we examined the influence of betaine on high-fructose-induced renal damage involving renal inflammation, insulin resistance and lipid accumulation in rats and explored its possible mechanisms. Betaine was found to improve high-fructose-induced metabolic syndrome including hyperuricemia, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in rats with systemic inflammation. Betaine also showed a protection against renal dysfunction and tubular injury with its restoration of the increased glucose transporter 9 and renal-specific transporter in renal brush bolder membrane and the decreased organic anion transporter 1 and adenosine-triphosphate-binding cassette transporter 2 in the renal cortex in this model. These protective effects were relevant to the anti-inflammatory action by inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in renal tissue of high-fructose-fed rat, being more likely to suppress renal NOD-like receptor superfamily, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome activation than nuclear factor κB activation. Subsequently, betaine with anti-inflammation ameliorated insulin signaling impairment by reducing the up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and lipid accumulation partly by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/palmityltransferase 1/carnitine/organic cation transporter 2 pathway in kidney of high-fructose-fed rats. These results indicate that the inflammatory inhibition plays a pivotal role in betaine's improvement of high-fructose-induced renal injury with insulin resistance and lipid accumulation in rats.

  5. Differential organization of male copulatory patterns in high- and low-yawning-frequency sublines versus outbred Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, Jose R; Cortes, Carmen; Toriz, Cesar G; Romero-Carbente, Jose C; González-Flores, Oscar; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso

    2016-01-01

    The temporal organization of masculine sexual behavior in rats is highly stereotyped; involving a sequence of mounts, intromissions and ejaculations. Sexual behavior has been described in exogamic and genetically manipulated rodent species. In this work, we compare the male sexual behavior of outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) to those of rats inbred for high (HY)- and low (LY)- spontaneous yawning frequency. In the first experiment, the percentage of inexperienced rats' ejaculatory behavior is significantly lower in the HY and LY respect to Sprague-Dawley rats. The latency to ejaculate for inexperienced HY was shorter than the LY and SD rats. In the second experiment, we examined the differences between inbred sublines and Sprague-Dawley rats once the subjects had become sexually experienced after four copulatory sessions. HY rats still have slower proportion of ejaculators respect to LY and SD rats. Additionally, postejaculatory latencies were longer for HY rats, with longer intercopulatory intervals and higher number of copulatory bouts that delayed ejaculation. Both sublines show lower copulatory efficiency respect to SD rats. In conclusion, both sublines show alterations in the temporal organization of sexual motor pattern that are due at least partially to strong inbreeding process to select them.

  6. FGF21 ameliorates the neurocontrol of blood pressure in the high fructose-drinking rats

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian-Li; Zhao, Miao; Xia, Jing-Jun; Guan, Jian; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lu-Qi; Song, Dong-Xue; Qu, Mei-Yu; Zuo, Meng; Wen, Xin; Yu, Xue; Huo, Rong; Pan, Zhen-Wei; Ban, Tao; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Jiu-Xin; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) is closely related to various metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. However, the direct targets and mechanisms linking FGF21 to blood pressure control and hypertension are still elusive. Here we demonstrated a novel regulatory function of FGF21 in the baroreflex afferent pathway (the nucleus tractus solitarii, NTS; nodose ganglion, NG). As the critical co-receptor of FGF21, β-klotho (klb) significantly expressed on the NTS and NG. Furthermore, we evaluated the beneficial effects of chronic intraperitoneal infusion of recombinant human FGF21 (rhFGF21) on the dysregulated systolic blood pressure, cardiac parameters, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and hyperinsulinemia in the high fructose-drinking (HFD) rats. The BRS up-regulation is associated with Akt-eNOS-NO signaling activation in the NTS and NG induced by acute intravenous rhFGF21 administration in HFD and control rats. Moreover, the expressions of FGF21 receptors were aberrantly down-regulated in HFD rats. In addition, the up-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and -α (PPAR-γ/-α) in the NTS and NG in HFD rats were markedly reversed by chronic rhFGF21 infusion. Our study extends the work of the FGF21 actions on the neurocontrol of blood pressure regulations through baroreflex afferent pathway in HFD rats. PMID:27387420

  7. Hippocampal NMDA receptors are involved in rats' spontaneous object recognition only under high memory load condition.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Manami; Yamada, Kazuo; Iguchi, Natsumi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2015-10-22

    The possible involvement of hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in spontaneous object recognition was investigated in rats under different memory load conditions. We first estimated rats' object memory span using 3-5 objects in "Different Objects Task (DOT)" in order to confirm the highest memory load condition in object recognition memory. Rats were allowed to explore a field in which 3 (3-DOT), 4 (4-DOT), or 5 (5-DOT) different objects were presented. After a delay period, they were placed again in the same field in which one of the sample objects was replaced by another object, and their object exploration behavior was analyzed. Rats could differentiate the novel object from the familiar ones in 3-DOT and 4-DOT but not in 5-DOT, suggesting that rats' object memory span was about 4. Then, we examined the effects of hippocampal AP5 infusion on performance in both 2-DOT (2 different objects were used) and 4-DOT. The drug treatment before the sample phase impaired performance only in 4-DOT. These results suggest that hippocampal NMDA receptors play a critical role in spontaneous object recognition only when the memory load is high.

  8. Decreased measures of experimental anxiety in rats bred for high alcohol preference.

    PubMed

    Möller, C; Wiklund, L; Thorsell, A; Hyytiä, P; Heilig, M

    1997-06-01

    A prevalent notion holds that acute anti-anxiety actions of ethanol are important for the reinforcing properties of this drug, and might predispose individuals with pre-existing anxiety disorders for developing ethanol dependence. This notion remains controversial, and human studies have yielded conflicting results. Ethanol dependence is likely a heterogenous disorder, and the discrepancies might be explained by a different relationship between anxiety and alcohol reinforcement in different subtypes of alcoholism. Recent results in experimental animals suggest that antianxiety actions of ethanol are important reinforcers of voluntary ethanol consumption in heterogeneous rats. Here, we examined whether the relationship is different in the AA line of rats bred for high voluntary ethanol intake. Behavior was studied in two established animal models of anxiety, a punished drinking conflict test, and the elevated plus maze. In the conflict test, the AA line displayed a markedly disinhibited behavior over a range of shock intensities, compared both with their counterpart, the ANA line, and with regular Wistar rats. On the plus maze, both AA and Wistar rats showed lower measures of experimental anxiety than ANA subjects. The phenotype of the animals was confirmed using a two-bottle free choice alcohol drinking procedure. The disinhibited behavior and spontaneous ethanol preference of the AA line differs from what has been found in heterogeneous rats, and displays similarities to genetically transmitted type II alcoholism according to the nomenclature of Cloninger.

  9. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne . E-mail: wessling@hsph.harvard.edu

    2006-01-15

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased {approx}2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, {sup 54}Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. {sup 54}Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected {sup 54}Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration.

  10. Alteration of sweet taste in high-fat diet induced obese rats after 4 weeks treatment with exenatide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-juan; Wang, Yu-qing; Long, Yang; Wang, Lei; Li, Yun; Gao, Fa-bao; Tian, Hao-ming

    2013-09-01

    Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is effective in inducing weight loss. The exact mechanisms are not fully understood. Reduced appetite and food intake may play important roles. Sweet taste contributes to food palatability, which promotes appetite. Interestingly, GLP-1 and its receptor are expressed in the taste buds of rodents and their interaction has an effect on mediating sweet taste sensitivity. Our aim was to investigate whether sweet taste will be changed after long term treatment with exenatide. The results showed that high-fat diet induced obese rats (HF-C) presented metabolic disorders in food intake, body weight, blood glucose and lipid metabolism compared with long term exenatide treated obese rats (EX) and normal chow fed control rats (NC). Meanwhile, greater preference for sweet taste was observed in HF-C rats but not in EX rats. Compared with NC rats, brain activities induced by sweet taste stimulation were stronger in HF-C rats, however these stronger activities were not found in EX rats. We further found reduced sweet taste receptor T1R3 in circumvallte taste buds of HF-C rats, while GLP-1 was increased. Besides, serum leptin was evaluated in HF-C rats with decreased leptin receptor expressed in taste buds. These changes were not observed in EX rats, which suggest them to be the underlying hormone and molecular mechanisms responsible for alterations in sweet taste of HF-C rats and EX rats. In summary, our results suggest that long term treatment with exenatide could benefit dietary obese rats partially by reversing sweet taste changes.

  11. A high isoflavone soy protein diet and intravenous genistein delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Timothy P; Liesen, Daniel A; Mann, Paul C; Rolando, Lori; Banz, William J

    2002-08-01

    Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has in vitro immunosuppressive properties. We investigated whether genistein or dietary soy protein containing isoflavones could influence the outcome of rat cardiac allografts. Lewis rats were fed a diet with protein from high isoflavone soy protein fraction (HIS), casein (CAS) or casein with isoflavones added (CI) starting 1 wk before heart transplants from Wistar Furth donors, and continuing throughout the study. HIS-fed rats had significantly prolonged time to rejection compared with CAS- and CI-fed recipients (10.8 +/- 2.62 vs. 7.18 +/- 0.75 and 7.22 +/- 0.44 d, P < 0.001). Intravenous genistein [20mg/(kg. d) for 14 d] significantly prolonged heart survival compared with controls and dissolvent-treated recipients (23.2 +/- 7.4 vs. 8.4 +/- 1.3 and 11.4+/3.6 d, P < 0.0005), and had an additive effect when given to heart recipients also receiving low dose cyclosporine for 7 d (30.8 +/- 2.3 vs. 23.4 +/- 2.4 d, P < 0.005). Concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes, isolated from Lewis rats given intraperitoneal genistein for 7 d, had decreased production of interferon gamma compared with controls or dimethyl sulfoxide-treated groups (22.6 +/- 9.9 vs 149 +/- 105 and 154 +/- 103 micro g/L, P < 0.05). In conclusion, a high isoflavone soy diet and intravenous genistein, but not isoflavone extract alone, delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts, with an additive effect in cyclosporine-treated rats. In addition, intraperitoneal genistein has immunosuppressive properties in vivo.

  12. Oxidative Modification in the Salivary Glands of High Fat-Diet Induced Insulin Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kołodziej, Urszula; Maciejczyk, Mateusz; Miąsko, Agnieszka; Matczuk, Jan; Knaś, Małgorzata; Żukowski, Piotr; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Borys, Jan; Zalewska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Still little is known about the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of the salivary gland dysfunction in the course of insulin resistance (IR). To induce IR rats was fed with a high fat diet (HFD) during 8 weeks. Stimulated and non-stimulated salivary flow rate, total protein, as well as oxidative damage markers: 4-HNE protein adduct, 8-isoprostanes (8-isoP), 8-hydroxy-D-guanosine (8-OHdG), advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP), and protein carbonyls (PC) were determined in the plasma and submandibular and parotid glands of IR and control rats. We have shown a significant decrease (45%) of the stimulated salivary flow rate, and in the total protein concentration in the parotid (35%) and submandibular (10%) glands of HFD IR as compared to the control rats. The level of 4-HNE protein adduct (15%) and 8-isoP (20%) in the submandibular glands of IR rats as well as total level of 4-HNE protein adduct (39%), 8-isoP (27%), AOPP (25%), PC (32%), and 8-OHdG (18%) in the parotid glands of IR rats were significantly higher as compared to the control group. We showed no correlation between the assessed OS parameters in the plasma and salivary glands. However, the redox balance in both glands shifted toward the oxidative status, parotid glands of IR rats are exposed to greater intensity OS. Stimulated secretory ability and mechanisms involved in the synthesis/secretion of proteins in the salivary glands are depressed in the course of IR. Oxidative damage in the salivary glands arises independently from the general OS in the course of insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet. PMID:28184199

  13. Oxidative Modification in the Salivary Glands of High Fat-Diet Induced Insulin Resistant Rats.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Urszula; Maciejczyk, Mateusz; Miąsko, Agnieszka; Matczuk, Jan; Knaś, Małgorzata; Żukowski, Piotr; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Borys, Jan; Zalewska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Still little is known about the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of the salivary gland dysfunction in the course of insulin resistance (IR). To induce IR rats was fed with a high fat diet (HFD) during 8 weeks. Stimulated and non-stimulated salivary flow rate, total protein, as well as oxidative damage markers: 4-HNE protein adduct, 8-isoprostanes (8-isoP), 8-hydroxy-D-guanosine (8-OHdG), advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP), and protein carbonyls (PC) were determined in the plasma and submandibular and parotid glands of IR and control rats. We have shown a significant decrease (45%) of the stimulated salivary flow rate, and in the total protein concentration in the parotid (35%) and submandibular (10%) glands of HFD IR as compared to the control rats. The level of 4-HNE protein adduct (15%) and 8-isoP (20%) in the submandibular glands of IR rats as well as total level of 4-HNE protein adduct (39%), 8-isoP (27%), AOPP (25%), PC (32%), and 8-OHdG (18%) in the parotid glands of IR rats were significantly higher as compared to the control group. We showed no correlation between the assessed OS parameters in the plasma and salivary glands. However, the redox balance in both glands shifted toward the oxidative status, parotid glands of IR rats are exposed to greater intensity OS. Stimulated secretory ability and mechanisms involved in the synthesis/secretion of proteins in the salivary glands are depressed in the course of IR. Oxidative damage in the salivary glands arises independently from the general OS in the course of insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet.

  14. Effect of high-impact and low-repetition training on bones in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, A; Umemura, Y; Nagasawa, S

    2001-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of high-impact and low-repetition jump training on bones in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Forty female Wistar rats were sham-operated (sham) or OVX at the age of 11 weeks. The rats were divided randomly into the following four groups: sham-sedentary (SS; n = 10), sham-exercised (SE; n = 10), OVX-sedentary (OS; n = 10), and OVX-exercised (OE; n = 10). The rats started the jump training at the age of 12 weeks. The jump-training protocol was 10 times/day, 5 days/week and the jumping-height was 40 cm. After 8 weeks of training, the mass and breaking force in the tibia and ulna, cross-sectional areas of diaphysis in the tibia, and serum bone turnover markers were measured. The jump training significantly increased the fat-free dry weight, ash weight, and ultimate breaking force in the tibia. The rate of increase in these parameters was similar in both the sham and the OVX groups. On the other hand, in the ulna, there were no significant changes in the ultimate breaking force. The jump training significantly increased the periosteal perimeter and cortical area, although the increase in these parameters in OE compared with OS was lower than that in SE compared with SS. The jump training significantly increased serum osteocalcin in the OVX groups, as well as in the sham groups. These results suggest that high-impact and low-repetition training had beneficial effects on bone formation and bone biomechanical properties in OVX rats, as well as in sham rats.

  15. High-fat diet preference and overeating mediated by postingestive factors in rats.

    PubMed

    Lucas, F; Ackroff, K; Sclafani, A

    1998-11-01

    The role of postingestive factors in the preference for and overconsumption of high-fat (HF) foods, relative to high-carbohydrate (HC) foods, was investigated using a self-regulated intragastric feeding procedure. On one-bottle training days, rats drank one flavored saccharin solution [conditioned stimulus (CS) + HF] paired with intragastric infusions of an HF liquid diet, a second flavored solution (CS+HC) paired with an HC liquid diet, and a third flavored solution (CS-) paired with intragastric water. The diets had the same energy and protein content; the CS solutions and infusions along with chow were available ad libitum. The rats drank more CS and self-infused more diet on HF than HC training days. In two-bottle choice tests, the rats preferred the CS+HF to the CS+HC and both CS+HF and CS+HC to the CS-. The rats consumed more CS+HF than CS+HC by taking more bouts per day; bout sizes did not reliably differ. In a subsequent experiment, rats preferred the CS+HF even though diet intakes in training were matched. In a final experiment, the CS+HC and CS+HF intakes were equated in training by diluting the HC diet. Now the rats did not reliably prefer the CS+HF to the CS+HC, yet caloric intakes were much higher on CS+HF than CS+HC training days. Thus, relative to an isocaloric HC diet, the postingestive effects of HF diets stimulate overeating and condition a stronger flavor preference. Reduced satiety rather than increased reinforcement may be the direct promoter of overeating. However, postingestive reinforcement may enhance the selection of HF foods when a choice of HF and HC foods is available.

  16. α-Amyrin attenuates high fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Pankaj; Reeta, K H; Maulik, Subir Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of α-amyrin (a pentacyclic triterpene) on high-fructose diet (HFD)-induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into different groups. The control group was fed normal rat chow diet. The HFD group was fed HFD (60%; w/w) for 42 days. Pioglitazone (10 mg/kg, orally, once daily) was used as a standard drug. α-Amyrin was administered in 3 doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, orally, once daily along with HFD). Plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were estimated. Changes in blood pressure, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin tolerance were measured. Hepatic oxidative stress as well as messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were analyzed. A significant increase in systolic blood pressure, plasma glucose, total cholesterol, and plasma triglycerides and a significant decrease in HDL-C were observed in HFD rats as compared with control rats. Glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance were also significantly impaired with HFD. α-Amyrin prevented these changes in a dose-dependent manner. Hepatic oxidative stress as well as micro- and macrovesicular fatty changes in hepatocytes caused by HFD were also attenuated by α-amyrin. α-Amyrin preserved the hepatic mRNA and protein levels of PPAR-α, which was reduced in HFD group. This study thus demonstrates that α-amyrin attenuates HFD-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

  17. Beneficial effects of Plantago albicans on high-fat diet-induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Samout, Noura; Ettaya, Amani; Bouzenna, Hafsia; Ncib, Sana; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a one of the main global public health problems associated with chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes and cancer. As a solution to obesity, we suggest Plantago albicans, which is a medicinal plant with several biological effects. This study assesses the possible anti-obesity protective properties of Plantago albicans in high fat diet-fed rats. 28 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups; a group which received normal diet (C), the second group was fed HDF diet (HDF), the third group was given normal diet supplemented with Plantago albicans (P.AL), and the fourth group received HDF supplemented with Plantago albicans (HDF+P.AL) (30mg/kg/day) for 7 weeks. Our results showed an increase in body weight of HDF rats by ∼16% as compared to the control group with an increase in the levels of total cholesterol (TC) as well as LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG) in serum. Also, the concentration of TBARS increased in the liver and heart of HDF-fed rats as compared to the control group. The oral gavage of Plantago albicans extract to obese rats induced a reduction in their body weight, lipid accumulation in liver and heart tissue, compared to the high-fat diet control rats. The obtained results proved that the antioxidant potency of Plantago albicans extracts was correlated with their phenolic and flavonoid contents. The antioxidant capacity of the extract was evaluated by DPPH test (as EC50=250±2.12μg/mL) and FRAP tests (as EC50=27.77±0.14μg/mL). These results confirm the phytochemical and antioxidant impact of Plantago albicans extracts. Plantago albicans content was determined using validated HPLC methodology.

  18. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T.; Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R.; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  19. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  20. Olive leaf extract attenuates cardiac, hepatic, and metabolic changes in high carbohydrate-, high fat-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Hemant; Campbell, Fiona; Brown, Lindsay

    2010-05-01

    Olive oil, an important component of the Mediterranean diet, produces cardioprotective effects, probably due to both oleic acid and the polyphenols such as oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol. Our aim in this study was to assess whether a polyphenol-enriched extract from the leaves of Olea europaea L. with oleuropein as the major component attenuated the cardiovascular, hepatic, and metabolic signs of a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF) diet (carbohydrate, 52%; fat, 24%, 25% fructose in drinking water) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed either a cornstarch diet (CS) or a HCHF diet for a total of 16 wk. Diets of the treatment groups [CS+olive leaf extract (OLE) and HCHF+OLE] were supplemented with 3% OLE after 8 wk of being fed their respective CS or HCHF diets for a further 8 wk. After 16 wk, HCHF rats developed signs of metabolic syndrome, including elevated abdominal and hepatic fat deposition, collagen deposition in heart and liver, cardiac stiffness, and oxidative stress markers (plasma malondialdehyde and uric acid concentrations), with diminished aortic ring reactivity, abnormal plasma lipid profile, impaired glucose tolerance, and hypertension. Compared with HCHF rats, those in the HCHF+OLE group had improved or normalized cardiovascular, hepatic, and metabolic signs with the exception of elevated blood pressure. These results strongly suggest that an OLE containing polyphenols such as oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol reverses the chronic inflammation and oxidative stress that induces the cardiovascular, hepatic, and metabolic symptoms in this rat model of diet-induced obesity and diabetes without changing blood pressure.

  1. The alcohol-preferring (P) and high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats--animal models of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A; Bell, Richard L; Lumeng, Lawrence; Li, Ting-Kai

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this article is to review the literature on the utility of using the selectively bred alcohol-preferring (P) and high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) lines of rats in studies examining high alcohol drinking in adults and adolescents, craving-like behavior, and the co-abuse of alcohol with other drugs. The P line of rats meets all of the originally proposed criteria for a suitable animal model of alcoholism. In addition, the P rat exhibits high alcohol-seeking behavior, demonstrates an alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) under relapse drinking conditions, consumes amounts of ethanol during adolescence equivalent to those consumed in adulthood, and co-abuses ethanol and nicotine. The P line also exhibits excessive binge-like alcohol drinking, attaining blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) of 200 mg% on a daily basis. The HAD replicate lines of rats have not been as extensively studied as the P rats. The HAD1,2 rats satisfy several of the criteria for an animal model of alcoholism, e.g., these rats will voluntarily consume ethanol in a free-choice situation to produce BACs between 50 and 200 mg%. The HAD1,2 rats also exhibit an ADE under repeated relapse conditions, and will demonstrate similar levels of ethanol intake during adolescence as seen in adults. Overall, the P and HAD1,2 rats have characteristics attributed to an early onset alcoholic, and can be used to study various aspects of alcohol use disorders.

  2. High-impact exercise strengthens bone in osteopenic ovariectomized rats with the same outcome as Sham rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Akiko; Sogo, Naota; Nagasawa, Seigo; Shimizu, Takuya; Umemura, Yoshihisa

    2003-09-01

    The effect of jump exercise on middle-aged osteopenic rats was investigated. Forty-two 9-mo-old female rats were either sham-operated (Sham) or ovariectomized (OVX). Three months after surgery, the rats were divided into the following groups: Sham sedentary, Sham exercised, OVX sedentary, and OVX exercised. Rats in the exercise groups jumped 10 times/day, 5 days/wk, for 8 wk, with a jumping height of 40 cm. Less than 1 min was required for the jump training. After the experiment, the right tibia and femur were dissected, and blood was obtained from each rat. OVX rats were observed to have increased body weights and decreased bone mass in their tibiae and femurs. Jump-exercised rats, on the other hand, had significantly increased tibial bone mass, strength, and cortical areas. The bone mass and strength of OVX exercised rats increased to approximately the same extent as Sham exercised rats, despite estrogen deficiency or osteopenia. Our data suggest that jump exercise has beneficial effects on lower limb bone mass, strength, bone mineral density, and morphometry in middle-aged osteopenic rats, as well as in Sham rats.

  3. High-impact exercise in rats prior to and during suspension can prevent bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, G.R.; Paiva, A.G.; Gasparini, G.A.; Macedo, A.P.; Frighetto, P.D.; Volpon, J.B.; Shimano, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    High-impact exercise has been considered an important method for treating bone loss in osteopenic experimental models. In this study, we investigated the effects of osteopenia caused by inactivity in femora and tibiae of rats subjected to jump training using the rat tail suspension model. Eight-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n=10 each group): jump training for 2 weeks before suspension and training during 3 weeks of suspension; jump training for 2 weeks before suspension; jump training only during suspension; suspension without any training; and a control group. The exercise protocol consisted of 20 jumps/day, 5 days/week, with a jump height of 40 cm. The bone mineral density of the femora and tibiae was measured by double energy X-ray absorptiometry and the same bones were evaluated by mechanical tests. Bone microarchitecture was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA was used to compare groups. Significance was determined as P<0.05. Regarding bone mineral density, mechanical properties and bone microarchitecture, the beneficial effects were greater in the bones of animals subjected to pre-suspension training and subsequently to training during suspension, compared with the bones of animals subjected to pre-suspension training or to training during suspension. Our results indicate that a period of high impact exercise prior to tail suspension in rats can prevent the installation of osteopenia if there is also training during the tail suspension. PMID:26840705

  4. Dietary intake of high-dose biotin inhibits spermatogenesis in young rats.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Hiromi; Ikeda, Chieko; Shimada, Ryoko; Yoshii, Yui; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-02-01

    To characterize a new function of the water-soluble vitamin, biotin, in reproduction and early growth in mammals, the effects of high dietary doses of biotin on early spermatogenesis were biochemically and histologically investigated in male rats. Weaned rats were fed a CE-2 (control) diet containing 0.00004% biotin, or a control diet supplemented with 0.01%, 0.1%, or 1.0% biotin. Pair-fed rats were fed a control diet that was equal in calories to the amount ingested by the 1.0% biotin group, because food intake was decreased in the 1.0% biotin group. Food intake and body weight gain were lower in the 1.0% biotin group than in the control group. The kidney, brain and testis weights were significantly lower in the 1.0% biotin group than in the pair-fed group after 6 weeks of feeding. The accumulation of biotin in the liver and testis increased in a dose-dependent manner. In the 1.0% biotin group, the number of mature sperm was markedly lower, that of sperm with morphologically abnormal heads, mainly consisting of round heads, had increased. In addition, the development of seminiferous tubules was inhibited, and few spermatogonia and no spermatocytes were histologically observed. These results demonstrated that the long-term intake of high-dose biotin inhibited spermatogenesis in young male rats.

  5. High-impact exercise in rats prior to and during suspension can prevent bone loss.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, G R; Paiva, A G; Gasparini, G A; Macedo, A P; Frighetto, P D; Volpon, J B; Shimano, A C

    2016-03-01

    High-impact exercise has been considered an important method for treating bone loss in osteopenic experimental models. In this study, we investigated the effects of osteopenia caused by inactivity in femora and tibiae of rats subjected to jump training using the rat tail suspension model. Eight-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n=10 each group): jump training for 2 weeks before suspension and training during 3 weeks of suspension; jump training for 2 weeks before suspension; jump training only during suspension; suspension without any training; and a control group. The exercise protocol consisted of 20 jumps/day, 5 days/week, with a jump height of 40 cm. The bone mineral density of the femora and tibiae was measured by double energy X-ray absorptiometry and the same bones were evaluated by mechanical tests. Bone microarchitecture was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA was used to compare groups. Significance was determined as P<0.05. Regarding bone mineral density, mechanical properties and bone microarchitecture, the beneficial effects were greater in the bones of animals subjected to pre-suspension training and subsequently to training during suspension, compared with the bones of animals subjected to pre-suspension training or to training during suspension. Our results indicate that a period of high impact exercise prior to tail suspension in rats can prevent the installation of osteopenia if there is also training during the tail suspension.

  6. Spent turmeric reduces fat mass in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kinoshita, Mikio; Oh, Chan-Ho; Shimada, Ken-ichiro; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-04-01

    Indigestible carbohydrates may improve obesity. Spent turmeric contains high levels of dietary fibre and resistant starch (RS), which have fermentation potential in vitro. We hypothesised that indigestible carbohydrates in spent turmeric might prevent obesity development. In the first study, rats were administered 10% turmeric powder (TP) or spent turmeric powder (STP) in a high-fat (HF) diet for 28 d. In the second study, rats were fed 10% STP in a HF diet with or without antibiotics for 15 d. In the third study, rats were treated with a STP-containing suspension. In study 1, the TP and STP diet increased the caecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) content compared to that of a control diet. The lower energy intake in the TP and STP group was strongly related to the decrease in visceral fat weight. In study 2, after caecal fermentation suppression with antibiotics, STP treatment decreased the visceral fat mass. In study 3, the plasma glucose levels and incremental area under the curve (AUC) after ingestion of a STP-containing suspension were lower than those after ingestion of suspension alone. These findings suggest the reduction of carbohydrate absorption during the gastrointestinal passage after TP and STP treatment. Our data indicate that the reduced obesity development in rats fed a HF diet may be attributed to the low metabolisable energy density of carbohydrates in the spent turmeric, independent of SCFA-mediated factors.

  7. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  8. Differential neurochemical properties of central serotonergic transmission in Roman high- and low-avoidance rats.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, O; Piras, G; Lecca, D; Hansson, S; Driscoll, P; Corda, M G

    2003-07-01

    The selective breeding of Roman high- (RHA/Verh) and low-avoidance (RLA/Verh) rats for rapid versus poor acquisition of active avoidant behaviour has produced two behavioural phenotypes with different performances in a variety of animal models of anxiety, in which RLA/Verh rats are consistently more fearful than RHA/Verh rats. In addition, these two lines display different functional properties of brain neurotransmitters like serotonin (5-HT), known to be involved in the expression of anxiety- and depression-related behaviours. Therefore, we used brain microdialysis and [3H]-citalopram binding autoradiography to characterize further the neurochemical properties of 5-HTergic transmission in the two lines. No significant line-related differences were detected in the basal 5-HT output in the frontoparietal cortex (FPCx). In contrast, the increase in the cortical 5-HT output elicited by the systemic administration or the local application, via reverse dialysis, of chlorimipramine and fluoxetine was more robust in RHA/Verh than in RLA/Verh rats. Moreover, the binding signal of [3H]-citalopram to 5-HT re-uptake sites was more intense in the FPCx of RHA/Verh rats than in their RLA/Verh counterparts. These findings suggest that the functional tone of the 5-HTergic projection to the FPCx is stronger in the RHA/Verh line relative to the RLA/Verh line. It is proposed that RLA/Verh rats may be used as a model with heuristic value for studying the role of 5-HTergic transmission in anxiety and in the anxiolytic effects of monoamine re-uptake inhibitors.

  9. A High Phosphorus Diet Affects Lipid Metabolism in Rat Liver: A DNA Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Sunwoo; Bamba, Takeshi; Suyama, Tatsuya; Ishijima, Tomoko; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Abe, Keiko; Nakai, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A high phosphorus (HP) diet causes disorders of renal function, bone metabolism, and vascular function. We previously demonstrated that DNA microarray analysis is an appropriate method to comprehensively evaluate the effects of a HP diet on kidney dysfunction such as calcification, fibrillization, and inflammation. We reported that type IIb sodium-dependent phosphate transporter is significantly up-regulated in this context. In the present study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to investigate the effects of a HP diet on the liver, which plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA isolated from the livers of rats fed a control diet (containing 0.3% phosphorus) or a HP diet (containing 1.2% phosphorus). Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that the HP diet induced down-regulation of genes involved in hepatic amino acid catabolism and lipogenesis, while genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation process were up-regulated. Although genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated in HP diet-fed rats, genes important for the elongation and desaturation reactions of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids were up-regulated. Concentrations of hepatic arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were increased in HP diet-fed rats. These essential fatty acids activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a transcription factor for fatty acid β-oxidation. Evaluation of the upstream regulators of DEGs using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that PPARα was activated in the livers of HP diet-fed rats. Furthermore, the serum concentration of fibroblast growth factor 21, a hormone secreted from the liver that promotes fatty acid utilization in adipose tissue as a PPARα target gene, was higher (p = 0.054) in HP diet-fed rats than in control diet-fed rats. These data suggest that a HP diet enhances energy expenditure through the utilization of free fatty acids

  10. Plasma 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentration of Dahl salt-sensitive rats decreases during high salt intake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Tewolde, Teclemicael K.; Forte, Camille; Wang, Min; Bayorh, Mohamed A.; Emmett, Nerimiah L.; White, Jolanda; Griffin, Keri

    2002-01-01

    Dahl salt-sensitive rats, but not salt-resistant rats, develop hypertension in response to high salt intake. We have previously shown an inverse relationship between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and blood pressure of Dahl salt-sensitive rats during high salt intake. In this study, we report on the relationship between high salt intake and plasma 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25-(OH)(2)D) concentration of Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant rats. Rats were fed a high salt diet (8%) and sacrificed at day 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentrations of salt-sensitive rats were reduced to 50% of that at baseline at day 2-when blood pressure and plasma 25-OHD concentration were unchanged, but 25-OHD content in the kidney was 81% of that at baseline. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration was reduced further to 10% of that at baseline from day 7 to 14 of high salt intake, a reduction that was prevented in rats switched to a low salt (0.3%) diet at day 7. Exogenous 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (24,25-(OH)(2)D(3)), administered at a level that increased plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration to five times normal, did not attenuate the salt-induced hypertension of salt-sensitive rats. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration of salt-resistant rats was gradually reduced to 50% of that at baseline at day 14 and returned to baseline value at day 28 of high salt intake. We conclude that the decrease in plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration in salt-sensitive rats during high salt intake is caused by decreased 25-OHD content in the kidney and also by another unidentified mechanism.

  11. Protective effects of tiopronin against high fat diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-qing; Zou, Yu-hong; Huang, Cheng; Lu, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Yong; Lü, Xiong-wen; Liu, Li-ping; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To study the protective effects of tiopronin against high fat diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a high-fat diet for 10 weeks. The rats were administered tiopronin (20 mg/kg) or a positive control drug ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, 15 mg/kg) via gavage daily from week 5 to week 10. After the rats were sacrificed, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), and liver homogenate FFA, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured using commercial analysis kits. The expression levels of CYP2E1 mRNA and protein were determined using RT-PCR and immunoblot assays, respectively. Results: Tiopronin significantly lowered both the serum ALT and AST levels, while only the serum ALT level was lowered by UDCA. Tiopronin significantly decreased the serum and liver levels of TG, TC and FFA as well as the serum LDL-C level, and increased the serum HDL-C level, while UDCA decreased the serum and liver TC levels as well as the serum LDL-C level, but did not change the serum levels of TG, FFA and HDL-C. Tiopronin apparently ameliorated the hepatocyte degeneration and the infiltration of inflammatory cells in the livers, but UDCA did not affect the pathological features of the livers. Both tiopronin and UDCA ameliorated the mitochondrial abnormality in the livers. The benefits of tiopronin were associated with increased SOD and GSH-Px activities, and with decreased MDA activity and CYP2E1 expression in the livers. Conclusion: Tiopronin exerts protective effects against non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in rats, which may be associated with its antioxidant properties and regulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:22543705

  12. Effects of high-intensity swimming training on the bones of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taewoong; Tanaka, Sakura; Naka, Tatsuki; Igawa, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the effects of high-intensity intermittent swimming training(HIT) on bone in ovariectomized rats. [Methods] Six-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either sham operation or bilateral ovariectomy. After surgery, they were divided into the following four groups: 1) sham-operated sedentary (S), 2) sham-operated exercise training (SE), 3) OVX sedentary (O), 4) OVX exercise training (OE) 5) OVX given 17β-estradiol (OE2) and 6) OVX exercise training and given 17β-estradiol (OEE). SE, OE and OEE rats were used extremely high-intensity swim exercise. The rats repeated fourteen 20-s swimming bouts with a weight equivalent to 14, 15, and 16% of body weight for the first 5, the next 9, and the last 5 days, respectively. Between exercise bouts, a 10-s pause was allowed. HIT was originally designed as an exercise method; a method that very quickly induces an increase in the maximum oxygen intake (Tabata I et al., 1996). OEE and OE2 rats were subcutaneously injected ethanol with 25μg/kg body weight 17β-estradiol 3 times per week. [Results] Bone strength, bone mineral density and trabecular bone parameters were measured after a 8-weeks experimental period. Bone strength was significantly higher in the SE, OE, OE2 and OEE group compared with the O group. BV/TV was significant increase in the SE, OE groups compared with the O group. BMD showed no difference in the OE group compared with the O group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrate some beneficial effects of postmenopausal osteoporosis of high-intensity intermittent swimming training on bone structure and strength. PMID:27757386

  13. Oral ethanol self-administration in inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats: gradual versus abrupt ethanol presentation.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Lidia; Gómez, M José; Callejas-Aguilera, José E; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Papini, Mauricio R; Torres, Carmen

    2012-12-25

    Outbred Roman high-avoidance rats are known to consume more ethanol than inbred Roman low-avoidance rats. To determine whether ethanol consumption in inbred strains could be modulated by experiential factors, preference for a target 10% ethanol concentration was tested after either the gradual introduction of ethanol in increasing concentrations or the abrupt introduction of the target concentration. Whereas high-avoidance rats consumed more ethanol at lower concentrations, consumption and preference for ethanol over water were not differential across strains and administration procedure (gradual vs. abrupt). At the 4% concentration, ethanol was preferred over water by Roman high-avoidance rats, but water was preferred over ethanol by Roman low-avoidance rats. Ethanol consumption and preference for a 10% concentration appear to be immune to modification by either the gradual or abrupt ethanol presentation.

  14. High-Moisture Diet for Laboratory Rats: Complete Blood Counts, Serum Biochemical Values, and Intestinal Enzyme Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battles, August H.; Knapka, Joseph T.; Stevens, Bruce R.; Lewis, Laura; Lang, Marie T.; Gruendel, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    Rats were fed an irradiated high-moisture diet (KSC-25) with or without access to a water bottle. Physiologic values were compared between these two groups and a group of rats fed a purified diet. Hematologic and serum biochemical values, urine specific gravity, and intestinal enzyme activities were determined from samples collected from the three groups of rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=32) fed the irradiated high-moisture diet with or without a water bottle were the test animals. Rats (n=16) fed an irradiated purified diet and water provided via a water bottle were the control group. The purified diet formulation, modified AIN-76A, is a commonly used purified diet for laboratory rodents. All rats remained alert and healthy throughout the study. A comparison of the physiologic values of rats in this study with reported normal values indicated that all of the rats in the study were in good health. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) of the physiologic values from each rat group are reported.

  15. Fecal excretion pattern of bile acids in rats fed high fat diets and neomycin in induced colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Panda, S K; Broitman, S A

    1999-09-06

    Neomycin augments colon tumorigenesis in 1,2 - dimethylhydrazine treated rats fed polyunsaturated fat diet and decreases fecal cholic acid excretion, while it inhibits tumorigenesis with increased cholic acid and decreased deoxycholic acid excretions in rats fed high cholesterol diet. Participation of other fecal bile acids seems to be insignificant in relation to colon carcinogenesis.

  16. Elevated sup 22 Na uptake in aortae of Dahl salt-sensitive rats with high salt diet

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdev, S.; Prabhakaran, V.; Sampson, C.A. )

    1990-01-01

    We examined the effects of high salt intake on blood pressure and vascular {sup 22}Na uptake in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. At 6 weeks of age, one group of 6 DS rats was placed on a low (0.4%) salt diet and the second group of 6 DS rats was placed on a high (8.0%) salt diet for a period of 4 weeks. Blood pressure recordings were made weekly. At 10 weeks of age, the animals were sacrificed and aortic {sup 22}Na uptake was measured. Total and amiloride sensitive (Na(+)-H+ antiport) components of {sup 22}Na uptake were measured from which was calculated the amiloride insensitive component. Na+, K(+)-pumps were inhibited for these vascular {sup 22}Na uptake experiments with ouabain to prevent Na+ efflux. DS rats on the high salt diet demonstrated significantly (P less than 0.01) higher blood pressure when compared to DS rats on a low salt diet. Similarly, DS rats on a high salt diet demonstrated significantly (P less than 0.05) higher total, amiloride sensitive and amiloride insensitive vascular {sup 22}Na uptake as compared to DS rats on low salt diet. The parallel increase in vascular {sup 22}Na uptake and blood pressure suggests a possible, key role of Na+ influx in the mechanism of salt induced hypertension of DS rats.

  17. Hypocholesterolemic Effects of Lactic Acid-Fermented Soymilk on Rats Fed a High Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Maki; Hirahata, Rie; Egusa, Shintaro; Fukuda, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    The effect of fermented soymilk on rats fed a high cholesterol diet was investigated to clarify the cholesterol-lowering function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 7 weeks were fed a control diet (1% cholesterol, high cholesterol diet), high cholesterol diet containing 11.7% fermented soymilk diet (5% soy protein as final concentration, F-5), or high cholesterol diet containing 23.4% fermented soymilk diet (10% soy protein as final concentration, F-10) for 5 weeks. The liver weight and fat mass were decreased by the ingestion of fermented soymilk. The hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels in the F-5 and F-10 groups were significantly lowered compared to those in the control group. The plasma total cholesterol level of the F-10 group was significantly decreased. The expression of SREBP-2, a cholesterol synthesis-related gene, was significantly decreased in liver of the F-5 group, but the expression of CYP7a1, a cholesterol catabolism-related gene, was significantly increased. These results suggest that fermented soymilk can modulate the cholesterol metabolism in rats fed a high cholesterol diet. PMID:23112918

  18. PROLONGED PERFORMANCE OF A HIGH REPETITION LOW FORCE TASK INDUCES BONE ADAPTATION IN YOUNG ADULT RATS, BUT LOSS IN MATURE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Massicotte, Vicky S; Frara, Nagat; Harris, Michele Y; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steven N; Barbe, Mary F

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that prolonged repetitive reaching and grasping tasks lead to exposure-dependent changes in bone microarchitecture and inflammatory cytokines in young adult rats. Since aging mammals show increased tissue inflammatory cytokines, we sought here to determine if aging, combined with prolonged performance of a repetitive upper extremity task, enhances bone loss. We examined the radius, forearm flexor muscles, and serum from 16 mature (14–18 mo of age) and 14 young adult (2.5–6.5 mo of age) female rats after performance of a high repetition low force (HRLF) reaching and grasping task for 12 weeks. Young adult HRLF rats showed enhanced radial bone growth (e.g., increased trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, bone formation rate, and mid-diaphyseal periosteal perimeter), compared to age-matched controls. Mature HRLF rats showed several indices of radial bone loss (e.g., decreased trabecular bone volume, and increased cortical bone thinning, porosity, resorptive spaces and woven bone formation), increased osteoclast numbers and inflammatory cytokines, compared to age-matched controls and young adult HRLF rats. Mature rats weighed more yet had lower maximum reflexive grip strength, than young adult rats, although each age group was able to pull at the required reach rate (4 reaches/min) and required submaximal pulling force (30 force-grams) for a food reward. Serum estrogen levels and flexor digitorum muscle size were similar in each age group. Thus, mature rats had increased bone degradative changes than in young adult rats performing the same repetitive task for 12 weeks, with increased inflammatory cytokine responses and osteoclast activity as possible causes. PMID:26517953

  19. Characteristics of a rat model of an open craniocerebral injury at simulated high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Yu, An-Yong; Xu, Quan-Hong; Hu, Sheng-Li; Li, Fei; Chen, Yu-Jie; Yin, Yi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiang-Kai

    2014-01-01

    To establish a rat model of an open craniocerebral injury at simulated high altitude and to examine the characteristics of this model. Rats were divided randomly into a normobaric group and a high-altitude group and their corresponding control groups. A rat model of an open craniocerebral injury was established with a nail gun shot. Simulated high-altitude conditions were established with a hypobaric chamber at 0.6 ATA to mimic pressure at an altitude of 4000 m. Mortality, brain water content (BWC), Evans blue content, pathology, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), and brainstem auditory-evoked potential were observed after injury. The mortality of the high-altitude group was significantly greater than that of the normobaric group within 72 h after injury (P<0.05). BWC and Evans blue content increased by 48 h after injury (P<0.05); pathological changes in damaged brains were more serious. In contrast, rCBF and PbtO2 had decreased markedly by 72 h (P<0.01); brainstem auditory-evoked potential values were significantly prolonged (P<0.05). Moreover, an inverse correlation between rCBF and BWC and a positive correlation between rCBF and PbtO2 were found. The rat model of an open craniocerebral injury at simulated high altitude can be established successfully using a nail gun shot and a hypobaric chamber. The injury characteristics at high altitude were more serious, rapid, and prolonged than those in the normobaric group. PMID:25191925

  20. Protective effects of L-arabinose in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lei; Lu, Xiaoling; Sun, Min; Li, Kai; Shen, Lingmin; Wu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background L-Arabinose is a non-caloric sugar, which could affect glucose and lipid metabolism and suppress obesity. However, few reports have described the effect of L-arabinose in metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical disorders that increase the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Objective This study was conducted to explore the effects of L-arabinose in rats with metabolic syndrome induced by a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF) diet. Methods After the rat model for metabolic syndrome was successfully established, L-arabinose was administrated by oral gavage for 6 weeks. The biochemical index and histological analysis were measured, and the expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism were analyzed using real-time PCR. Results Following treatment with L-arabinose, metabolic syndrome rats had an obvious reduction in body weight, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, serum insulin, TNF-α, and leptin. Further study showed that treatment with L-arabinose significantly increased the expression of mRNA for hepatic CPT-1α and PDK4, but the expression of mRNA for hepatic ACCα was reduced. Conclusions This work suggests that L-arabinose could lower body weight, Lee's index, and visceral index and improve dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, and viscera function, which indicate that it might be a promising candidate for therapies combating metabolic syndrome. PMID:26652604

  1. Adipose tissue chromium and vanadium disbalance in high-fat fed Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Popova, Elizaveta V; Polyakova, Valentina S; Kwan, Olga V; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the current study is to investigate the relationship between adipose tissue chromium and vanadium content and adipose tissue dysfunction in a model of diet-induced obesity. A total of 26 female Wistar rats were fed either standard or high-fat diet (31.6% of fat from total caloric content) for 3 months. High-fat-feeding resulted in 21 and 33% decrease in adipose tissue chromium and vanadium content, respectively. No change was seen in hair chromium or vanadium levels. Statistical analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation of adipose tissue Cr and V with animal morphometric parameters and adipocyte size. Significant inverse dependence was observed between adipose tissue Cr and V and serum leptin and proinflammatory cytokines' levels. At the same time, adipose tissue Cr and V levels were characterized by positive correlation between serum adiponectin and adiponectin/leptin ratio. Adipose tissue Cr and V were inversely correlated (p<0.05) with insulin and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) levels. Cr and V concentrations were not correlated with serum glucose in either high-fat fed or control rats; however, both serum glucose and HOMA-IR levels were significantly higher in high-fat fed, compared to control, rats. The results allow to hypothesize that impairment of adipose tissue Cr and V content plays a certain role in the development of adipose tissue endocrine dysfunction in obesity.

  2. Inhibition by dietary D-psicose of body fat accumulation in adult rats fed a high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Masaru; Nakanishi, Yosuke; Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-obesity effects of dietary D-psicose on adult rats fed a high-sucrose diet. Wistar rats (16 weeks old) that had previously been fed a high-sucrose diet (HSD) were fed HSD or a high-starch diet (HTD) with or without 5% D-psicose for 8 weeks. The food efficiency, carcass fat percentage, abdominal fat accumulation, and body weight gain were all significantly suppressed by dietary D-psicose.

  3. High Frequency Electrical Stimulation of Lateral Habenula Reduces Voluntary Ethanol Consumption in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zuo, Wanhong; Fu, Rao; Xie, Guiqin; Kaur, Amandeep; Bekker, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background: Development of new strategies that can effectively prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders is of paramount importance, because the currently available treatments are inadequate. Increasing evidence indicates that the lateral habenula (LHb) plays an important role in aversion, drug abuse, and depression. In light of the success of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the LHb in improving helplessness behavior in rodents, we assessed the effects of LHb HFS on ethanol-drinking behavior in rats. Methods: We trained rats to drink ethanol under an intermittent access two-bottle choice procedure. We used c-Fos immunohistochemistry and electrophysiological approaches to examine LHb activity. We applied a HFS protocol that has proven effective for reducing helplessness behavior in rats via a bipolar electrode implanted into the LHb. Results: c-Fos protein expression and the frequency of both spontaneous action potential firings and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents were higher in LHb neurons of ethanol-withdrawn rats compared to their ethanol-naïve counterparts. HFS to the LHb produced long-term reduction of intake and preference for ethanol, without altering locomotor activity. Conversely, low-frequency electrical stimulation to the LHb or HFS applied to the nearby nucleus did not affect drinking behavior. Conclusions: Our results suggest that withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure increases glutamate release and the activity of LHb neurons, and that functional inhibition of the LHb via HFS reduces ethanol consumption. Thus, LHb HFS could be a potential new therapeutic option for alcoholics. PMID:27234303

  4. Effects of high carbohydrate and high fat diets on rat adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase responses to concanavalin A and spermine.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1982-11-01

    Rats were fed a high lard diet or a high glucose diet for 5-7 days. Basal and Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated epididymal fat pad pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities were decreased in fat diet-adapted rats compared to those fed the glucose diet. When adipocyte plasma membranes and mitochondria were coincubated with and without Con A, it was found that the lectin stimulation of PDH activity was lower in preparations from fat-fed rats. These results are comparable to our earlier observations with insulin on adipose tissue PDH. Spermine also stimulated PDH in whole adipose tissue pieces in both the absence and presence (0.5 mM) of medium glucose. The spermine stimulation of PDH in adipose tissue was decreased in fat-fed rats. In contrast to Con A, spermine failed to stimulate PDH in a cell-free system. This suggests that spermine activation of PDH in adipose tissue does not involve the generation of the second messenger responsible for the effects of insulin and Con A. The hypothesis was further substantiated by the findings that (1) the insulin and spermine effects were additive in whole adipose tissue and also in adipocytes, and (2) the spermine effect on fat cells was not significantly inhibited by protease inhibitors, which abolish the effects of insulin on fat cell PDH. The fat-induced decreases in response to Con A and spermine involve not only an adaptive change in the ability of the plasma membrane to generate the chemical modulator of PDH but are also related to postreceptor events.

  5. High-resolution second-harmonic optical coherence tomography of collagen in rat-tail tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Tomov, Ivan V.; Wang, Yimin; Chen, Zhongping

    2005-03-01

    A high-resolution second-harmonic optical coherence tomography (SH-OCT) system is demonstrated using a spectrum broadened femtosecond Ti :sapphire laser. An axial resolution of 4.2μm at the second-harmonic wave center wavelength of 400 nm has been achieved. Because the SH-OCT system uses the second-harmonic generation signals that strongly depend on the orientation, polarization, and local symmetry properties of chiral molecules, this technique provides unique contrast enhancement to conventional optical coherence tomography. The system is applied to image biological tissues of the rat-tail tendon. Highly organized collagen fibrils in the rat-tail tendon can be visualized in recorded images.

  6. A spontaneous high-grade undifferentiated mammary carcinoma in a seven-week-old female rat.

    PubMed

    Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Gama, Adelina; Oliveira, Paula A; Alvarado, Antonieta; Ferreira, Rita; Ginja, Mário

    2017-02-01

    The present work describes a rare case of a spontaneous high-grade carcinoma in a seven-week-old Sprague-Dawley female rat that had been included in the control group of an assay of mammary carcinogenesis. The mass was detected at 50days of age, it grown quickly and the animal was humanely sacrificed eight days later. The tumor was located in the left cervical region, in the vicinity of the left submandibular and sublingual glands. It was soft and reddish and had several dens with a bloody content. The tumor was PAS negative and exhibited immunostaining for ER-α. The histopathologic and immunohistochemical data are suggestive of a high-grade carcinoma from mammary gland. It was the first report of a spontaneous mammary tumor in such a young rat.

  7. Lack of Apoptosis of Infiltrating Cells as the Mechanism of High Susceptibility to EAE in DA Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mensah-Brown, Eric; Galadari, Sehamuddin; Shahin, Allen

    2001-01-01

    Dark Agouti (DA) rats are highly susceptible to induction of Th-l-mediated autoimmunity disease, including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast to other susceptible rat strains in which disease is induced only with encephalitogen emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvants (CFA), in DA rats EAE develops after injection of encephalitogen in incomplete Freund's adjuvants (IFA) or Titermax, putative Th-2 directed adjuvant. Lymph node cells derived from immunized DA rats and stimulated in vitro produce significantly more Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) than resistant Albino Oxford (AO) rats. However, cells derived from both strains produce large amounts of IL-10 but not IL-4. Immunized lymph node cells derived from EAE susceptible (AO × DA) F1rats induce clinical signs of disease in sublethally irradiated parental DA but not AO rats. The pathohistology of the target tissue in these recipients clearly demonstrated infiltration of mononuclear cells in both parental strains. However, the number of CD4+ cells was significantly higher and number of apoptotic cells significantly lower in DA rats sacrificed 8 days after passive transfer. We postulate that in addition to higher IFN-γ and TNF-α production, resistance to early apoptosis of the invading cells in the target tissue possibly due to lack of downregulation by TGF-β leads to exceptional susceptibility to EAE in DA rats. PMID:11785669

  8. Ultrastructural changes in the parenchymal liver cells of rats treated with high doses of rifampicin.

    PubMed Central

    Piriou, A.; Maissiat, R.; Jacqueson, A.; Warnet, J. M.; Claude, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrastructural study of hepatic parenchyma was carried out in female Wistar rats after they had received high doses (400 mg X kg-1) of rifampicin for 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days. Morphological changes in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and mitochondria were observed as early as day 1 of intoxication. These changes corroborate the biochemical data available regarding RFP-induced fatty liver. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 & 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:3580280

  9. High novelty-seeking rats are resilient to negative physiological effects of the early life stress.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Sarah M; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to early life stress dramatically impacts adult behavior, physiology, and neuroendocrine function. Using rats bred for novelty-seeking differences and known to display divergent anxiety, depression, and stress vulnerability, we examined the interaction between early life adversity and genetic predisposition for high- versus low-emotional reactivity. Thus, bred Low Novelty Responder (bLR) rats, which naturally exhibit high anxiety- and depression-like behavior, and bred High Novelty Responder (bHR) rats, which show low anxiety/depression together with elevated aggression, impulsivity, and addictive behavior, were subjected to daily 3 h maternal separation (MS) stress postnatal days 1-14. We hypothesized that MS stress would differentially impact adult bHR/bLR behavior, physiology (stress-induced defecation), and neuroendocrine reactivity. While MS stress did not impact bHR and bLR anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and elevated plus maze, it exacerbated bLRs' already high physiological response to stress - stress-induced defecation. In both tests, MS bLR adult offspring showed exaggerated stress-induced defecation compared to bLR controls while bHR offspring were unaffected. MS also selectively impacted bLRs' (but not bHRs') neuroendocrine stress reactivity, producing an exaggerated corticosterone acute stress response in MS bLR versus control bLR rats. These findings highlight how genetic predisposition shapes individuals' response to early life stress. Future work will explore neural mechanisms underlying the distinct behavioral and neuroendocrine consequences of MS in bHR/bLR animals.

  10. Proteomic profile of primary isolated rat mesangial cells in high-glucose culture condition and decreased expression of PSMA6 in renal cortex of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Haojun; Dong, Xi; Burczynski, Frank J; Choy, Patrick; Yang, Fang; Liu, Hui; Li, Ping; Gong, Yuewen

    2010-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most important complications of diabetic patients and is characterized histologically by an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein in the glomerular mesangium. Therefore, mesangial cells likely play an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we employed proteomic techniques to investigate the protein profile of rat mesangial cells under high-glucose culture conditions. Primary isolated rat glomerular mesangial cells were cultured under different concentrations of glucose (5.4 mmol.L-1 for normal control and 30 mmol.L-1 for high glucose) for 0, 8, 16, and 72 h, as well as for 25 days. Cellular total proteins were isolated from these cells and employed for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption - ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and some of these proteins were documented in rat models of diabetes by Western blot. Rat mesangial cells were successfully isolated in the laboratory and their proliferation rates were significantly inhibited by high glucose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses revealed 28 differentially expressed protein spots between the normal and high-glucose groups. After MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, all 28 protein spots were successfully identified with the peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) method. Representatively, SOD1, PCBP1 and PSMA6 were validated by Western blot analysis following protein extractions from the normal and high-glucose groups. Abundance of these proteins was consistent with that found in 2-DE. Moreover, expression of SOD1, PCBP1, and PSMA6 in renal cortex was further examined in two rat models of diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and spontaneous OLETF diabetic models). Abundance of SOD1 and PCBP1 proteins did not show any significant difference between normal control and diabetic rats. However, abundance of the PSMA6 protein was significantly

  11. Place conditioning with ethanol in rats bred for high (UChB) and low (UChA) voluntary alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske

    2011-12-01

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the ability of an ethanol dose (1g/kg) administered intraperitoneally to induce conditioned place preference (CPP) and/or conditioned place aversion (CPA) in two lines of rats selectively bred for their high (UChB) or low (UChA) voluntary ethanol intake. It was found that five pairings with ethanol induced CPA in ethanol-naïve rats of both lines, but the magnitude of avoidance was lower in the UChB relative to the UChA rats, indicating that ethanol was less aversive to naïve rats bred for high alcohol drinking. After 2 months of high voluntary ethanol drinking (~6-7g/kg/day), in free choice between 10% ethanol and water, ethanol produced CPP in UChB rats, reflecting that ethanol had become rewarding to these rats. By contrast, the low voluntary ethanol intake (<1g/kg/day) displayed by UChA rats preexposed for 2 months in free choice did not change ethanol-induced CPA. However, preexposure of UChA rats to forced ethanol drinking (~5.7g/kg/day) and the later inhibition of ethanol-derived acetaldehyde by 4-methylpyrazole (10mg/kg intraperitoneal), an inhibitor of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase, not only increased their voluntary ethanol intake in free choice, but also had a facilitating effect on the development of CPP. Taken together, these results show that the expression of the reinforcing effects of ethanol required a period of voluntary ethanol intake in UChB rats, whereas in UChA rats, both prior exposure to forced ethanol drinking and reduction of high blood ethanol-derived acetaldehyde were required.

  12. Fat substitutes promote weight gain in rats consuming high-fat diets

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Ogden, Sean B.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of food products designed to mimic the sensory properties of sweet and fat while providing fewer calories has been promoted as a method for reducing food intake and body weight. However, such products may interfere with one mechanism that animals use to regulate energy balance, a learned relationship between the sensory properites of food and the caloric consequences of consuming those foods. Consistent with this hypothesis, previous data have shown that providing rats with sweet tastes that are not associated with the delivery of calories using high-intensity sweeteners results in increased food intake, body weight and adiposity, but only if the diet on which they are maintained also tastes sweet. In the present experiment, we examined whether use of the fat substitute, olestra, would have similar consequences by comparing the effects of consuming high-fat, high-calorie potato chips to the effects of consuming potato chips that sometimes signalled high calories (using high-fat potato chips) and that sometimes signalled lower calories (using non-fat potato chips manufactured with the fat substitute olestra). The results demonstrated that food intake, body weight gain and adiposity were greater for rats that consumed both the high-calorie chips and the low-calorie chips with olestra compared to rats that consumed consuming only the high-calorie chips, but only if animals were also consuming a chow diet that was high in fat and calories. When animals were maintained on a low-fat chow diet, intake, weight gain, and adiposity did not differ significantly based on chip type. However, rats previously exposed to both the low-calorie chips with olestra and the high-calorie chips exhibited increased body weight gain, food intake and adiposity when they were provided with a high fat, high calorie chow diet, even though the potato chips were no longer available. This suggests that the experience with the chips containing olestra affected the ability to predict high

  13. High blood pressure in transgenic mice carrying the rat angiotensinogen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, S; Mullins, J J; Bunnemann, B; Metzger, R; Hilgenfeldt, U; Zimmermann, F; Jacob, H; Fuxe, K; Ganten, D; Kaling, M

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated by injecting the entire rat angiotensinogen gene into the germline of NMRI mice. The resulting transgenic animals were characterized with respect to hemodynamics, parameters of the renin angiotension system, and expression of the transgene. The transgenic line TGM(rAOGEN)123 developed hypertension with a mean arterial blood pressure of 158 mmHg in males and 132 mmHg in females. In contrast, the transgenic line TGM(rAOGEN)92 was not hypertensive. Rat angiotensinogen was detectable only in plasma of animals of line 123. Total plasma angiotensinogen and plasma angiotensin II concentrations were about three times as high as those of negative control mice. In TGM(rAOGEN)123 the transgene was highly expressed in liver and brain. Transcripts were also detected in heart, kidney and testis. In TGM(rAOGEN)92 the brain was the main expressing organ. In situ hybridization revealed an mRNA distribution in the brain of TGM(rAOGEN)123 similar to the one in rat. In TGM(rAOGEN)92 the expression pattern in the brain was aberrant. These data indicate that overexpression of the angiotensinogen gene in liver and brain leads to the development of hypertension in transgenic mice. The TGM(rAOGEN)123 constitutes a high angiotensin II type of hypertension and may provide a new experimental animal model to study the kinetics and function of the renin angiotensin system. Images PMID:1547785

  14. Antihypertensive Effect of Radix Paeoniae Alba in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats and Excessive Alcohol Intake and High Fat Diet Induced Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Su-Hong, Chen; Qi, Chen; Bo, Li; Jian-Li, Gao; Jie, Su; Gui-Yuan, Lv

    2015-01-01

    Radix Paeoniae Alba (Baishao, RPA) has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine formulation to treat hypertension by repression the hyperfunction of liver. However, whether the RPA itself has the antihypertensive effect or not is seldom studied. This study was to evaluate the protective effect of RPA on hypertensive rats. Alcohol in conjunction with a high fat diet- (ACHFD-) induced hypertensive rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) was constantly received either RPA extract (25 or 75 mg/kg) or captopril (15 mg/kg) all along the experiments. As a result, RPA extract (75 mg/kg) could significantly reduce systolic blood pressure of both ACHFD-induced hypertensive rats and SHR after 9-week or 4-week treatment. In ACHFD-induced hypertensive rats, the blood pressure was significantly increased and the lipid profiles in serum including triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol were significantly deteriorated. Also, hepatic damage was manifested by a significant increase in alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) in serum. The RPA extract significantly reversed these parameters, which revealed that it could alleviate the liver damage of rats. In SHR, our result suggested that the antihypertensive active of RPA extract may be related to its effect on regulating serum nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET) levels. PMID:25784949

  15. A high-potassium diet reduces infarct size and improves vascular structure in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Dorrance, Anne M; Pollock, David M; Romanko, Olga P; Stepp, David W

    2007-01-01

    High-potassium diets can improve vascular function, yet the effects of potassium supplementation on ischemic stroke have not been studied. We hypothesized that dietary potassium supplementation would reduce ischemic cerebral infarct size by reversing cerebral artery hypertrophy. Six-week-old male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were fed diets containing 0.79% potassium (LK) or 2.11% potassium (HK) for 6 wk; Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were fed the LK diet. The HK diet did not reduce blood pressure, as measured by telemetry, in the SHRSP. Cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. The resultant infarct was smaller in the HK-SHRSP than in the LK-SHRSP: 55.1 +/- 6.3 vs. 71.4 +/- 2.4% of the hemisphere infarcted (P < 0.05). Infarcts were smaller in WKY rats (33.5 +/- 4.8%) than in LK-SHRSP or HK-SHRSP. The vessel wall of MCAs from LK-SHRSP was hypertrophied compared with WKY rats; this was reversed in HK-SHRSP. RT-PCR analysis of the cerebral vessels showed that expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors-alpha and -beta, epidermal growth factor receptor, and collagen I and III was increased in the vessels from LK-SHRSP compared with WKY rats and reduced in HK-SHRSP. These results suggest that potassium supplementation provides neuroprotection in a model of ischemic stroke independent of blood pressure and possibly through changes in vascular structure.

  16. Behavioral effects on rats of high strength magnetic fields generated by a resistive electromagnet.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Thomas A; Pittman, David W; Riccardi, Christina; Cassell, Jennifer A; Lockwood, Denesa R; Barranco, Jan M; Kwon, Bumsup; Smith, James C

    2005-10-15

    It has been reported previously that exposure to static high magnetic fields of 7 T or above in superconducting magnets has behavioral effects on rats. In particular, magnetic field exposure acutely but transiently suppressed rearing and induced walking in tight circles; the direction of circular locomotion was dependent on the rats' orientation within the magnet. Furthermore, when magnet exposure was paired with consumption of a palatable, novel solution, rats acquired a persistent taste aversion. In order to confirm these results under more controlled conditions, we exposed rats to static magnetic fields of 4 to 19.4 T in a 189 mm bore, 20 T resistive magnet. By using a resistive magnet, field strengths could be arbitrary varied from -19.4 to 19.4 T within the same bore. Rearing was suppressed after exposure to 4 T and above; circling was observed after 7 T and above. Conditioned taste aversion was acquired after 14 T and above. The effects of the magnetic fields were dependent on orientation. Exposure to +14 T induced counter-clockwise circling, while exposure to -14 T induced clockwise circling. Exposure with the rostral-caudal axis of the rat perpendicular to the magnetic field produced an attenuated behavioral response compared to exposure with the rostral-caudal axis parallel to the field. These results in a single resistive magnet confirm and extend our earlier findings using multiple superconducting magnets. They demonstrate that the behavioral effects of exposure within large magnets are dependent on the magnetic field, and not on non-magnetic properties of the machinery. Finally, the effects of exposure to 4 T are clinically relevant, as 4 T magnetic fields are commonly used in functional MRI assays.

  17. Role of high density lipoproteins in the biodistribution of two radioiodinated probes in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Pohland, R.C.; Counsell, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Two radioiodinated probes, /sup 125/I-cholesteryl oleate (/sup 125/I-CO), a derivative of a natural constituent of lipoproteins, and 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-(4(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)-2,2-dichlorethane (/sup 125/I-DDD), an analog of the adrenolytic drug o,p'-DDD (mitotane), were selected to study the role of lipoproteins in drug disposition and to examine the ability of these vehicles to direct foreign molecules to specific tissues. In vivo and in vitro techniques were utilized to associate these probes with rat high density lipoproteins (HDL). Tissue distribution studies indicated that prior incorporation of /sup 125/I-CO into rat HDL increased the uptake of /sup 125/I-CO by rat adrenal, which was dramatically enhanced when this preparation was administered to animals made hypolipidemic with 4-aminopyrazolo(3,4-d)-pyrimidine (4-APP). Acetylation of HDL labeled with /sup 125/I-CO provided evidence that the observed uptake into the adrenal was via a receptor-mediated process. In contrast with these results, prior association of /sup 125/I-DDD with rat HDL failed to alter the ability of this compound to accumulate in adrenal tissue of normal or hypolipidemic animals. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was utilized to examine the stability of the association of /sup 125/I-CO and /sup 125/I-DDD with rat HDL. These results suggested that /sup 125/I-CO was associated with the lipophilic core of HDL, whereas /sup 125/I-DDD appeared to be partially associated with the surface components of HDL. Saturation of surface components with stable o,p'-DDD offered data to suggest that this binding to apoproteins may disrupt the normal receptor-mediated uptake process.

  18. Lower oxidative DNA damage despite greater ROS production in muscles from rats selectively bred for high running capacity.

    PubMed

    Tweedie, Constance; Romestaing, Caroline; Burelle, Yan; Safdar, Adeel; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Seadon, Scott; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Hepple, Russell T

    2011-03-01

    Artificial selection in rat has yielded high-capacity runners (HCR) and low-capacity runners (LCR) that differ in intrinsic (untrained) aerobic exercise ability and metabolic disease risk. To gain insight into how oxygen metabolism may have been affected by selection, we compared mitochondrial function, oxidative DNA damage (8-dihydroxy-guanosine; 8dOHG), and antioxidant enzyme activities in soleus muscle (Sol) and gastrocnemius muscle (Gas) of adult and aged LCR vs. HCR rats. In Sol of adult HCR rats, maximal ADP-stimulated respiration was 37% greater, whereas in Gas of adult HCR rats, there was a 23% greater complex IV-driven respiratory capacity and 54% greater leak as a fraction of electron transport capacity (suggesting looser mitochondrial coupling) vs. LCR rats. H(2)O(2) emission per gram of muscle was 24-26% greater for both muscles in adult HCR rats vs. LCR, although H(2)O(2) emission in Gas was 17% lower in HCR, after normalizing for citrate synthase activity (marker of mitochondrial content). Despite greater H(2)O(2) emission, 8dOHG levels were 62-78% lower in HCR rats due to 62-96% higher superoxide dismutase activity in both muscles and 47% higher catalase activity in Sol muscle in adult HCR rats, with no evidence for higher 8 oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1; DNA repair enzyme) protein expression. We conclude that genetic segregation for high running capacity has generated a molecular network of cellular adaptations, facilitating a superior response to oxidative stress.

  19. The effect of ''living high-training low'' on physical performance in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, S.; Sakai, A.

    In this research, we hypothesized that, in rats, adaptation to high altitude (2500 m) plus training at low altitude (610 m), ''living high-training low'', improves physical performance at low altitude more than living and training at low altitude (610 m). Rats were divided into four groups: (1) living at low altitude (LL, n=12), (2) living and training at low altitude (LLTL, n=13), (3) living at high altitude (LH, n=12), (4) living at high altitude and training at low altitude (LHTL, n=13). The program for living at high altitude involved raising rats under hypobaric hypoxia (equivalent to 2500 m), and the training program consisted of running on a tread-mill at low altitude. All groups were raised at each altitude and trained to run at 35 m/min for 40 min/day, 6 days/week for 6 weeks. During this program, we measured heart rates both at rest and during exercise, and performed running-time trials. The mean heart rate during exercise was lower in groups with training than in groups without training, and the groups receiving training could run longer than the untrained groups. The LHTL group especially showed the lowest mean heart rate during exercise and the longest running time among all groups. After 6 weeks of the training program, all rats had a catheter implanted into the carotid artery, and the mean systemic arterial pressure was continuously measured during treadmill running. The rate of increase of this pressure as the running intensity increased was lower in groups with training than in groups without training, especially in the LHTL group. Finally, we anesthetized all the rats and extracted both the right and left ventricles, and the triceps surae and liver. Training increased the weight of the left ventricle, triceps surae, and liver. The increase in weight of the left ventricle and triceps surae was higher in the LHTL group than in the LLTL group in particular. It appeared that living high- training low may be an effective strategy to improve performance

  20. Excess Folic Acid Increases Lipid Storage, Weight Gain, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Karen B.; Kennelly, John P.; Ordonez, Marta; Nelson, Randal; Leonard, Kelly; Stabler, Sally; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Field, Catherine J.; Jacobs, René L.

    2016-01-01

    Folic acid intake has increased to high levels in many countries, raising concerns about possible adverse effects, including disturbances to energy and lipid metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the effects of excess folic acid (EFA) intake compared to adequate folic acid (AFA) intake on metabolic health in a rodent model. We conducted these investigations in the setting of either a 15% energy low fat (LF) diet or 60% energy high fat (HF) diet. There was no difference in weight gain, fat mass, or glucose tolerance in EFA-fed rats compared to AFA-fed rats when they were fed a LF diet. However, rats fed EFA in combination with a HF diet had significantly greater weight gain and fat mass compared to rats fed AFA (p < 0.05). Gene expression analysis showed increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and some of its target genes in adipose tissue of high fat-excess folic acid (HF-EFA) fed rats. Inflammation was increased in HF-EFA fed rats, associated with impaired glucose tolerance compared to high fat-adequate folic acid (HF-AFA) fed rats (p < 0.05). In addition, folic acid induced PPARγ expression and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that excess folic acid may exacerbate weight gain, fat accumulation, and inflammation caused by consumption of a HF diet. PMID:27669293

  1. Excess Folic Acid Increases Lipid Storage, Weight Gain, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen B; Kennelly, John P; Ordonez, Marta; Nelson, Randal; Leonard, Kelly; Stabler, Sally; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Field, Catherine J; Jacobs, René L

    2016-09-23

    Folic acid intake has increased to high levels in many countries, raising concerns about possible adverse effects, including disturbances to energy and lipid metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the effects of excess folic acid (EFA) intake compared to adequate folic acid (AFA) intake on metabolic health in a rodent model. We conducted these investigations in the setting of either a 15% energy low fat (LF) diet or 60% energy high fat (HF) diet. There was no difference in weight gain, fat mass, or glucose tolerance in EFA-fed rats compared to AFA-fed rats when they were fed a LF diet. However, rats fed EFA in combination with a HF diet had significantly greater weight gain and fat mass compared to rats fed AFA (p < 0.05). Gene expression analysis showed increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and some of its target genes in adipose tissue of high fat-excess folic acid (HF-EFA) fed rats. Inflammation was increased in HF-EFA fed rats, associated with impaired glucose tolerance compared to high fat-adequate folic acid (HF-AFA) fed rats (p < 0.05). In addition, folic acid induced PPARγ expression and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that excess folic acid may exacerbate weight gain, fat accumulation, and inflammation caused by consumption of a HF diet.

  2. Cool-Water Immersion and High-Voltage Electric Stimulation Curb Edema Formation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mychaskiw, Anna M.; Mendel, Frank C.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Although cryotherapy and high-voltage electric stimulation, both alone and in combination, are commonly applied to curb acute edema, little evidence from randomized controlled studies supports these procedures. Our purpose was to examine the effects of cool-water immersion (CWI) at 12.8°C (55°F), cathodal high-voltage pulsed current (CHVPC) at 120 pulses per second and 90% of visible motor threshold, and the combination of CWI and CHVPC (CWI + CHVPC) on edema formation after impact injury to the hind limbs of rats. Design and Setting: Both feet of 34 rats were traumatized after hind-limb volumes were determined. Animals were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: CWI (n = 10), CHVPC (n = 10), or CWI + CHVPC (n = 14). One randomly selected hind limb of each rat was exposed to four 30-minute treatments, interspersed with four 30-minute rest periods beginning immediately after posttraumatic limb volumes were determined. Contralateral limbs served as controls. Limbs remained dependent during all treatments, rest periods, and volumetric measurements. Subjects: We used 34 anesthetized Zucker Lean rats in this study. Measurements: We measured limb volumes immediately before and after trauma and after each of 4 treatment and rest periods. Results: Volumes of treated limbs of all 3 experimental groups were smaller (P < .05) than those of untreated limbs. No treatment was more effective than another. Conclusions: Cool-water immersion, cathodal high-voltage electric stimulation, and simultaneous application of these treatments were effective in curbing edema after blunt injury. Combining CWI and CHVPC was not more effective than either CWI or CHVPC alone. PMID:14608432

  3. High fat diet-induced obesity modifies the methylation pattern of leptin promoter in rats.

    PubMed

    Milagro, F I; Campión, J; García-Díaz, D F; Goyenechea, E; Paternain, L; Martínez, J A

    2009-03-01

    Leptin is an adipokine involved in body weight and food intake regulation whose promoter region presents CpG islands that could be subject to dynamic methylation. This methylation process could be affected by environmental (e.g. diet) or endogenous (e.g., adipocyte differentiation, inflammation, hypoxia) factors, and could influence adipocyte leptin gene expression. The aim of this article was to study whether a high-energy diet may affect leptin gene promoter methylation in rats. A group of eleven male Wistar rats were assigned into two dietary groups, one fed on a control diet for 11 weeks and the other on a high-fat cafeteria diet. Rats fed a high-energy diet become overweight and hyperleptinemic as compared to the controls. DNA isolated from retroperitoneal adipocytes was treated with bisulfite and a distal portion of leptin promoter (from -694 to -372 bp) including 13 CpG sites was amplified by PCR and sequenced. The studied promoter portion was slightly more methylated in the cafeteria-fed animals, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05) for one of the CpG sites (located at the position -443). In obese rats, such methylation was associated to lower circulating leptin levels, suggesting that this position could be important in the regulation of leptin gene expression, probably by being a target sequence of different transcription factors. Our findings reveal, for the first time, that leptin methylation pattern can be influenced by diet-induced obesity, and suggest that epigenetic mechanisms could be involved in obesity by regulating the expression of important epiobesigenic genes.

  4. Trace glucose and lipid metabolism in high androgen and high-fat diet induced polycystic ovary syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and dyslipidemia in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of different metabolic pathways in the development of diabetes mellitus in high-androgen female mice fed with a high-fat diet. Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: the control group(C), n = 10; the andronate-treated group (Andronate), n = 10 (treated with andronate, 1 mg/100 g body weight/day for 8 weeks); and the andronate-treated and high-fat diet group (Andronate+HFD), n = 10. The rate of glucose appearance (Ra of glucose), gluconeogenesis (GNG), and the rate of glycerol appearance (Ra of glycerol) were assessed with a stable isotope tracer. The serum sex hormone levels, insulin levels, glucose concentration, and the lipid profile were also measured. Results Compared with control group, both andronate-treated groups exhibited obesity with higher insulin concentrations (P < 0.05) but similar blood glucose concentrations. Of the two andronate-treated groups, the andronate+HFD group had the most serious insulin resistance (IR). Estrus cycles were completely acyclic, with polycystic ovaries and elevated serum lipid profiles in the andronate+HFD group (P < 0.05). Ra of glucose and GNG increased significantly in the andronate+HFD rats. However, the Ra of glycerol was similar in the three groups. Conclusions Andronate with HFD rat model showed ovarian and metabolic features of PCOS, significant increase in glucose Ra, GNG, and lipid profiles, as well as normal blood glucose levels. Therefore, aberrant IR, increased glucose Ra, GNG, and lipid metabolism may represent the early-stage of glucose and lipid kinetics disorder, thereby might be used as potential early-stage treatment targets for PCOS. PMID:22276997

  5. Shengmai San reduces hepatic lipids and lipid peroxidation in rats fed on a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Chang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Chiang, Meng-Tsan; Chang, Ling; Yeh, Teng-Kuang

    2008-02-28

    Shengmai San (SMS), which is comprised of the medicinal herbs of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, Schisandra chinensis Baill., and Ophiopogon japonicus Ker-Gawl (2:1:2)., is a traditional Chinese medicine being used for treating coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of SMS on the plasma and liver lipids, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant systems in liver and heart of cholesterol-fed rats. Rats were fed on a high-cholesterol (0.5%) diet (control group), high-cholesterol diet containing 2% SMS (2% SMS group) and 4% SMS (4% SMS group) for four weeks. The oxidative stress marker (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) and antioxidant defense systems including glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities in rat liver and heart were evaluated. Results showed that rats fed with SMS-containing diet had reduced the H(2)O(2)-induced erythrocytes susceptibility to hemolysis, and 4% SMS feeding rats had higher plasma GSH concentration compared to the animals fed with the control diet. However, SMS had no effect on plasma lipids (total cholesterol, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and TBARS concentration. On the other hand, rats fed with the 4% SMS diet reduced the hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride contents. Fecal bile acid excretion was significantly increased in rats fed with the SMS-containing diet. Higher hepatic GSH and lower TBARS concentrations were observed in rats fed with the 4% SMS diet compared with the rats fed with the control diet. No significant difference in activities of GSH-Px, GST and SOD was found in liver and heart after the SMS treatment. Results from this study indicate that the SMS may reduce hepatic lipids and lipid peroxidation in rats.

  6. Impact of high altitude on the hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Qian; Shao, Yuan; Wang, Ying Zhen; Jing, Yu Hong; Zhang, You Cheng

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Acute exposure to high altitude (HA) increased hepatic fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation. • Acute exposure of rats to HA increased hepatic FA synthesis. • PPARα and AMPK can regulate the FA metabolism. • FA may be a key energy fuel and a compensation for CHO during acute exposure to HA. • The acute changes of FA metabolism may be a mechanism of acclimatization. - Abstract: High altitude (HA) affects energy metabolism. The impact of acute and chronic HA acclimatization on the major metabolic pathways is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to unveil the impact of HA on the key enzymes involved in the fatty acid (FA) metabolism in liver. Rats were exposed to an altitude of 4300 m for 30 days and the expressions of two key proteins involved in FA β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, CPT-I; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα), two proteins involved in FA synthesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase-1, ACC-1; and AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK), as well as the total ketone body in the liver and the plasma FFAs were examined. Rats without HA exposure were used as controls. We observed that the acute exposure of rats to HA (3 days) led to a significant increase in the expressions of CPT-I and PPARα and in the total hepatic ketone body. Longer exposure (15 days) caused a marked decrease in the expression of CPT-I and PPARα. By 30 days after HA exposure, the expression levels of CPT-I and PPARα returned to the control level. The hepatic ACC-1 level showed a significant increase in rats exposed to HA for 1 and 3 days. In contrast, the hepatic level of AMPK showed a significant reduction throughout the experimental period. Plasma FFA concentrations did not show any significant changes following HA exposure. Thus, increased hepatic FA oxidation and synthesis in the early phase of HA exposure may be among the important mechanisms for the rats to respond to the hypoxic stress in order to acclimatize themselves to the

  7. A molecular recognizing system of serotonin in rat fetal axonal growth cones: uptake and high affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1992-09-18

    Axonal growth cone particles (AGCP) isolated from prenatal and postnatal rat brain had different high-affinity 5-HT uptake characteristics. In postnatal AGCP the uptake behaves as in the adult rat brain, while in the prenatal AGCP the uptake characteristics seem to be in a transitional stage. Also in prenatal AGCP we observed specific, high-affinity 5-HT binding sites. These results support the idea of an important role for 5-HT during axogenesis.

  8. Low G preconditioning reduces liver injury induced by high +Gz exposure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bin; Feng, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Wen-Bing; Zhang, Hong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of repeated lower +Gz exposure on liver injury induced by high +Gz exposure in rats. METHODS: Sixty male Wister rats were randomly divided into a blank control group, a low G preconditioning group (LG) (exposed to +4 Gz/5 min per day for 3 d before +10 Gz/5 min exposure), and a +10 Gz/5 min group (10G) (n = 20 in each group). Blood specimens and liver tissue were harvested at 0 h and 6 h after +10 Gz/5 min exposure. Liver function was analyzed by measuring serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and liver injury was further assessed by histopathological observation. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Na+-K+-ATPase were determined in hepatic tissue. RESULTS: The group LG had lower ALT, AST, and MDA values at 0 h after exposure than those in group 10G. SOD values and Na+-K+-ATPase activity in the LG group were higher than in group 10G 0 h post-exposure. Hepatocyte injury was significantly less in group LG than in group 10G on histopathological evaluation. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that repeated low +Gz exposure shows a protective effect on liver injury induced by high +Gz exposure in rats. PMID:26074692

  9. The effects of intermittent high asbestos exposure (peak dose levels) on the lungs of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. M.; Beckett, S. T.; Bolton, R. E.; Donaldson, K.

    1980-01-01

    Four groups of rats were treated by inhalation with the UICC preparations of amosite or chrysotile in order to explore the effects of intermittent high dust concentrations (peak dosing). For each of the 2 asbestos types one group of rats was treated for 5 days each week, 7 h a day, for 1 year. Two other groups were treated with amosite or chrysotile at 5 times the previous dose for 1 day each week for 1 year. Results showed that the lung dust levels of both chrysotile or amosite in the lungs of rats after the 12-month inhalation period were similar regardless of whether "peak" or "even" dosing had been used. During the following 6 months, asbestos was cleared from the "peak" chrysotile group more slowly than the "even" chrysotile group but clearance from the "peak" amosite group was faster than that found after "even" dosing with amosite. Levels of early peribronchial fibrosis were generally lower for the "peak" dosing groups than for "even" dosing although levels of interstitial fibrosis were slightly higher following "peak" dosing. The incidence of pulmonary neoplasms did not differ between the "peak"-dosing and "even"-dosing experiments. These findings therefore give no indication that short periods of high dust exposure in an asbestos factory would result in a significantly greater hazard than would be indicated by the raised overall dust counts for the day in question. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7426382

  10. Effect of low carbohydrate high protein (LCHP) diet on lipid metabolism, liver and kidney function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kostogrys, Renata B; Franczyk-Żarów, Magdalena; Maślak, Edyta; Topolska, Kinga

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare effects of Western diet (WD) with low carbohydrate high protein (LCHP) diet on lipid metabolism, liver and kidney function in rats. Eighteen rats were randomly assigned to three experimental groups and fed for the next 2 months. The experimental diets were: Control (7% of soybean oil, 20% protein), WD (21% of butter, 20% protein), and LCHP (21% of butter and 52.4% protein) diet. The LCHP diet significantly decreased the body weight of the rats. Diet consumption was differentiated among groups, however significant changes were observed since third week of the experiment duration. Rats fed LCHP diet ate significantly less (25.2g/animal/day) than those from Control (30.2g/animal/day) and WD (27.8 g/animal/day) groups. Additionally, food efficiency ratio (FER) tended to decrease in LCHP fed rats. Serum homocysteine concentration significantly decreased in rats fed WD and LCHP diets. Liver weights were significantly higher in rats fed WD and LCHP diets. At the end of the experiment (2 months) the triacylglycerol (TAG) was significantly decreased in animals fed LCHP compared to WD. qRT-PCR showed that SCD-1 and FAS were decreased in LCHP fed rats, but WD diet increased expression of lipid metabolism genes. Rats receiving LCHP diet had two fold higher kidney weight and 54.5% higher creatinin level compared to Control and WD diets. In conclusion, LCHP diet decreased animal's body weight and decreased TAG in rat's serum. However, kidney damage in LCHP rats was observed.

  11. High-throughput staining for the evaluation of fetal skeletal development in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Redfern, Brian G; Wise, L David

    2007-06-01

    Typical developmental toxicity studies require the assessment of fetal skeletal development. Regulatory guidelines require the assessment of bone ossification and indicate preferences for an assessment of both ossified bone as well as cartilaginous elements. Current manual methods to process fetuses for skeletal examination, whether single or double staining, are laborious and time consuming, and ultimately extend the time before study interpretations. There is a definite need for a quick and efficient, yet reliable, procedure to generate stained fetal skeletons for analysis. A non-automated high-throughput method for single and double staining rat and rabbit fetuses for skeletal evaluations is described, which results in excellent quality specimens ready for evaluations in approximately 3 days for rats and 7 days for rabbits.

  12. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of vertilmicin in rat plasma using sensitive fluorometric derivatization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Sha, Yunfei; Huang, Taomin; Yang, Bei; Duan, Geng-Li

    2005-12-15

    A sensitive and reliable high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of vertilmicin in rat plasma. Derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC-Cl) followed by C(18) reversed-phase chromatography allowed the fluorimetric detection of vertilmicin. Optimal conditions for the derivatization of vertilmicin are described. The limit of quantification was 0.02 mg/L. The pharmacokinetics of vertilmicin was studied in 24 rats following intramuscular injection (i.m.) of different doses (4, 8, 16, 32 mg/kg of body weight). The pharmacokinetic parameter values were estimated by use of 3P97 program. In this study, we assessed the dose proportionality of vertilmicin after single intramuscular injection doses and obtained new information on the pharmacokinetics of the compound.

  13. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on lipid profile and liver histology in laboratory rats fed high-fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Kostogrys, Renata B; Pisulewski, Paweł M

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the effect of CLA on serum lipid profile, plasma malondialdehyde and liver histology in Wistar rats fed high-fructose diet. Eighteen rats were randomly assigned to three experimental groups and fed for the next 21 days. The experimental diets were: I, Control; II, Fructose (63.2% of fructose); and III, CLA+Fructose (1% CLA and 63.2% of fructose). The experimental treatments had no effect on body weight of the rats. The LDL+VLDL cholesterol, TG and liver weight were significantly increased in animals fed Fructose. MDA concentrations were significantly increased in rats fed Fructose diet but CLA+Fructose diet had no effect on this marker. In the same line, the histological examination of the livers showed a series of morphological alterations, notably hepatic steatosis in animals fed high-fructose diet. No signs of the steatosis in rats fed CLA+Fructose diet were observed. In conclusion, CLA in high-fructose diet, decreases serum LDL+VLDL and TG and plasma MDA concentrations as well as liver weight and liver cholesterol, thus opposing the effects of high-fructose diet and showing a potential antiatherogenic effect. Similarly, dietary CLA fed at 1% level (w/w) in high-fructose diet, prevented steatosis observed histologically in livers of rats fed high-fructose diets.

  14. High Dose Astaxanthin Lowers Blood Pressure and Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Rats: Are These Effects Interdependent?

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Harry G.; Echard, Bobby; Yamashita, Eiji; Perricone, Nicholas V.

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation in Sprague-Dawley rats (SD) was designed to examine effects of astaxanthin (Asta) at different doses on elevated blood pressure (BP) and glucose-insulin perturbations produced by heavy sucrose ingestion. We also examined effects of Asta on BP during restraint stress. SD were divided into six groups each containing eight rats. All SD ate a basic diet of ground regular rat chow with sucrose added at 30% w/w. The Control group received only the basic diet containing added sucrose, while the other five groups each received the same diet with added test material: captopril, (30 mg/Kg), pioglitazone (15.0 mg/Kg), low Asta (25 mg/Kg), medium Asta (50 mg/kg) or high Asta (100 mg/Kg). Many tests were carried out to examine the mechanisms behind the effects of Asta on BP (serum ACE activity, losartan challenge, and LNAME challenge) and the glucose-insulin system (glucose tolerance, HOMA measurement, and insulin challenge). In SD, a relatively low dose of Asta decreased SBP, but produced no major changes in the glucose-insulin system simulating results from a previous study using Zucker Fatty Rats. Increasing the dose of Asta resulted in both a lowering of elevated systolic BP and enhanced insulin sensitivity determined by many different estimations. BP lowering was consistent with changes in the renin-angiotensin (RAS) and nitric oxide (NO) systems. At the examined doses of each, captopril lowered BP in SD without influencing glucose-insulin metabolism, whereas pioglitazone favorably affected glucose-insulin metabolism while showing essentially no effects on BP. Accordingly, Asta beneficially affects both sucrose-induced elevations of BP and insulin resistance at relatively high doses in SD. Also, Asta at higher doses lessens restraint stress, whereas, captopril and pioglitazone did not at the doses examined, even though they influenced the BP and glucose-insulin systems respectively. PMID:21326955

  15. Apoptosis induced by a low-carbohydrate and high-protein diet in rat livers

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Maria Emília L; Xavier, Analucia R; Oliveira, Felipe L; Filho, Porphirio JS; Azeredo, Vilma B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether high-protein, high-fat, and low-carbohydrate diets can cause lesions in rat livers. METHODS: We randomly divided 20 female Wistar rats into a control diet group and an experimental diet group. Animals in the control group received an AIN-93M diet, and animals in the experimental group received an Atkins-based diet (59.46% protein, 31.77% fat, and 8.77% carbohydrate). After 8 wk, the rats were anesthetized and exsanguinated for transaminases analysis, and their livers were removed for flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and light microscopy studies. We expressed the data as mean ± standard deviation (SD) assuming unpaired and parametric data; we analyzed differences using the Student’s t-test. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: We found that plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. According to flow cytometry, the percentages of nonviable cells were 11.67% ± 1.12% for early apoptosis, 12.07% ± 1.11% for late apoptosis, and 7.11% ± 0.44% for non-apoptotic death in the experimental diet group and 3.73% ± 0.50% for early apoptosis, 5.67% ± 0.72% for late apoptosis, and 3.82% ± 0.28% for non-apoptotic death in the control diet group. The mean percentage of early apoptosis was higher in the experimental diet group than in the control diet group. Immunohistochemistry for autophagy was negative in both groups. Sinusoidal dilation around the central vein and small hepatocytes was only observed in the experimental diet group, and fibrosis was not identified by hematoxylin-eosin or Trichrome Masson staining in either group. CONCLUSION: Eight weeks of an experimental diet resulted in cellular and histopathological lesions in rat livers. Apoptosis was our principal finding; elevated plasma transaminases demonstrate hepatic lesions. PMID:27298559

  16. [Fundamental study on effect of high-mineral drinking water for osteogenesis in calciprivia ovariectomized rats].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2014-01-01

    Since osteoporosis is a major public health problem in Japan, it is important to clarify the effect of high-mineral drinking water consumption on osteogenesis. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the relationship between high-mineral drinking water consumption and osteogenesis in ovariectomized rats that received a low-calcium diet and purified water (PW group) or a low-calcium diet and high-mineral drinking water (CR group). High-mineral drinking water affected the rats' body weight. After 3 months, the bone density of the CR group was higher than that of the PW group (p<0.05). Furthermore, the CR group showed a decrease in the amount of calcium in the bones after 3 months. These results suggest that high-mineral drinking water contributes to the maintenance of bone density and not to the amount of calcium in bone. On the other hand, serum alkaline phosphatase levels in the PW group at 3 months were higher than those in the CR group, which indicates that the blood concentration of calcium in the CR group was maintained. Moreover, the amount of magnesium in the bones and the blood concentration of magnesium in the CR group after 3 months were higher than the corresponding values in the PW group. These results suggest that consumption of high-mineral drinking water could be beneficial for osteogenesis (i.e., for maintaining bone quantity).

  17. Effects of a high protein diet on cognition and brain metabolism in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, M; Méndez, M; Arias, J; Arias, J L

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neurological complication observed in patients with liver disease. Patients who suffer from HE present neuropsychiatric, neuromuscular and behavioral symptoms. Animal models proposed to study HE resulting from cirrhosis mimic the clinical characteristics of cirrhosis and portal hypertension, and require the administration of hepatotoxins such as thioacetamide (TAA). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a high protein diet on motor function, anxiety and memory processes in a model of cirrhosis induced by TAA administration. In addition, we used cytochrome c-oxidase (COx) histochemistry to assess the metabolic activity of the limbic system regions. Male rats were distributed into groups: control, animals with cirrhosis, Control rats receiving a high protein diet, and animals with cirrhosis receiving a high protein diet. Results showed preserved motor function and normal anxiety levels in all the groups. The animals with cirrhosis showed an impairment in active avoidance behavior and spatial memory, regardless of the diet they received. However, the animals with cirrhosis and a high protein diet showed longer escape latencies on the spatial memory task. The model of cirrhosis presented an under-activation of the dentate gyrus and CA3 hippocampal subfields and the medial part of the medial mammillary nucleus. The results suggest that a high protein intake worsens spatial memory deficits shown by the TAA-induced model of cirrhosis. However, high protein ingestion has no influence on the COx hypoactivity associated with the model.

  18. Physical Activity Differentially Affects the Cecal Microbiota of Ovariectomized Female Rats Selectively Bred for High and Low Aerobic Capacity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tzu-Wen; Park, Young-Min; Holscher, Hannah D; Padilla, Jaume; Scroggins, Rebecca J; Welly, Rebecca; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Swanson, Kelly S

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota is considered a relevant factor in obesity and associated metabolic diseases, for which postmenopausal women are particularly at risk. Increasing physical activity has been recognized as an efficacious approach to prevent or treat obesity, yet the impact of physical activity on the microbiota remains under-investigated. We examined the impacts of voluntary exercise on host metabolism and gut microbiota in ovariectomized (OVX) high capacity (HCR) and low capacity running (LCR) rats. HCR and LCR rats (age = 27 wk) were OVX and fed a high-fat diet (45% kcal fat) ad libitum and housed in cages equipped with (exercise, EX) or without (sedentary, SED) running wheels for 11 wk (n = 7-8/group). We hypothesized that increased physical activity would hinder weight gain, increase metabolic health and shift the microbiota of LCR rats, resulting in populations more similar to that of HCR rats. Animals were compared for characteristic metabolic parameters including body composition, lipid profile and energy expenditure; whereas cecal digesta were collected for DNA extraction. 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon Illumina MiSeq sequencing was performed, followed by analysis using QIIME 1.8.0 to assess cecal microbiota. Voluntary exercise decreased body and fat mass, and normalized fasting NEFA concentrations of LCR rats, despite only running one-third the distance of HCR rats. Exercise, however, increased food intake, weight gain and fat mass of HCR rats. Exercise clustered the gut microbial community of LCR rats, which separated them from the other groups. Assessments of specific taxa revealed significant (p<0.05) line by exercise interactions including shifts in the abundances of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Relative abundance of Christensenellaceae family was higher (p = 0.026) in HCR than LCR rats, and positively correlated (p<0.05) with food intake, body weight and running distance. These findings demonstrate that exercise differentially impacts

  19. Physicochemical characteristics of rapidly dried onion powder and its anti-atherogenic effect on rats fed high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Hamauzu, Yasunori; Nosaka, Toshiya; Ito, Fuyu; Suzuki, Takanori; Torisu, Shuichi; Hashida, Miyoko; Fukuzawa, Akira; Ohguchi, Masakatsu; Yamanaka, Shigeru

    2011-12-01

    Rapidly dried onion (Allium cepa L. cv. Momiji No. 3) powder (OP) prepared from the outer layers (from second to fourth scale leaves from the surface) of onion bulbs was analysed for its quercetin and polyuronide contents, the effects of enzymatic treatment and the anti-atherogenic effect on rats fed a high-fat diet. Quercetin 4'-glucoside (50%), free quercetin (30%) and quercetin 3,4'-diglucoside (20%) were identified as quercetin derivatives, and boiling-water extraction was effective in extracting these compounds. OP contained 12.9% of polyuronides, the basic skeleton of pectin. Enzymatic degradation (cellulase and pectinase, 50°C for 12h, pH 6.0) of OP was effective in obtaining a slurry of smaller particle sizes. The free quercetin increased and the glucosides decreased with enzyme treatment. In Wistar rats fed an OP-added high-fat diet, the total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were not significantly different from the rats fed a high-fat diet without OP. However, the atherogenic index (AI) of Wistar rats fed an OP-added high-fat diet was lower (AI=3.3) than rats fed the diet without OP (AI=4.1). The incremental elastic modulus (IEM) of the aorta from rats fed the OP-added diet was also significantly lower than that of the rats fed the diet without OP. The AI and IEM values of the rats fed the OP-added diet were quite similar to the values of rats fed the diet without OP but were allowed spontaneous exercise. These results suggest that OP intake is effective for decreasing the risk of arteriosclerosis.

  20. Basis of aggravated hepatic lipid metabolism by chronic stress in high-fat diet-fed rat.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Lin, Min; Wang, Xiaobin; Guo, Keke; Wang, Shanshan; Sun, Mengfei; Wang, Jiao; Han, Xiaoyu; Fu, Ting; Hu, Yang; Fu, Jihua

    2015-03-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that long-term stress, known as chronic stress (CS), can aggravate nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed rat. In this study, we tried to figure out which lipid metabolic pathways were impacted by CS in the HFD-fed rat. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks of age, n = 8 per group) were fed with either standard diet or HFD with or without CS exposure for 8 weeks. Hepatic lipidosis, biochemical, hormonal, and lipid profile markers in serum and liver, and enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis (DNL) of fatty acids (FAs) and cholesterol, β-oxidation, FAs uptake, triglycerides synthesis, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly in the liver were detected. CS exposure reduced hepatic lipidosis but further elevated hepatic VLDL content with aggravated dyslipidemia in the HFD-fed rats. There was a synergism between CS and HFD on VLDL production and dyslipidemia. PCR and western blot assays showed that CS exposure significantly promoted hepatic VLDL assembly in rats, especially in the HFD-fed rats, while it had little impact on DNL, β-oxidation, FAs uptake, and triglycerides synthesis in the HFD-fed rats. This phenomenon was in accordance with elevated serum glucocorticoid level. The critical influence of CS exposure on hepatic lipid metabolism in the HFD-fed rats is VLDL assembly which might be regulated by glucocorticoid.

  1. Hypertension induced by high salt intake in absence of volume retention in reduced renal mass rats.

    PubMed

    Cowley, A W; Skelton, M M; Papanek, P E; Greene, A S

    1994-11-01

    Reduction of renal mass (RRM) combined with a high-salt diet results in volume retention, a rise of cardiac output, and hypertension. The present studies were designed to determine whether prevention of volume retention would alter the rise of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in RRM rats given high salt. Rats were studied in a modified metabolic cage to permit continuous determination of total body weight (TBW). In group 1, NaCl was increased from 1 to 14.5 meq/day and delivered isotonically. In group 2, NaCl was increased while TBW was servo-controlled to a constant level. Group 3 was also servo-controlled, but rats received an intravenous infusion of an arginine vasopressin V1 antagonist throughout the study. MAP in group 1 rose 24 mmHg by day 4 of high salt with a parallel increase of TBW of 26 g. In group 2, MAP rose 48 mmHg by day 4 of high salt, while TBW was controlled to within 0.6% of control body weight. With inhibition of vasopressin V1 receptors (group 3), MAP rose 39 mmHg. Nearly equivalent amounts of NaCl were retained in all groups, which was associated with no change of plasma Na in group 1 but an increase of nearly 7 meq/ml in groups 2 and 3. Hematocrit fell nearly 9% in groups 2 and 3 compared with a 4% reduction in group 1. The results suggest that under conditions where net retention cannot occur, high salt intake increases MAP by an osmotically driven fluid transfer from cells, which results in an even greater expansion of blood volume.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Exercise and a High Fat Diet Synergistically Increase the Pantothenic Acid Requirement in Rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    It is thought that both exercise and dietary composition increase the utilization of, and thus the requirement for, certain water-soluble vitamins. However, there have been no studies evaluating the combined impacts of exercise and dietary composition on vitamin utilization. In this experiment, rats were fed a pantothenic acid (PaA)-restricted (0.004 g PaA-Ca/kg diet) diet containing 5% (ordinary amount of dietary fat) or 20% fat (high fat), and were forced to swim until exhaustion every other day for 22 d. PaA status was assessed by urinary excretion, which reflects body stores of water-soluble vitamins. The urinary excretion of PaA in rats fed a 5% fat diet was not affected by swimming (5% fat + non-swimming vs. 5% fat + swim; p>0.05). Excretion of PaA was decreased by the high-fat diet (5% fat + non-swim vs. 20% fat + non-swim; p<0.05) and synergistically decreased by exercise (20% fat + non-swim vs. 20% fat + swim; p<0.05). There was a significant interaction between exercise and a high-fat diet. Plasma PaA concentrations showed changes similar to those seen for urinary excretion. The experiment was then repeated using rats fed a PaA-sufficient (0.016 g PaA-Ca/kg diet) diet, and PaA excretion was again synergistically decreased by the combination of exercise and a high-fat diet (p<0.05). These results suggest that the combination of exercise and a high-fat diet synergistically increases the requirement for PaA.

  3. High-phosphorus diet maximizes and low-dose calcitriol attenuates skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; López, Ignacio; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; Pineda, Carmen; Chamizo, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2016-05-01

    Although disorders of mineral metabolism and skeletal muscle are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), their potential relationship remains unexplored. Elevations in plasma phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblastic growth factor 23 together with decreased calcitriol levels are common features of CKD. High-phosphate intake is a major contributor to progression of CKD. This study was primarily aimed to determine the influence of high-phosphate intake on muscle and to investigate whether calcitriol supplementation counteracts negative skeletal muscle changes associated with long-term uremia. Proportions and metabolic and morphological features of myosin-based muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of uremic rats (5/6 nephrectomy, Nx) and compared with sham-operated (So) controls. Three groups of Nx rats received either a standard diet (0.6% phosphorus, Nx-Sd), or a high-phosphorus diet (0.9% phosphorus, Nx-Pho), or a high-phosphorus diet plus calcitriol (10 ng/kg 3 day/wk ip, Nx-Pho + Cal) for 12 wk. Two groups of So rats received either a standard diet or a high-phosphorus diet (So-Pho) over the same period. A multivariate analysis encompassing all fiber-type characteristics indicated that Nx-Pho + Cal rats displayed skeletal muscle phenotypes intermediate between Nx-Pho and So-Pho rats and that uremia-induced skeletal muscle changes were of greater magnitude in Nx-Pho than in Nx-Sd rats. In uremic rats, treatment with calcitriol preserved fiber-type composition, cross-sectional size, myonuclear domain size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity of muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that a high-phosphorus diet potentiates and low-dose calcitriol attenuates adverse skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

  4. High concentrations of stavudine impair fatty acid oxidation without depleting mitochondrial DNA in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Igoudjil, Anissa; Massart, Julie; Begriche, Karima; Descatoire, Véronique; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The antiretroviral nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) stavudine (d4T) can induce mild to severe liver injuries such as steatosis (i.e. triglyceride accumulation), steatohepatitis and liver failure. NRTI-induced toxicity has been ascribed to the inhibition of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication causing mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain dysfunction. This can secondarily impair the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty acid oxidation (FAO), thus leading to lactic acidosis and hepatic steatosis. However, NRTIs could also impair mitochondrial function and induce hepatic steatosis through other mechanisms. In this study, we sought to determine whether d4T could inhibit mitochondrial FAO and induce triglyceride accumulation through a mtDNA-independent mechanism. Since human tumoral and non-tumoral hepatic cell lines were unable to efficiently oxidize palmitic acid, the effects of d4T on mitochondrial FAO were assessed on cultured rat hepatocytes. Our results showed that 750 microM of d4T significantly inhibited palmitic acid oxidation after 48 or 72 h of culture, without inducing cell death. Importantly, high concentrations of zidovudine and zalcitabine (two other NRTIs that can induce hepatic steatosis), or beta-aminoisobutyric acid (a d4T metabolite), did not impair FAO in rat hepatocytes. D4T-induced FAO inhibition was observed without mtDNA depletion and lactate production, and was fully prevented with l-carnitine or clofibrate coincubation. l-carnitine also prevented the accretion of neutral lipids within rat hepatocytes. High concentrations of d4T were unable to inhibit FAO on freshly isolated liver mitochondria. Moreover, a microarray analysis was performed to clarify the mechanism whereby d4T can inhibit mitochondrial FAO and induce triglyceride accumulation in rat hepatocytes. The microarray data, confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, showed that d4T increased the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c

  5. Ameliorating effect of Allium Sativum on high-fat diet induced fatty liver in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Aisha; Usmani, Ambreen; Waqar, Humera; Siddiqui, Asma; Kumar, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the hepatoprotective effect provided by fresh garlic on fatty liver induced by high-fat diet. Methods: This experimental study was carried out at BMSI, JPMC from October to November 2008. Thirty adult albino rats, 200-240 gram weight, were divided into three groups. Group A received control diet, Group B received high-fat diet (20 mg butter/100 gm diet) and Group C received high-fat diet with fresh garlic (20 mg butter with 6 gm fresh garlic/100 gm diet). The groups were further divided on the basis of duration of treatment, four weeks and eight weeks respectively. The rats were sacrificed, liver removed, weighed and relative liver weight calculated. Hepatic tissue was processed and tissue slides stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Results: There was significant increase in relative liver weight in group B animals as compared to the control animals, which decreased significantly in group C. Haematoxylin and eosin stained sections revealed ballooned hepatocytes having vesicular appearance with pyknotic nuclei in high-fat group which were preserved to a great extent in group C animals. Conclusion: This study has shown that use of fresh garlic along with high-fat diet prevents its damaging effects on liver to a great extent. PMID:27182249

  6. High-Salt Intake Suppressed MicroRNA-133a Expression in Dahl SS Rat Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tong-Shuai; Zhang, Jie; Mu, Jian-Jun; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Ren, Ke-Yu; Wang, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Salt-sensitive individuals show earlier and more serious cardiac damage than nonsalt-sensitive ones. Some studies have suggested that microRNA-133a could reduce cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. The current study aims to investigate the different functions of high-salt intake on salt-sensitive (SS) rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and the involvement of microRNA-133a in these roles. After high-salt intervention, the left ventricular mass (LVW) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) of the salt-sensitive high salt (SHS) group were obviously higher than those of the salt-sensitive low salt (SLS) group. However, the difference between the Sprague-Dawley high salt (DHS) group and the Sprague-Dawley low salt (DLS) group was not significant. Compared with SLS group, collagen I and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the heart of SHS group were significantly higher, whereas no statistical difference was observed between the DHS group and the DLS group. Compared with low-salt diet, microRNA-133a in the heart of both strains were significantly decreased, but that in the SHS group decreased more significantly. These results suggest that high salt intervention could down-regulate the expression of myocardial microRNA-133a, which may be one of the mechanisms involved in myocardial fibrosis in salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:24937684

  7. High-resolution profiling of novel transcribed regions during rat spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chalmel, Frédéric; Lardenois, Aurélie; Evrard, Bertrand; Rolland, Antoine D; Sallou, Olivier; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Coiffec, Isabelle; Collin, Olivier; Primig, Michael; Jégou, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex and highly orchestrated combination of processes in which male germline proliferation and differentiation result in the production of mature spermatozoa. If recent genome-wide studies have contributed to the in-depth analysis of the male germline protein-encoding transcriptome, little effort has yet been devoted to the systematic identification of novel unannotated transcribed regions expressed during mammalian spermatogenesis. We report high-resolution expression profiling of male germ cells in rat, using next-generation sequencing technology and highly enriched testicular cell populations. Among 20 424 high-confidence transcripts reconstructed, we defined a stringent set of 1419 long multi-exonic unannotated transcripts expressed in the testis (testis-expressed unannotated transcripts [TUTs]). TUTs were divided into 7 groups with different expression patterns. Most TUTs share many of the characteristics of vertebrate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). We also markedly reinforced the finding that TUTs and known lncRNAs accumulate during the meiotic and postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis in mammals and that X-linked meiotic TUTs do not escape the silencing effects of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Importantly, we discovered that TUTs and known lncRNAs with a peak expression during meiosis define a distinct class of noncoding transcripts that exhibit exons twice as long as those of other transcripts. Our study provides new insights in transcriptional profiling of the male germline and represents a high-quality resource for novel loci expressed during spermatogenesis that significantly contributes to rat genome annotation.

  8. Subchronic in vivo effects of a high static magnetic field (9.4 T) in rats.

    PubMed

    High, W B; Sikora, J; Ugurbil, K; Garwood, M

    2000-07-01

    The potential adverse biologic effects of sub chronic (cumulatively 10 weeks) exposure to a high magnetic field (9.4 T) were evaluated in young adult male and female Fischer rats as well as in their progeny. Biologic end points in adult rats included changes in daily clinical observations; spatial memory tests; weekly heart rates, body weights, food and water consumption, and the feed efficiency ratio; terminal hematologic, blood biochemical and urinary parameter changes; gross pathologic findings; and major organ weights. In offspring, biologic end points included the gestation period, number of live births, number of pups, ratio of male to female pups/litter; postnatal time period of eye opening; birth and weekly body weights, behavioral changes, central nervous system responses, as well as hematologic, blood biochemistry, and urinary parameter changes; and gross pathologic findings. Findings from this study showed that there were no adverse biologic effects in male and female adult rats or their progeny that could be attributed to 10-week exposure to a 9.4-T static magnetic field.

  9. Increased iron deposition in rat liver fibrosis induced by a high-dose injection of dimethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Limei; Enzan, Hideaki; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Eriko; Jin, Yulan; Toi, Makoto; Kuroda, Naoto; Hiroi, Makoto

    2006-12-01

    Using a developed rat model of hepatic necrosis and subsequent fibrosis induced by a high-dose intraperitoneal injection of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), we studied iron deposition and expression of transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) during the development of persistent liver fibrosis. Rats were sacrificed at several timepoints from 6 h to 10 months post-injection and the livers were examined for iron content and distribution, and for expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, ED-1, TGF-beta(1), and collagen (alpha(2))I. Morphologic evidence of acute submassive hemorrhagic necrosis peaked at 36 h; on day 3 the residual parenchyma contained activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and necrotic areas contained numerous macrophages; and on day 5, necrotic tissues and erythrocytes had been phagocytosed and macrophages contained abundant iron deposits. From days 7 to 10, iron-laden macrophages and activated HSCs (myofibroblasts) populated the fibrous septa in parallel. From week 2 to month 10, closely arranged macrophages and myofibroblasts were found in central-to-central bridging fibrotic tissue. TGF-beta(1) was strongly detected in both macrophages and HSCs during development of liver fibrosis. Our data suggest that increased iron deposition may be involved in the initiation and perpetuation of rat liver fibrosis. Iron-laden macrophages may influence HSCs through the action of TGF-beta(1) in DMN-induced liver fibrosis.

  10. Noninvasive high-speed photoacoustic tomography of cerebral hemodynamics in awake-moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianbo; Xi, Lei; Zhou, Junli; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Tao; Carney, Paul R; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-01-01

    We present a noninvasive method of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) for imaging cerebral hemodynamics in awake-moving rats. The wearable PAT (wPAT) system has a size of 15 mm in height and 33 mm in diameter, and a weight of ~8 g (excluding cabling). The wPAT achieved an imaging rate of 3.33 frames/s with a lateral resolution of 243 μm. Animal experiments were designed to show wPAT feasibility for imaging cerebral hemodynamics on awake-moving animals. Results showed that the cerebral oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin changed significantly in response to hyperoxia; and, after the injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), cerebral blood volume changed faster over time and larger in amplitude for rats in awake-moving state compared with rats under anesthesia. By providing a light-weight, high-resolution technology for in vivo monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in awake-behaving animals, it will be possible to develop a comprehensive understanding on how activity alters hemodynamics in normal and diseased states. PMID:26082016

  11. Anesthetic and pathological changes following high doses of ketamine and xylazine in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Marie-Chantal; Hélie, Pierre; Burns, Patrick; Vachon, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of ketamine and xylazine in aging rats when coadministered intraperitoneally at high anesthetic doses. Three groups (n=6 rats/group) consisting of rats at 3, 6 and 12 months of age were used. During anesthesia, animals were monitored for heart rate, respiratory frequency, blood oxygen saturation, and rectal temperature. The corneal and paw withdrawal reflex were also examined during anesthesia. During anesthesia, withdrawal and corneal reflexes were absent for progressively longer durations with increasing age. Significant decreases in cardiac and respiratory frequency and, blood oxygen saturation occurred for the 6- and 12-month-old animals. Respiratory frequency and blood oxygen saturation returned to normal at the end of the anesthesia; however, the significant decrease in cardiac frequency persisted in the 6- and 12-month-old animals. Rectal temperature was decreased significantly only in the 3-month-old animals. Pulmonary edema and effusion occurred in 50% of the 12-month-old animals. In conclusion, if ketamine-xylazine are used for anesthesia, the doses should be optimized for the age of the subjects prior to initiation of the research project.

  12. Developing high-frequency ultrasound tomography for testicular tumor imaging in rats: An in vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chen, Wei-Tsen

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a feasibility study for developing a 35-MHz high-frequency ultrasound computed-tomography (HFUCT) system for imaging rat testicles. Methods: The performances of two kinds of HFUCT-attenuation and sound-speed UCT-based on transmission and pulse-echo modes were investigated in this study. Experiments were carried out using phantoms and actual rat testiclesin vitro. HFUCT images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Results: The phantom experimental results indicated that all types of HFUCT can determine the dimensions of a plastic cylinder with a diameter of 500μm. Compared to sound-speed HFUCT, attenuation HFUCT exhibited a better performance in recognizing a tiny sclerosed region in a gelatin phantom. Therefore, the in vitro testicular experiments were performed using attenuation HFUCT based on transmission and pulse-echo modes. The experimentally measured attenuation coefficient and sound speed for healthy rat testicles were 2.92 ± 0.25 dB/mm and 1537 ± 25 m/s, respectively. Conclusions: A homogeneous texture was evident for healthy testicles using both modes. An artificial sclerosed tumor could also be clearly observed using two- and three-dimensional attenuation HFUCT in both modes. However, an object artifact was apparent in pulse-echo mode because of ultrasound beam refraction. All of the obtained experimental results indicate the potential of using HFUCT as a novel tool for monitoring the preclinical responses of testicular tumors in small animals.

  13. A Low-Cost High-Definition Video System for Microsurgical Hindlimb Replantation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Rui; de Barros, Monteiro; Brito, Marcus Vinicius Henriques; Leal, Rafael Aquino; Teixeira, Renan Kleber Costa; Sabbá, Marcelo Ferreia; Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Lemos, Marcos Vinicius Vieira

    2017-03-01

    Background The surgical microscope is still essential for microsurgery, but several alternatives that show promising results are currently under development, such as endoscopes and laparoscopes with video systems; however, as yet, these have only been used for arterial anastomoses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a low-cost video-assisted magnification system in replantation of the hindlimbs of rats. Methods Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into two matched groups according to the magnification system used: the microscope group, with hindlimb replantation performed under a microscope with an image magnification of 40× and the video group, with the procedures performed under a video system composed of a high-definition camcorder, macrolenses, a 42-in television, and a digital HDMI cable. The camera was set to 50× magnification. We analyzed weight, arterial and venous caliber, total surgery time, arterial and venous anastomosis time, patency immediately and 7 days postoperatively, the number of stitches, and survival rate. Results There were no significant differences between the groups in weight, arterial or venous caliber, or the number of stitches. Replantation under the video system took longer (p < 0.05). Patency rates were similar between groups, both immediately and 7 days postoperatively. Conclusion It is possible to perform a hindlimb replantation in rats through video system magnification, with a satisfactory success rate comparable with that for procedures performed under surgical microscopes.

  14. Consumption of diets high in prebiotic fiber or protein during growth influences the response to a high fat and sucrose diet in adulthood in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Early dietary exposure can influence susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes later in life. We examined the lasting effects of a high protein or high prebiotic fiber weaning diet when followed by a high energy diet in adulthood. Methods At birth, litters of Wistar rats were culled to 10 pups. At 21 d pups were weaned onto control (C), high prebiotic fiber (HF) or high protein (HP) diet. Rats consumed the experimental diets until 14 wk when they were switched to a high fat/sucrose (HFHS) diet for 6 wk. Body composition and energy intake were measured and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed. Blood was analyzed for satiety hormones and tissues collected for real-time PCR. Results Weight gain was attenuated in male rats fed HF from 12 wk until study completion. In females there were early reductions in body weight that moderated until the final two wk of HFHS diet wherein HF females weighed less than HP. Final body weight was significantly higher following the high fat challenge in male and female rats that consumed HP diet from weaning compared to HF. Lean mass was higher and fat mass lower with HF compared to HP and compared to C in males. Energy intake was highest in HP rats, particularly at the start of HFHS feeding. Plasma glucose was higher in HP rats compared to HF during an OGTT. Plasma amylin was higher in HF females compared to C and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was higher in HF rats during the OGTT. Leptin was higher in HP rats during the OGTT. HF upregulated GLUT 5 mRNA expression in the intestine and downregulated hepatic hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Male rats fed HP had higher hepatic triglyceride content than C or HF. Conclusion These data suggest that while a long-term diet high in protein predisposes to an obese phenotype when rats are given a high energy diet in adulthood, consumption of a high fiber diet during growth may provide some protection. PMID:20920272

  15. Intermittent access to a nutritionally complete high-fat diet attenuates alcohol drinking in rats.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Van Cleef, Arriel; Davis, Jon F

    2017-02-01

    Binge eating disorder and alcohol use disorder (AUD) frequently co-occur in the presence of other psychiatric conditions. Data suggest that binge eating engages similar behavioral and neurochemical processes common to AUD, which might contribute to the etiology or maintenance of alcoholism. However, it is unclear how binge feeding behavior and alcohol intake interact to promote initiation or maintenance of AUD. We investigated the impact of binge-like feeding on alcohol intake and anxiety-like behavior in male Long Evans rats. Rats received chow (controls) or extended intermittent access (24h twice a week; Int-HFD) to a nutritionally complete high-fat diet for six weeks. Standard rodent chow was available ad-libitum to all groups and food intake was measured. Following HFD exposure, 20.0% ethanol, 2.0% sucrose intake and endocrine peptide levels were evaluated. Anxiety-like behavior was measured using a light-dark (LD) box apparatus. Rats in the Int-HFD group displayed a binge-like pattern of feeding (alternations between caloric overconsumption and voluntary caloric restriction). Surprisingly, alcohol intake was significantly attenuated in the Int-HFD group whereas sugar consumption was unaffected. Plasma acyl-ghrelin levels were significantly elevated in the Int-HFD group, whereas glucagon-like peptide-1 levels did not change. Moreover, rats in the Int-HFD group spent more time in the light side of the LD box compared to controls, indicating that binge-like feeding induced anxiolytic effects. Collectively, these data suggest that intermittent access to HFD attenuates alcohol intake through reducing anxiety-like behavior, a process potentially controlled by elevated plasma ghrelin levels.

  16. High Hydrostatic Pressure Extract of Red Ginseng Attenuates Inflammation in Rats with High-fat Diet Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sunyoon; Lee, Mak-Soon; Shin, Yoonjin; Kim, Chong-Tai; Kim, In-Hwan; Kim, Yangha

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with obesity. This study investigated effect of high hydrostatic pressure extract of red ginseng (HRG) on inflammation in rats with high-fat (HF) diet induced obesity. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (80~110 g) were randomly divided into two groups, and fed a 45% HF diet (HF) and a 45% HF diet containing 1.5% HRG (HF+HRG) for 14 weeks. At the end of the experiment, the serum leptin level was reduced by the HRG supplementation. The mRNA expression of genes related to adipogenesis including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and adipocyte protein 2 was down-regulated in the white adipose tissue (WAT). The mRNA levels of major inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and interleukin-6 were remarkably down-regulated by the HRG in WAT. These results suggest that HRG might be beneficial in ameliorating the inflammation-associated health complications by suppressing adipogenic and pro-inflammatory gene expression. PMID:26770912

  17. Effects of ALA, EPA and DHA in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Hemant; Panchal, Sunil K; Ward, Leigh C; Brown, Lindsay

    2013-06-01

    We compared the cardiovascular, hepatic and metabolic responses to individual dietary n-3 fatty acids (α-linolenic acid, ALA; eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA; and docosahexaenoic acid, DHA) in a high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced model of metabolic syndrome in rats. Additionally, we measured fatty acid composition of plasma, adipose tissue, liver, heart and skeletal muscle in these rats. The same dosages of ALA and EPA/DHA produced different physiological responses to decrease the risk factors for metabolic syndrome. ALA did not reduce total body fat but induced lipid redistribution away from the abdominal area and favorably improved glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and left ventricular dimensions, contractility, volumes and stiffness. EPA and DHA increased sympathetic activation, reduced the abdominal adiposity and total body fat and attenuated insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and left ventricular stiffness but not glucose tolerance. However, ALA, EPA and DHA all reduced inflammation in both the heart and the liver, cardiac fibrosis and hepatic steatosis. These effects were associated with complete suppression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 activity. Since the physiological responses to EPA and DHA were similar, it is likely that the effects are mediated by DHA with EPA serving as a precursor. Also, ALA supplementation increased DHA concentrations but induced different physiological responses to EPA and DHA. This result strongly suggests that ALA has independent effects in metabolic syndrome, not relying on its metabolism to DHA.

  18. Enhancement of Skeletal Muscle in Aged Rats Following High-Intensity Stretch-Shortening Contraction Training.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Naimo, Marshall A; Layner, Kayla N; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Chetlin, Robert D; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2016-08-03

    Exercise is the most accessible, efficacious, and multifactorial intervention to improve health and treat chronic disease. High-intensity resistance exercise, in particular, also maximizes skeletal muscle size and strength-outcomes crucial at advanced age. However, such training is capable of inducing muscle maladaptation when misapplied at old age. Therefore, characterization of parameters (e.g., mode and frequency) that foster adaptation is an active research area. To address this issue, we utilized a rodent model that allowed training at maximal intensity in terms of muscle activation and tested the hypothesis that muscles of old rats adapt to stretch-shortening contraction (SSC) training, provided the training frequency is sufficiently low. At termination of training, normalized muscle mass (i.e., muscle mass divided by tibia length) and muscle quality (isometric force divided by normalized muscle mass) were determined. For young rats, normalized muscle mass increased by ∼20% regardless of training frequency. No difference was observed for muscle quality values after 2 days versus 3 days per week training (0.65 ± 0.09 N/mg/mm vs. 0.59 ± 0.05 N/mg/mm, respectively). For old rats following 3 days per week training, normalized muscle mass was unaltered and muscle quality was 30% lower than young levels. Following 2 days per week training at old age, normalized muscle mass increased by 17% and muscle quality was restored to young levels. To investigate this enhanced response, oxidative stress was assessed by lipid peroxidation quantification. For young rats, lipid peroxidation levels were unaltered by training. With aging, baseline levels of lipid peroxidation increased by 1.5-fold. For old rats, only 2 days per week training decreased lipid peroxidation to levels indistinguishable from young values. These results imply that, appropriately scheduled high-intensity SSC training at old age is capable of restoring muscle to a younger phenotype in terms

  19. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of fermented red ginseng against high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Hwan; Lee, Eun-Jin; Cheon, Jeong-Mu; Nam, Ki-Jun; Oh, Tae-Ho; Kim, Kil-Soo

    2016-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of fermented red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer; FRG) on high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups of seven: normal control, NC; high-fat diet control, HFC; high-fat diet-0.5% FRG, HF-FRGL; and high-fat diet-1% FRG, HF-FRGH. All rats were fed a high-fat diet for eight weeks, except those in the NC group, while rats in the FRG treatment groups received drinking water containing 0.5% or 1% FRG. After eight weeks of treatment, levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) in the serum were measured. The concentration of the oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde (MDA), and activity of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in rat liver were evaluated. Histological analysis of the liver was performed using hematoxylin and eosin. The high-fat diet markedly increased serum levels of ALT, AST, TC, TG, and LDL-C and hepatic MDA levels, while administration of FRG to the hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a significant decline in the levels of these parameters. Furthermore, the decline in the levels of serum HDL-C and hepatic SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px induced by the high-fat diet was attenuated by FRG treatment. In addition, histopathological analysis of liver sections suggested that FRG treatment also provided protection against liver damage. These results suggested that FRG improved lipid profiles, inhibited lipid peroxidation, and played a protective role against liver injury in hyperlipidemic rats.

  20. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of fermented red ginseng against high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong-Hwan; Lee, Eun-Jin; Cheon, Jeong-Mu; Nam, Ki-Jun; Oh, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of fermented red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer; FRG) on high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups of seven: normal control, NC; high-fat diet control, HFC; high-fat diet–0.5% FRG, HF-FRGL; and high-fat diet–1% FRG, HF-FRGH. All rats were fed a high-fat diet for eight weeks, except those in the NC group, while rats in the FRG treatment groups received drinking water containing 0.5% or 1% FRG. After eight weeks of treatment, levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) in the serum were measured. The concentration of the oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde (MDA), and activity of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in rat liver were evaluated. Histological analysis of the liver was performed using hematoxylin and eosin. The high-fat diet markedly increased serum levels of ALT, AST, TC, TG, and LDL-C and hepatic MDA levels, while administration of FRG to the hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a significant decline in the levels of these parameters. Furthermore, the decline in the levels of serum HDL-C and hepatic SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px induced by the high-fat diet was attenuated by FRG treatment. In addition, histopathological analysis of liver sections suggested that FRG treatment also provided protection against liver damage. These results suggested that FRG improved lipid profiles, inhibited lipid peroxidation, and played a protective role against liver injury in hyperlipidemic rats. PMID:28053615

  1. Effect of potassium salts in rats adapted to an acidogenic high-sulfur amino acid diet.

    PubMed

    Sabboh, Houda; Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle; Coxam, Véronique; Tressol, Jean-Claude; Besson, Catherine; Rémésy, Christian; Demigné, Christian

    2005-08-01

    Low-grade metabolic acidosis, consecutive to excessive catabolism of sulfur amino acids and a high dietary Na:K ratio, is a common feature of Western food habits. This metabolic alteration may exert various adverse physiological effects, especially on bone, muscle and kidneys. To assess the actual effects of various K salts, a model of the Westernised diet has been developed in rats: slight protein excess (20 % casein); cations provided as non-alkalinising salts; high Na:K ratio. This diet resulted in acidic urine (pH 5.5) together with a high rate of divalent cation excretion in urine, especially Mg. Compared with controls, K supplementation as KCl accentuated Ca excretion, whereas potassium bicarbonate or malate reduced Mg and Ca excretion and alkalinised urine pH (up to 8). In parallel, citraturia was strongly increased, together with 2-ketoglutarate excretion, by potassium bicarbonate or malate in the diet. Basal sulfate excretion, in the range of 1 mmol/d, was slightly enhanced in rats fed the potassium malate diet. The present model of low-grade metabolic acidosis indicates that potassium malate may be as effective as KHCO3 to counteract urine acidification, to limit divalent cation excretion and to ensure high citrate concentration in urine.

  2. Fish Oil Decreases Hepatic Lipogenic Genes in Rats Fasted and Refed on a High Fructose Diet

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Gabriela S.; Cardoso, João Felipe R.; Calder, Philip C.; Jordão, Alceu A.; Vannucchi, Helio

    2015-01-01

    Fasting and then refeeding on a high-carbohydrate diet increases serum and hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations compared to standard diets. Fructose is a lipogenic monosaccharide which stimulates de novo fatty acid synthesis. Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids stimulate hepatic β-oxidation, partitioning fatty acids away from TAG synthesis. This study investigated whether dietary n-3 fatty acids from fish oil (FO) improve the hepatic lipid metabolic response seen in rats fasted and then refed on a high-fructose diet. During the post-prandial (fed) period, rats fed a FO rich diet showed an increase in hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) gene expression and decreased expression of carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP). Feeding a FO rich diet for 7 days prior to 48 h of fasting resulted in lower hepatic TAG, lower PPAR-α expression and maintenance of hepatic n-3 fatty acid content. Refeeding on a high fructose diet promoted an increase in hepatic and serum TAG and in hepatic PPAR-α, ChREBP and MTTP expression. FO did not prevent the increase in serum and hepatic TAG after fructose refeeding, but did decrease hepatic expression of lipogenic genes and increased the n-3 fatty acid content of the liver. n-3 Fatty acids can modify some components of the hepatic lipid metabolic response to later feeding with a high fructose diet. PMID:25751821

  3. Fish oil decreases hepatic lipogenic genes in rats fasted and refed on a high fructose diet.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Gabriela S; Cardoso, João Felipe R; Calder, Philip C; Jordão, Alceu A; Vannucchi, Helio

    2015-03-05

    Fasting and then refeeding on a high-carbohydrate diet increases serum and hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations compared to standard diets. Fructose is a lipogenic monosaccharide which stimulates de novo fatty acid synthesis. Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids stimulate hepatic β-oxidation, partitioning fatty acids away from TAG synthesis. This study investigated whether dietary n-3 fatty acids from fish oil (FO) improve the hepatic lipid metabolic response seen in rats fasted and then refed on a high-fructose diet. During the post-prandial (fed) period, rats fed a FO rich diet showed an increase in hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) gene expression and decreased expression of carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP). Feeding a FO rich diet for 7 days prior to 48 h of fasting resulted in lower hepatic TAG, lower PPAR-α expression and maintenance of hepatic n-3 fatty acid content. Refeeding on a high fructose diet promoted an increase in hepatic and serum TAG and in hepatic PPAR-α, ChREBP and MTTP expression. FO did not prevent the increase in serum and hepatic TAG after fructose refeeding, but did decrease hepatic expression of lipogenic genes and increased the n-3 fatty acid content of the liver. n-3 Fatty acids can modify some components of the hepatic lipid metabolic response to later feeding with a high fructose diet.

  4. A comparative study on hypolipidemic activities of high and low molecular weight chitosan in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiali; Zhang, Wei; Mamadouba, Bangoura; Xia, Wenshui

    2012-11-01

    The hypolipidemic activities of high (712.6 kDa) and low (39.8 kDa) molecular weight chitosan (HMWC and LMWC) were evaluated in rats fed high-fat diets. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats in four groups were fed on three high-fat diets with each of them containing HMWC, LMWC or cellulose (high-fat control), and a control normal-fat diet for eight weeks. Compared with HMWC group, LMWC group showed decreased body weight gain, serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), as well as decreased liver triglyceride (TG). Fecal fat and cholesterol of LMWC group was lower than those of HMWC group. However, the activities of liver and serum lipoprotein lipase (LPL) of LMWC group were increased compared with HMWC group. The obtained results suggested that hypolipidemic activity of LMWC was better than HMWC, which might be partially attributed to the increase of serum and liver LPL activities.

  5. Effect of high-intensity exercise and high-fat diet on lipid metabolism in the liver of rats

    PubMed Central

    Suk, MinHwa; Shin, YunA

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of high-intensity exercise (Ex) and high dietary fat intake on lipid metabolism in the liver of rats. [Methods] Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of the four groups (n=10 per group) that were maintained on a normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) consisting of 30% fat (w/w), with or without exercise on a treadmill at 30 m/min and 8% grade) for 4 weeks (i.e., ND, ND+Ex, HFD, and HFD+Ex groups). [Results] Body weight (p<.001), total plasma cholesterol (TC) (p<.001), triglyceride (TG) (p<.05), and liver TG levels (p<.05) were increased in the HFD group relative to the ND groups, and serum glucose (p<.05), insulin (p<.05), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p<.01), and liver TG levels (p<.01) were also higher in the HFD group compared to the ND+Ex group. Plasma free fatty acid was elevated in the HFD+Ex group compared to the HFD group (p<.01). With the exception of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, the expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in the liver was altered in the Ex groups compared to the control group (p<.05), with genes involved in lipolysis specifically up regulated in the HFD+Ex group compared to the other groups. [Conclusion] Vigorous exercise may increase glucose utilization and fat oxidation by activating genes in the liver that are associated with lipid metabolism compared to that in animals consuming a HFD without exercise. Therefore, high intensity exercise can be considered to counter the adverse effects of high dietary fat intake. PMID:27274461

  6. Ameliorative effect of berberine on renal damage in rats with diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Duo; Wen, Wei; Qi, Chun-Li; Zhao, Ru-Xia; Lü, Jun-Hua; Zhong, Chun-Yan; Chen, Yi-Yu

    2012-06-15

    Berberine (BBR) is one of the main constituents in Rhizoma coptidis and it has widely been used for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. The aims of the study were to investigate the effects and mechanism of action of berberine on renal damage in diabetic rats. Diabetes and hyperglycaemia were induced in rats by a high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ). Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, such as i) control rats, ii) untreated diabetic rats iii) 250 mg/kg metformin-treated, iv and v) 100 and 200 mg/kg berberine-treated diabetic rats and treated separately for 8 weeks. The fasting blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, glycosylated hemoglobin were measured in rats. Kidneys were isolated at the end of the treatment for histology, Western blot analysis and estimation of malonaldehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and renal advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). The results revealed that berberine significantly decreased fasting blood glucose, insulin levels, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels, urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in diabetic rats. The histological examinations revealed amelioration of diabetes-induced glomerular pathological changes following treatment with berberine. In addition, the protein expressions of nephrin and podocin were significantly increased. It seems likely that in rats berberine exerts an ameliorative effect on renal damage in diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin. The possible mechanisms for the renoprotective effects of berberine may be related to inhibition of glycosylation and improvement of antioxidation that in turn upregulate the expressions of renal nephrin and podocin.

  7. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic β-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects.

  8. Ketoprofen and antinociception in hypo-oestrogenic Wistar rats fed on a high sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Morales, Osmar Antonio; Espinosa-Juárez, Josué Vidal; García-Martínez, Betzabeth Anali; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-05

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ketoprofen are the most commonly used analgesics for the treatment of pain. However, no studies have evaluated the analgesic response to ketoprofen in conditions of obesity. The aim of this study was to analyse the time course of nociceptive pain in Wistar rats with and without hypo-oestrogenism on a high sucrose diet and to compare the antinociceptive response using ketoprofen. Hypo-oestrogenic and naïve rats received a hyper caloric diet (30% sucrose) or water ad libitum for 17 weeks, the thermal nociception ("plantar test" method) and body weight were tested during this period. A biphasic response was observed: thermal latency decreased in the 4th week (hyperalgesia), while from 12th to 17th week, thermal latency increased (hypoalgesia) in hypo-oestrogenic rats fed with high sucrose diet compared with the hypo-oestrogenic control group. At 4th and 17th weeks, different doses of ketoprofen (1.8-100mg/kg p.o.), were evaluated in all groups. The administration of ketoprofen at 4th and 17th weeks showed dose-dependent effects in the all groups; however, a greater pharmacological efficacy was observed in the 4th week in the hypo-oestrogenic animals that received sucrose. Nevertheless, in all the groups significantly diminish the antinociceptive effects in the 17th week. Our data showed that nociception was altered in the hypo-oestrogenic animals that were fed sucrose (hyperalgesia and hypoalgesia). Ketoprofen showed a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect at both time points. However, hypo-oestrogenism plus high-sucrose diet modifies the antinociceptive effect of ketoprofen.

  9. Behavioral effects on rats of motion within a high static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Thomas A; Carella, Lee; Gonzalez, Dani; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Anthony; Mueller, Kathleen; Neth, Bryan; Smith, James C

    2011-03-01

    Some human subjects report vestibular disturbances such as vertigo, apparent motion, and nausea around or within high strength MRI systems operating at 4 T to 9.4 T. These vestibular effects have been ascribed to the consequences of movement through the high magnetic field. We have previously found that exposure to magnetic fields above 7 T suppresses rearing, causes locomotor circling, and induces conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in rodents. The present experiments were designed to test the effects on rats of motion through the magnetic field of the 14.1 T superconducting magnet. In Experiment 1, we compared the effects of multiple rapid insertions and removals from the center of the magnet to the effects of continuous exposure. Repeated traversal of the magnetic field gradient with only momentary exposure to 14.1 T was sufficient to suppress rearing and induce a significant CTA. Repeated insertion and removal from the magnet, however, did not have a greater effect than a single 30-min exposure on either acute locomotor behavior or CTA acquisition. Prolonged exposure was required to induce locomotor circling. In the second series of experiments, we controlled the rate of insertion and removal by means of an electric motor. Locomotor circling appeared to be dependent on the speed of insertion and removal, but the suppression of rearing and the acquisition of CTA were independent of speed of insertion and removal. In Experiment 3, we inserted rats into the center of the magnet and then rotated them about their rostral-caudal axis during a 30-min 14.1 T exposure. Rotation within the magnet did not modulate the behavioral effects of exposure. We conclude that, in rats, movement through the steep gradient of a high magnetic field has some behavioral effects, but sustained exposure to the homogenous center of the field is required for the full behavioral consequences.

  10. Dynamic changes in phrenic motor output following high cervical hemisection in the decerebrate rat.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki; Marchenko, Vitaliy

    2015-09-01

    Hemisection of the spinal cord at C2 eliminates ipsilateral descending drive to the phrenic nucleus and causes hemidiaphragmatic paralysis in rats. Phrenic nerve (PhN) or diaphragmatic activity ipsilateral to hemisection can occasionally be induced acutely following hemisection by respiratory stressors (i.e., hypercapnia, asphyxia, contralateral phrenicotomy) and becomes spontaneously active days-to-weeks later. These investigations, however, are potentially confounded by the use of anesthesia, which may suppress spontaneously-active crossed phrenic pathways. Experiments were performed on vecuronium-paralyzed, unanesthetized, decerebrate adult male rats and whole PhN activity recorded continuously before, during, and after high cervical hemisection at the C1 spinal level. Crossed phrenic activity recovered spontaneously over minutes-to-hours with maximal recovery of 11.8 ± 3.1% (m ± SE) in the PhN ipsilateral to hemisection. Additionally, there was a significant increase in PhN activity contralateral to hemisection of 221.0 ± 4 0.4% (m ± SE); since animals were artificially-ventilated, these changes likely represent an increase in central respiratory drive. These results underscore the state-dependence of crossed bulbophrenic projections and suggest that unanesthetized models may be more sensitive in detecting acute recovery of respiratory output following spinal cord injury (SCI). Additionally, our results may suggest an important role for a group of C1-C2 neurons exhibiting respiratory-related activity, spared by the higher level of hemisection. These units may function as relays of polysynaptic bulbophrenic pathways and/or provide excitatory drive to phrenic motoneurons. Our findings provide a new model for investigating acute respiratory recovery following cervical SCI, the high C1-hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rat and suggest a centrally-mediated increase in central respiratory drive in response to high cervical SCI.

  11. High glucose inhibits HCO3(-) and fluid secretion in rat pancreatic ducts.

    PubMed

    Futakuchi, Sachiko; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Naruse, Satoru; Ko, Shigeru B H; Fujiki, Kotoyo; Yamamoto, Akiko; Nakakuki, Miyuki; Song, Ying; Steward, Martin C; Kondo, Takaharu; Goto, Hidemi

    2009-11-01

    Cellular mechanisms underlying the impairment of pancreatic fluid and electrolyte secretion in diabetes were examined using interlobular ducts isolated from rat pancreas. Fluid secretion was assessed by monitoring changes in luminal volume. HCO3(-) uptake across the basolateral membrane was estimated from the recovery of intracellular pH following an acid load. Exposure to high glucose concentrations inhibited fluid secretion and reduced the rate of basolateral HCO3(-) uptake in secretin-stimulated ducts isolated from normal rats. In ducts isolated from streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats, fluid secretion and basolateral HCO3(-) uptake were also severely impaired but could be largely reversed by incubation in normal-glucose solutions. Sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1), glucose transporter (GLUT)1, GLUT2, and GLUT8 transcripts were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in isolated ducts. Raising the luminal glucose concentration in microperfused ducts caused a depolarization of the membrane potential, consistent with the presence of SGLT1 at the apical membrane. Unstimulated ducts filled with high-glucose solutions lost luminal fluid by a phlorizin-sensitive mechanism, indicating that pancreatic ducts are capable of active glucose reabsorption from the lumen via SGLT1. In ducts exposed to high glucose concentrations, continuous glucose diffusion to the lumen and active reabsorption via SGLT1 would lead to elevation of intracellular Na+ concentration and sustained depolarization of the apical membrane. These two factors would tend to inhibit the basolateral uptake and apical efflux of Cl(-) and HCO3(-) and could therefore account for the impaired fluid and electrolyte secretion that is observed in diabetes.

  12. Care of rats with complete high-thoracic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, John B G; Ramer, Leanne M; Inskip, Jessica A; Alan, Nima; Ramer, Matt S; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2010-09-01

    The complications of spinal cord injury (SCI) increase in number and severity with the level of injury. A recent survey of SCI researchers reveals that animal models of high SCI are essential. Despite this consensus, most laboratories continue to work with mid- or low-thoracic SCI. The available data on cervical SCI in animals characterize incomplete injuries; for example, nearly all studies published in 2009 examine discrete, tract-specific lesions that are not clinically-relevant. A primary barrier to developing animal models of severe, higher SCI is the challenge of animal care, a critical determinant of experimental outcome. Currently, many of these practices vary substantially between laboratories, and are passed down anecdotally within institutions. The care of animals with SCI is complex, and becomes much more challenging as the lesion level ascends. In our experience, the care of animals with high-thoracic (T3) SCI is much more demanding than the care of animals with low-thoracic SCI, even though both injuries result in paraplegia. We have developed an animal care regimen for rats with complete high-thoracic SCI. Our practices have been refined over the past 7 years, in collaboration with animal care centre staff and veterinarians. During this time, we have cared for more than 300 rats with T3 complete transection SCI, with experimental end-points of up to 3 months. Here we provide details of our animal care procedures, including acclimatization, housing, diet, antibiotic prophylaxis, surgical procedures, post-operative monitoring, and prevention of complications. In our laboratory, this comprehensive approach consistently produces good outcomes following T3 complete transection SCI: using body weight as an objective indicator of animal health, we have found that our rats typically return to pre-operative weights within 10 days of T3 complete SCI. It is our hope that the information provided here will improve care of experimental animals, and facilitate

  13. Melatonin improves metabolic syndrome induced by high fructose intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Akira; Ohta, Yoshiji; Ohashi, Koji

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we examined whether melatonin improves metabolic syndrome induced by high fructose intake in male Wistar rats. Feeding of a diet containing 60% fructose (HFD) for 4 or 6 wk caused increased serum insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, free fatty acids, uric acid, leptin, and lipid peroxide concentrations as well as hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations, and relative intra-abdominal fat and liver weights. The 4- or 6-wk HFD feeding reduced serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and adiponectin concentrations. The 6-wk HFD feeding increased serum tumor necrosis factor-α concentration and hepatic lipid peroxide concentration and lowered hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. Daily intraperitoneal administration of melatonin (1 or 10mg/kg body weight), starting at 4-wk HFD feeding, attenuated these changes at 6-wk HFD feeding more effectively at its higher dose than at its lower dose. In an oral glucose tolerance test, rats with 4- or 6-wk HFD feeding showed higher serum insulin response curve and normal serum glucose response curve when compared with the corresponding animals that received the control diet. The 4- or 6-wk HFD feeding caused insulin resistance, judging from the scores of HOMR-IR and QUICKI, which are indices of insulin resistance. The daily administered melatonin (1 or 10mg/kg body weight) ameliorated the higher serum insulin response curve in the oral glucose tolerance test and insulin resistance at 6-wk HFD feeding more effectively at its higher dose than at its lower dose. These results indicate that melatonin improves metabolic syndrome induced by high fructose intake in rats.

  14. Effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on pulmonary sensitivity, motor activity, and body composition of brown Norway rats exposed to ozone

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    pulmonary parameters, BALF biomarkers, body composition, motor activity data collected from rats exposed to ozone after high fructose or high fat diets.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Gordon , C., P. Phillips , A. Johnstone , T. Beasley , A. Ledbetter , M. Schladweiler , S. Snow, and U. Kodavanti. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone. INHALATION TOXICOLOGY. Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28(5): 203-15, (2016).

  15. Effect of Carnitine and herbal mixture extract on obesity induced by high fat diet in rats

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kamal A; Nagy, Mohamed A

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity-associated type 2 diabetes is rapidly increasing throughout the world. It is generally recognized that natural products with a long history of safety can modulate obesity. Aim To investigate the development of obesity in response to a high fat diet (HFD) and to estimate the effect of L-carnitine and an Egyptian Herbal mixture formulation (HMF) (consisting of T. chebula, Senae, rhubarb, black cumin, aniseed, fennel and licorice) on bodyweight, food intake, lipid profiles, renal, hepatic, cardiac function markers, lipid Peroxidation, and the glucose and insulin levels in blood and liver tissue in rats. Method White male albino rats weighing 80-90 gm, 60 days old. 10 rats were fed a normal basal diet (Cr), 30 rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks during the entire study. Rats of the HFD group were equally divided into 3 subgroups each one include 10 rats. The first group received HFD with no supplement (HFD), the 2nd group HFD+L-carnitine and the third group received HFD+HMF. Carnitine and HMF were administered at 10th week (start time for treatments) for 4 weeks. Body weight, lipid profile & renal function (urea, uric acid creatinine) ALT & AST activities, cardiac markers, (LDH, C.K-NAC and MB) the oxidative stress marker reduced glutathione (GSH), and Malondialdehyde (MDA) catalase activity, in addition to glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance in serum & tissues were analyzed. Results Data showed that feeding HFD diet significantly increased final body weight, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, & LDL concentration compared with controls, while significantly decreasing HDL; meanwhile treatment with L-carnitine, or HMF significantly normalized the lipid profile. Serum ALT, urea, uric acid, creatinine, LDH, CK-NAC, CK-MB were significantly higher in the high fat group compared with normal controls; and administration of L-carnitine or herbal extract significantly lessened the effect of the HFD. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and high

  16. An opiate binding site in the rat brain is highly selective for 4,5-epoxymorphinans.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Sadée, W

    1983-09-16

    In vitro binding studies have demonstrated the existence of multiple opiate receptor types. An additional site in the rat brain (termed the lambda site) is distinct from the established types by its selectivity for 4,5-epoxymorphinans (such as naloxone and morphine). While the lambda site displays a high affinity for naloxone in vivo and in vitro in fresh brain membrane homogenates, these sites rapidly convert in vitro to a state of low affinity. The regional distribution of the lambda site in the brain is strikingly different from that of the classic opiate receptor types.

  17. High-anxiety rats are less sensitive to the rewarding affects of amphetamine on 50kHz USV.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Małgorzata H; Taracha, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Wisłowska-Stanek, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Jacek; Sobolewska, Alicja; Turzyńska, Danuta; Skórzewska, Anna; Płaźnik, Adam

    2014-12-15

    This study assessed behaviour, as measured by 50kHz calls related to positive affect, in rats with different fear conditioned response strengths: low-anxiety rats (LR) and high-anxiety rats (HR), after amphetamine injection in a two-injection protocol (TIPS). The results showed that the first dose of amphetamine evoked similar behavioural effects in frequency-modulated (FM) 50kHz calls in the LR and HR groups. The second injection of amphetamine resulted in stronger FM 50kHz calls in LR compared with HR rats. The biochemical data ('ex vivo' analysis) showed that the LR rats had increased basal levels of dopamine in the amygdala, and increased homovanilic acid (HVA), dopamine's main metabolite, in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex compared with HR rats. The 'in vivo' analysis (microdialysis study) showed that the LR rats had increased HVA concentrations in the basolateral amygdala in response to an aversively conditioned context. Research has suggested that differences in dopaminergic system activity in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex may be one of the biological factors that underlie individual differences in response to fear stimuli, which may also affect the rewarding effects of amphetamine.

  18. Impact of food supplementation and methionine on high densities of cotton rats: Support of the amino-acid-quality hypothesis?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, R.E.; Leslie, David M.; Lochmiller, R.L.; Masters, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Considerable research supports the tenet that quantity and quality of food limit vertebrate populations. We evaluated predictions that increased availabilities of food and the essential amino acid methionine were related to population limitation of the hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus). Effects of supplemental food and methionine on density, survival, and reproductive parameters of wild cotton rats were assessed in north-central Oklahoma in 1998-1999. Twelve enclosed groups of 16 adult cotton rats each (8 male, 8 female) were randomly assigned to either no supplementation (control), supplementation with a mixed ration that had methionine at slightly below maintenance levels (0.20%), or a methionine-enhanced mixed ration (1.20%). In general, densities of cotton rats were twice as high and were sustained longer with dietary supplementation, and methionine-supplemented populations maintained the highest densities. Treatment effects on survival depended on time of year, with higher survival in supplemented enclosures in October and November. Per capita recruitment was highest with methionine-enhanced food. Treatment effects on proportions of overall and female cotton rats in reproductive condition depended on sampling date, but males were most reproductively active with methionine supplementation. Methionine supplementation resulted in an earlier and longer reproductive season. Density-dependent and density-independent factors no doubt interplay to determine population dynamics of cotton rats, but our results suggest that methionine plays a role in the population dynamics of wild cotton rats, apparently by enhancing overall density, recruitment, and reproductive activity of males.

  19. Effect of crude saponin of Korean red ginseng on high-fat diet-induced obesity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Hahm, Dae Hyun; Yang, Deck Chun; Kim, Jang Hyun; Lee, Hye Jung; Shim, Insop

    2005-01-01

    The anti-obesity effects of crude saponin (CS) of Korean red ginseng (KRG) were investigated in the rat fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats became obese by feeding the HF diet over 5 weeks, while the control rats were fed a normal diet, and then both groups were treated with CS (200 mg/kg, i.p.) for 3 weeks. The body weight, food consumption, adipose tissues, and expression of appetite peptides such as leptin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were investigated in rats fed normal and HF diet after treatment of CS. Administration of CS reduced body weight, food intake, and fat content in HF diet rats in a manner similar to those of the normal diet fed rats. The hypothalamic NPY expression and serum leptin level were reduced in HF diet rats after CS treatment. Our results suggest that CS may be useful in the treatment of obesity and related disorders as anti-obesity agents.

  20. Prenatal high protein exposure decreases energy expenditure and increases adiposity in young rats.

    PubMed

    Daenzer, Maren; Ortmann, Sylvia; Klaus, Susanne; Metges, Cornelia C

    2002-02-01

    Epidemiologic results suggest that protein intake in infancy and later adiposity might be related. We examined whether high dietary protein exposure in utero and/or during postnatal life affects body fatness. Two groups of female rats were mated and pair-fed isocaloric high (40% protein; HP) or adequate protein (20% protein; AP) diets throughout pregnancy. The male offspring were suckled (3 wk) by foster mothers pair-fed HP or AP diets, resulting in 4 pre-/postnatal groups (AP-AP, AP-HP, HP-AP, HP-HP). Subsequently, they were pair-fed the same diets their nurses received during lactation until wk 9. Offspring of HP dams had a lower body weight on d 2 of life than their AP counterparts (7.6 +/- 0.7 vs. 8.3 +/- 0.8 g; P < 0.001). HP-AP rats had a higher body weight than AP-AP controls at wk 3, 5, and 6 (P < 0.05), in contrast to HP-HP which did not differ from controls. Prenatal HP exposure resulted in a greater total and relative fat mass and decreased total energy expenditure at wk 9 (P < 0.05). Postnatal HP alone had no significant effect on body composition or metabolic rate. These results indicate that in utero exposure to a high protein level reprograms body weight and energy homeostasis.

  1. Lipid and fatty acid profiles in rats consuming different high-fat ketogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Dell, C A; Likhodii, S S; Musa, K; Ryan, M A; Burnham, W M; Cunnane, S C

    2001-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are used to treat intractable seizures in children, but little is known of the mechanism by which these diets work or whether fats rich in n-3 polyunsaturates might be beneficial. Tissue lipid and fatty acid profiles were determined in rats consuming very high fat (80 weight%), low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets containing either medium-chain triglyceride, flaxseed oil, butter, or an equal combination of these three fat sources. Ketogenic diets containing butter markedly raised liver triglyceride but had no effect on plasma cholesterol. Unlike the other fats, flaxseed oil in the ketogenic diet did not raise brain cholesterol. Brain total and free fatty acid profiles remained similar in all groups, but there was an increase in the proportion of arachidonate in brain total lipids in the medium-chain triglyceride group, while the two groups consuming flaxseed oil had significantly lower arachidonate in brain, liver, and plasma. The very high dietary intake of alpha-linolenate in the flaxseed group did not change docosahexaenoate levels in the brain. Our previous report based on these diets showed that although ketosis is higher in rats consuming a ketogenic diet based on medium-chain triglyceride oil, seizure resistance in the pentylenetetrazol model is not clearly related to the degree of ketosis achieved. In combination with our present data from the same seizure study, it appears that ketogenic diets with widely differing effects on tissue lipids and fatty acid profiles can confer a similar amount of seizure protection.

  2. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  3. Nature of elevated rat intestinal carbohydrase activities after high-carbohydrate diet feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuboi, K.K.; Kwong, L.K.; Yamada, K.; Sunshine, P.; Koldovsky, O.

    1985-10-01

    Adult rats that were maintained on a low-carbohydrate intake showed rapid increase in the activities of sucrase, maltase, and lactase along the length of the small intestine when they were fed a high-starch diet. In the present study, the authors have identified these activity increases, and showed that they reflect proportional accumulations in enzyme-protein of sucrase-isomaltase, maltase-glucoamylase, and neutral lactase. It was determined that each of these enzymes exists in adult rat intestine in single immunoreactive form and accounts as a group for all sucrase, cellobiase, and most maltase and lactase activities. Dietary change from low to high carbohydrate (starch) resulted in an increase in (TH)leucine accumulation in each of the enzymes, without a change in the amount of label accumulation in total intestinal proteins. The increase in label accumulation in the brush-border carbohydrase pools was matched generally by proportional elevation in the pool concentrations of sucrase-isomaltase and lactase but not maltase. These studies suggest that the elevation of intestinal carbohydrase concentrations induced by high-carbohydrate feeding may involve selective stimulation of their synthesis.

  4. Effects of telmisartan and pioglitazone on high fructose induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Shahataa, Mary Girgis; Mostafa-Hedeab, Gomaa; Ali, Esam Fouaad; Mahdi, Emad Ahmed; Mahmoud, Fatma Abd Elhaleem

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hyperuricemia. This study was designed to assess the effect of telmisartan and pioglitazone on high fructose induced MS. Thirty-five male albino rats were classified into 5 groups: A, normal diet; B, high-fructose diet (HFD) subdivided into B1 (HFD only), B2 (telmisartan, 5 mg/kg), B3 (pioglitazone, 10 mg/kg), and B4 (telmisartan + pioglitazone). Administration of the drugs was started after the rats had been on HFD for 4 weeks and continued for 4 weeks. Body mass (BM), blood pressure (BP), uric acid (UA), total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and nitric oxide (NO) were measured and the levels of fasting glucose and fasting insulin were estimated. Compared with group B1, telmisartan treatment significantly decreased BP, BM, serum glucose, insulin, UA, urea, cholesterol, TGA, and LDL and significantly increased HDL, whereas pioglitazone treatment significantly decreased BP, serum glucose, insulin, UA, urea, creatinine, cholesterol, TGA, and LDL and significantly increased HDL. Co-administration of pioglitazone + telmisartan significantly decreased insulin, urea, and creatinine compared with telmisartan alone. Combined telmisartan + pioglitazone allowed better control of BP, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, and the amelioration of BM increase that may be associated with pioglitazone treatment.

  5. Serial Measurements of Splanchnic Vein Diameters in Rats Using High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Bridget M.; Krieger-Burke, Teresa; Fink, Gregory D.; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate serial ultrasound imaging in rats as a fully non-invasive method to (1) quantify the diameters of splanchnic veins in real time as an indirect surrogate for the capacitance function of those veins, and (2) assess the effects of drugs on venous dimensions. A 21 MHz probe was used on anesthetized male Sprague–Dawley rats to collect images containing the portal vein (PV), superior mesenteric vein (SMV), abdominal inferior vena cava (IVC), and splenic vein (SpV; used as a landmark in timed studies) and the abdominal aorta (AA). Stable landmarks were established that allowed reproducible quantification of cross-sectional diameters within an animal. The average diameters of vessels measured every 5 min over 45 min remained within 0.75 ± 0.15% (PV), 0.2 ± 0.09% (SMV), 0.5 ± 0.12% (IVC), and 0.38 ± 0.06% (AA) of baseline (PV: 2.0 ± 0.12 mm; SMV: 1.7 ± 0.04 mm; IVC: 3.2 ± 0.1 mm; AA: 2.3 ± 0.14 mm). The maximal effects of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus) on venous diameters were determined 5 min post SNP bolus; the diameters of all noted veins were significantly increased by SNP, while mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased 29 ± 4 mmHg. By contrast, administration of the venoconstrictor sarafotoxin (S6c; 5 ng/kg, i.v. bolus) significantly decreased PV and SpV, but not IVC, SMV, or AA, diameters 5 min post S6c bolus; MAP increased by 6 ± 2 mmHg. In order to determine if resting splanchnic vein diameters were stable over much longer periods of time, vessel diameters were measured every 2 weeks for 8 weeks. Measurements were found to be highly reproducible within animals over this time period. Finally, to evaluate the utility of vein imaging in a chronic condition, images were acquired from 4-week deoxycorticosterone acetate salt (DOCA-salt) hypertensive and normotensive (SHAM) control rats. All vessel diameters increased from baseline while MAP increased (67 ± 4 mmHg) in DOCA-salt rats

  6. Coenzyme Q Metabolism Is Disturbed in High Fat Diet-Induced Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Elena; Palleschi, Simonetta; Rossi, Barbara; Napolitano, Mariarosaria; Tiano, Luca; D’Amore, Emanuela; Botham, Kathleen M

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is believed to be a major contributory factor in the development of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common liver disorder worldwide. In this study, the effects of high fat diet-induced NAFLD on Coenzyme Q (CoQ) metabolism and plasma oxidative stress markers in rats were investigated. Rats were fed a standard low fat diet (control) or a high fat diet (57% metabolizable energy as fat) for 18 weeks. The concentrations of total (reduced + oxidized) CoQ9 were increased by >2 fold in the plasma of animals fed the high fat diet, while those of total CoQ10 were unchanged. Reduced CoQ levels were raised, but oxidized CoQ levels were not, thus the proportion in the reduced form was increased by about 75%. A higher percentage of plasma CoQ9 as compared to CoQ10 was in the reduced form in both control and high fat fed rats. Plasma protein thiol (SH) levels were decreased in the high fat-fed rats as compared to the control group, but concentrations of lipid hydroperoxides and low density lipoprotein (LDL) conjugated dienes were unchanged. These results indicate that high fat diet-induced NAFLD in rats is associated with altered CoQ metabolism and increased protein, but not lipid, oxidative stress. PMID:22408414

  7. A comparative study on the effect of high cholesterol diet on the hippocampal CA1 area of adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Abo El-Khair, Doaa M; El-Safti, Fatma El-Nabawia A; Nooh, Hanaa Z; El-Mehi, Abeer E

    2014-06-01

    Dementia is one of the most important problems nowadays. Aging is associated with learning and memory impairments. Diet rich in cholesterol has been shown to be detrimental to cognitive performance. This work was carried out to compare the effect of high cholesterol diet on the hippocampus of adult and aged male albino rats. Twenty adult and twenty aged male rats were used in this study. According to age, the rats were randomly subdivided into balanced and high cholesterol diet fed groups. The diet was 15 g/rat/day for adult rats and 20 g/rat/day for aged rats for eight weeks. Serial coronal sections of hippocampus and blood samples were taken from each rat. For diet effect evaluation, Clinical, biochemical, histological, immunohistochemical, and morphometric assessments were done. In compare to a balanced diet fed rat, examination of Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA 1) area in the hippocampus of the high cholesterol diet adult rats showed degeneration, a significant decrease of the pyramidal cells, attenuation and/or thickening of small blood vessels, apparent increase of astrocytes and apparent decrease of Nissl's granules content. Moreover, the high cholesterol diet aged rats showed aggravation of senility changes of the hippocampus together with Alzheimer like pathological changes. In conclusion, the high cholesterol diet has a significant detrimental effect on the hippocampus and aging might pronounce this effect. So, we should direct our attention to limit cholesterol intake in our food to maintain a healthy life style for a successful aging.

  8. Downregulation of vascular soluble guanylate cyclase induced by high salt intake in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Kagota, Satomi; Tamashiro, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Yu; Sugiura, Reiko; Kuno, Takayoshi; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP)-mediated mechanism plays an important role in vasodilatation and blood pressure regulation. We investigated the effects of high salt intake on the nitric oxide (NO) – cyclic GMP signal transduction pathway regulating relaxation in aortas of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR).Four-week-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) received a normal salt diet (0.3% NaCl) or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 4 weeks.In aortic rings from SHR, endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to acetylcholine (ACh), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and calcium ionophore A23187 were significantly impaired by the high salt intake. The endothelium-independent relaxations in response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nitroglycerin were also impaired, but that to 8-bromo-cyclic GMP remained unchanged. On the other hand, high salt diet had no significant effects on the relaxations of aortic rings from WKY.In aortas from SHR, the release of NO stimulated by ACh was significantly enhanced, whereas the production of cyclic GMP induced by either ACh or SNP was decreased by the high salt intake.Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was slightly increased, whereas that of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) was dramatically reduced by the high salt intake.These results indicate that in SHR, excessive dietary salt can result in downregulation of sGC followed by decreased cyclic GMP production, which leads to impairment of vascular relaxation in responses to NO. It is notable that chronic high salt intake impairs the sGC/cyclic GMP pathway but not the eNOS/NO pathway. PMID:11606313

  9. "Omics" of High Altitude Biology: A Urinary Metabolomics Biomarker Study of Rats Under Hypobaric Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koundal, Sunil; Gandhi, Sonia; Kaur, Tanzeer; Mazumder, Avik; Khushu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    High altitude medicine is an emerging subspecialty that has crosscutting relevance for 21(st) century science and society: from sports medicine and aerospace industry to urban and rural communities living in high altitude. Recreational travel to high altitude has also become increasingly popular. Rarely has the biology of high altitude biology been studied using systems sciences and omics high-throughput technologies. In the present study, 1H-NMR-based metabolomics, along with multivariate analyses, were employed in a preclinical rat model to characterize the urinary metabolome under hypobaric hypoxia stress. Rats were exposed to simulated altitude of 6700 m above the sea level. The urine samples were collected from pre- and post-exposure (1, 3, 7, and 14 days) of hypobaric hypoxia. Metabolomics urinalysis showed alterations in TCA cycle metabolites (citrate, α-ketoglutarate), cell membrane metabolism (choline), gut micro-flora metabolism (hippurate, phenylacetylglycine), and others (N-acetyl glutamate, creatine, taurine) in response to hypobaric hypoxia. Taurine, a potential biomarker of hepatic function, was elevated after 3 days of hypobaric hypoxia, which indicates altered liver functioning. Liver histopathology confirmed the damage to tissue architecture due to hypobaric hypoxia. The metabolic pathway analysis identified taurine metabolism and TCA as important pathways that might have contributed to hypobaric hypoxia-induced pathophysiology. This study demonstrates the use of metabolomics as a promising tool for discovery and understanding of novel biochemical responses to hypobaric hypoxia exposure, providing new insight in the field of high altitude medicine and the attendant health problems that occur in response to high altitude. The findings reported here also have potential relevance for sports medicine and aviation sciences.

  10. Effects of red pitaya juice supplementation on cardiovascular and hepatic changes in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The fruit of Hylocereus polyrhizus, also known as red pitaya, and buah naga in Malay, is one of the tropical fruits of the cactus family, Cactaceae. Red pitaya has been shown to protect aorta from oxidative damage and improve lipid profiles in hypercholesterolemic rats probably due to phytochemicals content including phenolics and flavonoids. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in cardiac stiffness, hepatic and renal function in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced obese rats following supplementation of red pitaya juice. Methods Total 48 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: corn-starch group (CS), corn-starch + red pitaya juice group (CRP), high-carbohydrate, high fat group (HCHF) and high-carbohydrate, high fat + red pitaya juice (HRP). The intervention with 5% red pitaya juice was started for 8 weeks after 8 weeks initiation of the diet. Heart function was determined ex vivo with Langendorff hearts while plasma liver enzymes, uric acid and urea were measured using commercial kits. Total fat mass was determined with Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Glucose uptake was measured with Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT). Liver and cardiac structures were defined by histology. Results Supplementation of red pitaya juice for 8 weeks increased energy intake and abdominal circumference but no change in body fat and lean mass respectively. Also, there were a trend of uric acid and glucose normalization for HRP as compared to H-fed rats. Red pitaya juice treatment reduced ALP and ALT but caused significant increment in AST. Diastolic stiffness of the heart was reduced after supplementation of red pitaya juice in corn starch fed rats. However, the reduction was not significant in HRP rats in comparison with H rats. Conclusion The present study concluded that red pitaya juice may serve as a complimentary therapy for attenuating some signs of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24919841

  11. The effects of Ananas comosus L. leaves on diabetic-dyslipidemic rats induced by alloxan and a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weidong; Xing, Dongming; Sun, Hong; Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Du, Lijun

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effects of Ananas comosus L. leaves on diabetic-dyslipidemic rats. Hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities of the ethanolic extract of Ananas comosus L. leaves (EEACL) were evaluated in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats by oral glucose tolerance test and an olive oil load test. Anti-diabetic, anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-oxidative activities of EEACL were also investigated in diabetic-dyslipidemic rats induced by alloxan and a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. EEACL at the dose of 0.40 g/kg significantly inhibited the increase in blood glucose in diabetic rats in oral glucose tolerance test, but did not cause any hypoglycerimic activity in normal rats. It also significantly inhibited the increase in postprandial triglycerides (TG) levels in both normal and diabetic rats in olive oil load test. After 15 days of treatment of diabetic dyslipidemic rats, EEACL significantly decreased blood glucose (-51.0%, P < 0.01), TG (-50.1%, P < 0.01), TC (-23.3%, P < 0.01), LDL-c (-47.9%, P < 0.01) and glycated albumin (-25.4%, P < 0.01) levels, significantly increased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (66.2%, P < 0.01) and prevented lower body weight of diabetes (11.8%, P < 0.05), significantly lowered lipid peroxidation productions of blood (-27.8%, P < 0.01), brain (-31.6%, P < 0.05), liver (-44.5%, P < 0.01) and kidneys (-72.2%, P < 0.05) compared with those in untreated diabetic dyslipidemic rats. These data suggest that EEACL has anti-diabetic, anti-dyslipidemic and anti-oxidative activities, which may be developed into a new plant medicine for treatment of diabetes and its complications.

  12. Tumour induction in rats following exposure to short-term high dose aristolochic acid I.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Qiu, Qi; Li, Heng; Li, Lei-Shi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the carcinogenic activity of aristolochic acid I (AAI) in short-term high doses. Forty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups. A dose of 50 mg/kg/day AAI was administrated to rats in the experimental group by gavage consecutively for 3 days, while the control group received only distilled water, after which renal function and pathological changes were assessed. At day 8 post-treatment AAI had induced elevations of both plasma urea and creatinine, coupled with increased urine production, urinary proteins, glucose and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. At 1, 3 and 6 months post-treatment renal function and urinary parameters for the experimental group approached baseline values. However, tumours and preneoplastic proliferation were both observed at 6 months for the experimental group. The rate of occurrence of preneoplastic proliferation in the kidneys was 100% (14/14); the rate of occurrence of renal tumours was 28.6% (4/14), which included three mesenchymal tumours and one case of renal oncocytoma; the rate of occurrence of extrarenal tumours was 7.1% (1/14), which was a case of mammary duct carcinoma. Renal preneoplastic proliferation and renal tumours, as well as extrarenal tumours, were not observed in control rats during the 6 months. These results differ from previous reports in that tumours originating from both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues were found, which may be attributed to the duration of treatment and the dosage of the drug. These data indicate that AAI administered in an acute manner at high doses does in fact have carcinogenic properties.

  13. High Dietary Fructose Intake on Cardiovascular Disease Related Parameters in Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, SooYeon; Ahn, Hyejin; Park, Yoo Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a high-fructose diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related parameters in growing rats. Three-week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups; a regular diet group (RD: fed regular diet based on AIN-93G, n = 8), a high-fructose diet group (30Frc: fed regular diet with 30% fructose, n = 8), a high-fat diet group (45Fat: fed regular diet with 45 kcal% fat, n = 8) or a high fructose with high-fat diet group (30Frc + 45Fat, fed diet 30% fructose with 45 kcal% fat, n = 8). After an eight-week treatment period, the body weight, total-fat weight, serum glucose, insulin, lipid profiles and pro-inflammatory cytokines, abdominal aortic wall thickness, and expressions of eNOS and ET-1 mRNA were analyzed. The result showed that total-fat weight was higher in the 30Frc, 45Fat, and 30Frc + 45Fat groups compared to the RD group (p < 0.05). Serum triglyceride (TG) levels were highest in the 30Frc group than the other groups (p < 0.05). The abdominal aorta of 30Frc, 45Fat, and 30Frc + 45Fat groups had higher wall thickness than the RD group (p < 0.05). Abdominal aortic eNOS mRNA level was decreased in 30Frc, 45Fat, and 30Frc + 45Fat groups compared to the RD group (p < 0.05), and also 45Fat and 30Frc + 45Fat groups had decreased mRNA expression of eNOS compared to the 30Frc group (p < 0.05). ET-1 mRNA level was higher in 30Frc, 45Fat, and 30Frc + 45Fat groups than the RD group (p < 0.05). Both high fructose consumption and high fat consumption in growing rats had similar negative effects on CVD-related parameters. PMID:28035952

  14. High Dietary Fructose Intake on Cardiovascular Disease Related Parameters in Growing Rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, SooYeon; Ahn, Hyejin; Park, Yoo Kyoung

    2016-12-26

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a high-fructose diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related parameters in growing rats. Three-week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups; a regular diet group (RD: fed regular diet based on AIN-93G, n = 8), a high-fructose diet group (30Frc: fed regular diet with 30% fructose, n = 8), a high-fat diet group (45Fat: fed regular diet with 45 kcal% fat, n = 8) or a high fructose with high-fat diet group (30Frc + 45Fat, fed diet 30% fructose with 45 kcal% fat, n = 8). After an eight-week treatment period, the body weight, total-fat weight, serum glucose, insulin, lipid profiles and pro-inflammatory cytokines, abdominal aortic wall thickness, and expressions of eNOS and ET-1 mRNA were analyzed. The result showed that total-fat weight was higher in the 30Frc, 45Fat, and 30Frc + 45Fat groups compared to the RD group (p < 0.05). Serum triglyceride (TG) levels were highest in the 30Frc group than the other groups (p < 0.05). The abdominal aorta of 30Frc, 45Fat, and 30Frc + 45Fat groups had higher wall thickness than the RD group (p < 0.05). Abdominal aortic eNOS mRNA level was decreased in 30Frc, 45Fat, and 30Frc + 45Fat groups compared to the RD group (p < 0.05), and also 45Fat and 30Frc + 45Fat groups had decreased mRNA expression of eNOS compared to the 30Frc group (p < 0.05). ET-1 mRNA level was higher in 30Frc, 45Fat, and 30Frc + 45Fat groups than the RD group (p < 0.05). Both high fructose consumption and high fat consumption in growing rats had similar negative effects on CVD-related parameters.

  15. Daily patterns of ethanol drinking in adolescent and adult, male and female, high alcohol drinking (HAD) replicate lines of rats.

    PubMed

    Dhaher, Ronnie; McConnell, Kathleen K; Rodd, Zachary A; McBride, William J; Bell, Richard L

    2012-10-01

    The rationale for our study was to determine the pattern of ethanol drinking by the high alcohol-drinking (HAD) replicate lines of rats during adolescence and adulthood in both male and female rats. Rats were given 30 days of 24 h free-choice access to ethanol (15%, v/v) and water, with ad lib access to food, starting at the beginning of adolescence (PND 30) or adulthood (PND 90). Water and alcohol drinking patterns were monitored 22 h/day with a "lickometer" set-up. The results indicated that adolescent HAD-1 and HAD-2 males consumed the greatest levels of ethanol and had the most well defined ethanol licking binges among the age and sex groups with increasing levels of ethanol consumption throughout adolescence. In addition, following the first week of adolescence, male and female HAD-1 and HAD-2 rats differed in both ethanol consumption levels and ethanol licking behavior. Adult HAD-1 male and female rats did not differ from one another and their ethanol intake or licking behaviors did not change significantly over weeks. Adult HAD-2 male rats maintained a relatively constant level of ethanol consumption across weeks, whereas adult HAD-2 female rats increased ethanol consumption levels over weeks, peaking during the third week when they consumed more than their adult male counterparts. The results indicate that the HAD rat lines could be used as an effective animal model to examine the development of ethanol consumption and binge drinking in adolescent male and female rats providing information on the long-range consequences of adolescent alcohol drinking.

  16. Dopamine agonist-induced penile erection and yawning: a comparative study in outbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Corda, Maria Giuseppa; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Piludu, Maria Antonietta; Löber, Stefan; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Argiolas, Antonio; Giorgi, Osvaldo

    2013-08-01

    The effects on penile erection and yawning of subcutaneous (SC) injections of the mixed dopamine D1/D2-like agonist apomorphine (0.02-0.2 mg/kg) were studied in outbred Roman high- (RHA) and low-avoidance (RLA) male rats, two lines selectively bred for their respectively rapid versus poor acquisition of the active avoidance response in the shuttle-box, and compared with the effects observed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Apomorphine dose-response curves were bell-shaped in all rat lines/strains. Notably, more penile erections and yawns were recorded mainly in the ascending part of these curves (e.g., apomorphine 0.02-0.08 mg/kg) in both RLA and RHA rats compared to SD rats, with RLA rats showing the higher response (especially for yawning) with respect to RHA rats. Similar results were found with PD-168,077 (0.02-0.2 mg/kg SC), a D4 receptor agonist, which induced penile erection but not yawning. In all rat lines/strains, apomorphine responses were markedly reduced by the D2 antagonist L-741,626, but not by the D3 antagonist, SB277011A, whereas the D4 antagonists L-745,870 and FAUC213 elicited a partial, yet statistically significant, inhibitory effect. In contrast, the pro-erectile effect of PD-168,077 was completely abolished by L-745,870 and FAUC213, as expected. The present study confirms and extends previously reported differences in dopamine transmission between RLA and RHA rats and between the SD strain and the Roman lines. Moreover, it confirms previous studies supporting the view that dopamine receptors of the D2 subtype play a predominant role in the pro-yawning and pro-erectile effect of apomorphine, and that the selective stimulation of D4 receptors induces penile erection.

  17. High-Fat Diet Increased Renal and Hepatic Oxidative Stress Induced by Vanadium of Wistar Rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, J P; Cui, R Y; Zhang, K Y; Ding, X M; Luo, Y H; Bai, S P; Zeng, Q F; Xuan, Y; Su, Z W

    2016-04-01

    The study was conducted to assess the effect of vanadium (V) in high-fat diet on the liver and kidney of rats in a 5-week trial. Seventy-two female Wistar rats (BW = 95 ± 5 g) were randomly allotted into eight groups. Groups I, II, III, and IV obtained low-fat diet containing 0, 3, 15, and 30 mg/kg V, and V, VI, VII, and VIII groups received the respective vanadium doses with high-fat diet, respectively. There were lesions in the liver and kidney of V, VI, VII, and VIII groups, granular degeneration and vacuolar degeneration were observed in the renal tubular and glomerulus epithelial cells, and hepatocytes showed granular degeneration and vacuolar degeneration. Supplemented high-fat diet with vanadium was shown to decrease (P < 0.05) activities of superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity, glutathione-S transferase, and NAD(P)H/quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and increase malondialdehyde content in the liver and kidney. The relative expression of hepatic nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and NQO1 mRNA was downregulated by V addition and high-fat diet, and the effect of V was more pronounced in high-fat diet (interaction, P < 0.05), with VIII group having the lowest mRNA expression of Nrf-2 and NQO1 in the liver and kidney. In conclusion, it suggested that dietary vanadium ranging from 15 to 30 mg/kg could lead to oxidative damage and vanadium accumulation in the liver and kidney, which caused renal and hepatic toxicity. The high-fat diet enhanced vanadium-induced hepatic and renal damage, and the mechanism was related to the modulation of the hepatic and renal mRNA expression of Nrf-2 and NQO1.

  18. High Salt Intake Promotes Urinary Loss of Vitamin D Metabolites by Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats in a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierry-Palmer, M.; Cephas, S.; Sayavongsa, P.; Clark, T.; Arnaud, S. B.

    2004-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolism in the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat, a model of salt-induced hypertension, differs from that in the Dahl salt-resistant (R) rat. We have demonstrated that female S rats are more vulnerable than female R rats to decreases in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) concentrations during hind limb unloading (a space flight model). We report here on the response of the vitamin D endocrine system of S and R rats to hind limb unloading during high salt intake. Dahl female rats (9.7-week-old) were tail-suspended (hind limb unloaded) for 28 days, while fed a diet containing twice the salt in standard rat chow (2 % sodium chloride). Control rats were fed the same diet, but were not hind limb unloaded. Vitamin D metabolites were analyzed by HPLC and radioimmunoassay kits from Diasorin.

  19. Probing the anti-hyperlipidemic efficacy of the allspice (Pimenta officinalis Lindl.) in rats fed with high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Shyamala, M P; Paramundayil, Julie J; Venukumar, M R; Latha, M S

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the anti-hyperlipidemic effect of aqueous extract of Pimenta officinalis (APO) was investigated in experimental rats fed with high fat diet (HFD). Hyperlipidemia in experimental rats was evidenced by a significant enhancement in the level of glycerol, triglycerides and phopholipids in serum, and also in liver and kidney tissues. HFD caused oxidative stress in these animals as shown by marked increment in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and diene conjugates (CD), and a distinct diminution in reduced glutathione (GSH) content in liver and kidneys. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) showed reduced activity in hyperlipidemic rats. All these biochemical parameters showed reliable signs of retrieving towards near-normalcy in APO-administered HFD fed rats. This study unveiled the anti-hyperlipidemic as well as antioxidant activity of APO.

  20. Loss of calcitonin receptors: A genetically transmitted defect in rats with high incidence of C-cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bouizar, Z.; Minvielle, S.; Treilhou-Lahille, F.; Rostene, W.H.; Pidoux, E.; Feingold, N.; Milhaud, G.; Moukhtar, M.S. )

    1989-09-15

    C-cell tumors (medullary thyroid carcinoma) occur in humans and several other mammalian species. This tumor develops spontaneously with a high incidence (50%) in old Wag/Rij (Wistar-derived strain) rats. We have recently shown that calcitonin binding sites, which are present in the Wistar rats, are lost from renal medulla of the Wag/Rij rats before they reach the age of 1 month. In the present work, we investigated the distribution of calcitonin binding sites in the kidneys of first and second generation hybrids of Wistar x Wag/Rij rats. The absence of calcitonin binding sites from the renal medullas of 25% of F2 hybrids indicates that the deficiency is inherited in a Mendelian fashion and opens the way to establishing inbred strains lacking renal medullary calcitonin binding sites.

  1. Efficacy of phytosterols and fish-oil supplemented high-oleic-sunflower oil rich diets in hypercholesterolemic growing rats.

    PubMed

    Alsina, Estefania; Macri, Elisa V; Lifshitz, Fima; Bozzini, Clarisa; Rodriguez, Patricia N; Boyer, Patricia M; Friedman, Silvia M

    2016-06-01

    Phytosterols (P) and fish-oil (F) efficacy on high-oleic-sunflower oil (HOSO) diets were assessed in hypercholesterolemic growing rats. Controls (C) received a standard diet for 8 weeks; experimental rats were fed an atherogenic diet (AT) for 3 weeks, thereafter were divided into four groups fed for 5 weeks a monounsaturated fatty acid diet (MUFA) containing either: extra virgin olive oil (OO), HOSO or HOSO supplemented with P or F. The diets did not alter body weight or growth. HOSO-P and HOSO-F rats showed reduced total cholesterol (T-chol), non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (non-HDL-chol) and triglycerides and increased HDL-chol levels, comparably to the OO rats. Total body fat (%) was similar among all rats; but HOSO-F showed the lowest intestinal, epididymal and perirenal fat. However, bone mineral content and density, and bone yield stress and modulus of elasticity were unchanged. Growing hypercholesterolemic rats fed HOSO with P or F improved serum lipids and fat distribution, but did not influence material bone quality.

  2. Chronic mild stress induces variations in locomotive behavior and metabolic rates in high fat fed rats.

    PubMed

    García-Díaz, D F; Campion, J; Milagro, F I; Lomba, A; Marzo, F; Martínez, J A

    2007-12-01

    Chronic mild stress (CMS) has been often associated to the pathogenesis of many diseases including obesity. Indeed, visceral obesity has been linked to the development of metabolic syndrome features and constitutes a serious risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. In order to study possible mechanistic relationships between stress and the onset of obesity, we developed during 11 weeks a model of high-fat dietary intake (cafeteria diet) together with a CMS regimen in male Wistar rats. During the experimental period, basal metabolism by indirect calorimetry, rectal temperature, food intake, and locomotive markers were specifically analyzed. After 77 days, animals were sacrificed and body, adiposity and plasma biochemical profiles were also examined. As expected, cafeteria diet in unstressed animals induced a significative increase in body weight, adiposity, and insulin resistance markers. Locomotive variables, specifically distance, rearing and meander, were significantly increased by CMS on the first weeks of stress. Moreover, this model of CMS in Wistar rats increased significantly energy expenditure, and apparently interplayed with the dietary treatment on the muscle weight/fat weight ratio. In summary, this chronic stress model did not affected weight gain in control and high fat fed animals, but induced an interaction concerning the metabolic muscle/fat repartitioning.

  3. Virgin coconut oil maintains redox status and improves glycemic conditions in high fructose fed rats.

    PubMed

    Narayanankutty, Arunaksharan; Mukesh, Reshma K; Ayoob, Shabna K; Ramavarma, Smitha K; Suseela, Indu M; Manalil, Jeksy J; Kuzhivelil, Balu T; Raghavamenon, Achuthan C

    2016-01-01

    Virgin Coconut Oil (VCO), extracted from fresh coconut kernel possess similar fatty acid composition to that of Copra Oil (CO), a product of dried kernel. Although CO forms the predominant dietary constituent in south India, VCO is being promoted for healthy life due to its constituent antioxidant molecules. High fructose containing CO is an established model for insulin resistance and steatohepatitis in rodents. In this study, replacement of CO with VCO in high fructose diet markedly improved the glucose metabolism and dyslipidemia. The animals fed VCO diet had only 17 % increase in blood glucose level compared to CO fed animals (46 %). Increased level of GSH and antioxidant enzyme activities in VCO fed rats indicate improved hepatic redox status. Reduced lipid peroxidation and carbonyl adducts in VCO fed rats well corroborate with the histopathological findings that hepatic damage and steatosis were comparatively reduced than the CO fed animals. These results suggest that VCO could be an efficient nutraceutical in preventing the development of diet induced insulin resistance and associated complications possibly through its antioxidant efficacy.

  4. Effect of prolonged high salt intake on atrial natriuretic factor's kinetics in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Widimsky, J.; Debinski, W.; Kuchel, O.; Buu, N.T.; Du Souich, P. )

    1990-05-01

    Plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) paradoxically decreases after 5 weeks (but not after 3 weeks) of 8% NaCl intake in normotensive rats. As this phenomenon remains unaccounted for by changes in ANF production, we studied the disappearance of ({sup 125}I)ANF(99-126) from the circulation as an alternative explanation of plasma ANF decline. Following 5 weeks (but not 3 weeks) of an 8% NaCl diet, plasma concentrations of ({sup 125}I)ANF were significantly decreased and metabolic clearance rate and volume of distribution were increased compared to control rats fed a 0.8% NaCl diet. By studying ({sup 125}I)ANF tissue uptake we noted significantly greater peptide uptake after 5 weeks (but not after 3 weeks) of high salt consumption in several tissues. We hypothesize that prolonged (at least 5 weeks) 8% NaCl ingestion increases the density and/or affinity of ANF binding sites. These changes may be responsible for the previously observed decline in plasma ANF concentrations after a prolonged high salt intake.

  5. Antiatherogenic Effect of Camellia japonica Fruit Extract in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ho; Paudel, Keshav Raj; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, An-Jin; Park, Whoa-Shig; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a well-known etiological factor for cardiovascular disease and a common symptom of most types of metabolic disorders. Camellia japonica is a traditional garden plant, and its flower and seed have been used as a base oil of traditional cosmetics in East Asia. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of C. japonica fruit extracts (CJF) in a high fat diet- (HFD-) induced hypercholesterolemic rat model. CJF was administered orally at three different doses: 100, 400, and 800 mg·kg−1·day−1 (CJF 100, 400, and 800, resp.). Our results showed that CJF possessed strong cholesterol-lowering potency as indicated by the decrease in serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), accompanied by an increase in serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Furthermore, CJF reduced serum lipid peroxidation by suppressing the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance. In addition, oil red O (ORO) staining of rat arteries showed decreased lipid-positive staining in the CJF-treated groups compared to the control HFD group. Taken together, these results suggest that CJF could be a potent herbal therapeutic option and source of a functional food for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases associated with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27340422

  6. Protective effect of ginkgolide B on high altitude cerebral edema of rats.

    PubMed

    Botao, Yu; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Wenjing; Xiang, Qingyu; Fan, Kaihua; Hou, Jun; Wu, Juan; Jing, Weihua

    2013-03-01

    Ginkgolide B (GB) is one of the ginkgolides isolated from leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree. The aim of this study was to investigate whether GB has a protective effect on high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) of rats. HACE was induced by hypobaric hypoxia exposure for 24 hours in an animal decompression chamber with the chamber pressure of 267 mmHg to simulate an altitude of 8000 m. Before the exposure, three doses (3, 6, and 12 mg·kg(-1)) of GB were given intraperitoneally (ip) daily for 3 days. Effects of GB on brain water content (BWC), activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), concentration of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA), expression of active caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were measured. In GB pretreatment groups (6 and 12 mg·kg(-1), but not 3 mg·kg(-1)), BWC, the concentration of MDA, the expression of active caspase-3 and PARP were reduced significantly, while the activity of SOD and concentration of GSH were significantly increased. In conclusion, these results indicate that GB has a protective effect on cerebral edema caused by high altitude in rats. The protective effect of GB might be attributed to its antioxidant properties and suppression of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  7. QRFP in Female Rats: Effects on High Fat Food Intake and Hypothalamic Gene Expression across the Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Primeaux, Stefany D.

    2011-01-01

    Pyroglutamylated arginine-phenylalanineamide peptide (QRFP) is a neuropeptide involved in feeding behavior. Central administration of QRFP selectively increases the intake of a high fat diet in male rats. QRFP administration also stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via gonadotrophin-releasing hormone in male and female rats. Prepro-QRFP mRNA is expressed in localized regions of the mediobasal hypothalamus which are abundant in neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and receptor systems important for food intake regulation and reproductive behaviors. The current experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of centrally administered QRFP-26 on the intake of a high fat diet (HFD, 60% kcal from fat) in female rats and to investigate alterations in hypothalamic prepro-QRFP and its receptors, GPR130a and GPR103b, mRNA levels over the estrous cycle. In Experiment 1, female rats were administered QRFP-26 (intracerebroventricular; 0.3nmol, 0.5nmol, 1.0nmol) in rats consuming either a HFD or a low fat diet. All doses of QRFP-26 selectively increased the intake of the HFD in female rats. These data suggest that QRFP-26 regulates the intake of energy dense foods in female rats, which is similar to previous findings in male rats. In Experiment 2, hypothalamic levels of prepro-QRFP mRNA and its receptors were assessed during diestrus, proestrus, or estrus. The level of prepro-QRFP mRNA in the ventromedial/arcuate nucleus (VMH/ARC) of the hypothalamus was increased during proestrus, which suggests that endogenous estrogen levels regulate QRFP expression in the VMH/ARC. These data suggest that QRFP may play a role in coordinating feeding behaviors with reproductive function when energy demand is increased. PMID:21473894

  8. High incidence of HAM/TSP-like symptoms in WKA rats after administration of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-producing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kushida, S; Mizusawa, H; Matsumura, M; Tanaka, H; Ami, Y; Hori, M; Yagami, K; Kameyama, T; Tanaka, Y; Yoshida, A

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate a significantly high incidence of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy (HAM)-or tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP)-like symptoms in WKA rats after injection with HTLV-1-producing MT-2 cells, while no symptoms were observed in F344 rats injected with MT-2 cells or in control WKA rats. Five of the eight (63%) WKA rats injected with MT-2 cells showed HAM/TSP-like paraparesis at 105 weeks of age, but none of seven MT-2-injected F344 rats or eight control WKA rats showed symptoms. This high incidence of HAM/TSP-like symptoms in WKA rats was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Six of the eight (75%) WKA rats injected with MT-2 cells showed HAM/TSP-like paraparesis at 108 weeks of age. HAM/TSP-like symptoms were also observed in one of the two WKA rats injected with HTLV-1-producing Ra-1 cells at 128 weeks of age. HTLV-1 provirus was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in both WKA and F344 rats. The provirus was detected in the spinal cords of the HAM/TSP-like WKA rats that had severe neuropathological changes. WKA and F344 rats showed no significant difference in antibody response against HTLV-1 Gag antigen. However, the antibody response against the C-terminal half of gp46 HTLV-1 envelope protein was lower in WKA rats than in F344 rats. Pathological analysis of the HAM/TSP-like rats showed degeneration of the white matter of the spinal cord and peripheral nerves. These findings suggest that both the genetic background of the host and HTLV-1 infection are important in neuropathogenesis of HAM/TSP-like paraparesis in rats. Images PMID:7933104

  9. Beneficiary effect of Tinospora cordifolia against high-fructose diet induced abnormalities in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Sreenivasa; Ramatholisamma, P; Ramesh, B; Baskar, R; Saralakumari, D

    2009-10-01

    High intake of dietary fructose has been shown to exert a number of adverse metabolic eff ects in humans and experimental animals. The present study was designed to investigate the eff ect of the aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia stem (TCAE) on the adverse eff ects of fructose loading toward carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats. Adult male Wistar rats of body weight around 200 g were divided into four groups, two of which were fed with starch diet and the other two with high fructose (66 %) diet. Plant extract of TC (400 mg/kg/day) was administered orally to each group of the starch fed rats and the highfructose fed rats. At the end of 60 days of experimental period, biochemical parameters related to carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were assayed. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and elevated levels of hepatic total lipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and free fatty acids (p < 0.05) observed in fructose-fed rats were completely prevented with TCAE treatment. Alterations in the activities of enzymes of glucose metabolism (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) and lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthetase, lipoprotein lipase, and malic enzyme) as observed in the high fructose-fed rats were prevented with TCAE administration. In conclusion, our fi ndings indicate improvement of glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fructose fed rats by treatment with Tinospora cordifolia, and suggest that the plant can be used as an adjuvant for the prevention and/or management of insulin resistance and disorders related to it.

  10. Protective Effects of Tamarillo (Cyphomandra betacea) Extract against High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Kadir, Noor Atiqah Aizan; Rahmat, Asmah; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the protective effect of Cyphomandra betacea in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats fed with high fat diet. Rats were fed on either normal chow or high fat diet for 10 weeks for obesity induction phase and subsequently received C. betacea extract at low dose (150 mg kg−1), medium dose (200 mg kg−1), or high dose (300 mg kg−1) or placebo via oral gavages for another 7 weeks for treatment phase. Treatment of obese rats with C. betacea extracts led to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and significant increase in HDL-C (p < 0.05). Also there was a trend of positive reduction in blood glucose, triglyceride, and LDL-C with positive reduction of body weight detected in medium and high dosage of C. betacea extract. Interestingly, C. betacea treated rats showed positive improvement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity along with a significant increase of total antioxidant status (TAS) (p < 0.05). Further, rats treated with C. betacea show significantly lower in TNF-α and IL-6 activities (p < 0.05). This study demonstrates the potential use of Cyphomandra betacea extract for weight maintenance and complimentary therapy to suppress some obesity complication signs. PMID:26171246

  11. The Effects of Remifentanil on Expression of High Mobility Group Box 1 in Septic Rats

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a pivotal mediator of sepsis progression. Remifentanil, an opioid agonist, has demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects in septic mice. However, it is not yet known whether remifentanil affects the expression of HMGB1. We investigated the effects of remifentanil on HMGB1 expression and the underlying mechanism in septic rats. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups; a sham group, a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) group, and a CLP with remifentanil treatment (Remi) group. The rat model of CLP was used to examine plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, tissue HMGB1 mRNA and the activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the liver, lungs, kidneys, and ileum. Pathologic changes and immunohistochemical staining of NF-κB in the liver, lungs, and kidneys tissue were observed. We found that remifentanil treatment suppressed the level of serum interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α 6 hours after CLP, and serum HMGB1 24 hours after CLP. HMGB1 mRNA levels and the activity of NF-κB in multiple organs decreased by remifentanil treatment 24 hours after CLP. Remifentanil treatment also attenuated nuclear expression of NF-κB in immunohistochemical staining and mitigated pathologic changes in multiple organs. Altogether, these results suggested that remifentanil inhibited expression of HMGB1 in vital organs and release of HMGB1 into plasma. The mechanism was related to the inhibitory effect of remifentanil on the release of proinflammatory cytokines and activation of NF-κB. PMID:28145661

  12. Phenotypic and molecular differences between rats selectively bred to voluntarily run high vs. low nightly distances

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael D.; Brown, Jacob D.; Company, Joseph M.; Oberle, Lauren P.; Heese, Alexander J.; Toedebusch, Ryan G.; Wells, Kevin D.; Cruthirds, Clayton L.; Knouse, John A.; Ferreira, J. Andries; Childs, Thomas E.; Brown, Marybeth

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to partially phenotype male and female rats from generations 8–10 (G8–G10) that had been selectively bred to possess low (LVR) vs. high voluntary running (HVR) behavior. Over the first 6 days with wheels, 34-day-old G8 male and female LVRs ran shorter distances (P < 0.001), spent less time running (P < 0.001), and ran slower (P < 0.001) than their G8 male and female HVR counterparts, respectively. HVR and LVR lines consumed similar amounts of standard chow with or without wheels. No inherent difference existed in PGC-1α mRNA in the plantaris and soleus muscles of LVR and HVR nonrunners, although G8 LVR rats inherently possessed less NADH-positive superficial plantaris fibers compared with G8 HVR rats. While day 28 body mass tended to be greater in both sexes of G9–G10 LVR nonrunners vs. G9–G10 HVR nonrunners (P = 0.06), body fat percentage was similar between lines. G9–G10 HVRs had fat mass loss after 6 days of running compared with their prerunning values, while LVR did not lose or gain fat mass during the 6-day voluntary running period. RNA deep sequencing efforts in the nucleus accumbens showed only eight transcripts to be >1.5-fold differentially expressed between lines in HVR and LVR nonrunners. Interestingly, HVRs presented less Oprd1 mRNA, which ties in to potential differences in dopaminergic signaling between lines. This unique animal model provides further evidence as to how exercise may be mechanistically regulated. PMID:23552494

  13. Low and high dietary folic acid levels perturb postnatal cerebellar morphology in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Peña-Melián, Ángel; Maestro-de-Las-Casas, Carmen; Úbeda, Natalia; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    The brain is particularly sensitive to folate metabolic disturbances, because methyl groups are critical for brain functions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different dietary levels of folic acid (FA) on postnatal cerebellar morphology, including the architecture and organisation of the various layers. A total of forty male OFA rats (a Sprague-Dawley strain), 5 weeks old, were classified into the following four dietary groups: FA deficient (0 mg/kg FA); FA supplemented (8 mg/kg FA); FA supra-supplemented (40 mg/kg FA); and control (2 mg/kg FA) (all n 10 per group). Rats were fed ad libitum for 30 d. The cerebellum was quickly removed and processed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Slides were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (to label Bergmann glia), calbindin (to label Purkinje cells) and NeuN (to label post-mitotic neurons). Microscopic analysis revealed two types of defect: partial disappearance of fissures and/or neuronal ectopia, primarily in supra-supplemented animals (incidence of 80 %, P≤0·01), but also in deficient and supplemented groups (incidence of 40 %, P≤0·05), compared with control animals. The primary fissure was predominantly affected, sometimes accompanied by defects in the secondary fissure. Our findings show that growing rats fed an FA-modified diet, including both deficient and supplemented diets, have an increased risk of disturbances in cerebellar corticogenesis. Defects caused by these diets may have functional consequences in later life. The present study is the first to demonstrate that cerebellar morphological defects can arise from deficient, as well as high, FA levels in the diet.

  14. Antidiabetic activity of 3-hydroxyflavone analogues in high fructose fed insulin resistant rats

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Yogendra; Venkatachalam, H.; Daroji, Vijay Kumar; Mathew, Geetha; Jayashree, B.S.; Unnikrishnan, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic 3-hydroxyflavone analogues (JY-1, JY-2, JY-3, JY-4), were tested for antidiabetic activity in high-fructose-diet-fed (66 %, for 6 weeks) insulin-resistant Wistar rats (FD-fed rats). The fasting blood glucose, insulin, creatinine and AGEs were decreased to near normal upon treatment with test compounds. Insulin resistance markers such as HOMA-IR, K-ITT, plasma triglycerides, lipids, endogenous antioxidant defense and glycogen were restored in FD-fed rats after treatment with 3-hydroxyflavones. It is known that insulin resistance is partly because of oxidative stress and hence antioxidant activity was determined. They exhibited significant in vitro DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity (IC50: 10.66-66.63 µM). Test compounds inhibited ROS and NO production in RAW 264.7 cells (IC50: 10.39–42.63 µM) and they were found as potent as quercetin. Further, the test compounds inhibited lipid peroxidation at low concentrations (IC50: 99.61-217.47 µM). All test compounds at concentrations 100-200 µM protected calf thymus DNA-damage by Fenton reaction. In addition, test compounds inhibited protein glycation in different in vitro antiglycation assays. JY-2 showed maximum potency in all the stages of glycation which was comparable to the standard quercetin and aminoguanidine. Test compounds also enhanced the glucose uptake by L6 myotubes at an EC50 much lower than that of quercetin. Thus the synthetic 3-hydroxyflavones were found to have good antidiabetic activity by pleotropic and multimodal suppression of insulin resistance and enhancement of glucose uptake by skeletal muscles. These compounds are non-toxic at the doses tested. Further, the combined antioxidant and antiglycation activities of these molecules have complementary benefits in management of diabetes. PMID:26417321

  15. Resveratrol Improved Flow-Mediated Outward Arterial Remodeling in Ovariectomized Rats with Hypertrophic Effect at High Dose

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Marie; Guihot, Anne-Laure; Grimaud, Linda; Vessieres, Emilie; Toutain, Bertrand; Menet, Marie-Claude; Nivet-Antoine, Valérie; Arnal, Jean-François; Loufrani, Laurent; Procaccio, Vincent; Henrion, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic increases in blood flow in resistance arteries induce outward remodeling associated with increased wall thickness and endothelium-mediated dilatation. This remodeling is essential for collateral arteries growth following occlusion of a large artery. As estrogens have a major role in this remodeling, we hypothesized that resveratrol, described as possessing phytoestrogen properties, could improve remodeling in ovariectomized rats. Methods Blood flow was increased in vivo in mesenteric arteries after ligation of adjacent arteries in 3-month old ovariectomized rats treated with resveratrol (5 or 37.5 mg/kg per day: RESV5 or RESV37.5) or vehicle. After 2 weeks arterial structure and function were measured in vitro in high flow (HF) and normal flow (NF) arteries isolated from each rat. Results Arterial diameter was greater in HF than in NF arteries in ovariectomized rats treated with RESV5 or RESV37.5, not in vehicle-treated rats. In mice lacking estrogen receptor alpha diameter was equivalent in HF and NF arteries whereas in mice treated with RESV5 diameter was greater in HF than in NF vessels. A compensatory increase in wall thickness and a greater phenylephrine-mediated contraction were observed in HF arteries. This was more pronounced in HF arteries from RESV37.5-treated rats. ERK1/2 phosphorylation, involved in hypertrophy and contraction, were higher in RESV37.5-treated rats than in RESV5- and vehicle-treated rats. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was greater in HF than in NF arteries in RESV5-treated rats only. In HF arteries from RESV37.5-treated rats relaxation was increased by superoxide reduction and markers of oxidative stress (p67phox, GP91phox) were higher than in the 2 other groups. Conclusion Resveratrol improved flow-mediated outward remodeling in ovariectomized rats thus providing a potential therapeutic tool in menopause-associated ischemic disorders. This effect seems independent of the estrogen receptor alpha. Nevertheless

  16. Supplementary chromium(III) propionate complex does not protect against insulin resistance in high-fat-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Król, Ewelina; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Iwanik, Katarzyna

    2014-02-01

    Improper eating habits such as high-fat or high-carbohydrate diets are responsible for metabolic changes resulting in impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and ultimately diabetes. Although the essentiality of trivalent chromium for humans has been recently questioned by researchers, pharmacological dosages of this element can improve insulin sensitivity in experimental animals and diabetic subjects. The aim of the study was to assess the preventive potential of the supplementary chromium(III) propionate complex (CrProp) in rats fed a high-fat diet. The experiment was conducted on 32 male Wistar rats divided into four groups and fed the following diets: the control (C, AIN-93G), high-fat diets (HF, 40% energy from fat), and a high-fat diet supplemented with CrProp at dosages of 10 and 50 mg Cr/kg diet (HF + Cr10 and HF + Cr50, respectively). After 8 weeks, high-fat feeding led to an increased body mass, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, a decreased serum urea concentration, accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes, and increased renal Fe and splenic Cu contents. Supplementary CrProp in both dosages did not alleviate these changes but increased renal Cr content and normalized splenic Cu content in high-fat-fed rats. Supplementary CrProp does not prevent the development of insulin resistance in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  17. A comparison of insulin binding by liver plasma membranes of rats fed a high glucose diet or a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Sun, J V; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1977-07-01

    The interaction of (125)I-labeled insulin with purified liver plasma membrane from rats fed a high fat (L) diet or a high glucose (G) diet was studied with respect to specific binding, insulin degradation, binding site degradation, and rate of hormone association and dissociation. Scatchard analysis suggested the presence of high and low affinity binding sites for membranes of both G and L diet-adapted rats. However, liver plasma membrane from rats fed the high glucose diet bound 50% more insulin than did membrane from rats fed the high fat diet. Diet did not change insulin binding site degradation. The results suggested that an apparently reduced number of insulin binding sites (G = 10.2 +/- 2.45 x 10(-12) mol/mg membrane protein, L = 4.5 +/- 1.73 x 10(-12) mol/mg membrane protein) associated with fat feeding as compared to glucose feeding was responsible for the reduced insulin binding by membrane from rats fed the high fat diet. The effects of concanavalin A (Con A) on insulin binding to liver plasma membranes were also investigated. Con A enhanced the specific binding of insulin to liver plasma membranes from rats fed either diet at concentrations lower than 50 micro g/ml, whereas at concentrations higher than 50 micro g/ml Con A inhibited insulin binding to these membranes. The stimulatory effect of Con A on insulin binding at low concentrations was greater and inhibition of binding at high concentration was less in the case of membrane prepared from L diet-adapted animals. These results suggested that diet can modify the plasma membrane glycoproteins.

  18. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (03); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and th...

  19. The Effects of Two Lactobacillus plantarum Strains on Rat Lipid Metabolism Receiving a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Salaj, Rastislav; Štofilová, Jana; Šoltesová, Alena; Hertelyová, Zdenka; Hijová, Emília; Bertková, Izabela; Strojný, Ladislav; Kružliak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of the different probiotic strains, Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96, on lipid metabolism and body weight in rats fed a high fat diet. Compared with the high fat diet group, the results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 reduced serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, but Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 decreased triglycerides and VLDL, while there was no change in the serum HDL level and liver lipids. Both probiotic strains lowered total bile acids in serum. Our strains have no significant change in body weight, gain weight, and body fat. These findings indicate that the effect of lactobacilli on lipid metabolism may differ among strains and that the Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 can be used to improve lipid profile and can contribute to a healthier bowel microbial balance. PMID:24470789

  20. The effects of two Lactobacillus plantarum strains on rat lipid metabolism receiving a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Salaj, Rastislav; Stofilová, Jana; Soltesová, Alena; Hertelyová, Zdenka; Hijová, Emília; Bertková, Izabela; Strojný, Ladislav; Kružliak, Peter; Bomba, Alojz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of the different probiotic strains, Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96, on lipid metabolism and body weight in rats fed a high fat diet. Compared with the high fat diet group, the results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 reduced serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, but Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 decreased triglycerides and VLDL, while there was no change in the serum HDL level and liver lipids. Both probiotic strains lowered total bile acids in serum. Our strains have no significant change in body weight, gain weight, and body fat. These findings indicate that the effect of lactobacilli on lipid metabolism may differ among strains and that the Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 can be used to improve lipid profile and can contribute to a healthier bowel microbial balance.

  1. Glycolytic intermediates and adenosine phosphates in rat liver at high altitude /3,800 m/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipriano, L. F.; Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    Liver tissue obtained from adult rats exposed to 3800 m altitude for intervals ranging from 1.5 hr to 63 days was examined by enzymatic analysis. During the first 3 hr of exposure, an immediate decrease in rephosphorylation of high-energy phosphates led to reduced glycogenesis and eventual pileup of AMP, pyruvate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, and glucose. This was accompanied by a reduction of pentose phosphate pathway activity. After 3 to 6 hr, a secondary adjustment of substrate concentrations occurred along with the apparent facilitation of phosphofructokinase. This secondary adjustment appears to increase anaerobic production of ATP and represents a significant intracellular contribution to the acclimatization process at high altitude.

  2. Selenium bioavailability from naturally produced high-selenium peas and oats in selenium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Johnson, LuAnn K

    2011-06-08

    This study determined the bioavailability of selenium (Se) from yellow peas and oats harvested from the high-Se soil of South Dakota, United States. The Se concentrations were 13.5 ± 0.2 and 2.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg (dry weight) for peas and oats, respectively. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were depleted of Se by feeding them a 30% Torula yeast-based diet (4.1 μg Se/kg) for 56 days, and then they were replenished with Se for an additional 50 days by feeding them the same diet supplemented with 20, 30, or 40 μg Se/kg from peas or oats, respectively. Selenium bioavailability was determined on the basis of the restoration of Se-dependent enzyme activities and tissue Se concentrations in Se-depleted rats, comparing those responses for yellow peas and oats to those for l-selenomethionine (SeMet; used as a reference) by using a slope-ratio method. Dietary supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in glutathione peroxidase activities in blood and liver and in thioredoxin reductase activity in liver. Supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in Se concentrations of plasma, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and kidneys. The overall bioavailability was approximately 88% for Se from yellow peas and 92% from oats, compared to SeMet. It was concluded that Se from naturally produced high-Se yellow peas or oats is highly bioavailable in this model and that these high-Se foods may be a good dietary source of Se.

  3. Myocardial Infarction Area Quantification using High-Resolution SPECT Images in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; Mejia, Jorge; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Lataro, Renata Maria; Frassetto, Sarita Nasbine; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Hélio Cesar; Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth; Simões, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-01-01

    Background Imaging techniques enable in vivo sequential assessment of the morphology and function of animal organs in experimental models. We developed a device for high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging based on an adapted pinhole collimator. Objective To determine the accuracy of this system for quantification of myocardial infarct area in rats. Methods Thirteen male Wistar rats (250 g) underwent experimental myocardial infarction by occlusion of the left coronary artery. After 4 weeks, SPECT images were acquired 1.5 hours after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of 99mTc-Sestamibi. The tomographic reconstruction was performed by using specially developed software based on the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. The analysis of the data included the correlation between the area of perfusion defects detected by scintigraphy and extent of myocardial fibrosis assessed by histology. Results The images showed a high target organ/background ratio with adequate visualization of the left ventricular walls and cavity. All animals presenting infarction areas were correctly identified by the perfusion images. There was no difference of the infarct area as measured by SPECT (21.1 ± 21.2%) and by histology (21.7 ± 22.0%; p=0.45). There was a strong correlation between individual values of the area of infarction measured by these two methods. Conclusion The developed system presented adequate spatial resolution and high accuracy for the detection and quantification of myocardial infarction areas, consisting in a low cost and versatile option for high-resolution SPECT imaging of small rodents. PMID:23917507

  4. Mechanisms of high-dose citalopram-induced death in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Beaune, Sébastien; Callebert, Jacques; Baud, Frédéric J; Risède, Patricia; Juvin, Philippe; Mégarbane, Bruno

    2012-12-16

    Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is generally considered to be of low toxicity. However, serotonin syndrome, seizures, electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as respiratory failure and death have been described in patients with citalopram overdose. The mechanisms of severe toxicity remain unclear. Our objective was to study the mechanisms of death following high-dose citalopram administration in Sprague Dawley rats. The median lethal dose (MLD) of intraperitoneal (i.p.) citalopram was measured using Dixon & Bruce's up-and-down method at 102 mg/kg. Dose-effect relationships of citalopram-induced clinical features, alterations in arterial blood gas and plethysmography, and disturbances in blood lactate, plasma and platelet serotonin concentrations were studied. Seizures were significantly increased in rats receiving 80% and 120% of citalopram MLD versus controls (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). A significant decrease in body temperature was observed after 90 min in rats treated with doses >60% MLD in comparison to controls (p<0.05). The occurrence of serotonin behavioural syndrome was comparable in all groups. Citalopram administration did not result in significant hypoxemia, hypercapnia and lactate elevation. However, a significant moderate increase in the inspiratory time (p<0.05) accompanied with an expiratory braking was observed. A significant dose-related linear decrease in platelet serotonin and increase in plasma serotonin concentrations were measured (p<0.05). Pre-treatments of rats receiving 120% of citalopram MLD with diazepam (1.77 mg/kg) and cyproheptadine (17.1mg/kg) prevented seizures and death, but propranolol pre-treatment was ineffective. Neuroprotection with diazepam and cyproheptadine was not associated with decreased serotonin plasma concentrations. In conclusion, citalopram-induced deaths resulted from seizures in relation to serotonin release, whilst respiratory and metabolic toxicity was mild. Our observations

  5. Growth performance and muscle oxidation in rats fed increasing amounts of high-tannin sorghum.

    PubMed

    Larraín, R E; Richards, M P; Schaefer, D M; Ji, L L; Reed, J D

    2007-12-01

    Oxidative processes deteriorate the quality of meat products. High tannin sorghums (HTS) contain flavonoid oligomers known as proanthocyanidins or condensed tannins. These compounds act as anti-oxidants in vitro, but their effectiveness in vivo remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that moderate amounts of dietary HTS could reduce markers of oxidation on muscle of rats without having detrimental effects in growth. We used 2 groups of 38 male Sprague Dawley rats at 5 and 13 wk of age each. Each age group was fed 4 diets in a completely randomized design. The younger group was fed the experimental diets for 10 wk (10W); whereas the older group was fed for 2 wk (2W). The diets were modified from the NIH-07 diet and contained HTS and corn at ratios of 0:50 (S0, control), 20:30 (S20), 35:15 (S35), and 50:0 (S50) as a percentage of the diet. Growth and the efficiency of gain were assessed periodically measuring BW, ADFI, ADG, and G:F. Oxidation in muscle was measured in fresh tissue and after 6 d of aerobic-refrigerated storage. Muscles evaluated were LM and soleus (SM). Fresh liver was also evaluated. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and carbonyl content were used as markers of lipid and protein oxidation, respectively. No differences in BW, ADFI, ADG, and G:F were observed in 2W rats. Greater (P < 0.05) ADFI and ADG were observed in 10W-S35 group between d 1 and 7 and greater BW (P = 0.049) was observed in group 10W-S35 at d 70 compared with 10W-S0. No differences were observed between S0 and any HTS diet in G:F in 10W and 2W rats. No differences in TBARS or carbonyls were observed in liver. No differences in TBARS were observed in fresh and aged LM and SM. When LM samples were aged for 6 d, decreased carbonyl contents (P < 0.01) were observed in 10W-S35 and 10W-S50 diets compared with 10W-S0. Reductions in carbonyls were also observed in aged SM between 2W-S50 and 2W-S0 (P = 0.013). We concluded that inclusion of 35% HTS in the diet increased intake

  6. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields (GSM 1800 MHz) on immature and mature rats.

    PubMed

    Sekeroğlu, Vedat; Akar, Ayşegül; Sekeroğlu, Zülal Atlı

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the cytogenotoxic effects of high frequency electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) for 45 day and the effect of a recovery period of 15 day after exposure to EMF on bone marrow cells of immature and mature rats. The animals in treatment groups were exposed to 1800 MHz EMF at SAR of 0.37 W/kg and 0.49 W/kg for 2h/day for 45 day. Two recovery groups were kept for a recovery period of 15 day without EMF after exposure to HF-EMF. Two control groups for both immature and mature rats were also included. Significant differences were also observed in chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleus (MN) frequency, mitotic index (MI) and ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in all treatment groups. The cytogenotoxic damage was more remarkable in immature rats and, the recovery period did not improve this damage in immature rats. Because much higher and irreversible cytogenotoxic damage was observed in immature rats than in mature rats, further studies are needed to understand effects of EMF on DNA damage and DNA repair, and to determine safe limits for environment and human, especially for children.

  7. Differential gene expression between inbred Roman high- (RHA-I) and low- (RLA-I) avoidance rats.

    PubMed

    Sabariego, Marta; Gómez, M José; Morón, Ignacio; Torres, Carmen; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Tobeña, Adolfo; Cañete, Toni; Martínez-Conejero, José A; Horcajadas, José A; Esteban, Francisco J

    2011-10-31

    Microarray technology was used to explore differences in brain gene expression under basal conditions in two strains of psychogenetically selected rats which differ in anxiety/stress responses, the inbred Roman High-(RHA-I) and Roman Low-(RLA-I) Avoidance rats. Microarray analysis detected 14 up-regulated and 24 down-regulated genes in RLA-I vs. RHA-I rats functionally related to neurobiological processes. The differentially expressed genes CAMKK2, CRHBP, EPHX2, HOMER3, NDN, PRL and RPL6 were selected for microarray validation using qRT-PCR. EPHX2, CAMKK2 (both up-regulated in RLA-I vs. RHA-I rats) and HOMER3 (down-regulated in RLA-I vs. RHA-I rats) showed a similar tendency and fold-change both in microarray and RT-PCR analyses; PRL (up-regulated in RLA-I vs. RHA-I rats), CRHBP and RPL6 (both down-regulated in RLA-I vs. RHA-I animals) showed a similar tendency but a different order of magnitude of change among experiments; finally, NDN was validated neither in tendency nor in magnitude of change.

  8. Effect of High Intensity Interval and Continuous Swimming Training on Body Mass Adiposity Level and Serum Parameters in High-Fat Diet Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Guilherme L; Crisp, Alex H; de Oliveira, Maria R M; da Silva, Carlos A; Silva, Jadson O; Duarte, Ana C G O; Sene-Fiorese, Marcela; Verlengia, Rozangela

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of interval and continuous training on the body mass gain and adiposity levels of rats fed a high-fat diet. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, standard diet and high-fat diet, and received their respective diets for a period of four weeks without exercise stimuli. After this period, the animals were randomly divided into six groups (n = 8): control standard diet (CS), control high-fat diet (CH), continuous training standard diet (CTS), continuous training high-fat diet (CTH), interval training standard diet (ITS), and interval training high-fat diet (ITH). The interval and continuous training consisted of a swimming exercise performed over eight weeks. CH rats had greater body mass gain, sum of adipose tissues mass, and lower serum high density lipoprotein values than CS. The trained groups showed lower values of feed intake, caloric intake, body mass gain, and adiposity levels compared with the CH group. No significant differences were observed between the trained groups (CTS versus ITS and CTH versus ITH) on body mass gains and adiposity levels. In conclusion, both training methodologies were shown to be effective in controlling body mass gain and adiposity levels in high-fat diet fed rats.

  9. Effect of High Intensity Interval and Continuous Swimming Training on Body Mass Adiposity Level and Serum Parameters in High-Fat Diet Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Guilherme L.; Crisp, Alex H.; de Oliveira, Maria R. M.; da Silva, Carlos A.; Silva, Jadson O.; Duarte, Ana C. G. O.; Sene-Fiorese, Marcela; Verlengia, Rozangela

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of interval and continuous training on the body mass gain and adiposity levels of rats fed a high-fat diet. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, standard diet and high-fat diet, and received their respective diets for a period of four weeks without exercise stimuli. After this period, the animals were randomly divided into six groups (n = 8): control standard diet (CS), control high-fat diet (CH), continuous training standard diet (CTS), continuous training high-fat diet (CTH), interval training standard diet (ITS), and interval training high-fat diet (ITH). The interval and continuous training consisted of a swimming exercise performed over eight weeks. CH rats had greater body mass gain, sum of adipose tissues mass, and lower serum high density lipoprotein values than CS. The trained groups showed lower values of feed intake, caloric intake, body mass gain, and adiposity levels compared with the CH group. No significant differences were observed between the trained groups (CTS versus ITS and CTH versus ITH) on body mass gains and adiposity levels. In conclusion, both training methodologies were shown to be effective in controlling body mass gain and adiposity levels in high-fat diet fed rats. PMID:26904718

  10. Dissociation between PGC-1alpha and GLUT-4 expression in skeletal muscle of rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Kazuhiko; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Terada, Shin

    2009-12-01

    It has recently been reported that a 4-wk high-fat diet gradually increases skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) protein content, which has been suggested to regulate GLUT-4 gene transcription. However, it has not been reported that a high-fat diet enhances GLUT-4 mRNA expression and protein content in skeletal muscle, suggesting that an increase in PGC-1alpha protein content is not sufficient to induce muscle GLUT-4 biogenesis in a high-fat fed animal. Therefore, we first evaluated the relationship between PGC-1alpha and GLUT-4 expression in skeletal muscle of rats fed a high-fat diet for 4 wk. The PGC-1alpha protein content in rat epitrochlearis muscle significantly increased by twofold after the 4-wk high-fat diet feeding. However, the high-fat diet had no effect on GLUT-4 protein content and induced a 30% decrease in GLUT-4 mRNA expression in rat skeletal muscle (p<0.05). To clarify the mechanism by which a high-fat diet downregulates GLUT-4 mRNA expression, we next examined the effect of PPARdelta activation, which is known to occur in response to a high-fat diet, on GLUT-4 mRNA expression in L6 myotubes. Incubation with 500 nM GW501516 (PPARdelta activator) for 24 h significantly decreased GLUT-4 mRNA in L6 myotubes. Taken together, these findings suggest that a high-fat diet downregulates GLUT-4 mRNA, possibly through the activation of PPARdelta, despite an increase in PGC-1alpha protein content in rat skeletal muscle, and that a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism maintains GLUT-4 protein content in skeletal muscle of rats fed a high-fat diet.

  11. Angelica acutiloba root attenuates insulin resistance induced by high-fructose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, I-Min; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Chia Ju

    2011-09-01

    Angelica acutiloba root (Japanese Dong Quai), used for treatment of gynecological disorders, is currently cultivated in Taiwan. The present study evaluated the preventative effect of Angelica acutiloba root (Japanese Dong Quai) on the induction of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was induced in rats by feeding a high fructose diet for 6 weeks. Thereafter, the rats were maintained on the same diet and treated with oral A. acutiloba root extract or pioglitazone once daily for 8 weeks. At the end of treatment, the degree of basal insulin resistance was measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Insulin sensitivity was calculated using the composite whole body insulin sensitivity index (ISIcomp). Protein expression was evaluated by immunoblotting. A. acutiloba (300 mg/kg/day) displayed similar characteristics to pioglitazone (20 mg/kg/day) in reducing HOMA-IR and elevating ISIcomp. Elevated glycosylated hemoglobin levels and hyperinsulinemia were ameliorated by A. acutiloba treatment without hepatotoxic or nephrotoxic effects. A. acutiloba treatment improved dyslipidemia, induced lipoprotein lipase activity and enhanced hepatic glycogen accumulation. Further, A. acutiloba treatment enhanced the action of insulin on muscle glucose transporter subtype 4 translocation and attenuated hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression. The findings suggest that A. acutiloba may be an effective ethnomedicine for improving insulin sensitivity.

  12. High voltage pulsed current stimulation of the sciatic nerve in rats: analysis by the SFI

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Anita Sofia Leite; Mazzer, Nilton; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus; Jatte, Fernanda Guadallini; Chereguini, Paulo Augusto Costa; Monte-Raso, Vanessa Vilela

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the efficiency of high voltage pulsed current (HVPC) with early application in three different sites, in the regeneration of the sciatic nerve in rats submitted to crush injury, the sciatic functional index (SFI) was used to assess the functional recovery. Methods After crushing of the nerve, 57 animals were submitted to cathodal HVPC at frequency of 50Hz and voltage of 100V, 20 minutes per day, 5 days per week. The rats were divided into five groups: control group; ganglion group; ganglion + muscle group; muscle group; and sham group. The SFI was determined weekly for seven weeks, from the preoperative period to the 6th postoperative week. Results Compared with the control group, the results showed a significantly better performance of group 2 for the first 3 weeks; group 3 showed significantly better performance in the third week; and group 4 showed a significantly negative performance during the 4th and 6th weeks. Conclusion Early application of HVPC had a positive effect in the treatment of the spinal cord region and the sciatic nerve root ganglion with a dispersive electrode on the contralateral lumbar region or on the gastrocnemius. However, HVPC had a negative effect in the treatment with an active electrode on the gastrocnemius and a dispersive electrode on the contralateral thigh. Level of evidence II, Prospective comparative study. PMID:24453588

  13. Rats' preferences for high fructose corn syrup vs. sucrose and sugar mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2011-03-28

    High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has replaced sucrose in many food products, which has prompted research comparing these two sweeteners in rodents. The present study examined the relative palatability of HFCS and sucrose for rats, offering 11% carbohydrate solutions to match the content of common beverages for human consumption. The animals initially preferred HFCS to sucrose but after separate experience with each solution they switched to sucrose preference. Approximating the composition of HFCS with a mixture of fructose and glucose (55:45) yielded a solution that was less attractive than sucrose or HFCS. However, HFCS contains a small amount of glucose polymers, which are very attractive to rats. A 55:42:3 mixture of fructose, glucose and glucose polymers (Polycose) was equally preferred to HFCS and was treated similarly to HFCS in comparisons vs. sucrose. Post-oral effects of sucrose, which is 50% fructose and 50% glucose, may be responsible for the shift in preference with experience. This shift, and the relatively small magnitude of differences in preference for HFCS and sucrose, suggest that palatability factors probably do not contribute to any possible difference in weight gain responses to these sweeteners.

  14. Local glutamate release in the rat ventral lateral thalamus evoked by high-frequency stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Blaha, Charles D.; Lin, Jessica; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-04-01

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is proven therapy for essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency electrical stimulation results in local thalamic glutamate release. Enzyme-linked glutamate amperometric biosensors were implanted in anesthetized rat thalamus adjacent to the stimulating electrode. Electrical stimulation was delivered to investigate the effect of frequency, pulse width, voltage-controlled or current-controlled stimulation, and charge balancing. Monophasic electrical stimulation-induced glutamate release was linearly dependent on stimulation frequency, intensity and pulse width. Prolonged stimulation evoked glutamate release to a plateau that subsequently decayed back to baseline after stimulation. Glutamate release was less pronounced with voltage-controlled stimulation and not present with charge balanced current-controlled stimulation. Using fixed potential amperometry in combination with a glutamate bioprobe and adjacent microstimulating electrode, the present study has shown that monophasic current-controlled stimulation of the thalamus in the anesthetized rat evoked linear increases in local extracellular glutamate concentrations that were dependent on stimulation duration, frequency, intensity and pulse width. However, the efficacy of monophasic voltage-controlled stimulation, in terms of evoking glutamate release in the thalamus, was substantially lower compared to monophasic current-controlled stimulation and entirely absent with biphasic (charge balanced) current-controlled stimulation. It remains to be determined whether similar glutamate release occurs with human DBS electrodes and similar charge balanced stimulation. As such, the present results indicate the importance of evaluating local neurotransmitter dynamics in studying the mechanism of action of DBS.

  15. Resveratrol enhances exercise training responses in rats selectively bred for high running performance.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nikolett; Sarga, Linda; Csende, Zsolt; Koltai, Erika; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Davies, Kelvin J A; Kouretas, Dimitris; Wessner, Barbara; Radak, Zsolt

    2013-11-01

    High Capacity Runner (HCR) rats have been developed by divergent artificial selection for treadmill endurance running capacity to explore an aerobic biology-disease connection. The beneficial effects of resveratrol supplementation have been demonstrated in endurance running and the antioxidant capacity of resveratrol is also demonstrated. In this study we examine whether 12 weeks of treadmill exercise training and/or resveratrol can enhance performance in HCR. Indeed, resveratrol increased aerobic performance and strength of upper limbs of these rats. Moreover, we have found that resveratrol activated the AMP-activated protein kinase, SIRT1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (p<0.05). The changes in mitochondrial fission/fusion and Lon protease/HSP78 levels suggest that exercise training does not significantly induce damage of proteins. Moreover, neither exercise training nor resveratrol supplementation altered the content of protein carbonyls. Changes in the levels of forkhead transcription factor 1 and SIRT4 could suggest increased fat utilization and improved insulin sensitivity. These data indicate, that resveratrol supplementation enhances aerobic performance due to the activation of the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α pathway.

  16. Association between oxidative stress and contextual fear conditioning in Carioca high- and low-conditioned freezing rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Waseem; Gomes, Vitor de Castro; Pinton, Simone; Batista Teixeira da Rocha, Joao; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2013-05-28

    We recently reported two novel breeding lines of rats known as Carioca high-and low-conditioned freezing (CHF and CLF), based on defensive freezing responses to contextual cues previously associated with electric footshock. The anxiety-like profile of these animals from the 7th generation was tested in the elevated plus maze. The results indicated that CHF animals presented a significantly more "anxious" phenotype compared with CLF animals. Animals from the 12th generation were used to evaluate the oxidative stress status of the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) were evaluated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA; a sensor of reactive oxygen species [ROS]), and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), an early marker of lipid peroxidation, were assessed. The results indicated that free radical concentrations and MDA levels were significantly higher in all three brain structures in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. Our data also showed that the hippocampus had the highest reactive species and MDA concentrations compared with the cortex and cerebellum in CHF rats. Animals from the 16th generation were used to evaluate the antioxidant enzyme activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) within these three brain structures. The results indicated that CAT activity was lower in the cortex and hippocampus in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. No significant difference was observed in the cerebellum. The enzymatic activity of GPx was significantly decreased in all three structures in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. The hippocampus exhibited the highest GPx activity compared with the other two brain structures. These findings suggest the involvement of a redox system in these two bidirectional lines, and the hippocampus might be one of the prime brain structures involved in this state of oxidative stress imbalance.

  17. Impulsivity and aggressive behavior in Roman high and low avoidance rats: baseline differences and adolescent social stress induced changes.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Caroline M; de Boer, Sietse F; Steimer, Thierry; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2012-03-20

    Adverse and stressful experiences during adolescence are often of a social nature. The social defeat model in rats is used as an animal model for bullying in humans. Usually large individual differences in response to social defeat are found. The personality type that is mostly affected and the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We used male rats of the Roman selection lines to test whether social defeat (between postnatal days 45 and 57) followed by social isolation has a different impact in animals with divergent levels of emotional reactivity and coping style. The level of offensive aggression, impulsivity and performance during frustrating non-reward (extinction) were used as measures for the adult coping style of animals. Impulsivity was measured by performance on an unpredictable operant conditioning schedule (variable interval-15, VI-15) for food reinforcement. This study demonstrates that the adult, baseline level of impulsivity is higher in Roman high avoidance (RHA) rats. RHA rats showed a higher number of lever presses compared to Roman low avoidance (RLA) rats on a VI-15 schedule. The level of offensive aggression did not differ between the two lines. Surprisingly, a tendency towards more offensive aggression in RLA rats was found. Social stress during adolescence disturbed the normal development of adult personality, mostly in RHA rats. RHA rats that were defeated during adolescence reduced the number of lever presses on the VI-15 schedule of reinforcement and were more persistent during a session of frustrating non-reward. However, we did not find an effect of social defeat on performance during extinction. A tendency towards increased attack latencies after social defeat in adolescence was found. The time spent on offensive aggression was unaffected by social defeat.

  18. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activities of a novel polyherbal formulation in high fat diet/streptozotocin induced diabetic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Subhasree, N.; Kamella, Ananthkumar; Kaliappan, Ilango; Agrawal, Aruna; Dubey, Govind Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activities of polyherbal formulation (PHF) containing hydroalcoholic extracts of four plants namely Salacia oblonga, Salacia roxbhurgii, Garcinia indica and Lagerstroemia parviflora in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats by administering oral doses (200 and 400 mg/kg body weight). Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Rats were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) and induced with a single low dose of STZ (35 mg/kg) i.p. Diabetic rats were treated with formulation (200 and 400 mg/kg) and metformin 250 mg/kg. Blood glucose levels were measured using blood glucose test strips with ACCU CHEK glucometer. Lipid profile and gluconeogenic enzymes were determined in normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats after oral administration of the PHF for 28 days. Histopathological changes in diabetic rat organs (pancreas, liver, and kidney) were also observed after PHF treatment. Results: Treatment of diabetic rats with PHF and metformin decreased plasma glucose and lipid profile levels. Blood glucose level showed significant reduction after 28 days of treatment with formulation at 200 and 400 mg/kg and in metformin. Formulation treated rats showed significant (P < 0.001) decrease in the activities of gluconeogenic enzymes. Histological examination of various organ tissues of normal control, diabetic control, and drug-treated rats revealed significant results. Treatment with PHF reverses the most blood and tissue changes toward the normal level. Conclusion: These findings suggested the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic properties of the PHF and thus help in preventing future complications of diabetes. PMID:26600639

  19. Regulation of hepatic branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Takanari; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Adams, Sean H; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2013-12-01

    Branched-chain α-ketoacid (BCKA) dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) regulates branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism at the level of BCKA catabolism. It has been demonstrated that the activity of hepatic BCKDC is markedly decreased in type 2 diabetic animal models. In this study, we examined the regulation of hepatic BCKDC in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). Rats were fed a control or a 60% of energy high-fat diet (HFD) for twelve weeks. Concentrations of blood components and the activities and protein amounts of hepatic BCKDC and its specific kinase (BDK) were measured. The concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and corticosterone were significantly elevated in DIO rats compared to those fed the control diet, suggestive of insulin resistance. Blood BCAA concentrations were not increased. The activity of hepatic BCKDC that was present in the active form in the liver was higher in DIO rats compared to controls, although the total activity and the enzyme amount were not different between two diet groups. The activity of hepatic BDK and the abundance of BDK bound to the BCKDC were decreased in DIO rats. The total amount of hepatic BDK was also significantly decreased in DIO rats. In rats made obese through HFD feeding, in contrast to prior studies in rat models of type 2 diabetes, hepatic BDK was down-regulated and thereby hepatic BCKDC was activated, suggesting that DIO promotes liver BCKA catabolism. In this model there was no evidence that increased blood BCAAs drive DIO-associated insulin resistance, since concentrations of BCAAs were not altered by DIO.

  20. Effect of exercise and caloric restriction on DMBA induced mammary tumorigenesis and plasma lipids in rats fed high fat diets

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, D. )

    1991-03-15

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single 10 mg dose of 7, 12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and grouped as follows: (1) low fat-sedentary (LF-SED), (2) low fat-exercised (LF-EX), (3) high fat-sedentary (HF-SED), (4) high fat-exercised (HF-EX), (5) high fat-caloric restricted (HF-RES). Diets were isocaloric and contained 3.9% (LF) and 19.4% (HF) of corn oil. Group 5 was fed a 25% caloric restricted diet but with 24.6% fat content to equalize fat intake to HF-SED. After 12 weeks of diet or treadmill exercise, tumor data and plasma lipid profiles were determined. Results show that rats on HF-EX had more total tumors, % of tumors and tumors per tumor bearing rat than rats on HF-SED. The effect of exercise was also evident in LF-EX rats, when compared to LF-SED. Average tumor size and tumor volumes were not affected. The HF-RES group showed reduced tumor profiles compared to HF-SED. HDL, LDL, triglycerides and total cholesterol were unaffected by HF or LF diets or exercise. These data suggest that tumorigenesis is increased by moderate and constant exercise.

  1. Cinnamon Polyphenol Extract Inhibits Hyperlipidemia and Inflammation by Modulation of Transcription Factors in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tuzcu, Zeynep; Orhan, Cemal; Sahin, Nurhan; Juturu, Vijaya

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of cinnamon polyphenol extract on hepatic transcription factors expressions including SREBP-1c and LXR-α in rats fed high fat diet (HFD). Twenty-eight Wistar rats were allocated into four groups: (i) normal control: animals fed with normal chow; (ii) cinnamon: animals supplemented with cinnamon polyphenol; (iii) HFD: animals fed a high-fat diet; and (iv) HFD + cinnamon: animals fed a high-fat diet and treated with cinnamon polyphenol. Obesity was linked to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and oxidative stress as imitated by elevated serum glucose, lipid profile, and serum and liver malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. Cinnamon polyphenol decreased body weight, visceral fat, liver weight and serum glucose and insulin concentrations, liver antioxidant enzymes, and lipid profile (P < 0.05) and reduced serum and liver MDA concentration compared to HFD rats (P < 0.05). Cinnamon polyphenol also suppressed the hepatic SREBP-1c, LXR-α, ACLY, FAS, and NF-κB p65 expressions and enhanced the PPAR-α, IRS-1, Nrf2, and HO-1 expressions in the HFD rat livers (P < 0.05). In conclusion, cinnamon polyphenol reduces the hyperlipidemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress through activating transcription factors and antioxidative defense signaling pathway in HFD rat liver.

  2. Total and high molecular weight adiponectin levels in the rat model of post-myocardial infarction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kalisz, M; Baranowska, B; Wolinska-Witort, E; Maczewski, M; Mackiewicz, U; Tulacz, D; Gora, M; Martynska, L; Bik, W

    2015-10-01

    Adiponectin is a protein secreted primarily by adipose tissue. It has been suggested that adiponectin plays a protective role in the early phase following myocardial infarction. Our primary aim was to investigate the effects of post-myocardial infarction heart failure well-characterized by left ventricular hemodynamic parameters on the total and high molecular weight adiponectin concentrations in plasma, fat and cardiac tissue. Eight weeks after myocardial infarction or sham operation, total and high molecular weight adiponectin concentrations in plasma, fat, and cardiac tissues were assayed in rats. In addition, hemodynamic parameters and expression of the genes encoding atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide in left ventricle were evaluated. Atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA levels in left ventricle tissue were higher in rats with myocardial infarction-induced heart failure compared with the controls. Similarly, total adiponectin concentration was increased in left ventricle (but not in right ventricle) in rats with post-myocardial infarction heart failure. In contrast, adiponectin levels in plasma and cardiac adipose tissue in rats with post-myocardial infarction heart failure were lower than in sham-operated animals. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in levels of high molecular weight adiponectin in plasma, cardiac tissue or adipose tissue between these two groups. We conclude that in the rat model of post-myocardial infarction heart failure, adiponectin level is increased in left ventricle tissue. This is accompanied by decreased adiponectin levels in plasma and cardiac adipose tissue.

  3. Effect of Morinda citrifolia (Noni) Fruit Juice on High Fat Diet Induced Dyslipidemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shoeb, Ahsan; Alwar, M.C.; Gokul, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The medicinal value of Morinda citrifolia L. (commonly known as Noni) has been explored in ancient folk remedies with a wide range of therapeutic utility, including antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antitumour, analgesic, hypotensive, anti-inflammatory and immune enhancing effects. Aim The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of Noni fruit juice on serum lipid profile in high fat diet induced murine model of dyslipidemia. Materials and Methods Hyperlipidemia was induced by feeding a cholesterol rich high fat diet for 45 days in wistar albino rats of either sex (n=8). Noni fruit juice administered at 50mg/kg/day and 100mg/kg/day, per oral, was compared with the standard drug Atorvastatin (10mg/kg/day, oral) fed for the latter 30 days. The blood samples were then sent for complete blood lipid profile, after 30 days of treatment. The data presented as mean ± SEM was analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post-hoc test. The p <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The Noni fruit juice treated group showed a significant decrease in the total cholesterol, triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein - Cholesterol at both the doses when compared to the disease control (p<0.05). However, the decrease in the TC (102.75±9.79 mg/dL) and LDL-C (47.87±7.47 mg/dL) levels observed with the noni fruit juice at the 50mg/kg dose employed, failed to show a statistical significance when compared to atorvastatin. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for the hypolipidemic activity of Noni fruit juice in high fat diet induced hyperlipidemia in rats. PMID:27190827

  4. Photovoltaic restoration of sight with high visual acuity in rats with retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Goetz, G.; Lorach, H.; Mandel, Y.; Smith, R.; Boinagrov, D.; Lei, X.; Kamins, T.; Harris, J.; Mathieson, K.; Sher, A.

    2015-03-01

    Patients with retinal degeneration lose sight due to gradual demise of photoreceptors. Electrical stimulation of the surviving retinal neurons provides an alternative route for delivery of visual information. Subretinal photovoltaic arrays with 70μm pixels were used to convert pulsed near-IR light (880-915nm) into pulsed current to stimulate the nearby inner retinal neurons. Network-mediated responses of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) could be modulated by pulse width (1-20ms) and peak irradiance (0.5-10 mW/mm2). Similarly to normal vision, retinal response to prosthetic stimulation exhibited flicker fusion at high frequencies, adaptation to static images, and non-linear spatial summation. Spatial resolution was assessed in-vitro and in-vivo using alternating gratings with variable stripe width, projected with rapidly pulsed illumination (20-40Hz). In-vitro, average size of the electrical receptive fields in normal retina was 248+/-59μm - similar to their visible light RF size: 249+/-44μm. RGCs responded to grating stripes down to 67μm using photovoltaic stimulation in degenerate rat retina, and 28μm with visible light in normal retina. In-vivo, visual acuity in normally-sighted controls was 29+/-5μm/stripe, vs. 63+/-4μm/stripe in rats with subretinal photovoltaic arrays, corresponding to 20/250 acuity in human eye. With the enhanced acuity provided by eye movements and perceptual learning in human patients, visual acuity might exceed the 20/200 threshold of legal blindness. Ease of implantation and tiling of these wireless arrays to cover a large visual field, combined with their high resolution opens the door to highly functional restoration of sight.

  5. Functional evaluation of rat hearts transplanted after preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Naoyuki; Inubushi, Masayuki; Naito, Munekazu; Hirai, Shuichi; Jin, Yong-Nan; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Seki, Kunihiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Saga, Tsuneo; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We recently succeeded in resuscitating an extracted rat heart following 24–48 hours of preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2). This study aimed to examine the function of rat hearts transplanted after being preserved in the high-pressure CO and O2 gas mixture. The hearts of donor rats were preserved in a chamber filled with CO and O2 under high pressure for 24 h (CO24h) or 48 h at 4 °C. For the positive control (PC) group, hearts immediately extracted from donor rats were used for transplantation. The preserved hearts were transplanted into recipient rats by heterotopic cervical heart transplantation. CO toxicity does not affect the grafts or the recipients. Light microscopy and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed that there were no significant differences in the size of the myocardial infarction or apoptosis of myocardial cells in post-transplant hearts between the PC and CO24h groups. Furthermore, at 100 days after the transplantation, the heart rate, weight and histological staining of the post-transplanted hearts did not differ significantly between the PC and CO24h groups. These results indicate that the function of rat hearts is well preserved after 24 hours of high-pressure preservation in a CO and O2 gas mixture. Therefore, high-pressure preservation in a gas mixture can be a useful method for organ preservation. PMID:27562456

  6. Antiobesity and hypolipidemic effects of lotus leaf hot water extract with taurine supplementation in rats fed a high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaf has been used to treat obesity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antiobesity and hypolipidemic effects of lotus leaf hot water extract with taurine supplementation in high fat diet-induced obese rats. Methods Four week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups with 8 rats in each group for a period of 6 weeks (normal diet, N group; high fat diet, HF group; high fat diet + lotus leaf hot water extract, HFL group; high fat diet + lotus leaf hot water extract + taurine, HFLT group). Lotus leaf hot water extract was orally administrated to HFL and HFLT groups and the same amount of distilled water was orally administered (400 mg/kg/day) to N and HF groups. Taurine was supplemented by dissolving in feed water (3% w/v). Results The body weight gain and relative weights of epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissues were significantly lower in N, HFL and HFLT groups compared to HF group. HFL and HFLT groups showed lower concentrations of total cholesterol, triglyceride and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum. HFLT group showed higher the ratio of high density lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol compared to HFL group. HFLT group showed better blood lipid profiles compared to HFL group. Conclusions Lotus leaf hot water extract with taurine supplementation showed antiobesity and hypolipidemic effects in high fat diet-induced obese rats, which was more effective than lotus leaf hot water extract alone. PMID:20804619

  7. Locus coeruleus galanin expression is enhanced after exercise in rats selectively bred for high capacity for aerobic activity.

    PubMed

    Murray, Patrick S; Groves, Jessica L; Pettett, Brett J; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Dishman, Rod K; Holmes, Philip V

    2010-12-01

    The neuropeptide galanin extensively coexists with norepinephrine in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons. Previous research in this laboratory has demonstrated that unlimited access to activity wheels in the home cage increases mRNA for galanin (GAL) in the LC, and that GAL mediates some of the beneficial effects of exercise on brain function. To assess whether capacity for aerobic exercise modulates this upregulation in galanin mRNA, three heterogeneous rat models were tested: rats selectively bred for (1) high intrinsic (untrained) aerobic capacity (High Capacity Runners, HCR) and (2) low intrinsic aerobic capacity (Low Capacity Runners, LCR) and (3) unselected Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with and without free access to running wheels for 3 weeks. Following this exercise protocol, mRNA for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GAL was measured in the LC. The wheel running distances between the three models were significantly different, and age contributed as a significant covariate. Both selection and wheel access condition significantly affected GAL mRNA expression, but not TH mRNA expression. GAL was elevated in exercising HCR and SD rats compared to sedentary rats while LCR rats did not differ between conditions. Overall running distance significantly correlated with GAL mRNA expression, but not with TH mRNA expression. No strain differences in GAL or TH gene expression were observed in sedentary rats. Thus, intrinsic aerobic running capacity influences GAL gene expression in the LC only insofar as actual running behavior is concerned; aerobic capacity does not influence GAL expression in addition to changes associated with running.

  8. Locus coeruleus galanin expression is enhanced after exercise in rats selectively bred for high capacity for aerobic activity

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick S.; Groves, Jessica L.; Pettett, Brett J.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Dishman, Rod K.

    2010-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin extensively coexists with norepinephrine in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons. Previous research in this laboratory has demonstrated that unlimited access to activity wheels in the home cage increases mRNA for galanin (GAL) in the LC, and that GAL mediates some of the beneficial effects of exercise on brain function. To assess whether capacity for aerobic exercise modulates this upregulation in galanin mRNA, three heterogeneous rat models were tested: rats selectively bred for 1) high intrinsic (untrained) aerobic capacity (High Capacity Runners, HCR) and 2) low intrinsic aerobic capacity (Low Capacity Runners, LCR) and 3) unselected Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with and without free access to running wheels for three weeks. Following this exercise protocol, mRNA for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GAL was measured in the LC. The wheel-running distances between the three models were significantly different, and age contributed as a significant covariate. Both selection and wheel access condition significantly affected GAL mRNA expression, but not TH mRNA expression. GAL was elevated in exercising HCR and SD rats compared to sedentary rats while LCR rats did not differ between conditions. Overall running distance significantly correlated with GAL mRNA expression, but not with TH mRNA expression. No strain differences in GAL or TH gene expression were observed in sedentary rats. Thus, intrinsic aerobic running capacity influences GAL gene expression in the LC only insofar as actual running behavior is concerned; aerobic capacity does not influence GAL expression in addition to changes associated with running. PMID:20850488

  9. [High-frequency electro-acupuncture stimulation modulates intracerebral γ-aminobutyric acid content in rat model of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Sun, Zuo-Li; Jia, Jun; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2011-08-25

    The purpose of the present study is to observe the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) stimulation on intracerebral neurotransmitters in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD), and explore the possible mechanism. We used 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection in medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in the right brain of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat to establish the parkinsonian rat model, and randomly divided the PD rats into model and 100 Hz EA stimulation groups (n =10 in each group). EA stimulation group received 4 courses of EA stimulation on Baihui (GV-20) and Dazhui (GV-14) acupuncture points. Moreover, ten rats were randomly selected as sham operation group, only receiving normal saline (NS) injection in MFB. Then apomorphine (APO)-induced rotational behavior in different groups was recorded, and the contents of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain were analyzed with high pressure/performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). The results showed that model group exhibited abnormal rotational behavior with APO treatment, suggesting the successful establishment of PD model. Compared with sham operation group, model group showed increased GABA contents in cortex and striatum, as well as decreased GABA content in ventral midbrain, on the lesioned side. EA stimulation could effectively ameliorate the abnormal rotational behavior of PD rat. Compared with the model group, EA stimulation decreased the ratio of GABA content on the lesioned side to that on unlesioned side in the cortex, while increased the ratios in the striatum and cerebellum. However, there was no difference of the ratio in the ventral midbrain among three groups. These results suggest high-frequency EA stimulation significantly improves the abnormal behavior of PD rats, which may exert through enhancing the inhibitory effect of cerebellum-basal ganglia-cortical loop on motor center.

  10. Low vagally-mediated heart rate variability and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias in rats bred for high anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, Luca; Trombini, Mimosa; Graiani, Gallia; Madeddu, Denise; Quaini, Federico; Landgraf, Rainer; Neumann, Inga D; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2014-04-10

    In humans, there is a documented association between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Putative underlying mechanisms may include an impairment of the autonomic nervous system control of cardiac function. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize cardiac autonomic modulation and susceptibility to arrhythmias in genetic lines of rats that differ largely in their anxiety level. To reach this goal, electrocardiographic recordings were performed in high-anxiety behavior (HAB, n=10) and low-anxiety behavior (LAB, n=10) rats at rest, during stressful stimuli and under autonomic pharmacological manipulations, and analyzed by means of time- and frequency-domain indexes of heart rate variability. During resting conditions, HAB rats displayed a reduced heart rate variability, mostly in terms of lower parasympathetic (vagal) modulation compared to LAB rats. In HAB rats, this relatively low cardiac vagal control was associated with smaller heart rate responsiveness to acute stressors compared to LAB counterparts. In addition, beta-adrenergic pharmacological stimulation induced a larger incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in HABs compared to LABs. At sacrifice, a moderate increase in heart-body weight ratio was observed in HAB rats. We conclude that high levels of anxiety-related behavior in rats are associated with signs of i) impaired autonomic modulation of heart rate (low vagally-mediated heart rate variability), ii) poor adaptive heart rate responsiveness to stressful stimuli, iii) increased arrhythmia susceptibility, and iv) cardiac hypertrophy. These results highlight the utility of the HAB/LAB model for investigating the mechanistic basis of the comorbidity between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Krill Oil Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Rats Treated with High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Zara, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies focused their attention on the role of dietary fats in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. It has been demonstrated that a high-fat diet is able to induce hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the other hand, krill oil, a novel dietary supplement of n-3 PUFAs, has the ability to improve lipid and glucose metabolism, exerting possible protective effects against hepatic steatosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of krill oil on mitochondrial energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed for 4 weeks with a standard diet (control group), a diet with 35% fat (HF group), or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (HF+KO group). The obtained results suggest that krill oil promotes the burning of fat excess introduced by the high-fat diet. This effect is obtained by stimulating mitochondrial metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle, and respiratory chain complexes activity. Modulation of the expression of carrier proteins involved in mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed. Overall, krill oil counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on mitochondrial energetic metabolism. PMID:26301251

  12. Krill Oil Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Rats Treated with High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Zara, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies focused their attention on the role of dietary fats in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. It has been demonstrated that a high-fat diet is able to induce hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the other hand, krill oil, a novel dietary supplement of n-3 PUFAs, has the ability to improve lipid and glucose metabolism, exerting possible protective effects against hepatic steatosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of krill oil on mitochondrial energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed for 4 weeks with a standard diet (control group), a diet with 35% fat (HF group), or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (HF+KO group). The obtained results suggest that krill oil promotes the burning of fat excess introduced by the high-fat diet. This effect is obtained by stimulating mitochondrial metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle, and respiratory chain complexes activity. Modulation of the expression of carrier proteins involved in mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed. Overall, krill oil counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on mitochondrial energetic metabolism.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Myocardial Oxidative Stress and Myocardial Hypertrophy in Dahl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Yu, Wen; Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on high-salt-induced oxidative stress and myocardial hypertrophy in salt-sensitive (Dahl) rats. Thirty male Dahl rats and 40 SD rats were included in the study. They were randomly divided into Dahl control (Dahl + NS), Dahl high salt (Dahl + HS), Dahl + HS + NaHS, SD + NS, SD + HS, SD + HS + NaHS, and SD + HS + hydroxylamine (HA). Rats in Dahl + NS and SD + NS groups were given chow with 0.5% NaCl and 0.9% normal saline intraperitoneally daily. Myocardial structure, α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) expressions were determined. Endogenous myocardial H2S pathway and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues were tested. Myocardial H2S pathway was downregulated with myocardial hypertrophy featured by increased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, decreased α-MHC and increased β-MHC expressions in Dahl rats with high-salt diet (all P < 0.01), and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues was significantly activated, demonstrated by the increased contents of hydroxyl radical, malondialdehyde and oxidized glutathione and decreased total antioxidant capacity, carbon monoxide, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and decreased SOD1 and SOD2 protein expressions (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). However, H2S reduced myocardial hypertrophy with decreased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, increased α-MHC, decreased β-MHC expressions and inhibited oxidative stress in myocardial tissues of Dahl rats with high-salt diet. However, no significant difference was found in H2S pathway, myocardial structure, α-MHC and β-MHC protein and oxidative status in myocardial tissues among SD + NS, SD + HS, and SD + HS + NaHS groups. HA, an inhibitor of cystathionine β-synthase, inhibited myocardial H2S pathway (P < 0.01), and stimulated myocardial hypertrophy and oxidative stress in SD rats

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Myocardial Oxidative Stress and Myocardial Hypertrophy in Dahl Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Yu, Wen; Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on high-salt-induced oxidative stress and myocardial hypertrophy in salt-sensitive (Dahl) rats. Thirty male Dahl rats and 40 SD rats were included in the study. They were randomly divided into Dahl control (Dahl + NS), Dahl high salt (Dahl + HS), Dahl + HS + NaHS, SD + NS, SD + HS, SD + HS + NaHS, and SD + HS + hydroxylamine (HA). Rats in Dahl + NS and SD + NS groups were given chow with 0.5% NaCl and 0.9% normal saline intraperitoneally daily. Myocardial structure, α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) expressions were determined. Endogenous myocardial H2S pathway and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues were tested. Myocardial H2S pathway was downregulated with myocardial hypertrophy featured by increased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, decreased α-MHC and increased β-MHC expressions in Dahl rats with high-salt diet (all P < 0.01), and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues was significantly activated, demonstrated by the increased contents of hydroxyl radical, malondialdehyde and oxidized glutathione and decreased total antioxidant capacity, carbon monoxide, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and decreased SOD1 and SOD2 protein expressions (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). However, H2S reduced myocardial hypertrophy with decreased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, increased α-MHC, decreased β-MHC expressions and inhibited oxidative stress in myocardial tissues of Dahl rats with high-salt diet. However, no significant difference was found in H2S pathway, myocardial structure, α-MHC and β-MHC protein and oxidative status in myocardial tissues among SD + NS, SD + HS, and SD + HS + NaHS groups. HA, an inhibitor of cystathionine β-synthase, inhibited myocardial H2S pathway (P < 0.01), and stimulated myocardial hypertrophy and oxidative stress in SD rats

  15. Effects of ID-alG™ on weight management and body fat mass in high-fat-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Terpend, Kathleen; Bisson, Jean-François; Le Gall, Claire; Linares, Elodie

    2012-05-01

    Seaweed extract of Ascophyllum nodosum, ID-alG™, was evaluated for its chronic effects on weight management in high-fat-fed Sprague-Dawley rats. ID-alG™ was orally administered daily during 9 weeks at doses of 40 and 400 mg/kg/day with fat-enriched diet (FED) in comparison with two control groups consuming standard diet (negative control) or FED (positive control) and orally treated with vehicle. Body weight, percentage of body fat mass and lipid parameters were measured. After 9 weeks, the oral administration of ID-alG™ at both doses decreased significantly the mean body weight gains (MBWG) of rats submitted to the FED in comparison to the positive control (-6.8% and -11.8%). ID-alG™ at both doses improved significantly the MBWG of rats and decreased significantly the percentage of body fat mass of rats (-9.8% and -19.0%), in comparison to the positive control. In the same way, the triglyceride blood level was also significantly improved for the dose of 400 mg/kg/day (-30.6% vs. +49.9% for the positive control); and the dose of 40 mg/kg/day just lead to a trend. Moreover, in both controls and ID-alG™-treated groups, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL blood levels were not modified. The seaweed extract of Ascophyllum nodosum, ID-alG™, demonstrated beneficial effects on weight management of rats submitted to a high-fat diet.

  16. A magnetic resonance imaging study on changes in rat mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue after high-dose irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung-Do; Lee, Kang-Kyoo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to evaluate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appropriate for detecting early changes in the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of rats after high-dose irradiation. Materials and Methods The right mandibles of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 10 Gy (Group 1, n=5) and 20 Gy (Group 2, n=5). Five non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The MR images of rat mandibles were obtained before irradiation and once a week until week 4 after irradiation. From the MR images, the signal intensity (SI) of the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of the incisor was interpreted. The MR images were compared with the histopathologic findings. Results The SI of the mandibular bone marrow had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. There was little difference between Groups 1 and 2. The SI of the irradiated groups appeared to be lower than that of the control group. The histopathologic findings showed that the trabecular bone in the irradiated group had increased. The SI of the irradiated pulp tissue had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. However, the SI of the MR images in Group 2 was high in the atrophic pulp of the incisor apex at week 2 after irradiation. Conclusion These patterns seen on MRI in rat bone marrow and pulp tissue were consistent with histopathologic findings. They may be useful to assess radiogenic sclerotic changes in rat mandibular bone marrow. PMID:24701458

  17. Amygdaloid lesions produced similar contextual fear conditioning disruption in the Carioca high- and low-conditioned freezing rats.

    PubMed

    de Castro Gomes, Vitor; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2008-10-03

    Rats selectively bred for high or low levels of emotionality represent an important and powerful tool to investigate the role of genetic variables in the occurrence of different anxiety disorders. In the present study, albino rats were selectively bred for differences in defensive freezing behavior in response to contextual cues previously associated with footshock, an animal model of general anxiety disorder. The results indicate that these two new lines of rats, which we refer to as Carioca High-Freezing (CHF) and Carioca Low-Freezing (CLF), show a reliable difference in conditioned freezing after three generations of selection. CHF and CLF rats did not present any differences during baseline or post-shock periods. Males from both lines consistently exhibit more conditioned freezing to contextual cues than females. A second experiment used male rats from the fourth generation to investigate the participation of the amygdala during contextual fear conditioning in the CHF and CLF lines. The results indicate that post-training amygdaloid electrolytic lesions lead to similar disruptions in conditioned freezing behavior in both animal lines.

  18. Characterisation of rat and human tissue alkaline phosphatase isoforms by high-performance liquid chromatography and agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dziedziejko, Violetta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Slowik-Zylka, Dorota; Machoy-Mokrzynska, Anna; Millo, Barbara; Machoy, Zygmunt; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2009-03-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) exists as several isoenzymes and many isoforms present in tissues and serum. The objective of this study was to separate tissue ALP forms in rats and humans and characterise their properties. The materials for the investigation were intestinal, bone, and liver tissue of rats and commercially available human preparations of tissue ALP. Two methods of separation were used: high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and agarose gel electrophoresis. Using HPLC in the rat tissues, two ALP isoforms in the intestine, one in the bone, and three in the liver were identified. In humans three intestinal, two bone, and one liver isoform were resolved. Electrophoresis showed two ALP activity bands in rat intestine, one wide band in the bone, and three bands in the liver. ALP of human tissues was visualised as a single wide band, with a different mobility observed for each organ. In both species the presence of a form with properties characteristic of the bone isoform of the tissue-nonspecific isoenzyme was observed in the intestine. HPLC offers a higher resolution than electrophoresis with respect to tissue ALP fractions in rats and in humans, but electrophoresis visualises high-molecular-mass insoluble enzyme forms.

  19. Effect of concurrent saccharin intake on ethanol consumption by high-alcohol-drinking (UChB) rats.

    PubMed

    Tampier, Lutske; Quintanilla, Maria Elena

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the effect of concurrent presentation of a highly palatable saccharin solution on ethanol consumption during the acquisition or maintenance of ethanol drinking by high-alcohol-drinking (UChB) rats. Rats were exposed to ethanol (10% v/v) and water under a home cage, two-bottle, free-choice regimen with unlimited access for 24 hours/day. After 7 days (acquisition) of ethanol exposure, a third bottle containing saccharin (0.2% w/v) was concomitantly offered for an additional seven consecutive days, and the same process was repeated after 3 months (maintenance) of ethanol exposure. We found that concurrent saccharin intake significantly reduced ethanol intake by UChB rats after 7 days of ethanol exposure indicating that preference for sweet taste tends to override the preference for ethanol. However, the concurrent saccharin presentation to rats after 3 months of stable ethanol consumption did not reduce ethanol intake, whereas their saccharin consumption reached polydipsic-like values. These results support the notion that in UChB rats, a time-dependent sensitization to the rewarding effects of ethanol is developed that may account for the increases in ethanol volition seen following chronic ethanol intake.

  20. Hypolipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of Malus toringoides (Rehd.) Hughes Leaves in High-Fat-Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Liu, Haifeng; Meng, Ning; Li, Bin; Wang, Jule

    2017-03-01

    Malus toringoides (Rehd.) Hughes (MT) leaves are traditionally used as a medicine for treating or preventing cardiovascular disease in Tibet. In addition to the effect of this medicinal plant on thrombosis, we tested its effect on dyslipidemia in a hypolipidemic rat model. A total of 60 healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, as follows: normal control, model control, simvastatin groups, and MT low-, medium-, and high-dose groups. The normal controls were fed with a normal diet, whereas all other groups were fed with a high-fat diet. After 6 weeks, the high-fat diet had induced hyperlipidemia in the rats, which were then orally administered with different doses of MT leaf extract (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) for an additional 6 weeks. Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c and HDL-c, respectively), as well as the antioxidant capacity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHP-x), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured at the end of the study. MT significantly reduced serum TC, TG, and LDL-c and increased the HDL-c content in MT-treated rats compared with the model group. These changes were dose dependent. MT treatment also significantly elevated the activity of SOD and GSHP-x, and decreased the serum levels of MDA compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats, thereby increasing serum antioxidant capacity. In addition, MT reduced liver steatosis in hyperlipidemic rats. Overall, MT exerts considerable hypolipidemic and antioxidant properties.

  1. Cocaine-, caffeine-, and stress-evoked cocaine reinstatement in high vs. low impulsive rats: Treatment with allopregnanolone

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Paul S.; Claxton, Alexander B.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research indicates that individual differences in traits such as impulsivity, avidity for sweets, and novelty reactivity are predictors of several aspects of drug addiction. Specifically, rats that rank high on these behavioral measures are more likely than their low drug-seeking counterparts to exhibit several characteristics of drug-seeking behavior. In contrast, initial work suggests that the low drug-seeking animals are more reactive to negative events (e.g., punishment and anxiogenic stimuli). The goal of this study was to compare high and low impulsive rats on reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior elicited by cocaine (COC) and by negative stimuli such as the stress-inducing agent yohimbine (YOH) or a high dose of caffeine (CAFF). An additional goal was to determine whether treatment with allopregnanolone (ALLO) would reduce reinstatement (or relapse) of cocaine-seeking behavior under these priming conditions. Methods Female rats were selected as high (HiI) or low (LoI) impulsive using a delay-discounting task. After selection, they were allowed to self-administer cocaine for 12 days. Cocaine was then replaced with saline, and rats extinguished lever responding over 16 days. Subsequently, rats were pretreated with either vehicle control or ALLO, and cocaine seeking was reinstated by injections of COC, CAFF, or YOH. Results While there were no phenotype differences in maintenance and extinction of cocaine self-administration or reinstatement under control treatment conditions, ALLO attenuated COC- and CAFF-primed reinstatement in LoI but not HiI rats. Conclusions Overall, the present findings suggest that individual differences in impulsive behavior may influence efficacy of interventions aimed to reduce drug-seeking behavior. PMID:25073834

  2. Studies on organ weights in naproxen treated rats after intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, R. C.; Biswas, H. M.

    1990-06-01

    Rats were exposed intermittently for 8h per day over 6 days at simulated high altitude of 20 000 feet. One group of altitude-exposed animals was treated with naproxen, a prostaglandin inhibiting drug. Significant reduction in body weight gain was observed in both altitude-exposed and drug-treated altitude-exposed animals compared to the control group. Right and left ventricular weights and weights of the adrenal glands were increased significantly in altitude-exposed and altitude-exposed drug-treated animals. The weight of the spleen was increased significantly in altitude-exposed animals whereas no such increase of splenic weight was observed in drug-treated altitude-exposed group of animals. On the other hand, the weight of the liver was decreased significantly in both cases. In drug-treated altitude-exposed animals, the unaltered splenic weight was thought to be due to inhibition of the erythropoietic activity.

  3. A diet rich in leafy vegetable fiber improves cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Ezz El-Arab, A M

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, the hypocholesterolemic effect of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) was studied in high-cholesterol fed rats. The animals were fed diets supplemented with cholesterol (0.25%) for 4 weeks. Leaf vegetable diet produced an important hypocholesterolemic action: it led to a significant lowering (p<0.05) of cholesterol in the plasma and liver, as well as of the atherogenic index and a significant increase (p<0.05) in cecal short chain fatty acids, with respect to the control group. Concurrently, total fecal neutral sterols in the excretion increased (p<0.05) and apparent absorption of dietary cholesterol was significantly depressed (-58%). The consumption of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) with a hypercholesterolemic diet improved the lipidemic profile and increased excretion of the total cholesterol end-products.

  4. Current source imaging for high spatial resolution magnetocardiography in normal and abnormal rat cardiac muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, S.; Iramina, K.; Goto, K.; Ueno, S.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the current source produced by acute ischemia and infarction. We measured magnetocardiograms (MCG) and electrocardiograms (ECG) of five male rats using a high-resolution dc superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer in a magnetically shielded room after performing coronary artery occlusion. The spatial resolution of the detecting magnetic field of our system is higher than the typical system, thus permitting the measurement of magnetic fields in small animals. Distribution of the magnetic fields B(t) and distribution of |rot B(t)|, which corresponded to the distribution of the current source, were imaged by 12-channel MCGs. As a result, the distribution of current source changes in the affected area of the myocardium during the ST segment, and amplitude of the peak significantly increased after occlusion. Our system can be used to help clarify the mechanism of the ST shift related to severe heart disease.

  5. Pinealectomy increases ouabain high-affinity binding sites and dissociation constant in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Acuña Castroviejo, D; del Aguila, C M; Fernández, B; Gomar, M D; Castillo, J L

    1991-06-24

    The effect of the pineal gland on the ouabain high-affinity binding sites (Kd = 3.1 +/- 0.4 nM, Bmax = 246.4 +/- 18.4 fmol/mg protein) in rat cerebral cortex was studied. Pinealectomy increased Bmax (940.7 +/- 42.8 fmol/mg protein) and Kd (7.6 +/- 1.5 nM) while melatonin injection (100 micrograms/kg b.wt.) counteracted these effects, restoring kinetic parameters (Kd = 1.9 +/- 0.05 nM; Bmax = 262.2 +/- 29.6 fmol/mg prot) to control values. Melatonin activity on ouabain binding in vitro did not depend upon a direct effect on the binding sites themselves. However, in competition experiments, melatonin increased binding affinity of ouabain as shown by the decreased IC50 values.

  6. Hypocholesterolemic effect of sericin-derived oligopeptides in high-cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Lapphanichayakool, Phakhamon; Sutheerawattananonda, Manote; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial effect of cholesterol-lowering proteins and/or peptides derived from various dietary sources is continuously reported. A non-dietary protein from silk cocoon, sericin, has also demonstrated cholesterol-lowering activity. A sericin hydrolysate prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis was also expected to posses this effect. The present study was aimed at investigating the cholesterol-lowering effect of sericin peptides, so called "sericin-derived oligopeptides" (SDO) both in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that SDO at all three doses tested (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1), 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1), and 200 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) suppressed serum total and non-HDL cholesterol levels in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. Triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels were not significantly changed among all groups. The fecal contents of bile acids and cholesterol did not differ among high-cholesterol fed rats. SDO dose-dependently reduced cholesterol solubility in lipid micelles, and inhibited cholesterol uptake in monolayer Caco-2 cells. SDO also effectively bound to all three types of bile salts including taurocholate, deoxytaurocholate, and glycodeoxycholate. Direct interaction with bile acids of SDO may disrupt micellar cholesterol solubility, and subsequently reduce the absorption of dietary cholesterol in intestines. Taking all data together, SDO or sericin peptides exhibit a beneficial effect on blood cholesterol levels and could be potentially used as a health-promoting dietary supplement or nutraceutical product.

  7. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  8. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p < 0.01) and slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.04) compared with the CTL group. LIT and HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT had significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and cardiac conduction compared with the CTL and SED groups whilst HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT and HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health.

  9. High dietary intake of retinol leads to bone marrow hypoxia and diaphyseal endosteal mineralization in rats.

    PubMed

    Lind, Thomas; Lind, P Monica; Jacobson, Annica; Hu, Lijuan; Sundqvist, Anders; Risteli, Juha; Yebra-Rodriguez, Africa; Larsson, Sune; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Andersson, Göran; Melhus, Håkan

    2011-03-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) is the only molecule known to induce spontaneous fractures in laboratory animals and we have identified retinol as a risk factor for fracture in humans. Since subsequent observational studies in humans and old animal data both show that high retinol intake appears to only have small effects on bone mineral density (BMD) we undertook a mechanistic study of how excess retinol reduces bone diameter while leaving BMD essentially unaffected. We fed growing rats high doses of retinol for only 1 week. Bone analysis involved antibody-based methods, histology, pQCT, biomechanics and bone compartment-specific PCR together with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of bone mineral. Excess dietary retinol induced weakening of bones with little apparent effect on BMD. Periosteal osteoclasts increased but unexpectedly endosteal osteoclasts disappeared and there was a reduction of osteoclastic serum markers. There was also a lack of capillary erythrocytes, endothelial cells and serum retinol transport protein in the endosteal/marrow compartment. A further indication of reduced endosteal/marrow blood flow was the increased expression of hypoxia-associated genes. Also, in contrast to the inhibitory effects in vitro, the marrow of retinol-treated rats showed increased expression of osteogenic genes. Finally, we show that hypervitaminotic bones have a higher degree of mineralization, which is in line with biomechanical data of preserved stiffness in spite of thinner bones. Together these novel findings suggest that a rapid primary effect of excess retinol on bone tissue is the impairment of endosteal/marrow blood flow leading to hypoxia and pathological endosteal mineralization.

  10. High-fructose diet during periadolescent development increases depressive-like behavior and remodels the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Constance S; Burgado, Jillybeth; Kelly, Sean D; Johnson, Zachary P; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2015-12-01

    Fructose consumption, which promotes insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, has increased by over 25% since the 1970s. In addition to metabolic dysregulation, fructose ingestion stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevations in glucocorticoids. Adolescents are the greatest consumers of fructose, and adolescence is a critical period for maturation of the HPA axis. Repeated consumption of high levels of fructose during adolescence has the potential to promote long-term dysregulation of the stress response. Therefore, we determined the extent to which consumption of a diet high in fructose affected behavior, serum corticosterone, and hypothalamic gene expression using a whole-transcriptomics approach. In addition, we examined the potential of a high-fructose diet to interact with exposure to chronic adolescent stress. Male Wistar rats fed the periadolescent high-fructose diet showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test in adulthood, irrespective of stress history. Periadolescent fructose-fed rats also exhibited elevated basal corticosterone concentrations relative to their chow-fed peers. These behavioral and hormonal responses to the high-fructose diet did not occur in rats fed fructose during adulthood only. Finally, rats fed the high-fructose diet throughout development underwent marked hypothalamic transcript expression remodeling, with 966 genes (5.6%) significantly altered and a pronounced enrichment of significantly altered transcripts in several pathways relating to regulation of the HPA axis. Collectively, the data presented herein indicate that diet, specifically one high in fructose, has the potential to alter behavior, HPA axis function, and the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

  11. A High-Fat High-Sucrose Diet Rapidly Alters Muscle Integrity, Inflammation and Gut Microbiota in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kelsey H.; Paul, Heather A.; Hart, David A.; Reimer, Raylene A.; Smith, Ian C.; Rios, Jaqueline L.; Seerattan, Ruth A.; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The chronic low-level inflammation associated with obesity is known to deleteriously affect muscle composition. However, the manner in which obesity leads to muscle loss has not been explored in detail or in an integrated manner following a short-term metabolic challenge. In this paper, we evaluated the relationships between compromised muscle integrity, diet, systemic inflammatory mediators, adipose tissue, and gut microbiota in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We show that intramuscular fat, fibrosis, and the number of pro-inflammatory cells increased by 3-days and was sustained across 28-days of high-fat high-sugar feeding compared to control-diet animals. To understand systemic contributors to muscle damage, dynamic changes in gut microbiota and serum inflammatory markers were evaluated. Data from this study links metabolic challenge to persistent compromise in muscle integrity after just 3-days, a finding associated with altered gut microbiota and systemic inflammatory changes. These data contribute to our understanding of early consequences of metabolic challenge on multiple host systems, which are important to understand as obesity treatment options are developed. Therefore, intervention within this early period of metabolic challenge may be critical to mitigate these sustained alterations in muscle integrity. PMID:27853291

  12. Effect of ethyl pyruvate on skeletal muscle metabolism in rats fed on a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Olek, Robert A; Ziolkowski, Wieslaw; Wierzba, Tomasz H; Kaczor, Jan J

    2013-07-01

    Impaired mitochondrial capacity may be implicated in the pathology of chronic metabolic diseases. To elucidate the effect of ethyl pyruvate supplementation on skeletal muscles metabolism we examined changes in activities of mitochondrial and antioxidant enzymes, as well as sulfhydryl groups oxidation (an indirect marker of oxidative stress) during the development of obesity. After 6 weeks feeding of control or high fat diet, Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control diet, control diet and ethyl pyruvate, high fat diet, and high fat diet and ethyl pyruvate. Ethyl pyruvate was administered as 0.3% solution in drinking water, for the following 6 weeks. High fat diet feeding induced the increase of activities 3-hydroxyacylCoA dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and fumarase. Moreover, higher catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, as well as sulfhydryl groups oxidation, were noted. Ethyl pyruvate supplementation did not affect the mitochondrial enzymes' activities, but induced superoxide dismutase activity and sulfhydryl groups oxidation. All of the changes were observed in soleus muscle, but not in extensor digitorum longus muscle. Additionally, positive correlations between fasting blood insulin concentration and activities of catalase (p = 0.04), and superoxide dismutase (p = 0.01) in soleus muscle were noticed. Prolonged ethyl pyruvate consumption elevated insulin concentration, which may cause modifications in oxidative type skeletal muscles.

  13. A Krill Oil Supplemented Diet Suppresses Hepatic Steatosis in High-Fat Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Burri, Lena; Berge, Kjetil; De Nuccio, Francesco; Giudetti, Anna Maria; Zara, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Krill oil (KO) is a dietary source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, mainly represented by eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid bound to phospholipids. The supplementation of a high-fat diet with 2.5% KO efficiently prevented triglyceride and cholesterol accumulation in liver of treated rats. This effect was accompanied by a parallel reduction of the plasma levels of triglycerides and glucose and by the prevention of a plasma insulin increase. The investigation of the molecular mechanisms of KO action in high-fat fed animals revealed a strong decrease in the activities of the mitochondrial citrate carrier and of the cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase, which are both involved in hepatic de novo lipogenesis. In these animals a significant increase in the activity of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase I and in the levels of carnitine was also observed, suggesting a concomitant stimulation of hepatic fatty acid oxidation. The KO supplemented animals also retained an efficient mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, most probably as a consequence of a KO-induced arrest of the uncoupling effects of a high-fat diet. Lastly, the KO supplementation prevented an increase in body weight, as well as oxidative damage of lipids and proteins, which is often found in high-fat fed animals. PMID:22685607

  14. A krill oil supplemented diet suppresses hepatic steatosis in high-fat fed rats.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Burri, Lena; Berge, Kjetil; De Nuccio, Francesco; Giudetti, Anna Maria; Zara, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Krill oil (KO) is a dietary source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, mainly represented by eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid bound to phospholipids. The supplementation of a high-fat diet with 2.5% KO efficiently prevented triglyceride and cholesterol accumulation in liver of treated rats. This effect was accompanied by a parallel reduction of the plasma levels of triglycerides and glucose and by the prevention of a plasma insulin increase. The investigation of the molecular mechanisms of KO action in high-fat fed animals revealed a strong decrease in the activities of the mitochondrial citrate carrier and of the cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase, which are both involved in hepatic de novo lipogenesis. In these animals a significant increase in the activity of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase I and in the levels of carnitine was also observed, suggesting a concomitant stimulation of hepatic fatty acid oxidation. The KO supplemented animals also retained an efficient mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, most probably as a consequence of a KO-induced arrest of the uncoupling effects of a high-fat diet. Lastly, the KO supplementation prevented an increase in body weight, as well as oxidative damage of lipids and proteins, which is often found in high-fat fed animals.

  15. Altered potassium ATP channel signaling in mesenteric arteries of old high salt-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Whidden, Melissa A.; Basgut, Bilgen; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Erdos, Benedek; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Both aging and the consumption of a high salt diet are associated with clear changes in the vascular system that can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease; however the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined whether aging and the consumption of excess salt alters the function of potassium ATP-dependent channel signaling in mesenteric arteries [Methods] Young (7 months) and old (29 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were fed a control or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 12 days and mesenteric arteries were utilized for vascular reactivity measurements. [Results] Acetylcholine-induced endothelium relaxation was significantly reduced in old arteries (81 ± 4%) when compared with young arteries (92 ± 2%). Pretreatment with the potassium-ATP channel blocker glibenclamide reduced relaxation to acetylcholine in young arteries but did not alter dilation in old arteries. On a high salt diet, endothelium dilation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced in old salt arteries (60 ± 3%) when compared with old control arteries (81 ± 4%). Glibenclamide reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation in young salt arteries but had no effect on old salt arteries. Dilation to cromakalim, a potassium-ATP channel opener, was reduced in old salt arteries when compared with old control arteries. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that aging impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, a high salt diet alters the function of potassium-ATP-dependent channel signaling in old isolated mesenteric arteries and affects the mediation of relaxation stimuli. PMID:27508155

  16. Highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid ameliorates cardiac injury and adipose tissue inflammation in a rat model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S.; Sano, Y.; Nagasawa, K.; Matsuura, N.; Yamada, Y.; Uchinaka, A.; Murohara, T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction n‐3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which are abundant in fish oil, have been shown to delay the onset of cardiovascular events. We previously established DahlS.Z‐Lepr fa/Lepr fa (DS/obese) rats, which are derived from a cross between Dahl salt‐sensitive and Zucker rats, as a model of metabolic syndrome. This study has now explored the influence of highly purified EPA on cardiac and adipose tissue pathophysiology in this animal model. Materials and methods DS/obese rats were administered EPA (300 or 1,000 mg kg−1 d−1, per os) or vehicle from age 9 to 13 weeks. Homozygous lean (DahlS.Z‐Lepr +/Lepr +, or DS/lean) littermates were studied as controls. Results Whereas EPA had no effect on body weight, food intake or systolic blood pressure in DS/obese rats, it attenuated cardiac fibrosis, diastolic dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation in these animals. In addition, EPA did not affect insulin resistance but reduced adipocyte hypertrophy and inflammation in visceral fat of DS/obese rats. Moreover, EPA increased circulating levels of adiponectin as well as attenuated both the down‐regulation of AMP‐activated protein kinase phosphorylation and the up‐regulation of phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor‐kB in the heart of DS/obese rats. Conclusions Treatment of DS/obese rats with EPA did not affect hypertension but reduced cardiac fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction, with the latter effects being accompanied by AMP‐activated protein kinase activation and inactivation of nuclear factor‐kB signalling in the heart, possibly as a result of an increase in adiponectin secretion. EPA may be suitable for the treatment of cardiac injury associated with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27708849

  17. A Low-Protein, High-Carbohydrate Diet Stimulates Thermogenesis in the Brown Adipose Tissue of Rats via ATF-2.

    PubMed

    de França, Suélem A; dos Santos, Maísa P; Przygodda, Franciele; Garófalo, Maria Antonieta R; Kettelhut, Isis C; Magalhães, Diego A; Bezerra, Kalinne S; Colodel, Edson M; Flouris, Andreas D; Andrade, Cláudia M B; Kawashita, Nair H

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate thermogenesis in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) of rats submitted to low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet and the involvement of adrenergic stimulation in this process. Male rats (~100 g) were submitted to LPHC (6%-protein; 74%-carbohydrate) or control (C; 17%-protein; 63%-carbohydrate) isocaloric diets for 15 days. The IBAT temperature was evaluated in the rats before and after the administration of noradrenaline (NA) (20 µg 100 g b w(-1) min(-1)). The expression levels of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and other proteins involved in the regulation of UCP1 expression were determined by Western blot (Student's t test, P ≤ 0.05). The LPHC diet promoted a 1.1 °C increase in the basal temperature of IBAT when compared with the basal temperature in the IBAT of the C group. NA administration promoted a 0.3 °C increase in basal temperature in the IBAT of the C rats and a 0.5 °C increase in the IBAT of the LPHC group. The level of UCP1 increased 60% in the IBAT of LPHC-fed rats, and among the proteins involved in its expression, such as β3-AR and α1-AR, there was a 40% increase in the levels of p38-MAPK and a 30% decrease in CREB when compared to the C rats. The higher sympathetic flux to IBAT, which is a consequence of the administration of the LPHC diet to rats, activates thermogenesis and increases the expression of UCP1 in the tissue. Our results suggest that the increase in UCP1 content may occur via p38 MAPK and ATF2.

  18. Bromocriptine increased operant responding for high fat food but decreased chow intake in both obesity-prone and resistant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Cho, J. Kim, R.; Michaelides, M.; Primeaux, S.; Bray, G.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-10-27

    Dopamine (DA) and DAD{sub 2} receptors (D2R) have been implicated in obesity and are thought to be involved in the rewarding properties of food. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are susceptible to diet induced obesity (DIO) while S5B/P (S5B) rats are resistant when given a high-fat diet. Here we hypothesized that the two strains would differ in high-fat food self-administration (FSA) and that the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differently affect their behavior. Ad-libitum fed OM and S5B/P rats were tested in a FSA operant chamber and were trained to lever press for high-fat food pellets under a fixed-ratio (FR1) and a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. After sixteen days of PR sessions, rats were treated with three different doses of BC (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg). No significant differences were found between the two strains in the number of active lever presses. BC treatment (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) increased the number of active lever presses (10 mg/kg having the strongest effect) whereas it decreased rat chow intake in the home cage with equivalent effects in both strains. These effects were not observed on the day of BC administration but on the day following its administration. Our results suggest that these two strains have similar motivation for procuring high fat food using this paradigm. BC increased operant responding for high-fat pellets but decreased chow intake in both strains, suggesting that D2R stimulation may have enhanced the motivational drive to procure the fatty food while correspondingly decreasing the intake of regular food. These findings suggest that susceptibility to dietary obesity (prior to the onset of obesity) may not affect operant motivation for a palatable high fat food and that differential susceptibility to obesity may be related to differential sensitivity to D2R stimulation.

  19. The anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil is metabolized by the isolated perfused rat liver and in rats into highly toxic fluoroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, M.; Malet-Martino, M.; Martino, R.; Gires, P.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of the biotransformation of the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (FU) into two new metabolites, alpha-fluoro-beta-hydroxypropionic acid (FHPA) and fluoroacetate (FAC), in the isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) and in the rat in vivo. IPRL was perfused with solutions of pure FU at two doses, 15 or 45 mg kg(-1) body weight, and rats were injected i.p. with 180 mg of FU kg(-1) body weight. Fluorine-19 NMR analysis of perfusates from IPRL and rat urine showed the presence of the normal metabolites of FU and low amounts of FHPA (0.4% or 0.1% of injected FU in perfusates from IPRL treated with 15 or 45 mg of FU kg(-1) body weight, respectively; 0.08% of the injected FU in rat urine) and FAC (0.1% or 0.03% of injected FU in perfusates from IPRL treated with 15 or 45 mg of FU kg(-1) body weight, respectively; 0.003% of the injected FU in rat urine). IPRL was also perfused with a solution of alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL) hydrochloride at 16.6 mg kg(-1) body weight dose equivalent to 15 mg of FU kg(-1) body weight. Low amounts of FHPA (0.2% of injected FBAL) and FAC (0.07%) were detected in perfusates, thus demonstrating that FHPA and FAC arise from FBAL catabolism. As FAC is a well-known cardiotoxic poison, and FHPA is also cardiotoxic at high doses, the cardiotoxicity of FU might stem from at least two sources. The first one, established in previous papers (Lemaire et al, 1992, 1994), is the presence in commercial solutions of FU of degradation products of FU that are metabolized into FHPA and FAC; these are formed over time in the basic medium necessary to dissolve the drug. The second, demonstrated in the present study, is the metabolism of FU itself into the same compounds. PMID:9459149

  20. Age-dependent effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on lipid metabolism and lipid accumulation in liver and kidney of rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by variable coexistence of metabolic and pathophysiological alterations which are important risk factors for developing of type II diabetes and/or cardiovascular diseases. Increased of MS patients in worldwide has stimulated the development of experimental models. However, it is still challenging to find an dietetic model that most closely approximates human MS and, in addition, is not yet fully established the effect of different diets of MS in lipid metabolism in rats of different ages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different diets of MS in lipid metabolism and ectopic fat deposition and define the most appropriate diet for inducing the characteristic disturbances of the human MS in rats of different ages. Methods Young (4 weeks old) and adult rats (12 weeks old) were given a high-fat (FAT) or high-fructose diet (FRU) for 13 weeks and biochemical, physiological, histological and biometric parameters were evaluated. Results In young rats, the FAT diet induced increased mean blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), body weight after 6 to 10 weeks, and in the 13th week, increased the liver, mesenteric, retroperitoneal and epididymal fat weights, fasting glucose, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and reduced HDL cholesterol; and also induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and renal inflammatory infiltrates. In adult rats, the FRU diet induced transient elevations of MAP and HR in the 6th week, and, at 13 weeks, increased fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, AST and ALT; increased liver, kidneys and retroperitoneal fat weights; and induced macrovesicular and microvesicular NAFLD, the presence of fat cells in the kidney, glomerular sclerosis, and liver and kidney inflammation. Additionally, the FAT and FRU diets induced, respectively, increases in liver glycogen in adults and young rats. Conclusions Our data show that FRU diet

  1. Effects of Ibuprofen and High-Voltage Electric Stimulation on Acute Edema Formation After Blunt Trauma to Limbs of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Michael G; Graves, Paul; Nakazawa, Chika; Delano, Teresa; Hutson, Alan; Mendel, Frank C

    2005-01-01

    Context: Ibuprofen is widely used to manage pain and inflammation after orthopaedic trauma, but its effect on acute swelling has not been investigated. Cathodal high-voltage pulsed current (CHVPC) at 120 pulses per second and 90% of visible motor threshold is known to curb edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Objective: To examine the effects of ibuprofen, continuous CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC on acute edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Design: Randomized, parallel-group, repeated-measures design. Setting: Laboratory animal facility. Participants: A total of 21 3-month-old Zucker Lean rats (mass = 288 ± 55 g) were studied. Intervention(s): We assessed the effects of ibuprofen, continuous CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC on acute edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Main Outcome Measure(s): Limb volumes were measured immediately before and after trauma and every 30 minutes over the 4 hours of the experiment. Results: Volumes of treated limbs of all 3 experimental groups were smaller (P < .05) than those of untreated limbs, but no treatment was more effective than another. Conclusions: Ibuprofen, CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC effectively curbed edema after blunt injury by roughly 50% relative to untreated but similarly injured control limbs of rats. PMID:15970957

  2. Purification of the high-Km aldehyde reductase from rat brain and liver and from ox brain.

    PubMed Central

    Rivett, A J; Smith, I L; Tipton, K F

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described that yields an apparently homogeneous preparation of the high-Km aldehyde reductase from rat brain. This procedure is also applicable to the purification of this enzyme from rat liver and ox brain. In the latter case, however, the purified preparation could be resolved into two protein bands, both of which had enzyme activity, by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Since a sample of the ox brain enzyme from an earlier step in the purification procedure only showed the presence of a single band of activity after electrophoresis, this apparent multiplicity probably results from modification of the enzyme, possibly by oxidation, during the final step of the purification. A number of properties of the rat brain enzyme were determined and these were compared with those of the enzyme from rat liver. The two preparations were similar in their stabilities, behaviour during purification, kinetic properties, electrophoretic mobilities and amino acid compositions. Antibodies to the rat liver enzyme cross-reacted with that from brain and the inhibition of both these preparations by the antiserum was similar, further supporting the view that the enzymes from these two sources were closely similar if not identical. PMID:6798966

  3. Discriminating Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Rats Using a High-Tc SQUID Detected Nuclear Resonance Spectrometer in a Magnetic Shielding Box

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Yang, Shieh Yueh; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Wang, Li-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report the spin-lattice relaxation rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and normal liver tissue in rats using a high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer. The resonance spectrometer used for discriminating liver tumors in rats via the difference in longitudinal relaxation time in low magnetic fields was set up in a compact and portable magnetic shielding box. The frequency-domain NMR signals of HCC tissues and normal liver tissues were analyzed to study their respective longitudinal relaxation rate T1−1. The T1−1 of liver tissues for ten normal rats and ten cancerous rats were investigated respectively. The averaged T1−1 value of normal liver tissue was (6.41±0.66) s−1, and the averaged T1−1 value of cancerous tissue was (3.38±0.15) s−1. The ratio of T1−1 for normal liver tissues and cancerous liver tissues of the rats investigated is estimated to be 1.9. Since this significant statistical difference, the T1−1 value can be used to distinguish the HCC tissues from normal liver tissues. This method of examining liver and tumor tissues has the advantages of being convenient, easy to operate, and stable. PMID:23071710

  4. Discriminating hepatocellular carcinoma in rats using a high-Tc SQUID detected nuclear resonance spectrometer in a magnetic shielding box.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Yang, Shieh Yueh; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Wang, Li-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report the spin-lattice relaxation rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and normal liver tissue in rats using a high-T(c) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer. The resonance spectrometer used for discriminating liver tumors in rats via the difference in longitudinal relaxation time in low magnetic fields was set up in a compact and portable magnetic shielding box. The frequency-domain NMR signals of HCC tissues and normal liver tissues were analyzed to study their respective longitudinal relaxation rate T(1) (-1). The T(1) (-1) of liver tissues for ten normal rats and ten cancerous rats were investigated respectively. The averaged T(1) (-1) value of normal liver tissue was (6.41±0.66) s(-1), and the averaged T(1) (-1) value of cancerous tissue was (3.38±0.15) s(-1). The ratio of T(1) (-1) for normal liver tissues and cancerous liver tissues of the rats investigated is estimated to be 1.9. Since this significant statistical difference, the T(1) (-1) value can be used to distinguish the HCC tissues from normal liver tissues. This method of examining liver and tumor tissues has the advantages of being convenient, easy to operate, and stable.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of (-)-verbenone 10-hydroxylation catalyzed by rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Sugie, Atsushi; Shimada, Tsutomu

    2003-08-15

    A sensitive assay for the determination of (-)-verbenone 10-hydroxylation catalyzed by rat liver microsomes was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Verbenone was incubated in vitro with liver microsomes of untreated rats and rats treated with phenobarbital and the products thus formed were extracted with CH(2)Cl(2) and the extracts were separated by HPLC with a C(18) 5-microm analytical column. Elution was conducted with 40% methanol containing 20 mM NaClO(4) and the detection of UV absorbance was done at 251 nm. Product formation was dependent on the incubation time at least up to 30 min and the microsomal protein concentration between 0.01 and 0.1 mg protein/ml. The limit of detection of (-)-10-hydroxyverbenone with the HPLC was found to be about 40 pg, indicating that this method is about 100-fold sensitive than the GC-MS method. Optimized pH for the reaction was at 7.4 when examined with 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer in different pHs. Kinetic analysis showed that K(m) values for liver microsomes of untreated and phenobarbital-treated rats were 206 and 41 microM and V(max) values were 5.8 and 44 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Thus the present results provided a sensitive and useful method for the determination of verbenone 10-hydroxylation catalyzed by rat liver microsomes.

  6. Highly Sensitive LC-MS-MS Method for the Determination of Tacrine in Rat Plasma: Application to Pharmacokinetic Studies in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ponnayyan Sulochana, Suresh; Ravichandiran, Vishnuvardh; Mullangi, Ramesh; Sukumaran, Sathesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive assay method has been developed and validated for the estimation of tacrine in rat plasma using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive-ion mode. The assay procedure involves a simple liquid-liquid extraction of tacrine and phenacetin (internal standard, IS) from rat plasma using ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was achieved with 0.2% formic acid : acetonitrile (30 : 70, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.50 mL/min on an Atlantis dC18 column with a total run time of 3.0 min. The MS-MS ion transitions monitored were 199.10 → 171.20 for tacrine and 180.10 → 110.10 for IS. Method validation was performed as per United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) guidelines and the results met the acceptance criteria. The lower limit of quantification achieved was 0.008 ng/mL and linearity was observed from 0.008 to 53.4 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision was in the range of 2.76-12.5 and 5.15-12.8%, respectively. This novel method has been applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats.

  7. Prolonged stimulation of corticosterone secretion by corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats exhibiting high preference for dietary fat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herminghuysen, D.; Plaisance, K.; Pace, R. M.; Prasad, C.

    1998-01-01

    Through the secretion of corticosterone, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is thought to play an important role in the regulation of caloric intake and dietary fat preference. In an earlier study, we demonstrated a positive correlation between urinary corticosterone output and dietary fat preference. Furthermore, dietary fat preference was augmented following chronic but not acute hypercorticosteronemia produced by exogenous corticosterone administration. These observations led us to explore whether the HPA axis of rats exhibiting high preference for fat may have exaggerated sensitivity to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). The results of these studies show a delayed and blunted but more prolonged corticosterone response to CRH in the fat-preferring rats compared with that of the carbohydrate-preferring rats.

  8. High Prevalence of Rickettsia typhi and Bartonella Species in Rats and Fleas, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Laudisoit, Anne; Falay, Dadi; Amundala, Nicaise; Akaibe, Dudu; de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy; Van Houtte, Natalie; Breno, Matteo; Verheyen, Erik; Wilschut, Liesbeth; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; Socolovschi, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and identity of Rickettsia and Bartonella in urban rat and flea populations were evaluated in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by molecular tools. An overall prevalence of 17% Bartonella species and 13% Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in the cosmopolitan rat species, Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus that were infested by a majority of Xenopsylla cheopis fleas. Bartonella queenslandensis, Bartonella elizabethae, and three Bartonella genotypes were identified by sequencing in rat specimens, mostly in R. rattus. Rickettsia typhi was detected in 72% of X. cheopis pools, the main vector and reservoir of this zoonotic pathogen. Co-infections were observed in rodents, suggesting a common mammalian host shared by R. typhi and Bartonella spp. Thus, both infections are endemic in DRC and the medical staffs need to be aware knowing the high prevalence of impoverished populations or immunocompromised inhabitants in this area. PMID:24445202

  9. High prevalence of Rickettsia typhi and Bartonella species in rats and fleas, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed

    Laudisoit, Anne; Falay, Dadi; Amundala, Nicaise; Akaibe, Dudu; de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy; Van Houtte, Natalie; Breno, Matteo; Verheyen, Erik; Wilschut, Liesbeth; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; Socolovschi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence and identity of Rickettsia and Bartonella in urban rat and flea populations were evaluated in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by molecular tools. An overall prevalence of 17% Bartonella species and 13% Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in the cosmopolitan rat species, Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus that were infested by a majority of Xenopsylla cheopis fleas. Bartonella queenslandensis, Bartonella elizabethae, and three Bartonella genotypes were identified by sequencing in rat specimens, mostly in R. rattus. Rickettsia typhi was detected in 72% of X. cheopis pools, the main vector and reservoir of this zoonotic pathogen. Co-infections were observed in rodents, suggesting a common mammalian host shared by R. typhi and Bartonella spp. Thus, both infections are endemic in DRC and the medical staffs need to be aware knowing the high prevalence of impoverished populations or immunocompromised inhabitants in this area.

  10. High-resolution MRI of intact and transected rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Fraidakis, M; Klason, T; Cheng, H; Olson, L; Spenger, C

    1998-10-01

    Spinal cord transection at midthoracic level leads to an immediate loss of hindlimb motor function as well as to a progressive degeneration of descending and ascending spinal cord pathways. Thoracic spinal cord in unlesioned control rats and in rats 2 to 6 months after complete midthoracic transection were imaged in vivo using an ultrahigh-field (4.7 T) magnetic resonance spectrometer. High-resolution spin-echo and inversion-recovery pulse sequences were employed. In addition, the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in longitudinal and transverse directions of the spinal cord were determined. Anatomical MRI findings were confirmed in histological spinal cord tissue preparations. In healthy spinal cord, gray and white matter were easily discerned in proton density-weighted images. An infield resolution of max. 76 micrometers per pixel was achieved. In animals with chronic spinal cord transection changes in gray-white matter structure and contrast were observed toward the cut end. The spinal cord stumps showed a tapering off. This coincided with changes in the longitudinal/transverse ADC ratio. Fluid-filled cysts were found in most cases at the distal end of the rostral stump. The gap between the stumps contained richly vascularized scar tissue. Additional pathologic changes included intramedullary microcysts, vertebral dislocations, and in one animal compression of the spinal cord. In conclusion, MRI was found to be a useful method for in vivo investigation of anatomical and physiological changes following spinal cord transection and to estimate the degree of neural degeneration. In addition, MRI allows the description of the accurate extension of fluid spaces (e.g., cysts) and of water diffusion characteristics which cannot be achieved by other means in vivo.

  11. Distribution of High-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Rat Vestibular Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Felix E.; Savin, David; Luu, Cindy; Sultemeier, David R.; Hoffman, Larry F.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels (BK) are important regulators of neuronal excitability. BK channels seem to be crucial for frequency tuning in nonmammalian vestibular and auditory hair cells. However, there are a paucity of data concerning BK expression in mammalian vestibular hair cells. We therefore investigated the localization of BK channels in mammalian vestibular hair cells, specifically in rat vestibular neuroepithelia. We find that only a subset of hair cells in the utricle and the crista ampullaris express BK channels. BK-positive hair cells are located mainly in the medial striolar region of the utricle, where they constitute at most 12% of hair cells, and in the central zone of the horizontal crista. A majority of BK-positive hair cells are encapsulated by a calretinin-positive calyx defining them as type I cells. The remainder are either type I cells encapsulated by a calretinin-negative calyx or type II hair cells. Surprisingly, the number of BK-positive hair cells in the utricle peaks in juvenile rats and declines in early adulthood. BK channels were not found in vestibular afferent dendrites or somata. Our data indicate that BK channel expression in the mammalian vestibular system differs from the expression pattern in the mammalian auditory and the nonmammalian vestibular system. The molecular diversity of vestibular hair cells indicates a functional diversity that has not yet been fully characterized. The predominance of BK-positive hair cells within the medial striola of juvenile animals suggests that they contribute to a scheme of highly lateralized coding of linear head movements during late development. PMID:19731297

  12. High virulence in hamsters of four dominant Leptospira serovars isolated from rats in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Saito, Mitsumasa; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Segawa, Takaya; Baterna, Rubelia A; Chakraborty, Antara; Asoh, Tatsuma; Miyahara, Satoshi; Yanagihara, Yasutake; Cavinta, Lolita L; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-02-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize the pathogenicity of four dominant Leptospira isolates prevailing among rats in the Philippines. The isolates were Leptospira interrogans serovar Manilae strain K64, L. interrogans serovar Losbanos strain K37, L. interrogans serovar Ratnapura strain K5 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Javanica strain K6. Pathogenicities were studied using hamsters, which reproduce severe human leptospirosis. The minimum lethal doses were 10(0) ( = 1) leptospires for K64, K37 and K5, and 10(1) leptospires for K6. Weight loss amongst the Leptospira-infected hamsters was observed from 1 day before death (K64-, K37- and K5-infected hamsters) to as much as 1 week before death for K6-infected hamsters. Similar and varied gross and microscopic lesions were observed amongst infected hamsters, even for strains belonging to the same species (i.e. L. interrogans). The most significant and common histopathological findings were congestion of the glomerulus, disarrangement of hepatic cords and erythrophagocytosis. Other findings were foamy splenic macrophages for K6, severe petechial pulmonary haemorrhage for K64, and hematuria and severe pulmonary congestion for K37. Immunostaining and culture revealed the presence of leptospires in different organs of the infected hamsters. Based on these results, Leptospira isolates from rats in the Philippines were shown to be highly virulent, causing pulmonary haemorrhage, severe hepato-renal damage and death in hamsters even at lower doses. The present findings on experimental leptospirosis support clinical data showing that patients with severe manifestations of leptospirosis, such as pulmonary haemorrhage, are increasing in the Philippines. These findings may serve as a basis to strengthen the early diagnosis and treatment of human leptospirosis.

  13. Aluminum bone toxicity in immature rats exposed to simulated high altitude.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María del Pilar; Bozzini, Clarisa; Olivera, María Itatí; Dmytrenko, Ganna; Conti, María Inés

    2011-09-01

    Aluminum (Al) is an element to which humans are widely exposed. Chronic administration induces a negative effect on bone tissue, affecting collagen synthesis and matrix mineralization. Its toxic effects are cumulative. Hypobaric hypoxia induces stress erythropoiesis, leading to hypertrophy of the erythropoietic marrow affecting the bone. This study was designed to evaluate the risk of Al bone toxicity among immature rats maintained at simulated high altitude (SHA) by mechanical assessment of stiffness and strength, calculation of some indicators of bone material and geometrical properties, as well as blood determinations. Forty growing rats were divided into control and experimental groups whether injected with vehicle or Al, as Al(OH)(3), three times a week for 3 months. Half of each group was exposed to hypobaric conditions (HX) by placing the animals in a SHA chamber. Both treatments negatively affected structural properties of bones, decreasing the maximum capacity to withstand load, the limit elastic load and the capacity of absorbing energy in elastic conditions. Al administration significantly depressed mandible structural stiffness, although diaphyseal stiffness was not modified. Indicators of bone material intrinsic properties, elastic modulus and stress, were significantly reduced by Al or HX. Treatments increased the diaphyseal sectional bending moment of inertia, suggesting that femur, but not mandible, compensates for the decline in the material properties with an adaptation of its architecture to maintain structural properties. The different biomechanical behaviors between the two kinds of bone are probably due to their different embryological origin and specific functions, as mandible is a bone that adjusts its strength to biting forces, whereas femur is designed to support load.

  14. Comparative effects of Aliskiren and Telmisartan in high fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Esraa M; Heeba, Gehan H; Abouzied, Mekky M; Khalifa, Mohamed M A

    2015-08-05

    Fructose is a commonly used sweetener associated with diets that increase the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS). Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been consistently demonstrated to reduce MS. However, there has been no direct comparison among different pharmacological modes of inhibiting the RAS concerning their effects on MS. This study investigated the effect of aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor, versus telmisartan, an angiotensin II-receptor blocker, in the treatment of fructose-induced MS in rats. MS was induced by high fructose (FRC) diet feeding for 12 weeks. Oral administrations of telmisartan (TEL, 5 mg/kg), aliskiren (ALS, 30 mg/kg) or vehicle were started in the last 4 weeks. Results showed that administration of either TEL or ALS with FRC diet equally ameliorated the metabolic parameters (glucose level, oral glucose tolerance test, insulin resistance and serum lipids profile), systolic blood pressure and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, reduced glutathione levels and catalase activity). Additionally, the effects of TEL and ALS were associated with a decrease in body composition index and attenuation of liver index, serum liver enzyme activities and hepatic expressions of inflammatory and fibrotic markers (tumor necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor kappa-B and transforming growth factor-β) with a significant increase in hepatic glucose transporter-2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-alpha and gamma expressions. The results suggested that, at indicated dosage, ALS has ameliorative effect equal to that of TEL against FRC-induced metabolic and hepatic disorders; implying that drugs which inhibit the RAS, by different mode of inhibition, profoundly affect fructose-induced MS in rats.

  15. Hypocholesterolemic effect of daily fisetin supplementation in high fat fed Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min-Jeong; Cho, Yoonsu; Moon, Jiyoung; Jeon, Hyun Ju; Lee, Seung-Min; Chung, Ji Hyung

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to test whether fisetin could modulate cholesterol homeostasis in rats with diet-induced hypercholesterolemia, and further investigated the underlying mechanisms by which fisetin exerts its cholesterol lowering effect. Blood lipid profile, hepatic cholesterol content, as well as gene expressions in cholesterol metabolism were examined. Elevated levels of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, along with hepatic cholesterol content in a high fat group were found to be significantly reduced by fisetin. The high fat diet significantly decreased hepatic mRNA levels of LDLR, SREBP2, HMGCR and PCSK9 in comparison to the control diet, however, fisetin did not further elicit any changes in mRNA levels of the same genes. The high fat diet dramatically increased the transcript levels of CYP7A1, which was subsequently reversed by the fisetin. In HepG2 cells, fisetin was found to increase the levels of a nuclear form of SREBP2 and LDLR. In conclusion, fisetin supplementation displayed hypocholesterolemic effects by modulating the expression of genes associated with cholesterol and bile acid metabolism.

  16. Injectable, high-density collagen gels for annulus fibrosus repair: An in vitro rat tail model.

    PubMed

    Borde, Brandon; Grunert, Peter; Härtl, Roger; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-08-01

    A herniated intervertebral disc often causes back pain when disc tissue is displaced through a damaged annulus fibrosus. Currently, the only methods available for annulus fibrosus repair involve mechanical closure of defect, which does little to address biological healing in the damaged tissue. Collagen hydrogels are injectable and have been used to repair annulus defects in vivo. In this study, high-density collagen hydrogels at 5, 10, and 15 mg/mL were used to repair defects made to intact rat caudal intervertebral discs in vitro. A group of gels at 15 mg/mL were also cross-linked with riboflavin at 0.03 mM, 0.07 mM, or 0.10 mM. These cross-linked, high-density collagen gels maintained their presence in the defect under loading and contributed positively to the mechanical response of damaged discs. Discs exhibited increases to 95% of undamaged effective equilibrium and instantaneous moduli as well as up to fourfold decreases in effective hydraulic permeability from the damaged discs. These data suggest that high-density collagen gels may be effective at restoring mechanical function of injured discs as well as potential vehicles for the delivery of biological agents such as cells or growth factors that may aid in the repair of the annulus fibrosus.

  17. Effects of dianabol and high-intensity sprint training on body composition of rats.

    PubMed

    Hickson, R C; Heusner, W W; Huss, W D; Jackson, D E; Anderson, D A; Jones, D A; Psaledas, A T

    1976-01-01

    The effects on body composition and organ weights of anabolic steroid administration and of high-intensity sprint running, separately and in combination, were studied in young adult male rats. Dianabol (methandrostenolone) 1 mg/day for 8 weeks had no significant effects on muscle weight or lean body mass in either the trained or the sedentary animals. The program of sprint training resulted in a lower body weight, a lesser percentage of body fat (Runners, 8.5%, vs. sedentary, 13.5% P less than 0.01) and a greater relative lean body mass (runners, 91.5% vs. sedentry, 86.5%, P less than 0.01). We conclude from these results that (a) normal androgen levels in young, healthy male animals are sufficiently high so that the addition of a large dose of anabolic steroid does not result in stimulation of additional muscle growth, and (b) the changes in body composition induced by high-intensity, short-duration sprint training are qualitatively similar to those seen with endurance exercise training.

  18. Injectable, High Density Collagen Gels for Annulus Fibrosus Repair: An In Vitro Rat Tail Model

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Brandon; Grunert, Peter; Härtl, Roger; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    A herniated intervertebral disc often causes back pain when disc tissue is displaced through a damaged annulus fibrosus. Currently the only methods available for annulus fibrosus repair involve mechanical closure of defect, which does little to address biological healing in the damaged tissue. Collagen hydrogels are injectable and have been used to repair annulus defects in vivo. In this study, high-density collagen hydrogels at 5, 10 and 15 mg/ml were used to repair defects made to intact rat caudal intervertebral discs in vitro. A group of gels at 15 mg/ml were also crosslinked with riboflavin at 0.03 mM, 0.07 mM or 0.10 mM . These crosslinked, high-density collagen gels maintained presence in the defect under loading and contributed positively to the mechanical response of damaged discs. Discs exhibited increases to 95% of undamaged effective equilibrium and instantaneous moduli as well as up to four fold decreases in effective hydraulic permeability from the damaged discs. These data suggest that high density collagen gels may be effective at restoring mechanical function of injured discs as well as potential vehicles for delivery of biological agents such as cells or growth factors that may aid in the repair of the annulus fibrosus. PMID:25504661

  19. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)neurotensin of rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Pettibone, D.J.; Totaro, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 3/H)Neurotensin (NT) was found to bind specifically and with high affinity to crude membranes prepared from rat uterus. Scatchard analysis of saturation binding studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)NT apparently binds to two sites (high affinity Kd 0.5 nM; low affinity Kd 9 nM) with the density of high affinity sites (41 fmoles/mg prot.) being about one-third that of the low affinity sites (100 fmoles/mg prot.). In competition studies, NT and various fragments inhibited (/sup 3/H)NT binding with the following potencies (approximately IC50): NT 8-13 (0.4 nM), NT 1-13 (4 nM), NT 9-13 (130 nM), NT 1-11, NT 1-8 (greater than 100 microM). Quantitatively similar results were obtained using brain tissue. These findings raise the possibility of a role for NT in uterine function.

  20. Effects of High Fat Feeding on Liver Gene Expression in Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki Rats

    PubMed Central

    Almon, Richard R.; DuBois, Debra C.; Sukumaran, Siddharth; Wang, Xi; Xue, Bai; Nie, Jing; Jusko, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of high fat diet (HFD) on obesity and, subsequently, on diabetes are highly variable and modulated by genetics in both humans and rodents. In this report, we characterized the response of Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a spontaneous polygenic model for lean diabetes and healthy Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls, to high fat feeding from weaning to 20 weeks of age. Animals fed either normal diet or HFD were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks of age and a wide array of physiological measurements were made along with gene expression profiling using Affymetrix gene array chips. Mining of the microarray data identified differentially regulated genes (involved in inflammation, metabolism, transcription regulation, and signaling) in diabetic animals, as well as the response of both strains to HFD. Functional annotation suggested that HFD increased inflammatory differences between the two strains. Chronic inflammation driven by heightened innate immune response was identified to be present in GK animals regardless of diet. In addition, compensatory mechanisms by which WKY animals on HFD resisted the development of diabetes were identified, thus illustrating the complexity of diabetes disease progression. PMID:23236253

  1. High-NaCl diet impairs dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aso; DiBona, Gerald F; Grimberg, Elisabeth; Nguy, Lisa; Mikkelsen, Minne Line Nedergaard; Marcussen, Niels; Guron, Gregor

    2014-03-15

    This study examined the effects of 2 wk of high-NaCl diet on kidney function and dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation (RBFA) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an identical diet without adenine (controls). After 10 wk, rats were randomized to either remain on the same diet (0.6% NaCl) or to be switched to high 4% NaCl chow. Two weeks after randomization, renal clearance experiments were performed under isoflurane anesthesia and dynamic RBFA, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), systolic arterial pressure variability (SAPV), and heart rate variability were assessed by spectral analytical techniques. Rats with ACRF showed marked reductions in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow (RBF), whereas mean arterial pressure and SAPV were significantly elevated. In addition, spontaneous BRS was reduced by ∼50% in ACRF animals. High-NaCl diet significantly increased transfer function fractional gain values between arterial pressure and RBF in the frequency range of the myogenic response (0.06-0.09 Hz) only in ACRF animals (0.3 ± 4.0 vs. -4.4 ± 3.8 dB; P < 0.05). Similarly, a high-NaCl diet significantly increased SAPV in the low-frequency range only in ACRF animals. To conclude, a 2-wk period of a high-NaCl diet in ACRF rats significantly impaired dynamic RBFA in the frequency range of the myogenic response and increased SAPV in the low-frequency range. These abnormalities may increase the susceptibility to hypertensive end-organ injury and progressive renal failure by facilitating pressure transmission to the microvasculature.

  2. Anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic activity of Hemidesmus indicus in rats fed with high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshan, Suganya; Subramaniyan, Vetriselvan; Chinnasamy, Velmurugan; Chandiran, Sarath

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dietary changes play major risk roles in oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease and modulate normal metabolic function. The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of different extracts of Hemidesmus indicus to experimental high-fat diet in wistar rats, and their possible mechanism of action. Materials and Methods: Male wistar rats were divided into 6 groups (n=6/group) and fed with a standard diet (control), high-fat diet (HFD), high-fat diet supplemented with different extracts and positive control for 9 weeks. High-fat diet induced changes in average body weight and oxidative stress and elevated levels of plasma lipid profile in rats. Results: Oral administration of methanolic extract of H. indicus (200 mg/kg) offered a significant dose-dependent protection against HFD-induced oxidative stress, as reflected in the levels of catalase (p<0.001 in the aorta, heart and liver), superoxide dismutase (p<0.001 in the aorta, heart and liver), and glutathione peroxidase (p<0.001 in the aorta, heart and liver). Hyperlipidemia condition assessed in terms of body weight, total cholesterol, free cholesterol, ester cholesterol, phospholipids, triglycerides, and atherogenic index and the results showed significant differences between HFD and non-HFD fed rats (p<0.001). High-fat diet treated rats showed changes in hepatic tissue architecture such as micro and macrovascular steatosis, increased fatty infiltration, and inflammation. Conclusion: The present study revealed that the methanolic extract of H. indicus protects against oxidative stress, hyperlipidemia and liver damage. PMID:27761421

  3. High affinity choline uptake: an early index of cholinergic innervation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, M; Kataoka, K

    1975-08-29

    The uptake of [3H]choline was investigated in nuclei-free homogenates or crude synaptosomal fractions (P2) from rat brain under various stages of development. A comparable sensitivity of uptake to treatment by hyposmotic shock suggested the involvement of synaptosomal populations in choline uptake in immature as well as in adult brains. However, significant changes in the "apparent" Km for the high affinity transport system and quantitative differences in the Na ion requirement for maximal uptake at 0.43 muM choline concentration were found during development; facts which suggested a greater contribution of the low affinity system in the more immature brains. Assuming that the uptake with high and low sensitivity to Na+ reduction reflected that via the high and low affinity system reslectively, we have attempted to obtain real Km values for the high affinity system. These Km values changed less than those measured directly, suggesting that the affinity constant for the high affinity system does not change during development. On these assumptions, the developmental changes of cholinergic synaptogenesis were examined in 5 distinct regions of the brain. It was found that the synaptogenesis begins several days earlier than the increase of choline acetyltransferase (ChAc) level in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus, the superior colliculus and the cerebellum. These regions may be included among the terminal-rich regions according to available evidence related to cholinergic systems. On the other hand, synaptogenesis accompanied the concomitant ChAc increase in the striatum, where the cholinergic interneurons are present. It is concluded that the increase of ChAc in the terminal-rich regions is delayed by the axoplasmic flow; therefore, the earlier index of cholinergic synaptogenesis in these regions is the high affinity uptake activity rather than the enzyme activity.

  4. Mu opioid receptor modulation in the nucleus accumbens lowers voluntary wheel running in rats bred for high running motivation.

    PubMed

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Will, Matthew J; Booth, Frank W

    2015-10-01

    The exact role of opioid receptor signaling in mediating voluntary wheel running is unclear. To provide additional understanding, female rats selectively bred for motivation of low (LVR) versus high voluntary running (HVR) behaviors were used. Aims of this study were 1) to identify intrinsic differences in nucleus accumbens (NAc) mRNA expression of opioid-related transcripts and 2) to determine if nightly wheel running is differently influenced by bilateral NAc injections of either the mu-opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyo5-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25, 2.5 μg/side), or its antagonist, naltrexone (5, 10, 20 μg/side). In Experiment 1, intrinsic expression of Oprm1 and Pdyn mRNAs were higher in HVR compared to LVR. Thus, the data imply that line differences in opioidergic mRNA in the NAc could partially contribute to differences in wheel running behavior. In Experiment 2, a significant decrease in running distance was present in HVR rats treated with 2.5 μg DAMGO, or with 10 μg and 20 μg naltrexone between hours 0-1 of the dark cycle. Neither DAMGO nor naltrexone had a significant effect on running distance in LVR rats. Taken together, the data suggest that the high nightly voluntary running distance expressed by HVR rats is mediated by increased endogenous mu-opioid receptor signaling in the NAc, that is disturbed by either agonism or antagonism. In summary, our findings on NAc opioidergic mRNA expression and mu-opioid receptor modulations suggest HVR rats, compared to LVR rats, express higher running levels mediated by an increase in motivation driven, in part, by elevated NAc opioidergic signaling.

  5. Low-carbohydrate high-fat diets: regulation of energy balance and body weight regain in rats.

    PubMed

    Caton, Samantha J; Yinglong, Bai; Burget, Lukas; Spangler, Lothar J; Tschöp, Matthias H; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the current investigations was to examine the effects of a low-carbohydrate high-fat diet (LC-HFD) on body weight, body composition, growth hormone (GH), IGF-I, and body weight regain after stopping the dietary intervention and returning the diet back to standard laboratory chow (CH). In study one, both adolescent and mature male Wistar rats were maintained on either an isocaloric LC-HFD or CH for 16 days before having their diet switched. In study two, mature rats were maintained on either LC-HFD or CH for 16 days to determine the effects of the LC-HFD on fat pad weight. LC-HFD leads to body weight loss in mature rats (P < 0.01) and lack of body weight gain in adolescent rats (P < 0.01). Despite less body weight, increased body fat was observed in rats maintained on LC-HFD (P < 0.05). Leptin concentrations were higher (P < 0.05), and IGF-I (P < 0.01) concentrations were reduced in the LC-HFD rats. When the diet was returned to CH following LC-HFD, body weight regain was above and beyond that which was lost (P < 0.01). The LC-HFD resulted in increased body fat and had a negative effect upon both GH and IGF-I concentrations, which might have implications for the accretion and maintenance of lean body mass (LBM), normal growth rate and overall metabolic health. Moreover, when the LC-HFD ceases and a high-carbohydrate diet follows, more body weight is regained as compared to when the LC-HFD is consumed, in the absence of increased energy intake.

  6. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations are critical for fibrin glue adherence in rat high-risk colon anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Buen, Eliseo Portilla-de; Orozco-Mosqueda, Abel; Leal-Cortés, Caridad; Vázquez-Camacho, Gonzalo; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Alvarez-Villaseñor, Andrea Socorro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fibrin glues have not been consistently successful in preventing the dehiscence of high-risk colonic anastomoses. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in glues determine their ability to function as sealants, healers, and/or adhesives. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin on bursting pressure, leaks, dehiscence, and morphology of high-risk ischemic colonic anastomoses using fibrin glue in rats. METHODS: Colonic anastomoses in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 250-350 g) treated with fibrin glue containing different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin were evaluated at post-operative day 5. The interventions were low-risk (normal) or high-risk (ischemic) end-to-end colonic anastomoses using polypropylene sutures and topical application of fibrinogen at high (120 mg/mL) or low (40 mg/mL) concentrations and thrombin at high (1000 IU/mL) or low (500 IU/mL) concentrations. RESULTS: Ischemia alone, anastomosis alone, or both together reduced the bursting pressure. Glues containing a low fibrinogen concentration improved this parameter in all cases. High thrombin in combination with low fibrinogen also improved adherence exclusively in low-risk anastomoses. No differences were detected with respect to macroscopic parameters, histopathology, or hydroxyproline content at 5 days post-anastomosis. CONCLUSIONS: Fibrin glue with a low fibrinogen content normalizes the bursting pressure of high-risk ischemic left-colon anastomoses in rats at day 5 after surgery. PMID:24714834

  7. Involvement of purinergic P2X4 receptors in alcohol intake of high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Kelle M.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Lasek, Amy W.; Bell, Richard L.; McBride, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The P2X4 receptor is thought to be involved in regulating alcohol-consuming behaviors and ethanol (EtOH) has been reported to inhibit P2X4 receptors. Ivermectin is an anti-parasitic agent that acts as a positive allosteric modulator of the P2X4 receptor. The current study examined the effects of systemically- and centrally-administered ivermectin on alcohol drinking of replicate lines of high-alcohol-drinking (HAD-1/HAD-2) rats, and the effects of lentiviral-delivered short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting P2rx4 on EtOH intake of female HAD2 rats. Method For the 1st experiment, adult male HAD-1 & HAD-2 rats were given 24-hr free-choice access to 15% EtOH vs. water. Dose-response effects of ivermectin (1.5 to 7.5 mg/kg i.p.) on EtOH intake were determined; the effects of ivermectin were then examined for 2% w/v sucrose intake over 5 consecutive days. In the 2nd experiment, female HAD-2 rats were trained to consume 15% EtOH under 2-hr limited access conditions, and dose-response effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of ivermectin (0.5 to 2.0 μg) were determined over 5 consecutive days. The 3rd experiment determined the effects of microinfusion of a lentivirus expressing P2rx4 shRNAs into the posterior ventral tegmental area (VTA) on 24-hr EtOH free-choice drinking of female HAD-2 rats. Results The highest i.p. dose of ivermectin reduced alcohol drinking (30-45%) in both rat lines, but did not alter sucrose intake. HAD-2 rats appeared to be more sensitive than HAD1 rats to the effects of ivermectin. ICV administration of ivermectin reduced 2-hr limited access intake (∼35%) of female HAD-2 rats; knockdown of P2rx4 expression in the posterior VTA reduced 24-hr free choice EtOH intake (∼20%). Conclusion Overall, the results of the current study support a role for P2X4 receptors within the mesolimbic system in mediating alcohol drinking behavior. PMID:26334550

  8. Oral administration of Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-263 improves insulin resistance and ameliorates hepatic steatosis in high fructose-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), characterized by peripheral insulin resistance, is the most common form of diabetes. Probiotics are live micro-organisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer delaying effect on DM development. In this study, the effects Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-263 (Lr263), a new probiotic strain developed by our laboratory, on insulin resistance and the development of hepatic steatosis in high-fructose fed rats were explored. Furthermore, the relevant regulatory pathways involved were also investigated. Method Male Sprague–Dawley rats were fed a high-fructose diet with or without Lr263 administration for 14 weeks. The composition of fecal microbiota, oral glucose tolerance, glycated haemoglobin, insulin, leptin, C-peptide, and incretins were measured. The markers of liver injury, serum and hepatic lipids profile, activity of hepatic antioxidant enzyme, and proinflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue were investigated. Additionally, the expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and insulin signaling related genes in adipose tissue were also studied. Liver sections were examined for hepatic steatosis using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results The levels of serum glucose, insulin, leptin, C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin, GLP-1, liver injury markers, lipid profile in serum and liver were significantly increased in high-fructose-fed rats. However, after Lr263 administration, the elevation of these parameters was significantly suppressed. Feeding of Lr263 reversed the decreased number of bifidobacterium species and lactobacillus species and increased number of clostridium species induced by high fructose treatment. The decreased activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes in HFD rats were dramatically reversed by Lr263 treatment. Concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α in adipose tissue which were elevated in high fructose treatment were markedly decreased after Lr263 feeding. Decreased levels of PPAR-γ and GLUT4 mRNA after high fructose

  9. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  10. Laughing Rats? Playful Tickling Arouses High-Frequency Ultrasonic Chirping in Young Rodents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panksepp, Jaak; Burgdorf, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In this reprint of a seminal article, once considered quite controversial, the authors discuss their radical claim that rats laugh. Even more provocative, the authors found that this rat-joy sound, especially evident during play, could be amplified dramatically by what they formally call heterospecific (cross-species) handplay (tickling). The…

  11. Antioxidant effects of fucoxanthin rich powder in rats fed with high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ae Wha; Na, Se Jung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the antioxidant effect of fucoxanthin. After rats were fed a normal fat diet (NF), high fat diet (HF), and high fat with 0.2% fucoxanthin diet (HF + Fxn) for 4 weeks, the markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity like lipid peroxidation, plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and gluthathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)) were determined. mRNA expression of transcription factor, nuclear erythroid factor like 2 (Nrf2), and its target genes such as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were also determined. Mean weight gain in the HF + Fxn group was lower, without statistical significance, and the total food intake in the HF + Fxn group was lower than that in the HF group (P < 0.05). The activity of GSH-Px (P < 0.05) in plasma was significantly higher in the HF + Fxn group than those in the HF group (P < 0.05). In the liver, the activities of catalase (P < 0.05) and GSH-Px (P < 0.05) in the HF + Fxn group were significantly higher than those in the HF group. Plasma TAC level was significantly higher in the HF + Fxn group than that in the HF group (P < 0.05). Lipid peroxidation in plasma tended to be lower without statistical significance. Fucoxanthin supplements were shown to have higher mRNA expression of Nrf2 and NQO1 than those in the high fat diet only group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation of fucoxanthin improved the antioxidant capacity, depleted by high fat diet, by activating the Nrf2 pathway and its downstream target gene NQO1. Therefore, supplementation of fucoxanthin, especially for those who consume high fat in their diet, may benefit from reduced risk of oxidative stress. PMID:24353833

  12. Hypoglycemic and insulin-sensitizing effects of berberine in high-fat diet- and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanwen; Campbell, Tony; Perry, Benjamin; Beaurepaire, Cécile; Qin, Ling

    2011-02-01

    Hypoglycemic effects of berberine (BBR) have been reported in several studies in cell and animal models. However, the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. The present study was therefore aimed at determining the effect and underlying mechanisms of action of BBR on diabetes in a high-fat diet- and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model. Ninety male Sprague-Dawley rats, 150 to 170 g, were housed individually in cages. Two groups (n = 12 each) were fed the AIN-93G diet (normal control) and the same diet modified to contain 33% fat and 2% cholesterol (high-fat control), respectively. The third group (n = 66) was fed the high-fat diet and injected intraperitoneally 2 weeks later with 35 mg/kg body weight of streptozotocin in citrate buffer (pH 4.5). The rats in both control groups were injected with the vehicle. After 12 days, rats with semifasting (5 hours) blood glucose levels between 14 and 25 mmol/L were divided into 4 groups (n = 12 each) and treated with 0 (diabetic control), 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg/d of BBR for 6 weeks while continuing on the high-fat diet. Hypoglycemic effects of BBR were consistently demonstrated by semifasting and fasting blood glucose levels, and insulin-sensitizing effects were seen during oral glucose tolerance testing. Berberine also reduced food intake while having no effect on body weight in diabetic rats. No effect of BBR was observed on plasma levels of insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), or inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein). Berberine did not affect the state of oxidative stress as assessed by the activity of superoxide dismutase and the concentrations of malondialdehyde and reduced and oxidized glutathione in the liver. These findings demonstrated the hypoglycemic and insulin-sensitizing capabilities of BBR, with the underlying mechanisms awaiting further investigation.

  13. Effects of discontinuing a high-fat diet on mitochondrial proteins and 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Delin; Shuler, Jeffrey M; Raider, Kayla D; Rogers, Robert S; Wheatley, Joshua L; Geiger, Paige C; Stanford, John A

    2015-07-10

    Diet-induced obesity can increase the risk for developing age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Increasing evidence suggests that mitochondrial and proteasomal mechanisms are involved in both insulin resistance and PD. The goal of this study was to determine whether diet intervention could influence mitochondrial or proteasomal protein expression and vulnerability to 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) depletion in rats' nigrostriatal system. After a 3 month high-fat diet regimen, we switched one group of rats to a low-fat diet for 3 months (HF-LF group), while the other half continued with the high-fat diet (HF group). A chow group was included as a control. Three weeks after unilateral 6-OHDA lesions, HF rats had higher fasting insulin levels and higher Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), indicating insulin resistance. HOMA-IR was significantly lower in HF-LF rats than HF rats, indicating that insulin resistance was reversed by switching to a low-fat diet. Compared to the Chow group, the HF group exhibited significantly greater DA depletion in the substantia nigra but not in the striatum. DA depletion did not differ between the HF-LF and HF group. Proteins related to mitochondrial function (such as AMPK, PGC-1α), and to proteasomal function (such as TCF11/Nrf1) were influenced by diet intervention, or by 6-OHDA lesion. Our findings suggest that switching to a low-fat diet reverses the effects of a high-fat diet on systemic insulin resistance, and mitochondrial and proteasomal function in the striatum. Conversely, they suggest that the effects of the high-fat diet on nigrostriatal vulnerability to 6-OHDA-induced DA depletion persist.

  14. High-affinity IgG antibodies develop naturally in Ig-knockout rats carrying germline human IgH/Igκ/Igλ loci bearing the rat CH region.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Avis, Suzanne; Binnie, Ashleigh; Dilley, Jeanette; Yang, Xi; Lindquist, Kevin; Ménoret, Séverine; Iscache, Anne-Laure; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; Rajpal, Arvind; Anegon, Ignacio; Neuberger, Michael S; Buelow, Roland; Brüggemann, Marianne

    2013-02-15

    Mice transgenic for human Ig loci are an invaluable resource for the production of human Abs. However, such mice often do not yield human mAbs as effectively as conventional mice yield mouse mAbs. Suboptimal efficacy in delivery of human Abs might reflect imperfect interaction between the human membrane IgH chains and the mouse cellular signaling machinery. To obviate this problem, in this study we generated a humanized rat strain (OmniRat) carrying a chimeric human/rat IgH locus (comprising 22 human V(H)s, all human D and J(H) segments in natural configuration linked to the rat C(H) locus) together with fully human IgL loci (12 Vκs linked to Jκ-Cκ and 16 Vλs linked to Jλ-Cλ). The endogenous Ig loci were silenced using designer zinc finger nucleases. Breeding to homozygosity resulted in a novel transgenic rat line exclusively producing chimeric Abs with human idiotypes. B cell recovery was indistinguishable from wild-type animals, and human V(D)J transcripts were highly diverse. Following immunization, the OmniRat strain performed as efficiently as did normal rats in yielding high-affinity serum IgG. mAbs, comprising fully human variable regions with subnanomolar Ag affinity and carrying extensive somatic mutations, are readily obtainable, similarly to conventional mAbs from normal rats.

  15. Withdrawal from chronic, intermittent access to a highly palatable food induces depressive-like behavior in compulsive eating rats.

    PubMed

    Iemolo, Attilio; Valenza, Marta; Tozier, Lisa; Knapp, Clifford M; Kornetsky, Conan; Steardo, Luca; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2012-09-01

    The increased availability of highly palatable foods is a major contributing factor toward the development of compulsive eating in obesity and eating disorders. It has been proposed that compulsive eating may develop as a form of self-medication to alleviate the negative emotional state associated with withdrawal from highly palatable foods. This study was aimed at determining whether withdrawal from chronic, intermittent access to a highly palatable food was responsible for the emergence of depressive-like behavior. For this purpose, a group of male Wistar rats was provided a regular chow diet 7 days a week (Chow/Chow), whereas a second group of rats was provided chow for 5 days a week, followed by a 2-day access to a highly palatable sucrose diet (Chow/Palatable). Following 7 weeks of diet alternation, depressive-like behavior was assessed during withdrawal from the highly palatable diet and following renewed access to it, using the forced swim test, the sucrose consumption test, and the intracranial self-stimulation threshold procedure. It was found that Chow/Palatable rats withdrawn from the highly palatable diet showed increased immobility time in the forced swim test and decreased sucrose intake in the sucrose consumption test compared with the control Chow/Chow rats. Interestingly, the increased immobility in the forced swim test was abolished by renewing access to the highly palatable diet. No changes were observed in the intracranial self-stimulation threshold procedure. These results validate the hypothesis that withdrawal from highly palatable food is responsible for the emergence of depressive-like behavior, and they also show that compulsive eating relieves the withdrawal-induced negative emotional state.

  16. Striatal Glutamate and GABA after High Frequency Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Shim, Insop; Sung, Jae Hoon; Hong, Jae Taek; Kim, Il sup; Cho, Chul Bum

    2017-01-01

    Objective High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is recognized as an effective treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. However, the neurochemical basis of its effects remains unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of STN HFS in intact and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rat model on changes of principal neurotransmitters, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the striatum. Methods The authors examined extracellular glutamate and GABA change in the striatum on sham group, 6-OHDA group, and 6-OHDA plus deep brain stimulation (DBS) group using microdialysis methods. Results High-pressure liquid chromatography was used to quantify glutamate and GABA. The results show that HFS-STN induces a significant increase of extracellular glutamate and GABA in the striatum of 6-OHDA plus DBS group compared with sham and 6-OHDA group. Conclusion Therefore, the clinical results of STN-HFS are not restricted to the direct STN targets but involve widespread adaptive changes within the basal ganglia. PMID:28264233

  17. High-frequency sound field and bubble formation in a rat decompression model.

    PubMed

    Shupak, Avi; Arieli, Yehuda; Bitterman, Haim; Brod, Vera; Arieli, Ran; Rosenhause, Giora

    2002-05-01

    High-frequency sound might cause bubble enlargement by rectified diffusion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate gas bubble formation in the immersed diving animal during exposure to high-frequency sound. Anaesthetised rats were subjected to a simulated diving profile while immersed inside a hyperbaric chamber. An acoustic beacon (pinger) was placed ventral to the animal's abdomen, transmitting at an intensity of 208.9 dB re 1 micro Pa and a frequency of 37 kHz. Six groups of eight animals were included in the study as in Table 1, breathing air (n = 4) or Nitrox 72/28 (n = 2), at a depth of 0 m, 30 m or 40 m. Immediately after decompression, the intestinal mesenterium was imaged, and frames were acquired digitally. The number of bubbles and their radii were analysed and compared among the groups. The mean bubble density for group 1 was 1.35 +/- 0.18 bubbles/mm(2), significantly higher when compared with the other groups (p < 0.0001). The average bubble radius for groups 1 and 2 was similar (12.57 +/- 4.1 and 10.63 +/- 1.8 microm, respectively), but significantly larger than in the other groups (p < 0.0002). The percentage of bubbles with a radius greater than 50 microm was significantly higher in group 1 (p < 0.0001). The results suggest that commercially available underwater pingers might enhance bubble growth during deep air diving.

  18. Lipoprotein lipase activity and chylomicron clearance in rats fed a high fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.M.; Layman, D.K.

    1988-11-01

    The relationships of tissue and plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities to tissue uptake and plasma clearance of UC-labeled chylomicron-triglyceride ( UC-CM-TG) were studied in female rats fed isoenergetic and isonitrogenous control (12% kJ from fat) or high fat diets (72% kJ from fat) for 8 wk. Animals fed the high-fat diet had higher levels of fasting plasma triglycerides and lower LPL activities in heart, renal adipose tissue and post-heparin plasma. Changes in LPL activities of skeletal muscles varied among muscles with higher values in the soleus and plantaris (32-61%) and no differences in the gastrocnemius. The lower LPL activity in renal adipose tissue was associated with lower uptake of fatty acids from UC-CM-TG by adipose. Fatty-acid uptake from labeled TG was not associated with tissue LPL activity in other tissues. Clearance of UC-CM-TG from plasma and the half-lives of UC-CM-TG were similar in both dietary groups. These data indicate that tissue and plasma LPL activities are not a direct index of uptake of fatty acids by tissues or clearance of chylomicron triglycerides.

  19. Specialized structure and metabolic activities of high endothelial venules in rat lymphatic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, N D; Anderson, A O; Wyllie, R G

    1976-01-01

    Microscopic, histochemical and ultrastructural techniques were used to define characteristics of high endothelial venules (HEV) in rat lymphatic tissues. This endothelium contained acetyl esterase and acid hydrolase activities which were not altered by lymphocyte depletion. No immunoglobulins were detected on luminal surfaces of HEV by fluorescent antibody staining. Only minor structural differences were seen between HEV within lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. At both sites, high endothelial cells were linked together by macular junctional complexes and interlocking basal foot processes. Endothelial cell cytoplasm moulded about surfaces of lymphocytes migrating through the venular wall, and flocculant deposits of basement membrane formed over lymphocytes penetrating the basal lamina. The endothelium was ensheathed by three to five layers of overlapping reticular cell plates and connective tissue. Each plate was linked to the reticular meshwork of the node by collagen bundles and anchoring filaments which inserted into the plate's external limiting membrane. This permitted individual paltes to separate or approximate each other as tissue and intravascular pressure varied, and lymphocytes moved across the sheath by insinuating themselves into gaps between overlapping plates. This composite structure of the HEV wall appeared to facilitate lymphocyte entry into the node and minimized vascular leakge. Images Figures 11-13 Figures 1-4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figures 9-10 Figures 14-15 Figure 16 Figures 17-20 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 PMID:1027726

  20. Role of TRPV1 in high-threshold rat colonic splanchnic afferents is revealed by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Phillis, Benjamin D; Martin, Chris M; Kang, Daiwu; Larsson, Håkan; Lindström, Erik A; Martinez, Vicente; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2009-08-07

    The vanilloid-1 receptor TRPV1 is known to play a role in extrinsic gastrointestinal afferent function. We investigated the role of TRPV1 in mechanosensitivity in afferents from normal and inflamed tissue. Colonic mechanosensitivity was determined in an in vitro rat colon preparation by recording from attached splanchnic nerves. Recordings were made from serosal/mesenteric afferents responding only at high thresholds to graded mechanical stimulation with von Frey probes. Colonic inflammation was induced by adding 5% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water for 5 days, and was confirmed by histopathology. The selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB-750364 (10(-8) to 10(-6)M), was tested on mechanosensory stimulus response functions of afferents from normal and inflamed preparations (N=7 each). Mechanosensory responses had thresholds of 1-2g, and maximal responses were observed at 12 g. The stimulus response function was not affected by DSS-induced colitis. SB-750364 had no effect on stimulus response functions in normal preparations, but reduced (up to 60%) in a concentration-dependent manner those in inflammation (2-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Moreover, in inflamed tissue, spontaneous afferent activity showed a dose-dependent trend toward reduction with SB-750364. We conclude that mechanosensitivity of high-threshold serosal colonic splanchnic afferents to graded stimuli is unaffected during DSS colitis. However, there is a positive influence of TRPV1 in mechanosensitivity in inflammation, suggesting up-regulation of excitatory TRPV1-mediated mechanisms.

  1. A Root-Based Combination Supplement Containing Pueraria lobata and Rehmannia glutinosa and Exercise Preserve Bone Mass in Ovariectomized Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ok, Hyang Mok; Gebreamanuel, Meron Regu; Oh, Sang A; Jeon, Hyejin; Lee, Won Jun; Kwon, Oran

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a supplement containing Pueraria lobata/Rehmannia glutinosa (PR) root extracts on bone turnover in ovariectomized (OVX) rats (a model for postmenopausal osteoporosis). Female Sprague-Dawley rats (8 weeks old) were randomized into eight groups: sham-operated rats with low-fat control diet + vehicle, OVX rats with low-fat control diet + vehicle, OVX rats with high-fat diet (HFD) + vehicle, OVX rats with HFD + vehicle + exercise, OVX rats with HFD + PR (400 mg/kg body weight/day p.o.), OVX rats with HFD + PR + exercise, OVX rats with HFD + 17β-estradiol (0.5 mg/kg body weight/day p.o.), OVX rats with HFD + 17β-estradiol + exercise. Bone microarchitecture, bone turnover markers (e.g., plasma alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin), expressions of osteogenic and resorptive gene markers in the bone were measured. Eight weeks of PR and/or aerobic exercise improved cortical microarchitecture of the femur and decreased markers of bone turnover and expression of skeletal osteoclastogenic genes in the femur. PR supplementation combined with exercise preserved bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency and should be investigated further as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy for preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

  2. Diets containing soy or rice protein isolate increase insulin sensitivity and improve lipid homeostasis in weanling rats fed high fat, high cholesterol Western diets as a result of activation of PPAR and LXR-mediated pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study examined the effects of feeding soy protein isolate (SPI) and rice protein isolate (RPI) on insulin sensitivity and fat breakdown in weanling rats consuming high fat/high cholesterol diets. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on semi-purified diets containing the milk protein case...

  3. Sesamin ameliorates hepatic steatosis and inflammation in rats on a high-fat diet via LXRα and PPARα.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruijuan; Yu, Yan; Hu, Senke; Zhang, Jinghua; Yang, Haixia; Han, Bei; Cheng, Yue; Luo, Xiaoqin

    2016-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined by a nonalcohol relevant pathological accumulation of fat in the liver. Previous studies have shown that sesamin exerts antioxidant effects and improves lipid metabolism of the fatty liver. In this study, we hypothesized that sesamin improves lipid homeostasis of Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) by regulating the expression of genes related to de novo lipogenesis and β-oxidation. We induced NAFLD in rats with HFD and examined the effect of sesamin in vivo. The results showed that HFD rats accumulated total cholesterol and triacylglycerols in the liver and developed inflammation, as evidenced by the elevation of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the liver and serum. Sesamin attenuated the disease progression by improving the blood lipid profile in a dose-dependent manner. Sesamin reduced the serum levels of total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and free fatty acid, whereas it increased the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Meanwhile, sesamin increased the activities of hepatic glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase while reducing the level of malonaldehyde and cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, higher doses of sesamin reduced the expression of liver X receptor α and its downstream target genes, whereas it upregulated the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-mediated signaling. These findings suggest that sesamin attenuates diet-induced dyslipidemia and inflammation of NAFLD in rats via mechanisms regulated by liver X receptor α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α.

  4. Effect of high saturated free fatty acids feeding on progression of renal failure in rat model of experimental nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Zaid O.; Sattar, Munavvar A.; Abdullah, Nor A.; Rathore, Hassaan A.; Johns, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The current study evaluates the impact of high saturated fat feeding in rat model of experimental nephrotoxicity induced by gentamicin. Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 g were randomized into four groups; the first one received the standard rodents chow for 8 weeks and was treated as control, the second group (HFD)received an experimental high fat diet rich in palm kernel oil (40% of Calories as fat) for the same period. The third group (HFDG) was given 80 mg/kg (body weight)/day gentamicin sulphate intraperitoneally during the last 24 days of the feeding period while the fourth group was given gentamicin as above along with the standard rodents chow. Renal function was assessed through measuring serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and absolute and fractional excretion of both sodium and potassium. At the end, rats underwent a surgical procedure for blood pressure measurement. Renal function study showed a stronger nephrotoxicity for HFDG group. Hypertension was observed in HFD group while the pressure declined after gentamicin co-administration. Overall, changing the feeding behavior toward using more SAFFAs for rats injected with gentamicin promotes the progression of renal failure. PMID:22364300

  5. Comparison of cardiovascular protective effects of tropical seaweeds, Kappaphycus alvarezii, Caulerpa lentillifera, and Sargassum polycystum, on high-cholesterol/high-fat diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Matanjun, Patricia; Mohamed, Suhaila; Muhammad, Kharidah; Mustapha, Noordin Mohamed

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the comparative in vivo cardiovascular protective effects of red, green, and brown tropical seaweeds, namely, Kappaphycus alvarezii (or Eucheuma cottonii), Caulerpa lentillifera, and Sargassum polycystum, in rats fed on high-cholesterol/high-fat (HCF) diets. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 260-300 g) on the HCF diet had significantly increased body weight, plasma total cholesterol (TC), plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), plasma triglycerides (TG), lipid peroxidation, and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase levels after 16 weeks. Supplementing 5% seaweeds to HCF diet significantly reduced plasma TC (-11.4% to -18.5%), LDL-C (-22% to -49.3%), and TG (-33.7% to -36.1%) levels and significantly increased HDL-C levels (16.3-55%). Among the seaweeds, S. polycystum showed the best anti-obesity and blood GSH-Px properties, K. alvarezii showed the best antihyperlipemic and in vivo antioxidation effects, and C. lentillifera was most effective at reducing plasma TC. All seaweeds significantly reduced body weight gain, erythrocyte GSH-Px, and plasma lipid peroxidation of HCF diet rats towards the values of normal rats.

  6. Inhibitory Effects of Eucalyptus and Banaba Leaf Extracts on Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Induced by a High-Fructose/High-Glucose Diet in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Soejima, Yurie; Kumagai, Arisa; Koeda, Tatsuki; Shojo, Aiko; Nakagawa, Kazuya; Harada, Naoki; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Toshikazu; Fukusato, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a liver disease associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to examine whether eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) leaf extract (ELE) and banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa L.) leaf extract (BLE) inhibited NASH induced by excessive ingestion of fructose in rats. Wistar rats were divided into four groups according to four distinct diets: starch diet (ST), high-fructose/high-glucose diet (FG), FG diet supplemented with ELE, or FG diet supplemented with BLE. All rats were killed after 5 weeks of treatment. Serum alanine aminotransferase and total cholesterol levels were significantly lower in the BLE group than in the FG group. Liver histopathology, including steatosis, lipogranulomas, and perisinusoidal fibrosis, was significantly attenuated in the ELE and BLE groups compared with the FG group. Levels of 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), which reflect oxidative injury to the liver, were significantly suppressed by ELE and BLE. Western blotting analysis indicated that interleukin-6 expression levels were significantly lower in the ELE and BLE groups than in the FG group. These results suggest that ELE and BLE reduced lipogenesis, oxidative stress, and inflammatory cytokine expression and thus inhibited NASH induced by excessive ingestion of fructose in rats. PMID:26000287

  7. Inhibitory effects of eucalyptus and banaba leaf extracts on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis induced by a high-fructose/high-glucose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Soejima, Yurie; Kumagai, Arisa; Koeda, Tatsuki; Shojo, Aiko; Nakagawa, Kazuya; Harada, Naoki; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Toshikazu; Fukusato, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a liver disease associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to examine whether eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) leaf extract (ELE) and banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa L.) leaf extract (BLE) inhibited NASH induced by excessive ingestion of fructose in rats. Wistar rats were divided into four groups according to four distinct diets: starch diet (ST), high-fructose/high-glucose diet (FG), FG diet supplemented with ELE, or FG diet supplemented with BLE. All rats were killed after 5 weeks of treatment. Serum alanine aminotransferase and total cholesterol levels were significantly lower in the BLE group than in the FG group. Liver histopathology, including steatosis, lipogranulomas, and perisinusoidal fibrosis, was significantly attenuated in the ELE and BLE groups compared with the FG group. Levels of 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), which reflect oxidative injury to the liver, were significantly suppressed by ELE and BLE. Western blotting analysis indicated that interleukin-6 expression levels were significantly lower in the ELE and BLE groups than in the FG group. These results suggest that ELE and BLE reduced lipogenesis, oxidative stress, and inflammatory cytokine expression and thus inhibited NASH induced by excessive ingestion of fructose in rats.

  8. Early Life Stress Induced by Limited Nesting Material Produces Metabolic Resilience in Response to a High-Fat and High-Sugar Diet in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Antoniadis, Christopher P.; Wang, Kristy W.; Morris, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions experienced in early life can profoundly influence long-term metabolic health, but the additive impact of poor nutrition is poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that early life stress (ELS) induced by limited nesting material (LN) combined with high-fat and high-sugar diet (HFHS) post-weaning would worsen diet-related metabolic risk. Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to LN, postnatal days 2–9, and at weaning (3 weeks), siblings were given unlimited access to chow or HFHS resulting in (Con-Chow, Con-HFHS, LN-Chow, and LN-HFHS, n = 11–15/group). Glucose and insulin tolerance were tested and rats were killed at 13 weeks. LN rats weighed less at weaning but were not different to control at 13 weeks; HFHS diet led to similar increases in body weight. LN-chow rats had improved glucose and insulin tolerance relative to Con-Chow, whereas LN-HFHS improved insulin sensitivity versus Con-HFHS, associated with increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1-alpha (Pgc-1α) mRNA in muscle. No effect of LN on plasma or liver triglycerides was observed, and hepatic gluconeogenic regulatory genes were unaltered. In summary, this study demonstrates that ELS induced by LN conferred some metabolic protection against insulin and/or glucose intolerance in a diet-dependent manner during adulthood. PMID:26441828

  9. Preventive effect of Monascus-fermented products enriched with ubiquinones on type 2 diabetic rats induced by a high-fructose plus high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Young-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Won

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the aqueous extract of Monascus-fermented grains (MFGEs) enriched with ubiquinones (Coenzyme Qs, CoQ9+CoQ10) alleviates high-fructose (60%) plus high-fat (20%) diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycemia and hepatic oxidative stress in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were fed HFD for 16 weeks and orally administered with MFGEs (300 mg/kg/day) or atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day) for the last 4 weeks of the study. HFD-fed rats exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and impaired insulin sensitivity. MFGE treatment prevented the increase in glucose levels and index of insulin resistance in the HFD-induced diabetic rats. A significant decrease in hepatic lipid peroxidation and significant increases in hepatic superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were observed in the MFGE supplemented group. The results suggest that dietary supplementation with MFGEs enriched with CoQs exerts an antidiabetic effect in type 2 diabetic rats by improving insulin resistance and hepatic antioxidant enzymes.

  10. Trigonelline attenuates hepatic complications and molecular alterations in high-fat high-fructose diet-induced insulin resistance in rats.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Nehal A; Ramadan, Amer; Erian, Emad Y; Saleh, Dalia O; Sedik, Ahmed A; Badawi, Manal; El Hotaby, Walid

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trigonelline (TRG) on the hepatic complications associated with high-fat high-fructose (HFHF) diet-induced insulin resistance (IR) in rats. IR was induced by giving a saturated fat diet and 10% fructose in drinking water to rats for 8 weeks. Insulin-resistant rats were orally treated with TRG (50 and 100 mg/kg), sitagliptin (SIT; 5 mg/kg), or a combination of TRG (50 mg/kg) and SIT (5 mg/kg) for 14 days. Liver homogenates were used for assessment of hepatic lipids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and inflammatory cytokines. Histopathological and DNA cytometry examinations were carried out for hepatic and pancreatic tissues. Hepatic tissues were examined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for assessment of any molecular changes. Results of the present study revealed that oral treatment of insulin-resistant rats with TRG or TRG in combination with SIT significantly decreased homeostatic model assessment of IR, hepatic lipids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and the inflammatory cytokines. TRG or TRG in combination with SIT ameliorated the histopathological, DNA cytometry, and molecular alterations induced by a HFHF diet. Finally, it can be concluded that TRG has beneficial effects on the hepatic complications associated with IR due to its hypoglycemic effect and antioxidant potential.

  11. Chronic high blood flow potentiates shear stress-induced release of NO in arteries of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Changdong; Huang, An; Kaley, Gabor; Sun, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Aging impairs shear-stress-dependent dilation of arteries via increased superoxide production, decreased SOD activity, and decreased activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). In the present study, we investigated whether chronic increases in shear stress, elicited by increases in blood flow, would improve vascular endothelial function of aged rats. To this end, second-order mesenteric arteries of young (6 mo) and aged (24 mo) male Fischer-344 rats were selectively ligated for 3 wk to elevate blood flow in a first-order artery [high blood flow (HF)]. An in vitro study was then conducted on first-order arteries with HF and normal blood flow (NF) to assess shear stress (1, 10, and 20 dyn/cm2)-induced release of NO into the perfusate. In HF arteries of both age groups, shear stress-induced NO production increased significantly. In 24-mo-old rats, the reduced shear stress-induced NO production in NF arteries was normalized by HF to a level similar to that in NF arteries of 6-mo-old rats. The increased NO production in HF arteries of 24-mo-old rats was associated with increased shear stress-induced dilation, expression of eNOS protein, and shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, reduced shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation and vasodilation. Superoxide production decreased significantly in HF compared with NF arteries in 24-mo-old rats. The decreased superoxide production was associated with significant increases in CuZn-SOD and extracellular SOD protein expressions and total SOD activity. These results suggest that stimulation with chronic HF restores shear-stress-induced activation of eNOS and antioxidant ability in aged arteries. PMID:17873019

  12. Range Measurement and a Habitat Suitability Map for the Norway Rat in a Highly Developed Urban Environment

    PubMed Central

    Oyedele, Dauda Taofik; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Kairuddinand, Liyana; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Mohd Muhiyuddin

    2015-01-01

    Studies of habitat suitability (HS) are essential when animals’ habitats have been altered or when animals migrate to a habitat different from their natural habitat. This study assessed HS and used an integrated geographic information system in the assessment of Rattus norvegicus in a highly developed urban environment. Using data from the Campbell market and the police quarters of George Town, Malaysia, home range (through the use of 100% Minimum Convex Polygon [MCP], 95% MCP and 95% Harmonic Mean [HM]) was estimated. Home range for male rats at Campbell market reached an asymptote, with a slight increase, at 96 radio fixes (home range = 133.52 m2; core area = 29.39 m2). Female rats reached an asymptote at 62 radio fixes (home range = 13.38 m2; core area = 9.17 m2). At Campbell market, male rats emerged at 1900 hours every day, whereas females emerged at 2000 hours; at police quarters, the most common time of emergence for males was 2000 hours and for females was 2200. Raster charts of R. norvegicus showed that rat hot spots can be grouped into 4 zones (market, shop houses, settlement and general places). The standardised raster chart isolated the market as the major rallying points of the rats (hot spots) by producing the highest rats frequencies of 255. All of the habitat suitability thresholds, including the built-up points, skip bins, water source and nature of the site explored in this study, produced a structural pattern (monotonic increase or decrease) of habitat suitability. PMID:26868708

  13. Anti-Obesity Effects of Aster spathulifolius Extract in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sa-Jic; Bang, Chae-Young; Guo, Yuan-Ri; Choung, Se-Young

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-obesity and antihyperlipidemic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of Aster spathulifolius Maxim extract (ASE) in rats with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Rats were separately fed a normal diet or a HFD for 8 weeks, then they were treated with ASE (62.5, 125, or 250 mg/kg) for another 4.5 weeks. The ASE supplementation significantly lowered body weight gain, visceral fat pad weights, serum lipid levels, as well as hepatic lipid levels in HFD-induced obese rats. Histological analysis showed that the ASE-treated group showed lowered numbers of lipid droplets and smaller size of adipocytes compared to the HFD group. To understand the mechanism of action of ASE, the expression of genes and proteins involved in obesity were measured in liver and skeletal muscle. The expression of fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis-related genes (e.g., PPAR-α, ACO, CPT1, UCP2, and UCP3) of HFD-induced obese rats were increased by ASE treatment. On the other hand, ASE treatment resulted in decreased expression of fat intake-related gene ACC2 and lipogenesis-related genes (e.g., SREBP-1c, ACC1, FAS, SCD1, GPATR, AGPAT, and DGAT). Furthermore, ASE treatment increased the level of phosphorylated AMPKα in obese rats. Similarly, the level of phosphorylated ACC, a target protein of AMPKα in ASE groups, was increased by ASE treatment compared with the HFD group. These results suggest that ASE attenuated visceral fat accumulation and improved hyperlipidemia in HFD-induced obese rats by increasing lipid metabolism through the regulation of AMPK activity and the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis.

  14. Adverse effects of high-intensity sweeteners on energy intake and weight control in male and obesity-prone female rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Sample, Camille H; Davidson, Terry L

    2013-04-01

    The use of high-intensity sweeteners has been proposed as a method to combat increasing rates of overweight and obesity in the human population. However, previous work with male rats suggests that consumption of such sweeteners might contribute to, rather than ameliorate, weight gain. The goals of the present experiments were to assess whether intake of high-intensity sweeteners is associated with increased food intake and body weight gain in female rats; to evaluate whether this effect depends on composition of the maintenance diet (i.e., standard chow compared with diets high in energy, fat, and sugar [HE diets]); and to determine whether the phenotype of the rats with regard to propensity to gain weight on HE diets affects the consequences of consuming high-intensity sweeteners. The data demonstrated that female rats fed a low-fat, standard laboratory chow diet did not gain extra weight when fed yogurt dietary supplements sweetened with saccharin compared with those fed glucose-sweetened dietary supplements. However, female rats maintained on a "Westernized" diet high in fat and sugar (HE diet) showed significant increases in energy intake, weight gain, and adiposity when given saccharin-sweetened compared with glucose-sweetened yogurt supplements. These differences were most pronounced in female rats known to be prone to obesity prior to the introduction of the yogurt diets. Both selectively bred Crl:OP[CD] rats and outbred Sprague-Dawley rats fed an HE diet showing high levels of weight gain (diet-induced obese [DIO] rats) had increased weight gain in response to consuming saccharin-sweetened compared with glucose-sweetened supplements. However, in male rats fed an HE diet, saccharin-sweetened supplements produced extra weight gain regardless of obesity phenotype. These results suggest that the most negative consequences of consuming high-intensity sweeteners may occur in those most likely to use them for weight control, females consuming a "Westernized" diet

  15. Rats with high left ventricular end-diastolic pressure can be identified by Doppler echocardiography one week after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, R M; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, R M; Antonio, E L; Campos, O; P J F, Tucci; Moisés, V A

    2007-11-01

    The severity of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in rats with myocardial infarction (MI) varies widely. Because homogeneity in baseline parameters is essential for experimental investigations, a study was conducted to establish whether Doppler echocardiography (DE) could accurately identify animals with high LV end-diastolic pressure as a marker of LV dysfunction soon after MI. Direct measurements of LV end-diastolic pressure were made and DE was performed simultaneously 1 week after surgically induced MI (N = 16) or sham-operation (N = 17) in female Wistar rats (200 to 250 g). The ratio of peak early (E) to late (A) diastolic LV filling velocities and the ratio of E velocity to peak early (Em) diastolic myocardial velocity were the best predictors of high LV end-diastolic pressure (>12 mmHg) soon after MI. Cut-off values of 1.77 for the E/A ratio (P = 0.001) identified rats with elevated LV end-diastolic pressure with 90% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Cut-off values of 20.4 for the E/Em ratio (P = 0.0001) identified rats with elevated LV end-diastolic pressure with 81.8% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Moreover, E/A and E/Em ratios were the only echocardiographic parameters independently associated with LV end-diastolic pressure in multiple linear regression analysis. Therefore, DE identifies rats with high LV end-diastolic pressure soon after MI. These findings have implications for using serial DE in animal selection and in the assessment of their response to experimental therapies.

  16. Resistant starch and exercise independently attenuate weight regain on a high fat diet in a rat model of obesity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Long-term weight reduction remains elusive for many obese individuals. Resistant starch (RS) and exercise may be useful for weight maintenance. The effects of RS, with or without exercise, on weight regain was examined during relapse to obesity on a high carbohydrate, high fat (HC/HF) diet. Methods Obesity-prone rats were fed ad libitum for 16 weeks then weight reduced on a low fat diet to induce a 17% body weight loss (weight reduced rats). Weight reduced rats were maintained on an energy-restricted low fat diet for 18 weeks, with or without a daily bout of treadmill exercise. Rats were then allowed free access to HC/HF diet containing low (0.3%) or high (5.9%) levels of RS. Weight regain, energy balance, body composition, adipocyte cellularity, and fuel utilization were monitored as rats relapsed to obesity and surpassed their original, obese weight. Results Both RS and exercise independently attenuated weight regain by reducing the energy gap between the drive to eat and suppressed energy requirements. Exercise attenuated the deposition of lean mass during relapse, whereas its combination with RS sustained lean mass accrual as body weight returned. Early in relapse, RS lowered insulin levels and reduced the deposition of fat in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Exercise cessation at five weeks of relapse led to increased weight gain, body fat, subcutaneous adipocytes, and decreased lean mass; all detrimental consequences to overall metabolic health. Conclusions These data are the first to show the complimentary effects of dietary RS and regular exercise in countering the metabolic drive to regain weight following weight loss and suggest that exercise cessation, in the context of relapse on a HC/HF diet, may have dire metabolic consequences. PMID:21736742

  17. Anorexic effects of intra-VTA leptin are similar in low-fat and high-fat-fed rats but attenuated in a subgroup of high-fat-fed obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.; Qi, Xiaoli; Corrie, Lu W.

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is an adiposity hormone that plays an important role in regulating food intake and energy homeostasis. This study investigated the effects of a high-fat (HF) and a low-fat, high-carbohydrate/sugar (LF) diet on leptin sensitivity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in rats. The animals were exposed to a HF or LF diet for 16 weeks. Then the effects of intra-VTA leptin (150 and 500 ng/side, unilateral dose) on food intake and body weights were investigated while the animals were maintained on the HF or LF diet. Long-term exposure to the HF or LF diet led to similar body weight gain in these groups. The HF-fed animals consumed a smaller amount of food by weight than the LF-fed animals but both groups consumed the same amount of calories. The bilateral administration of leptin into the VTA decreased food intake (72 h) and body weights (48 h) to a similar degree in the HF and LF-fed animals. When the HF-fed animals were ranked by body weight gain it was shown that the diet-induced obese rats (HF-fed DIO, upper quartile for weight gain) were less sensitive to the effects of leptin on food intake and body weights than the diet-resistant rats (HF-fed DR, lower quartile for weight gain). A control experiment with fluorescent Cy3-labeled leptin showed that leptin did not spread beyond the borders of the VTA. This study indicates that leptin sensitivity in the VTA is the same in animals that are exposed to a HF or LF diet. However, HF-fed DIO rats are less sensitive to the effects of leptin in the VTA than HF-fed DR rats. Leptin resistance in the VTA might contribute to overeating and weight gain when exposed to a HF diet. PMID:23107643

  18. Anti-diabetic activity of chromium picolinate and biotin in rats with type 2 diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Kazim; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Orhan, Cemal; Sahin, Nurhan; Kucuk, Osman; Ozercan, Ibrahim H; Juturu, Vijaya; Komorowski, James R

    2013-07-28

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate anti-diabetic effects of chromium picolinate (CrPic) and biotin supplementations in type 2 diabetic rats. The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by high-fat diet (HFD) and low-dose streptozotocin. The rats were divided into five groups as follows: (1) non-diabetic rats fed a regular diet; (2) diabetic rats fed a HFD; (3) diabetic rats fed a HFD and supplemented with CrPic (80 μg/kg body weight (BW) per d); (4) diabetic rats fed a HFD and supplemented with biotin (300 μg/kg BW per d); (5) diabetic rats fed a HFD and supplemented with both CrPic and biotin. Circulating glucose, cortisol, total cholesterol, TAG, NEFA and malondialdehyde concentrations decreased (P< 0·05), but serum insulin concentrations increased (P< 0·05) in diabetic rats treated with biotin and CrPic, particularly with a combination of the supplements. Feeding a HFD to diabetic rats decreased PPAR-γ expression in adipose tissue and phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (p-IRS-1) expression of liver, kidney and muscle tissues, while the supplements increased (P< 0·001) PPAR-γ and p-IRS-1 expressions in relevant tissues. Expression of NF-κB in the liver and kidney was greater in diabetic rats fed a HFD, as compared with rats fed a regular diet (P< 0·01). The supplements decreased the expression of NF-κB in diabetic rats (P< 0·05). Results of the present study revealed that supplementing CrPic and biotin alone or in a combination exerts anti-diabetic activities, probably through modulation of PPAR-γ, IRS-1 and NF-κB proteins.

  19. Green tea polyphenols benefits body composition and improves bone quality in long-term high-fat diet-induced obese rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP) on body composition and 2 bone properties in obese female rats. Thirty-six 3-month-old SD female rats were fed either a 3 low-fat (LF) diet (n = 12) or a high-fat (HF) diet (n= 24) for 4 months. Animals in the LF diet 4 group continu...

  20. Differences in Monoamine Oxidase Activity in the Brain of Wistar and August Rats with High and Low Locomotor Activity: A Cytochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Sergutina, A V; Rakhmanova, V I

    2016-06-01

    Monoamine oxidase activity was quantitatively assessed by cytochemical method in brain structures (layers III and V of the sensorimotor cortex, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampal CA3 field) of rats of August line and Wistar population with high and low locomotor activity in the open fi eld test. Monoamine oxidase activity (substrate tryptamine) predominated in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar rats with high motor activity in comparison with rats with low locomotor activity. In August rats, enzyme activity (substrates tryptamine and serotonin) predominated in the hippocampus of animals with high motor activity. Comparison of August rats with low locomotor activity and Wistar rats with high motor activity (i.e. animals demonstrating maximum differences in motor function) revealed significantly higher activity of the enzyme (substrates tryptamine and serotonin) in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. The study demonstrates clear-cut morphochemical specificity of monoaminergic metabolism based on the differences in the cytochemical parameter "monoamine oxidase activity", in the studied brain structures, responsible for the formation and realization of goal-directed behavior in Wistar and August rats.

  1. A New Model For Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in the Rat Utilizing Total Enteral Nutrition to Overfeed a High Polyunsaturated Fat Diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have used total enteral nutrition (TEN) to moderately overfeed rats high polyunsaturated fat diets to develop a model for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed by TEN a 187 kcal/kg 3/4 /d diet containing 5% (total calories) corn oil or a 220 kcal/kg 3/4 /d diet i...

  2. Relatively high motivation for context-evoked reward produces the magnitude effect in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Shoko; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-09-01

    Using a concurrent-chain schedule, we demonstrated the effect of absolute reinforcement (i.e., the magnitude effect) on choice behavior in rats. In general, animals' simultaneous choices conform to a relative reinforcement ratio between alternatives. However, studies in pigeons and rats have found that on a concurrent-chain schedule, the overall reinforcement ratio, or absolute amount, also influences choice. The effect of reinforcement amount has also been studied in inter-temporal choice situations, and this effect has been referred to as the magnitude effect. The magnitude effect has been observed in humans under various conditions, but little research has assessed it in animals (e.g., pigeons and rats). The present study confirmed the effect of reinforcement amount in rats during simultaneous and inter-temporal choice situations. We used a concurrent-chain procedure to examine the cause of the magnitude effect during inter-temporal choice. Our results suggest that rats can use differences in reinforcement amount as a contextual cue during choice, and the direction of the magnitude effect in rats might be similar to humans when using the present procedure. Furthermore, our results indicate that the magnitude effect was caused by the initial-link effect when the reinforcement amount was relatively small, while a loss aversion tendency was observed when the reinforcement amount changed within a session. The emergence of the initial-link effect and loss aversion suggests that rats make choices through cognitive processes predicted by prospect theory.

  3. Olive Leaf Extract Improves the Atherogenic Lipid Profile in Rats Fed a High Cholesterol Diet.

    PubMed

    Olmez, Ercument; Vural, Kamil; Gok, Sule; Ozturk, Zeynep; Kayalar, Husniye; Ayhan, Semin; Var, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    Coronary heart disease because of atherosclerosis is still the most common cause of mortality. Elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol are major risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the olive leaf extract on serum lipid profile, early changes of atherosclerosis and endothelium-dependent relaxations in cholesterol-fed rats. For this purpose, rats were fed by 2% cholesterol-enriched or standard chow for 8 weeks. Some rats in each group were also fed orally by olive leaf extract at doses of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. Atorvastatin at dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight daily was also given as positive control. After 8 weeks, lipid profiles of rat serums were analyzed. Antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) and degree of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde levels) were also measured in the hearts isolated from rats. In addition, expression of adhesion molecules and endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated thoracic aortas of rats were evaluated. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels were found to be increased in cholesterol-fed rats, and both doses of olive leaf extract and atorvastatin significantly decreased those levels. In conclusion, because the olive leaf extract attenuates the increased cholesterol levels, it may have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis.

  4. Efficacy of Garcinia Cambogia on Body Weight, Inflammation and Glucose Tolerance in High Fat Fed Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sripradha, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity leads to derangements in lipid and glucose homeostasis resulting in various metabolic complications. Plants containing vital phytochemicals are known to posses anti obesity properties and have proved to exert beneficial effects in obesity. Objectives: The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of Garcinia Cambogia on body weight, glucose tolerance and inflammation in high fat diet fed male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Five month old male wistar rats (n=40) were divided into four groups. Two groups were fed with standard rodent diet and the remaining two with 30% high fat diet. One group in each of the two sets received the crude ethanolic extract of Garcinia Cambogia at a dose of 400mg/kg body weight/day for ten weeks. Body weight, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, leptin, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and renal function (urea, creatinine, uric acid) were studied. Results: High fat diet fed rats showed increased body weight gain, glucose intolerance, elevated levels of plasma leptin and TNF-α. Supplementation of Garcinia Cambogia extract (GE) along with high fat diet significantly decreased body weight gain, glucose intolerance, plasma leptin and TNF-α level. No significant changes were observed in the renal function parameters in any of the groups. Conclusion: Supplementation of the Garcinia Cambogia extract with high fat diet reduced body weight gain, inflammation and glucose intolerance. PMID:25859449

  5. Effect of a high fat diet on rat adipocyte lipolysis: responses to epinephrine, forskolin, methylisobutylxanthine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, insulin and nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Tepperman, H M; Dewitt, J; Tepperman, J

    1986-10-01

    An earlier report from this laboratory showed that feeding rats a high fat diet decreased epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis in their adipose tissue. Experiments were designed to explore further the effects of such diets on adipocyte response to epinephrine and to several other lipolytic and antilipolytic agents. Rats were fed diets with 67% of energy consisting of glucose or lard for 5 to 7 d. Adipocytes were prepared from epididymal fat pads and lipolysis measured by the release of glycerol into the medium during 1-h incubations. The cells from the rats fed the high fat diet showed lower lipolytic responses to stimulation by epinephrine, forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP than those from rats fed the high glucose diet. The lard diet effect on the lipolytic response to isobutylmethylxanthine varied among experiments, but it also decreased it in some of them. However, the high fat diet did not induce decreased sensitivity or responsiveness to the antilipolytic effect of insulin, although previous reports have demonstrated resistance to other actions of insulin in rats fed a high fat diet. The antilipolytic effect of nicotinic acid was also similar in cells from rats fed a high fat diet to that found for cells from rats fed the high glucose diet.

  6. Protective Effect of High Molecular Weight Protein Sub-fraction of Calotropis procera Latex in Monoarthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Priyanka; Ramos, Marcio V.; Vasconcelos, Mirele da Silveira; Kumar, Vijay L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proteins present in the latex of Calotropis procera have been shown to produce anti-inflammatory effect and to afford protection in various disease models. Objectives: To determine the efficacy of high molecular weight protein sub-fraction (LPPI) of latex of C. procera in ameliorating joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a preclinical model of arthritis. Materials and Methods: Monoarthritis was induced in rats by intra-articular injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and the effect of two doses of LPPI (5 and 25 mg/kg) and diclofenac (5 mg/kg) was evaluated on joint swelling, stair climbing ability, motility, and dorsal flexion pain on day 3. The rats were sacrificed on day 3 to measure tissue levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Evaluation of joint histology was also made. Results: Intra-articular injection of FCA produced joint swelling and difficulty in stair climbing ability, motility, and pain on flexion of the joint as revealed by scores obtained for these functional parameters. LPPI produced a dose-dependent decrease in joint swelling and improved joint functions. Arthritic rats also revealed altered oxidative homeostasis where joint tissue GSH levels were decreased and TBARS levels were increased as compared to normal rats. The levels of these oxidative stress markers were near normal in arthritic rats treated with LPPI. Moreover, treatment with LPPI also maintained the structural integrity of the joint. The protective effect of LPPI was comparable to the standard anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac. Conclusion: The findings of the present study show that LPPI fraction comprising high molecular weight proteins could be used for the alleviation of arthritic symptoms. SUMMARY High molecular weight protein sub-fraction of latex of Calotropis procera (LPPI) reduced joint swelling and hyperalgesia in arthritic ratsLPPI produced a significant improvement in stair climbing ability and motility

  7. Memantine reduces consumption of highly palatable food in a rat model of binge eating

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Tomasz; Zhang, Yulei; Bisaga, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Excessive consumption of highly palatable food has been linked to the development of eating disorders and obesity, and can be modeled in non-food-deprived rats by offering them a limited (2-h daily) access to an optional dietary fat. Since the glutamatergic system has recently emerged as a viable target for binge-eating medication development, we compared the effects of subchronic treatment with glutamatergic receptor antagonists to the effects of a reference appetite-suppressing agent sibutramine on highly palatable food (lard) and normal chow intake. In three separate experiments, the consumption of a standard laboratory chow and lard were measured during 12 days of medication treatment and for 6 days afterwards. Generalized estimating equations analysis demonstrated that sibutramine (7.5 mg/kg, PO) significantly decreased lard consumption, with a concurrent increase in chow consumption. Sibutramine effects disappeared after treatment discontinuation. The NMDA receptor antagonist memantine (5 mg/kg, IP) significantly decreased lard consumption and increased chow consumption, comparable to effects of sibutramine; however, memantine’s effects persisted after treatment discontinuation. The effects of the mGluR5 antagonist MTEP (7.5 mg/kg, IP) on food consumption were in the same direction as seen with memantine, but the observed differences were not significant. In an additional control experiment, sibutramine and memantine reduced unlimited (24 h) chow intake during the treatment phase. Present results provide evidence that glutamatergic neurotransmission might be involved in the regulation of excessive consumption of highly palatable foods, and suggest that NMDA receptor may be an attractive target for developing obesity and disordered eating pharmacotherapies. PMID:20571841

  8. High-dose subchronic imipramine treatment: effects on anxiety-like (conflict) behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Commissaris, R L; Hill, T J

    In the management of both anxiety and depression, agents such as imipramine (IMI) are noted for their 3-5 week delay to onset of clinical effect. A similar delay to onset has been reported for the anxiolytic-like (i.e., anticonflict) effect of chronic IMI treatment (2.5 mg/kg, BID for 5 weeks) in the Conditioned Suppression of Drinking (CSD) conflict paradigm; similar effects have been reported with other antidepressants and in other conflict procedures. In contrast, in the Forced Swim Test (FST) model of depression, antidepressant-like effects are reported immediately following subchronic treatment with relatively high doses of these agents (e.g., 30 mg/kg IMI, 3 times in 24 hr). The present study examined the effects of this high-dose, subchronic treatment with IMI on CSD conflict behavior. Conflict-trained female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups with comparable pretreatment baselines for shocks received. Treatments (0, 15, and 30 mg/kg IMI) were administered intraperitoneally (IP) at 23, 5, and 1 hr prior to CSD conflict testing on day 1; CSD conflict behavior was then monitored daily (Mon-Fri) for 5 weeks following treatment. IMI treatment (30 and, to a lesser extent, 15 mg/kg) significantly reduced shocks received (punished responding) and water intake (unpunished responding) on day 1; although water intake was also slightly reduced in both IMI treatment groups for the remainder of test week 1, there was no difference in shocks received between the various treatments for this period. Subjects receiving 30 mg/kg IMI (but not those receiving 15 mg/kg IMI or vehicle) accepted significantly more shocks than controls on weeks 2-4 (maximal increase at week 3) and returned to pretreatment baseline levels by week 5. Thus, subchronic high-dose treatment with IMI (and perhaps other antidepressants) produces anxiolytic-like effects which are delayed in nature and persist for several weeks after treatment.

  9. Sulfur dioxide derivatives modulation of high-threshold calcium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengqing; Meng, Ziqiang

    2006-09-11

    This study addressed the effect of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) derivatives on high-voltage-activated calcium currents (HVA-I(Ca)) in somatic membrane of freshly isolated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by using the whole-cell configuration of patch-clamp technique. High-threshold Ca(2+) channels are highly expressed in small dorsal root ganglion neurons. SO(2) derivatives increased the amplitudes of calcium currents in a concentration-dependent and voltage-dependent manner. The 50% enhancement concentrations (EC(50)) of SO(2) derivatives on HVA-I(Ca) was about 0.4 microM. In addition, SO(2) derivatives significantly shifted the activation and inactivation curve in the depolarizing direction. Parameters for the fit of a Boltzmann equation to mean values for the activation were V(1/2)=-17.9+/-1.3 mV before and -12.5+/-1.1 mV after application 0.5 microM SO(2) derivatives 2 min (P<0.05). The half inactivation of HVA-I(Ca) was shifted 9.7 mV to positive direction (P<0.05). Furthermore, SO(2) derivatives significantly prolonged the slow constant of inactivation, slowed the fast recovery but markedly accelerated the slow recovery of HVA-I(Ca) from inactivation. From HP of -60 mV 0.5 microM SO(2) derivatives increased the amplitude of HVA-I(Ca) with a depolarizing voltage step to -10 mV about 54.0% in small DRG neurons but 33.3% in large DRG neurons. These results indicated a possible correlation between the change of calcium channels and SO(2) inhalation toxicity, which might cause periphery neurons abnormal regulation of nociceptive transmission via calcium channels.

  10. Poria cocos inhibits high glucose-induced proliferation of rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Joo; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Jin, Song Nan; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2013-01-01

    Mesangial cell proliferation is correlated with the progression of renal failure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a water extract of Poria cocos Wolf (WPC), a well-known medicinal plant, regulates rat mesangial cell proliferation in the presence of high glucose (HG). HG significantly accelerated [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, which was inhibited by WPC (1-50 μg/mL) in a dose-dependent manner. Cell migration and fibronectin mRNA expression data also supported the anti-proliferative effect of WPC. Western blot analysis revealed that pretreatment with WPC decreased the expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and promoted the expression of p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). WPC also suppressed HG-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation. Furthermore, WPC inhibited HG-induced production of dichlorofluorescein (DCF)-sensitive intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, HG promoted mesangial cell proliferation, and WPC inhibited this activity, at least in part, via induction of cell cycle arrest and activation of anti-oxidant properties. Taken together, these results suggest that P. cocos may be a potent regulator of HG-induced proliferation.

  11. Inactivation of a high conductance calcium dependent potassium current in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    McLarnon, J G

    1995-06-23

    Inactivating, high conductance BK-type currents have been recorded from inside-out patches (internal and external K+ of 140 mM and 5 mM, respectively), obtained from cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The presence of prominent inactivation, not normally associated with BK channel activity, was dependent on two factors: a depolarizing step to 0 mV from a holding level of -80 mV and internal calcium at a concentration of 0.7 microM. Without the prior conditioning step to a negative potential, unitary currents were not evident at 0 mV; in addition, such currents were not elicited with the stimulus protocol if the internal Ca2+ was reduced to a level of 0.3 microM. Concomitant with current inactivation was the finding of a delayed activation of BK currents following the depolarizing step. Higher internal calcium, at 100 microM, led to persistent and sustained channel activity at 0 mV which was not dependent on a prior step to -80 mV. These results may be relevant to the complex nature of the repolarizing neuronal current Ic which is the macroscopic analogue of the unitary BK current.

  12. A high sensitivity MEA probe for measuring real time rat brain glucose flux.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjing; Song, Yilin; Shi, Wentao; Lin, Nansen; Jiang, Tingjun; Cai, Xinxia

    2014-05-15

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) relies on a constant supply of external glucose for its undisturbed operation. This article presents an implantable Multi-Electrode Array (MEA) probe for brain glucose measurement. The MEA was implemented on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) wafer using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) methods. There were 16 platinum recording sites on the probe and enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized on them. The glucose sensitivity of the MEA probe was as high as 489 µA mM(-1) cm(-2). 1,3-Phenylenediamine (mPD) was electropolymerized onto the Pt recording surfaces to prevent larger molecules such as ascorbic acid (AA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA) from reaching the recording sites surface. The MEA probe was implanted in the anesthetized rat striatum and responded to glucose levels which were altered by intraperitoneal injection of glucose and insulin. After the in vivo experiment, the MEA probe still kept sensitivity to glucose, these suggested that the MEA probe was reliable for glucose monitoring in brain extracellular fluid (ECF).

  13. Determination of pyrazinamide and its main metabolites in rat urine by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mehmedagic, A; Vérité, P; Ménager, S; Tharasse, C; Chabenat, C; André, D; Lafont, O

    1997-08-01

    A new high-performance liquid chromatograhic procedure for simultaneous determination of pyrazinamide (PZA) and its three metabolites 5-hydroxypyrazinamide (5-OH-PZA), pyrazinoic acid (PA), and 5-hydroxypyrazinoic acid (5-OH-PA), in rat urine was developed. 5-OH-PZA and 5-OH-PA standards were obtained by enzymatic synthesis (xanthine oxidase) and checked by HPLC and GC-MS. Chromatographic separation was achieved in 0.01 M KH2PO4 (pH 5.2), circulating at 0.9 ml/min, on a C18 silica column, at 22 degrees C. The limits of detection were 300 microg/l for PZA, 125 microg/l for PA, 90 microg/l for 5-OH-PZA and 70 microg/l for 5-OH-PA. Good linearity (r2>0.99) was observed within the calibration ranges studied: 0.375-7.50 mg/l for PZA, 0.416-3.33 mg/l for PA, 0.830-6.64 mg/l for 5-OH-PZA and 2.83-22.6 mg/l for 5-OHPA. Accuracy was always lower than +/- 10.8%. Precision was in the range 0.33-5.7%. The method will constitute a useful tool for studies on the influence of drug interactions in tuberculosis treatment.

  14. Resolving Fine Cardiac Structures in Rats with High-Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Irvin; McClymont, Darryl; Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Maguire, Mahon L.; Whittington, Hannah J.; Lygate, Craig A.; Kohl, Peter; Schneider, Jürgen E.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac architecture is fundamental to cardiac function and can be assessed non-invasively with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Here, we aimed to overcome technical challenges in ex vivo DTI in order to extract fine anatomical details and to provide novel insights in the 3D structure of the heart. An integrated set of methods was implemented in ex vivo rat hearts, including dynamic receiver gain adjustment, gradient system scaling calibration, prospective adjustment of diffusion gradients, and interleaving of diffusion-weighted and non-diffusion-weighted scans. Together, these methods enhanced SNR and spatial resolution, minimised orientation bias in diffusion-weighting, and reduced temperature variation, enabling detection of tissue structures such as cell alignment in atria, valves and vessels at an unprecedented level of detail. Improved confidence in eigenvector reproducibility enabled tracking of myolaminar structures as a basis for segmentation of functional groups of cardiomyocytes. Ex vivo DTI facilitates acquisition of high quality structural data that complements readily available in vivo cardiac functional and anatomical MRI. The improvements presented here will facilitate next generation virtual models integrating micro-structural and electro-mechanical properties of the heart. PMID:27466029

  15. KGF-2 targets alveolar epithelia and capillary endothelia to reduce high altitude pulmonary oedema in rats

    PubMed Central

    She, Jun; Goolaerts, Arnaud; Shen, Jun; Bi, Jing; Tong, Lin; Gao, Lei; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2012-01-01

    High altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) severely affects non-acclimatized individuals and is characterized by alveolar flooding with protein- rich oedema as a consequence of blood-gas barrier disruption. Limited choice for prophylactic treatment warrants effective therapy against HAPE. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) has shown efficiency in preventing alveolar epithelial cell DNA damages in vitro. In the current study, the effects of KGF-2 intratracheal instillation on mortality, lung liquid balance and lung histology were evaluated in our previously developed rat model of HAPE. We found that pre-treatment with KGF-2 (5 mg/kg) significantly decreased mortality, improved oxygenation and reduced lung wet-to-dry weight ratio by preventing alveolar-capillary barrier disruption demonstrated by histological examination and increasing alveolar fluid clearance up to 150%. In addition, KGF-2 significantly inhibited decrease of transendothelial permeability after exposure to hypoxia, accompanied by a 10-fold increase of Akt activity and inhibited apoptosis in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, demonstrating attenuated endothelial apoptosis might contribute to reduction of endothelial permeability. These results showed the efficacy of KGF-2 on inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis, preservation of alveolar-capillary barrier integrity and promotion of pulmonary oedema absorption in HAPE. Thus, KGF-2 may represent a potential drug candidate for the prevention of HAPE. PMID:22568566

  16. Ultra high-resolution fMRI and electrophysiology of the rat primary somatosensory cortex✰

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Chen, You-Yin; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Kao, Yu-Chieh Jill; Shyu, Bai-Chuang; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution functional-magnetic-resonance-imaging (fMRI) has been used to study brain functions at increasingly finer scale, but whether fMRI can accurately reflect layer-specific neuronal activities is less well understood. The present study investigated layer-specific cerebral-blood-volume (CBV) fMRI and electrophysiological responses in the rat cortex. CBV fMRI at 40×40 µm in-plane resolution was performed on an 11.7-T scanner. Electrophysiology used a 32-channel electrode array that spanned the entire cortical depth. Graded electrical stimulation was used to study activations in different cortical layers, exploiting the notion that most of the sensory-specific neurons are in layers II–V and most of the nociceptive-specific neurons are in layers V–VI. CBV response was strongest in layer IV of all stimulus amplitudes. Current source density analysis showed strong sink currents at cortical layers IV and VI. Multi-unit activities mainly appeared at layers IV–VI and peaked at layer V. Although our measures showed scaled activation profiles during modulation of stimulus amplitude and failed to detect specific recruitment at layers V and VI during noxious electrical stimuli, there appears to be discordance between CBV fMRI and electrophysiological peak responses, suggesting neurovascular uncoupling at laminar resolution. The technique implemented in the present study offers a means to investigate intracortical neurovascular function in the normal and diseased animal models at laminar resolution. PMID:23384528

  17. Transition of historical control data for high incidence tumors in f344 rats.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, Yuichi; Ando, Ryo; Kasahara, Kenichiro; Nagatani, Mariko; Yamakawa, Seiki; Okazaki, Shuzo

    2013-06-01

    Historical control data of tumor incidence were collected from the control groups (215 animals of each sex) in four recent carcinogenicity studies that were started between 2005 to 2009 (terminally sacrificed between 2007 and 2011) at BoZo Research Center Inc. (Gotemba, Shizuoka, Japan) using Fischer 344 rats (F344/DuCrlCrlj). These data were compared to the previous historical control data (from 1990 to 2004, previously reported) in the same facility. In the results, the incidence of C-cell adenoma in the thyroid tended to increase in both sexes in recent years (30.8% for males and 24.4% for females in 2005-2009) as compared with the previous data (17.4% and 20.1% for males and 11.5% and 11.8% for females in 1990-1999 and 2000-2004, respectively). In addition, the incidences of pancreatic islet cell adenoma in males and uterine adenocarcinoma tended to increase from around 2000 and remained high in recent years (incidences of islet cell adenoma in males of 10.5%, 17.1% and 20.5% in 1990-1999, 2000-2004 and 2005-2009; incidences of uterine adenocarcinoma of 3.3%, 12.0% and 13.5% in 1990-1999, 2000-2004 and 2005-2009, respectively). There was no apparent difference in the incidence of other tumors.

  18. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95/sup 0/C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na/sup +/ ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC/sub 50/ = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC/sub 50/ values below ..mu..M concentrations.

  19. Effects of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid on induced arthritis of the temporomandibular joint in rats.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2015-07-01

    High molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMWHA) has been used to treat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, but controversial results have been described. This study aimed to characterize the morphological and biochemical actions of HMWHA on induced arthritis of the TMJ. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were used, and arthritis of the TMJ was induced through an intra-articular injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) (50 μl). One week after arthritis induction, the animals were treated with HMWHA (once per week for three weeks). Histological analyses were performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine blue and Picrosirius. Were also performed histomorphometric analysis and birefringence of collagenous fibers (polarization microscopy). Biochemical analyses of TMJ tissues were carried out through measurements of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and zymography for evaluation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and -9). Data were analyzed using paired t-test and unpaired t-test, with a 5% significance level. HMWHA reduced histologic changes and thickness of the articular disc, led to a greater arrangement of collagenous fibers, lower concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and lower activity in all isoforms of MMP-2 and -9 in TMJs with induced arthritis. These findings suggest that HMWHA may exert a protective effect on the TMJ.

  20. Isolation of highly purified type A spermatogonia from prepubertal rat testis.

    PubMed

    Morena, A R; Boitani, C; Pesce, M; De Felici, M; Stefanini, M

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new method that allows isolation of highly purified type A spermatogonia from prepubertal rats. The procedure is based on the maximal release of spermatogonia from the seminiferous epithelium obtained by the complete enzymatic digestion of the tubular basal lamina, followed by removal of contaminating somatic cells through adhesion to plastic dishes coated with the lectin Datura stramonium agglutinin and fractionation on a discontinuous Percoll gradient. The cell suspension obtained contains up to 85% type A spermatogonia. Besides morphological criteria, the identification of germ cells and somatic cells has been performed by means of immunocytochemical markers, such as c-kit receptor, which is present only in germ cells, and vimentin, which is present only in somatic cells. All type A spermatogonia isolated were c-kit positive, thus suggesting that c-kit receptor is present in both undifferentiated and differentiating type A spermatogonia. Preliminary culture experiments demonstrate that spermatogonia survival in vitro was significantly improved by the addition of 10% fetal calf serum or horse serum to the culture medium; however, optimal culture conditions remain to be established. In vitro studies on isolated spermatogonia may provide a significant contribution toward elucidation of the mechanisms regulating spermatogonial proliferation and differentiation.

  1. High-viscosity dietary fibers reduce adiposity and decrease hepatic steatosis in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Brockman, David A; Chen, Xiaoli; Gallaher, Daniel D

    2014-09-01

    Viscous dietary fiber consumption lowers the postprandial glucose curve and may decrease obesity and associated comorbidities such as insulin resistance and fatty liver. We determined the effect of 2 viscous fibers, one fermentable and one not, on the development of adiposity, fatty liver, and metabolic flexibility in a model of diet-induced obesity. Rats were fed a normal-fat (NF) diet (26% energy from fat), a high-fat diet (60% energy from fat), each containing 5% fiber as cellulose (CL; nonviscous and nonfermentable), or 5% of 1 of 2 highly viscous fibers-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC; nonfermentable) or guar gum (GG; fermentable). After 10 wk, fat mass percentage in the NF (18.0%; P = 0.03) and GG groups (17.0%; P < 0.01) was lower than the CL group (20.7%). The epididymal fat pad weight of the NF (3.9 g; P = 0.04), HPMC (3.9 g; P = 0.03), and GG groups (3.6 g; P < 0.01) was also lower than the CL group (5.0 g). The HPMC (0.11 g/g liver) and GG (0.092 g/g liver) groups had lower liver lipid concentrations compared with the CL group (0.14 g/g liver). Fat mass percentage, epididymal fat pad weight, and liver lipid concentration were not different among the NF, HPMC, and GG groups. The respiratory quotient was higher during the transition from the diet-deprived to fed state in the GG group (P = 0.002) and tended to be higher in the HPMC group (P = 0.06) compared with the CL group, suggesting a quicker shift from fatty acid (FA) to carbohydrate oxidation. The HPMC group [15.1 nmol/(mg ⋅ h)] had higher ex vivo palmitate oxidation in muscle compared with the GG [11.7 nmol/(mg ⋅ h); P = 0.04] and CL groups [10.8 nmol/(mg ⋅ h); P < 0.01], implying a higher capacity to oxidize FAs. Viscous fibers can reduce the adiposity and hepatic steatosis that accompany a high-fat diet, and increase metabolic flexibility, regardless of fermentability.

  2. Comparison of the behavioral effects of exercise and high fat diet on cognitive function in adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Min; Park, Jong-Min; Song, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Ju; Kim, Youn-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period for neurodevelopment, neuronal plasticity, and cognitive function. Experiences of adolescence can be exerted positive and negative effects on brain development. Physical exercise has a positive effect on brain function, which is characterized by improving memory function and increased neural plasticity. High fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity has a negative effect on brain function, which is characterized by insulin resistance and neuroinflammation and reduced microvessel constructure. Although the positive effect of exercise and negative effect of obesity on cognitive function have been documented, it has not been well whether comparison of the effects of exercise and obesity on cognitive function in adolescent rats. In the present study, we evaluated the behavioral changes related to cognitive function induced by exercise and obesity in adolescent rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: the control group (CON), the exercise group (Ex), the high fat diet group (HFD). The HFD containing fat 60% was freely provided. The present results showed that spatial learning ability and short-term memory did not show significant effect exercise as compared to the control group. The present results showed that spatial learning ability and short-term memory was significantly decreased HFD-induced obesity group as compared to the control group. These results suggest that positive effect of physical exercise in adolescence rats may be exerted no significant effect on cognitive function. But, negative effect of HFD-induced obesity might induce cognitive impairment. HFD-induced obesity in adolescent rats may be used as an animal model of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:28119872

  3. High doses of caffeine reduce in vivo osteogenic activity in prepubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jiwon; Choi, Yuri; Kim, Jisook; Yu, A-Ram; Shin, Ji-Soo; Choi, Yun-Young; Roh, Jaesook

    2015-07-01

    Caffeine adversely affects endochondral ossification during fetal skeletal growth, and results in increased incidence of delayed and abnormal fetal skeletal development. Chronic caffeine intake also decreases growth hormone secretion. Thus, it is conceivable that caffeine may disrupt bone growth during the peripubertal period. This study aimed to investigate the impact of high-caffeine consumption on bone growth throughout puberty. A total of 51 male rats (21 days old) were divided randomly into three groups: a control group and two groups fed caffeine via gavage with 120 and 180 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) for 4 weeks. After death, the final length and weight of leg bones were measured, and the tibia processed for histomorphometric analysis. Caffeine caused a significant decrease in body mass gain. This was accompanied with proportional decreases in lean body mass and body fat. In addition, bone mass and osteogenic activity in vivo were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and (18) F-NaF positron emission tomography. The results showed significant decreases of bone mass and in vivo osteogenic activity in the caffeine-fed groups. Rats fed with caffeine showed a significantly shorter and lighter tibia and femur and the vertebral column compared with controls. In addition, caffeine does not increase the width of the growth plates (GPs), it slows the rate at which the GP closes due to a slower rate of growth. These results demonstrated that caffeine altered osteogenic activity, leading to delayed peripubertal longitudinal bone growth and maturation. Given that osteogenic cells undergo dynamic changes in metabolic activity and that the pubertal growth spurt is mainly stimulated by growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 and sex steroids during pubertal development, caffeine could suppress ossification by interfering with both physiological changes in hormonal secretion and osteogenic activity during this critical period. Further study will be needed to

  4. Consequences of brief exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zengfa; Januszkiewicz, Adolph J; Mayorga, Maria A; Coleman, Gary D; Morrissette, Craig R

    2005-12-01

    Exposure to high-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) is of concern in military operations. Experimentally, the physiologic manifestations of a brief exposure to elevated levels of CO have not been fully described. This study investigated the development of acute CO poisoning in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats (220-380 g). Animals were randomly grouped (n = 6) and exposed to either air or 1 of 6 CO concentrations (1000, 3000, 6000, 10,000, 12,000, or 24,000 ppm) in a continuous air/CO dynamic exposure chamber for 5 min. Respiration was recorded prior to and during exposures. Mixed blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and pH were measured before and immediately after exposure. Before exposure the mean baselines of respiratory minute volumes (RMVs) were 312.6 +/- 43.9, 275.2 +/- 40.8, and 302.3 +/- 39.1 ml/min for the 10,000, 12,000 and 24,000 ppm groups, respectively. In the last minute of exposure RMVs were 118.9 +/- 23.7, 62.1 +/- 10.4, and 22.0 +/- 15.1% (p < .05) of their mean baselines in these 3 groups, respectively. Immediately after exposure, blood COHb saturations were elevated to 60.16, 63.42, and 69.37%, and blood pH levels were reduced to 7.43 +/- 0.09, 7.25 +/- 0.05, and 7.13 +/- 0.04 in the 3 groups, respectively. Mortality during exposure was 1/12 in the 12,000 ppm group and 4/12 in the 24,000 ppm group. Deaths occurred close to the end of 5 min exposure. In each animal that died by exposure, pH was <6.87 and COHb saturation was >82%. Blood pH was unaltered and no death occurred in rats exposed to CO at concentrations <6000 ppm, although COHb saturations were elevated to 14.52, 29.94, and 57.24% in the 1000, 3000, and 6000 ppm groups, respectively. These results suggest that brief exposure to CO at concentrations <10,000 ppm may produce some significant physiological changes. However, exposure to CO at concentrations >10,000 ppm for brief periods as short as 5 min may change RMV, resulting in acute respiratory failure, acidemia, and even death.

  5. Functional food supplements to ameliorate the secondary complications in high fructose fed diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Gite, S S; Yadav, S A; Nilegaonkar, S S; Agte, V V

    2017-04-13

    Functional foods are the most natural and safest source of health ingredients, providing health benefits beyond basic nutrition, and hence can be used as supplements for the prevention of secondary complications in diabetes. Persistent diabetes may cause glycation of various tissue proteins such as of those in lens, kidney, blood, and brain, which may further lead to the development of pathological conditions such as cataract and cardiovascular diseases. This study on adult rats was designed to assess if the functional food supplements A and B (proprietary blends of antioxidant rich plant materials) can reduce secondary complications such as cataract, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress under severe diabetic conditions. After nine weeks of intervention of the supplements, it was found that the % HbA1c levels in the formulation group B significantly (p < 0.05) lowered (10.9%) followed by those in group A (11.1%) as compared to those in the diabetic fructose control (DFC) group (15.1%); moreover, plasma insulin levels were significantly (p < 0.01) improved in the formulation B group (9.8 mU L(-1)) as compared to those in the DFC group (8.5 mU L(-1)). The significantly higher level of plasma TEAC in group B (27.5 mg dL(-1)) (p < 0.02) and group A (26.6 mg dL(-1)) (p < 0.05) indicates an improved plasma antioxidants status as compared to that in DFC group (21.7 mg dL(-1)). Both the formulation groups A and B showed a decrease in AGEs and tryptophan fluorescence, which suggests amelioration of the glycation of lens proteins as compared to that in the DFC group. The present results indicate that the formulations A and B exhibit antiglycating and antioxidant potentials by inhibiting the high fructose-induced glycation in diabetic rats; hence, they may have therapeutic value as functional foods in the effective management of secondary complications associated with severe diabetic conditions.

  6. Effects of long-term feeding of chitosan on postprandial lipid responses and lipid metabolism in a high-sucrose-diet-impaired glucose-tolerant rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; He, Sih-Pin; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2012-05-02

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of long-term feeding of chitosan on postprandial lipid response and lipid metabolism in a high-sucrose (HS)-diet-impaired glucose-tolerant rat model. As the results, HS-diet-fed rats supplemented with 5 and 7% chitosan in diets for 9 weeks had lower postprandial plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels, but 7% chitosan in the diet had higher postprandial plasma triglyceride (TG) and TG-rich lipoprotein TG levels. Supplementation of chitosan significantly decreased the postprandial ratio of apolipoprotein B (apoB)48/apoB100 in TG-rich lipoprotein fractions of HS-diet-fed rats. Long-term supplementation of 5 and 7% chitosan in diets for 16 weeks had lower plasma TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) + very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), TC/high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) ratio, leptin, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in HS-diet-fed rats. Moreover, it was noticed that the VLDL receptor (VLDLR) protein expression in skeletal muscles of HS-diet-fed rats was significantly decreased, which could be significantly reversed by supplementation of 5 and 7% chitosan. Rats supplemented with 7% chitosan in the diet significantly elevated the lipolysis rate and decreased the accumulation of TG in epididymal fat pads of HS-diet-fed rats. The plasma angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) protein expression was not affected in HS-diet-fed rats, but it was significantly increased in 7% chitosan-supplemented HS-diet-fed rats. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation of chitosan in the diet can improve the impairment of lipid metabolism in a HS-diet-fed rat model, but long-term high-dose chitosan feeding may enhance postprandial plasma TG and TG-rich lipoprotein TG levels in HS-diet-fed rats through an ANGPTL4-regulated pathway.

  7. Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Intestinal Barrier Function in Rats Exposed to High Altitude Hypoxia Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Xu, Cuicui; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining; Chao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the role of vitamin E in the high altitude hypoxia-induced damage to the intestinal barrier in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (Control), high altitude hypoxia (HH), and high altitude hypoxia+vitamin E (250 mg/kg BW*d) (HV) groups. After the third day, the HH and HV groups were placed in a hypobaric chamber at a stimulated elevation of 7000 m for 5 days. The rats in the HV group were given vitamin E by gavage daily for 8 days. The other rats were given equal volume saline. The results showed that high altitude hypoxia caused the enlargement of heart, liver, lung and kidney, and intestinal villi damage. Supplementation with vitamin E significantly alleviated hypoxia-caused damage to the main organs including intestine, increased the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p< 0.05), diamino oxidase (DAO) (p< 0.01) levels, and decreased the serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) (p< 0.01), interleukin-4 (IL-4) (p<0.001), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) (p<0.01) and malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.001), and decreased the serum erythropoietin (EPO) activity (p<0.05). Administration of vitamin E significantly increased the S-IgA (p<0.001) in ileum and significantly improved the expression levels of occludin and IκBα, and decreased the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and 2 alpha (HIF-1α and HIF-2α), Toll-like receptors (TLR4), P-IκBα and nuclear factor-κB p65(NF-κB P65) in ileum compared to the HH group. This study suggested that vitamin E protectis from intestinal injury caused by high altitude hypoxia environment. These effects may be related to the HIF and TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25177163

  8. Effects of α-lipoic acid on endothelial function in aged diabetic and high-fat fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Sena, C M; Nunes, E; Louro, T; Proença, T; Fernandes, R; Boarder, M R; Seiça, R M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was conducted to investigate the effects of α-lipoic acid (α-LA) on endothelial function in diabetic and high-fat fed animal models and elucidate the potential mechanism underlying the benefits of α-LA. Experimental approach: Plasma metabolites reflecting glucose and lipid metabolism, endothelial function, urinary albumin excretion (UAE), plasma and aortic malondialdehyde (MDA) and urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were assessed in non-diabetic controls (Wistar rats), untreated Goto-Kakizaki (GK) diabetic and high-fat fed GK rats (fed with atherogenic diet only, treated with α-LA and treated with vehicle, for 3 months). Vascular eNOS, nitrotyrosine, carbonyl groups and superoxide anion were also assessed in the different groups. Key results: α-LA and soybean oil significantly reduced both total and non-HDL serum cholesterol and triglycerides induced by atherogenic diet. MDA, carbonyl groups, vascular superoxide and 8-OHdG levels were higher in GK and high-fat fed GK groups and fully reversed with α-LA treatment. High-fat fed GK diabetic rats showed significantly reduced endothelial function and increased UAE, effects ameliorated with α-LA. This endothelial dysfunction was associated with decreased NO production, decreased expression of eNOS and increased vascular superoxide production and nitrotyrosine expression. Conclusions and implications: α-LA restores endothelial function and significantly improves systemic and local oxidative stress in high-fat fed GK diabetic rats. Improved endothelial function due to α-LA was at least partially attributed to recoupling of eNOS and increased NO bioavailability and represents a pharmacological approach to prevent major complications associated with type 2 diabetes. PMID:17906683

  9. Preserving of Postnatal Leptin Signaling in Obesity-Resistant Lou/C Rats following a Perinatal High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Poher, Anne-Laure; Arsenijevic, Denis; Asrih, Mohamed; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Jornayvaz, François R.; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Physiological processes at adulthood, such as energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity may originate before or weeks after birth. These underlie the concept of fetal and/or neonatal programming of adult diseases, which is particularly relevant in the case of obesity and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a perinatal high fat diet on energy metabolism and on leptin as well as insulin sensitivity, early in life and at adulthood in two strains of rats presenting different susceptibilities to diet-induced obesity. The impact of a perinatal high fat diet on glucose tolerance and diet-induced obesity was also assessed. The development of glucose intolerance and of increased fat mass was confirmed in the obesity-prone Wistar rat, even after 28 days of age. By contrast, in obesity-resistant Lou/C rats, an improved early leptin signaling may be responsible for the lack of deleterious effect of the perinatal high fat diet on glucose tolerance and increased adiposity in response to high fat diet at adulthood. Altogether, this study shows that, even if during the perinatal period adaptation to the environment appears to be genetically determined, adaptive mechanisms to nutritional challenges occurring at adulthood can still be observed in rodents. PMID:27618559

  10. Effects of solid-state fermented rice on lipid metabolism and antioxidant status in high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yun Jung; Kim, Mi Hyun; Nam, Seok Hyun; Kang, Mi Young

    2007-12-01

    We investigated the effect of solid-state fermented rice cultured with Basidiomycota (sangwhang) and Monascus ruber on lipid metabolism and antioxidant activity. Forty 4-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed high cholesterol diets in which carbohydrate sources in the treatment groups consisted of non-fermented rice and sangwhang or M. ruber rice at 80% and 20%, respectively, for 5 weeks. Supplementation with sangwhang and M. ruber rice had no effect on growth and food intakes in high-cholesterol-fed rats. The plasma triglyceride concentration was not significantly different among the groups. Supplementation with M. ruber rice resulted in lower plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations and atherogenic index compared to the control group, while the plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration was elevated. In addition, fermented rice cultured with M. ruber-supplemented animals had greater bile acid excretion. The M. ruber groups had significantly lower plasma and hepatic levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances than the control group. Moreover, hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities, including catalase and superoxide dismutase, were significantly higher in the M. ruber group. In conclusion, fermented rice, especially M. ruber rice, was very effective for improving the lipid metabolism and reducing oxidative stress by up-regulating the hepatic antioxidant enzymes in high-cholesterol-fed rats.

  11. Umbelliferone Improves an Impaired Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in High-Fat Diet/Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Somparn, Nuntiya; Saentaweesuk, Suphaket; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2015-06-08

    Umbelliferone (UMB) is a natural product that has several pharmacological effects including antihyperglycemic activity in diabetic rats. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of UMB on insulin resistance and on the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats by feeding a high-fat diet (45 kcal% fat) and a single dose of streptozotocin injection. After 8 weeks of treatment, UMB significantly reduced the elevated blood glucose levels and insulin resistance and increased the liver glycogen and serum adiponectin. Moreover, the serum lipid and the storages of triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid in liver tissue were reduced. From histological examination, the lipid droplets in liver tissue were clearly decreased, and the fat cell size in the fat tissue was smaller in diabetic rats treated with UMB. Interestingly, UMB increased fat cell adiponectin, plasma membrane glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and liver PPARα protein expressions. Our findings demonstrate that UMB improves glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes by stimulating the insulin secretion and the related mechanisms via stimulating expression of adiponectin, GLUT4, PPARγ, and PPARα-protein expressions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Fructus xanthii improves lipid homeostasis in the epididymal adipose tissue of rats fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIUMIN; YANG, MINGXING; LI, ZHIPENG; XUE, MEI; SHANGGUAN, ZHAOSHUI; OU, ZHIMIN; LIU, MING; LIU, SUHUAN; YANG, SHUYU; LI, XUEJUN

    2016-01-01

    High fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity triggers common features of human metabolic syndrome in rats. Our previous study showed that Fructus xanthii (FX) attenuates HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of FX on lipid metabolism in epididymal fat (EF), and examine its underlying mechanisms. Aqueous extraction fractions of FX or vehicle were orally administered by gavage for 6 weeks to rats fed either a HFD or a normal chow diet (NCD). The levels of circulating free fatty acid (FFA) were determined in plasma, and the expression levels of lipid metabolism- and inflammation-associated genes in the EF were measured using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The general morphology, size and number of adipocytes in the EF, and the levels of macrophage infiltration were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin staining or immunohistochemical staining. FX decreased circulating levels of FFA, increased the expression levels of sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein-1c, FAS, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, diacylglycerol acyltransferase and lipoprotein lipase lipogenic genes in the EF. FX increased the numbers of adipocytes in the EF, and featured a shift towards smaller adipocyte size. Compared with the vehicle-treated rats, positive staining of F4/80 was more dispersed in the FX-treated rats, and the percentage of F4/80 positive cells was significantly decreased. FX attenuated HFD-induced lipid dyshomeostasis in the epididymal adipose tissue. PMID:26648271

  13. Acetylshikonin from Zicao Prevents Obesity in Rats on a High-Fat Diet by Inhibiting Lipid Accumulation and Inducing Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Banghao

    2016-01-01

    Various drugs have been developed to treat obesity, but these have undesirable secondary effects, and an efficient but non-toxic anti-obesity drug from natural sources is desired. This study investigated the anti-obesity effects and mechanisms of action of acetylshikonin (AS)—which is used in traditional Chinese medicine—in rats on a high-fat diet (HFD). Rats were fed a normal diet or an HFD; the latter group was received no treatment or were treated with 100, 300, or 900 mg/kg AS extract by intragastric administration for 6 weeks. In addition, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with AS and the effects on adipogenesis and lipolysis were evaluated by western blot analysis of adipogenic transcription factors and lipid-metabolizing enzyme levels and the phosphorylation status of protein kinase (PK) A and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). AS prevented HFD-induced obesity including reduction in body weight, white adipose tissue content, liver mass, and serum triglyceride and free fatty acid levels in rats. It also suppressed the expression of adipogenic differentiation transcription factors and decreased the expression of the adipocyte-specific proteins HSL and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). Furthermore, AS treatment induced lipolysis, leading to the release of glycerol and increased in PKA and HSL phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate that AS has anti-obesity effects in a rat model and may be a safe treatment for obesity in humans. PMID:26771185

  14. D-psicose increases energy expenditure and decreases body fat accumulation in rats fed a high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Masaru; Onishi, Kana; Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the anti-obesity effects of D-psicose by increasing energy expenditure in rats pair-fed the high-sucrose diet (HSD). Wistar rats were divided into two dietary groups: HSD containing 5% cellulose (C) and 5% d-psicose (P). The C dietary group was further subdivided into two groups: rats fed the C diet ad libitum (C-AD) and pair-fed the C diet along with those in the P group (C-PF). Resting energy expenditure during darkness and lipoprotein lipase activity in the soleus muscle were significantly higher in the P group than in the C-PF group. Serum levels of glucose, leptin and adiponectin; glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in the liver and perirenal adipose tissue; and body fat accumulation were all significantly lower in the P group than in the C-PF group. The anti-obesity effects of D-psicose could be induced not only by suppressing lipogenic enzyme activity but also by increasing EE in rats.

  15. Apparent target size of rat brain benzodiazepine receptor, acetylcholinesterase, and pyruvate kinase is highly influenced by experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.; Braestrup, C.

    1988-08-25

    Radiation inactivation is a method to determine the apparent target size of molecules. In this report we examined whether radiation inactivation of various enzymes and brain receptors is influenced by the preparation of samples preceding irradiation. The apparent target sizes of endogenous acetylcholinesterase and pyruvate kinase from rat brain and from rabbit muscle and benzodiazepine receptor from rat brain were investigated in some detail. In addition the target sizes of alcohol dehydrogenase (from yeast and horse liver), beta-galactosidase (from Escherichia coli), lactate dehydrogenase (endogenous from rat brain), and 5-HT2 receptors, acetylcholine muscarine receptors, and (/sup 35/S) butyl bicyclophosphorothionate tertiary binding sites from rat brain were determined. The results show that apparent target sizes are highly influenced by the procedure applied for sample preparation before irradiation. The data indicate that irradiation of frozen whole tissue as opposed to lyophilized tissue or frozen tissue homogenates will estimate the smallest and most relevant functional target size of a receptor or an enzyme.

  16. Numerical modelling of thermal effects in rats due to high-field magnetic resonance imaging (0.5 1 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, Adnan; Crozier, Stuart; Liu, Feng

    2004-12-01

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) thermal model has been developed to compute the temperature elevation in the Sprague Dawley rat due to electromagnetic energy deposition in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The field strengths examined ranged from 11.75-23.5 T (corresponding to 1H resonances of 0.5-1 GHz) and an N-stub birdcage resonator was used to both transmit radio-frequency energy and receive the MRI signals. With an in-plane resolution of 1.95 mm, the inhomogeneous rat phantom forms a segmented model of 12 different tissue types, each having its electrical and thermal parameters assigned. The steady-state temperature distribution was calculated using a Pennes 'bioheat' approach. The numerical algorithm used to calculate the induced temperature distribution has been successfully validated against analytical solutions in the form of simplified spherical models with electrical and thermal properties of rat muscle. As well as assisting with the design of MRI experiments and apparatus, the numerical procedures developed in this study could help in future research and design of tumour-treating hyperthermia applicators to be used on rats in vivo.

  17. Numerical modelling of thermal effects in rats due to high-field magnetic resonance imaging (0.5-1 GHZ).

    PubMed

    Trakic, Adnan; Crozier, Stuart; Liu, Feng

    2004-12-21

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) thermal model has been developed to compute the temperature elevation in the Sprague Dawley rat due to electromagnetic energy deposition in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The field strengths examined ranged from 11.75-23.5 T (corresponding to 1H resonances of 0.5-1 GHz) and an N-stub birdcage resonator was used to both transmit radio-frequency energy and receive the MRI signals. With an in-plane resolution of 1.95 mm, the inhomogeneous rat phantom forms a segmented model of 12 different tissue types, each having its electrical and thermal parameters assigned. The steady-state temperature distribution was calculated using a Pennes 'bioheat' approach. The numerical algorithm used to calculate the induced temperature distribution has been successfully validated against analytical solutions in the form of simplified spherical models with electrical and thermal properties of rat muscle. As well as assisting with the design of MRI experiments and apparatus, the numerical procedures developed in this study could help in future research and design of tumour-treating hyperthermia applicators to be used on rats in vivo.

  18. Complex response competition and dopamine blocking: choosing of high cost sucrose solution versus low cost water in rats.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, S; Chen, B H

    1995-01-01

    The effect of DA blocking with pimozide on complex response competition involving coupling of cost and benefit was studied with a double-bottle test in lickometer: The competition occurred between two responses; licking of 2% sucrose solution requiring a high effort of standing up and licking of water requiring a low effort of crouching posture. Rats normally chose sucrose over water (76% with vehicle); however, pimozide (0, 0.25, 0.375 and 0.5 mg/kg) diminished licking of the sucrose solution dose-dependently (57% at 0.5 mg/kg) without affecting licking of water. Analysis of lick pattern suggested that this shift in choice was attributable not much to a potential effect of pimozide to hamper motor capability or to reduce rewarding impact of sucrose because (a) the difference in licking profile for sucrose and water remained intact, (b) rats remained fully capable of assuming the standing posture for sustained and efficient licking of sucrose, and (c) the integrity of licking pattern largely remained. Pimozide appeared to selectively affect the behavior that cost more but with higher reward; rats settled with behavior that cost less with lower reward. Rats became less motivated to invest effort for a better reward, a behavior pattern described as "indolent". A more complex view of incentive motivation including coupling of behavioral cost and benefit was presented as a theory to explain the DA mediation of reward-maintained behaviors.

  19. Oxidative Inactivation of Liver Mitochondria in High Fructose Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats: Effect of Glycyrrhizin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sil, Rajarshi; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a serious health problem in the present world. Glycyrrhizin, a triterpenoid saponin of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root, has been reported to ameliorate the primary complications and hepatocellular damage in rats with the syndrome. In this study, we have explored metabolic syndrome-induced changes in liver mitochondrial function and effect of glycyrrhizin against the changes. Metabolic syndrome was induced in rats by high fructose (60%) diet for 6 weeks. The rats were then treated with glycyrrhizin (50 mg/kg body weight) by single intra-peritoneal injection. After 2 weeks of the treatment, the rats were sacrificed to collect liver tissue. Elevated mitochondrial ROS, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl, and decreased reduced glutathione content indicated oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome. Loss of mitochondrial inner membrane cardiolipin was observed. Mitochondrial complex I activity did not change but complex IV activity decreased significantly. Mitochondrial MTT reduction ability, membrane potential, phosphate utilisation and oxygen consumption decreased in metabolic syndrome. Reduced mitochondrial aconitase activity and increased aconitase carbonyl content suggested oxidative damage of the enzyme. Elevated Fe(2+) ion level in mitochondria might be associated with increased ROS generation in metabolic syndrome. Glycyrrhizin effectively attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress and aconitase degradation, and improved electron transport chain activity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G.; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, “Low-PPI” NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to “Medium-PPI” and “High-PPI” NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps “at risk”) phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to

  1. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, "Low-PPI" NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to "Medium-PPI" and "High-PPI" NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps "at risk") phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  2. High conjugated linoleic acid enriched ghee (clarified butter) increases the antioxidant and antiatherogenic potency in female Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypercholesterolemia and oxidative stress are the main stimulating factors responsible for coronary artery disease and progression of atherosclerosis. Dairy food products are rich in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) which is considered as an important component due to its potential health benefits such as anticarcinogenic, antiatherogenic, antidiabetic and antiadipogenic properties. In the present study, the effect of CLA enriched ghee on the antioxidant enzyme system and antiatherogenic properties in Wistar rats has been studied. Methods Female Wistar rats of 21 days were taken for the study and fed with soybean diet (Control diet), low CLA diet and high CLA ghee diet (treatments) for thirty five days for studying antioxidative enzymes and sixteen weeks in case of antiatherogenic studies. Results Feeding of high CLA enhanced ghee during pubescent period in rats lead to an increase in catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activities in blood and increased CAT, SOD and glutathione transferase (GST) enzymes activities in liver by 27, 130 and 168 percent, respectively. Plasma nitrate concentration and Haemoglobin levels remained the same in all the treatments. Feeding of high CLA ghee resulted in lower (P < 0.01) plasma cholesterol & triglyceride level (52.17 and 30.27%), and higher high density lipoproteins (33.26%) than feeding of soybean oil (control group) and thus manifested in decreased (P < 0.05) atherogenic index (from 0.472 to 0.244). Lesser cholesterol and triglyceride levels were observed in the liver and aorta of high CLA fed rats than in those of the other groups. Histopathological studies of liver showed normal hepatic cords with portal triad in the high CLA ghee fed rats whereas fatty degeneration of hepatocytes containing fat vacuoles was observed in the liver of the other groups. Conclusion This paper is the first report of the antioxidant and antiatherogenic properties of the high CLA enriched ghee suggesting that

  3. Intracranial self-stimulation reward thresholds during morphine withdrawal in rats bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin intake

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Nathan A.; Radke, Anna K.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Harris, Andrew C.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Rational Sweet preference is a marker of vulnerability to substance use disorders, and rats selectively bred for high (HiS) vs. low saccharin (LoS) intake display potentiated drug-seeking behaviors. Recent work indicated that LoS rats were more responsive to the negative effects of drugs in several assays. Objective The current study used the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure to investigate the anhedonic component of morphine withdrawal in male HiS and LoS rats. Methods Rats were administered morphine (10 mg/kg) or saline for 8 days. To evaluate withdrawal effects, reward thresholds were measured 24 and 28 h following the 8th morphine injection (spontaneous withdrawal) and again for 4 days following daily acute morphine and naloxone (1 mg/kg) administration (precipitated withdrawal). Results Twenty-four hr following the final morphine injection, reward thresholds in LoS rats were significantly elevated compared to reward thresholds in LoS controls, indicating spontaneous withdrawal. This effect was not observed in HiS rats. LoS rats also showed greater elevations of reward thresholds on several days during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal compared to their HiS counterparts. Conclusions LoS rats were more sensitive to morphine withdrawal-mediated elevations in ICSS thresholds than HiS rats. While these differences were generally modest, our data suggest that severity of the negative affective component of opiate withdrawal may be influenced by genotypes related to addiction vulnerability. PMID:25582876

  4. Betaine alleviates hepatic lipid accumulation via enhancing hepatic lipid export and fatty acid oxidation in rats fed with a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Huang, Danping; Hu, Qiaolin; Wu, Jing; Wang, Yizhen; Feng, Jie

    2015-06-28

    To assess the effects of betaine on hepatic lipid accumulation and investigate the underlying mechanism, thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 100 (sd 2·50) g were divided into four groups, and started on one of four treatments: basal diet, basal diet with betaine administration, high-fat diet and high-fat diet with betaine administration. The results showed that no significant difference of body weight was found among experimental groups. Compared with high-fat diet-fed rats, a betaine supplementation decreased (P< 0·05) hepatic TAG accumulation induced by high-fat diet, which was also supported by hepatic histology results. Additionally, hepatic betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase concentration [corrected] as well as its mRNA abundance and lecithin level were found increased (P< 0·05) by betaine supplementation in both basal diet-fed rats and high-fat diet-fed rats. Betaine administration in high-fat diet-fed rats exhibited a higher (P< 0·05) concentration [corrected] of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) compared with high-fat diet-fed rats. High-fat diet inhibited (P< 0·05) the gene expression of hepatic PPARα and CPT1. However, betaine administration in high-fat diet-fed rats elevated (P< 0·05) the gene expression of PPARα and CPT1. Moreover, concentration, gene and protein expressions of hepatic fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) were increased (P< 0·05) in response to betaine administration in high-fat diet group; meanwhile the gene expression of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase was increased (P< 0·05) as well. The results suggest that betaine administration enhanced hepatic lipid export and fatty acid oxidation in high-fat diet-fed rats, thus effectively alleviating fat accumulation in the liver.

  5. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  6. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C.; Muir, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  7. Effects of high-dose selegiline on morphine reinforcement and precipitated withdrawal in dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Grasing, K; He, S

    2005-02-01

    Selegiline is an irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO) with psychostimulant and neuroprotective effects. Several lines of evidence suggest that treatment with selegiline at doses that exceed levels required for inhibition of MAO can produce distinct pharmacologic effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic treatment with high-dose selegiline on extinction responding, cue-induced reinstatement, morphine reinforcement and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. After pretreatment with noncontingent morphine to establish opiate dependence, rats acquired self-administration of 3.2 mg/kg per injection of morphine under a progressive ratio schedule. Daily treatment with saline or 6.4 mg/kg per day of selegiline was then administered over extinction, reinstatement and re-acquisition of morphine self-administration. To enhance or diminish the potential for psychostimulant effects, selegiline was administered either immediately prior to (pre-session) or 1 h following (post-session) extinction, reinstatement and self-administration sessions. Pre-session selegiline decreased the number of ratios completed on days 2, 3 and 4 of extinction, and decreased morphine self-administration during all four re-acquisition sessions. When administered at the same dose level, post-session selegiline decreased responding on the fourth extinction session, and was ineffective in modifying re-acquisition of self-administration. Selegiline administered by either schedule did not modify cue-induced reinstatement. Daily treatment with 6.4 mg/kg per day of selegiline did not modify self-administration of food under a progressive ratio schedule. Acute treatment with single, 6.4 mg/kg doses of selegiline attenuated naloxone-induced increases in ptosis and global withdrawal score, but did not modify any other sign of withdrawal or global withdrawal score calculated without ratings of ptosis. In conclusion, high-dose selegiline can attenuate extinction responding

  8. Post-operative pain behavior in rats is reduced after single high-concentration capsaicin application.

    PubMed

    Pospisilova, Eva; Palecek, Jiri

    2006-12-05

    Surgical procedures associated with tissue injury are often followed by increased sensitivity to innocuous and noxious stimuli in the vicinity of the surgical wound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1) containing nociceptors in this process, by their functional inactivation using a high-concentration intradermal injection of capsaicin in a rat plantar incision model. Paw withdrawal responses to mechanical stimuli (von Frey filaments 10-367mN) and to radiant heat applied on plantar skin were tested in animals treated with capsaicin or the vehicle 6 days and 24h before or 2h after the incision was made. In the vehicle-treated animals, mechanical and thermal sensitivity increased significantly 1-96h following the incision. Capsaicin applied 24h before the surgery was most effective and significantly diminished the development of post-incisional mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia. Thermal hypoalgesia was present in the incised paw after the capsaicin treatment. Capsaicin application 6 days before the incision induced thermal hypoalgesia before the incision but did not prevent completely the thermal hyperalgesia after the incision, while there was also a reduction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Application of the capsaicin injection after the incision showed its first effect at 2h after the injection and at 24h the effect was comparable with the 6 days pretreatment. Our results show an important role of TRPV1-containing nociceptors in the development of post-surgical hypersensitivity and suggest that local, high-concentration capsaicin treatment could be used to reduce it.

  9. Metabolomic Analysis of Rat Brain by High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Tissue Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Norbert W.; Béraud, Evelyne; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene expression on the RNA and protein levels have long been used to explore biological processes underlying disease. More recently, genomics and proteomics have been complemented by comprehensive quantitative analysis of the metabolite pool present in biological systems. This strategy, termed metabolomics, strives to provide a global characterization of the small-molecule complement involved in metabolism. While the genome and the proteome define the tasks cells can perform, the metabolome is part of the actual phenotype. Among the methods currently used in metabolomics, spectroscopic techniques are of special interest because they allow one to simultaneously analyze a large number of metabolites without prior selection for specific biochemical pathways, thus enabling a broad unbiased approach. Here, an optimized experimental protocol for metabolomic analysis by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is presented, which is the method of choice for efficient quantification of tissue metabolites. Important strengths of this method are (i) the use of crude extracts, without the need to purify the sample and/or separate metabolites; (ii) the intrinsically quantitative nature of NMR, permitting quantitation of all metabolites represented by an NMR spectrum with one reference compound only; and (iii) the nondestructive nature of NMR enabling repeated use of the same sample for multiple measurements. The dynamic range of metabolite concentrations that can be covered is considerable due to the linear response of NMR signals, although metabolites occurring at extremely low concentrations may be difficult to detect. For the least abundant compounds, the highly sensitive mass spectrometry method may be advantageous although this technique requires more intricate sample preparation and quantification procedures than NMR spectroscopy. We present here an NMR protocol adjusted to rat brain analysis; however, the same protocol can be applied to other tissues with minor

  10. Effects of Silicon vs. Hydroxytyrosol-Enriched Restructured Pork on Liver Oxidation Status of Aged Rats Fed High-Saturated/High-Cholesterol Diets

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Pinar; López-Oliva, M. Elvira; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pork is an essential component of the diet that has been linked with major degenerative diseases and development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Previous studies have. Previous studies have demonstrated the in vitro antioxidant activity of silicon (Si). Furthermore, when Si is added to restructured pork (RP) strongly counterbalances the negative effect of high-cholesterol-ingestion, acting as an active hypocholesterolemic and hypolipemic dietary ingredient in aged rats. Objective This study was designed to evaluate the effects of Si vs hydroxytyrosol (HxT) RP on liver antioxidant defense in aged rats fed cholesterol-enriched high saturated/high cholesterol diets as a NASH model. Methods Four diets were prepared: Control RP diet (C) with non-added cholesterol; Cholesterol-enriched high-saturated/high-cholesterol control RP diet (CHOL-C) with added cholesterol and cholic acid; Si- or HxT-RP cholesterol-enriched high-saturated/high-cholesterol diets (CHOL-Si and CHOL-HxT). Groups of six male Wistar rats (1-yr old) were fed these modified diets for eight weeks. Total cholesterol, hepatosomatic index, liver Nrf2 and antioxidant (CAT, SOD, GSH, GSSG, GR, GPx) markers were determined. Results Both CHOL-Si and CHOL-HxT diets enhanced the liver antioxidant status, reduced hepatosomatic index and increased SOD actvity. Hydrogen peroxide removal seemed to be involved, explaining that the value of redox index was even lower than C without changing the CAT activity. CHOL-Si results were quite better than CHOL-HxT in most measured parameters. Conclusions Our study suggests that Si incorporated into RP matrix was able to counterbalance, more efficiently than HxT, the deleterious effect of consuming a high-saturated/high-cholesterol diet, by improving the liver antioxidant defenses in the context of NASH. PMID:26807847

  11. Effects of high-fat diet on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced aberrant crypt foci and colorectal tumours in rats

    PubMed Central

    QI, GUANGYING; TANG, BO; ZHOU, LIHUA; JIKIHARA, HIROSHI; KIWATA, ATSUMI; SAKAMOTO, YUKI; TANG, FANG; XIAO, SHENGJUN; WANG, ZHENRAN; WU, QIUHUI; LU, HUILING; WU, ZHEN; ZENG, SIEN; SHIMAMOTO, FUMIO

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of numerous types of cancer. The present study investigated the impact of a high-fat diet on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal cancer (CRC) in F344 rats. A total of 16 male F344 rats aged 4 weeks were randomly divided into two groups (8 rats/group). Rats in group A were fed a basal diet with a moderate fat (MF) content, while rats in group B were fed a high-fat diet. Upon reaching 5 weeks of age, the rats were injected subcutaneously with DMH (20 mg/kg body weight). DMH was administered once a week for 8 consecutive weeks. All the rats were sacrificed 34 weeks after the first DMH injection and dissected to obtain samples of colorectal tissues. The tissues were examined under a microscope for the presence of aberrant crypt foci (ACFs) and subjected to histopathological analysis. The results showed that at the end of the 34-week experiment, body weights and visceral fat levels were significantly higher in the high-fat diet group compared to the basal diet group. In addition, the incidences of colorectal ACF, adenoma and adenocarcinoma were markedly elevated in the high-fat diet group compared to the basal diet group. These results indicate that the consumption of a high-fat diet promotes the development and progression of CRC and the control of fat intake may prevent CRC. PMID:26137224

  12. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R.; Collins, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  13. Use of High Resolution 3D Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Study Brain White Matter Development in Live Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yu; McMurray, Matthew S.; Oguz, Ipek; Yuan, Hong; Styner, Martin A.; Lin, Weili; Johns, Josephine M.; An, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    High resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can provide important information on brain development, yet it is challenging in live neonatal rats due to the small size of neonatal brain and motion-sensitive nature of DTI. Imaging in live neonatal rats has clear advantages over fixed brain scans, as longitudinal and functional studies would be feasible to understand neuro-developmental abnormalities. In this study, we developed imaging strategies that can be used to obtain high resolution 3D DTI images in live neonatal rats at postnatal day 5 (PND5) and PND14, using only 3 h of imaging acquisition time. An optimized 3D DTI pulse sequence and appropriate animal setup to minimize physiological motion artifacts are the keys to successful high resolution 3D DTI imaging. Thus, a 3D rapid acquisition relaxation enhancement DTI sequence with twin navigator echoes was implemented to accelerate imaging acquisition time and minimize motion artifacts. It has been suggested that neonatal mammals possess a unique ability to tolerate mild-to-moderate hypothermia and hypoxia without long term impact. Thus, we additionally utilized this ability to minimize motion artifacts in magnetic resonance images by carefully suppressing the respiratory rate to around 15/min for PND5 and 30/min for PND14 using mild-to-moderate hypothermia. These imaging strategies have been successfully implemented to study how the effect of cocaine exposure in dams might affect brain development in their rat pups. Image quality resulting from this in vivo DTI study was comparable to ex vivo scans. fractional anisotropy values were also similar between the live and fixed brain scans. The capability of acquiring high quality in vivo DTI imaging offers a valuable opportunity to study many neurological disorders in brain development in an authentic living environment. PMID:22013426

  14. Use of high-performance liquid chromatography to study the pharmacokinetics of colistin sulfate in rats following intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Milne, Robert W; Nation, Roger L; Turnidge, John D; Smeaton, Timothy C; Coulthard, Kingsley

    2003-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of colistin was investigated using specific high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to measure the concentrations of colistin and colistin A and B in plasma and urine in five rats after administration of an intravenous bolus of 1 mg of colistin sulfate/kg of body weight. There were differences in the pharmacokinetic behaviors of unbound colistin A and B. This is the first report of the use of HPLC to study the pharmacokinetics of colistin and its two major components.

  15. High fat diet and food restriction differentially modify the behavioral effects of quinpirole and raclopride in rats.

    PubMed

    Baladi, Michelle G; France, Charles P

    2009-05-21

    Nutritional status can impact dopamine systems in a manner that might be important to understanding possible common neurobiological mechanisms that mediate abnormal compulsive food (e.g., obesity) and drug taking. Limiting food intake, for example, can increase sensitivity to the behavioral effects of indirect-acting dopamine receptor agonists. Much less is known regarding possible diet-induced changes in sensitivity to direct-acting dopamine receptor drugs. The present study investigated the effects of a high fat diet and of food restriction on sensitivity of rats to the behavioral effects of a direct-acting dopamine receptor agonist and a dopamine receptor antagonist. Free access to high fat chow increased sensitivity to quinpirole-induced yawning without changing sensitivity to raclopride-induced catalepsy or quinpirole-induced hypothermia. Food restriction (10 g/day) decreased sensitivity to quinpirole-induced yawning and raclopride-induced catalepsy without affecting sensitivity to quinpirole-induced hypothermia. Free access to a standard chow restored sensitivity to the behavioral effects of both drugs in rats that were previously food-restricted but not in rats that previously ate a high fat diet. These data confirm that food restriction can decrease sensitivity to behavioral effects of direct-acting dopamine receptor drugs, they provide evidence (i.e., no change in hypothermic effects) indicating that these changes are not due to pharmacokinetic mechanisms, and they provide initial evidence showing enhanced sensitivity to behavioral effects of dopamine receptor drugs in rats eating a high fat diet. These changes in sensitivity of dopamine systems could be relevant to understanding the impact of nutrition on therapeutic and recreational drug use.

  16. Exposure to a high-fat diet decreases sensitivity to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced motor effects in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Jones, Amanda R.; Wright, M. Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Arachidonic acid, a fatty acid component of neuronal cell membranes, forms the backbone of endogenous ligands of the endocannabinoid system. The lipid nature of this system may make it particularly susceptible to changes in fat content of the diet, which may, in turn, affect endocannabinoid tone and subsequent changes in receptor expression or activity. The latter would also be expected to affect responses to exogenous cannabinoids. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of a high-fat diet on sensitivity to the pharmacological effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). Male and female Long-Evans rats were fed either a diet of standard rodent chow or chow enhanced with corn oil. Subsequently, they were repeatedly assessed for Δ9-THC-induced hypomobility, catalepsy and hypothermia. Female rats that received the high fat diet beginning in adolescence or in adulthood became significantly less sensitive to the effects of Δ9-THC on motor behavior, but not its hypothermic effects, with faster development of decreased sensitivity in female rats that began the high-fat diet as adults. In contrast, diet-induced differences either did not occur, or were less pronounced, in male rats of both ages. After acute injection, brain and blood levels of Δ9-THC and its two primary metabolites were similar regardless of diet. Combined with the fact that diet differentially affected only some of the measures, these results suggest that pharmacokinetic differences cannot fully account for the effects of the high-fat diet on response to Δ9-THC. Further, these results suggest that dietary fat content may represent an important consideration in predicting the effects of marijuana in females. PMID:20850461

  17. Effects of discontinuing a high-fat diet on mitochondrial proteins and 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Delin; Shuler, Jeffrey M.; Raider, Kayla D.; Rogers, Robert S.; Wheatley, Joshua L.; Geiger, Paige C.; Stanford, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity can increase the risk for developing age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD). Increasing evidence suggests that mitochondrial and proteasomal mechanisms are involved in both insulin resistance and PD. The goal of this study was to determine whether diet intervention could influence mitochondrial or proteasomal protein expression and vulnerability to 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) depletion in rats’ nigrostriatal system. After a 3 month high-fat diet regimen, we switched one group of rats to a low-fat diet for 3 months (HF-LF group), while the other half continued with the high-fat diet (HF group). A chow group was included as a control. Three weeks after unilateral 6-OHDA lesions, HF rats had higher fasting insulin levels and higher Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), indicating insulin resistance. HOMA-IR was significantly lower in HF-LF rats than HF rats, indicating that insulin resistance was reversed by switching to a low-fat diet. Compared to the Chow group, the HF group exhibited significantly greater DA depletion in the substantia nigra but not in the striatum. DA depletion did not differ between the HF-LF and HF group. Proteins related to mitochondrial function (such as AMPK, PGC-1α), and to proteasomal function (such as TCF11/Nrf1) were influenced by diet intervention, or by 6-OHDA lesion. Our findings suggest that switching to a low-fat diet reverses the effects of a high-fat diet on systemic insulin resistance, and mitochondrial and proteasomal function in the striatum. Conversely, they suggest that the effects of the high-fat diet on nigrostriatal vulnerability to 6-OHDA-induced DA depletion persist. PMID:25862572

  18. Antioxidant properties of tea blunt ROS-dependent lipogenesis: beneficial effect on hepatic steatosis in a high fat-high sucrose diet NAFLD obese rat model.

    PubMed

    Braud, Laura; Battault, Sylvain; Meyer, Grégory; Nascimento, Alessandro; Gaillard, Sandrine; de Sousa, Georges; Rahmani, Roger; Riva, Catherine; Armand, Martine; Maixent, Jean-Michel; Reboul, Cyril

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress could trigger lipid accumulation in liver and thus hepatic steatosis. Tea is able to prevent liver disorders, but a direct link between antioxidant capacities and prevention of steatosis has not been reported yet. We aimed to investigate such relationship in a rat model of high fat-high sucrose diet (HFS)-induced obesity and to explore more deeply the mechanisms in isolated hepatocytes. Wistar rats were divided into a control group (standard diet), an HFS group (high fat-sucrose diet) and an HFS+tea group (HFS diet with ad-libitum access to tea drink). Body weight, fat mass, glycemic parameters in blood, lipid and oxidative stress parameters in blood and liver were measured in each group after 14 weeks. Isolated hepatocytes were treated with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inducer t-BHP in the presence or not of antioxidants (tempol or tea), and superoxide anion production and lipid accumulation were measured using specific fluorescent probes. We reported that the HFS diet highly increased hepatic lipids content, while tea consumption attenuated steatosis and improved the oxidative status (decrease in hepatic oxidative stress, increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity). The role of antioxidant properties of tea in such phenomenon was confirmed in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Indeed, the increase of mitochondrial ROS production with t-BHP resulted in lipid accumulation in hepatocytes (positive linear regression), and antioxidants (tempol or tea) normalized both. We reported that the antioxidant properties of tea protect rats from an obesogenic HFS diet-induced hepatic steatosis by counteracting the ROS-dependent lipogenesis.

  19. Dietary restriction in moderately obese rats improves body size and glucose handling without the renal and hepatic alterations observed with a high-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Devassy, Jessay G; Caligiuri, Stephanie P B; Mayengbam, Shyamchand; Ibrahim, Naser H M; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; House, James D; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is increasing worldwide, and high-protein (HP) diets are widely used for weight loss. However, the overall safety of HP diets is not well established in obese individuals, who make up a significant proportion of the population. To evaluate the health effects of an HP diet in obesity, obesity-prone (OP) Sprague-Dawley rats were given high-fat diets for 12 weeks to induce obesity. Following this, for 8 more weeks, these rats were given either a normal-protein (NP) (15% of energy) or an HP (35% of energy) diet ad libitum, or the NP diet at a restricted level to achieve body weights similar to those of the HP group (pair-weighted (PW) group). Obesity-resistant (OR) control rats were also given the NP diet throughout the feeding period. The HP-OP group had higher food intake but lower body weight, improved glucose handling, and lowered serum haptoglobin compared with the NP-OP group. These benefits were also observed in PW-OP rats. In addition, PW-OP rats had less fat accumulation when compared with NP-OP rats, and an improved Lee index, lower liver size, and lower serum alanine aminotransferase when compared with HP-OP rats. On the other hand, kidney size, proteinuria, and serum homocysteine were increased in HP-OP rats compared with NP-OP rats, whereas PW-OP rats did not experience these effects. These results indicate that in obese rats, more benefits are obtained via dietary restriction with an NP diet and without some of the potentially detrimental effects of an HP diet.

  20. Peripheral nerve metabolism and zinc levels in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Effect of diets high in fish and corn oil

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J.P.; Fenton, M.R. )

    1991-03-15

    This study was designed to assess the effects of diets high in fish and corn oil on peripheral nerve metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. A type I diabetic state was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats by injection of STZ. Animals were divided into three dietary groups; normal rat chow, high corn oil diet and high fish oil diet. After 4 weeks animals were analyzed for nerve conduction velocity, bled and then sacrificed. Sciatic nerves were removed, processed and several biochemical parameters determined. Plasma zinc levels were elevated in the STZ normal chow group compared to non-diabetic controls. Both corn oil and fish oil diets tended to eliminate the rise in plasma zinc. Differen